Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
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Newspaper
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English
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United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
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May 30, 2013
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Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
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30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

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Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
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Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
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Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, APRIL 3, 2014 I I D E NHJ OMBUDSMAN Welcome Jose Hernandez LT. DAN BAND Gary Sinise Rocks For Military Page 4 NOMADS DEPLOY VR-62 Det to CENTCOM Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com HSM-72s first independent deployment det.By Lt. j.g. Fleet LawrenceHSM-72 Det.1 Public Affairs OfficerThe Proud Warriors of HSM-72 stood up their first MH-60R Seahawk Detachment on Dec. 2, 2013. The HSM-72 Det.1 Highlanders is now set to embark on board guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) later this year in support of international exercises Northern Eagle and Baltic Operations. The Det.1 Highlanders are led by Officer-InCharge Lt. Cmdr. Chad Harvey and Leading Chief Petty Officer, ADC(AW/SW) Zachary Bennett. They are supported by 23 mainte nance personnel, plus, 10 pilots and aircrew. As HSM-72 is not expected to deploy for its first Carrier Air Wing Deployment for some time, the opportunity to send a detachment to gain valuable shipboard experience will great ly benefit the Proud Warriors in their future endeavors. The Highlanders wasted no time in show ing how far HSM-72 has traveled in utilizing its new Romeo aircraft. Their first task took By Clark PierceEditorNAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander wel comed high-ranking U.S. Navy offi cials March 27, along with the United Kingdom (UK) secretary of state for defence, who were visiting area bases to review strategic weapons systems. Vice Adm. Terry Benedict is direc tor of the Navys Strategic Systems Programs (SSP). He manages the Navys Strategic Weapons Systems to include training, systems, equipment, facilities and per sonnel. SSP, with offices throughout the United States and another in the United Kingdom, is responsible for fulfilling the terms of the US/UK Polaris Sales Agreement. UK Secretary of State for Defence, the Right Honourable Philip Hammond and key staff members accompa nied Benedict on an early morning flight from Washington D.C. to NAS Jacksonville, where they departed to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. In the afternoon, the group returned to NAS Jacksonville for a tour of VP-30 training facilities, including the P-8A Integrated Training Center. The visit included guided tours of a P-3C Orion and a P-8A Poseidon aircraft that were parked side by side on the VP-30 flight line. Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group Rear Adm. Matthew Carter and VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Curtis Philips briefed their British guests and answered questions con cerning the strategic significance of the first P-8A squadron (VP-16) to fly opera tional missions in the U.S. Pacific Fleet area of responsibility. The UK cancelled its maritime patrol capability in 2010 but as an island nation, some voices in parliament are calling for the reinstatement of the UKs maritime reconnaissance force. Hammond was introduced to a UK Royal Air Force contingent at VP-30 that is led by Squadron Leader Andy Bull. The defence ministry wants to retain a certain level of maritime patrol skills Photo by Clark Pierce(From left) RAF Squadron Leader and VP-30 instructor Andy Bull shows the P-8A internal bomb bay to UK Secretary of State for Defence, the Right Honourable Philip Hammond.British, American officials tour First Coast bases From U.S. 7th Fleet Public AffairsIn an effort to pinpoint the exact location Malaysian Air MH370 that landed in the Indian Ocean, U.S. 7th Fleet sent a second P-8 Poseidon patrol aircraft to Perth, Australia to aid in the search efforts. The P-8A, assigned to the VP-16 War Eagles, flew from its deployment site in Okinawa, Japan to Perth March 28 to join an international coali tion of search aircraft being coordinated by the Australian Defence Force. Its critical to continue searching for debris so we can reverse-forecast the wind, cur rent and sea state since March 8 to recreate the position where MH370 possibly went into the water. Weve got to get this initial position right prior to deploying the Towed Pinger Locator since the MH370s black box has a limited bat tery life and we cant afford to lose time searching in the wrong area, said Cmdr. Tom Moneymaker, U.S. 7th Fleet oceanographer. Harsh weather conditions, including ceilings as low as 800 feet and potential icing condi tions, make the addition of the all-weather P-8 extremely valu able. In total, 7th Fleet patrol aircraft have flown 16 missions and more than 150 flight hours covering 220,000 square nau tical miles. In anticipation of finding MH370 debris and pinpoint ing a close approximation of the crash coordinates, U.S. Pacific Fleet moved a Towed Pinger Locator hydrophone and Bluefin-21 Side-scan sonar into Perth for future position ing to the crash site. This movement is a prudent effort to preposition equipment and trained personnel closer to the search area so that if debris is found, search coordi nators will be able to respond as quickly as possible since the battery life of the MH370s black box pinger is limited. The P-3C Orion previous ly searching in the Northern Indian Ocean will return to previously assigned 7th Fleet missions. In terms of mission effective Photo by MC2 Eric Pastor Lt. Cmdr. Mike Trumbull, a naval flight officer assigned to VP-16, monitors his workstation March 24 in a P-8A Poseidon during a mission to assist in search and recovery operations for Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370. VP-16 adds second P-8 Poseidon to MH370 searchPhoto courtesy of HSM-72HSM-72 Det.1 maintainers check rotors on "Highlander" No. 710 during a recent pre-flight inspection on board guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66). The ship, home-ported at Naval Station Mayport, will depart on an independent deployment later this year.See Page 10 See Page 10 See Page 9

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014 SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)5487789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley U.S. Navy photoLooking back to Aug. 30, 1945 . .Attendees of the NAS Jacksonville Air Show get an up-close look at a Grumman ties. Designed to operate from aircraft carriers of the USS Midway class, it was the first Navy fighter to have tricycle landing gear and was powered by two Pratt & Whitney R-2800 engines. The Tigercat was too late for operational service in World War II, arriving in Okinawa the day before VJ-day. U.S. Navy photoLooking back to August 1947 . .Before there was a Fuller Warren Bridge or a Buckman Bridge, there was the NAS Jacksonville ferry that took civilian employees across the St. Johns River to San Jose and Mandarin. From StaffApril 3 1797 Capt. Thomas Truxtun issued first known American signal book using numerary system. 1942 Adm. Nimitz named Commander-in-Chief, Pacific Ocean Areas, a joint command, and retained his other title, Commander-in-Chief, Pacific Fleet. 1992 First five coed recruit compa nies from Orlando, Fla. Naval Training Center graduate. April 4 1776 Continental Navy frigate Columbus captures HM Tender Hawke, first American capture of British armed vessel. 1854 Sailors and Marines from sail ing sloop Plymouth, protect U.S. citi zens at Shanghai. 1898 Mordecai Endicott is appoint ed first Civil Engineering Corps, Chief, Bureau of Yards and Docks. 1949 Establishment of NATO. April 5 1946 USS Missouri (BB-63) arrives in Turkey to return the body of Turkish ambassador from the U.S. and to show U.S. support and willingness to defend Turkey. April 6 1776 Continental sloop-of-war Ranger, frigate Queen of France and frigate Warren capture British Hibernia and seven other vessels. 1862 Naval Gunfire from Tyler and Lexington help save Union troops at Battle of Shiloh. 1909 Cmdr. Robert E. Peary reports reaching the North Pole. 1917 U.S. declares war on Germany. 1945 First heavy kamikaze attack on ships near Okinawa. 1968 USS New Jersey (BB-62) recom missioned for shore bombardment duty in Vietnam. 1989 President orders DoD to assist in Exxon Valdez oil spill cleanup. 1993 Branch Navy Hospital Adak responds to crash of civilian Chinese airline providing life-saving treatment and medical evacuation of 89 injured passengers. Only one passenger out of 265 passengers died. April 7 1776 Continental brig Lexington captures British Edward. 1917 Navy takes control of all wire less radio stations in the U.S. 1942 Navy accepts AfricanAmericans for general service. 1945 First two Navy flight nurses land on an active battlefield (Iwo Jima), Ensign Jane Kendeigh and Lt. j.g. Ann Purvis. 1945 Carrier aircraft defeat last Japanese Navy sortie (Battle of East China Sea). Yamato, the worlds largest battleship, and five other ships were sunk. 1979 Launch of first Trident subma rine, USS Ohio (SSBN-726) at Groton, Conn. April 8 1925 First night landings on a car rier, USS Langley (CV-1), by VF-1. 1950 Unarmed Navy patrol aircraft shot down over Baltic Sea by USSR. 1951 First of four detonations for Operation Greenhouse nuclear test. April 9 1861 Second relief convoy for Fort Sumter leaves New York City. 1941 Commissioning of USS North Carolina (BB-55), which carried nine 16-inch guns. 1943 Re-establishment of Commodore rank. 1959 Selection of the first seven Mercury astronauts includes four naval aviators. By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorI wrote the following column in 2005 after my friend Marc Tace died of Muscular Dystrophy. This week marks 20 years since Marcs dad, a Marine Colonel, died of a heart attack while serving overseas. Ive been thinking a lot lately about Marc and his fam ily. On Thursday, I was invited to have brunch at the Commandant of the Marine Corps house due to my book, Dinner with the Smileys, being included in the First Lady of the Marine Corps recommended reading list. Marcs mom, Heather, is one of the proudest Marine wives Ive ever known. Much of what I know about the USMC and its culture comes from her. This also is the time of year when many restaurants and convenience stores run their annual Muscular Dystrophy Association shamrock fundraiser. With these things in mind, I (re)introduce to you the Tace family. Like most military children, Marc Tace knew how to wait. He knew how to wait for his Marine Corps dads next job, his next homecoming, and the next deployment. Marc knew how to wait even when his dads absences could only be explained by the words Semper Fi. And for a child whos missing his dad, thats a hard concept. But unlike most military children, Marc waited without moving. Diagnosed with Muscular Dystrophy at the age of 4, Marc was wheelchair-bound by the time he and I were in elementary school. I remember his wheelchair decked out with 17th Street Surf Shop and USMC stickers like I remember my grandparents brown Volvo station wagon coming up the street. Marcs wheelchair was simply part of my elementary school experience long before inclusion was a word tossed around in newspaper editorials. And Marcs mom became somewhat like a beloved aunt I looked forward to seeing in the school hallway as she helped Marc with the things that he needed. There shed come down the hall, dressed in a jeweled sweatshirt with the American flag on it, singing something like, I love you, you love me, were a happy family to me, and Marc, who would roll his eyes with feigned embarrass ment. But my favorite memory of Mrs. Tace and Marc was when they found me crying in the hallway of the junior high school. Now, we cant have our little Sarah crying, she said, and then she let Marc and me play hooky from school, taking us to get donuts. Later, Marc and I went to the same high school and college. And he was always there. And so was Mrs. Tace. When both our dads were away on military assignments, our families spent Easters and Thanksgivings together. And over time, Marcs wheelchair got bigger and more complex. There were more machines. More contraptions keeping him still. Keeping him waiting. Then I got married, moved away and had children. In some ways, I had left my military childhood behind. I no longer knew when my dad was on detachment or home with mom. But each time I went home and saw Marc, I was reminded how faithfully he still waited, the world coming to him as he waited for his dads homecomings. But in 1994, Col. Tace died of a massive heart attack while serving overseas and never came home. Everyone wondered, What will Mrs. Tace and Marc do? How will they manage? No one could have anticipated the strength and support of the greater military family that would keep them going. No one could have anticipated the way Marc would rise to the occasion and become the father figure for his family. And no one anticipated (although we should have) the way the Marines would take care of their own and embrace Marc and his family. Last week, more than 10 years after Col. Taces death, it was that same strength and support that cradled Mrs. Tace when she laid Marc to rest next to his dad. With an American flag in one hand and the Marine Corps flag in the other, Mrs. Tace kissed her sons coffin and told him, Dont be afraid. Im here with you. Just then, a military jet screeched overhead, rustling the flaps of the tent we all stood under, and I smiled as I thought, Leave it to a Marine to arrange a fly-by for his sons funeral. On June 19, Muscular Dystrophy finally took Marc Taces life, just a few months shy of his 30th birthday. Yet in some way, death also freed Marc. Because the morning Mrs. Tace found her son lying still in his bed wasnt any ordi nary day. No, the day Marc slipped from this life to the next, to find what hed been waiting for, was Fathers Day. And so it was, on the day set aside for fathers and their children, Marc went home to be with his dad, where this time the Marine stood waiting for his son. Semper Fi. This Week in Navy HistoryIn life and death, Marines and Fathers are always faithful From the Homefront SAPR director visits(From left) Navy Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Deputy Director Jill Loftus meets with NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander on March 26 during her three-day visit to NAS Jax to conduct a series of office calls, meetings and focus groups. She and Undersander discussed key points of the Guide, including leadership development at the unit level. Photo by AE2(AW) Samantha Jones

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By Yan Kennon NH Jacksonville Public Affairs Senior WriterCapt. Gayle Shaffer, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville commanding officer, has appointed Jose Hernandez as the new command ombudsman. Hernandez, a native of Darrouzett, Texas, is married to YN1 Veronica Hernandez of NH Jacksonvilles Human Resources Department. He assumed ombudsman duties in February, replac ing former ombudsman Molly Croft. Despite being new to ombudsman responsibilities, Hernandez is more than ready for the challenge ahead. I can relate to the needs of the military family, said Hernandez, a 15-year Navy veteran. I plan to use my experience and training to ensure family readiness and resolve any issues that may arise. Ombudsmen have served as liaisons between military families and the com mand since the programs introduction in 1970. They are considered the go to people for valuable resources, guidance and other support military families may need. The Navy ombudsman plays a criti cal role supporting our Navy families something especially important for our families with deployed spouses, said Shaffer. Jose will be a valuable asset to the command and I am extremely confi dent he will step right in and guide our families through any challenges they may face. Navy ombudsmen are the point of contact between a sailors family and command leadership. They work in a volunteer capacity and attend train ing regularly to stay abreast of available information and Navy programs. I enjoy being involved and helping others, said Hernandez. My first order of business is getting to know our sailors and letting them know I am here to help when needed. To contact the NH Jacksonville ombudsman, email at nhjaxombuds man@gmail.com or call 904-250-6450. From StaffThe American Legion AuxiliaryawardedSarah Smiley,author of Dinner with the Smileys, and herhus band, Lt. Cmdr.Dustin Smiley,and sonsFord, 13, Owen, 11, and Lindell, 7,with its prestigious Public Spirit award. American LegionAuxiliaryN ationalPresidentNancy BrownPark presentedthe award at a spe cialreceptioninthe Smileys honor March25attheAuxiliarysannual con ference in Washington, D.C. Established in 1983, the award rec ognizes outstanding individualsand organizations for contributionsthat have a positive impact on communi ties, especially those efforts that ben efit military, veterans and their fami lies. Previous recipients of the Public Spirit award include retired Gen.Colin Powell, Hillary Rodham Clinton, for mer President RonaldReagan, Jeanne Kirkpatrick, Ann Landers and Miss America 2000 Heather Renee French. Sarah Smiley is the author of Dinner with the Smileys, in which she chroni cled a year of weekly dinners withcom munity members and leaders while her Navy husband was deployed. I was moved when I read Sarahs book, said Brown-Park. The sacrifices she, her husband, and their sons have made for our country arecommendable. They are the sac rifices military families everywhere make every day.We honor theirdedica tion and applaud the awareness Sarah hasbrought to the military family community. At the Public Spirit award recep tion, Brown-Park presented Sarah Smiley with a lifetime membership to the American Legion Auxiliary, while Dustin Smiley was presented with a lifetime membership to The American Legion by American Legion National Cmdr. Daniel M. Dellinger. The Smiley boys each received lifetime member ships to the Sons of The American Legion by Sons National Cmdr. Joseph Gladden. Naval Hospital Jacksonville welcomes new ombudsmanJose HernandezSmiley garners Public Spirit award JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014 By MC2 Amanda CabasosStaff WriterActor Gary Sinise and his Lt. Dan Band kicked off the week end with a free USO concert for service members, and their families at Deweys All Hands Club aboard NAS Jax March 28. Despite overcast skies and intermittent rainfall, noth ing stopped the audience from dancing and singing along to favorite tunes during the twohour performance. His 12-member band rocked the stage with flashing lights, and played a variety of hit music geared for all members of the audience. In an interview, Sinise said, We play a wide variety of cover tunes. I want to make sure we play music that every one in the military is going to enjoy clas sic rock, contemporary, pop, blues, Motown, swing, soul and country. The important thing to me is that people have a great time at our shows. It is a very high-energy show. Vietnam Veteran Raymond Manzo said, I am a big Gary Sinise fan. The band is excel lent. Gary has done so much for the veterans. I had the privilege to meet him before and he is a great person. As far as his roles as Lt. Dan in Forrest Gump its like the best performance ever. The guy has done a great job for the disabled veterans in this country. Sinise and his band travel the country and overseas perform ing at various military hospitals, bases and USO events. Sinise and his band officially became a program of the non-profit Gary Sinise Foundation in 2011. The foundations mission is to serve our military, veterans and first responder communities by entertaining, boosting morale and raising funds wherever needed. I like seeing smiling faces, said Sinise. Quite often we play for military bases here domestically in states where you have a lot of service members deployed. So we are playing for the kids and the families giving them a good time while their loved ones are on a long deploy ment. During the performance Sinise talked of his many ties to the military. My dad was in the Navy in the early 1950s. His two brothers served in World War II. One was a navigator on a B-17 over Europe. The other was on a ship in the pacific. My grandfather served in the Army in World War I. Sinise explained that this was his first visit to Jacksonville. Its very pretty here. I always love the sound of freedom [aircraft] when I come to a military base. The actor mentioned that in the past the band averaged 10 to 12 USO shows a year, but there will only be five this year as well as no overseas tours. I am not in the music busi ness to make money, said Sinise. I make a living as an actor. I use the music to help folks and to support our mili tary. Navy spouse Kris Hawes said, Gary Sinise and the Gary Sinise Foundation has done so much to represent not only active duty Sailors, but also reserv ists and first responders all over the globe. He gives people that moment of respite to let go of their mission for a minute and enjoy just being with musicians and each other. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander said, I want to thank the USO for pro viding this wonderful opportu nity for NAS Jax to provide some quality entertainment to our military community. Despite the threatening weather, Gary Sinise and the Lt. Dan Band put on a great family show that was quite memorable. It was also a first for NAS Jax to take some time to honor our Gold Star families and wounded warriors, added Undersander. We hosted about 22 family members who came from as far away as Stuart, Fla. They are now part of the NAS Jax family and we hope they feel welcome to come back for visits and other events. Molly Callinan, a vocalist with the Lt. Dan Band, took center stage and entertained the crowd with her lead vocal performances on popular cover songs. Keyboard player Ben Lewis with the Lt. Dan Band demonstrates his impressive talent as hundreds active duty Sailors and retirees enjoy the free concert March 28 at NAS Jacksonville. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander introduces Gary Sinise and the Lt. Dan Band to an enthusiastic crowd during the free concert March 28 at Dewey's All Hands Club. Jeff Vezain and Gary Sinise rock out in front of an estimated 1,000 active duty, families and retir ees at the Lt. Dan Band concert. Dummer Danny Gottlieb per forms during the Lt. Dan Band concert. Gottlieb is consid ered one of the most popular drummers in Jazz and con temporary music and has been featured in more than 400 recordings to date, including four Grammy Award. Gary Sinise rocks his bass guitar. Gary Sinise, playing electric bass, encouraged concert goers to catch the beat and sing along.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014 5 Photos by Shannon Leonard and MC2 Amanda Cabasos Actor Gary Sinise invites children to the stage to participate in the performance as a way to show his appreciation to military families. Despite the intermittent rainfall, the audience continued to express their excite ment for the concert. MA1(EXW) Keith Danalewich from NAS Jax Security Department and his Military Working Dog, Doly, make an appearance for security purposes at the Lt. Dan Band Concert at NAS Jax. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander welcomes Gold Star Families and wounded warriors at a special gathering at Deweys All Hands Club before the Lt. Dan Band concert. Service members, retirees and their families dance and sing during the concert. Gary Sinise speaks with Ronald and Joanne Gutcher dur ing a meet and greet session with the Gold Star Families for Peace (GSFP) after the concert. GSFP is a U.S.-based organization founded in 2005 by individuals who lost family members in the Iraq war. GSFP MA3 Robert Gutcher from NAS Jax Security Department said, My brother was killed in Iraq in 2007. I am part of the Gold Star Family organization so that I can help others deal with similar situations. From left, Molly Callinan, Marie Anne Jayme and Julie Dutchak delivered powerful vocals during the Gary Sinise and Lt. Dan Band concert at Dewey's All Hands Club. Claire Brabazon, 2, dances to music during the Gary Sinise and Lt. Dan Band Concert aboard NAS Jax March 28.

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By Twilla SmithNavy Region Southeast Public AffairsRear Adm. Rick Williamson, Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE), signed proclamations March 28 in support of child abuse preven tion, sexual assault awareness and the Month of the Military Child. The proclamations coincide with National Child Abuse Prevention Month, National Sexual Assault Prevention Month and the Month of the Militrary Child, which are all recog nized during the month of April. This proclamation is an affirmation of beliefs long held in our Navy that sexual assault and child abuse is not now, nor has it ever been, acceptable behavior, Williamson said. One instance is one too many. As we formally recognize April as Sexual Assault and Child Abuse Prevention Month, we reaffirm our support of our shipmates and their families as we continue to make our workplace and our homes the safe harbors they were always meant to be. According to Commander, Navy Installations Command, the Navy recorded an increased number of vali dated reports of child abuse during the last ten years. We are working hard to keep the number of incidents on a decline, yet incidents are not always reported, said Jeanette Werby, CNRSE counseling and advocacy coordinator. It is difficult to pinpoint one reason people hesitate to report child abuse, Werby said. Sometimes people just dont want to get involved because they worry that the outcome may not sup port that their report was valid. According to Werby, many times abused children feel responsibility for their own abuse and blame themselves for circumstances which are beyond their control. It should not be surprising that many abused children are often protective of their abusers, said Werby. This behav ior keeps the abuse hidden and perpet uates the cycle. One of the most effective ways to help end child abuse, explained Werby, is by developing and maintaining a height ened sense of awareness regarding the problem. Communicating the long-term impact child abuse can have on chil dren and their families heightens awareness that there is always another way to handle frustrations that come with parenting and that abuse is never the solution, said Werby. It is everyones responsibility to become aware of the indicators of child abuse, to encourage awareness in oth ers, and to respond appropriately to incidents of abuse by reporting to the Family Advocacy Program. To find out more about how you can help prevent child abuse or to report an incident of child abuse, contact your installations Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC). Like the child abuse prevention and military child proclamation, the Sexual Assault Awareness Month proclamation is intended to raise awareness about sexual assault. Regional sexual assault response coordinator, Capt. Steve Holmes stat ed, Although the proclamation is in support of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, it should serve as a reminder to us that sexual crimes is something we need to combat all year long by liv ing our values and stepping up to stop sexual assault. While raising awareness is one of the primary tools in preventing sex ual assault, the Navy Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) pro gram also focuses on supporting victims. The Navy offers a variety of sup port services, including clinical coun seling and legal services. Each installation has a 24-hour SAPR victim advocate line. These numbers are advertised throughout the instal lations and may be dialed to ask ques tions, inquire about resources or report a sexual assault. In addition, each installation has a Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) located at the FFSC to ensure victims receive the support services they need. People may also contact the DoD Safe Helpline at 1-877-995-5247 or via http://www.safehelpline.org To find out more about the Navys SAPR program, contact your local FFSC or SARC, or visit https://g2.cnic.navy. mil/tscnrse/N00/CNRSE_SAPR_Team_ Site/default.aspx. By Yan KennonNH Jacksonville Public Affairs Senior WriterNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville recognizes April as Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM), focusing on awareness and prevention through a series of educational outreach from self-defense classes to a 5/10K run. The theme of the Department of Defenses (DoD) 10th awareness month is Live Our Values: Step Up to Stop Sexual Assault. The theme asks everyone to live the values every day, all year long step up by intervening when appropriate, reporting crimes and supporting vic tims. We all play a role in the fight against sexual assault with the commitment to eliminate it from our ranks, said Capt. Gayle Shaffer, NH Jacksonvilles commanding officer. We must first foster a professional command climate that encourages sexual assault victims to report these crimes, and hold perpetrators account able. If we work together, we can create a culture that does not tolerate sexual assault. Sexual assault is defined as any type of sexual contact or behavior that occurs without explicit consent. In 2013, DoD reissued its Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Strategic Plan to ensure the entire DoD worked together towards ending sexual assault. According to the U.S. Department of Justices National Crime Victimization Survey, an average of 237,868 sexual assaults occur each year about one every two minutes. Of these, two-thirds are committed by someone known to the victim. Sadly, about 60 percent of sexual assaults go unreported, making it one of the most under-reported crimes in the U.S. DoD tracks both unrestricted and restricted (the two reporting options) cases. Unrestricted cases are reported through the chain of command, while restricted reports are made confiden tially allowing sailors to get help with out reporting it through their chains of command or law enforcement. According to the DoD Safe Helpline, there are many steps to reduce the risk. Common sense, situational awareness and trusting ones instincts are key. Other tips include: consume alcohol only in moderation; never leave bever ages unattended or accept a drink from an open container; communicate lim its and expectations clearly with oth ers; inform close friends when going on a date with a new person; walk only in lighted areas if its dark; have extra money to get home; and have a plan for someone to call for help. One of the most effective methods of preventing sexual assault is active bystander intervention. The three com ponents to active bystander interven tion are: recognizing when to inter vene, considering whether the situation needs attention and deciding if there is a responsibility to act. The active bystander approach encourages people to identify situa tions that might lead to a sexual assault and then safely intervene to prevent an assault from occurring. Remember, everyone has the right to say no, even if they first say yes. The Navys SAPR Program is an ongo ing effort to prevent and respond to sex ual assault. Its goal is to eliminate sexual assault from the ranks, while preserving Navy mission readiness. Command SAPR program managers are responsible for ensuring all Navy employees military and civilian are properly trained. There is zero-tolerance for sexual assault in the Navy, said Lt. Hillary Sivik, NH Jacksonvilles SAPR program manager. There are a wide variety of resources available to help cope with any acts of sexual violence. We want to ensure victims that they will be taken care of, and encourage them to speak up. During April, NH Jacksonville will conduct command-wide train ing to build awareness. In addition, NH Jacksonville will combine efforts with NAS Jacksonvilles sexual assault response coordinator (SARC) on numer ous base-wide sexual assault educa tional events. This years events will include a SAAM proclamation signing, health fair, self-defense classes, SAPR general military training (with SAPR victim advocates on-hand to answer questions) and a 5K/10K support run. Wrapping up this years SAAM activi ties, a Take Back the Night event will be held April 30 at NAS Jacksonvilles Patriots Grove. This nationally recog nized event is an avenue for people to take a stand and speak out against all forms of sexual violence. The event will feature music, poetry, educational information and a candlelight tribute to sexual assault survivors. SAPR is an important element of the readiness aspect of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative that con solidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combateffective force in the history of the Navy. Anyone in immediate danger should call 911 (in the U.S.). To report a sexu al assault, call the DoD Safe Helpline at 877-995-5247, NAS Jacksonville duty SAPR Victim Advocate at 904-910-9075, NAS Jacksonville SARC at 904-548-7789 or Naval Station Mayport SARC at 904548-8392. Williamson signs Child Abuse Prevention, Sexual Assault Awareness and Military Child proclamationsPhoto by MC1 Greg JohnsonRear Adm. Rick Williamson, Commander, Navy Region Southeast, signs proc lamations in support of Sexual Assault Awareness Month and The Month of the Military Child at Region Southeast headquarters aboard NAS Jacksonville.NH Jacksonville supports Sexual Assault Awareness MonthPhoto by Jacob Sippel Lt. Cmdr. Michelle Perkins (right), Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles sexual assault forensic examiner (SAFE) pro gram manager, discusses goals and objectives of the National Sexual Assault TeleNursing Center with Lt. Hillary Sivik (left), NH Jacksonvilles Sexual Assault Prevention and Reporting program manager and Lt. Christina Boensel, NH Jacksonvilles command liaison. The telenursing center is a pilot program designed to provide consultant services to support providers who perform sexual assault forensic examinations. April is Sexual Assault Prevention Month, and serves as a time to focus efforts on awareness and prevention of sexual violence. 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014

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By Barbie SmolinskiNMCRS Publicity AssistantRetired Senior Chief Storekeeper (SKCS) Gabriel Aviles of Crystal River, Fla., beamed March 20 as Jim Reid, relief services assistant for Navy Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) Jacksonville, presented him a decorated U.S. Navy dress blues uniform. Six months earlier, Aviles had contacted NMCRS with a special request. Advancing in years, Aviles wanted a uni form to be buried in to honor the many years he served in the Navy. Originally from Puerto Rico, Aviles served in the Navy from 1956 to 1988. His long career took him all over the world, most nota bly to the U.S. Embassy in the Dominican Republic, where he worked as a military advisor on three separate tours. In a strange occurrence, after more than 32 years of service, Aviles walked down the gang way of USS Glover (FF-1098) for the last time but no one had organized a formal retirement ceremony for him. In frustration and haste, he donated all of his naval uni forms to the NMCRS Norfolk branch soon after he left the service. As he got older, Aviles regret ted giving away all of his uni forms. He initially contacted NMCRS Norfolk for assistance with obtaining a uniform, but was eventually referred to NMCRS Jacksonville, since it is the closest location to his home. Reid, a retired YNC, quick ly took an interest in Aviles request. This was definitely a unique case, but we try to help out in any way we can here at NMCRS, said Reid. Active duty or retired once a chief, always a chief. We are forever brothers. The mission to find Aviles a complete uniform became a labor of love for Reid and his team. We sent out a message to all of our thrift stores, said Reid. It took a while, but eventu ally it all came together. We got the jacket from Newport, Rhode Island. The trousers came from Kings Bay, Ga., and we found the cover right here in our own thrift store. Reid presented the final uni form to an overjoyed Aviles during a small ceremony at the NMCRS Jacksonville branch. I cant believe you were able to find the complete uniform, along with the SEA badge and ESWS pin. Aviles admired the uniform, that took him 32 years to earn, with pride and gratitude. I can only imagine the many hours of labor and research that went into the assembly of this uniform, he said. I promise I will honor your efforts until the day I die. Thanks for everything. NMCRS fulfills a very special requestPhoto by Barbie Smolinski(From left) NMCRS Relief Services Assistant Jim Reid presents retired SKCS Gabriel Aviles with a dress blues uniform to replace the one he discarded in 1988 after he retired. During his monthly Mayor's Base Commanders Meeting held March 27 at City Hall, Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown (center) and area base com manders shared lunch and some laughs. Around the table (from left) are NAS Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker, Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville Commander Capt. Tom Allan, Naval Station Mayport Commanding Officer Capt. Wess McCall, Brown, City of Jacksonville (COJ) Director of Military and Veterans Affairs Vic Guillory, Marine Corps Blount Island Command Deputy Commander Jim Hooks and COJ Deputy of Military and Veterans Affairs Harrison Conyers.City of Jacksonville Official photoMayor Brown hosts base commanders JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014 7

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By Earl BittnerNAVFAC Southeast Public AffairsNaval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus recog nized two of four employ ees March 20 for graduating from the NAVFAC Leadership Development Program (LDP). Al Sanderlin, senior business analyst/Lean Six Sigma Black Belt Process Improvement instructor, and Christopher Cimento, Public Works Department Kings Bay utilities branch head, recently complet ed the two-year program and were recognized by Kiwus with LDP Level 1 certificates of com pletion. I commend you on your dedication and commitment to the program, said Kiwus to the graduates. I have enjoyed speaking to both of you and look forward to seeing you con tinue to grow as leaders. I was elated to be select ed into the program, said Sanderlin. As I stopped and looked at some of the incred ible people we have that didnt make it in this time. It really gives you some perspective of what a privilege and honor is it to be accepted into the program and to graduate from it. Sanderlin said his goal is to now take the additional train ing and experience and to spread that to others, and help others to either get into the program, help them to better themselves, or just help them overcome obstacles in their job or life to make them successful. Its about being a lead er, continued Sanderlin. Leadership ability is not defined by position title alone, helping others, building your people skills, thats what will shape you into more of a lead er. My goals are to apply what I learned not only here at work, but equally outside of work too. This program has provided me with a very valuable insight into NAVFAC senior manage ment ideals, said Cimento. As I review the information and notes gathered over the past two years, I am genuinely sur prised at the sheer volume of material. The obligations of the program never seemed bur densome yet a considerable amount of formal and informal training was received. This structured leader ship training has improved my supervisory skill set, contin ued Cimento. I am grateful for the opportunity to improve my management and leadership skills by participating in the LDP program. Jeremy Thompson, dep uty public works officer at Public Works Department Key West, and Michael Chmura, Integrated Product Team (IPT) South Atlantic engineer, also completed the two-year LDP program but were unavail able to receive their certificates March 20. Their certificates will be presented at a later date. NAVFAC created the LDP to provide more robust devel opmental opportunities for its future civilian senior lead ers. The program is designed to provide leadership devel opment through progressive learning opportunities consist ing of formal education and training, rotational assign ments, and other developmen tal activities. Employees selected for the program are challenged to per form outside their sphere of influence and comfort zone. Annually, NAVFAC selects employees from around the corporation to be a part of the LDP program. Navy prepares black box locator for MH370 searchFrom U.S. 7th Fleet Public AffairsThe U.S. Navy is continuing efforts to search for missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370. As a precautionary mea sure in case a debris field is located, U.S. Pacific Command has ordered U.S. Pacific Fleet to move a black box locator into the region, March 24. If a debris field is confirmed, The Navys Towed Pinger Locator 25 will add a significant advantage in locating the missing Malaysian aircrafts black box. The TPL-25 Towed Pinger Locator System is able to locate black boxes on downed Navy and commercial aircraft down to a maximum depth of 20,000 feet anywhere in the world. Commercial aircraft pingers are mounted directly on the flight recorder, the recovery of which is critical to an accident investi gation. The Pinger Locator is towed behind a vessel at slow speeds, generally 1-5 knots, depending on the depth. The tow array carries a passive listening device for detecting pingers that automatically transmit an acoustic pulse. In the event a debris field is locat ed, were moving some specialized locator equipment into the area. The Towed Pinger Locator has some high ly sensitive listening capability so that if the wreck site is located, we can hear the black box pinger down to a depth of about 20,000 feet. Basically, this super-sensitive hydrophone gets towed behind a commercial vessel very slowly and listens for black box pings, said Cmdr. Chris Budde, U.S. 7th Fleet Operations Officer. This movement is simply a prudent effort to preposition equipment and trained personnel closer to the search area so that if debris is found we will be able to respond as quickly as possible since the battery life of the black boxs pinger is limited, said Budde. If found, the acoustic signal of the pinger is transmitted up the cable and is presented audibly, and can be out put to either an oscilloscope or a sig nal processing computer. The operator monitors the greatest signal strength and records the navigation coordinates. This procedure is repeated on multiple track lines until the final position is tri angulated. The system consists of the tow fish, tow cable, winch, hydraulic power unit, generator, and topside control console. Most pingers transmit every second at 37.5 kHz, although the TPL can detect any pinger transmitting between 3.5 kHz and 50 kHz at any repetition rate. By MC2(AW) Doug WojciechowskiVP-5 Public AffairsDuring their frenetic InterDeployment Readiness Cycle, the Mad Foxes of VP-5 have qualified patrol plane commanders, tactical coordina tors, acoustic aviation warfare opera tors, and electronic warfare operators. On March 18, the Mad Foxes gathered in Hangar 511 to witness yet another event added to VP-5s distinguished history AWO2 Andrew OBrien received his Wings of Gold in a surprise pin ning ceremony. It was an awesome surprise to see my wife, kids, and entire squadron waiting for me in the hangar bay after my flight, said OBrien. There was no better way to get my wings pinned on than by my wife in front of all of my Mad Fox family. While there have been two other VP-5 naval aircrewman who complet ed qualifications to earn their Acoustic Aviation Warfare Operator designation since OBriens pinning, his designation is especially important to VP-5 and the entire U.S. Navy Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force. OBrien is the first naval aircrewman to complete the entire P-8A Poseidon Naval Aircrewman Acoustic Operator training pipeline starting from boot camp, through various service schools, and eventually completion of squadronbased personal qualification standards. OBrien enlisted in the Delayed Entry Program in January 2011 and reported to Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Ill., in November 2011. Upon graduation, OBrien reported to Naval Air Station Pensacola in January 2012 for Naval Aircrew Candidate School (NACCS) and Naval Aircrewman Operator A School. In addition to his training in Pensacola, he completed Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape (SERE) training in Portsmouth, N.H. He then reported to VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville and completed the P-8A CAT I Acoustic Aviation Warfare Operator Course. Upon completion of two and a half years of training, he received orders to the Mad Foxes where he has set the bar high for qualification standards. Earning the Level 300 Sensor Station One qualification in just nine months is an amazing feat, AWOC Kim Darling, VP-5s NATOPS Department leading chief petty officer. Not many, very few actually, earn their qualification that quickly, displaying the sharp knowl edge demonstrated by Petty Officer OBrien. OBrien currently works as a VP-5 Operations Department schedule writer and will assist the upgrading operators to earn their qualifications. VP-5 is currently nine months into its Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle and is preparing for its first P-8A Poseidon deployment to the 7th Fleet Area of Responsibility. Four graduate from leadership development programPhotos by Sue BrinkNaval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus (right) stands with Alfred Sanderlin March 20 after presenting him with a cer tificate of completion for the Level I Leadership Development Program (LDP). Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus (right) stands with Christopher Cimento, after presenting him with a certificate of completion for the Level I Leadership Development Program (LDP). Mad Fox achieves acoustic qualifications in record timePhoto by MC2 Doug WojciechowskiAWO2 Andrew O'Brien shares a smile with his wife, Ashlee, after she pinned on his naval aircrewman "Wings of Gold" for which he earned Level 300 Sensor Station One qualification in just nine months. U.S. Navy file photoThe TPL-25 System is used for locat ing emergency relocation pingers on downed Navy and commercial aircraft down to a maximum depth of 20,000 feet anywhere in the world. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014

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by sending small groups of RAF personnel to other countries with established maritime patrol capabili ties including the U.S., New Zealand and Canada, said Bull. He, along with Flight Lt. Rob Butler, Master Air Crew (MAcr) Keith Treece and MAcr Mark Cutting, are P-8A instructors attached to VP-30. BRITISH VISITFrom Page 1 At the conclusion of his tour at VP-30 aboard NAS Jacksonville, UK Secretary of State for Defence, the Right Honourable Philip Hammond received a commemorative P-8A Poseidon plaque for his office in England. Inside a crowded P-3C Orion, Lt. Robert Dibbern of VP-30 talks about the aircraft's navigation and com munications workstation with UK Secretary of State for Defence, the Right Honourable Philip Hammond.Photos by Clark PierceNAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander welcomed the United Kingdom Secretary of State for Defence, the Right Honourable Philip Hammond (right), and his official party on March 27 at Air Operations. (From left) Director, Strategic Systems Programs Vice Adm. Terry Benedict, UK Secretary of State for Defence Philip Hammond, and Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group Rear Adm. Matthew Carter discuss the strategic significance of maritime patrol aircraft prior to a March 27 briefing at the P-8A Integrated Training Center. (From left) VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Curtis Philips explains features of the instructor's station inside a P-8A Operational Flight Trainer, as RAF Squadron Leader Andy Bull looks on. (From left) AWO1 Matthew Pradon of VP-30 answers questions about the P-3C Orion radar station to Royal Navy Capt. John StanleyWhyte. Outside the P-8A weapons tactics trainer, VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Curtis Philips shows how instructors simulate anti-submarine warfare scenarios to test operators at detection and weapons stations. Vice Adm. Terry Benedict, director of the Navys Strategic Systems Programs, took some time to check out an anti-submarine warfare workstation on board a P-8A Poseidon multi-mis sion aircraft. As visitors take a look inside the P-8A Weapons Tactics Trainer, AWO3 Alexis Laszlo (right) checks her radar monitor during a simulated anti-submarine warfare mission. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014 9

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them to the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC) at Andros Island, Bahamas in January to support Combat Sea Systems Qualification Training (CSSQT) for guided-missile cruiser USS Normandy (CG 60). The Highlanders provided a wide variety of sup port, from range clearance to medical evacuation. The hallmark of the exercise was the employment of antisubmarine warfare (ASW) tactics against an under water target resulting in a successful MK-54 torpedo engagement. This event also allowed Normandy to successfully optimize and troubleshoot their recently upgraded acoustic and data link systems to ensure full functionality for future tasking with MH-60R helicop ters. Following their successful participation in CSSQT, the Highlanders remained on Andros Island to com plete HSM-72s first Helicopter Advanced Readiness Program (HARP). This gave the aircrew and main tainers of Det. 1 the invaluable opportunity to both plan and execute more than 50 flight hours of tactical training missions against realistic surface, subsur face, and land-based threat systems, while accurately directing the employment of four MK-54 torpedoes, three Hellfire missiles, and more than 5,000 rounds of .50cal and 7.62mm ammunition. Det.1 also conducted coordinated ASW operations in mixed-aircraft sections alongside HSL-48s Det.1 operating the SH-60B Seahawk. HARP culminated for the Highlanders in a full-spectrum warfare scenario in which three MH-60Rs were employed simulta neously to protect a High Value Unit in a simulated restricted waters transit. OIC Harvey said of the Highlanders superior perfor mance, I couldnt be more proud of their dedication to mission excellence! The team truly came together to employ ordnance on target, on time. Upon returning to NAS Jacksonville, Det.1 set sail with Hu City to complete Initial Ship Aviation Team Training (ISATT). This was to show that both units could be deployed as one asset. The union also estab lished a strong foundation for future HSM-72 opera tions with Hu City. ISATT complete, Hu City steamed north with the Highlanders on board to take part in an Independent Deployer Certification Exercise (IDCERTEX) in which seven U.S. warships demonstrated their proficiency in the employment of ASW and Surface Warfare (SuW) tactics. With Det.1 having recently honed their own ASW/SuW skills at AUTEC, they provided a strong asset for both mission areas, and again took full advantage of a valuable opportunity for realistic coor dinated warfare training. This time, in concert with surface ships and landbased maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft, the Highlanders protected against actual submarine targets. Det.1 showed off their impressive capabili ties of the MH-60R yet again, logging over six hours of ASW contact time with multiple active and passive sensors. In between successful strait-transit exercises, the Highlanders were also able to step forward to assist the surface group and fulfill a critical need for logis tics support, executing over 20 passenger and cargo transfers that allowed for maximum flexibility of exer cise participants and evaluators from Commander, Strike Force Training Atlantic and Naval Mine and Air Warfare Center. Following the completion of IDCERTEX, Det.1 returned home to NAS Jacksonville to complete final deployment preparations. Having been tested early and often, the Highlanders are excited to write the first chapter in HSM-72s seagoing history and contin ue to demonstrate the pride and professionalism that mark its reputation. HSM-72From Page 1ness and reliability, the P-8A repre sents a leap forward for the Navys maritime patrol and reconnais sance community. The aircraft has a maximum speed of 490 knots, a ceiling of 41,000 feet, and provides a range of more than 1,200 nautical miles with four hours on station. For a mission such as the MH370 search, the P-8 will typically fly at 5,000 feet at 350 knots, dropping to 1,000 feet to get a visual identifica tion of any radar returns. It may also fly at 1,000 feet for an extended period of the flight, depending on the environment and mission for the flight. It has a search time of approximately eight, nine hours depending on distance to search area, though during this mission the search time on station is greatly reduced due to the distance of the search area from Perth. The new P-8A is part of the Navys commitment to the Pacific rebalance, bringing newer and more capable aircraft to 7th Fleet to ensure the Navy is best postured to honor its security commitments to the Indo-Asia-Pacific and contrib ute to regional security and stabil ity. The VP-16 War Eagles are home based at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. Photo by AE2(AW) Samantha Jones Awards QuartersThe following outstanding Sailors were presented awards on March 28 during an All Hands Quarters by NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander: (bottom row from left) AB2 Christopher Adamson, OS3 Samuel Polanco, AO3 Devanae Bradley, (mid dle row from left) AC1 Nicholas Done, AC1 Matthew Hubbell, AWV3 Tyler Hoepker, (top row from left) AC1 Omowale Browne and MA3 Stephan Moore II. VP-16 SEARCHFrom Page 1 Photo by MC2 Eric PastorElectronic warfare operators attached to VP-16 watch the exterior of a P-8A Poseidon during a highfrequency radio check. 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014

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By AWFCS(NAC/SCW) Mike WendelinVR-62 Public AffairsA detachment from the VR-62 Nomadsdepart edNAS Jacksonville last weekfor their nor mal logistics rotation in U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM). After knocking out their first FY-14 detachment in U.S. Pacific Command last December, and com pleting their change of command in March, the Nomads are ready to sup port CTF-53 in Bahrain. New skipper Cmdr. B.T. Smith was ready to get on the road. We have one detach ment down and two to go for fiscal 2014. Our Nomads are more than ready to get back to CENTCOM and support the carrierstrike group along with and any other logistics needs required by CTF-53. The Nomads provide high-priority, in-theater airlift services and report to CTF-53 for tasking. The squadron deploys with just 21 aircrew and maintainers to support a multitude of transport requests while operating inCENTCOM for the next 90 days. The C-130T Hercules is just a great platform for providing logisti cal support in Central Command. We are part of a very important sup ply chain supporting the CENTCOM AOR in many different ways, said Nomad Operations Officer Lt. Cmdr. Mariusz Drozdzowski. VR-62 is a Navy Reserve squadron that operates four of the Navys C-130T Hercules aircraft from its home base at NAS Jacksonville. Call 778-9772 for more information facebook.com/nasjaxmwr Month of the Military Child CARNIVAL April 12, 11 a.m. 2 p.m.FREE ADMISSION! Bounce houses, Activites and Games!Allegheny Softball Field AWF3 Austin Toynton directs a K-loader driver to add more cargo for the VR-62 detachment to CENTCOM in Bahrain. Squadron cargo goes out on a K-loader to the C-130T Hercules aircraft staged on the the tarmac of NAS Jacksonville.Photos courtesy of VR-62Nomads deploy to U.S. Central CommandAWF2 Anthony Nesbit adjusts tiedown chains on the VR-62 "Nomads" Goat utility vehicle. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014 11

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By Clark PierceEditorAlmost 100 children from the kin dergarten classes at John Stockton Elementary School in Jacksonville enjoyed a field trip to the Black Point Interpretive Center March 27 aboard NAS Jacksonville. Natural Resources Manager Christine Bauer and Assistant Natural Resources Manager Angela Glass recruited vol unteers to properly manage the large group of young learners. Lt. Hanayo Arimoto, Lt. Jen Wright and James Harwood volunteered from the Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE), in addition to Teri Wanamaker, a vbolunteer and the spouse of NAS Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker. Were splitting the children into three groups with 30-minute rotations at each learning station, said Glass. Wanamakers demonstration was all about camouflage and how it applies to nature. Activities included searching the outdoors for camouflaged items. They also learned about the Sphinx moth and its natural camouflage sys tem. At the NECE learning station, Wright and her team talked about the basic biology of insects. We brought along some butterfly nets so the children can learn how to catch bugs by going on an insect scav enger hunt, said Wright. I also brought along a non-poisonous corn snake that the children can touch. Inside the nature center, Bauer took kindergartners on a tour of aquariums and terrariums filled with fish, amphib ians and reptiles including the Florida box turtle and a corn snake. VP-8 takes top prize in a Bahrain cook-offBy MC2 Clay WhaleyVP-8 Public AffairsFive judges, pre-determined ingredi ents and five teams hungry for victory set the stage March 18 for the 2014 Isa Air Base Bahrain Cook-off. Eight VP-8 Fighting Tigers took a break from their daily routines, donned their chef hats and competed to cre ate the most delicious grilled cuisine in Bahrain. It was a beautiful morning the sun was shining, the sky was blue and a cool breeze gave relief from the hot temper ature but not all was so perfect. At the cook-off, tension filled the air as the judges silently sampled each of the dishes and marked their score sheets. Each team watched in suspense, read ing the faces of each judge. The judg es remained silent and stoic, until one of them tried the Pineapple Glazed Chicken Churrasco and the word delicious slipped from his mouth. At that point, the Fighting Tigers knew they had a fighting chance to win the competition. After two hours of teamwork, cre ativity and sheer determination to win, VP-8 arose victorious as Bahrain Cookoff champions. When the final scores were tallied, the VP-8 team was called to receive accolades as the victors. They held their spatula trophy high and proud, knowing that they had created the most delicious meal in Bahrain. The galley did a great job in pro viding us this amazing opportunity to break from our busy schedules and have some fun with food, said VP-8s AWO1 Jared The Grill Master Larsen. Everyone who participated had a great time, and I think anytime you can get a taste of home, it makes you feel much better, he added. After the competition, a base-wide grill-out was hosted, providing every one the opportunity to enjoy delicious food and the company of shipmates. VP-8 is currently deployed to the United States Navys 4th and 5th Fleet Areas of Responsibility, conducting Maritime Security Operations, support ing Operation Enduring Freedom and counter transnational organized crime missions. Photos by MC2 Clay Whaley Sailors assigned to the Fighting Tigers of Patrol Squadron (VP) 8 display their 2014 Isa Air Base Bahrain Cook-off spatula trophy after winning the base-wide competition hosted by the galley in Bahrain. (From left) AWO1 Jared, The Grill Master Larsen and AWF2 Larry, Team Leading Tosten, spread pineapple onto Glazed Chicken Churrasco dur ing the March 18 Isa Air Base Bahrain Cook-off. VP-8 is currently deployed to the Navys 4th and 5th Fleet Areas of Responsibility. Photos by Clark Pierce(Right) NAS Jax Natural Resources Manager Christine Bauer presents a Florida box turtle to inquisitive students from John Stockton Elementary School. Learning is natural for kindergartnersVolunteer Teri Wanamaker leads a group of kindergartners in a natural camou flage exercise. Lt. Jen Wright, from the Navy Entomology Center of Excellence, dis played a corn snake that children could safely touch. 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014

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By MC1(SW/EXW/AW) Joshua Bryce BrunsCommander, U.S. Naval Forces Korea Public AffairsThe U.S. Navys P-8A Poseidon maritime patrol air craft conducted its first train ing missions in the Republic of Korea (ROK) March 27-31 in support of exercise Foal Eagle 2014. During the combined U.S. and ROK armed forces train ing events, flight crew mem bers from Patrol Squadron (VP) 16 operated with P-3C Orion maritime patrol crews from the ROK navy. The exercise gave the pilots, mission planners and flight crews from both the U.S. and ROK navies the opportunity to train together and exchange ideas and concepts. This was a great opportu nity to strengthen relation ships and show what opera tional capabilities this aircraft brings to the Pacific and to our allies, said Lt. Cmdr. Dwight Brungard, the P-8A mission commander. Everyone was discussing the similarities and differences between the P-8 and the P-3 and how we can operate effi ciently in the operational envi ronment. Its so important for us to understand each other and continue to work seam lessly together. Exercise Foal Eagle in an umbrella of regularly sched uled, annual exercises between U.S. and ROK armed forces in 7th Fleet. The naval portion of these bi-lateral exercises test skills in a variety of warfare disciplines including maritime patrol. We are excited to have the P-8A Poseidon performing its first missions in Korea as a part of Foal Eagle 2014, said Rear Adm. Lisa Franchetti, com mander, U.S. Naval Forces Korea. The presence of this mod ern and dynamic aircraft oper ating with our Korean coun terparts further demonstrates the U.S. Navys commitment to our alliance with the Republic of Korea and represents the physical manifestations of our rebalance to the Pacific. The P-8A Poseidon is designed with the latest avion ics and onboard systems mak ing it one of the most advanced anti-submarine and anti-sur face warfare aircraft in the world. Six P-8A aircraft are cur rently deployed in support of the U.S. 7th Fleet conducting maritime stability, patrol, and search operations throughout the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live enter tainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaokeFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: April 19, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: April 26, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 9th Annual Captain Chuck Cornett Navy Run April 5 at 8 a.m. Register race day 6:30 7:45 a.m. NEX Convenience Store Parking Lot Learn to Swim 2014 Registration is open May 10 June 2 Register at the base gym $40 military, $45 DOD Session I: June 9 19 Session II: July 7 17 Session III: July 21 31I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_mwritt@navy.mil. ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Daytona International Speedway Coke Zero 400 Daytona Lagoon $19 waterpark Alhambra Dinner show $38 $50.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Jacksonville Suns $5.50 $11.50 Jacksonville Zoo $8.50 $17 Rivership Romance (includes dinner) $40$57.75 Funk Fest 2 Day Ticket $62 Motley Crew Concert Club seats $63.50 Wild Adventures $30 $70 while sup plies last Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27, 2014) $166 $194.50 Discover Disney Ticket Florida Resident Ticket Valid for sale through APRIL 12, 2014 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 THE ARTIST SERIES-BROADWAY IN JACKSONVILLE 2014 SEASON Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation $349-$369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St Augustine $4.25 $15.50 St Augustine Alligator Farm Nile Zipline $35.25 (free admission with reservation) St Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Half Hour Boggy Creek Airboat Rides $15.50 $20 Wild Florida Airboats (Kenansville, FL) $18 $46.75 Florida Ecosafaris $22.75 $52.75 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld Hotel properties, Universal Hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restrict ed to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. One Spark Festival Trip April 12 at noon Paintball Trip GTF in Yulee April 19 at 9 a.m. Jacksonville Suns Game April 22 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty April 8 & 22 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests April 10 & 24 Mondays & Tuesdays Play 18-holes for $20, includes cart and green fees Not applicable on holidays Daily Special Play 18 holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. Command Party Swing into savings & book your com mand golf tournamentMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Month of the Military Family Carnival April 12, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Allegheny Softball Field Easter Egg Hunt April 16, 7 p.m. McCaffrey Softball ComplexFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Learn to fly at NAS Jax Call for introduction flightAdditional ratings are available including instrument, complex and commercialFind more info. online at jaxnfc.net From MWR MarketingNAS Jacksonville Freedom Lanes hosted the 2014 Teen Masters Bowling qualifier March 29 30. The qualifier featured a Boys and Girls Under-14 Division and a Boys and Girls High School Division. The event offered an opportu nity for young bowlers to qualify to compete in the 2014 Teen Masters National finals to be held in Fort Lauderdale, June 30-July 6. Bowlers will then compete for a $64,000 college scholarship, along with many other scholarship opportuni ties. These young bowlers are not bowling on the oil patterns that most league bowlers bowl on. They are bowling on one short and one long sport pattern developed specifically for the teen masters quali fier, said John Duncan, manager of Freedom Lanes. The added, teen bowlers mak ing it to Fort Lauderdale will all bowl with identical plastic and urethane bowling balls designed to allow the skill of the bowler rather than the equipment to play the large part in determining the champion. The volume of oil for the National finals has also been reduced in order to allow these bowlers to show their bowling skills. Boys High School Qualifiers: (1st) Donald Atwood Jr. of Callahan; (2nd) Jacob Bassell of Jacksonville. Girls High School Qualifier: (1st) Ember Miksa of Winter Springs.Sand Volleyball League forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. Commands and required paperwork. Play begins in April. The tournament is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractor women assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants will earn participation points for their command toward the third. Greybeard Softball League Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractor personnel age 30 and older who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play on Tuesday & Thursday at 11:30 a.m. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Play begins in April. Intramural Softball League Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 5422930 for rules and required paperwork. Play begins in April. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians; DoD contractors; retirees; and dependents over 18. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Play begins in April. Kickball League Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. Game play at lunch time. Contact the NAS Jacksonville Sports Department at 542-2930 for rules and the required paperwork. Open to active duty, retirees, dependents over 18, selective reservists, DoD civilians and contractors. The tournament starts at 5 p.m. at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts on the corner of Allegheny Road and Birmingham Road. Call 542-2930 to sign up by April 25. Intramural Golf Summer League Meeting May 7 Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. Meet at 11:30 a.m. at the golf course. Commands and required paperwork. Intramural Basketball League Meeting May 14 Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. Meet at noon at points, along with rules and required paperwork. Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Meet at noon at points, along with rules and required paperwork. Badminton Singles League Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS or designated representative attend P-8A Poseidon performs first missions in Korea Teen Masters take over Freedom LanesPhotos by Shannon Leonard Sixteen-year-old Jameson Tarrant warms up during practice time before the 2014 Teen Masters Qualification began on March 29 at NAS Jax Freedom Lanes. Teen Masters Bowling Qualifier participants. See SPORTS, Page 17 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014 13

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14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014 Munitions spill drillBy AE2(AW) Samantha JonesStaff WriterNavy Munitions Command (NMC) Jacksonville conducted an OTTO Fuel II drill March 27 to fulfill their semiannual requirement however, the sce nario of this drill was different from any other spill drill previously conducted onboard NAS Jax. What made this drill different was the location of the spill and the manner in which the spill occurred. In this instance, GM3 Eric Edwards was attempting to use a forklift to move a 55-gallon drum of OTTO Fuel II. The sailor accidentally punctured the drum causing a HAZMAT leak that con taminated the clothing of GM3 Jihad Littlejohn and GMSN Richard London, the two Sailors who were safety observ ers for the forklift evolution. NMC Jax Sailors responded swiftly and appropriately by notifying base security and the NAS Jax First Coast Fire and Emergency Services. The area was immediately secured and a spill kit was used to prevent the OTTO Fuel II from spreading and causing further contamination. The two contaminated sailors ran over to the eye wash station where they began the decontamination process by rinsing off their clothes while they waited for their shipmates to bring out the decontamination pool. Upon their quick arrival, GM2 Timothy McIntyre and GM3 Benjamin Parrish quickly and properly executed the primary decon tamination phase. The NAS Jax First Coast Fire and Emergency Services, as well as paramedics, arrived on the scene within minutes to perform a second decontamination on the exposed Sailors. Any amount over two quarts is con sidered a major OTTO Fuel II spill. We must preform these drills so that we can be aware of and properly carry out the pre-planned responses, said GMC Isiah Pinckney, the facilitator of the drill. I believe the drill went very well. The Sailors did an outstanding job with communications. Nas Jax Training Officer Jim Butters was responsible for the coordination between NMC Jacksonville and NAS Jax first responders. The variation in the drill location and cause of the spill brought some new elements into the response by NAS Jax First Coast Fire and Emergency Services, as well as the cleanup by NAS Jax Environmental Department and FLUOR. Otto Fuel II is a distinct-smelling, red dish-orange, oily liquid that the U.S. Navy uses as a fuel for torpedoes and other weapon systems. Headaches are the most common effects from overex posure. USO golf fundraiserBy Bob RossGreater Jacksonville Area USOThe 3rd Annual USO Memorial Golf Championship was held aboard NAS Jacksonville on March 21. The Troops Championship hosted 128 golfers, half of whom were active duty service mem bers from each branch of our armed forces all sponsored by anonymous donors. The weather was fantastic, the golf course in perfect shape and everyone enjoyed a great day. 1st Place: Ion Revak, Troy Laliberte, Travis Page and Trevic McAfee. 2nd Place: Charlie Moore, Rusty Cain, Patrick Pennell and Matt Wentzel. 3rd Place: Bill Herbert, Apollo Reelerson, John Corher and Jeff Kearns. Special thanks go to Title Sponsor, Siemens Industry; Silver Sponsor, W.W. Gay Mechanical Contractor; as well as Bronze Sponsors, Clear Payment Solutions, Grand Canyon University, Miller Electric, Patriot Sales and Monster Energy Drinks for their gener ous support and sponsorship of USO active duty troops and families. Photos by Shannon Leonard Children play in their spe cial area of the Family Fitness Center March 26 while their parents are working out. The center is open Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. and is located above the Youth Activities Center (YAC) gym. Call 778-9772 for more info. (Left) Casey Chevalier participates in the circuit training group exercise class March 25 at the Family Fitness Center located above the YAC gym. Circuit training is offered Monday Friday, 9:30 10:30 a.m. by a certified trainer. For more info call 778-9772.YAC Family Fitness Center Photo by AE2(AW) Samantha Jones Participants of the 3rd Annual USO Memorial Golf Championship stand at atten tion as the national anthem is performed by Navy Band Southeast during the tournament's opening ceremony. Photo courtesy of USO(From left) CM3 Adam Brown, BU1 Chad Josi, BU2 Nicholas Garand and EA2 Henry Andermann of Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CMBU) 202, NAS Jacksonville enjoyed a round of golf at The Troops Championship held aboard NAS Jacksonville on March 21. Photos by AE2(AW) Samantha JonesJim Butters (center), NAS Jax training officer, conducts a safety brief with Navy Munitions Command Jacksonville personnel prior to the onset of the spill drill conducted on March 27. NAS Jax First Coast Fire and Emergency Services arrives on scene and prepares to conduct the second decontaination of the contaminated Sailors. (From right) GM3 Jihad Pettyjohn, GMSN Richard London, and Work Leader Wade Martin safety observe as GM3 Eric Edwards simulates punctur ing a 55-gallon drum of OTTO Fuel II while operating a forklift. GM3 Eric Edwards and Work Leader Wade Martin use a spill kit to establish a liquid containment barrier in order to prevent the spilled Otto Fuel II from causing further contamination. (From left) Contaminated Sailors GMSN Richard London and GM3 Jihad Littlejohn use the eye wash station to rinse off the OTTO Fuel II. GM2 Timothy McIntyre (center left) and GM3 Benjamin Parrish (right) perform primary decontamination on GMSN Richard London. The two contaminated sailors (center) stand on barrier paper to prevent fur ther contamination as they await the arrival of the NAS Jax fire department and medical responders. Firefighter Chris Hicks (left) and Capt. Fred Chambers (right) of the NAS Jax First Coast Fire and Emergency Services simulate the second decon tamination of the Sailors.

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Celebrating Freedom February By Lt. Cmdr. John DzialoskiVP-26 CSOPresident Barack Obama issued a proclamation, designating January 2013 as National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month, with it culmi nating in the celebration of National Freedom Day on Feb. 1. The president called upon the people of the United States to recognize the vital role we can play in ending modern slavery and to observe this month with appropriate programs and activities. CPRW-11 answered the presidents call by partici pating in the 2nd Annual Freedom February Campaign a VP-26 initiative designed to support local organi zations whose mission is to support the freedom of others. The VP-26 Tridents joined forces with more than 100 volunteers from VP-10, VP-45, Lake Asbury Middle School, Oakleaf High School, the Bannerman Learning Center, and the Church at Argyle Youth Group. More than 750 volunteer service hours were donated to K9s for Warriors, Rethreaded, S.A.F.E. Pet Rescue, and the City Rescue Mission. We were able to exceed our Freedom February goals and support these amazing organizations because of the team effort put forth by Wing-11 and our local youth, said VP-26 Tridents Command Services Officer Lt. Cmdr. John Dzialoski. K9s for Warriors is dedicated to providing rescued canines to service members suffering from post-trau matic stress syndrome (PTSS) as a result of conflicts after 9/11. They help warriors return to civilian life with dignity and independence by pairing, training and graduating K9/warrior teams. Each warrior completes approximately 120 hours of training and takes a written test and two practi cal tests with their K9 teammate. This year, K9s for Warriors has partnered with S.A.F.E. Pet Rescue and is striving to graduate 50 K9/warrior teams from their program. Volunteers fed, walked, and acclimated service dogs; conducted grounds upkeep, and met with wounded warriors. These efforts will aid K9s for Warriors in their mission to serve those who have sacrificed much in the fight for freedom around the world. Rethreaded provides assistance to individuals who have been denied freedom as victims of human traf fickers. Human trafficking is a multi-billion dol lar industry founded on the exploitation of vulner able members of society, mostly women and children. Rethreaded is dedicated to assisting victims of Human Trafficking by fostering a life-giving community. Their vision is to unravel the effects of the sex trade by fighting business with business on a global and local level; as they strive to provide safe, viable, and dignity-giving work to survivors of the sex trade. One of Rethreadeds 2014 goal is to employ seven survivors of human trafficking. In order to do so, they accept donations of clean, new or used, cotton T-shirts, which are then upcy cled and sewn into garments and other resalable items. In an effort to assist Rethreaded in reaching their goal, Team Trident conducted a T-shirt drive during February. As a result, Wing-11 and local youth responded by donating 5,126 shirts to support the fight against human trafficking. To learn more about K9s for Warriors, Rethreaded, S.A.F.E. Pet Rescue, and the City Rescue Mission visit them online at: http://www.k9sforwarriors.org http://www.rethreaded.com http://www.safe-petrescue-fl.com or http://www.crmjax.org CNRSE Sailors, Civilians volunteer at Habitat for Humanity JacksonvilleBy MC1(SW) Greg JohnsonNavy Region Southeast Public AffairsSailors and civilians from Commander Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) participated in a Habitat for Humanity (H4H) construction project March 26. During the project, volunteers helped excavate soil in preparation for a new sidewalk outside the organizations north-side offices and warehouse. According to Angie Leatherbury, opera tions director with H4H Jacksonville, the volunteer effort helped strengthen an already firm relationship between the Navy and the local community. The Navy has contributed hundreds of hours of time to HabiJax (Habitat for Humanity Jacksonville), both on the construction site and at our restore facility, she said. For those who vol unteered their time today, I would just like to say thank you for your time and commitment to HabiJax and we hope that your volunteer experience was very rewarding. We cannot thank our volun teers enough for their contributions. H4Hs mission is to build affordable housing for low-income families and individuals. Those who receive homes from the program work alongside vol unteers under trained supervision to build their home. Upon completion, H4H grants them a no-interest mort gage for the value of the home, mak ing monthly payments affordable for those who cannot afford a traditional mortgage payment. The organization built more than1,800 homes last year in Jacksonville alone. Its an organization that has a very positive impact on the local community and I think thats why our Sailors and civilians are always so excited to vol unteer here, said Twilla Smith, Navy Region Southeast community service program coordinator. This kind of an event gives them an opportunity to get out and do something physically active and have an impact on the community at the same time. During the effort, Sailors and civil ians removed approximately a ton of earth from a 30-yard strip in prepara tion for the sidewalk. In addition, they used sledge hammers to remove the remains of an older piece of sidewalk within the same area. It was hard work, but it was really worth it, said YN1 (SS) Serge Kabanda, who volunteered for the event. As members of the military, we are very fortunate to not have to worry about a lot of things that many others do, so it feels good to be able to get out and con tribute to an organization that is proac tive in improving peoples lives. While the volunteer group did not have the opportunity to directly help build a home during the event, Leatherbury said the volunteers should take a lot of pride in their efforts. Given that our home buyers are required to complete a minimum of 300 volunteer hours, or sweat equity, before they can purchase their home through HabiJax, they understand and greatly appreciate the commitment and time that community volunteers like Navy Sailors contribute, whether that time is put in at a construction site or helping out here at our warehouse, she said. Photos courtesy of VP-26AWO1 Kyle Huey and AWO2 Micheal Crawford, of VP-26, help organize the Rethreaded warehouse in downtown Jacksonville in support of the annual Freedom February Campaign. (From right) AWO2(NAC) Michael Crawford, AWO2(NAC/AW) George Munoz and ADAN Phillip Shaw of VP-26 and AN Larry Sutton of VP-45 deliv er 5,126 T-shirts to the Rethreaded warehouse in support National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month. AWO2 Kristin Depouw of VP-10 volunteers her land scaping skills at the K9s for Warriors facility in Ponte Vedra during the Freedom February Campaign. Joerick Ortiz-Crespo helps wash one of the res cued service dogs at the K-9's for Warriors facility in Ponte Vedra, during the annual Freedom February Campaign supported by squadrons of CPRW-11. IT1(SW) Paul Voigt (left) and YN1(SW) John Felizpolanco dig a trench March 26 in preparation for the construction of a sidewalk.Photos by MC1 Greg Johnson JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014 By MC1 Elliott FabrizioThe Chief of Naval Personnel (CNP) talked with Sailors around the world in an All Hands Call, broadcast from the Defense Media Activity at Ft. Meade, Md., March 5. Vice Adm. Bill Moran, CNP, and Fleet Master Chief for Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education (MPT&E) April Beldo, updat ed Sailors on Navy subjects including pay, the Career Intermission Pilot Program (CIPP), advancement and Tuition Assistance (TA). Fleet and I are always inter ested in hearing what Sailors are hearing in the Fleet and what questions they have, said Moran. This gives us the oppor tunity to give them the right information and beat back any bad information that is circu lating. Sailors asked live questions via satellite, telephone and social media. The Secretary of the Navy approved raises to Career Sea Pay allowance and a Sailor from San Diego asked via satel lite when the increases would show up in Sailors paychecks. We think within the next 60 days were going to start improving the pay of anybody on Career Sea Pay today, said Moran. Via telephone, a Sailor from USS Harpers Ferry (LSD 49) asked if the Navy had plans to fully adopt the Career Intermission Pilot Program. The answer is absolutely, said Moran. The results weve gotten from this program have been very positive. People have been able to go out and get a college degree, start a family, or start another job and have come back into the Navy and picked up right where they left off. He added that the Navy is seeking congressional permis sion next year to remove the pilot moniker and institution alize it across the Navy. Sailors aware of plans to change the advancement pro cess had several questions about the details, such as removing the point value of Good Conduct Medals and the timeline. The things that we are focusing on is evaluations, performance and the advance ment score, said Beldo. Right now we are not changing the points you are given for awards. Moran added, Theres a lot being talked about and dis cussed with advancement exams and I think its impor tant for Sailors to know that while were talking about it, nothing is being implemented in this March cycle. Its more likely to be a year from now that youll see these changes take place, and we will com municate that to all of you. From in-studio, a Sailor had a question about the TA pro gram. The Navy has been 100 percent on TA for the longest time, and even when the other branches of service dropped TA, the Navy kept it at 100 per cent; but, Ive heard talk of them possibly going down to 75 percent-Have you heard any thing about that? asked Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Xander Gamble. TA is funded at 100 percent through fiscal year 2014, but Beldo confirmed that Navy TA may see a 25 percent contribu tion from Sailors in the next fis cal year. We believe if there is an investment in there from the Sailor, they will be more com mitted, said Beldo. I think it will still be a good deal for Sailors. CNP also busted several rumors that Sailors had heard in the fleet. He said there are no plans to increase the length of boot camp, the Navy is not eliminating the Command Advancement Program (CAP) and there are no current plans to add advancement points for warfare pins or fitness exams. More questions Sailors sub mitted that were not answered during the All Hands Call will be addressed next week in All Hands Magazine. By MC1 Brianna Dandridge Sailors and family members from Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville volunteered at the citywide environmental clean up event March 22. The 19th St. Johns River Cleanup and Celebration presented by the City of Jacksonville, and the Keep Jacksonville Beautiful Commission was the citys kick-off event for the Florida Great American Cleanup. Community service projects are a continuing partnership between the Navy and city of Jacksonville, said YN1 Heather Montgomery. Nearly 70 sites were target ed for cleaning by civilian and military volunteers throughout the city. Involvement in community relations projects continue to build a positive partnership between the military and local community. I volunteered because this was a good way to show that the US Navy is a real part of the city, said PS1 Anthony Sonola. Community service and vol unteerism are an investment in our neighborhoods and the people who live call it home. Navy Recruiting Region oversees 13 recruiting districts providing support to hundreds of recruiting stations and thou sands of Sailors and civilian personnel. The Navy Recruiting Command (NRC) mission is to attract the best men and women for Americas Navy to accomplish todays missions and meet tomorrows challeng es. With 70 percent of the world covered by water, 80 percent of the worlds population living near coasts, and 90 percent of the worlds commerce travel ing by water, Americas Navy is very much a global force for good. From Navy Jax Yacht ClubSailboats raced up and down the St Johns River March 22 as the Navy Jax Yacht Club (NJYC) hosted the WAVES Regatta with five sail boats participating. KAOS, skippered by Kim Brewer and her all-female crew won first place and also took home the Committee Boat Prize for being the fastest vessel on the water. More sailboat racing, pleasure cruises and social events are scheduled for the upcoming spring and summer months. The NJYC meets the first Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the River Cove Catering & Conference Center on base. Membership is open to active duty and retired military, DoD employees, and their families. On May 17, racers from all over the area will take to the St Johns River as NJYC hosts its annual Armed Forces Day Regatta. For more NJYC info, call 778-0805. "KAOS" 41/33000, "Onyva" 583 and "Bernoulli" 67 are off to a good start as the WAVES Regatta begins.Photos by Chery LeDouxNavy Jax Yacht Club race participants and volunteers get ready to go racing on March 22 at the NAS Jax Mulberry Cove Marina.All-women crew rules Navy Recruiting Jacksonville volunteers at St. Johns River cleanupPhotos by MC1 Brianna Dandridge YN1 Heather Montgomery, Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville, and her son, Orion, volunteer at the cleanup for the City of Jacksonville and Keep Jacksonville Beautiful Commission on March 22. It was Jacksonville's kick-off event for the Florida Great American Cleanup. PS1 Anthony Sonola, Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville, bags debris for The City of Jacksonville and Keep Jacksonville Beautiful Commission 19th St. Johns River Cleanup and Celebration, March 22. CNP responds to Sailors questions in worldwide All Hands CallPhoto by MC3 Jules StobaughChief of Naval Personnel (CNP) Vice Adm. Bill Moran talks to Sailors during a world-wide all-hands call at Defense Media Activity at Fort George G. Meade, Md. By Terri Moon CronkAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe military has a moral obligation to take care of veter ans and the relatives of service members, Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey told attendees at the 2014 Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors Honor Guard Gala March 27. Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, was the keynote speaker for the event.Cameron Santos-Silva, a surviving child, presented Air Force Gen. Mark A. Welsh III, chief of staff of the Air Force, with the TAPS Honor Guard Gala Military Award. Recipients of TAPS awards, the chairman said, are hon ored for something that I con sider to be absolutely extraordi nary. What holds us together as a force is that we trust each other, the chairman said. You dont walk out of a for ward-operating base in Iraq or Afghanistan or anyplace and put yourself in the cock pit of an aircraft or deploy on a ship unless you trust that if something happens, the man or woman to your right or left knows what they have to do. And just as important, he added, is that your family youve left behind will be cared for. TAPS mission, Dempsey said, is absolutely essential to who we are as a profession. Establishing, maintaining and living up to that bond of trust absolutely has to exist among our ranks in peace and in war. The chairman commended Bonnie Carroll, TAPS president, for founding the organization. Its the brilliance of Bonnie Carroll that brings us here tonight, Dempsey said. Can you imagine, he added, if, in 1994, she hadnt begun to put this organizations together, so that when we really needed it in 2002 and beyond, we [might not have had a] public-private partnership that we could fall back on to take care of the sur vivors of those who served and gave their lives in the protection of their country? Gen. Martin Dempsey addresses TAPS Honor Guard GalaPhoto by MC1 Daniel Hinton18th Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey speaks at the 20th Anniversary Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors Honor Guard Gala at the National Building Museum in Washington D.C., March 27.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014 17 along with rules and required paperwork. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil StandingsAs of March 28 Badminton Doubles NAVHOSP MSU 7 0 NAVFAC Blue 5 1 NBHC Jax 4 1 MWR Dynamic Duo 4 2 NAVFAC Red 3 3 CV-TSC Ashore 2 3 NAVFAC Orange 2 4 FACSFAC-1 1 3 FACSFAC-2 1 3 NAVFAC Gold 0 4 NCTS 6 0 VP-45 5 1 CNATTU Blue 5 1 FRCSE 4 2 Navy Band 4 2 VP-30 4 2 CV-TSC/PSD 3 3 HS-11 1 2 VP-10 1 4 CNATTU Gold 1 5 SERCC 1 5 FRCSE II 0 2 Sports (Contd. from Page 13) By Phillip MilanoJacksonville University What started out with a sim ple request at a meeting in the Presidents office last year is now a vision come true for student vet erans, as Jacksonville University dedicated its Defenders Den Student Veterans of America (SVA) study center March 25. This speaks a lot of JU and how much it is putting into its veterans, said JU SVA Chapter President Danielle DAmato, her self a Navy veteran and graduate student. JU is setting up its vet erans to succeed in school and then in the working world. We are becoming a pillar example for other colleges. The new 1,000-square-foot space, centrally located on cam pus in the Founders Building, is designed especially for student veterans, who at about 400, make up 10 percent of JUs student body and are the Universitys secondlargest affinity group behind ath letes. Part of the space is a com puter lab and study area, and part is a gathering spot and lounge in which to relax, complete with flatscreen TV, refrigerator, microwave and comfortable chairs. Former JU Trustee and area Taco Bell franchise Chief Operating Officer Thaddeus Foster was instrumental in funding the center, which rep resents an investment of tens of thousands of dollars. He plays a prominent role on the board of the Armed Forces Families Foundation, a major donor toward the facility. At JU we are trying to inno vate, and find more creative ways to enrich all of our students lives, including our veterans, JU President Tim Cost told about 200 people gathered at the dedica tion ceremony. We are signing agreements, creating scholarships and creating physical spaces for them. In the case of the Defenders Den, DAmato and other JU stu dent veterans met with Cost in his office last year and responded to his overtures for ideas by sug gesting a special gathering spot be found for them. They wished they had their own place, Cost said. They have their own challenges, many have kids, many are older, and some were looking for a place to study and relax. Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown, a two-time JU graduate, said the new center is a testa ment to the way Cost and JU are embracing student veterans. Its a reaffirmation and confir mation that with President Costs leadership, veterans will continue to be successful not only at JU, but when they leave JU, Brown said. He is investing in our leaders. Dr. Donnie Horner, JUs chief government and community affairs officer, ticked off some of the ways in which JU is working toward becoming the most mili tary friendly campus in the United States: higher education institution in the U.S. to partner with the Children of Fallen Patriots Foundation in awarding scholarships to stu dents whose veteran parents died in the line of duty. JU is provid ing a 40 percent undergraduate tuition reduction per academ ic year for children of deceased veterans who meet JUs admissions requirements and have been accepted for enrollment. Horner noted that UCLA and the University of Washington have both contacted JU for information on possibly duplicating the pro gram on their campuses. Ribbon tuition match for most degree programs, up to $2,600 maximum per year. is one of the largest in America, with more than 1,500 Sailors and Marines having gone through the program. recently became one of only nine programs nationwide awarded funding $870,000 to implement a veterans bachelors of science in nursing program, helping wound ed and returning veterans excel as they pursue careers in health care. Veterans of America recently received two awards: it was recognized by SVA headquarters in Washington, D.C., as a model chapter with a $1,500 cash award. In addition, VFW District 6 cited JUs SVA for outstand ing efforts for student veterans, including advocacy, outreach, and volunteerism. Retired Rear Adm. Victor Guillory, director of Military Affairs, Veterans and Disabled Services for the City of Jacksonville, applauded JUs huge step in its efforts at being student veteran-friendly, and he urged all the veterans on campus to take advantage of their new center. Breathe life into the Defenders Den, make it a pertinent place on campus, and leave it even better than when you found it, he said. First Sergeant Doug Buck (U.S. Air Force Ret), now a gradu ate student in the JU School of Education, told audience mem bers that veterans want noth ing more than to be stimulated and challenged, especially in the workforce. JU has been very welcoming to me, despite my age, and it has addressed both of those needs: it has provided a stimulating edu cational environment and, it has hired me for the challenging job of supervisor at the soon-to-be opened River House, he said. I am very proud to be here today. Association is accepting applications for its earn-whileyou-learn, apprenticeshiptraining program. Apply at 103 Century 21 Drive, Suite 100 at 6 p.m. on April 7, 14, 21 and 28. For more info call 421-0296. Spring Picnic, Food and drinks provided. For more info, call 542-3955 or 859-2581. USS Iwo Jima (LPH2/LHD7) Reunion Aug. 27-31 at Crowne Plaza Hotel in Jacksonville. Call 757-723-0317 or http://ussiwojimashipmates.cfns.net/ N.E. Florida Chapter meets the third Wednesday of each month. Open to active duty and retirees of all military branches. Contact Johnnie.walsh@gmail.com or call 282-4650. meets the fourth Thursday of each month at 5 p.m. at Jacksonville Urban nix@navy.mil. meets the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Center on Collins Road. For information, visit www.aao9. com. (VFW) Post 5968 and its Auxiliary located at 187 Aurora Blvd. meets on the second Wednesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. VFW of combat veterans and eligible service members from the Active, Guard or Reserve forces. Go to www. vfwpost5968.org or call 2765968. at NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) needs volunteers to assist military retirees and dependents. Work four hours a day, one day per week. Call 542-5790 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays to volunteer. a breast cancer support group at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, meets on the second Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. Call 542-7857 for more info. is open to active duty, reserve and retired military, plus, active or retired DoD civilians. Call 778-0805 or email commodore@njyc.org. Program. Helping others help themselves. Visit www. gocompass.org for more info. meets the Methodist Church, 2246 Blanding Blvd. Call 272-9489. monthly Atlantic Beach. Call 246-6855. meets at 1 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the Murray Hill United Methodist Church, (Fellowship Hall Building) at 4101 College Street. Call 786-7083. Retired Enlisted Association meets the fourth Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Hall at 7673 Blanding Blvd. Call 772-8622. New Civil War exhibit opensFrom Staff On April 1, 1864, a military transport ship hit a mine in the St. Johns River southeast of NAS Jax, (near Mandarin Point), and sank with the loss of four lives. The Maple Leaf, a private steamship leased to the Union army, was headed back to Jacksonville after dropping off men, horses and supplies in Palatka. At 4 a.m., the ship hit a mine placed in the river by Clay County Sheriff Joshua OHern, who was also a Lieutenant in the Confederate army. OHern had mined the river at its narrowest point with what were known as torpedoes at that time. Today, there is new interest in the sinking and sal vaging of Civil War artifacts from the Maple Leaf, due to the 150th year recognition of its sinking and the display of rarely seen artifacts from the ship on loan from the Florida Department of Sate, Division of Historical Resources. Beginning April 4, the Mandarin Museum will host a new exhibit, free to the public, through Dec. 28. For more information on the exhibit, museum hours and location, go to MandarinMuseum.net. In 1989, local dentist and historian Keith Holland found the wreckage of the Maple Leaf, and conducted an underwater expedition that recovered approxi mately 3,000 artifacts. The recovery expedition took several years and pro vided a cache of personal belongings of Union solders; U.S. Army issued equipment; and items taken from plantations from South Carolina. Even though thousands of artifacts were recov ered, this represented only a small part of the ships cargo that still remains at the bottom of the river. Silt and mud buildup over the wreckage helped preserve items, even newspapers, in pristine condition that will be saved for future generations to see. The former chief historian for the National Park Service stated that the Maple Leaf is the most impor tant repository of Civil War artifacts ever found and probably will remain so. The site is now recognized as a National Historic Landmark. April 4 5 is the grand opening of the new Maple Leaf exhibit and Dr. Holland will be present each day to give a first hand account of his experience with searching, locating and diving to recover arti facts. Community Calendar Photos courtesy of JURetired Navy Capt. Matt Tuohy and Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown toured the new Defenders Den stu dent center at Jacksonville University on March 25.JU dedicates Defenders Den student veteran center JU Student Veterans of America Chapter President Danielle DAmato is a Navy veteran who is pursuing a graduate degree. Photos courtesy of Mandarin MuseumAn artists illustration of the paddle-wheel steam ship Maple Leaf that sank in the St. Johns River in 1864 after striking a Confederate mine near Mandarin Point. A confederate mine (torpedo) of the type used during the American Civil War. www.jaxairnews.com

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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, APRIL 3, 2014 I I D E NHJ OMBUDSMAN Welcome Jose Hernandez LT. DAN BAND Gary Sinise Rocks For Military Page 4 NOMADS DEPLOY VR-62 Det to CENTCOM Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com HSM-72s first independent deployment det.By Lt. j.g. Fleet LawrenceHSM-72 Det.1 Public Affairs OfficerThe Proud Warriors of HSM-72 stood up their first MH-60R Seahawk Detachment on Dec. 2, 2013. The HSM-72 Det.1 Highlanders is now set to embark on board guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66) later this year in support of international exercises Northern Eagle and Baltic Operations. The Det.1 Highlanders are led by Officer-InCharge Lt. Cmdr. Chad Harvey and Leading Chief Petty Officer, ADC(AW/SW) Zachary Bennett. They are supported by 23 mainte nance personnel, plus, 10 pilots and aircrew. As HSM-72 is not expected to deploy for its first Carrier Air Wing Deployment for some time, the opportunity to send a detachment to gain valuable shipboard experience will greatly benefit the Proud Warriors in their future endeavors. The Highlanders wasted no time in show ing how far HSM-72 has traveled in utilizing its new Romeo aircraft. Their first task took By Clark PierceEditorNAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander wel comed high-ranking U.S. Navy offi cials March 27, along with the United Kingdom (UK) secretary of state for defence, who were visiting area bases to review strategic weapons systems. Vice Adm. Terry Benedict is direc tor of the Navys Strategic Systems Programs (SSP). He manages the Navys Strategic Weapons Systems to include training, systems, equipment, facilities and per sonnel. SSP, with offices throughout the United States and another in the United Kingdom, is responsible for fulfilling the terms of the US/UK Polaris Sales Agreement. UK Secretary of State for Defence, the Right Honourable Philip Hammond and key staff members accompa nied Benedict on an early morning flight from Washington D.C. to NAS Jacksonville, where they departed to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, Ga. In the afternoon, the group returned to NAS Jacksonville for a tour of VP-30 training facilities, including the P-8A Integrated Training Center. The visit included guided tours of a P-3C Orion and a P-8A Poseidon aircraft that were parked side by side on the VP-30 flight line. Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group Rear Adm. Matthew Carter and VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Curtis Philips briefed their British guests and answered questions con cerning the strategic significance of the first P-8A squadron (VP-16) to fly operational missions in the U.S. Pacific Fleet area of responsibility. The UK cancelled its maritime patrol capability in 2010 but as an island nation, some voices in parliament are calling for the reinstatement of the UKs maritime reconnaissance force. Hammond was introduced to a UK Royal Air Force contingent at VP-30 that is led by Squadron Leader Andy Bull. The defence ministry wants to retain a certain level of maritime patrol skills Photo by Clark Pierce(From left) RAF Squadron Leader and VP-30 instructor Andy Bull shows the P-8A internal bomb bay to UK Secretary of State for Defence, the Right Honourable Philip Hammond.British, American officials tour First Coast bases From U.S. 7th Fleet Public AffairsIn an effort to pinpoint the exact location Malaysian Air MH370 that landed in the Indian Ocean, U.S. 7th Fleet sent a second P-8 Poseidon patrol aircraft to Perth, Australia to aid in the search efforts. The P-8A, assigned to the VP-16 War Eagles, flew from its deployment site in Okinawa, Japan to Perth March 28 to join an international coali tion of search aircraft being coordinated by the Australian Defence Force. Its critical to continue searching for debris so we can reverse-forecast the wind, cur rent and sea state since March 8 to recreate the position where MH370 possibly went into the water. Weve got to get this initial position right prior to deploying the Towed Pinger Locator since the MH370s black box has a limited bat tery life and we cant afford to lose time searching in the wrong area, said Cmdr. Tom Moneymaker, U.S. 7th Fleet oceanographer. Harsh weather conditions, including ceilings as low as 800 feet and potential icing condi tions, make the addition of the all-weather P-8 extremely valuable. In total, 7th Fleet patrol aircraft have flown 16 missions and more than 150 flight hours covering 220,000 square nautical miles. In anticipation of finding MH370 debris and pinpoint ing a close approximation of the crash coordinates, U.S. Pacific Fleet moved a Towed Pinger Locator hydrophone and Bluefin-21 Side-scan sonar into Perth for future position ing to the crash site. This movement is a prudent effort to preposition equipment and trained personnel closer to the search area so that if debris is found, search coordi nators will be able to respond as quickly as possible since the battery life of the MH370s black box pinger is limited. The P-3C Orion previous ly searching in the Northern Indian Ocean will return to previously assigned 7th Fleet missions. In terms of mission effectivePhoto by MC2 Eric Pastor Lt. Cmdr. Mike Trumbull, a naval flight officer assigned to VP-16, monitors his workstation March 24 in a P-8A Poseidon during a mission to assist in search and recovery operations for Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370. VP-16 adds second P-8 Poseidon to MH370 searchPhoto courtesy of HSM-72HSM-72 Det.1 maintainers check rotors on "Highlander" No. 710 during a recent pre-flight inspection on board guided-missile cruiser USS Hu City (CG 66). The ship, home-ported at Naval Station Mayport, will depart on an independent deployment later this year.See Page 10 See Page 10 See Page 9

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014 SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)5487789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley U.S. Navy photoLooking back to Aug. 30, 1945 . .Attendees of the NAS Jacksonville Air Show get an up-close look at a Grumman ties. Designed to operate from aircraft carriers of the USS Midway class, it was the first Navy fighter to have tricycle landing gear and was powered by two Pratt & Whitney R-2800 engines. The Tigercat was too late for operational service in World War II, arriving in Okinawa the day before VJ-day. U.S. Navy photoLooking back to August 1947 . .Before there was a Fuller Warren Bridge or a Buckman Bridge, there was the NAS Jacksonville ferry that took civilian employees across the St. Johns River to San Jose and Mandarin. From StaffApril 3 1797 Capt. Thomas Truxtun issued first known American signal book using numerary system. 1942 Adm. Nimitz named Commander-in-Chief, Pacific Ocean Areas, a joint command, and retained his other title, Commander-in-Chief, Pacific Fleet. 1992 First five coed recruit compa nies from Orlando, Fla. Naval Training Center graduate. April 4 1776 Continental Navy frigate Columbus captures HM Tender Hawke, first American capture of British armed vessel. 1854 Sailors and Marines from sail ing sloop Plymouth, protect U.S. citi zens at Shanghai. 1898 Mordecai Endicott is appoint ed first Civil Engineering Corps, Chief, Bureau of Yards and Docks. 1949 Establishment of NATO. April 5 1946 USS Missouri (BB-63) arrives in Turkey to return the body of Turkish ambassador from the U.S. and to show U.S. support and willingness to defend Turkey. April 6 1776 Continental sloop-of-war Ranger, frigate Queen of France and frigate Warren capture British Hibernia and seven other vessels. 1862 Naval Gunfire from Tyler and Lexington help save Union troops at Battle of Shiloh. 1909 Cmdr. Robert E. Peary reports reaching the North Pole. 1917 U.S. declares war on Germany. 1945 First heavy kamikaze attack on ships near Okinawa. 1968 USS New Jersey (BB-62) recommissioned for shore bombardment duty in Vietnam. 1989 President orders DoD to assist in Exxon Valdez oil spill cleanup. 1993 Branch Navy Hospital Adak responds to crash of civilian Chinese airline providing life-saving treatment and medical evacuation of 89 injured passengers. Only one passenger out of 265 passengers died. April 7 1776 Continental brig Lexington captures British Edward. 1917 Navy takes control of all wireless radio stations in the U.S. 1942 Navy accepts AfricanAmericans for general service. 1945 First two Navy flight nurses land on an active battlefield (Iwo Jima), Ensign Jane Kendeigh and Lt. j.g. Ann Purvis. 1945 Carrier aircraft defeat last Japanese Navy sortie (Battle of East China Sea). Yamato, the worlds largest battleship, and five other ships were sunk. 1979 Launch of first Trident submarine, USS Ohio (SSBN-726) at Groton, Conn. April 8 1925 First night landings on a car rier, USS Langley (CV-1), by VF-1. 1950 Unarmed Navy patrol aircraft shot down over Baltic Sea by USSR. 1951 First of four detonations for Operation Greenhouse nuclear test. April 9 1861 Second relief convoy for Fort Sumter leaves New York City. 1941 Commissioning of USS North Carolina (BB-55), which carried nine 16-inch guns. 1943 Re-establishment of Commodore rank. 1959 Selection of the first seven Mercury astronauts includes four naval aviators. By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorI wrote the following column in 2005 after my friend Marc Tace died of Muscular Dystrophy. This week marks 20 years since Marcs dad, a Marine Colonel, died of a heart attack while serving overseas. Ive been thinking a lot lately about Marc and his fam ily. On Thursday, I was invited to have brunch at the Commandant of the Marine Corps house due to my book, Dinner with the Smileys, being included in the First Lady of the Marine Corps recommended reading list. Marcs mom, Heather, is one of the proudest Marine wives Ive ever known. Much of what I know about the USMC and its culture comes from her. This also is the time of year when many restaurants and convenience stores run their annual Muscular Dystrophy Association shamrock fundraiser. With these things in mind, I (re)introduce to you the Tace family. Like most military children, Marc Tace knew how to wait. He knew how to wait for his Marine Corps dads next job, his next homecoming, and the next deployment. Marc knew how to wait even when his dads absences could only be explained by the words Semper Fi. And for a child whos missing his dad, thats a hard concept. But unlike most military children, Marc waited without moving. Diagnosed with Muscular Dystrophy at the age of 4, Marc was wheelchair-bound by the time he and I were in elementary school. I remember his wheelchair decked out with 17th Street Surf Shop and USMC stickers like I remember my grandparents brown Volvo station wagon coming up the street. Marcs wheelchair was simply part of my elementary school experience long before inclusion was a word tossed around in newspaper editorials. And Marcs mom became somewhat like a beloved aunt I looked forward to seeing in the school hallway as she helped Marc with the things that he needed. There shed come down the hall, dressed in a jeweled sweatshirt with the American flag on it, singing something like, I love you, you love me, were a happy family to me, and Marc, who would roll his eyes with feigned embarrass ment. But my favorite memory of Mrs. Tace and Marc was when they found me crying in the hallway of the junior high school. Now, we cant have our little Sarah crying, she said, and then she let Marc and me play hooky from school, taking us to get donuts. Later, Marc and I went to the same high school and college. And he was always there. And so was Mrs. Tace. When both our dads were away on military assignments, our families spent Easters and Thanksgivings together. And over time, Marcs wheelchair got bigger and more complex. There were more machines. More contraptions keeping him still. Keeping him waiting. Then I got married, moved away and had children. In some ways, I had left my military childhood behind. I no longer knew when my dad was on detachment or home with mom. But each time I went home and saw Marc, I was reminded how faithfully he still waited, the world coming to him as he waited for his dads homecomings. But in 1994, Col. Tace died of a massive heart attack while serving overseas and never came home. Everyone wondered, What will Mrs. Tace and Marc do? How will they manage? No one could have anticipated the strength and support of the greater military family that would keep them going. No one could have anticipated the way Marc would rise to the occasion and become the father figure for his family. And no one anticipated (although we should have) the way the Marines would take care of their own and embrace Marc and his family. Last week, more than 10 years after Col. Taces death, it was that same strength and support that cradled Mrs. Tace when she laid Marc to rest next to his dad. With an American flag in one hand and the Marine Corps flag in the other, Mrs. Tace kissed her sons coffin and told him, Dont be afraid. Im here with you. Just then, a military jet screeched overhead, rustling the flaps of the tent we all stood under, and I smiled as I thought, Leave it to a Marine to arrange a fly-by for his sons funeral. On June 19, Muscular Dystrophy finally took Marc Taces life, just a few months shy of his 30th birthday. Yet in some way, death also freed Marc. Because the morning Mrs. Tace found her son lying still in his bed wasnt any ordi nary day. No, the day Marc slipped from this life to the next, to find what hed been waiting for, was Fathers Day. And so it was, on the day set aside for fathers and their children, Marc went home to be with his dad, where this time the Marine stood waiting for his son. Semper Fi. This Week in Navy HistoryIn life and death, Marines and Fathers are always faithful From the Homefront SAPR director visits(From left) Navy Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Deputy Director Jill Loftus meets with NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander on March 26 during her three-day visit to NAS Jax to conduct a series of office calls, meetings and focus groups. She and Undersander discussed key points of the Guide, including leadership development at the unit level. Photo by AE2(AW) Samantha Jones

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By Yan Kennon NH Jacksonville Public Affairs Senior WriterCapt. Gayle Shaffer, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville commanding officer, has appointed Jose Hernandez as the new command ombudsman. Hernandez, a native of Darrouzett, Texas, is married to YN1 Veronica Hernandez of NH Jacksonvilles Human Resources Department. He assumed ombudsman duties in February, replacing former ombudsman Molly Croft. Despite being new to ombudsman responsibilities, Hernandez is more than ready for the challenge ahead. I can relate to the needs of the military family, said Hernandez, a 15-year Navy veteran. I plan to use my experience and training to ensure family readiness and resolve any issues that may arise. Ombudsmen have served as liaisons between military families and the command since the programs introduction in 1970. They are considered the go to people for valuable resources, guidance and other support military families may need. The Navy ombudsman plays a criti cal role supporting our Navy families something especially important for our families with deployed spouses, said Shaffer. Jose will be a valuable asset to the command and I am extremely confi dent he will step right in and guide our families through any challenges they may face. Navy ombudsmen are the point of contact between a sailors family and command leadership. They work in a volunteer capacity and attend train ing regularly to stay abreast of available information and Navy programs. I enjoy being involved and helping others, said Hernandez. My first order of business is getting to know our sailors and letting them know I am here to help when needed. To contact the NH Jacksonville ombudsman, email at nhjaxombuds man@gmail.com or call 904-250-6450. From StaffThe American Legion AuxiliaryawardedSarah Smiley,author of Dinner with the Smileys, and herhusband, Lt. Cmdr.Dustin Smiley,and sonsFord, 13, Owen, 11, and Lindell, 7,with its prestigious Public Spirit award. American LegionAuxiliaryN ationalPresidentNancy BrownPark presentedthe award at a spe cialreceptioninthe Smileys honor March25attheAuxiliarysannual conference in Washington, D.C. Established in 1983, the award rec ognizes outstanding individualsand organizations for contributionsthat have a positive impact on communi ties, especially those efforts that ben efit military, veterans and their fami lies. Previous recipients of the Public Spirit award include retired Gen.Colin Powell, Hillary Rodham Clinton, for mer President RonaldReagan, Jeanne Kirkpatrick, Ann Landers and Miss America 2000 Heather Renee French. Sarah Smiley is the author of Dinner with the Smileys, in which she chronicled a year of weekly dinners withcommunity members and leaders while her Navy husband was deployed. I was moved when I read Sarahs book, said Brown-Park. The sacrifices she, her husband, and their sons have made for our country arecommendable. They are the sac rifices military families everywhere make every day.We honor theirdedication and applaud the awareness Sarah hasbrought to the military family community. At the Public Spirit award recep tion, Brown-Park presented Sarah Smiley with a lifetime membership to the American Legion Auxiliary, while Dustin Smiley was presented with a lifetime membership to The American Legion by American Legion National Cmdr. Daniel M. Dellinger. The Smiley boys each received lifetime member ships to the Sons of The American Legion by Sons National Cmdr. Joseph Gladden. Naval Hospital Jacksonville welcomes new ombudsmanJose HernandezSmiley garners Public Spirit award JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014 By MC2 Amanda CabasosStaff WriterActor Gary Sinise and his Lt. Dan Band kicked off the week end with a free USO concert for service members, and their families at Deweys All Hands Club aboard NAS Jax March 28. Despite overcast skies and intermittent rainfall, noth ing stopped the audience from dancing and singing along to favorite tunes during the twohour performance. His 12-member band rocked the stage with flashing lights, and played a variety of hit music geared for all members of the audience. In an interview, Sinise said, We play a wide variety of cover tunes. I want to make sure we play music that every one in the military is going to enjoy classic rock, contemporary, pop, blues, Motown, swing, soul and country. The important thing to me is that people have a great time at our shows. It is a very high-energy show. Vietnam Veteran Raymond Manzo said, I am a big Gary Sinise fan. The band is excel lent. Gary has done so much for the veterans. I had the privilege to meet him before and he is a great person. As far as his roles as Lt. Dan in Forrest Gump its like the best performance ever. The guy has done a great job for the disabled veterans in this country. Sinise and his band travel the country and overseas perform ing at various military hospitals, bases and USO events. Sinise and his band officially became a program of the non-profit Gary Sinise Foundation in 2011. The foundations mission is to serve our military, veterans and first responder communities by entertaining, boosting morale and raising funds wherever needed. I like seeing smiling faces, said Sinise. Quite often we play for military bases here domestically in states where you have a lot of service members deployed. So we are playing for the kids and the families giving them a good time while their loved ones are on a long deployment. During the performance Sinise talked of his many ties to the military. My dad was in the Navy in the early 1950s. His two brothers served in World War II. One was a navigator on a B-17 over Europe. The other was on a ship in the pacific. My grandfather served in the Army in World War I. Sinise explained that this was his first visit to Jacksonville. Its very pretty here. I always love the sound of freedom [aircraft] when I come to a military base. The actor mentioned that in the past the band averaged 10 to 12 USO shows a year, but there will only be five this year as well as no overseas tours. I am not in the music busi ness to make money, said Sinise. I make a living as an actor. I use the music to help folks and to support our mili tary. Navy spouse Kris Hawes said, Gary Sinise and the Gary Sinise Foundation has done so much to represent not only active duty Sailors, but also reserv ists and first responders all over the globe. He gives people that moment of respite to let go of their mission for a minute and enjoy just being with musicians and each other. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander said, I want to thank the USO for pro viding this wonderful opportu nity for NAS Jax to provide some quality entertainment to our military community. Despite the threatening weather, Gary Sinise and the Lt. Dan Band put on a great family show that was quite memorable. It was also a first for NAS Jax to take some time to honor our Gold Star families and wounded warriors, added Undersander. We hosted about 22 family members who came from as far away as Stuart, Fla. They are now part of the NAS Jax family and we hope they feel welcome to come back for visits and other events. Molly Callinan, a vocalist with the Lt. Dan Band, took center stage and entertained the crowd with her lead vocal performances on popular cover songs. Keyboard player Ben Lewis with the Lt. Dan Band demonstrates his impressive talent as hundreds active duty Sailors and retirees enjoy the free concert March 28 at NAS Jacksonville. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander introduces Gary Sinise and the Lt. Dan Band to an enthusiastic crowd during the free concert March 28 at Dewey's All Hands Club. Jeff Vezain and Gary Sinise rock out in front of an estimated 1,000 active duty, families and retirees at the Lt. Dan Band concert. Dummer Danny Gottlieb per forms during the Lt. Dan Band concert. Gottlieb is consid ered one of the most popular drummers in Jazz and con temporary music and has been featured in more than 400 recordings to date, including four Grammy Award. Gary Sinise rocks his bass guitar. Gary Sinise, playing electric bass, encouraged concert goers to catch the beat and sing along.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014 5 Photos by Shannon Leonard and MC2 Amanda Cabasos Actor Gary Sinise invites children to the stage to participate in the performance as a way to show his appreciation to military families. Despite the intermittent rainfall, the audience continued to express their excitement for the concert. MA1(EXW) Keith Danalewich from NAS Jax Security Department and his Military Working Dog, Doly, make an appearance for security purposes at the Lt. Dan Band Concert at NAS Jax. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander welcomes Gold Star Families and wounded warriors at a special gathering at Deweys All Hands Club before the Lt. Dan Band concert. Service members, retirees and their families dance and sing during the concert. Gary Sinise speaks with Ronald and Joanne Gutcher during a meet and greet session with the Gold Star Families for Peace (GSFP) after the concert. GSFP is a U.S.-based organization founded in 2005 by individuals who lost family members in the Iraq war. GSFP MA3 Robert Gutcher from NAS Jax Security Department said, My brother was killed in Iraq in 2007. I am part of the Gold Star Family organization so that I can help others deal with similar situations. From left, Molly Callinan, Marie Anne Jayme and Julie Dutchak delivered powerful vocals during the Gary Sinise and Lt. Dan Band concert at Dewey's All Hands Club. Claire Brabazon, 2, dances to music during the Gary Sinise and Lt. Dan Band Concert aboard NAS Jax March 28.

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By Twilla SmithNavy Region Southeast Public AffairsRear Adm. Rick Williamson, Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE), signed proclamations March 28 in support of child abuse preven tion, sexual assault awareness and the Month of the Military Child. The proclamations coincide with National Child Abuse Prevention Month, National Sexual Assault Prevention Month and the Month of the Militrary Child, which are all recognized during the month of April. This proclamation is an affirmation of beliefs long held in our Navy that sexual assault and child abuse is not now, nor has it ever been, acceptable behavior, Williamson said. One instance is one too many. As we formally recognize April as Sexual Assault and Child Abuse Prevention Month, we reaffirm our support of our shipmates and their families as we continue to make our workplace and our homes the safe harbors they were always meant to be. According to Commander, Navy Installations Command, the Navy recorded an increased number of vali dated reports of child abuse during the last ten years. We are working hard to keep the number of incidents on a decline, yet incidents are not always reported, said Jeanette Werby, CNRSE counseling and advocacy coordinator. It is difficult to pinpoint one reason people hesitate to report child abuse, Werby said. Sometimes people just dont want to get involved because they worry that the outcome may not sup port that their report was valid. According to Werby, many times abused children feel responsibility for their own abuse and blame themselves for circumstances which are beyond their control. It should not be surprising that many abused children are often protective of their abusers, said Werby. This behavior keeps the abuse hidden and perpetuates the cycle. One of the most effective ways to help end child abuse, explained Werby, is by developing and maintaining a height ened sense of awareness regarding the problem. Communicating the long-term impact child abuse can have on chil dren and their families heightens awareness that there is always another way to handle frustrations that come with parenting and that abuse is never the solution, said Werby. It is everyones responsibility to become aware of the indicators of child abuse, to encourage awareness in oth ers, and to respond appropriately to incidents of abuse by reporting to the Family Advocacy Program. To find out more about how you can help prevent child abuse or to report an incident of child abuse, contact your installations Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC). Like the child abuse prevention and military child proclamation, the Sexual Assault Awareness Month proclamation is intended to raise awareness about sexual assault. Regional sexual assault response coordinator, Capt. Steve Holmes stat ed, Although the proclamation is in support of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, it should serve as a reminder to us that sexual crimes is something we need to combat all year long by liv ing our values and stepping up to stop sexual assault. While raising awareness is one of the primary tools in preventing sex ual assault, the Navy Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) pro gram also focuses on supporting victims. The Navy offers a variety of sup port services, including clinical coun seling and legal services. Each installation has a 24-hour SAPR victim advocate line. These numbers are advertised throughout the instal lations and may be dialed to ask ques tions, inquire about resources or report a sexual assault. In addition, each installation has a Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) located at the FFSC to ensure victims receive the support services they need. People may also contact the DoD Safe Helpline at 1-877-995-5247 or via http://www.safehelpline.org To find out more about the Navys SAPR program, contact your local FFSC or SARC, or visit https://g2.cnic.navy. mil/tscnrse/N00/CNRSE_SAPR_Team_ Site/default.aspx. By Yan KennonNH Jacksonville Public Affairs Senior WriterNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville recognizes April as Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM), focusing on awareness and prevention through a series of educational outreach from self-defense classes to a 5/10K run. The theme of the Department of Defenses (DoD) 10th awareness month is Live Our Values: Step Up to Stop Sexual Assault. The theme asks everyone to live the values every day, all year long step up by intervening when appropriate, reporting crimes and supporting victims. We all play a role in the fight against sexual assault with the commitment to eliminate it from our ranks, said Capt. Gayle Shaffer, NH Jacksonvilles commanding officer. We must first foster a professional command climate that encourages sexual assault victims to report these crimes, and hold perpetrators account able. If we work together, we can create a culture that does not tolerate sexual assault. Sexual assault is defined as any type of sexual contact or behavior that occurs without explicit consent. In 2013, DoD reissued its Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Strategic Plan to ensure the entire DoD worked together towards ending sexual assault. According to the U.S. Department of Justices National Crime Victimization Survey, an average of 237,868 sexual assaults occur each year about one every two minutes. Of these, two-thirds are committed by someone known to the victim. Sadly, about 60 percent of sexual assaults go unreported, making it one of the most under-reported crimes in the U.S. DoD tracks both unrestricted and restricted (the two reporting options) cases. Unrestricted cases are reported through the chain of command, while restricted reports are made confiden tially allowing sailors to get help without reporting it through their chains of command or law enforcement. According to the DoD Safe Helpline, there are many steps to reduce the risk. Common sense, situational awareness and trusting ones instincts are key. Other tips include: consume alcohol only in moderation; never leave bever ages unattended or accept a drink from an open container; communicate lim its and expectations clearly with oth ers; inform close friends when going on a date with a new person; walk only in lighted areas if its dark; have extra money to get home; and have a plan for someone to call for help. One of the most effective methods of preventing sexual assault is active bystander intervention. The three components to active bystander interven tion are: recognizing when to inter vene, considering whether the situation needs attention and deciding if there is a responsibility to act. The active bystander approach encourages people to identify situa tions that might lead to a sexual assault and then safely intervene to prevent an assault from occurring. Remember, everyone has the right to say no, even if they first say yes. The Navys SAPR Program is an ongoing effort to prevent and respond to sexual assault. Its goal is to eliminate sexual assault from the ranks, while preserving Navy mission readiness. Command SAPR program managers are responsible for ensuring all Navy employees military and civilian are properly trained. There is zero-tolerance for sexual assault in the Navy, said Lt. Hillary Sivik, NH Jacksonvilles SAPR program manager. There are a wide variety of resources available to help cope with any acts of sexual violence. We want to ensure victims that they will be taken care of, and encourage them to speak up. During April, NH Jacksonville will conduct command-wide train ing to build awareness. In addition, NH Jacksonville will combine efforts with NAS Jacksonvilles sexual assault response coordinator (SARC) on numerous base-wide sexual assault educa tional events. This years events will include a SAAM proclamation signing, health fair, self-defense classes, SAPR general military training (with SAPR victim advocates on-hand to answer questions) and a 5K/10K support run. Wrapping up this years SAAM activities, a Take Back the Night event will be held April 30 at NAS Jacksonvilles Patriots Grove. This nationally recog nized event is an avenue for people to take a stand and speak out against all forms of sexual violence. The event will feature music, poetry, educational information and a candlelight tribute to sexual assault survivors. SAPR is an important element of the readiness aspect of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative that con solidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combateffective force in the history of the Navy. Anyone in immediate danger should call 911 (in the U.S.). To report a sexu al assault, call the DoD Safe Helpline at 877-995-5247, NAS Jacksonville duty SAPR Victim Advocate at 904-910-9075, NAS Jacksonville SARC at 904-548-7789 or Naval Station Mayport SARC at 904548-8392. Williamson signs Child Abuse Prevention, Sexual Assault Awareness and Military Child proclamationsPhoto by MC1 Greg JohnsonRear Adm. Rick Williamson, Commander, Navy Region Southeast, signs proc lamations in support of Sexual Assault Awareness Month and The Month of the Military Child at Region Southeast headquarters aboard NAS Jacksonville.NH Jacksonville supports Sexual Assault Awareness MonthPhoto by Jacob Sippel Lt. Cmdr. Michelle Perkins (right), Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles sexual assault forensic examiner (SAFE) pro gram manager, discusses goals and objectives of the National Sexual Assault TeleNursing Center with Lt. Hillary Sivik (left), NH Jacksonvilles Sexual Assault Prevention and Reporting program manager and Lt. Christina Boensel, NH Jacksonvilles command liaison. The telenursing center is a pilot program designed to provide consultant services to support providers who perform sexual assault forensic examinations. April is Sexual Assault Prevention Month, and serves as a time to focus efforts on awareness and prevention of sexual violence. 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014

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By Barbie SmolinskiNMCRS Publicity AssistantRetired Senior Chief Storekeeper (SKCS) Gabriel Aviles of Crystal River, Fla., beamed March 20 as Jim Reid, relief services assistant for Navy Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) Jacksonville, presented him a decorated U.S. Navy dress blues uniform. Six months earlier, Aviles had contacted NMCRS with a special request. Advancing in years, Aviles wanted a uni form to be buried in to honor the many years he served in the Navy. Originally from Puerto Rico, Aviles served in the Navy from 1956 to 1988. His long career took him all over the world, most nota bly to the U.S. Embassy in the Dominican Republic, where he worked as a military advisor on three separate tours. In a strange occurrence, after more than 32 years of service, Aviles walked down the gang way of USS Glover (FF-1098) for the last time but no one had organized a formal retirement ceremony for him. In frustration and haste, he donated all of his naval uni forms to the NMCRS Norfolk branch soon after he left the service. As he got older, Aviles regretted giving away all of his uni forms. He initially contacted NMCRS Norfolk for assistance with obtaining a uniform, but was eventually referred to NMCRS Jacksonville, since it is the closest location to his home. Reid, a retired YNC, quick ly took an interest in Aviles request. This was definitely a unique case, but we try to help out in any way we can here at NMCRS, said Reid. Active duty or retired once a chief, always a chief. We are forever brothers. The mission to find Aviles a complete uniform became a labor of love for Reid and his team. We sent out a message to all of our thrift stores, said Reid. It took a while, but eventu ally it all came together. We got the jacket from Newport, Rhode Island. The trousers came from Kings Bay, Ga., and we found the cover right here in our own thrift store. Reid presented the final uniform to an overjoyed Aviles during a small ceremony at the NMCRS Jacksonville branch. I cant believe you were able to find the complete uniform, along with the SEA badge and ESWS pin. Aviles admired the uniform, that took him 32 years to earn, with pride and gratitude. I can only imagine the many hours of labor and research that went into the assembly of this uniform, he said. I promise I will honor your efforts until the day I die. Thanks for everything. NMCRS fulfills a very special requestPhoto by Barbie Smolinski(From left) NMCRS Relief Services Assistant Jim Reid presents retired SKCS Gabriel Aviles with a dress blues uniform to replace the one he discarded in 1988 after he retired. During his monthly Mayor's Base Commanders Meeting held March 27 at City Hall, Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown (center) and area base commanders shared lunch and some laughs. Around the table (from left) are NAS Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker, Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville Commander Capt. Tom Allan, Naval Station Mayport Commanding Officer Capt. Wess McCall, Brown, City of Jacksonville (COJ) Director of Military and Veterans Affairs Vic Guillory, Marine Corps Blount Island Command Deputy Commander Jim Hooks and COJ Deputy of Military and Veterans Affairs Harrison Conyers.City of Jacksonville Official photoMayor Brown hosts base commanders JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014 7

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By Earl BittnerNAVFAC Southeast Public AffairsNaval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus recog nized two of four employ ees March 20 for graduating from the NAVFAC Leadership Development Program (LDP). Al Sanderlin, senior business analyst/Lean Six Sigma Black Belt Process Improvement instructor, and Christopher Cimento, Public Works Department Kings Bay utilities branch head, recently completed the two-year program and were recognized by Kiwus with LDP Level 1 certificates of completion. I commend you on your dedication and commitment to the program, said Kiwus to the graduates. I have enjoyed speaking to both of you and look forward to seeing you continue to grow as leaders. I was elated to be select ed into the program, said Sanderlin. As I stopped and looked at some of the incred ible people we have that didnt make it in this time. It really gives you some perspective of what a privilege and honor is it to be accepted into the program and to graduate from it. Sanderlin said his goal is to now take the additional train ing and experience and to spread that to others, and help others to either get into the program, help them to better themselves, or just help them overcome obstacles in their job or life to make them successful. Its about being a lead er, continued Sanderlin. Leadership ability is not defined by position title alone, helping others, building your people skills, thats what will shape you into more of a lead er. My goals are to apply what I learned not only here at work, but equally outside of work too. This program has provided me with a very valuable insight into NAVFAC senior manage ment ideals, said Cimento. As I review the information and notes gathered over the past two years, I am genuinely sur prised at the sheer volume of material. The obligations of the program never seemed bur densome yet a considerable amount of formal and informal training was received. This structured leader ship training has improved my supervisory skill set, contin ued Cimento. I am grateful for the opportunity to improve my management and leadership skills by participating in the LDP program. Jeremy Thompson, dep uty public works officer at Public Works Department Key West, and Michael Chmura, Integrated Product Team (IPT) South Atlantic engineer, also completed the two-year LDP program but were unavail able to receive their certificates March 20. Their certificates will be presented at a later date. NAVFAC created the LDP to provide more robust devel opmental opportunities for its future civilian senior lead ers. The program is designed to provide leadership devel opment through progressive learning opportunities consist ing of formal education and training, rotational assign ments, and other developmen tal activities. Employees selected for the program are challenged to perform outside their sphere of influence and comfort zone. Annually, NAVFAC selects employees from around the corporation to be a part of the LDP program. Navy prepares black box locator for MH370 searchFrom U.S. 7th Fleet Public AffairsThe U.S. Navy is continuing efforts to search for missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370. As a precautionary measure in case a debris field is located, U.S. Pacific Command has ordered U.S. Pacific Fleet to move a black box locator into the region, March 24. If a debris field is confirmed, The Navys Towed Pinger Locator 25 will add a significant advantage in locating the missing Malaysian aircrafts black box. The TPL-25 Towed Pinger Locator System is able to locate black boxes on downed Navy and commercial aircraft down to a maximum depth of 20,000 feet anywhere in the world. Commercial aircraft pingers are mounted directly on the flight recorder, the recovery of which is critical to an accident investi gation. The Pinger Locator is towed behind a vessel at slow speeds, generally 1-5 knots, depending on the depth. The tow array carries a passive listening device for detecting pingers that automatically transmit an acoustic pulse. In the event a debris field is locat ed, were moving some specialized locator equipment into the area. The Towed Pinger Locator has some high ly sensitive listening capability so that if the wreck site is located, we can hear the black box pinger down to a depth of about 20,000 feet. Basically, this super-sensitive hydrophone gets towed behind a commercial vessel very slowly and listens for black box pings, said Cmdr. Chris Budde, U.S. 7th Fleet Operations Officer. This movement is simply a prudent effort to preposition equipment and trained personnel closer to the search area so that if debris is found we will be able to respond as quickly as possible since the battery life of the black boxs pinger is limited, said Budde. If found, the acoustic signal of the pinger is transmitted up the cable and is presented audibly, and can be out put to either an oscilloscope or a sig nal processing computer. The operator monitors the greatest signal strength and records the navigation coordinates. This procedure is repeated on multiple track lines until the final position is triangulated. The system consists of the tow fish, tow cable, winch, hydraulic power unit, generator, and topside control console. Most pingers transmit every second at 37.5 kHz, although the TPL can detect any pinger transmitting between 3.5 kHz and 50 kHz at any repetition rate. By MC2(AW) Doug WojciechowskiVP-5 Public AffairsDuring their frenetic InterDeployment Readiness Cycle, the Mad Foxes of VP-5 have qualified patrol plane commanders, tactical coordina tors, acoustic aviation warfare opera tors, and electronic warfare operators. On March 18, the Mad Foxes gathered in Hangar 511 to witness yet another event added to VP-5s distinguished history AWO2 Andrew OBrien received his Wings of Gold in a surprise pin ning ceremony. It was an awesome surprise to see my wife, kids, and entire squadron waiting for me in the hangar bay after my flight, said OBrien. There was no better way to get my wings pinned on than by my wife in front of all of my Mad Fox family. While there have been two other VP-5 naval aircrewman who complet ed qualifications to earn their Acoustic Aviation Warfare Operator designation since OBriens pinning, his designation is especially important to VP-5 and the entire U.S. Navy Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force. OBrien is the first naval aircrewman to complete the entire P-8A Poseidon Naval Aircrewman Acoustic Operator training pipeline starting from boot camp, through various service schools, and eventually completion of squadronbased personal qualification standards. OBrien enlisted in the Delayed Entry Program in January 2011 and reported to Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Ill., in November 2011. Upon graduation, OBrien reported to Naval Air Station Pensacola in January 2012 for Naval Aircrew Candidate School (NACCS) and Naval Aircrewman Operator A School. In addition to his training in Pensacola, he completed Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape (SERE) training in Portsmouth, N.H. He then reported to VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville and completed the P-8A CAT I Acoustic Aviation Warfare Operator Course. Upon completion of two and a half years of training, he received orders to the Mad Foxes where he has set the bar high for qualification standards. Earning the Level 300 Sensor Station One qualification in just nine months is an amazing feat, AWOC Kim Darling, VP-5s NATOPS Department leading chief petty officer. Not many, very few actually, earn their qualification that quickly, displaying the sharp knowl edge demonstrated by Petty Officer OBrien. OBrien currently works as a VP-5 Operations Department schedule writer and will assist the upgrading operators to earn their qualifications. VP-5 is currently nine months into its Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle and is preparing for its first P-8A Poseidon deployment to the 7th Fleet Area of Responsibility. Four graduate from leadership development programPhotos by Sue BrinkNaval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus (right) stands with Alfred Sanderlin March 20 after presenting him with a certificate of completion for the Level I Leadership Development Program (LDP). Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus (right) stands with Christopher Cimento, after presenting him with a certificate of completion for the Level I Leadership Development Program (LDP). Mad Fox achieves acoustic qualifications in record timePhoto by MC2 Doug WojciechowskiAWO2 Andrew O'Brien shares a smile with his wife, Ashlee, after she pinned on his naval aircrewman "Wings of Gold" for which he earned Level 300 Sensor Station One qualification in just nine months. U.S. Navy file photoThe TPL-25 System is used for locat ing emergency relocation pingers on downed Navy and commercial aircraft down to a maximum depth of 20,000 feet anywhere in the world. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014

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by sending small groups of RAF personnel to other countries with established maritime patrol capabili ties including the U.S., New Zealand and Canada, said Bull. He, along with Flight Lt. Rob Butler, Master Air Crew (MAcr) Keith Treece and MAcr Mark Cutting, are P-8A instructors attached to VP-30. BRITISH VISITFrom Page 1 At the conclusion of his tour at VP-30 aboard NAS Jacksonville, UK Secretary of State for Defence, the Right Honourable Philip Hammond received a commemorative P-8A Poseidon plaque for his office in England. Inside a crowded P-3C Orion, Lt. Robert Dibbern of VP-30 talks about the aircraft's navigation and communications workstation with UK Secretary of State for Defence, the Right Honourable Philip Hammond.Photos by Clark PierceNAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander welcomed the United Kingdom Secretary of State for Defence, the Right Honourable Philip Hammond (right), and his official party on March 27 at Air Operations. (From left) Director, Strategic Systems Programs Vice Adm. Terry Benedict, UK Secretary of State for Defence Philip Hammond, and Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group Rear Adm. Matthew Carter discuss the strategic significance of maritime patrol aircraft prior to a March 27 briefing at the P-8A Integrated Training Center. (From left) VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Curtis Philips explains features of the instructor's station inside a P-8A Operational Flight Trainer, as RAF Squadron Leader Andy Bull looks on. (From left) AWO1 Matthew Pradon of VP-30 answers questions about the P-3C Orion radar station to Royal Navy Capt. John StanleyWhyte. Outside the P-8A weapons tactics trainer, VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Curtis Philips shows how instructors simulate anti-submarine warfare scenarios to test operators at detection and weapons stations. Vice Adm. Terry Benedict, director of the Navys Strategic Systems Programs, took some time to check out an anti-submarine warfare workstation on board a P-8A Poseidon multi-mission aircraft. As visitors take a look inside the P-8A Weapons Tactics Trainer, AWO3 Alexis Laszlo (right) checks her radar monitor during a simulated anti-submarine warfare mission. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014 9

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them to the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC) at Andros Island, Bahamas in January to support Combat Sea Systems Qualification Training (CSSQT) for guided-missile cruiser USS Normandy (CG 60). The Highlanders provided a wide variety of sup port, from range clearance to medical evacuation. The hallmark of the exercise was the employment of antisubmarine warfare (ASW) tactics against an under water target resulting in a successful MK-54 torpedo engagement. This event also allowed Normandy to successfully optimize and troubleshoot their recently upgraded acoustic and data link systems to ensure full functionality for future tasking with MH-60R helicopters. Following their successful participation in CSSQT, the Highlanders remained on Andros Island to com plete HSM-72s first Helicopter Advanced Readiness Program (HARP). This gave the aircrew and main tainers of Det. 1 the invaluable opportunity to both plan and execute more than 50 flight hours of tactical training missions against realistic surface, subsur face, and land-based threat systems, while accurately directing the employment of four MK-54 torpedoes, three Hellfire missiles, and more than 5,000 rounds of .50cal and 7.62mm ammunition. Det.1 also conducted coordinated ASW operations in mixed-aircraft sections alongside HSL-48s Det.1 operating the SH-60B Seahawk. HARP culminated for the Highlanders in a full-spectrum warfare scenario in which three MH-60Rs were employed simulta neously to protect a High Value Unit in a simulated restricted waters transit. OIC Harvey said of the Highlanders superior performance, I couldnt be more proud of their dedication to mission excellence! The team truly came together to employ ordnance on target, on time. Upon returning to NAS Jacksonville, Det.1 set sail with Hu City to complete Initial Ship Aviation Team Training (ISATT). This was to show that both units could be deployed as one asset. The union also established a strong foundation for future HSM-72 opera tions with Hu City. ISATT complete, Hu City steamed north with the Highlanders on board to take part in an Independent Deployer Certification Exercise (IDCERTEX) in which seven U.S. warships demonstrated their proficiency in the employment of ASW and Surface Warfare (SuW) tactics. With Det.1 having recently honed their own ASW/SuW skills at AUTEC, they provided a strong asset for both mission areas, and again took full advantage of a valuable opportunity for realistic coordinated warfare training. This time, in concert with surface ships and landbased maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft, the Highlanders protected against actual submarine targets. Det.1 showed off their impressive capabili ties of the MH-60R yet again, logging over six hours of ASW contact time with multiple active and passive sensors. In between successful strait-transit exercises, the Highlanders were also able to step forward to assist the surface group and fulfill a critical need for logis tics support, executing over 20 passenger and cargo transfers that allowed for maximum flexibility of exercise participants and evaluators from Commander, Strike Force Training Atlantic and Naval Mine and Air Warfare Center. Following the completion of IDCERTEX, Det.1 returned home to NAS Jacksonville to complete final deployment preparations. Having been tested early and often, the Highlanders are excited to write the first chapter in HSM-72s seagoing history and continue to demonstrate the pride and professionalism that mark its reputation. HSM-72From Page 1ness and reliability, the P-8A represents a leap forward for the Navys maritime patrol and reconnais sance community. The aircraft has a maximum speed of 490 knots, a ceiling of 41,000 feet, and provides a range of more than 1,200 nautical miles with four hours on station. For a mission such as the MH370 search, the P-8 will typically fly at 5,000 feet at 350 knots, dropping to 1,000 feet to get a visual identifica tion of any radar returns. It may also fly at 1,000 feet for an extended period of the flight, depending on the environment and mission for the flight. It has a search time of approximately eight, nine hours depending on distance to search area, though during this mission the search time on station is greatly reduced due to the distance of the search area from Perth. The new P-8A is part of the Navys commitment to the Pacific rebalance, bringing newer and more capable aircraft to 7th Fleet to ensure the Navy is best postured to honor its security commitments to the Indo-Asia-Pacific and contrib ute to regional security and stabil ity. The VP-16 War Eagles are home based at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. Photo by AE2(AW) Samantha Jones Awards QuartersThe following outstanding Sailors were presented awards on March 28 during an All Hands Quarters by NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander: (bottom row from left) AB2 Christopher Adamson, OS3 Samuel Polanco, AO3 Devanae Bradley, (middle row from left) AC1 Nicholas Done, AC1 Matthew Hubbell, AWV3 Tyler Hoepker, (top row from left) AC1 Omowale Browne and MA3 Stephan Moore II. VP-16 SEARCHFrom Page 1 Photo by MC2 Eric PastorElectronic warfare operators attached to VP-16 watch the exterior of a P-8A Poseidon during a highfrequency radio check. 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014

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By AWFCS(NAC/SCW) Mike WendelinVR-62 Public AffairsA detachment from the VR-62 NomadsdepartedNAS Jacksonville last weekfor their nor mal logistics rotation in U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM). After knocking out their first FY-14 detachment in U.S. Pacific Command last December, and com pleting their change of command in March, the Nomads are ready to support CTF-53 in Bahrain. New skipper Cmdr. B.T. Smith was ready to get on the road. We have one detach ment down and two to go for fiscal 2014. Our Nomads are more than ready to get back to CENTCOM and support the carrierstrike group along with and any other logistics needs required by CTF-53. The Nomads provide high-priority, in-theater airlift services and report to CTF-53 for tasking. The squadron deploys with just 21 aircrew and maintainers to support a multitude of transport requests while operating inCENTCOM for the next 90 days. The C-130T Hercules is just a great platform for providing logisti cal support in Central Command. We are part of a very important sup ply chain supporting the CENTCOM AOR in many different ways, said Nomad Operations Officer Lt. Cmdr. Mariusz Drozdzowski. VR-62 is a Navy Reserve squadron that operates four of the Navys C-130T Hercules aircraft from its home base at NAS Jacksonville. Call 778-9772 for more information facebook.com/nasjaxmwr Month of the Military Child CARNIVAL April 12, 11 a.m. 2 p.m.FREE ADMISSION! Bounce houses, Activites and Games!Allegheny Softball Field AWF3 Austin Toynton directs a K-loader driver to add more cargo for the VR-62 detachment to CENTCOM in Bahrain. Squadron cargo goes out on a K-loader to the C-130T Hercules aircraft staged on the the tarmac of NAS Jacksonville.Photos courtesy of VR-62Nomads deploy to U.S. Central CommandAWF2 Anthony Nesbit adjusts tiedown chains on the VR-62 "Nomads" Goat utility vehicle. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014 11

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By Clark PierceEditorAlmost 100 children from the kin dergarten classes at John Stockton Elementary School in Jacksonville enjoyed a field trip to the Black Point Interpretive Center March 27 aboard NAS Jacksonville. Natural Resources Manager Christine Bauer and Assistant Natural Resources Manager Angela Glass recruited vol unteers to properly manage the large group of young learners. Lt. Hanayo Arimoto, Lt. Jen Wright and James Harwood volunteered from the Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE), in addition to Teri Wanamaker, a vbolunteer and the spouse of NAS Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker. Were splitting the children into three groups with 30-minute rotations at each learning station, said Glass. Wanamakers demonstration was all about camouflage and how it applies to nature. Activities included searching the outdoors for camouflaged items. They also learned about the Sphinx moth and its natural camouflage sys tem. At the NECE learning station, Wright and her team talked about the basic biology of insects. We brought along some butterfly nets so the children can learn how to catch bugs by going on an insect scav enger hunt, said Wright. I also brought along a non-poisonous corn snake that the children can touch. Inside the nature center, Bauer took kindergartners on a tour of aquariums and terrariums filled with fish, amphibians and reptiles including the Florida box turtle and a corn snake. VP-8 takes top prize in a Bahrain cook-offBy MC2 Clay WhaleyVP-8 Public AffairsFive judges, pre-determined ingredi ents and five teams hungry for victory set the stage March 18 for the 2014 Isa Air Base Bahrain Cook-off. Eight VP-8 Fighting Tigers took a break from their daily routines, donned their chef hats and competed to cre ate the most delicious grilled cuisine in Bahrain. It was a beautiful morning the sun was shining, the sky was blue and a cool breeze gave relief from the hot temper ature but not all was so perfect. At the cook-off, tension filled the air as the judges silently sampled each of the dishes and marked their score sheets. Each team watched in suspense, read ing the faces of each judge. The judg es remained silent and stoic, until one of them tried the Pineapple Glazed Chicken Churrasco and the word delicious slipped from his mouth. At that point, the Fighting Tigers knew they had a fighting chance to win the competition. After two hours of teamwork, cre ativity and sheer determination to win, VP-8 arose victorious as Bahrain Cookoff champions. When the final scores were tallied, the VP-8 team was called to receive accolades as the victors. They held their spatula trophy high and proud, knowing that they had created the most delicious meal in Bahrain. The galley did a great job in pro viding us this amazing opportunity to break from our busy schedules and have some fun with food, said VP-8s AWO1 Jared The Grill Master Larsen. Everyone who participated had a great time, and I think anytime you can get a taste of home, it makes you feel much better, he added. After the competition, a base-wide grill-out was hosted, providing every one the opportunity to enjoy delicious food and the company of shipmates. VP-8 is currently deployed to the United States Navys 4th and 5th Fleet Areas of Responsibility, conducting Maritime Security Operations, supporting Operation Enduring Freedom and counter transnational organized crime missions. Photos by MC2 Clay Whaley Sailors assigned to the Fighting Tigers of Patrol Squadron (VP) 8 display their 2014 Isa Air Base Bahrain Cook-off spatula trophy after winning the base-wide competition hosted by the galley in Bahrain. (From left) AWO1 Jared, The Grill Master Larsen and AWF2 Larry, Team Leading Tosten, spread pineapple onto Glazed Chicken Churrasco dur ing the March 18 Isa Air Base Bahrain Cook-off. VP-8 is currently deployed to the Navys 4th and 5th Fleet Areas of Responsibility. Photos by Clark Pierce(Right) NAS Jax Natural Resources Manager Christine Bauer presents a Florida box turtle to inquisitive students from John Stockton Elementary School. Learning is natural for kindergartnersVolunteer Teri Wanamaker leads a group of kindergartners in a natural camouflage exercise. Lt. Jen Wright, from the Navy Entomology Center of Excellence, dis played a corn snake that children could safely touch. 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014

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By MC1(SW/EXW/AW) Joshua Bryce BrunsCommander, U.S. Naval Forces Korea Public AffairsThe U.S. Navys P-8A Poseidon maritime patrol air craft conducted its first train ing missions in the Republic of Korea (ROK) March 27-31 in support of exercise Foal Eagle 2014. During the combined U.S. and ROK armed forces train ing events, flight crew mem bers from Patrol Squadron (VP) 16 operated with P-3C Orion maritime patrol crews from the ROK navy. The exercise gave the pilots, mission planners and flight crews from both the U.S. and ROK navies the opportunity to train together and exchange ideas and concepts. This was a great opportu nity to strengthen relation ships and show what opera tional capabilities this aircraft brings to the Pacific and to our allies, said Lt. Cmdr. Dwight Brungard, the P-8A mission commander. Everyone was discussing the similarities and differences between the P-8 and the P-3 and how we can operate effi ciently in the operational environment. Its so important for us to understand each other and continue to work seam lessly together. Exercise Foal Eagle in an umbrella of regularly sched uled, annual exercises between U.S. and ROK armed forces in 7th Fleet. The naval portion of these bi-lateral exercises test skills in a variety of warfare disciplines including maritime patrol. We are excited to have the P-8A Poseidon performing its first missions in Korea as a part of Foal Eagle 2014, said Rear Adm. Lisa Franchetti, com mander, U.S. Naval Forces Korea. The presence of this mod ern and dynamic aircraft operating with our Korean coun terparts further demonstrates the U.S. Navys commitment to our alliance with the Republic of Korea and represents the physical manifestations of our rebalance to the Pacific. The P-8A Poseidon is designed with the latest avion ics and onboard systems mak ing it one of the most advanced anti-submarine and anti-sur face warfare aircraft in the world. Six P-8A aircraft are cur rently deployed in support of the U.S. 7th Fleet conducting maritime stability, patrol, and search operations throughout the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live entertainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaokeFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: April 19, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: April 26, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 9th Annual Captain Chuck Cornett Navy Run April 5 at 8 a.m. Register race day 6:30 7:45 a.m. NEX Convenience Store Parking Lot Learn to Swim 2014 Registration is open May 10 June 2 Register at the base gym $40 military, $45 DOD Session I: June 9 19 Session II: July 7 17 Session III: July 21 31I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_mwritt@navy.mil. ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Daytona International Speedway Coke Zero 400 Daytona Lagoon $19 waterpark Alhambra Dinner show $38 $50.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Jacksonville Suns $5.50 $11.50 Jacksonville Zoo $8.50 $17 Rivership Romance (includes dinner) $40$57.75 Funk Fest 2 Day Ticket $62 Motley Crew Concert Club seats $63.50 Wild Adventures $30 $70 while supplies last Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27, 2014) $166 $194.50 Discover Disney Ticket Florida Resident Ticket Valid for sale through APRIL 12, 2014 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 THE ARTIST SERIES-BROADWAY IN JACKSONVILLE 2014 SEASON Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation $349-$369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St Augustine $4.25 $15.50 St Augustine Alligator Farm Nile Zipline $35.25 (free admission with reservation) St Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Half Hour Boggy Creek Airboat Rides $15.50 $20 Wild Florida Airboats (Kenansville, FL) $18 $46.75 Florida Ecosafaris $22.75 $52.75 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld Hotel properties, Universal Hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. One Spark Festival Trip April 12 at noon Paintball Trip GTF in Yulee April 19 at 9 a.m. Jacksonville Suns Game April 22 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty April 8 & 22 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests April 10 & 24 Mondays & Tuesdays Play 18-holes for $20, includes cart and green fees Not applicable on holidays Daily Special Play 18 holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. Command Party Swing into savings & book your command golf tournamentMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Month of the Military Family Carnival April 12, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Allegheny Softball Field Easter Egg Hunt April 16, 7 p.m. McCaffrey Softball ComplexFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Learn to fly at NAS Jax Call for introduction flightAdditional ratings are available including instrument, complex and commercialFind more info. online at jaxnfc.net From MWR MarketingNAS Jacksonville Freedom Lanes hosted the 2014 Teen Masters Bowling qualifier March 29 30. The qualifier featured a Boys and Girls Under-14 Division and a Boys and Girls High School Division. The event offered an opportu nity for young bowlers to qualify to compete in the 2014 Teen Masters National finals to be held in Fort Lauderdale, June 30-July 6. Bowlers will then compete for a $64,000 college scholarship, along with many other scholarship opportunities. These young bowlers are not bowling on the oil patterns that most league bowlers bowl on. They are bowling on one short and one long sport pattern developed specifically for the teen masters qualifier, said John Duncan, manager of Freedom Lanes. The added, teen bowlers mak ing it to Fort Lauderdale will all bowl with identical plastic and urethane bowling balls designed to allow the skill of the bowler rather than the equipment to play the large part in determining the champion. The volume of oil for the National finals has also been reduced in order to allow these bowlers to show their bowling skills. Boys High School Qualifiers: (1st) Donald Atwood Jr. of Callahan; (2nd) Jacob Bassell of Jacksonville. Girls High School Qualifier: (1st) Ember Miksa of Winter Springs.Sand Volleyball League forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. Commands and required paperwork. Play begins in April. The tournament is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractor women assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants will earn participation points for their command toward the third. Greybeard Softball League Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractor personnel age 30 and older who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play on Tuesday & Thursday at 11:30 a.m. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Play begins in April. Intramural Softball League Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 5422930 for rules and required paperwork. Play begins in April. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians; DoD contractors; retirees; and dependents over 18. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Play begins in April. Kickball League Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. Game play at lunch time. Contact the NAS Jacksonville Sports Department at 542-2930 for rules and the required paperwork. Open to active duty, retirees, dependents over 18, selective reservists, DoD civilians and contractors. The tournament starts at 5 p.m. at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts on the corner of Allegheny Road and Birmingham Road. Call 542-2930 to sign up by April 25. Intramural Golf Summer League Meeting May 7 Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. Meet at 11:30 a.m. at the golf course. Commands and required paperwork. Intramural Basketball League Meeting May 14 Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. Meet at noon at points, along with rules and required paperwork. Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Meet at noon at points, along with rules and required paperwork. Badminton Singles League Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS or designated representative attend P-8A Poseidon performs first missions in Korea Teen Masters take over Freedom LanesPhotos by Shannon Leonard Sixteen-year-old Jameson Tarrant warms up during practice time before the 2014 Teen Masters Qualification began on March 29 at NAS Jax Freedom Lanes. Teen Masters Bowling Qualifier participants. See SPORTS, Page 17 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014 13

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14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014 Munitions spill drillBy AE2(AW) Samantha JonesStaff WriterNavy Munitions Command (NMC) Jacksonville conducted an OTTO Fuel II drill March 27 to fulfill their semiannual requirement however, the scenario of this drill was different from any other spill drill previously conducted onboard NAS Jax. What made this drill different was the location of the spill and the manner in which the spill occurred. In this instance, GM3 Eric Edwards was attempting to use a forklift to move a 55-gallon drum of OTTO Fuel II. The sailor accidentally punctured the drum causing a HAZMAT leak that con taminated the clothing of GM3 Jihad Littlejohn and GMSN Richard London, the two Sailors who were safety observers for the forklift evolution. NMC Jax Sailors responded swiftly and appropriately by notifying base security and the NAS Jax First Coast Fire and Emergency Services. The area was immediately secured and a spill kit was used to prevent the OTTO Fuel II from spreading and causing further contamination. The two contaminated sailors ran over to the eye wash station where they began the decontamination process by rinsing off their clothes while they waited for their shipmates to bring out the decontamination pool. Upon their quick arrival, GM2 Timothy McIntyre and GM3 Benjamin Parrish quickly and properly executed the primary decon tamination phase. The NAS Jax First Coast Fire and Emergency Services, as well as paramedics, arrived on the scene within minutes to perform a second decontamination on the exposed Sailors. Any amount over two quarts is con sidered a major OTTO Fuel II spill. We must preform these drills so that we can be aware of and properly carry out the pre-planned responses, said GMC Isiah Pinckney, the facilitator of the drill. I believe the drill went very well. The Sailors did an outstanding job with communications. Nas Jax Training Officer Jim Butters was responsible for the coordination between NMC Jacksonville and NAS Jax first responders. The variation in the drill location and cause of the spill brought some new elements into the response by NAS Jax First Coast Fire and Emergency Services, as well as the cleanup by NAS Jax Environmental Department and FLUOR. Otto Fuel II is a distinct-smelling, reddish-orange, oily liquid that the U.S. Navy uses as a fuel for torpedoes and other weapon systems. Headaches are the most common effects from overex posure. USO golf fundraiserBy Bob RossGreater Jacksonville Area USOThe 3rd Annual USO Memorial Golf Championship was held aboard NAS Jacksonville on March 21. The Troops Championship hosted 128 golfers, half of whom were active duty service members from each branch of our armed forces all sponsored by anonymous donors. The weather was fantastic, the golf course in perfect shape and everyone enjoyed a great day. 1st Place: Ion Revak, Troy Laliberte, Travis Page and Trevic McAfee. 2nd Place: Charlie Moore, Rusty Cain, Patrick Pennell and Matt Wentzel. 3rd Place: Bill Herbert, Apollo Reelerson, John Corher and Jeff Kearns. Special thanks go to Title Sponsor, Siemens Industry; Silver Sponsor, W.W. Gay Mechanical Contractor; as well as Bronze Sponsors, Clear Payment Solutions, Grand Canyon University, Miller Electric, Patriot Sales and Monster Energy Drinks for their gener ous support and sponsorship of USO active duty troops and families. Photos by Shannon Leonard Children play in their spe cial area of the Family Fitness Center March 26 while their parents are working out. The center is open Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. and is located above the Youth Activities Center (YAC) gym. Call 778-9772 for more info. (Left) Casey Chevalier participates in the circuit training group exercise class March 25 at the Family Fitness Center located above the YAC gym. Circuit training is offered Monday Friday, 9:30 10:30 a.m. by a certified trainer. For more info call 778-9772.YAC Family Fitness Center Photo by AE2(AW) Samantha Jones Participants of the 3rd Annual USO Memorial Golf Championship stand at attention as the national anthem is performed by Navy Band Southeast during the tournament's opening ceremony. Photo courtesy of USO(From left) CM3 Adam Brown, BU1 Chad Josi, BU2 Nicholas Garand and EA2 Henry Andermann of Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CMBU) 202, NAS Jacksonville enjoyed a round of golf at The Troops Championship held aboard NAS Jacksonville on March 21. Photos by AE2(AW) Samantha JonesJim Butters (center), NAS Jax training officer, conducts a safety brief with Navy Munitions Command Jacksonville personnel prior to the onset of the spill drill conducted on March 27. NAS Jax First Coast Fire and Emergency Services arrives on scene and prepares to conduct the second decontaination of the contaminated Sailors. (From right) GM3 Jihad Pettyjohn, GMSN Richard London, and Work Leader Wade Martin safety observe as GM3 Eric Edwards simulates punctur ing a 55-gallon drum of OTTO Fuel II while operating a forklift. GM3 Eric Edwards and Work Leader Wade Martin use a spill kit to establish a liquid containment barrier in order to prevent the spilled Otto Fuel II from causing further contamination. (From left) Contaminated Sailors GMSN Richard London and GM3 Jihad Littlejohn use the eye wash station to rinse off the OTTO Fuel II. GM2 Timothy McIntyre (center left) and GM3 Benjamin Parrish (right) perform primary decontamination on GMSN Richard London. The two contaminated sailors (center) stand on barrier paper to prevent fur ther contamination as they await the arrival of the NAS Jax fire department and medical responders. Firefighter Chris Hicks (left) and Capt. Fred Chambers (right) of the NAS Jax First Coast Fire and Emergency Services simulate the second decon tamination of the Sailors.

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Celebrating Freedom February By Lt. Cmdr. John DzialoskiVP-26 CSOPresident Barack Obama issued a proclamation, designating January 2013 as National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month, with it culmi nating in the celebration of National Freedom Day on Feb. 1. The president called upon the people of the United States to recognize the vital role we can play in ending modern slavery and to observe this month with appropriate programs and activities. CPRW-11 answered the presidents call by partici pating in the 2nd Annual Freedom February Campaign a VP-26 initiative designed to support local organi zations whose mission is to support the freedom of others. The VP-26 Tridents joined forces with more than 100 volunteers from VP-10, VP-45, Lake Asbury Middle School, Oakleaf High School, the Bannerman Learning Center, and the Church at Argyle Youth Group. More than 750 volunteer service hours were donated to K9s for Warriors, Rethreaded, S.A.F.E. Pet Rescue, and the City Rescue Mission. We were able to exceed our Freedom February goals and support these amazing organizations because of the team effort put forth by Wing-11 and our local youth, said VP-26 Tridents Command Services Officer Lt. Cmdr. John Dzialoski. K9s for Warriors is dedicated to providing rescued canines to service members suffering from post-traumatic stress syndrome (PTSS) as a result of conflicts after 9/11. They help warriors return to civilian life with dignity and independence by pairing, training and graduating K9/warrior teams. Each warrior completes approximately 120 hours of training and takes a written test and two practi cal tests with their K9 teammate. This year, K9s for Warriors has partnered with S.A.F.E. Pet Rescue and is striving to graduate 50 K9/warrior teams from their program. Volunteers fed, walked, and acclimated service dogs; conducted grounds upkeep, and met with wounded warriors. These efforts will aid K9s for Warriors in their mission to serve those who have sacrificed much in the fight for freedom around the world. Rethreaded provides assistance to individuals who have been denied freedom as victims of human traf fickers. Human trafficking is a multi-billion dol lar industry founded on the exploitation of vulner able members of society, mostly women and children. Rethreaded is dedicated to assisting victims of Human Trafficking by fostering a life-giving community. Their vision is to unravel the effects of the sex trade by fighting business with business on a global and local level; as they strive to provide safe, viable, and dignity-giving work to survivors of the sex trade. One of Rethreadeds 2014 goal is to employ seven survivors of human trafficking. In order to do so, they accept donations of clean, new or used, cotton T-shirts, which are then upcy cled and sewn into garments and other resalable items. In an effort to assist Rethreaded in reaching their goal, Team Trident conducted a T-shirt drive during February. As a result, Wing-11 and local youth responded by donating 5,126 shirts to support the fight against human trafficking. To learn more about K9s for Warriors, Rethreaded, S.A.F.E. Pet Rescue, and the City Rescue Mission visit them online at: http://www.k9sforwarriors.org http://www.rethreaded.com http://www.safe-petrescue-fl.com or http://www.crmjax.org CNRSE Sailors, Civilians volunteer at Habitat for Humanity JacksonvilleBy MC1(SW) Greg JohnsonNavy Region Southeast Public AffairsSailors and civilians from Commander Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) participated in a Habitat for Humanity (H4H) construction project March 26. During the project, volunteers helped excavate soil in preparation for a new sidewalk outside the organizations north-side offices and warehouse. According to Angie Leatherbury, operations director with H4H Jacksonville, the volunteer effort helped strengthen an already firm relationship between the Navy and the local community. The Navy has contributed hundreds of hours of time to HabiJax (Habitat for Humanity Jacksonville), both on the construction site and at our restore facility, she said. For those who vol unteered their time today, I would just like to say thank you for your time and commitment to HabiJax and we hope that your volunteer experience was very rewarding. We cannot thank our volunteers enough for their contributions. H4Hs mission is to build affordable housing for low-income families and individuals. Those who receive homes from the program work alongside vol unteers under trained supervision to build their home. Upon completion, H4H grants them a no-interest mort gage for the value of the home, mak ing monthly payments affordable for those who cannot afford a traditional mortgage payment. The organization built more than1,800 homes last year in Jacksonville alone. Its an organization that has a very positive impact on the local community and I think thats why our Sailors and civilians are always so excited to vol unteer here, said Twilla Smith, Navy Region Southeast community service program coordinator. This kind of an event gives them an opportunity to get out and do something physically active and have an impact on the community at the same time. During the effort, Sailors and civil ians removed approximately a ton of earth from a 30-yard strip in prepara tion for the sidewalk. In addition, they used sledge hammers to remove the remains of an older piece of sidewalk within the same area. It was hard work, but it was really worth it, said YN1 (SS) Serge Kabanda, who volunteered for the event. As members of the military, we are very fortunate to not have to worry about a lot of things that many others do, so it feels good to be able to get out and contribute to an organization that is proactive in improving peoples lives. While the volunteer group did not have the opportunity to directly help build a home during the event, Leatherbury said the volunteers should take a lot of pride in their efforts. Given that our home buyers are required to complete a minimum of 300 volunteer hours, or sweat equity, before they can purchase their home through HabiJax, they understand and greatly appreciate the commitment and time that community volunteers like Navy Sailors contribute, whether that time is put in at a construction site or helping out here at our warehouse, she said. Photos courtesy of VP-26AWO1 Kyle Huey and AWO2 Micheal Crawford, of VP-26, help organize the Rethreaded warehouse in downtown Jacksonville in support of the annual Freedom February Campaign. (From right) AWO2(NAC) Michael Crawford, AWO2(NAC/AW) George Munoz and ADAN Phillip Shaw of VP-26 and AN Larry Sutton of VP-45 deliver 5,126 T-shirts to the Rethreaded warehouse in support National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month. AWO2 Kristin Depouw of VP-10 volunteers her landscaping skills at the K9s for Warriors facility in Ponte Vedra during the Freedom February Campaign. Joerick Ortiz-Crespo helps wash one of the res cued service dogs at the K-9's for Warriors facility in Ponte Vedra, during the annual Freedom February Campaign supported by squadrons of CPRW-11. IT1(SW) Paul Voigt (left) and YN1(SW) John Felizpolanco dig a trench March 26 in preparation for the construction of a sidewalk.Photos by MC1 Greg Johnson JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014 By MC1 Elliott FabrizioThe Chief of Naval Personnel (CNP) talked with Sailors around the world in an All Hands Call, broadcast from the Defense Media Activity at Ft. Meade, Md., March 5. Vice Adm. Bill Moran, CNP, and Fleet Master Chief for Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education (MPT&E) April Beldo, updat ed Sailors on Navy subjects including pay, the Career Intermission Pilot Program (CIPP), advancement and Tuition Assistance (TA). Fleet and I are always interested in hearing what Sailors are hearing in the Fleet and what questions they have, said Moran. This gives us the oppor tunity to give them the right information and beat back any bad information that is circu lating. Sailors asked live questions via satellite, telephone and social media. The Secretary of the Navy approved raises to Career Sea Pay allowance and a Sailor from San Diego asked via satellite when the increases would show up in Sailors paychecks. We think within the next 60 days were going to start improving the pay of anybody on Career Sea Pay today, said Moran. Via telephone, a Sailor from USS Harpers Ferry (LSD 49) asked if the Navy had plans to fully adopt the Career Intermission Pilot Program. The answer is absolutely, said Moran. The results weve gotten from this program have been very positive. People have been able to go out and get a college degree, start a family, or start another job and have come back into the Navy and picked up right where they left off. He added that the Navy is seeking congressional permis sion next year to remove the pilot moniker and institutionalize it across the Navy. Sailors aware of plans to change the advancement pro cess had several questions about the details, such as removing the point value of Good Conduct Medals and the timeline. The things that we are focusing on is evaluations, performance and the advancement score, said Beldo. Right now we are not changing the points you are given for awards. Moran added, Theres a lot being talked about and dis cussed with advancement exams and I think its impor tant for Sailors to know that while were talking about it, nothing is being implemented in this March cycle. Its more likely to be a year from now that youll see these changes take place, and we will com municate that to all of you. From in-studio, a Sailor had a question about the TA pro gram. The Navy has been 100 percent on TA for the longest time, and even when the other branches of service dropped TA, the Navy kept it at 100 percent; but, Ive heard talk of them possibly going down to 75 percent-Have you heard any thing about that? asked Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Xander Gamble. TA is funded at 100 percent through fiscal year 2014, but Beldo confirmed that Navy TA may see a 25 percent contribution from Sailors in the next fiscal year. We believe if there is an investment in there from the Sailor, they will be more com mitted, said Beldo. I think it will still be a good deal for Sailors. CNP also busted several rumors that Sailors had heard in the fleet. He said there are no plans to increase the length of boot camp, the Navy is not eliminating the Command Advancement Program (CAP) and there are no current plans to add advancement points for warfare pins or fitness exams. More questions Sailors sub mitted that were not answered during the All Hands Call will be addressed next week in All Hands Magazine. By MC1 Brianna Dandridge Sailors and family members from Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville volunteered at the citywide environmental cleanup event March 22. The 19th St. Johns River Cleanup and Celebration presented by the City of Jacksonville, and the Keep Jacksonville Beautiful Commission was the citys kick-off event for the Florida Great American Cleanup. Community service projects are a continuing partnership between the Navy and city of Jacksonville, said YN1 Heather Montgomery. Nearly 70 sites were target ed for cleaning by civilian and military volunteers throughout the city. Involvement in community relations projects continue to build a positive partnership between the military and local community. I volunteered because this was a good way to show that the US Navy is a real part of the city, said PS1 Anthony Sonola. Community service and volunteerism are an investment in our neighborhoods and the people who live call it home. Navy Recruiting Region oversees 13 recruiting districts providing support to hundreds of recruiting stations and thousands of Sailors and civilian personnel. The Navy Recruiting Command (NRC) mission is to attract the best men and women for Americas Navy to accomplish todays missions and meet tomorrows challenges. With 70 percent of the world covered by water, 80 percent of the worlds population living near coasts, and 90 percent of the worlds commerce travel ing by water, Americas Navy is very much a global force for good. From Navy Jax Yacht ClubSailboats raced up and down the St Johns River March 22 as the Navy Jax Yacht Club (NJYC) hosted the WAVES Regatta with five sail boats participating. KAOS, skippered by Kim Brewer and her all-female crew won first place and also took home the Committee Boat Prize for being the fastest vessel on the water. More sailboat racing, pleasure cruises and social events are scheduled for the upcoming spring and summer months. The NJYC meets the first Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the River Cove Catering & Conference Center on base. Membership is open to active duty and retired military, DoD employees, and their families. On May 17, racers from all over the area will take to the St Johns River as NJYC hosts its annual Armed Forces Day Regatta. For more NJYC info, call 778-0805. "KAOS" 41/33000, "Onyva" 583 and "Bernoulli" 67 are off to a good start as the WAVES Regatta begins.Photos by Chery LeDouxNavy Jax Yacht Club race participants and volunteers get ready to go racing on March 22 at the NAS Jax Mulberry Cove Marina.All-women crew rules Navy Recruiting Jacksonville volunteers at St. Johns River cleanupPhotos by MC1 Brianna Dandridge YN1 Heather Montgomery, Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville, and her son, Orion, volunteer at the cleanup for the City of Jacksonville and Keep Jacksonville Beautiful Commission on March 22. It was Jacksonville's kick-off event for the Florida Great American Cleanup. PS1 Anthony Sonola, Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville, bags debris for The City of Jacksonville and Keep Jacksonville Beautiful Commission 19th St. Johns River Cleanup and Celebration, March 22. CNP responds to Sailors questions in worldwide All Hands CallPhoto by MC3 Jules StobaughChief of Naval Personnel (CNP) Vice Adm. Bill Moran talks to Sailors during a world-wide all-hands call at Defense Media Activity at Fort George G. Meade, Md. By Terri Moon CronkAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe military has a moral obligation to take care of veter ans and the relatives of service members, Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey told attendees at the 2014 Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors Honor Guard Gala March 27. Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, was the keynote speaker for the event.Cameron Santos-Silva, a surviving child, presented Air Force Gen. Mark A. Welsh III, chief of staff of the Air Force, with the TAPS Honor Guard Gala Military Award. Recipients of TAPS awards, the chairman said, are hon ored for something that I con sider to be absolutely extraordinary. What holds us together as a force is that we trust each other, the chairman said. You dont walk out of a for ward-operating base in Iraq or Afghanistan or anyplace and put yourself in the cock pit of an aircraft or deploy on a ship unless you trust that if something happens, the man or woman to your right or left knows what they have to do. And just as important, he added, is that your family youve left behind will be cared for. TAPS mission, Dempsey said, is absolutely essential to who we are as a profession. Establishing, maintaining and living up to that bond of trust absolutely has to exist among our ranks in peace and in war. The chairman commended Bonnie Carroll, TAPS president, for founding the organization. Its the brilliance of Bonnie Carroll that brings us here tonight, Dempsey said. Can you imagine, he added, if, in 1994, she hadnt begun to put this organizations together, so that when we really needed it in 2002 and beyond, we [might not have had a] public-private partnership that we could fall back on to take care of the sur vivors of those who served and gave their lives in the protection of their country? Gen. Martin Dempsey addresses TAPS Honor Guard GalaPhoto by MC1 Daniel Hinton18th Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Army Gen. Martin E. Dempsey speaks at the 20th Anniversary Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors Honor Guard Gala at the National Building Museum in Washington D.C., March 27.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 3, 2014 17 along with rules and required paperwork. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil StandingsAs of March 28 Badminton Doubles NAVHOSP MSU 7 0 NAVFAC Blue 5 1 NBHC Jax 4 1 MWR Dynamic Duo 4 2 NAVFAC Red 3 3 CV-TSC Ashore 2 3 NAVFAC Orange 2 4 FACSFAC-1 1 3 FACSFAC-2 1 3 NAVFAC Gold 0 4 NCTS 6 0 VP-45 5 1 CNATTU Blue 5 1 FRCSE 4 2 Navy Band 4 2 VP-30 4 2 CV-TSC/PSD 3 3 HS-11 1 2 VP-10 1 4 CNATTU Gold 1 5 SERCC 1 5 FRCSE II 0 2 Sports (Contd. from Page 13) By Phillip MilanoJacksonville University What started out with a sim ple request at a meeting in the Presidents office last year is now a vision come true for student vet erans, as Jacksonville University dedicated its Defenders Den Student Veterans of America (SVA) study center March 25. This speaks a lot of JU and how much it is putting into its veterans, said JU SVA Chapter President Danielle DAmato, her self a Navy veteran and graduate student. JU is setting up its vet erans to succeed in school and then in the working world. We are becoming a pillar example for other colleges. The new 1,000-square-foot space, centrally located on cam pus in the Founders Building, is designed especially for student veterans, who at about 400, make up 10 percent of JUs student body and are the Universitys secondlargest affinity group behind ath letes. Part of the space is a com puter lab and study area, and part is a gathering spot and lounge in which to relax, complete with flatscreen TV, refrigerator, microwave and comfortable chairs. Former JU Trustee and area Taco Bell franchise Chief Operating Officer Thaddeus Foster was instrumental in funding the center, which rep resents an investment of tens of thousands of dollars. He plays a prominent role on the board of the Armed Forces Families Foundation, a major donor toward the facility. At JU we are trying to inno vate, and find more creative ways to enrich all of our students lives, including our veterans, JU President Tim Cost told about 200 people gathered at the dedica tion ceremony. We are signing agreements, creating scholarships and creating physical spaces for them. In the case of the Defenders Den, DAmato and other JU stu dent veterans met with Cost in his office last year and responded to his overtures for ideas by sug gesting a special gathering spot be found for them. They wished they had their own place, Cost said. They have their own challenges, many have kids, many are older, and some were looking for a place to study and relax. Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown, a two-time JU graduate, said the new center is a testa ment to the way Cost and JU are embracing student veterans. Its a reaffirmation and confir mation that with President Costs leadership, veterans will continue to be successful not only at JU, but when they leave JU, Brown said. He is investing in our leaders. Dr. Donnie Horner, JUs chief government and community affairs officer, ticked off some of the ways in which JU is working toward becoming the most mili tary friendly campus in the United States: higher education institution in the U.S. to partner with the Children of Fallen Patriots Foundation in awarding scholarships to stu dents whose veteran parents died in the line of duty. JU is provid ing a 40 percent undergraduate tuition reduction per academ ic year for children of deceased veterans who meet JUs admissions requirements and have been accepted for enrollment. Horner noted that UCLA and the University of Washington have both contacted JU for information on possibly duplicating the pro gram on their campuses. Ribbon tuition match for most degree programs, up to $2,600 maximum per year. is one of the largest in America, with more than 1,500 Sailors and Marines having gone through the program. recently became one of only nine programs nationwide awarded funding $870,000 to implement a veterans bachelors of science in nursing program, helping wound ed and returning veterans excel as they pursue careers in health care. Veterans of America recently received two awards: it was recognized by SVA headquarters in Washington, D.C., as a model chapter with a $1,500 cash award. In addition, VFW District 6 cited JUs SVA for outstand ing efforts for student veterans, including advocacy, outreach, and volunteerism. Retired Rear Adm. Victor Guillory, director of Military Affairs, Veterans and Disabled Services for the City of Jacksonville, applauded JUs huge step in its efforts at being student veteran-friendly, and he urged all the veterans on campus to take advantage of their new center. Breathe life into the Defenders Den, make it a pertinent place on campus, and leave it even better than when you found it, he said. First Sergeant Doug Buck (U.S. Air Force Ret), now a gradu ate student in the JU School of Education, told audience mem bers that veterans want noth ing more than to be stimulated and challenged, especially in the workforce. JU has been very welcoming to me, despite my age, and it has addressed both of those needs: it has provided a stimulating edu cational environment and, it has hired me for the challenging job of supervisor at the soon-to-be opened River House, he said. I am very proud to be here today. Association is accepting applications for its earn-whileyou-learn, apprenticeshiptraining program. Apply at 103 Century 21 Drive, Suite 100 at 6 p.m. on April 7, 14, 21 and 28. For more info call 421-0296. Spring Picnic, Food and drinks provided. For more info, call 542-3955 or 859-2581. USS Iwo Jima (LPH2/LHD7) Reunion Aug. 27-31 at Crowne Plaza Hotel in Jacksonville. Call 757-723-0317 or http://ussiwojimashipmates.cfns.net/ N.E. Florida Chapter meets the third Wednesday of each month. Open to active duty and retirees of all military branches. Contact Johnnie.walsh@gmail.com or call 282-4650. meets the fourth Thursday of each month at 5 p.m. at Jacksonville Urban nix@navy.mil. meets the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Center on Collins Road. For information, visit www.aao9. com. (VFW) Post 5968 and its Auxiliary located at 187 Aurora Blvd. meets on the second Wednesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. VFW of combat veterans and eligible service members from the Active, Guard or Reserve forces. Go to www. vfwpost5968.org or call 2765968. at NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) needs volunteers to assist military retirees and dependents. Work four hours a day, one day per week. Call 542-5790 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays to volunteer. a breast cancer support group at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, meets on the second Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. Call 542-7857 for more info. is open to active duty, reserve and retired military, plus, active or retired DoD civilians. Call 778-0805 or email commodore@njyc.org. Program. Helping others help themselves. Visit www. gocompass.org for more info. meets the Methodist Church, 2246 Blanding Blvd. Call 272-9489. monthly Atlantic Beach. Call 246-6855. meets at 1 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the Murray Hill United Methodist Church, (Fellowship Hall Building) at 4101 College Street. Call 786-7083. Retired Enlisted Association meets the fourth Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Hall at 7673 Blanding Blvd. Call 772-8622. New Civil War exhibit opensFrom Staff On April 1, 1864, a military transport ship hit a mine in the St. Johns River southeast of NAS Jax, (near Mandarin Point), and sank with the loss of four lives. The Maple Leaf, a private steamship leased to the Union army, was headed back to Jacksonville after dropping off men, horses and supplies in Palatka. At 4 a.m., the ship hit a mine placed in the river by Clay County Sheriff Joshua OHern, who was also a Lieutenant in the Confederate army. OHern had mined the river at its narrowest point with what were known as torpedoes at that time. Today, there is new interest in the sinking and sal vaging of Civil War artifacts from the Maple Leaf, due to the 150th year recognition of its sinking and the display of rarely seen artifacts from the ship on loan from the Florida Department of Sate, Division of Historical Resources. Beginning April 4, the Mandarin Museum will host a new exhibit, free to the public, through Dec. 28. For more information on the exhibit, museum hours and location, go to MandarinMuseum.net. In 1989, local dentist and historian Keith Holland found the wreckage of the Maple Leaf, and conducted an underwater expedition that recovered approxi mately 3,000 artifacts. The recovery expedition took several years and provided a cache of personal belongings of Union solders; U.S. Army issued equipment; and items taken from plantations from South Carolina. Even though thousands of artifacts were recov ered, this represented only a small part of the ships cargo that still remains at the bottom of the river. Silt and mud buildup over the wreckage helped preserve items, even newspapers, in pristine condition that will be saved for future generations to see. The former chief historian for the National Park Service stated that the Maple Leaf is the most important repository of Civil War artifacts ever found and probably will remain so. The site is now recognized as a National Historic Landmark. April 4 5 is the grand opening of the new Maple Leaf exhibit and Dr. Holland will be present each day to give a first hand account of his experience with searching, locating and diving to recover arti facts. Community Calendar Photos courtesy of JURetired Navy Capt. Matt Tuohy and Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown toured the new Defenders Den student center at Jacksonville University on March 25.JU dedicates Defenders Den student veteran center JU Student Veterans of America Chapter President Danielle DAmato is a Navy veteran who is pursuing a graduate degree. Photos courtesy of Mandarin MuseumAn artists illustration of the paddle-wheel steam ship Maple Leaf that sank in the St. Johns River in 1864 after striking a Confederate mine near Mandarin Point. A confederate mine (torpedo) of the type used during the American Civil War. www.jaxairnews.com

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