Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
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Newspaper
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English
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United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
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May 30, 2013
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Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
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30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

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Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
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Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
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Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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oclc - 33313438
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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014 I I D E VR-62 COC Smith Relieves Scarpino Page 3 NATU R E CENTE R Kids & Kritters Interact Pages 4 & 5 F ACSF AC COC Parker Relieves Petre Page 6Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com From StaffCommander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 11 Capt. Sean Liedman held flight line news conferenc es March 18 and 21 at NAS Jacksonville to update media on Malaysian Air Flight MH370. The latest P-8 Poseidon mis sions flown by VP-16 in Australia March 23 did not discover any new information regarding the whereabouts of Malaysian Air Flight MH370. The search was flown 1,500 miles south and west of Perth Australia; in the vicinity of where the previously reported satellite imagery indi cated possible debris, explained Liedman. The crew searched an area of 1,200 square miles, which is less than what they searched in their previous missions due to the fact they decreased the track spacing of the ladder search in order to increase the visual probability and protection of small objects in the water. I anticipate they will con tinue to fly one mission per day until the mission is complete or CPRW-11 keeps media informedPhoto by AWO2 Joshua Eichhorn A CNN production team records a segment with National Correspondent David Mattingly dur ing a March 21 familiarization flight on board a P-8A Poseidon, as Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing-11 Capt. Sean Liedman (right) observes. Harry S. Truman, CVW-3 conclude OEF supportHSM-74 plans returnBy MCSN Emily BlairUSS Harry S. Truman Public AffairsCarrier Air Wing (CVW) 3, embarked on board aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (HST CSG), completed its final sortie in support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), March 19. CVW-3 flew more than 2,900 sor ties and more than 16,400 flight hours in support of OEF beginning Aug. 27, 2013. Lt. Ian Higgins, assigned to the Swordsmen of Strike Fighter Squadron 32, took part in the final combat sortie, flying an F/A-18F Super Hornet. He flew 27 OEF missions, totaling nearly 170 flight hours. It has been an honor supporting the troops on the ground, said Higgins. Launching our final mission was like any other day, we had to remain focused. Finishing our support of OEF may mean that we are closer to going home, but we still had to make sure the troops on the ground can make it home safely too. Sailors and Marines performed maintenance, and launched and recovered aircraft daily throughout seven months of OEF support. Capt. George Wikoff, commander, CVW-3, said teamwork was the key to success ful OEF operations. It begins and ends with teamwork, said Wikoff. We executed our missions safely and just as we practiced during our pre-deployment exercises. To do that, every Sailor and Marine, every main tainer and every pilot, worked togeth er. That teamwork is what enabled us to provide continuous support to coalition warfighters on the ground in Afghanistan. Wikoff said that while teamwork within the air wing was key, teamwork between the air wing and Harry S. Truman was equally as crucial. Team Truman was a major reason we were so successful, he said. Theyre the ones that launch and recover our aircraft and work non-stop From U.S. 7th Fleet Public AffairsA P-8A Poseidon patrol aircraft com pleted its transition from Kuala Lumpur to Perth, Australia on March 18 to con tinue the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 in the southern Indian Ocean. The search has expanded to the southern portions of the Indian Ocean and the P-8A has the range required to reach those waters, said Lt. Clayton Hunt of Patrol Squadron (VP) 16, the search and rescue detachment mission commander. We will be most effective operating out of Perth. For a mission such as the MH370 search, the P-8 will typically fly at 5,000 feet, dipping to 1,000 feet to get a closer visual look at objects. They typi cally fly at a speed of 250-270 knots, with a search time of eight to nine hours depending on the distance to search area. Even though we are flying long mis sions, the purpose behind these missions gives the crew the motivation to overcome any obstacles that may come Photo by MC2 Rob AylwardIn October, rescue swimmer AWR2 Nathan James is hoisted from the Mediterranean Sea in a rescue bas ket from an MH-60R Seahawk heli copter assigned to the "Swamp Foxes" of HSM-74, during a search and rescue exercise with the guidedmissile destroyer USS Mason (DDG 87). Mason was deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group, supporting maritime security operations and theater security coop eration efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility.Photo by MC2 Eric PastorLt. j.g. Kyle Atakturk (left) and Lt. j.g. Nicholas Horton, naval aviators assigned to VP-16, pilot a P-8A Poseidon during a March 19 mission to assist in search and rescue operations for Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370. VP-16 is temporar ily deployed to Perth, Australia as it continues searching a grid of the southern Indian Ocean.Navys P-8A Poseidon continues MH370 search from Australia Photo by MC2 Andrea PerezAir show season beginsU.S. Navy flight demonstration squadron, the Blue Angels, pilots render a salute after the team's first demonstration March 15 at the Naval Air Facility El Centro Air Show. The Blue Angels are scheduled to perform 68 demonstrations at 34 locations across the U.S. in 2014. The pilots will perform Oct. 25-26 at NAS Jacksonville.See VP-45, Page 8 See Page 8 See Page 8

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014 SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)5487789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley A VT-8 Avenger takes off from the Essex-class aircraft carrier USS Bunker Hill 16. It was the first such mission by carrier aircraft and the first large scale day of 108,000 tons sunk, and denial of the harbor to the enemy for an estimated six weeks during the World War II Pacific campaign. U.S. Navy photos Two Grumman F9F-2 Panther fighters dump fuel as they fly past the aircraft car quartet of 20mm guns, as well as underwing air-to ground rockets, and bombs of up to 2,000 pounds. From StaffMarch 27 1794 Congress authorizes con struction of six frigates, including USS Constitution. 1799 USS Constitution recaptures American sloop USS Neutrality from France. 1880 USS Constellation departs New York with food for famine victims in Ireland. March 28 1800 Essex is first U.S. Navy vessel to pass Cape of Good Hope. 1814 HMS Phoebe and Cherub cap ture USS Essex off Valparaiso, Chile. Before capture, Essex had captured 24 British prizes during the War of 1812. 1848 USS Supply reaches the Bay of Acre, anchoring under Mount Carmel near the village of Haifa, during expe dition to explore the Dead Sea and the River Jordan. 1970 Lt. Jerome Beaulier and Lt. j.g. Stephen Barkley in an F-4 Phantom II of VF-142 from USS Constellation shot down a MiG-21 while escorting an unarmed Navy reconnaissance plane on a mission near Thanh Hoa, North Vietnam. March 29 1954 Carrier aircraft begin recon naissance near Dien Bien Phu, Indochina. 1960 Launch of first fully inte grated Fleet Ballistic Missile from USS Observation Island. 1973 The last U.S. combat forc es depart South Vietnam. The U.S. Military Assistance Command Vietnam was disbanded, officially ending U.S. military involvement in South Vietnam. Operation Homecoming concluded when the final group of 148 American POWs was released by Hanoi. Of the 591 POWs released, 144 were naval pilots and aircrewmen. March 30 1944 First use of torpedo squadrons (VT-2, VT-8 and VT-16) from aircraft carriers to drop aerial mines. 1972 Easter Offensive begins in Vietnam. March 31 1854 Commodore Matthew Perry negotiates Treaty of Kanagawa to open trade between U.S. and Japan. 1971 Poseidon (C-3) missile becomes operational when USS James Madison began her third patrol carrying 16 tacti cal Poseidon missiles. 1992 USS Missouri (BB-63), the last active American battleship is decom missioned. April 1 1893 Navy General Order 409 estab lishes the rate of Chief Petty Officer. 1917 BM1 John Eopolucci, a naval armed guard on board the steamship Aztec, died when his vessel was sunk by a German U-boat. He was the first U.S. Navy Sailor killed in action in World War I. 1942 First Naval Air Transportation Service (NATS) squadron for Pacific operations commissioned. 1943 The first Navy night fighter squadron, VF(N)-75, was established at Quonset Point, R.I., Cmdr. William Widhelm, commanding. 1945 Over 1,200 Navy ships and Army troops begin invasion of Okinawa. 1966 Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Vietnam established. 1967 Helicopter squadron HAL 3 activated at Vung Tau. April 2 1781 U.S. Frigate Alliance cap tures two British privateers, Mars and Minerva. 1827 First Naval Hospital construc tion begun at Portsmouth, Va. 1947 UN places former Japanese mandated islands under U.S. trustee ship. 1951 First Navy use of jet aircraft as bombers, launched from the aircraft carrier USS Princeton (CV-37). 1960 USS Glacier (AGB-4) begins 12 days of relief operations, provid ing helicopter and boat transportation and emergency supplies to residents of Paramaribo, Suriname after floods. By Sarah Smiley Special ContributorFor the average kid, pre-ado lescence and the teen years are marked with many rites of passage facial hair, deodorant, pimples, crushes and braces. There is the experience of wear ing pants that fit yesterday but are too short today. There are awkward bus rides and annoying parents. And there is the moment you realize going to school without combing your hair only works for 5-year-olds. Military kids have all these things, plus one more: getting a military identification card. As soon as a military depen dent turns 10 years old, they are required to go to the nearest base, have a picture taken and receive their very first, laminated proof of identification. Sounds simple and ordinary maybe even tedious. Unless youre 10. Then its mind-blowing. Suddenly, after just a short decade on this earth, you can fill your wal let with something else besides Monopoly money and trading cards. I remember getting my first ID card. Unfortunately, it was the morning after I busted open my brow in the middle of the night on the headboard of my bed. I have always walked and talked in my sleep, so it was not surprising that I would sit up in my bed and have a conversation with myself. What was surprising was when I laid back down and misjudged the distance between my pillow and the headboard. After a long night in the emer gency room and several stitches later, I was back home waiting for my mom to take me to the base to get my ID card. I dont remember why it was so urgent, why we had to go that day, when I had a black eye and dried blood in my hair. I couldnt take a shower or get the stitches wet. Maybe it was because filling out the insurance papers at the ER was complicated without an ID card, and mom realized I needed my card . like, yesterday. My dad was stationed at NAS Oceana in Virginia Beach, Va., but in my memory, we were not on that base, which was so familiar to me. This is what getting your first ID card does to you it changes an ordinary task into a Field-ofDreams, light-shattering moment of inaccurate memories. For all I knew, I was at the Pentagon. I mean, this was serious. This was my ID card. About two hours later (the ID card office is the military equiva lent of the DMV), I had a laminat ed picture of my smashed eye and stitches. I put it in my My Little Pony wallet next to my favorite puffy sticker of a rainbow. My next thrilling moment at the ID office would be when I got married and went from Sarah Rutherford, dependent of Lindell Rutherford, to Sarah Smiley, dependent of Dustin. And then, last week, it occurred to me, like my mother before me, that I had forgotten to get my oldest boys, now 13 and 11, their ID cards. Were going tomorrow morning to get your identification cards, I said at dinner. Our what? Like that laminated thing in your wallet. We have to have one, too? I want one, Lindell screamed. Do I get one? After I had explained that Lindell was too young, he felt left out. He noticed the excitement surround ing this ID-card thing, and now he wasnt part of it. He started crying. Its okay, Lindell, Owen teased, The military does this ritual first where they stick a needle in your eye and draw blood to prove you are a military dependent. You dont want a needle in your eye, do you? Lindell cried more, now out of fear for his brothers. I wondered how Owen knew just how painful the process would be. No, there wouldnt be actual needles in the eye, but the military isnt ultra efficient when it comes to things like paperwork and records. Sometimes, a needle in the eye is an attractive alternative. The next morning, we drove to the base and parked in front of the personnel building, that Ford noted was precariously close to the recruiting center. It was 9:45 a.m. and Ford had to be back at school by 10:30 (the ID office is only open 7:30 a.m. 3 p.m., which is, of course, school hours. Based on previous experi ence, I wasnt hopeful wed make it. (Have you ever gotten through the DMV in 45 minutes?) Then, something incredible hap pened. We signed in, and before we could even sit down in the lobby, a nice man in fatigues took us to the office to start the paperwork. No waiting! Twenty minutes later, the boys had crossed a path paved by many military brats including their mom and dad before them. They now had ID cards. Except the boys path seemed too easy. On the way home I told them, Back when I got my ID card, I had to walk two miles both ways in the snow, and I waited 15 hours in the lobby . . Im not sure it really happened that way. But thats how I remem ber it. This Week in Navy History From the HomefrontRite of passage for military brats the ID card FIGHT deadly childhood diseases.St. Jude Childrens Research Hospitalstjude.org A CFC participant provided as a public service.

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VR-62 Nomads welcome new skipperBy AWFCS Michael WendelinVR-62 Public AffairsCmdr. Bryon Smith relieved Cmdr. Anthony Scarpino as commanding officer of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VR) 62 in a March 15 ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 117. Smith joined VR-62 in 2012 as executive officer. He is a 1994 graduate of the University of California, Davis, where he earned a double major in political sci ence and geography. He has accumulated more than 3,000 flight hours and 300 arrested landings. His awards include: the Air Medal for 80 combat missions flown in support of Operations Enduring Freedom and Southern Watch; the Navy/Marine Corps Commendation Medal (three awards); the Joint Service Achievement Medal; and other personal and unit awards. Scarpino expressed his gratitude to the VR-62 Nomads for his very successful tour. It has been a fantastic experience to serve as the skipper of such a hardworking and dedicated group of Sailors. I will never forget the great people who I have served with here and around he world, said Scarpino. During Scarpinos 18-month tenure, the Nomads earned the Golden Wrench, the Golden Anchor and the Noel Davis Battle E awards.While supporting Navy logistics needs around the globe, the Nomads executed 3,209 flight hours in FY 2013. Scarpino is scheduled to report to U.S. Central Command at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, Fla. Cmdr. Jeremy Casella assumed duties as VR-62 executive officer. The Nomads just completed a U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM) detachment for FY 2014 and are preparing for an upcoming U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) detachment.During the recent PACOM detachment the Nomads moved 46 tons of relief mate rials in support of Operation Damayan (Philippine relief efforts). VR-62 is one of five Navy Reserve C-130T units serv ing the Navys high priority logistics needs around the globe. Uniform guidance: Shift to summer uniformFrom StaffMilitary members within Commander, Navy Region Southeasts area of responsibility are reminded the summer uniform shift will take effect April 7. The uni form of the day will be: Male/Female Officer/Chief Petty Officer Prescribed: Service Dress White Alternate: Summer White/Service Khaki Male/Female E1-E6 Prescribed: Service Dress White Alternate: Service Uniform Sailors in the southeast region will maintain a sharp military appearance at all times. Officers, chief petty officers, and petty officers will review the latest revisions of the uniform instruction to ensure their knowledge of current standards. Leaders will set the highest standards, instruct their Sailors in proper uniform wear and appearance, and enforce regulations. Cmdr. Byron Smith (left) assumes command of VR-62 from Cmdr. Tony Scarpino as Fleet Logistics Support Wing Commodore Capt. Mark Bailey (center) and NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander (far left) look on. Caroline Smith pins her husband, Cmdr. Bryon Smith, with the command pin during the VR-62 "Nomads" change of command ceremony on March 15 at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 117.Photos courtesy of VR-62 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014 Youth Activities Center vs. natureBy AE2(AW) Samantha Jones Oh, I hope she doesnt bring out a snake, exclaimed a somewhat fearful Chloe Burke, 6, as NAS Jax Assistant Natural Resource Manager Angela Glass welcomed youngsters from the Youth Activities Center (YAC) to the bases Black Point Interpretive Center on March 19. This is where children of all ages can visit to learn the many interesting aspects of nature, ecology and con servation. These youth will learn how insects, birds, fish and other animals interact, explained Glass. Theyre really eager to learn how they can help make the environment better by conserving natural resources. The first group to visit the environ mental education facility center dur ing the YAC spring break field trip were 5to 7-year-olds who appeared to have a blast learning about nature through creative arts and crafts session. The children were encouraged to let their imaginations run wild as they constructed a fish from either paper plates or discarded CDs. As much fun as they had making their fish, the excitement in the room esca lated as Glass introduced the children to one of the more friendly habitants of the center, a Florida Box Turtle. The children were allowed to pet the turtle and asked Glass many questions regarding the reptiles shell. Samia Calloway, 6, explained to one of her classmates some information she learned during the field trip, turtles stay in their shells their whole lives because their spines are connected to their shell. The second group to visit the envi ronmental center was 8to 12-year-olds whom Glass led outside for a hands-on learning experience. As an environmentalist, you may be asked to conduct a species survey to determine the population in a specific area, she said. For underground species, that means using a tool called a burrow scope that consists of flexible tubing with a camera at one end and a video monitor at the other. The camera end is inserted into the burrow and the monitor allows the user to view what is inside. The children were split into groups and used teamwork to conduct a spe cies survey of a simulated burrow. After each group had participated in the simulation, it was time to view a real burrow. Glass led the children to a known Gopher tortoise burrow. Since the species is threatened in this area, Glass held the camera down in the burrow while the children viewed the tortoise from the monitor that was car ried by YAC Child Care Associate Maria Lainez. The children had a great time and talked about the field trip for the rest of the afternoon. They all had their arts and crafts fish to bring home to their parents and were excited they got to pet a turtle, said Shaqunta Jones, teen coordinator at the YAC. The spring break field trip was part of the 4-H healthy living education pro gram. We brought the children there, not only so they could learn about nature, but also teach them to appreciate and respect nature, as well, said Jones. The Florida Soft Shell Turtle is one of the many animals on display at the Interpretive Center. Since the turtle is known to be aggressive, the children were allowed to observe the turtle but not touch. Nicholas Harvey, 7, tries to spot the corn snake hiding in it's terrarium during a field trip to the Black Point Interpretive Center. The Florida Box turtle can be found in damp environments, such as wetlands, marshlands, and near swamps, however, the species does not usually enter water deep enough to swim. (From left) Nathaniel Harvey, 5, and Makayla Johnson, 6, are fascinated by the representation of Florida wildlife as they explore the Interpretive Center. Samia Calloway observes a Florida Box Turtle through a hole in the top of the log as she and her classmates from the NAS Jax Youth Activity Center explore the Black Point Interpretive Center. Angela Glass, assistant natural resource manager for NAS Jax, answers questions about the Florida Box Turtle for the students of the Youth Activities Center during their field trip to the Black Point Interpretive Center on March 19. Nature is the teacher

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014 5 Angela Glass explains why turtles are unable to leave their shells and answers student's questions regarding the species. Nicholas Harvey's favorite part of the field trip was getting to pet the Florida Box Turtle. "It was awesome!" (From left) friends Keirstyn Mounce, 6, and Chloe Burke, 6, hold up their works of art they created during their field trip. "We enjoyed the field trip and were happy the snake wasn't taken out of its cage!" (From left) Makalya Johnson, 6, and Nathaniel Harvey, 5, proudly display their fish made during a nature-inspired arts and crafts session. They both couldn't wait to show their parents what they made. The Florida Soft Shell Turtles long necks allow them to stretch up to the surface of shallow water -in order to breathe without leaving their hiding places. The red-eared slider (left) and Mississippi map turtle are kept in the same aquari um at the Black Point Interpretive Center. Both species are commonly kept as pets because they are enjoyable to watch. Aleiah Calloway, 10, uses the burrow scope monitor to observe inside a simulated burrow and direct her classmates during a demonstration. Angela Glass guides the camera of the burrow scope down a Gopher tortoise burrow while Youth Activites Center Child Care Associate, Maria Lainez, holds the monitor so the children can view the threatened spe cies in its habitat. Children from the Youth Activites Center are led by Angela Glass in a hands-on demonstration of how environmentalists use the burrow scope in order to obtain an accurate species count. (From left) Chloe Burke, 6, and Drake Chavez, 6, get an up-close look at a corn snake during their group walk around of the Black Point Interpretive Center. Photos by AE2(AW) Samantha Jones

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014 By ET1(SW) Patrick HorganFACSFACJAX PAOCmdr. Shannon Parker will relieve Cmdr. Shawn Petre as the 19th commanding offi cer of Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility (FACSFAC) Jacksonville on March 27 at NAS Jax Hangar 117. Parker, a native of Centralia, Ill., has served as an EA-6B Prowler pilot with the VAQ129 Vikings and the VAQ-138 Yellowjackets. He was also a student at the Defense Language Institute Presidio of Monterey, enroute to a Personnel Exchange Program flying the Panavia Tornados with the German Air Force, or Luftwaffe, in Schleswig, Germany. His most other assign ments included the VAQ-133 Wizards, Naval Personnel Command as the Assistant Aviation Officer Community Manager, and most recently, as FACSFAC Jacksonvilles execu tive officer. Parker commended FACSFAC Jacksonvilles outgo ing commanding officer. I want to congratulate skip per Petre on a truly outstand ing tour leading the FACSFAC Jacksonville team. The rela tionship he built with the members of the command and their buy-in to his vision, ensured that the command always set standards that will pay benefits for years to come. Additionally, he was the sole driving force behind numerous operational improvements that overwhelmingly increased the Fleets ability to train and fight. I wish my friend, fair winds and following seas in all future endeavors. During Petres tour as FACSFAC Jacksonville com manding officer, he inspired the command vision of: make a difference every day; be the standard on duty and off duty; trust your shipmates; and be a trusted shipmate to serve the Fleet and our nation with excellence and humility. In his parting remarks, Petre stated, It has been an honor and a privilege to work with and lead the team of professionals at FACSFAC Jacksonville and the Pinecastle Range Complex. The excep tional FACSFAC team clearly made distinctive, positive impacts in their day-to-day support to the Fleet. I wish my good friend and shipmate, Shannon Parker, all the best as he takes the helm. Since establishment in1977, FACSFAC Jacksonville has maintained, controlled and monitored 80,000 square miles of sea and air space along the Southeastern coast of the United States. FACSFAC Jacksonville is responsible for control and scheduling of offshore Fleet operating areas, as well as the Pinecastle Range Complex. Additionally, FACSFAC Jacksonville is the lead military coordinator with the Federal Aviation Agency and other cog nizant agencies for Fleet liaison while conducting operations in the Southeastern United States. By Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsFleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) is imple menting ConcertoTM project management software on numerous aircraft repair lines in an effort to increase air craft throughput, reduce turn around time and provide on time deliveries to warfighting customers. In 2009, FRCSE adopt ed the software created by Realization Technologies, Inc., which applies Theory of Constraints and Critical Chain theory that aided in the repair of P-3 Orion aircraft with structural wing fatigue that threatened to ground one-fourth of the P-3 fleet. The project management software has proven highly successful by providing the P-3 Integrated Product Team (IPT) and its support groups with a first-rate execution tool used on the industrial floor to oversee the progression of air craft repairs. ConcertoTM is a software tool used for production execution at the floor level to standardize work con tent, control work in progress (WIP), identify work stop bar riers and provide a road map for the production supervi sors, said Gregory Wallace, the FRCSE ConcertoTM imple mentation team lead. They can use this tool to determine the sequence of [repair] operations that occur on the aircraft by allowing them to focus on small buck ets of work instead of the big picture. The goal, according to Wallace, is to implement ConcertoTM across all aircraft lines at FRCSE by the end of 2014. We plan to implement ConcertoTM, develop a level of standardization across all aircraft lines and create an aircraft business model for FRCSE, he said. ConcertoTM enables super visors, support groups, team leads and managers to have one common place to com municate and identify barri ers with their teams. The soft ware automatically updates project plans and sets priori ties. It basically provides a road map for the production super visor and support groups focusing on the critical chain path, said Wallace. FRCSE leaders reunit ed the original FRCSE P-3 ConcertoTM implementa tion team (Gregory Wallace, Tim Knowles, Diane OBrien, Clinton Batten, Rodney Boone and Wilbert Barton) to rollout the software on the remain ing aircraft lines aided by Realization Technologies. We will start with the F/A18 line because that is our biggest and most challenging area, Wallace said. Our first step is to have Realization come in to discuss the benefits of ConcertoTM project management software with our core team members. The implementation team plans to establish a core team for each of the remaining aircraft lines (F/A-18, EA-6B Prowler, T-6/34/44 Trainers and H-60), then value stream map their processes to devel op templates that they will load into the software. Then each IPT will devel op strategies for its aircraft platform to determine WIP capacity and ways to increase throughput utilizing the proj ect management software. After full implementa tion across all aircraft lines, Realization Technologies will assess the depots progress to ensure everything is on track. We are always looking at continuous process improve ment, said Wallace. Every process has uncer tainties. You can plan for the best, but Murphys Law is always going to happen somewhere down the road. This program determines as early as possible those critical chain paths that may cause future issues. An aircraft that has been out in the Fleet always has problems. It may come in for a simple repair but after evaluation, many times we may find something else wrong. ConcertoTM is a really good program and will enhance production on all our lines once fully implemented. By Earl BittnerNAVFAC Southeast Public AffairsSeveral Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast employ ees participated in the annu al Manatee Region, Odyssey of the Mind Regional Tournament held March 1 at Bishop Snyder High School in Jacksonville, Fla. Odyssey of the Mind is an international nonprofit organi zation that promotes creative problem solving, innovative thinking and teambuilding for students ages kindergarten through college. Watching the kids minds work as they come up with cre ative solutions to the scenarios is just so impressive and inspir ing, said NAVFAC Southeast engineer Scott Glass. Glass first got involved in 2002 when his daughter, then a third grade student, brought home a permission slip and said she wanted to compete but only if daddy would be a judge. Volunteers assisted with judging one of five problem solutions presented by teams from Northeast Florida to Gainesville. The students apply creativ ity to solve problems that range from building mechanical devices to presenting their own interpretation of literary clas sics. They then bring solutions to competition on the local, state, and global level. Teams competed in one of three divisions; elementary, middle or high school and pre sented their eight-minute solu tion to the judging team in one of five categories where they were scored on the creativity, innovation and quality of their solutions. Categories include vehicle, technical, structural, theatri cal and literary classics prob lems. The winning teams will represent the Manatee Region at the State Tournament April 12 at the University of Central Florida in Orlando. NAVFAC Southeast employees have supported Odyssey of the Mind for sev eral years. This years volun teers included: Ryan Howard, PWD Mayport; Doug Mercer, Assistant Regional Engineer Staff; Trish Loop, PWD Mayport; Scott Glass, South Atlantic IPT; and Cheryl Mitchell, PWD Mayport. Glass and Mercer and their spouses are part of the Manatee Regional Board and have participated in the pro gram for more than a decade. We wore funny hats to add a little light heartedness to the judging, said Glass. We just try to make it fun for everyone, especially some of the more timid participants. Thousands of teams from throughout the U.S. and from about 25 other countries par ticipate in the Odyssey of the Mind program. The 35th Annual World Finals will be hosted by Iowa State University in May. FACSFAC Jax holds change of commandCmdr. Shannon Parker Cmdr. Shawn Petre FRCSE implementing Concerto to all assigned platformsPhotos by Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Overhaul and Repair Supervisor John Bailes (right) explains the F/A-18 engine nacelles repair process to Realization Technologies Inc. representatives Chris Timmer, Barry Scott and Keyur Patel as FRCSE P-3 Production Specialist Rodney Boone (cen ter rear) listens in during a visit to the depot on March 14. FRCSE is implementing Concerto proj ect management software on all aircraft production lines scheduled for completion by years end. Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) F/A-18 Overhaul and Repair Supervisor Chris Caldwell (left) explains opera tional issues and how Concerto project management software might increase production throughout on the Hornet line with Realization Technologies Inc. representatives Keyur Patel, Barry Scott and Chris Timmer during their visit to the military aviation depot. NAVFAC Southeast personnel judge Odyssey of the Mind competitionPhoto by Scott GlassNAVFAC Southeast employees supported the Odyssey of the Mind Regional Tournament March 1 at Jacksonvilles Bishop Snyder High School in Jacksonville. Volunteers included (from left) Ryan Howard, Doug Mercer, Trish Loop and Scott Glass. Not pictured was Cheryl Mitchell. The volun teers wore funny hats to add a little light heartedness to the judging.

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By AE2(AW) Samantha JonesStaff WriterBack from retirement in the military aviation Bone Yard near Tucson, Ariz., the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) 725 Squadrons newest addition to NAS Jax Hangar 1122 is a main tenance-training helicopter designated Bromeo. This aircraft was refur bished from an SH-60B (Bravo) Seahawk to provide a mainte nance platform that reflects the latest MH-60R (Romeo) heli copter. Despite some minor differ ences in the avionic equip ment, the Bromeo and Romeo are essentially identical. The aircraft will be held to the same airworthiness and mainte nance standards as the squad rons newly acquired Romeos. Although the Bromeo is fully capable of flying, it was pur chased with the sole purpose of providing realistic, hands-on training aide for maintainers. Why didnt the RAN purchase another Romeo helicopter for training instead? Simply cost and effective ness, explained pilot Lt. Mark Flowerdew, RAN 725 Squadron public affairs officer. The Bromeo will provide maintain ers and engineering staff with functional ground training without impacting operational readiness. According to Flowerdew, They will have the opportuni ty to progress in their training journals, build expertise and skill sets, and perform main tenance work that they would normally not have access to on a live aircraft. When all MH-60R Seahawks are flying, viable training may still be achieved by maintain ers though the performance of various tasks such as servic ing hydraulics, knowledge of components, and component removal procedures. For the past three weeks, the Bromeo has undergone preparations to be painted in RAN colors at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast. Upon its return to Hangar 1122, it will resume its new role in expedit ing maintenance training. In late 2014, the Bromeo will return to Australia by sea for use as a ground training tool in the future MH-60R school house at HMAS Albatross, home of the Royal Australian Navys Fleet Air Arm. From Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsAn increase in enlisted critical at-sea billets has Navy community managers reminding Sailors of the various incen tive programs available to them. The Navy has several incentive programs that the enlisted commu nity managers and detailers use to fill vacancies at sea, said Ron Dodge, dep uty director of enlisted distribution at Navy Personnel Command. We want to give Sailors good reasons to choose sea duty because that is where we need them. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced in March an upcoming increase in Career Sea Pay (CSP) and Career Sea Pay Premium incentives for eligible Sailors and Marines serving Bromeo is promising training tool for RANRAN sailors vent the Bromeo in preparation to be painted.Photos by AE2(AW) Samantha JonesAble Seaman Tenae Scott prepares the Bromeo to be painted.Tools detailers use for fleet manningSee DETAILERS, Page 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014 7

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8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014 we move on to the next phase of the operation. I would like to underscore that todays results do not indicate mission failure, but rather indicate the daunting chal lenge of locating small objects in the vast expanse mari time domain, Liedman added. According to Liedman, this type of search operations is part of the VP-16 deployment cycle. VP-16 deployed with six P-8 Poseidons to Okinawa last December where they were pos tured to respond to incidents such as this. Immediately after the incident, about three weeks ago, they were tasked by the U.S. Navy 7th fleet commander to reposition the aircraft first to Malaysia, and then to Perth, Australia where they could execute operations in support of the south ern corridor theory, he said. The P-8 has the speed, range and endurance neces sary to execute a search at a range of 1,500 miles from the nearest land. When asked to explain how the search was being conducted, he said, Floating objects in the maritime domain move around significantly due to wind, current and wave action, which complicates the search. We will continue to search until the mission is complete or we move on to the next phase of the search till more infor mation comes to light to refine our search area. It takes the airplane three hours to transit to on sta tion and can remain on station, executing search opera tions for approximately three to four hours before it returns to the base in Perth. Search operations will be conducted during day light hours only due to the challenge of detecting small objects in the maritime domain. The crew will continue to fly one mission per day during day light hours. VP-16 is executing operations in conjunction with allies and partners in the region. There has been reports that Australian P-3s and New Zealand P-3s are operating alongside VP-16s P-8 in the region. It truly is an interna tional search effort, Liedman stated. When asked how many P-8s were actually deployed to assist with in search he said, VP-16 has six P-8 Poseidons on deployment in Okinawa; they detached one P-8 to Perth Australia to participate in search opera tions. When asked about what other capabilities the aircraft had that could aid in the search he replied, In addition to the range, speed and endurance that the Poseidon brings, it also has an integrated sensor suite with high definition sensors such as a radar that can detect small objects in the maritime domain. Additionally, it has an advanced communication suite that can transmit imag ery from any of those sensors off board via satellite com munication links to higher headquarters. TRUMAN CVWFrom Page 1to ensure the ship is ready to execute each days air plan. Without them, we dont launch, and the warf ighters dont get the support they need. Capt. Bob Roth, Trumans commanding officer, echoed Wikoff in saying the teamwork between Truman and CVW-3 was the driving force behind successful support for OEF. Aircraft carriers are a powerful tool of diplo macy and power projection, said Roth. We oper ated seamlessly with Carrier Air Wing 3 to provide combat air power from the sea. The understand ing, respect, and unconditional mutual support between this ship and air wing are what I value above all else. Together, we are unstoppable. This teamwork is what allowed us to support the warf ighters on the ground when they needed us to pro tect them and help them accomplish their mission. HST CSG Commander Rear Adm. Kevin Sweeney praised both CVW-3 and Truman for the safe and successful execution of OEF flight operations. Providing support to the coalition troops on the ground in Afghanistan was one of the main mission areas for us, he said. I could not be more proud of our young Sailors and Marines. They executed pre cision, professionalism, and lethality when called upon. In doing so, we also helped build trust and confidence with our partners and allies throughout the region. Truman and CVW-3 are scheduled to be relieved by USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) and CVW-8 later this month. CVW-3, based at NAS Oceana, is embarked on Truman with its eight Navy and Marine Corps air craft squadrons: VFA-32 Swordsmen, VFA-37 Ragin Bulls, VFA -105 Gunslingers, Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 312 Checkerboards, Airborne Early Warning Squadron 126 Seahawks, Electronic Attack Squadron 130 Zappers, Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 7 Dusty Dogs, in addition to Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 74 Swamp Foxes based at NAS Jacksonville. up, said AWO1 Robert Pillars, an acoustic systems operator on the P-8A. During its missions out of Kuala Lumpur, the P-8A crew identi fied more than 400 radar contacts. Unfortunately none were associat ed with aircraft debris or wreckage. The aircrafts advanced radar capabilities allow the crew to rec ognize and investigate small con tacts on the waters surface. The crew uses the onboard camera sys tem, as well as a multitude of sen sors, to investigate the contacts. While on station, the crew uses all of the aircrafts sensors to iden tify objects in the water since we dont know exactly how big the debris may be, said Lt. Joshua Mize, a P-8A Poseidon tactical coordinator. There are many factors that come into play that could improve or decrease the efficiency of the search. While the process may seem simple, factors such as the number of ships or objects in the area, sea state, drift rate, and visibility can affect how much area were able to cover, Mize added. The search grid used varies from flight to flight. Not only does the crew have to account for various environmental factors, the dis tance to the search area is also taken into account. Depending on the transit dis tance, some flights may only have 2-3 hours of search time, Mize said. Our goal is to cover as much area as possible while still being thorough with our search. Being thorough is critical, especially in a search like this. In terms of mission effectiveness and reliability, the P-8A represents a leap forward for the Navys mari time patrol and reconnaissance. The aircraft has a maximum speed of 490 knots, a ceiling of 41,000 feet, and provides a range of more than 1,200 nautical miles with four hours on station. Having the flexibility and readi ness that comes with the practical ity of the P-8A airframe (Boeing 737), as well as our well-trained aircrews and maintenance team, we have been able to continuous ly meet and exceed our mission requirements, said AMCS Carlos Ure, the search and rescue detach ment senior enlisted leader. Our maintenance and aircrew teams continue to work together to have the Poseidon ready and safe for flight. Being able to work off of a com mercial airframe, such as the 737, the Poseidon maintenance person nel have the ability to use both mil itary and civilian assets to perform necessary maintenance. So far, we have been able to accomplish all of the pre-flight, daily and turnaround require ments using whatever resources we have available, be it military or civilian resources, Ure said. VP-16 is currently conducting the first operational deployment with the P-8A Poseidon in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility sup porting security and stability in the Indo-Asian Pacific. The new P-8A is part of the Navys commitment to the Pacific rebalance, bringing newer and more capable aircraft to 7th Fleet to ensure the Navy is best postured to honor its security commitments to the Indo-Asia-Pacific and con tribute to regional security and stability. aboard ships whose primary mission is conducted at sea. This increase, the first since 2001, is intended to compensate Sailors for extended deployments, and is expected to take place early this summer. Additionally, Sailors may qualify for Sea Duty Incentive Pay (SDIP), if they serve in specific rat ings, pay grades and/or NECs and agree to remain on sea duty past their Prescribed Sea Tour (PST), volunteer for a back-to-back sea tour, or curtail their current shore duty and return early to sea duty. Sailors who wish to extend at sea or return to sea duty early may be entitled to receive an incen tive pay along with a choice of duty station via the Voluntary Sea Duty Program (VSDP). Updated instructions outlining the VSDP guidelines are forthcoming, but Sailors can continue to refer to NAVADMINs 043/12 and 205/12 until the updates are released. The Chief Petty Officer (CPO) Early Return to Sea, announced in NAVADMIN 230/12, authorized detailers to fill opening high priority E7-E9 sea duty billets using their authorized transfer window in conjunction with the candidates current length of time on shore, recent advancement, fleet experi ence, and Navy Enlisted Classifications. When the CPO Early Return to Sea initiative was implemented, we were focused very hard on improving the Supervisor (E7-E9) manning at sea. However, we know that journeymen require ments are also important, particularly within the technical (NEC) skills. With this initiative we are trying to create a more holistic improvement in sea duty manning by expanding this initiative to E4-E9 Sailors, said Dodge. Navy detailers now will have increased flexibility in filling anticipated fleet vacancies on time with a fully trained and qualified relief, according to NAVADMIN 058/14. This is one more tool to ensure proper manning of the fleet for all Sailors. For more information about the programs avail able, talk to a command career counselor or visit www.npc.navy.mil. DETAILERSFrom Page 7 Photos by Eric PastorAM2 Matthew Walton, assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 16, sprays down a P-8A Poseidon with fresh water before its flight to assist in search and rescue operations for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. VP-16 is deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility supporting security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. Lt. Joshua Mize, a tactical coordinator assigned to VP 16, completes his pre-flight checklist in a P-8A Poseidon prior to a March 19 mission to assist in search and rescue operations for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. VP-16 can fly a 10-hour mission in the new twin-engine patrol aircraft. VP-16From Page 1 VP-45From Page 1 Photo by MC1 Michelle LuchtPatrol Squadron (VP) 45 "Pelicans" flight crew and a CNN reporting team stand alongside a P-8A Poseidon after their March 21 flight from NAS Jacksonville.Photo by AWO2 Joshua EichhornCPRW-11 Commanding Officer Capt. Captain Sean Liedman, explains the pur pose of a sonobouy to CNN National Correspondent David Mattingly during a March 21 familiariza tion flight on board a P-8A Poseidon assigned to VP-45 at NAS Jacksonville.

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War Eagles celebrate elders By Lt. j.g. Christi MorrisseyVP-16 Public Affairs OfficerTaking a brief respite from the daily grind of deployment, eight War Eagles from Patrol Squadron VP-16 traveled to a retirement home in Okinawa City, Japan to help residents celebrate birthdays for those born in the month of March. The officers and enlist ed personnel assisted workers at the home to hand out cake and juice to the residents. In addition to the food and beverages, squadron members were also given the opportunity to par ticipate in a traditional Japanese dance as part of the entertainment for the residents. Lt. j.g. Jason Rutherford remarked, Not only were we able to bring smiles to their faces, but it also gave us a glimpse of Japanese culture. I had never par ticipated in a traditional Japanese dance prior to today. I had a great time although Im sure I looked like I had two left feet. Its always nice to be able to give back to the community. The Okinawan people have been extremely accom modating to our mili tary. This is the least we can do to show them how much we appreciate their support, said Lt. j.g. Edward Potts-Szoke. As a squadron, weve been pushing hard since we arrived in Japan. It was nice taking a break to help out those in need. The community ser vice coordinator for the squadron, AWO1 John Herrman, spoke about why volunteerism is so important. We want to show the Navys and the War Eagles commitment to our communities, both at home and overseas. Throughout our deploy ment we have provided opportunities for our Sailors to make a posi tive impact on those around us. Not only does it enrich our Sailors lives, but it also continues to strengthen our bond with the local population. We are looking forward to the many more volunteer opportunities we will have out here. Home based at NAS Jacksonville, VP-16 is in the midst of its first operational deployment with the Navys new P-8A Poseidon. The squadron is currently deployed to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. Photos courtesy of VP-16 Sailors from VP-16 helped celebrate March birthdays of senior citizens at a retire ment home in Okinawa City, Japan. In addition to other activities, the War Eagles participated in a traditional Japanese fan dance to entertain the residents. Lt. j.g. Christi Morrissey serves juice to residents of a retirement home in Okinawa City, Japan. The "War Eagles" spent an afternoon volunteering at the party to honor those residents with March birthdays. Photos by Shannon LeonardNAS Jax Youth Activities Center children are busy building and painting pencil boxes during the Home Depot sponsored Kids Workshop on March 19.Hands-on workshopNikki Gomez, an employee of the Fleming Island Home Depot, assists Willow Farrington in making a minidry erase board during the Kids' Workshop on March 19 at the NAS Jax Youth Activities Center. (Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services.) JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014 9

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By MC3 Shaun GriffinUSS George H.W. Bush Public AffairsMore than 5,000 Sailors serving in the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group (GHWB CSG) arrived in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility (AOR) following a routine transit through the Suez Canal, March 19. While in the 5th Fleet AOR, CSG 2 and its accompanying units will continue to provide a wide range of flexible capa bilities in theater security cooperation and maritime security operations. Commanded by Rear Adm. DeWolfe Miller, GHWB CSG 2 is comprised of the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), Carrier Air Wing 8, Destroyer Squadron, guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58), guided-missile destroyer USS Truxtun (DDG 103), and guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80). Recent operations in the 6th Fleet AOR coupled with a lot of hard work and training over the last year has prepared us well said Miller. Our presence here will help main tain stability, security and safety in the region. GHWB CSG 2 is deployed as part of the ongoing rotation of forwarddeployed forces to support maritime security operations and operate in international waters across the globe, along with other coalition maritime forces. The strike group is prepared to conduct a variety of missions, including forward naval presence, maritime secu rity operations, and crisis response and theater security cooperation. Were ready to take the watch, added Miller. Harry S. Truman has done a remarkable job, and were ready to execute a seamless transition. USS Truxtun remains in the Black Sea conducting theater security coopera tion activities with NATO allies and will join the strike group after its operations there are complete. NAVCENT is responsible for approxi mately 2.5 million square miles of area including the Arabian Gulf, Gulf of Oman, North Arabian Sea, Gulf of Aden, and the Red Sea. NAVCENTs mission is to conduct maritime security opera tions, theater security cooperation efforts, and strengthen partner nations maritime capabilities in order to pro mote security and stability in the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility. By MCC Julianne MetzgerCNO Public AffairsIn a one-on-one interview last week and dur ing his March 18 all hands call at Naval Station Mayport, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert asserted that changes to the military retirement system are far from taking effect and that there is no plan in place to change it. Greenert made it clear at the all hands call and in a recent Conversation with a Shipmate interview, If you wear the uniform today, todays retirement system is your retirement system. Pushing back on recent retirement articles, Greenert told Sailors in Mayport, There is no plan today to change retirement. Greenert said the rumors of retirement changes stem from the Department of Defense recom mendations to the Military Compensation and Retirement Modernization Commis-sion review ing military retirement for Congress. The president established the commission to conduct a review of military compensation and retirement systems. The commission is tasked to submit a report of its findings, along with its recommendations, by May 1, to the president and congress. Any retirement change that would take place is quite a ways down the road, said Greenert. When asked about the possibility of a new retire ment system, Greenert said, Its going to be a few years before we get one put together, studied, voted on and implemented. An overhaul to military retirement is being considered to ensure fiscal sustainability for the Armed Forces as well as ensure quality of life for service members who choose to make the military a career. Greenert said if there are changes, service mem bers will have the option to transition to a new system but will still have the option to stay in the current retirement system under which they signed up. George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group enters 5th FleetPhoto by Lt. Juan David Guerra The Nimitz-class aircraft carriers USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) and USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) transit during a turnover of responsibility on March 22 in the Arabian Sea. George H.W. Bush is supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of Responsibility.Photo by MC2 Martin CareyCNO says no plan to change retirementIn a one-on-one interview last week and during the March 18 all hands call at Naval Station Mayport, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert asserted that changes to the military retirement system are far from taking effect and that there is no plan in place to change it. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014 11

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By Cheryl PellerinAmerican Forces Press ServiceShrunken but stable Defense Department budgets through fiscal 2015 allow the Navy an acceptable forward presence and have temporarily restored critical training and operations, but the force still faces shortfalls, backlogs and higher risks, the chief of naval operations said March 12. Navy Adm. Jonathan Greenert joined Navy Secretary Ray Mabus Jr. and Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James Amos before the Senate Armed Services Committee to testify on the Navys fiscal year 2015 budget request. Forward presence is our mandate. We operate forward to give the president the options to deal promptly with contingen cies, Greenert told the panel, directing their attention to small charts he gave them showing the global distribution of deployed ships, bases and support areas. Our efforts are focused in the AsiaPacific, I think you can see that, and the Arabian Gulf, Greenert said. But we provide presence and we respond as needed in other theaters as well. Over the past year, the Navy influ enced and shaped the decisions of lead ers in the Arabian Gulf, Northeast Asia and the Levant, and patrolled off the shores of Libya, Egypt and Sudan to pro tect American interests, he added. With the Marine Corps, the Navy relieved suffering and provided assis tance in the Philippines in the wake of typhoon Haiyan last November, dis suaded coercion against U.S. allies and friends in the East and South China seas, the admiral said, kept piracy at bay in the Horn of Africa and continues to support operations in Afghanistan. The 2014 budget will enable an acceptable forward presence. Through the remainder of the year well be able to restore a lot of our fleet training and our maintenance and our operations, and well recover a substantial part of the 2013 backlog that weve talked about quite a bit in this room, Greenert told the senators. The presidents 2015 budget submis sion enables us to continue to execute these missions, but were going to face some high risk in specific missions artic ulated in the defense strategic guidance, he added. The CNO said the Navys fiscal guid ance through the DOD five-year Future Year Defense Plan is about halfway between severe cuts required by the Budget Control Act caps, also known as sequestration, and the presidents fiscal 2014 plan. Its still a net decrease of $31 billion when compared with the presi dents fiscal 2014 plan. To prepare the Navys program within those constraints, Greenert said, he set the following priorities and Mabus sup ported him. rent; to win decisively; above; capabilities and maintain a technologi cal edge; and Using these priorities, we built a bal anced portfolio of capabilities within the fiscal guidance we were provided, the admiral said. We continue to maximize our presence in the Asia-Pacific and the Middle East, using innovative combina tions of rotational forward-based rota tional forces, forward basing and for ward-stationed forces. The Navy still faces shortfalls in sup port ashore and a backlog in facilities maintenance that erode the ability of its bases to support the fleet, he said, and has slowed modernization in areas that are central to staying ahead of or keep ing pace with technologically advanced adversaries. As a result, we face higher risk if con fronted with a high-tech adversary or if we attempt to conduct more than one multiphase major contingency simulta neously, he added. As I testified before you in September, he told the committee chairman, Im troubled by the prospect of reverting to the Budget Control Act revised caps in 2016. That would lead to a Navy that is just too small and lacking the advanced capabilities needed to exe cute the missions that the nation expects of the Navy. Greenert said such a Navy would be unable to execute at least four of the 10 primary missions laid out in the 2012 Defense Strategic Guidance and the 2014 Quadrennial Defense Review, and its ability to respond to contingencies would be dramatically reduced in that future scenario. It limits our options and the nations decision space, and we would be com pelled to inactivate an aircraft carrier and an air wing, he said. Further, our modernization and our recapitalization would be dramatically reduced, and that threatens our readiness and our indus trial base. If the nation reverts to the Budget Control Act caps, Greenert added, year by year it will leave our country less prepared to deal with crises, our allies trust will wane, and our enemies will be less inclined to be dissuaded or to be deterred. In his remarks to the panel, Amos said the Marine Corps, in its partnership with the Navy, gives the nation an unmatched naval expeditionary capability. This is why I share the CNOs con cerns about the impacts associated with the marked paucity of shipbuilding funds, he said. Americas engagement throughout the future security environment of the next two decades will be undoubtedly naval in character, the Marine Corps comman dant said. To be forward engaged and to be present when it matters most means a need for capital ships, and those ships need to be loaded with United States Marines, Amos added. Expeditionary naval forces are Americas insurance policy. Were a hedge against uncertainty in an unpre dictable world, the commandant said. The Navy and Marine Corps team pro vides power projection from the sea, responding immediately to crises when success is measured in hours, not in days. If the nation is saddled with the full eight years of sequestration, Amos said, the Marine Corps will be reduced to 175,000 Marines. When we built that force, we started almost a year ago today, and we looked forward expecting sequestration would be signed in March of this past year. So that force of 175,000, with 21 infantry battalions and the appropriate rest of the combat service support, is a fully seques tered force that will maintain itself out into the future, Amos explained. To maintain the near-term readi ness now of those deployed units and those that are about to deploy, he said, Amos said, he reached into operations and maintenance accounts within his authorities and canceled 17 programs. Ill be able to do that for probably another two years, he added. But the 36th commandant will reach a point, probably two years from now, where hes going to have to take a look at that readi ness level and say, Im going to have to lower that so I can get back into these facilities [and] my training ranges that I cant ignore, and the modernization. Otherwise, Amos said, well end up with an old Marine Corps thats out of date. In his remarks to the Senate panel, Mabus discussed the number of ships the Navy would end up with if sequestra tion moves ahead as planned. We would get to a 300-ship Navy by the end of this decade under the current plan, and we would keep it going forward, the secre tary said. The decommissioning of the aircraft carrier USS George Washington would be an issue, Mabus said. Three destroy ers, one submarine, four support ships, and one afloat forward-staging base that we are currently planning to build we could not build at those levels, He said. One of the perverse things that hap pens with sequestration, Mabus said, is that as the Navy takes ships such as destroyers or submarines out of multi year contracts. Were breaking the con tracts, which raises the cost of the indi vidual ships, he told the senators. So we get fewer, and they cost more. In response to a question about wheth er there is an area he considers a spe cial problem area, the secretary cited fair compensation for service members and what he called the unique characteristic that the Navy and Marine Corps give the nation: presence, which he defined as the ability to be forward deployed, the ability to have the right number and the right mix of ships forward, the ability to maintain those ships, the ability to have trained crews on those ships. That pres ence gives the nation options, he added. We the CNO, the commandant and I are working very hard to protect that presence ... with sailors and Marines on those ships to give options to this coun try, he said. From Navy League Mayport The Navy League of Mayport is cel ebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration din ner and program. This is an All Services event featuring a joint color guard, All Services Missing Person table, the Navy Band with all the service songs, and numerous historical displays. Tickets are now on sale for this years event which will be held June 7, at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine.The keynote speak er is Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert. Veterans who served at the Battle of Midway and veterans of all branches who served in prior conflicts, as well as those currently serving are invited to attend. Additionally, Medal of Honor recipients and former Prisoners of War who have heroically answered the call of duty will also be in attendance. Come meet these National Treasures and hear their adventures first hand. The evening promises to be emotion al and patriotic, and provide an excel lent opportunity to connect with sur vivors of what historians call one of the U. S. Navys greatest sea victories and the turning point of World War II in the Pacific. Ticket prices for active duty and spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50, O6 and above $65. Prices for Civilians and Retirees $65. The evening includes fine dining and a memorable program. Uniform will be O4 and above dinner dress white jack et; O3 and below dinner dress white/ dinner dress white jacket optional, and civilian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 5 p.m., with dinner served at 6 p.m. Tickets are mandatory and seat ing is reserved. Ticket sales end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before this date. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER. Tickets may be purchased from the following locations: NAVY LEAGUE MAYPORT Bob Price, 904-246-9982 or 904-718-2118 E-mail: bpricex4@comcast.net NAVY LEAGUE ST AUGUSTINE Bill Dudley, 904-806-4712 or 904-794-7814 E-mail: anuday00@aol.comCNO is Battle of Midway keynote speaker June 7 Greenert: Navy faces support shortfalls, maintenance backlogsPhoto by MCC(SW/EXW) Peter LawlorChief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert makes keynote remarks as the guest speaker at a Camden Partnership luncheon March 18 at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay to discuss the current and future status of the Navy with civic and community leaders and Navy supporters in attendance. Greenert took questions from the group about the future of the littoral combat ship, Ohio-class submarine, and cruiser fleet as well as questions about base realignment and closure affecting Kings Bay. 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live enter tainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaokeFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Jan. 18, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: Jan. 25, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Navy Run Training Program At the fitness center Running group meets every Tuesday at 4 p.m. 9th Annual Captain Chuck Cornett Navy Run April 5 at 8 a.m. Register online at www.1stplacesports. com/calendar.html Lifeguard Course Begins March 14 Sign-up at the base gymI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Alhambra Dinner show $38 $50.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Jacksonville Suns available soon! Rivership Romance (includes dinner) $40$57.75 Disney On Ice $15 Funk Fest 2-Day Ticket $62, VIP $169 Motley Crew Concert Club seats $63.50 Wild Adventures $30 $70 while sup plies last Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27) $166 $194.50 Discover Disney Ticket Florida Resident Ticket valid for sale through April 12. Universal Orlando Military Special 3rd day free Orlando Magic $11 $491 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 THE ARTIST SERIES-BROADWAY IN JACKSONVILLE 2014 SEASON Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation $349-$369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St Augustine $4.25 $15.50 St Augustine Alligator Farm Nile Zipline $35.25 (free admission with reservation) St Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Half Hour Boggy Creek Airboat Rides $15.50 $20 Wild Florida Airboats (Kenansville, FL) $18 $46.75 Florida EcoSafaris $22.75 $52.75 Visit ITT Office to book Shades of Green, Disneyworld Hotel properties, Universal Hotels and off-property hotels near attractions.The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restrict ed to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Ripleys Believe It or Not Museum Trip St. Augustine March 29 at 2 p.m. One Spark Festival Trip April 12 at noon Paintball Trip GTF in Yulee April 19 at 9 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Spring Breakout Championship April 4 at 10 a.m. $40 per person Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty April 8 & 22 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests April 10 & 24 Mondays & Tuesdays Play 18-holes for $20, includes cart and green fees Not applicable on holidays Daily Special Play 18 holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather permittingAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE-certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Month of the Military Family Carnival April 12, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Allegheny Softball Field Easter Egg Hunt April 16, 7 p.m. McCaffrey Softball ComplexFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Learn to fly at NAS Jax Call for introduction flight Additional ratings are available includ ing instrument, complex and commer cial Find more info. online at jaxnfc.netSand Volleyball League forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. Commands whose athletic rules and required paperwork. Rosters are due by March 28, play begins in April. The tournament is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractor women assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants will earn participation points for their command or third. Greybeard Softball League FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractor personnel age 30 and older who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play on Tuesday & Thursday at 11:30 a.m. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Play begins at the end of March or the beginning of April. Intramural Softball League Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Play begins at the end of March or the beginning of April. FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians; DoD contractors; retirees; and dependents over 18. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Play begins at the end of March or the beginning of April.Kickball League FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. Game play at lunch time. Contact the NAS Jacksonville Sports Department at 5422930 for rules and the required paperwork. Rosters are due by April 4. Open to active duty, retirees, dependents over 18, selective reservists, DoD civilians and contractors. The tournament starts at 5 p.m. at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts on the corner of Allegheny Road and Birmingham Road. Call 542-2930 to sign up by April 25.Intramural Golf Summer League Meeting May 7Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. Meet at 11:30 a.m. at the golf or designated representative attend receive and required paperwork. Intramural Basketball League Meeting May 14Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective designated representative attend receive and required paperwork. Meeting May 21Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Meet along with rules and required paperwork.Badminton Singles League Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Meet noon with rules and required paperwork. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil StandingsAs of March 21Badminton Doubles NAVHOSP MSU 5 0 NBHC Jax 4 0 NAVFAC Blue 4 1 CV-TSC Ashore 3 2 MWR Dynamic Duo 3 2 NAVFAC Red 2 3 FACSFAC-2 1 2 FACSFAC-1 1 3 NAVFAC Orange 1 3 NAVFAC Gold 0 4 Ultimate Frisbee CV-TSC Ashore 3 0 VP-30 Students 3 0 VP-62 Broadarrows 2 1 Hitron 1 2 HS-11 1 2 NAS Jax 1 2 NAVFAC/PWD 0 2 VP-10 0 2 NCTS 5 0 VP-45 5 0 CNATTU Blue 4 1 FRCSE 4 1 Navy Band 3 2 VP-30 3 2 HS-11 1 1 CV-TSC/PSD 2 3 VP-10 1 3 SERCC 1 4 FRCSE II 0 1 CNATTU Gold 0 5 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014 13

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By Colie Young, Frank Jordan and Tami BegasseFor the 5,800 veterans and 1,500 active duty military living in the Albany, Ga. area, accessibility to health care services has been expand ed and enhanced thanks to an agree ment between Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The agreement relocates VA healthcare providers and services to NH Jacksonvilles Branch Health Clinic (BHC) Albany aboard the Marine Corps Logistics Base (MCLB). Combining Navy Medicine and VA resources will bring the best in patient care for our active duty and veterans in Albany, said Capt. Gayle Shaffer, NH Jacksonvilles commanding officer. Our collaboration not only expands and enhances care, but we are able to deliver that care in a cost-effective way as good stewards of taxpayer dollars. The VA relocation to BHC Albanys 22,179 square-foot building provides veterans a state-of-the-art facility and access to new ancillary services such as pharmacy, laboratory and radiology. They will also have expanded access to services historically received from pri mary care to mental health. For exist ing BHC Albany service members, new services will include podiatry and optometry as well as access to increased staffing of existing services. The jointly staffed clinic will provide high quality, efficient and convenient care to patients in the region. The joint clinic will complement an existing agreement the VA has with MCLB Albany, entered into May 16, 2013, that provides a separate building near BHC Albany. Carl Vinson VA Medical Center direc tor John Goldman was enthusiastic about the move. In addition to offering primary care, we will expand services for veterans and active duty military to include optometry, audiology, mental health, podiatry, and physical rehabilitation, Goldman said. This move not only benefits our vet erans, it demonstrates superb collabo ration among federal agencies. Working with the Marine Corps and the Navy has been a genuinely rewarding experi ence for us. NH Jacksonville has another joint effort with the VA at its BHC in Key West, Fla. for mental health and physi cal therapy care. Marine Corps Logistics Base Albany is always searching for more opportu nities to become the Marine Corps, as well as the Department of the Navys, best in class installation, said Marine Col. Don Davis, MCLB Albanys com manding officer. This latest part nership with the Naval Hospital in Jacksonville, Fla., and the Carl Vinson VA Medical Center in Dublin, Ga., com bines resources to open a VA commu nity-based outpatient clinic aboard the base. This offers the promise of greater access for veterans and activeduty military, while maximizing exist ing resources and offering potential expansion of medical services in a joint effort. Albany, Ga. provides exemplary instal lation support services to its many ten ants, who in turn, provide vital sup port to the Marine Corps and other Department of Defense operations criti cal to supporting our great nation. Our goals embrace the principles and values of effectively and efficiently managing limited resources, providing a safe and secure installation, ensuring we are good stewards of taxpayer dollars and engaging our local community in mutu ally beneficial partnerships. founding in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. The com mand is comprised of the Navys third largest hospital and five branch health clinics across Florida and Georgia. Of its patient populationabout 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their familiesmore than 60,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities in Dublin, Ga., is one of 153 medi cal centers in the Veterans Health Administration that cares for U.S. military veterans. The medical center serves 38,000 veterans in 52 counties in middle and southeast Georgia and manages community-based outpatient clinics in Albany, Brunswick, Macon, Milledgeville, and Perry. Marines, Navy and VA collaborate on healthcare in GeorgiaPhoto by Yan Kennon Capt. Gayle Shaffer (left), Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles command ing officer, signs a joint agreement March 14 between NH Jacksonville and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) that will expand and enhance active duty and veteran health care services in the Albany, Ga. area. The joint agreement will relocate VA health care providers and services to NH Jacksonvilles Branch Health Clinic (BHC) Albany, aboard Marine Corps Logistics Base, to provide new ancillary services to veterans and increase staff ing for existing BHC patients. Photos by Morgan Kehnert NGIS award-winning performanceThe Navy Gateway Inns and Suites (NGIS) staff gathered at the NAS Jax Officers' Club on March 19 for a special Navy Lodging Program Appreciation Day Luncheon. This event was set aside to celebrate all the accomplishments of 2013, as well as to show appreciation for the employees for all they do in support of the military, retirees and their families. 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014

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By Lt. j.g. Winston MasseyFive Sailors assigned to the Fighting Tigers of VP-8 recently spent a day performing volunteer work for a community outreach program that is making improvements at a local church in El Salvador. The Sailors delivered more than 2,000 pounds of clothing, toys and two dental chairs to Iglesia Gran Comision Church in La Libertad, El Salvador. The donations were made possible by squadron members, family and friends prior to their deploy ment in November 2013. The Sailors also spent time restoring and repairing a much-needed storage area in the Church. They built clothing racks and shelves to organize the items that will be distributed to neighborhood residents. We have received many donations to our organi zation, but we have never received a donation as big as this one, said Mary Marks, one of the volunteers working at the church. The generosity and compassion that VP-8 has shown our community will positively impact the lives of many people. The Iglesia Gran Comision Church is a non-denom inational congregation of local residents and mis sionaries that work to improve the lives of the less fortunate. Some of their work includes nutritional pro grams that provide healthy meals to children whose families may not be able to afford a balanced diet. They also provide a safe haven for battered and abused women and children. The care and assistance La Gran Comision Church provides is a vital lifeline to the Salvadoran community. Some of the things we take for granted back home are the same things that people need here in order to survive, said AWV2 Antonio Willard. Being able to come out and help the church fulfill its mission was both a gratifying and humbling experience. The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 are currently deployed to the 4th and 5th Fleets areas of responsibility assisting in counter trans-national organized crime efforts and providing humanitarian assistance. By Lt. j.g. Torrey PlumVP-8 Public AffairsSailors from VP-8 sup ported the Love and Hope Childrens Home in San Salvador during a March 21 community outreach event. The 14 Sailors from the Fighting Tigers, escort ed 21 youths to a local bowling alley for an after noon of food, fun and bowling. We love spending time with the children from Love and Hope, said Lt. j.g. Paxie Cordova, a pilot with VP-8. Being able to interact with the children and see their smiling faces has been one of the most rewarding parts of our deployment here in El Salvador. Love and Hope was established in 2003 after outreach workers discov ered orphaned, abused, abandoned and neglect ed children living in a garbage dump. Since then, more than 30 chil dren have been provided food, shelter, safety, edu cation and love. Rachel Sanson, a Love and Hope volunteer, thanked the Fighting Tigers for their support. This bowling outing is a special treat for the Love and Hope kids, she said. It was a fun opportu nity to hang out with new friends and it was by far everyones favorite outing this month. The Fighting Tigers are deployed to the U.S. Naval Force Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet area of responsibil ity, assisting in counter transnational organized crime efforts and provid ing humanitarian assis tance. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet sup port U.S. Southern Commands joint and combined military oper ations by employing maritime forces in coop erative maritime security operations to maintain access, enhance interop erability, and build enduring partnerships to promote peace, stabil ity, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. VP-8 helps out at Salvadoran churchPhoto courtesy of VP-8VP-8 Sailors recently spent a day building storage shelves at a local Salvadoran church.Fighting Tigers support childrens home in San SalvadorPhoto courtesy of VP-8 "Fighting Tigers" recently spent some quality time with orphans when they sponsored a bowling event. Bringing the hospital to the poor... Provided as a public service. CFC ParticipantBringing the hospital to the worlds poor JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014 By Jim Garamone American Forces Press ServiceDefense Secretary Chuck Hagel has ordered a comprehensive review of the military decorations and awards pro gram, Pentagon Press Secretary Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby said March 20. The secretary wants to capture the lessons learned from 13 years of com bat to improve the program, Kirby said. The review will begin in June under the direction of Jessica Wright, acting undersecretary of defense for personnel and readiness. It is due to be completed in June 2015. Wright will consult closely with Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, as well as the military department secretaries and chiefs and the combatant command ers, Kirby said during a Pentagon news conference. Secretary Hagel believes this is a sol emn obligation for the Department of Defense, one that we can never take lightly, the admiral said. The review will focus on ensuring that the awards program appropriately recognizes all levels of combat valor, as well as the service, sacrifices and actions of all our service members. The review will examine how the awards program is structured to make sure that it fully reflects the joint nature of warfare, the admiral said. It will examine the processes and procedures of how medals for valor are nominated in order to determine whether they can be improved or streamlined and help make the overall awards process more timely, he added, and it will deter mine the best way to recognize service members who use remote technology to directly impact combat operations, such as through cyber and remotely piloted aircraft. Some awards and decorations are ser vice-specific, and others cut across the military. The secretary recognizes joint military operations have become the norm, Kirby told reporters. You dont have to look any farther than what we accomplished in Iraq and Afghanistan to see how joint the services have become, he said, and I think its a fair question to ask: do we need to look at the kinds of awards that we give, par ticularly for combat valor, in a more joint nature than perhaps some of them are? It doesnt mean that there will be changes, but I think he wants to look at everything across the whole scope. Hagel wants the panel to examine how the services submit and evaluate and decide on major combat awards, Kirby said. I think he would like to get a better sense of what discrepancies there may be between the services, and do those discrepancies need to be closed? he added. The answer may be no. But I think he wants to ask those questions. Families plan time away at ITT Travel FairBy Morgan KehnertMWR Marketing AssistantThe 24th ITT Travel Fair took place March 15 at the NAS Jax Navy Exchange courtyard. With disk jockeys from Unique DJ Entertainment providing the music, the mood at the Travel Fair was upbeat and more than 900 patrons were pleased to be able to speak directly with 53 vendors from attrac tions and resorts located in Orlando, St. Augustine, Kissimmee and Jacksonville as well as attractions and hotels in both Georgia and North Carolina. Not only did the vendors contrib ute to increased sales within the ITT (Information, Tickets Tours) Office, they also provided a one-on-one expe rience for customers to learn about new and upcoming enhancements at their attraction or hotel. When asked about the overall success of the event, ITT Manager Julie Kieffer said, We want to take care of our military by offering the best prices possible. We could not do that with out the support of our vendors. I am thankful for our ITT staff and the vol unteers for all they did to help make this a successful event. I also want to personally thank VyStar Credit Union for sponsoring this event. A big thank you to those who par ticipated this year:Best Western Plus Orlando Gateway Hotel Biltmore Estates Boggy Creek Buena Vista Suites Chartwell Hospitality Clarion Inn & Suites International Drive Clarion Inn & Suites Maingate Clay County Tourism CoCo Key Hotel & Water Resort Valley Comfort Inn Main Gate Hotel Kissimmee Comfort Suites Maingate East Kissimmee Comfort Inn & Suites Universal Experiences Kissimmee Fun Spot America Georgia Aquarium Georgia Visitors Center Kingsland HI Development DBA Holiday Isle Oceanfront Holiday Inn & Suites Universal Homes 4UU Inn at Ellis Square Savannah Kennedy Space Center Maingate Resort and Spa Medieval Times Dinner & Tournament Military Resort Rentals Old Town Trolley Tours St. Augustine Pirates Town Dinner Adventure Play Harder Tours Quality Inn Historic Ramada Jacksonville Baymeadows Ramada Maingate West Red Roof Inns SeaWorld Parks and Entertainment Seralago Hotel & Suites Stay Sky Hotels and Resorts Sleuths Mystery Dinner Shows St. Augustine Pirate and Treasure Museum St. Augustine Ponte Vedra & Beaches VCB Star Island Resort & Club Universal Orlando Visit Central Florida Contempo Vacation Homes Walt Disney World Warrior City Westgate Resorts Wet N Wild Wild Adventures Wonder Works World Quest Resort World of Coca-Cola Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. Airliner search funding could last until AprilBy Army Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone Marshall Jr. American Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department estimates funding set aside for assistance to the Malaysian government in the search for missing Malaysia Flight 370 could last until April, a Pentagon spokesman said March 21. Army Col. Steve Warren provided the departments costs in response to a query from Pentagon reporters earlier this week. As of now, weve set aside $4 million to aid in the search, he said. Based on our current expenditures, we expect these funds will last until sometime in the beginning of April. The total cost for supporting the search for Flight 370 is now about $2.5 million, Warren said. This includes operating costs of the ships and aircraft currently support ing the search, he added. Variables such as the number of flight hours or any other assets that may be dedi cated to the search could affect this esti mate, Warren noted. The colonel pointed out that some of the cost would have been incurred even without providing assistance to the search, because the USS Kidd was already out and operating. With two aircraft currently assisting the search, and the Navy ships previously ded icated to the efforts, Warren said the U.S. is doing all it can. Weve offered the P-8 [Poseidon] and the P-3 [Orion] that are participating, noting that President Barack Obama and Pentagon Press Secretary Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby have made clear that were providing everything that we can. Earlier this week, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel reaffirmed the U.S. commit ment to assisting in the ongoing search for the missing flight during a phone call with Malaysian Defense Minister Hishammuddin Tun Hussein. Warren said that plans are to move the P-3 Orion assisting in the search to the southern search area in coordination with Australia. Its still up in the Bay of Bengal now, he said. There is a plan for it to move further south. I dont have an exact timeline, but I believe its moving south toward the Cocoa Islands. Hagel orders review of military decorations, awards program Photos by Morgan KehnertAt the 24th ITT Travel Fair, Sales Manager Laura Graham of Wild Adventures Theme Park in Valdosta, Ga,. helps familiarize Ken Snyder about the theme park and its upcoming concert series. Siblings Jayln, Jaden and Justin Hope fill out a raffle ticket alongside Simon Benson at the VyStar Credit Union booth manned by Brad Smith and Basilia Brown.

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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, MARCH 27, 2014 I I D E VR-62 COC Smith Relieves Scarpino Page 3 NATU RE CENTE R Kids & Kritters Interact Pages 4 & 5 FACSFAC COC Parker Relieves Petre Page 6Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com From StaffCommander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 11 Capt. Sean Liedman held flight line news conferenc es March 18 and 21 at NAS Jacksonville to update media on Malaysian Air Flight MH370. The latest P-8 Poseidon mis sions flown by VP-16 in Australia March 23 did not discover any new information regarding the whereabouts of Malaysian Air Flight MH370. The search was flown 1,500 miles south and west of Perth Australia; in the vicinity of where the previously reported satellite imagery indi cated possible debris, explained Liedman. The crew searched an area of 1,200 square miles, which is less than what they searched in their previous missions due to the fact they decreased the track spacing of the ladder search in order to increase the visual probability and protection of small objects in the water. I anticipate they will con tinue to fly one mission per day until the mission is complete or CPRW-11 keeps media informedPhoto by AWO2 Joshua Eichhorn A CNN production team records a segment with National Correspondent David Mattingly dur ing a March 21 familiarization flight on board a P-8A Poseidon, as Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing-11 Capt. Sean Liedman (right) observes. Harry S. Truman, CVW-3 conclude OEF supportHSM-74 plans returnBy MCSN Emily BlairUSS Harry S. Truman Public AffairsCarrier Air Wing (CVW) 3, embarked on board aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (HST CSG), completed its final sortie in support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), March 19. CVW-3 flew more than 2,900 sor ties and more than 16,400 flight hours in support of OEF beginning Aug. 27, 2013. Lt. Ian Higgins, assigned to the Swordsmen of Strike Fighter Squadron 32, took part in the final combat sortie, flying an F/A-18F Super Hornet. He flew 27 OEF missions, totaling nearly 170 flight hours. It has been an honor supporting the troops on the ground, said Higgins. Launching our final mission was like any other day, we had to remain focused. Finishing our support of OEF may mean that we are closer to going home, but we still had to make sure the troops on the ground can make it home safely too. Sailors and Marines performed maintenance, and launched and recovered aircraft daily throughout seven months of OEF support. Capt. George Wikoff, commander, CVW-3, said teamwork was the key to successful OEF operations. It begins and ends with teamwork, said Wikoff. We executed our missions safely and just as we practiced during our pre-deployment exercises. To do that, every Sailor and Marine, every main tainer and every pilot, worked together. That teamwork is what enabled us to provide continuous support to coalition warfighters on the ground in Afghanistan. Wikoff said that while teamwork within the air wing was key, teamwork between the air wing and Harry S. Truman was equally as crucial. Team Truman was a major reason we were so successful, he said. Theyre the ones that launch and recover our aircraft and work non-stop From U.S. 7th Fleet Public AffairsA P-8A Poseidon patrol aircraft com pleted its transition from Kuala Lumpur to Perth, Australia on March 18 to continue the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 in the southern Indian Ocean. The search has expanded to the southern portions of the Indian Ocean and the P-8A has the range required to reach those waters, said Lt. Clayton Hunt of Patrol Squadron (VP) 16, the search and rescue detachment mission commander. We will be most effective operating out of Perth. For a mission such as the MH370 search, the P-8 will typically fly at 5,000 feet, dipping to 1,000 feet to get a closer visual look at objects. They typi cally fly at a speed of 250-270 knots, with a search time of eight to nine hours depending on the distance to search area. Even though we are flying long missions, the purpose behind these missions gives the crew the motivation to overcome any obstacles that may come Photo by MC2 Rob AylwardIn October, rescue swimmer AWR2 Nathan James is hoisted from the Mediterranean Sea in a rescue bas ket from an MH-60R Seahawk heli copter assigned to the "Swamp Foxes" of HSM-74, during a search and rescue exercise with the guidedmissile destroyer USS Mason (DDG 87). Mason was deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group, supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility.Photo by MC2 Eric PastorLt. j.g. Kyle Atakturk (left) and Lt. j.g. Nicholas Horton, naval aviators assigned to VP-16, pilot a P-8A Poseidon during a March 19 mission to assist in search and rescue operations for Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370. VP-16 is temporar ily deployed to Perth, Australia as it continues searching a grid of the southern Indian Ocean.Navys P-8A Poseidon continues MH370 search from Australia Photo by MC2 Andrea PerezAir show season beginsU.S. Navy flight demonstration squadron, the Blue Angels, pilots render a salute after the team's first demonstration March 15 at the Naval Air Facility El Centro Air Show. The Blue Angels are scheduled to perform 68 demonstrations at 34 locations across the U.S. in 2014. The pilots will perform Oct. 25-26 at NAS Jacksonville.See VP-45, Page 8 See Page 8 See Page 8

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014 SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)5487789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley A VT-8 Avenger takes off from the Essex-class aircraft carrier USS Bunker Hill 16. It was the first such mission by carrier aircraft and the first large scale dayof 108,000 tons sunk, and denial of the harbor to the enemy for an estimated six weeks during the World War II Pacific campaign. U.S. Navy photos Two Grumman F9F-2 Panther fighters dump fuel as they fly past the aircraft carquartet of 20mm guns, as well as underwing air-to ground rockets, and bombs of up to 2,000 pounds. From StaffMarch 27 1794 Congress authorizes con struction of six frigates, including USS Constitution. 1799 USS Constitution recaptures American sloop USS Neutrality from France. 1880 USS Constellation departs New York with food for famine victims in Ireland. March 28 1800 Essex is first U.S. Navy vessel to pass Cape of Good Hope. 1814 HMS Phoebe and Cherub cap ture USS Essex off Valparaiso, Chile. Before capture, Essex had captured 24 British prizes during the War of 1812. 1848 USS Supply reaches the Bay of Acre, anchoring under Mount Carmel near the village of Haifa, during expe dition to explore the Dead Sea and the River Jordan. 1970 Lt. Jerome Beaulier and Lt. j.g. Stephen Barkley in an F-4 Phantom II of VF-142 from USS Constellation shot down a MiG-21 while escorting an unarmed Navy reconnaissance plane on a mission near Thanh Hoa, North Vietnam. March 29 1954 Carrier aircraft begin recon naissance near Dien Bien Phu, Indochina. 1960 Launch of first fully inte grated Fleet Ballistic Missile from USS Observation Island. 1973 The last U.S. combat forc es depart South Vietnam. The U.S. Military Assistance Command Vietnam was disbanded, officially ending U.S. military involvement in South Vietnam. Operation Homecoming concluded when the final group of 148 American POWs was released by Hanoi. Of the 591 POWs released, 144 were naval pilots and aircrewmen. March 30 1944 First use of torpedo squadrons (VT-2, VT-8 and VT-16) from aircraft carriers to drop aerial mines. 1972 Easter Offensive begins in Vietnam. March 31 1854 Commodore Matthew Perry negotiates Treaty of Kanagawa to open trade between U.S. and Japan. 1971 Poseidon (C-3) missile becomes operational when USS James Madison began her third patrol carrying 16 tactical Poseidon missiles. 1992 USS Missouri (BB-63), the last active American battleship is decom missioned. April 1 1893 Navy General Order 409 establishes the rate of Chief Petty Officer. 1917 BM1 John Eopolucci, a naval armed guard on board the steamship Aztec, died when his vessel was sunk by a German U-boat. He was the first U.S. Navy Sailor killed in action in World War I. 1942 First Naval Air Transportation Service (NATS) squadron for Pacific operations commissioned. 1943 The first Navy night fighter squadron, VF(N)-75, was established at Quonset Point, R.I., Cmdr. William Widhelm, commanding. 1945 Over 1,200 Navy ships and Army troops begin invasion of Okinawa. 1966 Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Vietnam established. 1967 Helicopter squadron HAL 3 activated at Vung Tau. April 2 1781 U.S. Frigate Alliance cap tures two British privateers, Mars and Minerva. 1827 First Naval Hospital construction begun at Portsmouth, Va. 1947 UN places former Japanese mandated islands under U.S. trustee ship. 1951 First Navy use of jet aircraft as bombers, launched from the aircraft carrier USS Princeton (CV-37). 1960 USS Glacier (AGB-4) begins 12 days of relief operations, provid ing helicopter and boat transportation and emergency supplies to residents of Paramaribo, Suriname after floods. By Sarah Smiley Special ContributorFor the average kid, pre-ado lescence and the teen years are marked with many rites of passage facial hair, deodorant, pimples, crushes and braces. There is the experience of wear ing pants that fit yesterday but are too short today. There are awkward bus rides and annoying parents. And there is the moment you realize going to school without combing your hair only works for 5-year-olds. Military kids have all these things, plus one more: getting a military identification card. As soon as a military depen dent turns 10 years old, they are required to go to the nearest base, have a picture taken and receive their very first, laminated proof of identification. Sounds simple and ordinary maybe even tedious. Unless youre 10. Then its mind-blowing. Suddenly, after just a short decade on this earth, you can fill your wallet with something else besides Monopoly money and trading cards. I remember getting my first ID card. Unfortunately, it was the morning after I busted open my brow in the middle of the night on the headboard of my bed. I have always walked and talked in my sleep, so it was not surprising that I would sit up in my bed and have a conversation with myself. What was surprising was when I laid back down and misjudged the distance between my pillow and the headboard. After a long night in the emer gency room and several stitches later, I was back home waiting for my mom to take me to the base to get my ID card. I dont remember why it was so urgent, why we had to go that day, when I had a black eye and dried blood in my hair. I couldnt take a shower or get the stitches wet. Maybe it was because filling out the insurance papers at the ER was complicated without an ID card, and mom realized I needed my card . like, yesterday. My dad was stationed at NAS Oceana in Virginia Beach, Va., but in my memory, we were not on that base, which was so familiar to me. This is what getting your first ID card does to you it changes an ordinary task into a Field-ofDreams, light-shattering moment of inaccurate memories. For all I knew, I was at the Pentagon. I mean, this was serious. This was my ID card. About two hours later (the ID card office is the military equiva lent of the DMV), I had a laminat ed picture of my smashed eye and stitches. I put it in my My Little Pony wallet next to my favorite puffy sticker of a rainbow. My next thrilling moment at the ID office would be when I got married and went from Sarah Rutherford, dependent of Lindell Rutherford, to Sarah Smiley, dependent of Dustin. And then, last week, it occurred to me, like my mother before me, that I had forgotten to get my oldest boys, now 13 and 11, their ID cards. Were going tomorrow morning to get your identification cards, I said at dinner. Our what? Like that laminated thing in your wallet. We have to have one, too? I want one, Lindell screamed. Do I get one? After I had explained that Lindell was too young, he felt left out. He noticed the excitement surround ing this ID-card thing, and now he wasnt part of it. He started crying. Its okay, Lindell, Owen teased, The military does this ritual first where they stick a needle in your eye and draw blood to prove you are a military dependent. You dont want a needle in your eye, do you? Lindell cried more, now out of fear for his brothers. I wondered how Owen knew just how painful the process would be. No, there wouldnt be actual needles in the eye, but the military isnt ultra efficient when it comes to things like paperwork and records. Sometimes, a needle in the eye is an attractive alternative. The next morning, we drove to the base and parked in front of the personnel building, that Ford noted was precariously close to the recruiting center. It was 9:45 a.m. and Ford had to be back at school by 10:30 (the ID office is only open 7:30 a.m. 3 p.m., which is, of course, school hours. Based on previous experi ence, I wasnt hopeful wed make it. (Have you ever gotten through the DMV in 45 minutes?) Then, something incredible happened. We signed in, and before we could even sit down in the lobby, a nice man in fatigues took us to the office to start the paperwork. No waiting! Twenty minutes later, the boys had crossed a path paved by many military brats including their mom and dad before them. They now had ID cards. Except the boys path seemed too easy. On the way home I told them, Back when I got my ID card, I had to walk two miles both ways in the snow, and I waited 15 hours in the lobby . . Im not sure it really happened that way. But thats how I remem ber it. This Week in Navy History From the HomefrontRite of passage for military brats the ID card FIGHT deadly childhood diseases.St. Jude Childrens Research Hospitalstjude.org A CFC participant provided as a public service.

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VR-62 Nomads welcome new skipperBy AWFCS Michael WendelinVR-62 Public AffairsCmdr. Bryon Smith relieved Cmdr. Anthony Scarpino as commanding officer of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VR) 62 in a March 15 ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 117. Smith joined VR-62 in 2012 as executive officer. He is a 1994 graduate of the University of California, Davis, where he earned a double major in political science and geography. He has accumulated more than 3,000 flight hours and 300 arrested landings. His awards include: the Air Medal for 80 combat missions flown in support of Operations Enduring Freedom and Southern Watch; the Navy/Marine Corps Commendation Medal (three awards); the Joint Service Achievement Medal; and other personal and unit awards. Scarpino expressed his gratitude to the VR-62 Nomads for his very successful tour. It has been a fantastic experience to serve as the skipper of such a hardworking and dedicated group of Sailors. I will never forget the great people who I have served with here and around he world, said Scarpino. During Scarpinos 18-month tenure, the Nomads earned the Golden Wrench, the Golden Anchor and the Noel Davis Battle E awards.While supporting Navy logistics needs around the globe, the Nomads executed 3,209 flight hours in FY 2013. Scarpino is scheduled to report to U.S. Central Command at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, Fla. Cmdr. Jeremy Casella assumed duties as VR-62 executive officer. The Nomads just completed a U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM) detachment for FY 2014 and are preparing for an upcoming U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) detachment.During the recent PACOM detachment the Nomads moved 46 tons of relief materials in support of Operation Damayan (Philippine relief efforts). VR-62 is one of five Navy Reserve C-130T units serving the Navys high priority logistics needs around the globe. Uniform guidance: Shift to summer uniformFrom StaffMilitary members within Commander, Navy Region Southeasts area of responsibility are reminded the summer uniform shift will take effect April 7. The uniform of the day will be: Male/Female Officer/Chief Petty Officer Prescribed: Service Dress White Alternate: Summer White/Service Khaki Male/Female E1-E6 Prescribed: Service Dress White Alternate: Service Uniform Sailors in the southeast region will maintain a sharp military appearance at all times. Officers, chief petty officers, and petty officers will review the latest revisions of the uniform instruction to ensure their knowledge of current standards. Leaders will set the highest standards, instruct their Sailors in proper uniform wear and appearance, and enforce regulations. Cmdr. Byron Smith (left) assumes command of VR-62 from Cmdr. Tony Scarpino as Fleet Logistics Support Wing Commodore Capt. Mark Bailey (center) and NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander (far left) look on. Caroline Smith pins her husband, Cmdr. Bryon Smith, with the command pin during the VR-62 "Nomads" change of command ceremony on March 15 at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 117.Photos courtesy of VR-62 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014 Youth Activities Center vs. natureBy AE2(AW) Samantha Jones Oh, I hope she doesnt bring out a snake, exclaimed a somewhat fearful Chloe Burke, 6, as NAS Jax Assistant Natural Resource Manager Angela Glass welcomed youngsters from the Youth Activities Center (YAC) to the bases Black Point Interpretive Center on March 19. This is where children of all ages can visit to learn the many interesting aspects of nature, ecology and con servation. These youth will learn how insects, birds, fish and other animals interact, explained Glass. Theyre really eager to learn how they can help make the environment better by conserving natural resources. The first group to visit the environ mental education facility center dur ing the YAC spring break field trip were 5to 7-year-olds who appeared to have a blast learning about nature through creative arts and crafts session. The children were encouraged to let their imaginations run wild as they constructed a fish from either paper plates or discarded CDs. As much fun as they had making their fish, the excitement in the room esca lated as Glass introduced the children to one of the more friendly habitants of the center, a Florida Box Turtle. The children were allowed to pet the turtle and asked Glass many questions regarding the reptiles shell. Samia Calloway, 6, explained to one of her classmates some information she learned during the field trip, turtles stay in their shells their whole lives because their spines are connected to their shell. The second group to visit the envi ronmental center was 8to 12-year-olds whom Glass led outside for a hands-on learning experience. As an environmentalist, you may be asked to conduct a species survey to determine the population in a specific area, she said. For underground species, that means using a tool called a burrow scope that consists of flexible tubing with a camera at one end and a video monitor at the other. The camera end is inserted into the burrow and the monitor allows the user to view what is inside. The children were split into groups and used teamwork to conduct a spe cies survey of a simulated burrow. After each group had participated in the simulation, it was time to view a real burrow. Glass led the children to a known Gopher tortoise burrow. Since the species is threatened in this area, Glass held the camera down in the burrow while the children viewed the tortoise from the monitor that was car ried by YAC Child Care Associate Maria Lainez. The children had a great time and talked about the field trip for the rest of the afternoon. They all had their arts and crafts fish to bring home to their parents and were excited they got to pet a turtle, said Shaqunta Jones, teen coordinator at the YAC. The spring break field trip was part of the 4-H healthy living education program. We brought the children there, not only so they could learn about nature, but also teach them to appreciate and respect nature, as well, said Jones. The Florida Soft Shell Turtle is one of the many animals on display at the Interpretive Center. Since the turtle is known to be aggressive, the children were allowed to observe the turtle but not touch. Nicholas Harvey, 7, tries to spot the corn snake hiding in it's terrarium during a field trip to the Black Point Interpretive Center. The Florida Box turtle can be found in damp environments, such as wetlands, marshlands, and near swamps, however, the species does not usually enter water deep enough to swim. (From left) Nathaniel Harvey, 5, and Makayla Johnson, 6, are fascinated by the representation of Florida wildlife as they explore the Interpretive Center. Samia Calloway observes a Florida Box Turtle through a hole in the top of the log as she and her classmates from the NAS Jax Youth Activity Center explore the Black Point Interpretive Center. Angela Glass, assistant natural resource manager for NAS Jax, answers questions about the Florida Box Turtle for the students of the Youth Activities Center during their field trip to the Black Point Interpretive Center on March 19. Nature is the teacher

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014 5 Angela Glass explains why turtles are unable to leave their shells and answers student's questions regarding the species. Nicholas Harvey's favorite part of the field trip was getting to pet the Florida Box Turtle. "It was awesome!" (From left) friends Keirstyn Mounce, 6, and Chloe Burke, 6, hold up their works of art they created during their field trip. "We enjoyed the field trip and were happy the snake wasn't taken out of its cage!" (From left) Makalya Johnson, 6, and Nathaniel Harvey, 5, proudly display their fish made during a nature-inspired arts and crafts session. They both couldn't wait to show their parents what they made. The Florida Soft Shell Turtles long necks allow them to stretch up to the surface of shallow water -in order to breathe without leaving their hiding places. The red-eared slider (left) and Mississippi map turtle are kept in the same aquarium at the Black Point Interpretive Center. Both species are commonly kept as pets because they are enjoyable to watch. Aleiah Calloway, 10, uses the burrow scope monitor to observe inside a simulated burrow and direct her classmates during a demonstration. Angela Glass guides the camera of the burrow scope down a Gopher tortoise burrow while Youth Activites Center Child Care Associate, Maria Lainez, holds the monitor so the children can view the threatened species in its habitat. Children from the Youth Activites Center are led by Angela Glass in a hands-on demonstration of how environmentalists use the burrow scope in order to obtain an accurate species count. (From left) Chloe Burke, 6, and Drake Chavez, 6, get an up-close look at a corn snake during their group walk around of the Black Point Interpretive Center. Photos by AE2(AW) Samantha Jones

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014 By ET1(SW) Patrick HorganFACSFACJAX PAOCmdr. Shannon Parker will relieve Cmdr. Shawn Petre as the 19th commanding offi cer of Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility (FACSFAC) Jacksonville on March 27 at NAS Jax Hangar 117. Parker, a native of Centralia, Ill., has served as an EA-6B Prowler pilot with the VAQ129 Vikings and the VAQ-138 Yellowjackets. He was also a student at the Defense Language Institute Presidio of Monterey, enroute to a Personnel Exchange Program flying the Panavia Tornados with the German Air Force, or Luftwaffe, in Schleswig, Germany. His most other assign ments included the VAQ-133 Wizards, Naval Personnel Command as the Assistant Aviation Officer Community Manager, and most recently, as FACSFAC Jacksonvilles execu tive officer. Parker commended FACSFAC Jacksonvilles outgo ing commanding officer. I want to congratulate skip per Petre on a truly outstand ing tour leading the FACSFAC Jacksonville team. The rela tionship he built with the members of the command and their buy-in to his vision, ensured that the command always set standards that will pay benefits for years to come. Additionally, he was the sole driving force behind numerous operational improvements that overwhelmingly increased the Fleets ability to train and fight. I wish my friend, fair winds and following seas in all future endeavors. During Petres tour as FACSFAC Jacksonville com manding officer, he inspired the command vision of: make a difference every day; be the standard on duty and off duty; trust your shipmates; and be a trusted shipmate to serve the Fleet and our nation with excellence and humility. In his parting remarks, Petre stated, It has been an honor and a privilege to work with and lead the team of professionals at FACSFAC Jacksonville and the Pinecastle Range Complex. The excep tional FACSFAC team clearly made distinctive, positive impacts in their day-to-day support to the Fleet. I wish my good friend and shipmate, Shannon Parker, all the best as he takes the helm. Since establishment in1977, FACSFAC Jacksonville has maintained, controlled and monitored 80,000 square miles of sea and air space along the Southeastern coast of the United States. FACSFAC Jacksonville is responsible for control and scheduling of offshore Fleet operating areas, as well as the Pinecastle Range Complex. Additionally, FACSFAC Jacksonville is the lead military coordinator with the Federal Aviation Agency and other cognizant agencies for Fleet liaison while conducting operations in the Southeastern United States. By Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsFleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) is imple menting ConcertoTM project management software on numerous aircraft repair lines in an effort to increase air craft throughput, reduce turnaround time and provide on time deliveries to warfighting customers. In 2009, FRCSE adopt ed the software created by Realization Technologies, Inc., which applies Theory of Constraints and Critical Chain theory that aided in the repair of P-3 Orion aircraft with structural wing fatigue that threatened to ground one-fourth of the P-3 fleet. The project management software has proven highly successful by providing the P-3 Integrated Product Team (IPT) and its support groups with a first-rate execution tool used on the industrial floor to oversee the progression of aircraft repairs. ConcertoTM is a software tool used for production execution at the floor level to standardize work con tent, control work in progress (WIP), identify work stop bar riers and provide a road map for the production supervi sors, said Gregory Wallace, the FRCSE ConcertoTM imple mentation team lead. They can use this tool to determine the sequence of [repair] operations that occur on the aircraft by allowing them to focus on small buckets of work instead of the big picture. The goal, according to Wallace, is to implement ConcertoTM across all aircraft lines at FRCSE by the end of 2014. We plan to implement ConcertoTM, develop a level of standardization across all aircraft lines and create an aircraft business model for FRCSE, he said. ConcertoTM enables super visors, support groups, team leads and managers to have one common place to com municate and identify barri ers with their teams. The software automatically updates project plans and sets priori ties. It basically provides a road map for the production supervisor and support groups focusing on the critical chain path, said Wallace. FRCSE leaders reunit ed the original FRCSE P-3 ConcertoTM implementa tion team (Gregory Wallace, Tim Knowles, Diane OBrien, Clinton Batten, Rodney Boone and Wilbert Barton) to rollout the software on the remain ing aircraft lines aided by Realization Technologies. We will start with the F/A18 line because that is our biggest and most challenging area, Wallace said. Our first step is to have Realization come in to discuss the benefits of ConcertoTM project management software with our core team members. The implementation team plans to establish a core team for each of the remaining aircraft lines (F/A-18, EA-6B Prowler, T-6/34/44 Trainers and H-60), then value stream map their processes to devel op templates that they will load into the software. Then each IPT will devel op strategies for its aircraft platform to determine WIP capacity and ways to increase throughput utilizing the proj ect management software. After full implementa tion across all aircraft lines, Realization Technologies will assess the depots progress to ensure everything is on track. We are always looking at continuous process improve ment, said Wallace. Every process has uncer tainties. You can plan for the best, but Murphys Law is always going to happen somewhere down the road. This program determines as early as possible those critical chain paths that may cause future issues. An aircraft that has been out in the Fleet always has problems. It may come in for a simple repair but after evaluation, many times we may find something else wrong. ConcertoTM is a really good program and will enhance production on all our lines once fully implemented. By Earl BittnerNAVFAC Southeast Public AffairsSeveral Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast employ ees participated in the annu al Manatee Region, Odyssey of the Mind Regional Tournament held March 1 at Bishop Snyder High School in Jacksonville, Fla. Odyssey of the Mind is an international nonprofit organi zation that promotes creative problem solving, innovative thinking and teambuilding for students ages kindergarten through college. Watching the kids minds work as they come up with creative solutions to the scenarios is just so impressive and inspiring, said NAVFAC Southeast engineer Scott Glass. Glass first got involved in 2002 when his daughter, then a third grade student, brought home a permission slip and said she wanted to compete but only if daddy would be a judge. Volunteers assisted with judging one of five problem solutions presented by teams from Northeast Florida to Gainesville. The students apply creativ ity to solve problems that range from building mechanical devices to presenting their own interpretation of literary clas sics. They then bring solutions to competition on the local, state, and global level. Teams competed in one of three divisions; elementary, middle or high school and presented their eight-minute solution to the judging team in one of five categories where they were scored on the creativity, innovation and quality of their solutions. Categories include vehicle, technical, structural, theatri cal and literary classics prob lems. The winning teams will represent the Manatee Region at the State Tournament April 12 at the University of Central Florida in Orlando. NAVFAC Southeast employees have supported Odyssey of the Mind for sev eral years. This years volun teers included: Ryan Howard, PWD Mayport; Doug Mercer, Assistant Regional Engineer Staff; Trish Loop, PWD Mayport; Scott Glass, South Atlantic IPT; and Cheryl Mitchell, PWD Mayport. Glass and Mercer and their spouses are part of the Manatee Regional Board and have participated in the pro gram for more than a decade. We wore funny hats to add a little light heartedness to the judging, said Glass. We just try to make it fun for everyone, especially some of the more timid participants. Thousands of teams from throughout the U.S. and from about 25 other countries par ticipate in the Odyssey of the Mind program. The 35th Annual World Finals will be hosted by Iowa State University in May. FACSFAC Jax holds change of commandCmdr. Shannon Parker Cmdr. Shawn Petre FRCSE implementing Concerto to all assigned platformsPhotos by Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Overhaul and Repair Supervisor John Bailes (right) explains the F/A-18 engine nacelles repair process to Realization Technologies Inc. representatives Chris Timmer, Barry Scott and Keyur Patel as FRCSE P-3 Production Specialist Rodney Boone (center rear) listens in during a visit to the depot on March 14. FRCSE is implementing Concerto project management software on all aircraft production lines scheduled for completion by years end. Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) F/A-18 Overhaul and Repair Supervisor Chris Caldwell (left) explains operational issues and how Concerto project management software might increase production throughout on the Hornet line with Realization Technologies Inc. representatives Keyur Patel, Barry Scott and Chris Timmer during their visit to the military aviation depot. NAVFAC Southeast personnel judge Odyssey of the Mind competitionPhoto by Scott GlassNAVFAC Southeast employees supported the Odyssey of the Mind Regional Tournament March 1 at Jacksonvilles Bishop Snyder High School in Jacksonville. Volunteers included (from left) Ryan Howard, Doug Mercer, Trish Loop and Scott Glass. Not pictured was Cheryl Mitchell. The volunteers wore funny hats to add a little light heartedness to the judging.

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By AE2(AW) Samantha JonesStaff WriterBack from retirement in the military aviation Bone Yard near Tucson, Ariz., the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) 725 Squadrons newest addition to NAS Jax Hangar 1122 is a maintenance-training helicopter designated Bromeo. This aircraft was refur bished from an SH-60B (Bravo) Seahawk to provide a mainte nance platform that reflects the latest MH-60R (Romeo) heli copter. Despite some minor differ ences in the avionic equip ment, the Bromeo and Romeo are essentially identical. The aircraft will be held to the same airworthiness and mainte nance standards as the squad rons newly acquired Romeos. Although the Bromeo is fully capable of flying, it was pur chased with the sole purpose of providing realistic, hands-on training aide for maintainers. Why didnt the RAN purchase another Romeo helicopter for training instead? Simply cost and effective ness, explained pilot Lt. Mark Flowerdew, RAN 725 Squadron public affairs officer. The Bromeo will provide maintainers and engineering staff with functional ground training without impacting operational readiness. According to Flowerdew, They will have the opportunity to progress in their training journals, build expertise and skill sets, and perform main tenance work that they would normally not have access to on a live aircraft. When all MH-60R Seahawks are flying, viable training may still be achieved by maintain ers though the performance of various tasks such as servic ing hydraulics, knowledge of components, and component removal procedures. For the past three weeks, the Bromeo has undergone preparations to be painted in RAN colors at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast. Upon its return to Hangar 1122, it will resume its new role in expediting maintenance training. In late 2014, the Bromeo will return to Australia by sea for use as a ground training tool in the future MH-60R school house at HMAS Albatross, home of the Royal Australian Navys Fleet Air Arm. From Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsAn increase in enlisted critical at-sea billets has Navy community managers reminding Sailors of the various incentive programs available to them. The Navy has several incentive programs that the enlisted commu nity managers and detailers use to fill vacancies at sea, said Ron Dodge, deputy director of enlisted distribution at Navy Personnel Command. We want to give Sailors good reasons to choose sea duty because that is where we need them. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced in March an upcoming increase in Career Sea Pay (CSP) and Career Sea Pay Premium incentives for eligible Sailors and Marines serving Bromeo is promising training tool for RANRAN sailors vent the Bromeo in preparation to be painted.Photos by AE2(AW) Samantha JonesAble Seaman Tenae Scott prepares the Bromeo to be painted.Tools detailers use for fleet manningSee DETAILERS, Page 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014 7

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8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014 we move on to the next phase of the operation. I would like to underscore that todays results do not indicate mission failure, but rather indicate the daunting chal lenge of locating small objects in the vast expanse maritime domain, Liedman added. According to Liedman, this type of search operations is part of the VP-16 deployment cycle. VP-16 deployed with six P-8 Poseidons to Okinawa last December where they were pos tured to respond to incidents such as this. Immediately after the incident, about three weeks ago, they were tasked by the U.S. Navy 7th fleet commander to reposition the aircraft first to Malaysia, and then to Perth, Australia where they could execute operations in support of the south ern corridor theory, he said. The P-8 has the speed, range and endurance neces sary to execute a search at a range of 1,500 miles from the nearest land. When asked to explain how the search was being conducted, he said, Floating objects in the maritime domain move around significantly due to wind, current and wave action, which complicates the search. We will continue to search until the mission is complete or we move on to the next phase of the search till more information comes to light to refine our search area. It takes the airplane three hours to transit to on station and can remain on station, executing search operations for approximately three to four hours before it returns to the base in Perth. Search operations will be conducted during day light hours only due to the challenge of detecting small objects in the maritime domain. The crew will continue to fly one mission per day during day light hours. VP-16 is executing operations in conjunction with allies and partners in the region. There has been reports that Australian P-3s and New Zealand P-3s are operating alongside VP-16s P-8 in the region. It truly is an international search effort, Liedman stated. When asked how many P-8s were actually deployed to assist with in search he said, VP-16 has six P-8 Poseidons on deployment in Okinawa; they detached one P-8 to Perth Australia to participate in search operations. When asked about what other capabilities the aircraft had that could aid in the search he replied, In addition to the range, speed and endurance that the Poseidon brings, it also has an integrated sensor suite with high definition sensors such as a radar that can detect small objects in the maritime domain. Additionally, it has an advanced communication suite that can transmit imagery from any of those sensors off board via satellite communication links to higher headquarters. TRUMAN CVWFrom Page 1to ensure the ship is ready to execute each days air plan. Without them, we dont launch, and the warfighters dont get the support they need. Capt. Bob Roth, Trumans commanding officer, echoed Wikoff in saying the teamwork between Truman and CVW-3 was the driving force behind successful support for OEF. Aircraft carriers are a powerful tool of diplo macy and power projection, said Roth. We oper ated seamlessly with Carrier Air Wing 3 to provide combat air power from the sea. The understand ing, respect, and unconditional mutual support between this ship and air wing are what I value above all else. Together, we are unstoppable. This teamwork is what allowed us to support the warf ighters on the ground when they needed us to protect them and help them accomplish their mission. HST CSG Commander Rear Adm. Kevin Sweeney praised both CVW-3 and Truman for the safe and successful execution of OEF flight operations. Providing support to the coalition troops on the ground in Afghanistan was one of the main mission areas for us, he said. I could not be more proud of our young Sailors and Marines. They executed precision, professionalism, and lethality when called upon. In doing so, we also helped build trust and confidence with our partners and allies throughout the region. Truman and CVW-3 are scheduled to be relieved by USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) and CVW-8 later this month. CVW-3, based at NAS Oceana, is embarked on Truman with its eight Navy and Marine Corps aircraft squadrons: VFA-32 Swordsmen, VFA-37 Ragin Bulls, VFA -105 Gunslingers, Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 312 Checkerboards, Airborne Early Warning Squadron 126 Seahawks, Electronic Attack Squadron 130 Zappers, Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 7 Dusty Dogs, in addition to Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 74 Swamp Foxes based at NAS Jacksonville. up, said AWO1 Robert Pillars, an acoustic systems operator on the P-8A. During its missions out of Kuala Lumpur, the P-8A crew identi fied more than 400 radar contacts. Unfortunately none were associat ed with aircraft debris or wreckage. The aircrafts advanced radar capabilities allow the crew to rec ognize and investigate small con tacts on the waters surface. The crew uses the onboard camera system, as well as a multitude of sensors, to investigate the contacts. While on station, the crew uses all of the aircrafts sensors to identify objects in the water since we dont know exactly how big the debris may be, said Lt. Joshua Mize, a P-8A Poseidon tactical coordinator. There are many factors that come into play that could improve or decrease the efficiency of the search. While the process may seem simple, factors such as the number of ships or objects in the area, sea state, drift rate, and visibility can affect how much area were able to cover, Mize added. The search grid used varies from flight to flight. Not only does the crew have to account for various environmental factors, the dis tance to the search area is also taken into account. Depending on the transit dis tance, some flights may only have 2-3 hours of search time, Mize said. Our goal is to cover as much area as possible while still being thorough with our search. Being thorough is critical, especially in a search like this. In terms of mission effectiveness and reliability, the P-8A represents a leap forward for the Navys maritime patrol and reconnaissance. The aircraft has a maximum speed of 490 knots, a ceiling of 41,000 feet, and provides a range of more than 1,200 nautical miles with four hours on station. Having the flexibility and readiness that comes with the practicality of the P-8A airframe (Boeing 737), as well as our well-trained aircrews and maintenance team, we have been able to continuous ly meet and exceed our mission requirements, said AMCS Carlos Ure, the search and rescue detachment senior enlisted leader. Our maintenance and aircrew teams continue to work together to have the Poseidon ready and safe for flight. Being able to work off of a com mercial airframe, such as the 737, the Poseidon maintenance personnel have the ability to use both military and civilian assets to perform necessary maintenance. So far, we have been able to accomplish all of the pre-flight, daily and turnaround require ments using whatever resources we have available, be it military or civilian resources, Ure said. VP-16 is currently conducting the first operational deployment with the P-8A Poseidon in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility supporting security and stability in the Indo-Asian Pacific. The new P-8A is part of the Navys commitment to the Pacific rebalance, bringing newer and more capable aircraft to 7th Fleet to ensure the Navy is best postured to honor its security commitments to the Indo-Asia-Pacific and con tribute to regional security and stability. aboard ships whose primary mission is conducted at sea. This increase, the first since 2001, is intended to compensate Sailors for extended deployments, and is expected to take place early this summer. Additionally, Sailors may qualify for Sea Duty Incentive Pay (SDIP), if they serve in specific rat ings, pay grades and/or NECs and agree to remain on sea duty past their Prescribed Sea Tour (PST), volunteer for a back-to-back sea tour, or curtail their current shore duty and return early to sea duty. Sailors who wish to extend at sea or return to sea duty early may be entitled to receive an incentive pay along with a choice of duty station via the Voluntary Sea Duty Program (VSDP). Updated instructions outlining the VSDP guidelines are forthcoming, but Sailors can continue to refer to NAVADMINs 043/12 and 205/12 until the updates are released. The Chief Petty Officer (CPO) Early Return to Sea, announced in NAVADMIN 230/12, authorized detailers to fill opening high priority E7-E9 sea duty billets using their authorized transfer window in conjunction with the candidates current length of time on shore, recent advancement, fleet experi ence, and Navy Enlisted Classifications. When the CPO Early Return to Sea initiative was implemented, we were focused very hard on improving the Supervisor (E7-E9) manning at sea. However, we know that journeymen requirements are also important, particularly within the technical (NEC) skills. With this initiative we are trying to create a more holistic improvement in sea duty manning by expanding this initiative to E4-E9 Sailors, said Dodge. Navy detailers now will have increased flexibility in filling anticipated fleet vacancies on time with a fully trained and qualified relief, according to NAVADMIN 058/14. This is one more tool to ensure proper manning of the fleet for all Sailors. For more information about the programs avail able, talk to a command career counselor or visit www.npc.navy.mil. DETAILERSFrom Page 7 Photos by Eric PastorAM2 Matthew Walton, assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 16, sprays down a P-8A Poseidon with fresh water before its flight to assist in search and rescue operations for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. VP-16 is deployed to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility supporting security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. Lt. Joshua Mize, a tactical coordinator assigned to VP 16, completes his pre-flight checklist in a P-8A Poseidon prior to a March 19 mission to assist in search and rescue operations for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. VP-16 can fly a 10-hour mission in the new twin-engine patrol aircraft. VP-16From Page 1 VP-45From Page 1 Photo by MC1 Michelle LuchtPatrol Squadron (VP) 45 "Pelicans" flight crew and a CNN reporting team stand alongside a P-8A Poseidon after their March 21 flight from NAS Jacksonville.Photo by AWO2 Joshua EichhornCPRW-11 Commanding Officer Capt. Captain Sean Liedman, explains the purpose of a sonobouy to CNN National Correspondent David Mattingly during a March 21 familiarization flight on board a P-8A Poseidon assigned to VP-45 at NAS Jacksonville.

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War Eagles celebrate elders By Lt. j.g. Christi MorrisseyVP-16 Public Affairs OfficerTaking a brief respite from the daily grind of deployment, eight War Eagles from Patrol Squadron VP-16 traveled to a retirement home in Okinawa City, Japan to help residents celebrate birthdays for those born in the month of March. The officers and enlist ed personnel assisted workers at the home to hand out cake and juice to the residents. In addition to the food and beverages, squadron members were also given the opportunity to par ticipate in a traditional Japanese dance as part of the entertainment for the residents. Lt. j.g. Jason Rutherford remarked, Not only were we able to bring smiles to their faces, but it also gave us a glimpse of Japanese culture. I had never par ticipated in a traditional Japanese dance prior to today. I had a great time although Im sure I looked like I had two left feet. Its always nice to be able to give back to the community. The Okinawan people have been extremely accom modating to our mili tary. This is the least we can do to show them how much we appreciate their support, said Lt. j.g. Edward Potts-Szoke. As a squadron, weve been pushing hard since we arrived in Japan. It was nice taking a break to help out those in need. The community ser vice coordinator for the squadron, AWO1 John Herrman, spoke about why volunteerism is so important. We want to show the Navys and the War Eagles commitment to our communities, both at home and overseas. Throughout our deploy ment we have provided opportunities for our Sailors to make a posi tive impact on those around us. Not only does it enrich our Sailors lives, but it also continues to strengthen our bond with the local population. We are looking forward to the many more volunteer opportunities we will have out here. Home based at NAS Jacksonville, VP-16 is in the midst of its first operational deployment with the Navys new P-8A Poseidon. The squadron is currently deployed to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. Photos courtesy of VP-16 Sailors from VP-16 helped celebrate March birthdays of senior citizens at a retirement home in Okinawa City, Japan. In addition to other activities, the War Eagles participated in a traditional Japanese fan dance to entertain the residents. Lt. j.g. Christi Morrissey serves juice to residents of a retirement home in Okinawa City, Japan. The "War Eagles" spent an afternoon volunteering at the party to honor those residents with March birthdays. Photos by Shannon LeonardNAS Jax Youth Activities Center children are busy building and painting pencil boxes during the Home Depot sponsored Kids Workshop on March 19.Hands-on workshopNikki Gomez, an employee of the Fleming Island Home Depot, assists Willow Farrington in making a minidry erase board during the Kids' Workshop on March 19 at the NAS Jax Youth Activities Center. (Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services.) JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014 9

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By MC3 Shaun GriffinUSS George H.W. Bush Public AffairsMore than 5,000 Sailors serving in the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group (GHWB CSG) arrived in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility (AOR) following a routine transit through the Suez Canal, March 19. While in the 5th Fleet AOR, CSG 2 and its accompanying units will continue to provide a wide range of flexible capa bilities in theater security cooperation and maritime security operations. Commanded by Rear Adm. DeWolfe Miller, GHWB CSG 2 is comprised of the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), Carrier Air Wing 8, Destroyer Squadron, guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58), guided-missile destroyer USS Truxtun (DDG 103), and guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80). Recent operations in the 6th Fleet AOR coupled with a lot of hard work and training over the last year has prepared us well said Miller. Our presence here will help main tain stability, security and safety in the region. GHWB CSG 2 is deployed as part of the ongoing rotation of forwarddeployed forces to support maritime security operations and operate in international waters across the globe, along with other coalition maritime forces. The strike group is prepared to conduct a variety of missions, including forward naval presence, maritime security operations, and crisis response and theater security cooperation. Were ready to take the watch, added Miller. Harry S. Truman has done a remarkable job, and were ready to execute a seamless transition. USS Truxtun remains in the Black Sea conducting theater security coopera tion activities with NATO allies and will join the strike group after its operations there are complete. NAVCENT is responsible for approxi mately 2.5 million square miles of area including the Arabian Gulf, Gulf of Oman, North Arabian Sea, Gulf of Aden, and the Red Sea. NAVCENTs mission is to conduct maritime security opera tions, theater security cooperation efforts, and strengthen partner nations maritime capabilities in order to pro mote security and stability in the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility. By MCC Julianne MetzgerCNO Public AffairsIn a one-on-one interview last week and dur ing his March 18 all hands call at Naval Station Mayport, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert asserted that changes to the military retirement system are far from taking effect and that there is no plan in place to change it. Greenert made it clear at the all hands call and in a recent Conversation with a Shipmate interview, If you wear the uniform today, todays retirement system is your retirement system. Pushing back on recent retirement articles, Greenert told Sailors in Mayport, There is no plan today to change retirement. Greenert said the rumors of retirement changes stem from the Department of Defense recom mendations to the Military Compensation and Retirement Modernization Commis-sion review ing military retirement for Congress. The president established the commission to conduct a review of military compensation and retirement systems. The commission is tasked to submit a report of its findings, along with its recommendations, by May 1, to the president and congress. Any retirement change that would take place is quite a ways down the road, said Greenert. When asked about the possibility of a new retirement system, Greenert said, Its going to be a few years before we get one put together, studied, voted on and implemented. An overhaul to military retirement is being considered to ensure fiscal sustainability for the Armed Forces as well as ensure quality of life for service members who choose to make the military a career. Greenert said if there are changes, service members will have the option to transition to a new system but will still have the option to stay in the current retirement system under which they signed up. George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group enters 5th FleetPhoto by Lt. Juan David Guerra The Nimitz-class aircraft carriers USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) and USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) transit during a turnover of responsibility on March 22 in the Arabian Sea. George H.W. Bush is supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of Responsibility.Photo by MC2 Martin CareyCNO says no plan to change retirementIn a one-on-one interview last week and during the March 18 all hands call at Naval Station Mayport, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert asserted that changes to the military retirement system are far from taking effect and that there is no plan in place to change it. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014 11

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By Cheryl PellerinAmerican Forces Press ServiceShrunken but stable Defense Department budgets through fiscal 2015 allow the Navy an acceptable forward presence and have temporarily restored critical training and operations, but the force still faces shortfalls, backlogs and higher risks, the chief of naval operations said March 12. Navy Adm. Jonathan Greenert joined Navy Secretary Ray Mabus Jr. and Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James Amos before the Senate Armed Services Committee to testify on the Navys fiscal year 2015 budget request. Forward presence is our mandate. We operate forward to give the president the options to deal promptly with contingencies, Greenert told the panel, directing their attention to small charts he gave them showing the global distribution of deployed ships, bases and support areas. Our efforts are focused in the AsiaPacific, I think you can see that, and the Arabian Gulf, Greenert said. But we provide presence and we respond as needed in other theaters as well. Over the past year, the Navy influ enced and shaped the decisions of lead ers in the Arabian Gulf, Northeast Asia and the Levant, and patrolled off the shores of Libya, Egypt and Sudan to protect American interests, he added. With the Marine Corps, the Navy relieved suffering and provided assis tance in the Philippines in the wake of typhoon Haiyan last November, dis suaded coercion against U.S. allies and friends in the East and South China seas, the admiral said, kept piracy at bay in the Horn of Africa and continues to support operations in Afghanistan. The 2014 budget will enable an acceptable forward presence. Through the remainder of the year well be able to restore a lot of our fleet training and our maintenance and our operations, and well recover a substantial part of the 2013 backlog that weve talked about quite a bit in this room, Greenert told the senators. The presidents 2015 budget submis sion enables us to continue to execute these missions, but were going to face some high risk in specific missions articulated in the defense strategic guidance, he added. The CNO said the Navys fiscal guid ance through the DOD five-year Future Year Defense Plan is about halfway between severe cuts required by the Budget Control Act caps, also known as sequestration, and the presidents fiscal 2014 plan. Its still a net decrease of $31 billion when compared with the presi dents fiscal 2014 plan. To prepare the Navys program within those constraints, Greenert said, he set the following priorities and Mabus sup ported him. rent; to win decisively; above; capabilities and maintain a technologi cal edge; and Using these priorities, we built a bal anced portfolio of capabilities within the fiscal guidance we were provided, the admiral said. We continue to maximize our presence in the Asia-Pacific and the Middle East, using innovative combina tions of rotational forward-based rota tional forces, forward basing and for ward-stationed forces. The Navy still faces shortfalls in sup port ashore and a backlog in facilities maintenance that erode the ability of its bases to support the fleet, he said, and has slowed modernization in areas that are central to staying ahead of or keep ing pace with technologically advanced adversaries. As a result, we face higher risk if confronted with a high-tech adversary or if we attempt to conduct more than one multiphase major contingency simulta neously, he added. As I testified before you in September, he told the committee chairman, Im troubled by the prospect of reverting to the Budget Control Act revised caps in 2016. That would lead to a Navy that is just too small and lacking the advanced capabilities needed to execute the missions that the nation expects of the Navy. Greenert said such a Navy would be unable to execute at least four of the 10 primary missions laid out in the 2012 Defense Strategic Guidance and the 2014 Quadrennial Defense Review, and its ability to respond to contingencies would be dramatically reduced in that future scenario. It limits our options and the nations decision space, and we would be com pelled to inactivate an aircraft carrier and an air wing, he said. Further, our modernization and our recapitalization would be dramatically reduced, and that threatens our readiness and our indus trial base. If the nation reverts to the Budget Control Act caps, Greenert added, year by year it will leave our country less prepared to deal with crises, our allies trust will wane, and our enemies will be less inclined to be dissuaded or to be deterred. In his remarks to the panel, Amos said the Marine Corps, in its partnership with the Navy, gives the nation an unmatched naval expeditionary capability. This is why I share the CNOs con cerns about the impacts associated with the marked paucity of shipbuilding funds, he said. Americas engagement throughout the future security environment of the next two decades will be undoubtedly naval in character, the Marine Corps commandant said. To be forward engaged and to be present when it matters most means a need for capital ships, and those ships need to be loaded with United States Marines, Amos added. Expeditionary naval forces are Americas insurance policy. Were a hedge against uncertainty in an unpre dictable world, the commandant said. The Navy and Marine Corps team pro vides power projection from the sea, responding immediately to crises when success is measured in hours, not in days. If the nation is saddled with the full eight years of sequestration, Amos said, the Marine Corps will be reduced to 175,000 Marines. When we built that force, we started almost a year ago today, and we looked forward expecting sequestration would be signed in March of this past year. So that force of 175,000, with 21 infantry battalions and the appropriate rest of the combat service support, is a fully sequestered force that will maintain itself out into the future, Amos explained. To maintain the near-term readi ness now of those deployed units and those that are about to deploy, he said, Amos said, he reached into operations and maintenance accounts within his authorities and canceled 17 programs. Ill be able to do that for probably another two years, he added. But the 36th commandant will reach a point, probably two years from now, where hes going to have to take a look at that readiness level and say, Im going to have to lower that so I can get back into these facilities [and] my training ranges that I cant ignore, and the modernization. Otherwise, Amos said, well end up with an old Marine Corps thats out of date. In his remarks to the Senate panel, Mabus discussed the number of ships the Navy would end up with if sequestration moves ahead as planned. We would get to a 300-ship Navy by the end of this decade under the current plan, and we would keep it going forward, the secre tary said. The decommissioning of the aircraft carrier USS George Washington would be an issue, Mabus said. Three destroyers, one submarine, four support ships, and one afloat forward-staging base that we are currently planning to build we could not build at those levels, He said. One of the perverse things that hap pens with sequestration, Mabus said, is that as the Navy takes ships such as destroyers or submarines out of multi year contracts. Were breaking the con tracts, which raises the cost of the indi vidual ships, he told the senators. So we get fewer, and they cost more. In response to a question about whether there is an area he considers a spe cial problem area, the secretary cited fair compensation for service members and what he called the unique characteristic that the Navy and Marine Corps give the nation: presence, which he defined as the ability to be forward deployed, the ability to have the right number and the right mix of ships forward, the ability to maintain those ships, the ability to have trained crews on those ships. That presence gives the nation options, he added. We the CNO, the commandant and I are working very hard to protect that presence ... with sailors and Marines on those ships to give options to this coun try, he said. From Navy League Mayport The Navy League of Mayport is cel ebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration dinner and program. This is an All Services event featuring a joint color guard, All Services Missing Person table, the Navy Band with all the service songs, and numerous historical displays. Tickets are now on sale for this years event which will be held June 7, at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine.The keynote speak er is Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert. Veterans who served at the Battle of Midway and veterans of all branches who served in prior conflicts, as well as those currently serving are invited to attend. Additionally, Medal of Honor recipients and former Prisoners of War who have heroically answered the call of duty will also be in attendance. Come meet these National Treasures and hear their adventures first hand. The evening promises to be emotional and patriotic, and provide an excel lent opportunity to connect with sur vivors of what historians call one of the U. S. Navys greatest sea victories and the turning point of World War II in the Pacific. Ticket prices for active duty and spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50, O6 and above $65. Prices for Civilians and Retirees $65. The evening includes fine dining and a memorable program. Uniform will be O4 and above dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below dinner dress white/ dinner dress white jacket optional, and civilian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 5 p.m., with dinner served at 6 p.m. Tickets are mandatory and seat ing is reserved. Ticket sales end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before this date. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER. Tickets may be purchased from the following locations: NAVY LEAGUE MAYPORT Bob Price, 904-246-9982 or 904-718-2118 E-mail: bpricex4@comcast.net NAVY LEAGUE ST AUGUSTINE Bill Dudley, 904-806-4712 or 904-794-7814 E-mail: anuday00@aol.comCNO is Battle of Midway keynote speaker June 7 Greenert: Navy faces support shortfalls, maintenance backlogsPhoto by MCC(SW/EXW) Peter LawlorChief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert makes keynote remarks as the guest speaker at a Camden Partnership luncheon March 18 at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay to discuss the current and future status of the Navy with civic and community leaders and Navy supporters in attendance. Greenert took questions from the group about the future of the littoral combat ship, Ohio-class submarine, and cruiser fleet as well as questions about base realignment and closure affecting Kings Bay. 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live entertainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaokeFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Jan. 18, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: Jan. 25, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Navy Run Training Program At the fitness center Running group meets every Tuesday at 4 p.m. 9th Annual Captain Chuck Cornett Navy Run April 5 at 8 a.m. Register online at www.1stplacesports. com/calendar.html Lifeguard Course Begins March 14 Sign-up at the base gymI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Alhambra Dinner show $38 $50.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Jacksonville Suns available soon! Rivership Romance (includes dinner) $40$57.75 Disney On Ice $15 Funk Fest 2-Day Ticket $62, VIP $169 Motley Crew Concert Club seats $63.50 Wild Adventures $30 $70 while supplies last Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27) $166 $194.50 Discover Disney Ticket Florida Resident Ticket valid for sale through April 12. Universal Orlando Military Special 3rd day free Orlando Magic $11 $491 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 THE ARTIST SERIES-BROADWAY IN JACKSONVILLE 2014 SEASON Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation $349-$369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St Augustine $4.25 $15.50 St Augustine Alligator Farm Nile Zipline $35.25 (free admission with reservation) St Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Half Hour Boggy Creek Airboat Rides $15.50 $20 Wild Florida Airboats (Kenansville, FL) $18 $46.75 Florida EcoSafaris $22.75 $52.75 Visit ITT Office to book Shades of Green, Disneyworld Hotel properties, Universal Hotels and off-property hotels near attractions.The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Ripleys Believe It or Not Museum Trip St. Augustine March 29 at 2 p.m. One Spark Festival Trip April 12 at noon Paintball Trip GTF in Yulee April 19 at 9 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Spring Breakout Championship April 4 at 10 a.m. $40 per person Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty April 8 & 22 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests April 10 & 24 Mondays & Tuesdays Play 18-holes for $20, includes cart and green fees Not applicable on holidays Daily Special Play 18 holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather permittingAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE-certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Month of the Military Family Carnival April 12, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Allegheny Softball Field Easter Egg Hunt April 16, 7 p.m. McCaffrey Softball ComplexFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Learn to fly at NAS Jax Call for introduction flight Additional ratings are available including instrument, complex and commercial Find more info. online at jaxnfc.netSand Volleyball League forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. Commands whose athletic rules and required paperwork. Rosters are due by March 28, play begins in April. The tournament is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractor women assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants will earn participation points for their command or third. Greybeard Softball League FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractor personnel age 30 and older who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play on Tuesday & Thursday at 11:30 a.m. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Play begins at the end of March or the beginning of April. Intramural Softball League Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Play begins at the end of March or the beginning of April. FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians; DoD contractors; retirees; and dependents over 18. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Play begins at the end of March or the beginning of April.Kickball League FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. Game play at lunch time. Contact the NAS Jacksonville Sports Department at 5422930 for rules and the required paperwork. Rosters are due by April 4. Open to active duty, retirees, dependents over 18, selective reservists, DoD civilians and contractors. The tournament starts at 5 p.m. at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts on the corner of Allegheny Road and Birmingham Road. Call 542-2930 to sign up by April 25.Intramural Golf Summer League Meeting May 7Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. Meet at 11:30 a.m. at the golf or designated representative attend receive and required paperwork. Intramural Basketball League Meeting May 14Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective designated representative attend receive and required paperwork. Meeting May 21Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Meet along with rules and required paperwork.Badminton Singles League Open to active duty, DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Meet noon with rules and required paperwork. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil StandingsAs of March 21Badminton Doubles NAVHOSP MSU 5 0 NBHC Jax 4 0 NAVFAC Blue 4 1 CV-TSC Ashore 3 2 MWR Dynamic Duo 3 2 NAVFAC Red 2 3 FACSFAC-2 1 2 FACSFAC-1 1 3 NAVFAC Orange 1 3 NAVFAC Gold 0 4 Ultimate Frisbee CV-TSC Ashore 3 0 VP-30 Students 3 0 VP-62 Broadarrows 2 1 Hitron 1 2 HS-11 1 2 NAS Jax 1 2 NAVFAC/PWD 0 2 VP-10 0 2 NCTS 5 0 VP-45 5 0 CNATTU Blue 4 1 FRCSE 4 1 Navy Band 3 2 VP-30 3 2 HS-11 1 1 CV-TSC/PSD 2 3 VP-10 1 3 SERCC 1 4 FRCSE II 0 1 CNATTU Gold 0 5 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014 13

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By Colie Young, Frank Jordan and Tami BegasseFor the 5,800 veterans and 1,500 active duty military living in the Albany, Ga. area, accessibility to health care services has been expand ed and enhanced thanks to an agree ment between Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The agreement relocates VA healthcare providers and services to NH Jacksonvilles Branch Health Clinic (BHC) Albany aboard the Marine Corps Logistics Base (MCLB). Combining Navy Medicine and VA resources will bring the best in patient care for our active duty and veterans in Albany, said Capt. Gayle Shaffer, NH Jacksonvilles commanding officer. Our collaboration not only expands and enhances care, but we are able to deliver that care in a cost-effective way as good stewards of taxpayer dollars. The VA relocation to BHC Albanys 22,179 square-foot building provides veterans a state-of-the-art facility and access to new ancillary services such as pharmacy, laboratory and radiology. They will also have expanded access to services historically received from primary care to mental health. For exist ing BHC Albany service members, new services will include podiatry and optometry as well as access to increased staffing of existing services. The jointly staffed clinic will provide high quality, efficient and convenient care to patients in the region. The joint clinic will complement an existing agreement the VA has with MCLB Albany, entered into May 16, 2013, that provides a separate building near BHC Albany. Carl Vinson VA Medical Center director John Goldman was enthusiastic about the move. In addition to offering primary care, we will expand services for veterans and active duty military to include optometry, audiology, mental health, podiatry, and physical rehabilitation, Goldman said. This move not only benefits our veterans, it demonstrates superb collabo ration among federal agencies. Working with the Marine Corps and the Navy has been a genuinely rewarding experience for us. NH Jacksonville has another joint effort with the VA at its BHC in Key West, Fla. for mental health and physi cal therapy care. Marine Corps Logistics Base Albany is always searching for more opportu nities to become the Marine Corps, as well as the Department of the Navys, best in class installation, said Marine Col. Don Davis, MCLB Albanys com manding officer. This latest part nership with the Naval Hospital in Jacksonville, Fla., and the Carl Vinson VA Medical Center in Dublin, Ga., combines resources to open a VA commu nity-based outpatient clinic aboard the base. This offers the promise of greater access for veterans and activeduty military, while maximizing exist ing resources and offering potential expansion of medical services in a joint effort. Albany, Ga. provides exemplary instal lation support services to its many ten ants, who in turn, provide vital sup port to the Marine Corps and other Department of Defense operations critical to supporting our great nation. Our goals embrace the principles and values of effectively and efficiently managing limited resources, providing a safe and secure installation, ensuring we are good stewards of taxpayer dollars and engaging our local community in mutu ally beneficial partnerships. founding in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. The com mand is comprised of the Navys third largest hospital and five branch health clinics across Florida and Georgia. Of its patient populationabout 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their familiesmore than 60,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities in Dublin, Ga., is one of 153 medi cal centers in the Veterans Health Administration that cares for U.S. military veterans. The medical center serves 38,000 veterans in 52 counties in middle and southeast Georgia and manages community-based outpatient clinics in Albany, Brunswick, Macon, Milledgeville, and Perry. Marines, Navy and VA collaborate on healthcare in GeorgiaPhoto by Yan Kennon Capt. Gayle Shaffer (left), Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles commanding officer, signs a joint agreement March 14 between NH Jacksonville and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) that will expand and enhance active duty and veteran health care services in the Albany, Ga. area. The joint agreement will relocate VA health care providers and services to NH Jacksonvilles Branch Health Clinic (BHC) Albany, aboard Marine Corps Logistics Base, to provide new ancillary services to veterans and increase staffing for existing BHC patients. Photos by Morgan Kehnert NGIS award-winning performanceThe Navy Gateway Inns and Suites (NGIS) staff gathered at the NAS Jax Officers' Club on March 19 for a special Navy Lodging Program Appreciation Day Luncheon. This event was set aside to celebrate all the accomplishments of 2013, as well as to show appreciation for the employees for all they do in support of the military, retirees and their families. 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014

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By Lt. j.g. Winston MasseyFive Sailors assigned to the Fighting Tigers of VP-8 recently spent a day performing volunteer work for a community outreach program that is making improvements at a local church in El Salvador. The Sailors delivered more than 2,000 pounds of clothing, toys and two dental chairs to Iglesia Gran Comision Church in La Libertad, El Salvador. The donations were made possible by squadron members, family and friends prior to their deploy ment in November 2013. The Sailors also spent time restoring and repairing a much-needed storage area in the Church. They built clothing racks and shelves to organize the items that will be distributed to neighborhood residents. We have received many donations to our organi zation, but we have never received a donation as big as this one, said Mary Marks, one of the volunteers working at the church. The generosity and compassion that VP-8 has shown our community will positively impact the lives of many people. The Iglesia Gran Comision Church is a non-denominational congregation of local residents and mis sionaries that work to improve the lives of the less fortunate. Some of their work includes nutritional programs that provide healthy meals to children whose families may not be able to afford a balanced diet. They also provide a safe haven for battered and abused women and children. The care and assistance La Gran Comision Church provides is a vital lifeline to the Salvadoran community. Some of the things we take for granted back home are the same things that people need here in order to survive, said AWV2 Antonio Willard. Being able to come out and help the church fulfill its mission was both a gratifying and humbling experience. The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 are currently deployed to the 4th and 5th Fleets areas of responsibility assisting in counter trans-national organized crime efforts and providing humanitarian assistance. By Lt. j.g. Torrey PlumVP-8 Public AffairsSailors from VP-8 sup ported the Love and Hope Childrens Home in San Salvador during a March 21 community outreach event. The 14 Sailors from the Fighting Tigers, escort ed 21 youths to a local bowling alley for an afternoon of food, fun and bowling. We love spending time with the children from Love and Hope, said Lt. j.g. Paxie Cordova, a pilot with VP-8. Being able to interact with the children and see their smiling faces has been one of the most rewarding parts of our deployment here in El Salvador. Love and Hope was established in 2003 after outreach workers discov ered orphaned, abused, abandoned and neglect ed children living in a garbage dump. Since then, more than 30 chil dren have been provided food, shelter, safety, edu cation and love. Rachel Sanson, a Love and Hope volunteer, thanked the Fighting Tigers for their support. This bowling outing is a special treat for the Love and Hope kids, she said. It was a fun opportu nity to hang out with new friends and it was by far everyones favorite outing this month. The Fighting Tigers are deployed to the U.S. Naval Force Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet area of responsibil ity, assisting in counter transnational organized crime efforts and provid ing humanitarian assis tance. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet sup port U.S. Southern Commands joint and combined military oper ations by employing maritime forces in coop erative maritime security operations to maintain access, enhance interop erability, and build enduring partnerships to promote peace, stabil ity, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. VP-8 helps out at Salvadoran churchPhoto courtesy of VP-8VP-8 Sailors recently spent a day building storage shelves at a local Salvadoran church.Fighting Tigers support childrens home in San SalvadorPhoto courtesy of VP-8 "Fighting Tigers" recently spent some quality time with orphans when they sponsored a bowling event. Bringing the hospital to the poor... Provided as a public service. CFC ParticipantBringing the hospital to the worlds poor JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 27, 2014 By Jim Garamone American Forces Press ServiceDefense Secretary Chuck Hagel has ordered a comprehensive review of the military decorations and awards pro gram, Pentagon Press Secretary Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby said March 20. The secretary wants to capture the lessons learned from 13 years of com bat to improve the program, Kirby said. The review will begin in June under the direction of Jessica Wright, acting undersecretary of defense for personnel and readiness. It is due to be completed in June 2015. Wright will consult closely with Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, as well as the military department secretaries and chiefs and the combatant command ers, Kirby said during a Pentagon news conference. Secretary Hagel believes this is a solemn obligation for the Department of Defense, one that we can never take lightly, the admiral said. The review will focus on ensuring that the awards program appropriately recognizes all levels of combat valor, as well as the service, sacrifices and actions of all our service members. The review will examine how the awards program is structured to make sure that it fully reflects the joint nature of warfare, the admiral said. It will examine the processes and procedures of how medals for valor are nominated in order to determine whether they can be improved or streamlined and help make the overall awards process more timely, he added, and it will deter mine the best way to recognize service members who use remote technology to directly impact combat operations, such as through cyber and remotely piloted aircraft. Some awards and decorations are service-specific, and others cut across the military. The secretary recognizes joint military operations have become the norm, Kirby told reporters. You dont have to look any farther than what we accomplished in Iraq and Afghanistan to see how joint the services have become, he said, and I think its a fair question to ask: do we need to look at the kinds of awards that we give, par ticularly for combat valor, in a more joint nature than perhaps some of them are? It doesnt mean that there will be changes, but I think he wants to look at everything across the whole scope. Hagel wants the panel to examine how the services submit and evaluate and decide on major combat awards, Kirby said. I think he would like to get a better sense of what discrepancies there may be between the services, and do those discrepancies need to be closed? he added. The answer may be no. But I think he wants to ask those questions. Families plan time away at ITT Travel FairBy Morgan KehnertMWR Marketing AssistantThe 24th ITT Travel Fair took place March 15 at the NAS Jax Navy Exchange courtyard. With disk jockeys from Unique DJ Entertainment providing the music, the mood at the Travel Fair was upbeat and more than 900 patrons were pleased to be able to speak directly with 53 vendors from attrac tions and resorts located in Orlando, St. Augustine, Kissimmee and Jacksonville as well as attractions and hotels in both Georgia and North Carolina. Not only did the vendors contrib ute to increased sales within the ITT (Information, Tickets Tours) Office, they also provided a one-on-one experience for customers to learn about new and upcoming enhancements at their attraction or hotel. When asked about the overall success of the event, ITT Manager Julie Kieffer said, We want to take care of our military by offering the best prices possible. We could not do that with out the support of our vendors. I am thankful for our ITT staff and the volunteers for all they did to help make this a successful event. I also want to personally thank VyStar Credit Union for sponsoring this event. A big thank you to those who par ticipated this year:Best Western Plus Orlando Gateway Hotel Biltmore Estates Boggy Creek Buena Vista Suites Chartwell Hospitality Clarion Inn & Suites International Drive Clarion Inn & Suites Maingate Clay County Tourism CoCo Key Hotel & Water Resort Valley Comfort Inn Main Gate Hotel Kissimmee Comfort Suites Maingate East Kissimmee Comfort Inn & Suites Universal Experiences Kissimmee Fun Spot America Georgia Aquarium Georgia Visitors Center Kingsland HI Development DBA Holiday Isle Oceanfront Holiday Inn & Suites Universal Homes 4UU Inn at Ellis Square Savannah Kennedy Space Center Maingate Resort and Spa Medieval Times Dinner & Tournament Military Resort Rentals Old Town Trolley Tours St. Augustine Pirates Town Dinner Adventure Play Harder Tours Quality Inn Historic Ramada Jacksonville Baymeadows Ramada Maingate West Red Roof Inns SeaWorld Parks and Entertainment Seralago Hotel & Suites Stay Sky Hotels and Resorts Sleuths Mystery Dinner Shows St. Augustine Pirate and Treasure Museum St. Augustine Ponte Vedra & Beaches VCB Star Island Resort & Club Universal Orlando Visit Central Florida Contempo Vacation Homes Walt Disney World Warrior City Westgate Resorts Wet N Wild Wild Adventures Wonder Works World Quest Resort World of Coca-Cola Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. Airliner search funding could last until AprilBy Army Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone Marshall Jr. American Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department estimates funding set aside for assistance to the Malaysian government in the search for missing Malaysia Flight 370 could last until April, a Pentagon spokesman said March 21. Army Col. Steve Warren provided the departments costs in response to a query from Pentagon reporters earlier this week. As of now, weve set aside $4 million to aid in the search, he said. Based on our current expenditures, we expect these funds will last until sometime in the beginning of April. The total cost for supporting the search for Flight 370 is now about $2.5 million, Warren said. This includes operating costs of the ships and aircraft currently supporting the search, he added. Variables such as the number of flight hours or any other assets that may be dedicated to the search could affect this esti mate, Warren noted. The colonel pointed out that some of the cost would have been incurred even without providing assistance to the search, because the USS Kidd was already out and operating. With two aircraft currently assisting the search, and the Navy ships previously dedicated to the efforts, Warren said the U.S. is doing all it can. Weve offered the P-8 [Poseidon] and the P-3 [Orion] that are participating, noting that President Barack Obama and Pentagon Press Secretary Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby have made clear that were providing everything that we can. Earlier this week, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel reaffirmed the U.S. commit ment to assisting in the ongoing search for the missing flight during a phone call with Malaysian Defense Minister Hishammuddin Tun Hussein. Warren said that plans are to move the P-3 Orion assisting in the search to the southern search area in coordination with Australia. Its still up in the Bay of Bengal now, he said. There is a plan for it to move further south. I dont have an exact timeline, but I believe its moving south toward the Cocoa Islands. Hagel orders review of military decorations, awards program Photos by Morgan KehnertAt the 24th ITT Travel Fair, Sales Manager Laura Graham of Wild Adventures Theme Park in Valdosta, Ga,. helps familiarize Ken Snyder about the theme park and its upcoming concert series. Siblings Jayln, Jaden and Justin Hope fill out a raffle ticket alongside Simon Benson at the VyStar Credit Union booth manned by Brad Smith and Basilia Brown.

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