Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
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Newspaper
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English
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s.n.
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Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
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Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
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30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

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Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
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Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
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Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, MARCH 20, 2014 I I D E NEW SKIPPERS VP-5 & VP-8 CoC Page 3 FURRY SECURITY Military Working Dogs Page 4 RIVER RUN 15K Sailors Join Civilians Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Awarded Battle E and Isbell TrophyBy Lt. j.g. Joseph BayoVP-26 PAOCommander, Naval Air Forces Atlantic (CNAL) recently recognized the Tridents of Patrol Squadron (VP) 26 as winner of both the 2013 Maritime Patrol Battle Efficiency Award, or Battle E and the 2013 Arnold Jay Isbell Trophy. Capturing both awards in a single year is a rare occurrence in the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force, but as the last NAS Jacksonville-based P-3C Orion squadron sched uled to transition to the P-8A Poseidon, VP-26 was given several unique operational opportunities in 2013, and they delivered with characteristic Trident Pride. The Battle E is presented annually to the CNAL unit in each aviation community that best demonstrates warfighting efficiency and operational pro ficiency. The Arnold J. Isbell Trophy By Clark PierceEditorThe South Carolina Army National Guard 1-151st Attack Reconnaissance Battalion detached a pair of AH-64D Apache helicopters to NAS Jacksonville March 11, where the HS-ll Dragonslayers hosted them for two days of joint Strike Coordination and Reconnaissance (SCAR) exercises. Maj. Antonn Simmons, officer in charge of the Army National Guard detachment said, This joint exercise is valuable because of the coor dination involved in working with dissimilar assets. It moves us forward to a new level of com bat preparedness. Simmons added, When it comes to joint SCAR training, ours is the first AH-64D Apache battalion in the Army to become overwater and deck-landing qualified. Its part of our overwater program to give the Navy another asset to com bat enemy surface ships and small attack boats. HS-11 Training Officer Lt. Cmdr. Justin Cobb scheduled time at the Pinecastle Range in the Ocala National Forest for two days of joint SCAR exercises with the Dragonslayers HH-60H From StaffBoeing welcomed the Mad Foxes of Patrol Squadron (VP) 5 to its P-8 Poseidon facilities on March 13. The P-8A squadron, which arrived at NAS Whidbey Island, Wash., earlier in the week, will be the second squadron to operationally deploy later this spring. While in the Puget Sound area, the VP-5 group, comprised of a flight crew, maintenance team and the command master chief, toured the P-8A assembly and mission systems installation facto ries, as well as the companys commer cial 737 lines. Lt. Cmdr. Colette Lazenka, a 12-year Navy veteran, said the Mad Foxes, based at NAS Jacksonville, Fla., flew a P-8A to Whidbey Island to help pre pare for their upcoming deployment to Kadena, Japan. As part of our training here well fly a simulated anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare mission togeth er with three P-3C Orions, two EA-18G Growlers and two EA-6B Prowler air craft, Lazenka said. Between now and our deployment well work with carrier strike groups and other aircraft to practice tactics and missions. Lazenka added that shes heard a lot of positive feedback from the squadron currently deployed to Kadena. They love the P-8A and say its reli able and doing a great job. James Detwiler, Boeing P-8 business development director, said the visit was a good opportunity for VP-5 to get an up close look at how the aircraft are built, as well as see the pride the Boeing team takes in producing them. The Mad Foxes will eventually relieve the War Eagles of VP-16, which has been on deployment since November 2013. To date, Boeing had delivered 13 of the Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft to the Navy. VP-16 joins search for Malaysia Airlines flightCrew members on board a P-8A Poseidon assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 16 man their workstations March 16 while assisting in search and rescue operations for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. VP-16, home based at NAS Jacksonville, is deployed in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility supporting security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific. Photo by MC2 Eric PastorVP-26 recognized by CNALPhoto by Tech. Sgt. Jorge IntriagoA formation of U.S. Army AH-64D Apaches assigned to 1-151st Attack Reconnaissance Battalion, South Carolina Army National Guard, and a U.S. Navy HH-60H Seahawk assigned to the HS-11 "Dragonslayers" conducted joint training at the Navys Pinecastle Range, Fla., March 11-12. The units trained on anti-surface war fare and combat search and rescue, in preparation for the squad rons helicopter advance readiness program evaluation. Army-Navy exercise enhances helicopter flexibility and lethalityBoeing photo by Jim AndersonJames Detwiler, Boeing P-8 business development director (right), leads the U.S. Navy VP-5 "Mad Foxes" on a tour of the P-8A Poseidon mission systems installa tion factory. Mad Foxes visit P-8A programPhoto courtesy of VP-26A P-3C Orion assigned to the Tridents of VP-26 returned home to NAS Jax Dec. 10, 2013 from a seven-month deployment to the U.S. Pacific Command. Their deployment was the first integrated active-reserve P-3C deployment to the 7th Fleet area of responsi bility.See Page 8 See Page 9

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014 SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-7789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley From StaffMarch 20 1833 Cmdr. Geisinger of Peacock negotiates first commercial treaty with King of Siam. 1922 Collier USS Jupiter (AC-3) recommissioned as USS Langley (CV-1), Navys first aircraft carrier. 1939 Naval Research Lab recom mends financing research program to obtain power from uranium. 2003 U.S. led Operation Iraqi Freedom continues with cruise missiles launched from Navy ships in the Red Sea and Persian Gulf. March 21 1917 Loretta Walsh becomes first female Navy petty officer when sworn in as Chief Yeoman. 1919 Navy installs and tests Sperry gyrocompass in aircraft. 1945 Bureau of Aeronautics initiates rocket-powered, surface-to-air guided missile. March 22 1820 Commodore Stephen Decatur dies after duel with Capt. James Barron. 1915 Naval Aviator replaces Navy Air Pilot for officers qualified as aviators. 1929 Navy ships protect Americans and their property during Mexican revo lution. March 23 1815 USS Hornet captures HMS Penguin in a battle lasting 22 minutes. 1882 Secretary of the Navy Hunt issues General Order No. 292 creating Office of Naval Intelligence. 1917 Launching of USS New Mexico (BB-40), the first dreadnought with tur bo-electric drive, at the New York Navy Yard. 1945 Carrier aircraft begin preassault strikes on Okinawa, stimulating a kamikaze response from the Japanese. 1958 First launching of simulated Polaris missile from submerged tactical launcher facility off California coast. 1965 Lt. Cmdr. John Young, pilot of Gemini 3 completed three orbits in 4 hours, 53 minutes. Recovery was by heli copters from USS Intrepid (CVS-11). March 24 1977 Initial service acceptance trials for the CH-53E Super Stallion were com pleted at NATC. The CH-53E has three turbine engines instead of two. It also carries mission loads of 16 tons compared to nine tons for the CH-53D. It has seven rotor blades instead of six and could seat 56 troops. March 25 1813 USS Essex takes Neryeda, first capture by U.S. Navy in Pacific. 1898 Assist. Secretary of the Navy Theodore Roosevelt proposes Navy inves tigate military application of Samuel Langleys flying machine beginning naval aviation. March 26 1942 Adm. King becomes both Chief of Naval Operations and Commander, U.S. Fleet. 1943 Battle of Komandorski Islands, prevents Japanese reinforcements from reaching Attu. 1966 Operation Jackstay is Navys first amphibious assault in Vietnams inland waters. 1968 Operation Bold Dragon III began in Mekong Delta. By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorSomewhere at the Pentagon, someone with a lot of medals on his chest is shaking his head, wonder ing why I was chosen to take the 2014 Navy Spouse Personal and Family Readiness Survey. Except, the letter inviting my participation stated I was randomly selected, and I believe it. Any top brass whos read my column knows Im quite outspoken about these things, and I imagine the chances of me being hand-selected are slim. In any case, its always startling to receive a letter from the Department of the Navy addressed to The Spouse of. Its even more startling when you realize the Navy is asking for your opinion. This felt like those teacher evaluations in college that cause students to panic: Should I be honest? Will it affect my grade? (As someone who has been on the receiving end of teacher evaluations, the answers are Yes and No.) But remember, I view the Navy somewhat like a rela tive. Often, I love to hate it. Later, I feel guilty about my anger (Think of all the Navy has given me!). However, Im currently in an intense annoyed-with-the-Navy phase due to things that were not addressed in the 2014 survey. So, although I very much appreciate the Navy reaching out to spouses, Im seizing this opportunity as my use extra sheets of paper if necessary for all those is-there-anything-else-youd-like-to-add type of ques tions. First, the positives. The survey shows the Navy is adjusting to the new millennium. Ive written before about the changing dynamics of military families and how Uncle Sam often is delayed keeping pace. There was a time when a military mans uniform was an asset courting a romantic partner. Because social norms kept many women inside the house as homemakers, marry ing a military man did not necessarily mean abandon ing an education or career. Indeed, marrying a military man meant the opportunity for excitement and world travel. Today, as women increasingly match men as bread winners for their families, a mans military uniform can be a liability. It signifies extra hurdles to the wom ans own career and retirement. The Navys survey addressed this. It asked about my ability to pursue a career and education. It also asked about our living situation, revealing that the Navy is aware more families are choosing a geo-bachelor situ ation (commuter marriage in the civilian world) to deal with frequent moves and to stabilize the military spouses own career. The survey asked about our children, too, and how they handle deployments. This is a relatively new arena for the Navy, as well. When my dad was deploying in the 1970s, the absent father wasnt unusual, military or not. But the role of dad has changed with newer generations. Increasingly, dads are expectedand wantto be equally involved in their childrens upbringing. This makes deployments even more burdensome on all sides. I appreciate the Navy looking for programs and services to ease these unique military-family issues. But here are some areas the survey didnt address. When it asked about mental health and barriers to our familys ability to find help when we need it, there was no room to answer, TRICARE wont cover the counselor who was helping me. They wanted me instead to go to someone 90 miles away. (More on this in a forthcoming column.) When the survey asked about length of deployments, it offered nothing on the topic of the timing of deploy ments. When Dustin last deployed, he was expected to report to Djibouti on Dec. 23. When he got there, the new command told him, basically, they were on holiday and hed start the next week. Now, someone somewhere knew this would happen to my husband. And yet they didnt adjust his report date and allow him to be with us for Christmas and then leave for deployment. Its the little inefficiencies here and there that wear down a spouse. Like paying to move a family from one coast to another and back again, when said fam ily, after being asked to rank preferences for their next command, requested to stay on the east coast anyway. Its these inefficiencies that affect retention (and really thats the Navys ultimate interest). So I have some questions of my own for the Navy; questions that impact our decision to stay in or get out: 1. Why do you ask us where we want to be stationed and then send us somewhere else? 2. Why do you charge leave for a geo-bachelor on shore duty with a desk job to go home and take care of his Navy family for the weekend? 3. Why do you encourage us to get help and then restrict who we can see? 4. Why doesnt lower-level management have the ability to foresee a dilemma (service member reporting for deployment on Dec. 23) and tweak it? 5. Why do you say families are important, but then you make redundant policies (see question 2) that put us last? Feel free to use as many extra sheets of paper as nec essary. U.S. Navy photos USS New Mexico (BB-40) shown shortly aftere leaving the New York Navy Yard. She had a crew of 1,084 Sailors and main battle armament of 12 14-inch guns. New Mexico was escorting ships in the Atlantic when the Japanese struck Pearl Harbor, but spent the rest of World War II operating in the Pacific, where she took part in most major campaigns. After attending the 1945 for scrap. A CH-53E Super Stallion assigned to the "Condors" of HMH-464 lifts off the deck of USS Kearsarge (LHD 3) in March 2003 for another combat mission to re-supply the Marines fighting for con trol of Southern Iraq. Kearsarge was deployed to the Arabian Gulf in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. This Week in Navy History From the HomefrontThe Navys 2014 spouse survey misses some things Photo by Yan KennonExpanding health care servicesCapt. Gayle Shaffer, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles commanding officer, shakes hands with John Goldman, Carl Vinson Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center director, after signing an agreement on March 14 to expand and enhance active duty and veteran health care services in the Albany, Ga. area. The joint agreement will relo cate VA health care providers and services to NH Jacksonvilles Branch Health Clinic (BHC) Albany, aboard Marine Corps Logistics Base, to provide new ancillary services to veterans and increase staffing for existing BHC patients.

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By Lt. j.g. John BellezzaVP-5 Public AffairsCmdr. Gregory Petrovic will assume command of Patrol Squadron (VP) 5 from Cmdr. Matthew Pottenburgh dur ing the change of command ceremony to be held March 20 in Hangar 117 at NAS Jacksonville. Pottenburgh assumed command of the Mad Foxes in May 2013 and led VP-5 through a highly successful tran sition from the P-3C Orion to the P-8A Poseidon. Through his leadership, the squadron achieved a near flawless Safe For Flight certification. The squadrons Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle (IDRC) will soon see the Mad Foxes preparing to deploy to the 7th Fleet area of responsibility. During their IDRC, VP-5 participated in numerous exercises, including the first-ever P-8A support of a Composite Unit Training Exercise (COMPTUEX) and Joint Force Exercise (JTFEX). The Mad Foxes accomplished this while flying in support of the USS George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group deployment certifica tion the largest COMPTUEX ever assembled. Additionally, the squad ron earned the 2013 Medical M Award, Naval Aviation News Grampaw Pettibone Award, and the Chief of Naval Operations Safety S during Pottenburghs tenure as commanding officer. His next assignment will be at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C, serving as a Naval Aviation Program Analyst in the Programming Division (N80) of the Chief of Naval Operations staff. Cmdr. Petrovic, a native of New Bern, N.C., graduated from the U. S. Naval Academy in 1996. His naval career has included tours at VP-9 in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, CTF-67 and C6F in Naples, Italy, aboard the USS George Washington (CVN 73) in Norfolk, Va., VP-30 and VP-45 at NAS Jacksonville, and in the J8 Division of the Joint Staff in at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. Later this year, Petrovic will lead VP-5 on deployment, as the Mad Foxes will relieve VP-16 in the 7th Fleet area of responsibility and become only the second Navy P-8A squadron to operate overseas. By MC2 Clay WhaleyVP-8 Public AffairsPatrol Squadron (VP) 8 and Commander Task Group (CTG) 57.2 will conduct a change of command ceremo ny in Bahrain on April 1, when Cmdr. Derek Adametz, will relieve Cmdr. Todd Libby, as the 66th commanding officer of the squadron. Adametz, who earned his Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Wisconsin, was commissioned through the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps program in May 1996. He was designated a naval aviator in February 1998. Adametz previous squadrons include the Pelicans of VP-45 and the Mad Foxes of VP-5, both located at NAS Jacksonville, and the Grey Knights of VP-46 located at NAS Whidbey Island, Wash. His other assignments include the Naval History and Heritage Command at the Washington D.C. Navy Yard, USS Nimitz (CVN 68), and the Naval Postgraduate School at Monterey, Calif., where he earned a Master of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, with Distinction, and a minor in Applied Physics. Before reporting to VP-8, Adametz was the Military Assistant to the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Global Strategic Affairs, where he assisted in policy development and exe cution in the areas of: countering weap ons of mass destruction; nuclear and missile defense policy; and DoD Cyber Security and Space issues. The event will mark the end of Libbys second tour as a Fighting Tiger, where he previously served as Legal, Readiness and Naval Flight Officer (NFO) Training Officer from 1997 to 2000. As commanding officer, Libby suc cessfully led the Fighting Tigers through a challenging InterDeployment Readiness Cycle while pre paring for a multi-site deployment to Bahrain and El Salvador and various detachment sites. During Libbys tenure as CO, the Fighting Tigers have flown 432 sorties and 3,336 mishap-free flight hours. Following the change of command, Libby will transfer to the U.S. Northern Command in Colorado Springs, Colo. VP-8 is currently deployed to the Navys 4th and 5th Fleet areas of responsibility, conducting mari time security operations, supporting Operation Enduring Freedom and countering transnational organized crime. For more information about the VP-8 mission, history and biographies, visit our official homepage at: http://www. public.navy.mil/airfor/vp8/Pages/ default.aspx. VP-5 Mad Foxes change of command todayCmdr. Gregory Petrovic Cmdr. Matthew PottenburghVP-8 Fighting Tigers to conduct change of command in BahrainCmdr. Todd Libby Cmdr. Derek Adametz JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014 Dogs train to support Navys missionBy MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Public AffairsSix members of the NAS Jax Security Department K-9 Kennel train their Military Working Dogs (MWD) yearround to ensure these elite creatures maintain their mission readiness. MWDs undergo constant training, which include obedience, building search, scouting, bite work and detec tion. Kennel Supervisor MA1 Keith Danalewich said, We train to keep up with the ever changing security threats, such anti-terrorism/force protec tion (AT/FP). We are evaluated by the Naval Criminal Investigative Services Security Training Assistance and Assessment Team every other year. He added, There is always a constant threat out there and if we learn about something new we train our dogs are so their capable of handling that threat. Our dogs and handlers are constant ly learning to improve their skills. We train as a team to face any situation, whether its day or night, to familiarize them for any security scenario. Danalewich said, The dogs receive different rewards for good behavior. Our dogs only get toys when they per form a task well. When we are conduct ing detection work, we give our dogs a toy as a reward for discovering an odor. They also receive lots of affection and praise. According to Danalewich, when a handler transfers to a different com mand, they leave their dog behind for the next handler. This procedure is practiced to famil iarize the dogs with different handlers. Either one of them can move to the next team partner to certify and aid in their mission. A handler may work with his or her dog for a few months or a couple of years. The MWDs primary mission is base security, including AT/FP, said Danalewich. The dogs are great visual deterrents. Also, we are always con ducting detection searches around the base looking for explosives and drugs. The dogs need a lot of care, explained Danalewich. Handlers joke around and say they get better care of than we do. We have a veterinarian on base who is in charge of our dogs nutri tion and their annual health assess ments, as well as dental checkups. Handlers are also responsible for the dogs daily grooming sessions and head-to-tail health inspections, as well as bathing and clipping claws. The best thing about our job is that we get to work with a dog all day, said Danalewich. That is the highlight for me. I have a great team here. The handlers all work together and get along. Its really like a small family. I know what my other handlers are thinking and they know what I am thinking. We all know what our dogs are good at which is important in order to set up the teams for success. MWDs for all the services go through basic training at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas. When assigned to their next command, each dog receives more in-depth training with its handler. Although a variety of breeds have been used by the military for decades, the ones that currently have dem onstrated to be the best for patrol and detection work are the German Shepherd, Dutch Shepherd and Belgian Mallinois. These breeds have the com bination of keen sense of smell, endur ance, speed, strength, courage, intel ligence and adaptability to complete their mission at NAS Jax Security Department. MA2 Andrew Barnhart said, I love working canine. Its a unique way to make a difference in anti-terrorism and force protection. Working canine allows you to get interesting deployments, like going down range, and get to actually save lives in the real world. In a realistic scenario, if theres an unknown per son hiding in a building, its an MWD team that is sent in. If a person jumps the base perimeter fence and takes off through the woods, one of our teams is assigned to track and subdue them. According to Barnhart, MWDs retire after an average of 8-10 years of service. Its current handler at the time has the option to adopt. However, if the handler chooses not to take the retired dog, it is put up for adoption. Southeast Regional Kennel Master MA1 Elliot Fiashi said, These dogs demonstrate the Navys Core Values by: showing honor the dog is loyal to its handler; through courage the dog will do what the handler tells them to even when they are frightened; and display ing commitment they wont quite the job until they are given the command. Members of the NAS Jax Security Military Working Dog Unit gather for a group photo in front of the kennels March 11. (From left) MASN Cheli Matlock with Pato, Kennel Supervisor MA1(EXW) Keith Danalewich, MA2 Andrew Barnhart with Anouk, MA2 Glenn Patton with Benny, MA2 Erick Ortiz with Zoran and MA2 Bryan Chiverton with Doly. MA2 Andrew Barnhart shoots an M4 rifle with his dog Anouk by his side as part of a drill to familiarize the Military Working Dog to loud noises. After completing obedience training with their assigned dogs on March 11, mem bers of the NAS Jax Security Military Working Dog Unit fall in for a photo. (Front to left) Kennel Supervisor MA1(EXW) Keith Danalewich, MA2 Andrew Barnhart with MWD Anouk, MA2 Glenn Patton with Benny, MA2 Bryan Chiverton with Doly, MASN Cheli Matlock with Pato and MA2 Erick Ortiz with Zoran. MA1(EXW) Keith Danalewich and his dog, Doly, team up to investigate an empty building in search for a hidden suspect during a building search train ing exercise aboard NAS Jax. Military Working Dog Zoran is released by his handler MA2 Erick Ortiz to attack MA2 Andrew Barnhart during a building search training aboard NAS Jax. MA1(EXW) Keith Danalewich from NAS Jax Security Department (right) releases his Military Working Dog, Doly, to practice Dog Biting on MA2 Andrew Barnhart of the NAS Jax Security Department during a training session at the base.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014 5 MA2 Andrew Barnhart gives the command to his Military Working Dog, Anouk, to exit the vehicle. MA2 Erick Ortiz and his Military Working Dog, Zoran, work together to practice scouting through the woods as a training exercise. Military Working Dog, Doly, receives the command to guard as her handler MA1(EXW) Keith Danalewich performs a pat down on MA2 Andrew Barnhart as part of an exercise. MA2 Glenn Patton exercises his Military Working Dog, Benny, at the base track as part of the dogs daily conditioning routine. Military Working Dog, Zoran, attacks MA2 Andrew Barnhart, with his han dler, MA2 Erick Ortiz monitoring the canine during the dog bite training. MASN Cheli Matlock from NAS Jax Security Department and her Military Working Dog, Pato, inspect a commercial truck for contraband prior to the vehicle driving aboard the Navy installation. MA2 Erick Ortiz firmly holds the lead of his Military Working Dog, Zoran, as the team is about to perform scouting exer cises. Military Working Dog, Gergo leads his handler, MA2 Bryan Chiverton in the direction of a hidden live explosive as part of a continuous training military working dogs must attend to stay familiar with various odors. Photos by MC2 Amanda CabasosMA2 Erick Ortiz from NAS Jax Security Department guides his Military Working Dog (MWD), Zoran, during explosive detective training in a warehouse aboard NAS Jax. The MWDs are required to undergo constant odor training to keep them from forgetting important familiar smells. MASN Cheli Matlock and her Military Working Dog, Pato, (right), stand by to make an appearance while MA2 Emenson Exilus checks vehicle ID cards at the base commercial gate entrance. Military Working Dog, Zoran, detects a hidden explosive and escorts his handler, MA2 Erick Ortiz to the location of the bomb with MA1(EXW) Keith Danalewich supervising the training. Military Working Dog, Benny, leads his handler in the direction of a hidden explosive as part of a training to test the canines ability to recognize familiar odors.

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By Lt. j.g. Torrey PlumVP-8 Public AffairsThe VP-8 Fighting Tigers participated in the Jacksonville, Fla. 15K Gate River Run from their dual deployment sites in Comalapa, El Salvador and Isa, Bahrain. Forty-three Fighting Tigers from both deployments sites registered for the race along with the local Jacksonville community on March 15. On the morning of the race, 23 Sailors in El Salvador ran a 15K course created at their base of operations. Due to logistics, the VP-8 Sailors in Isa, Bahrain will run their race on March 22. We feel it is important to stay connected to our commu nity even while we are away on deployment, said Ensign Mark Baden, a naval flight officer with VP-8. Though the 15K was a chal lenge for most of us, it enabled us to feel closer to our friends and loved ones back in the states. The satellite race was coordi nated through 1st Place Sports, who helped with event details and delivery of race packets to the deployed Sailors. AT1 Jason Hersperger said, I think it is really great that 1st Place Sports can give VP-8 the opportunity to take part in the Gate River Run given our displaced location while deployed. It shows a real sense of the term Support the Troops or in our case, Sailors. Everybody was really excited to take part in this a great experi ence. The Gate River Run, former ly known as the Jacksonville River Run, is an annual 15 kilometer road running event in that attracts both competi tive and recreational runners. It has been the US National Championship 15K since 1994 and in 2007 became the largest 15K race in the country. It was voted as one of the top U.S. road races for the last 20 years by Runners World Magazine. The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 are currently deployed to the 4th and 5th Fleet areas of responsibility, assisting in the Counter Transnational Organized Crime mission and providing humanitarian assis tance. From Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsA change to personnel policy now allows detailers to write orders direct ing the transfer of Sailors up to six months prior to or after their Projected Rotation Date (PRD), according to NAVADMIN 058/14 released Mar 13. Additionally, shore duty Sailors in paygrades E-4 to E-9 may be pulled for Early Return to Sea Duty, after having completed at least 24-months ashore. A change to MILPERSMAN 1306-104 gives Navy detailers increased flexibil ity in filling anticipated fleet vacancies on time with a fully trained and quali fied relief. Although the use of the Voluntary Sea Duty Program, Sea Duty Incentive Pay, and the Chief Petty Officer Early Return to Sea programs have made progress in improving fleet manning, there are times when the number of fleet vacan cies and/or the associated training requirements for those positions do not align with the number or availability dates of Sailors in their orders negotia tion window. PRDs will not be adjusted and the current Career Management System/ Interactive Detailing (CMS/ID) appli cation and detailing policies remain unchanged. Sailors will still enter their CMS/ID order negotiation window nine months prior to their PRD. However, when they are selected for their next assignment, their orders may direct transfer earlier than the previous three months prior to four months after their PRD allowed. The actual transfer date will be determined by the commence ment of training for the prospective job and the date of the anticipated fleet vacancy they are being ordered to fill. Additionally, when the number of critical fleet vacancies exceeds the number of sea duty rollers, detailers may contact shore duty Sailors that are approaching or beyond 24-months ashore, and consider them for an early return to sea move. When being consid ered for an early return to sea require ment, Sailors will be contacted by their detailer, and their current command will be contacted by their placement coordinator, and they will be afforded a 30-day window to submit an impact statement for consideration regarding their early transfer. Also, nuclear enlisted sailors will have their initial sea tour PRDs set in accordance with their prescribed sea tour lengths. This change removes unnecessary administration from the ships, allows for more accurate person nel inventory reports and provides our Sailors with more accurate PRDs upon receipt of orders to their initial aircraft carrier sea tour. For more information, read the mes sage at www.npc.navy.mil.Increased assignment flexibility allows detailers to fill anticipated vacancies Fighting Tigers join River Run 15K from deployment sitesPhoto courtesy of VP-8Sailors assigned to the VP-8 "Fighting Tigers" currently on deployment in Comalapa, El Salvador, created their own rendition of the 15K Gate River Run on March 15. Everard Lord of the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) F414 engine shop gets his blood drawn by Phlebotomist Courtney Miller with The Blood Alliance during an FRCSE blood drive. Lord reached another milestone after his two-pint donation by hitting the four-gallon blood mark of giving "the gift of life." Photos by Kaylee LaRocqueFRCSE supports The Blood AllianceThe Blood Alliance Phlebotomist Courtney Miller checks the status of Alexander Aiken's line during a Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) blood drive on March 11. Aiken, who works at an FRCSE aircraft repair hangar, has donated blood for the past 10 years. A CFC Participant provided as a public service.While he works to defend our country, St. Jude works to save his son from a deadly disease.St. Jude patient, Aaron, with his father Lieutenant Commander, Scott 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014

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By Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsA longtime dream will finally come true for AS1(AW) Terry Yamin of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), when he attends Navy Officer Candidate School (OCS) this summer, followed by Navy aviator flight training. A native of Caracas, Venezuela, Yamin moved to Coral Springs, Fla. with his family at the age of nine. After graduat ing from J.P. Taravella High School, he joined the Navy in December 2005. I wanted a better life for my fam ily and myself, said Yamin. In high school, I developed an interest for the Navy. I had a goal of becoming a naval officer and the dream of becoming a pilot. After graduation, I knew that there was nothing else out there to get me closer to those goals, so I enlisted in the Navy. Yamin completed recruit training and AS A School before reporting on board USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) in June 2006. After attending AS C School, he transferred to FRCSE as a maintenance manager/technician. Yamin earned his Lean Six Sigma Black Belt certification, which extended his tour of duty assigned as the AIR Speed assistant leading petty officer. The AIR Speed office assists FRCSE teams with process improvement ini tiative to meet customer requirements efficiently and effectively. They use specific tools to promote continuous process improvements (CIP); advocate for cultural change through training, coaching and mentoring; and provide resources to identify and document work processes. My job is to mentor and run CIP projects, he explained. I am current ly running a Black Belt project for the F-18 center barrel plus replacement line, while mentoring five subprojects and three additional Green Belt projects. Yamin earned an associates degree from Florida State College at Jacksonville and a Bachelor of Science degree in Management Information Systems from Columbia College. He plans to attend OCS this summer, followed by pilot training. Im not sure what platform the Navy will give me, but Ill be happy with whatever aircraft they train me to fly, Yamin said enthu siastically. This is a great opportunity for me to provide for my family, reach my goals, and make positive impacts in the Navy. Yamin is grateful for the help he has received to make his dream come true. First and foremost, I have to thank God for all I have and my achievements, he said. I also have to thank my wife for sup porting me and my son for being the reason to be the best I can be. He is thankful to FRCSE Commanding Officer Capt. John Kemna and Lt. Cmdr. Victor Feal, the produc tion support officer, for affording him challenging opportunities to excel and providing the support and guidance he needed when applying for the pro grams. He is also appreciative to the Naval officers and chiefs who mentored me, as well as those who said I couldnt do this, because they challenged me. It was not by surprise that AS1 Yamin was selected for OCS, said Feal. He is currently working on a Master Black Belt project and has more than 60 employees working for him on various other complex projects on the F/A-18 line. I am very proud of him and cant wait to see him commissioned. During his off-duty hours, Yamin spends time with his family, trains for cycling events with Team Navy Jax, rides his motorcycle and volunteers in the community. I love the Navy and hope to finish my career by having positively impacted readiness, said Yamin. By Lt. j.g. Shelby GreenNAVSUP FLCJ Corporate Communications NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville (FLCJ) worked diligent ly March 8 to clean and enhance the courtyard of their adopted school, Hyde Grove Elementary School, during an outdoor beautification project. Hyde Grove is a categorized Title I school, which is a special assistance program funded by the federal gov ernment. The program works to assist schools with high numbers of children from low-income families to ensure that they are provided the necessary resources to meet state academic stan dards. Each of the schools students partici pate in the free lunch program and the Blessings in a Backpack program, that allows the children to bring home a backpack filled with food on the week ends. The 15 volunteers brought their own supplies to rake leaves, dig-out old trees, tear down fences, and trim bushes. The school provided the ser vice members with mulch to spread and flowers to plant in the courtyard as a means of sprucing up the area. Several students passed by and were delighted with the transformation, so they asked to join the volunteers in helping make their school look great. This project was the pinnacle event of the partnership formed with the school last August that began with a school supply drive that garnered $450 worth of supplies. Throughout the school year NAVSUP FLCJ Wardroom members and their families attended numerous activ ities such as Crafts with Kris Kringle, Literacy Night, and Math Night to assist the teachers, students and par ents at these events, and to be positive role models for the children. Our children need role models, said Principal Royal. Something as sim ple as sitting to talk with them while planting flowers makes a huge impact. It is amazing to see that a single con versation can change a childs life we are very excited about our present and future relationship with FLCJ. The impact of this affiliation has not only been felt by the the school, but also by the FLCJ members involved as it reinforces command and Navy prin ciples of giving back to the community. The partnership with Hyde Grove reminds me of all that I do have, so my family and I enjoy assisting at the events, remarked Cmdr. Paul DeMeyer. FLCJ plans to continue supporting this well-deserving school throughout the rest of the school year and into the next. The principal and vice principal are both enthusiastic and thankful for the commands participation and both parties look eagerly to the future. NAVSUP FLCJ, one of eight Fleet Logistics Centers under NAVSUP Global Logistics Support (GLS), provides oper ational logistics, business and support services to the fleet, shore, and indus trial commands of the Navy, Coast Guard, Military Sealift command, and other Joint Allied Forces. Services include contracting, region al transportation, fuel, material man agement, household goods movement support, postal and consolidated mail, warehousing, global logistics and hus banding, hazardous material manage ment, and integrated logistics support. By Katrina GergelyNETPDTC Center Public Affairs The latest Advancement Examination Readiness Review (AERR) schedule and request for volunteers was announced March 12 by the Naval Education and Training Professional Development Technology Center (NETPDTC) in Pensacola. Detailed in Naval Administrative Message (NAVADMIN) 052/14, Navy chiefs (E7 to E9) on active duty, Full Time Support (FTS), and Reservists on Active Duty for Special Work (ADSW) are encouraged to apply and partici pate in the process that helps identify the most qualified advancement candi dates. The Navy Advancement Center (NAC) AERR fleet liaison, Peter Pappas, coordinates with learning center rat ing managers, detailers, and Type Commander representatives to select the best nominees. Each enlisted rating has unique fleet subject matter expert (FSME) require ments calling for the right mix of skills FRCSE Sailor accepted to officer candidate schoolPhoto by Kaylee LaRocqueAS1(AW) Terry Yamin, (left) Fleet Readiness Center Southeast AirSpeed assistant leading petty officer, dis cusses continuous process improve ment projects on the F/A-18 Hornet maintenance, overhaul and repair line with AirSpeed Program Analyst Keith Probert at the military depot on March 5. Yamin recently learned of his acceptance to Navy Officer Candidate School and the pilot training program. Members of NAVSUP FLC Jax and their families transform Hyde Grove Elementary School's courtyard during a recent campus beautification day at their adopted school.Photo courtesy of Fleet Logistics Center JaxSupply Corps community partners with school for cleanup dayAdvancement exam readiness review panels seek rating Subject Matter ExpertsSee EXAM, Page 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014 7

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is awarded for anti-submarine and antisurface warfare excellence. The Tridents began 2013 in the second half of their 12-month Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle (IDRC). With the support of Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 11, they were preparing for an historic deploy ment to the 7th Fleet area of responsibil ity, where Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mark Sohaney would take charge of two task groups including aircrewmen and maintainers from two P-3C reserve squadrons and Whidbey Islands VP-1. In 2013, VP-26 also took on a lions share of the P-3C maintenance work load at NAS Jacksonville because three local squadrons were transitioning to the P-8A. VP-26 maintenance completed 14 modification line inductions, 15 aircraft acceptances, 13 aircraft transfers and 15 intermediate maintenance concept (IMC) inspections. In early 2013, when CPRW-11 was tasked to respond to a foreign out-ofarea deployer, they assigned VP-26 as the task group commander. Supported by NAS Jacksonvilles VP-30, VP-10, VP-16 and VP-62, the Tridents led a suc cessful 24-hour operation for 19 con tinuous days. It is an honor to be a part of this out standing organization, said Sohaney. These awards highlight for the rest of naval aviation the hard work and professionalism that I am privileged to wit ness every day. It is humbling to lead such great men and women. To see their efforts recognized in this way is truly rewarding. Also during the IDRC, VP-26 collabo rated with the CPRW-11 Weapons School to launch an AGM-84D Harpoon and AGM-65F Maverick from the same air craft on a single sortie. This team effort was the first time a CPRW-11 aircraft launched dissimilar anti-surface war fare missiles on a single flight. These experiences and an Advanced Readiness Program syllabus run by CPRW-11 weapons and tactics Instructors prepared VP-26 to per form superbly during its pre-deploy ment certifications an Operational Readiness Evaluation (ORE) and an Aviation Warfare Training Improvement Program (AWTIP) assessment during which VP-26 earned the highest scores in the Wing in 2013. During its U.S. 7th Fleet deployment, VP-26 assumed command of both Task Group 72.2 and Task Group 72.4. The squadron was augmented by six reserve crews from VP-62 and VP-69, as well as six crews from VP-1, maintaining 18 combat-proficient crews in theater throughout the deployment. VP-26s successful integration of air crews from four squadrons was unprec edented and established the model for future active-reserve integration. Overall, VP-26 led more than 533 active and reserve sailors, including 24 air crews and 12 aircraft achieving a 99.6 percent mission completion rate. The squadron also conducted 36 detachments to 14 countries and sup ported 28 multinational exercises and 20 U.S. maritime exercises. Among the highlights from this demanding sched ule were VP-26s interactions with allies and partners, including the Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) and Royal Australian Air Force. In July, VP-26 detached a P-3C to New Zealand, yield ing strategic gains as the first U.S. P-3 to fly there since 1984. In November, a combined active-reserve detach ment went to Chennai, India to support Exercise MALABAR-13. During that detachment a mixed crew of VP-62 and VP-26 aircrewmen conducted the first hot ASW turnover with a Russianmade TU-142. VP-26 also advanced the bilateral relationship with Japan and enhanced interoperability with the Japanese Maritime Defense Force (JMSDF), through numerous exchanges with JMSDF Patrol Squadrons 5 and 2 and hosting the three-star Commander, Fleet Air Force JMSDF at Kadena Air Base. These planned engagements are an important reason U.S. P-3Cs deploy to the Western Pacific, but Jacksonville squadrons also operate forward in order to respond rapidly to crises. VP-26 was deployed and responded superbly in October 2013 when Super Typhoon Haiyan devastated portions of the Philippines. Within hours of the government of the Philippines request for assistance, CTG 72.2 P-3Cs were on station to assess the damage. Aircrews and maintainers from VP-26 and VP-62 supported search and rescue missions and provided critical overhead imag ery to help those on the ground identify areas in need and deliver humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. Overall, VP-26 flew 4,268 flight hours with 412 hours of anti-submarine war fare contact time, and surpassed 51 years and 342,908 Class A mishap-free flight hours in 2013. The squadrons superlative performance across all mar itime patrol and reconnaissance mis sion areas, unmatched maintenance effectiveness, and outstanding leader ship during the first integrated activereserve deployment were honored by CNAL with the 2013 Battle Efficiency Award and Arnold Jay Isbell Trophy. VP-26From Page 1and knowledge to support the AERR process, said Pappas. The chiefs who are selected to participate in their ratings AERR must compliment other panel mem bers so all aspects of the rating are represented. The NAC works closely with each community and Learning Center to obtain the appropriate combination of panel members. The reviews are held at Saufley Field in Pensacola, Fla. and FSME travel is funded by NETPDTC. The reviews run one or two weeks in length with each rating being reviewed about every two years. Updates to the AERR schedule are published quarterly. According to NETPDTCs CMDCM Eric Riddle, each AERR volunteer plays a vital role as a rat ing FSME; chiefs who are selected are responsible for determining the content of E4 through E7 rating advancement exams. We have a dedicated staff of exam development profession als who know how to leverage the experience and rating expertise of our visiting chiefs, said Riddle. Before the FMSEs leave to go back to their commands, they tell me how rewarding the AERR experience has been, and many return to the NAC to participate in subsequent panels. Applications to serve as a FSME for advancement exam develop ment must be endorsed by the appli cants commanding officer or officer in charge, as well as the command master chief, senior chief or chief of the boat prior to submission to NETPDTC. Chiefs with experience in multiple platforms or recent experience on a major rating skill-set are highly desirable. There are seven eligibility require ments listed in the nomination package. Potential applicants should contact the NETPDTC POC listed in the NAVADMIN to request a waiver if needed. For application forms and addi tional requirements, visit https:// www.nko.navy.mil/group/navyadvancement-center. EXAMFrom Page 7 By Bob SrokaNDSL JacksonvilleThe Navy Drug Screening Laboratory (NDSL) Jacksonville is at the forefront of the Department of Defense (DoD) effort to combat the negative effects of Spice on service members. The local command recently began testing urine samples for synthetic drugs commonly referred to as spice and sold under many names, includ ing fake weed, K2, Yucatan Fire, Skunk and Moon Rocks. It is one of six DoD urine drug-testing laboratories to do so. NDSL Jacksonville routinely tests more than 900,000 specimens from the Navy, Marine Corps and Army each year for marijuana, cocaine, opiates, amphet amines, designer amphetamines, ben zodiazepines and heroin. Dr. Ricky Bateh, a senior chemist at NDSL Jacksonville and scientific expert for military courts-martial and adminis trative hearings, warned that while spice Navy expands efforts to deter Spice useSee SPICE, Page 16 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014

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Seahawks and the Armys AH-64D Apache and the AH-64D Longbow Apache. The AH-64 Longbow Apache is a fourblade, twin-engine attack helicopter with a tandem cockpit for a two-man (pilot and co-pilot/gunner) crew. It fea tures a nose-mounted sensor suite for target acquisition and night vision sys tems. It mounts radar-guided Hellfire airto-ground missiles, primarily used to destroy high-value targets with preci sion strikes. Other armaments include a 30mm automatic M230 chain gun locat ed under the fuselage, air-to-air missiles and 70mm, 2.75-inch rockets. Both the Army and Navy helicopters were armed with Hellfire Captive Air Training Missiles to simulate the air-toground missile with a seeker head. In addition to Hellfire missiles, the Dragonslayers HH-60H Seahawk heli copters employed crew-served M240 machine guns. Cobb noted, Pinecastle Range has a moving land target (MLT) system a remote controlled truck that simulates a small boat threat. To detect the MLT and other targets, I served on board an HH-60 as the SCAR-C (coordinator) for the various exercises. The SCAR-C flies at a higher altitude to assign tasking to the other HH-60 and the Apaches. Looking to the future, Cobb said, Were working on new joint exer cises with the addition of an MH-60R Seahawk as the SCAR-C, because of its more sophisticated avionics. HS-11From Page 1 Photos by Clark Pierce An HH-60H Seahawk helicopter assigned to HS-11 approaches a landing zone March 11 behind an Army AH-64D Apache (left) and an Army AH-64D Longbow. Aircrew and maintainers with the South Carolina Army National Guard 1-151st Attack Reconnaissance Battalion perform a preflight inspection on an AH-64D Longbow Apache attack helicopter, March 11 on the NAS Jacksonville flight line. The AH-64D Apache weapons pylons can carry 16 Hellfire air-to-surface missiles, 70mm rockets and Sidewinder air-to-air missiles. A 30mm automatic M230 chain gun is located under the forward fuselage. One of two HH-60H Seahawk helicopters assigned to HS-11 that participated in joint exercises March 11-12 with a pair of AH-64D Apache helicopters from South Carolina Army National Guard 1-151st Attack Reconnaissance Battalion. An HS-11 move crew prepares to tow one of the squadron's Seahawk helicopters March 11 from their hangar to the flight line.Photo by Tech. Sgt. Jorge Intriago This Navy HH-60H Seahawk, assigned to the HS-11 "Dragonslayers" based at NAS Jax, is equipped with air-tosurface Hellfire missiles, as well as a crew-served M240 machine gun. Free Concert at NAS Jax featuring Gary Sinese & The Lt. Dan BandFrom Staff Deweys no tickets necessary. allowed. sions available. Deweys. DIRECTIONS: Enter base through Yorktown gate. Turn right on Gillis and look for Deweys event area to your right. By Lt. Brian MorganVP-30 Public Affairs OfficeCapt. Steven Vahsen, chief of staff U.S. Naval Academy, and VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Curtis Phillips, at the VP-30 Auditorium. The recipients com pleted the Undergraduate VP-30, earning their cov eted Wings of Gold. These newly winged aviators will now enroll Replacement Squadron Upon completion of the CAT I syllabus, they will report to operational Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance squad rons to begin their ini tial sea tours at either Whidbey Island, Wash. or Jacksonville. line begins with Aviation Preflight Introduction (API) instruction at NAS aviation officers under go a classroom syllabus and are taught the basics of naval aviation that includes aerodynamics, meteorology and princi ples of navigation. After completing API, for primary training at Training Squadron TEN NAS Pensacola. While assigned to from a classroom learn ing environment to initial airborne flight training in the T-6A Texan II. Upon completion of primary flight training at NAS Pensacola, officers who are selected for the pipeline report to VP-30 for specific aircraft train ing. VP-30 wings new Naval Flight Officers Photo courtesy of VP-30(From left) NFO Class 1307 (front row) Capt. Steven Vahsen, Ensign David Hernandez, Lt. j.g. Melissa Seets, Ensign Caroline Lockett, Ensign Sarah Freshwater and Capt. Curtis Phillips. (Back row) Ensign Anthony Melvin, Lt. j.g. Carson Burton, Ensign Daniel Bennet and Ensign Dan Almendrales. JOIN TODAY! ducks.org 800-45-DUCKS JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014 9

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By Lt. Megan DoonerU.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsRear Adm. Sinclair Harris, com mander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet, was guest speaker March 3 at, The Last Good War: The Faces and Voices of World War II photo exhibition, at the Cultural Center in Ponte Vedra. This national exhibit, photographed and curated by Thomas Sanders, tells the story of World War II through pho tos and the words of its veterans. The brunch was attended by more than 60 WW II veterans and family members. Retired Petty Officer Second Class Robert Wise, at age 95, is the old est living WW II veteran in Northeast Florida. He spoke with Harris about the pride he has in African-Americans being in the service. I was glad, as I was telling [Harris], that it was nice to see a high ranking African-American officer. Because when I was in, there was segrega tion and the (Naval) Academy usually washed them out. I am glad he made it. He was proud to see that I had served on submarines. There were only 2,400 African-Americans in the submarine force during WW II, said Wise. Retired Capt. Donald Miller also served in submarines and was involved in the battle of Leyte Gulf. Miller commented on how much he enjoyed the brunch and how meaning ful it was to be part of such a historical event. Very rewarding really, and very enjoyable. I appreciate that they took an interest in what we did. People in our country taking an interest is very heart warming, said Miller. Harris spoke with both of these vet erans at the brunch and commented on his time with them. I had the great honor of meeting two of our WW II submarine shipmates. Both are still in fighting shape and con tinue to be great advocates for our great Navy. Both were very proud of their time in the Silent Service, said Harris. The exhibit will be on display at the Ponte Vedra Cultural Center until April 4. In conjunction with the national exhibit, the center is also hosting the Local Heroes exhibition, with photo graphs of local veterans submitted by members of the community. For more information, visit http:// www.ccpvb.org/the-last-good-warexhibition.html or call (904) 280-0614. From Commander Naval Air Force Reserve Public AffairsThe Nomads of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VR-62) transported a Seabee underwater construc tion team to and from Timor Leste where they were involved in a humanitarian assistance project in February. Underwater Construction Team 2 (UCT-2) Diving Detachment Bravo built a breakwater jetty on the shoreline of Dili, Timor Lestes capital. The pier will be will be used to accommodate sev eral local law enforcement 7-meter rigid hull inflatable boats (RHIBs). The jetty is 250 feet long and composed of armor stone, core stone and fill, which will shield the new pier from current and wave action. This will also provide the clearance depth for the RHIBs with an estimated maximum depth of 12 feet at the end of the jetty. Whether were hauling cargo, putting boots on the ground, or in this case, fins in the surf, we meet the logistics needs of the fleet more efficiently and effec tively than anyone else, said AWFCS Mike Wendelin, one of the VR-62 loadmasters. We can haul almost any combination of passengers and gear all over the world. When the Navy needs priority airlift, the VR community is there to get the job done. The UCT Teams have broad capabilities for build ing, maintaining and demolishing various waterfront facilities and in-water structures. The teams are made up of specialists from the various Seabee ratings who are also qualified divers. The Seabees of UCT-2 have the unique ability and dedication to perform quality underwater construc tion under various sea states and surrounding condi tions, said Lt. Seth McGuire, UCT-2 executive officer. While this particular jobs construction may be new to a few of the crew, the more seasoned divers who have either done it before or built similar structures, will utilize their collective skills and experience to guide the projects success, and pass on knowledge to the newer divers. Another lift completed and the VR-62 Nomads are ready to move on to the next high priority mis sion. VR-62 is scheduled to detach to U.S. Central Command later in the spring. VR-62 is one of five Navy Reserve C-130T squad rons providing the U.S. Navy and other services with global logistics support for high priority cargo. VR-62 is based at NAS Jacksonville. U.S. 4th Fleet admiral speaks at WWII photo exhibitionPhotos courtesy of Cultural CenterCommander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris talked with veterans Robert Wise (left) and Donald Miller, during a WW II photo exhibition luncheon on March 3 at The Cultural Center at Ponte Vedra Beach. Commander. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris speaks to people attending a World War II photo exhibition at The Cultural Center at Ponte Vedra Beach.VR-62 Nomads move underwater construction team to Timor LestePhoto courtesy of VR-62A VR-62 C-130T logistics aircraft delivered Seabees and their gear to Timor Leste in Southeast Asia, where they constructed a breakwater jetty in the har bor of Dili, Timor Leste's capital. 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014

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By Lt. Jen WrightNECE Public AffairsFloridas hot months will be here soon, which means outdoor fun, cookouts and pesky mosquitoes. Mosquitoes may not be the first thing that comes to mind as the weather warms, but it is critical to be aware of diseases that insects can transmit. In Florida, it is important to be aware of West Nile virus (WNV) and dengue fever. In 2013, both WNV and dengue were found in Florida, so its essential that we edu cate the public regard ing disease symptoms and how to avoid being bitten by infected mosquitoes, said Lt. James Harwood at the Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) aboard NAS Jacksonville. The symptoms of WNV are flu-like and can include high fever, headache, neck stiffness, tremors and muscle weakness. Approximately one in 150 cases lead to serious illness such as nuerological disorders, convul sions, loss of vision and even death according to the CDC. Dengue, also known as Break Bone Fever, is a febrile disease characterized by high fevers, low blood platelet counts, nau sea, vomiting and rash. Both of these diseases can be debilitating and lead to possible loss of life. However, effective preventative mea sures may be taken to avoid contracting disease. The rise of locally acquired dengue cases in Florida is particularly con cerning. Since the outbreak of 2009 in the Florida Keys, den gue cases transmitted by local mosquitoes have been on the rise. The Yellow Fever or Aedes aegypti mosquito is a respon sible for dengue transmission and breeds in close proxim ity to human housing. Ideal breeding sites include many artificial containers commonly found in urban backyards. Although local mosquito control districts and public health departments do a tre mendous job of controlling mosquitoes and other pests that carry disease, everyone must play a role to ensure their efforts are successful, said Capt. Eric Hoffman, NECE offi cer-in-charge. Simple preventive measures to include using repellents, avoiding outdoor activities around dusk/dawn, wearing long pants/shirts, eliminating standing water around your home. Ensuring screens on windows and around porches and pools are in good repair significantly reduce the risk of not only being bitten. One of the best ways to avoid WNV is to avoid con tact with mosquitoes as much as possible, said Lt. Marcus McDonough. This means applying DEET or picaradin on exposed skin and spraying clothing with permethrin. Be sure to wear long-sleeved, light-colored shirts and pants when outdoors or in places where mosquitoes may be present. Stay indoors at peak mosquito activity times, such as dawn and dusk and be sure to check that screens on windows and doors are in good repair. In order to keep mosquitoes away, be sure to dump water from any containers around your home. It is especially important during the rainy season since many disease carrying mosquitoes prefer to breed in small containers that temporarily hold water. More information can be found at the NECE home page at http://www.med.navy.mil/ sites/nmcphc/nece. Fight the bite early, avoid diseases from mosquitoesPhoto courtesy of NECEPetty Officer First Class Luis Santana uses a NECE dipper to make sure standing water at NAS Jacksonville is free of mosquito larvae. CDC photoSince 2009, dengue fever cases in Florida transmitted by local mosquitoes have been on the rise. Protect yourself during dawn and dusk. Sailors remove chocks from the landing gear of an MH-60R Seahawk helicopter on March 12. Assigned to the "Spartans" of NAS Jacksonville-based HSM-70, the helo prepares to lift from the flight deck of the guided-missile destroyer USS Ramage (DDG 61). Ramage is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. Photos by MC2 Jared KingHSM-70 on deploymentSailors assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Ramage (DDG 61) refuel an MH-60R Seahawk heli copter, Operated by the "Spartans" of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 70 on the flight deck of USS Ramage. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014 11

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12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014 From StaffUniversity of North Florida (UNF) students from the College of Computing, Engineering and Construction (CCEC), toured NAS Jax March 10 to see first hand, examples of green or environmentally sustainable Navy facilities and public works practices. UNF Associate Professor Dr. David Lambert, who teaches the CCEC honors course, Building Sustainable Cities, spearheaded the visit. Kevin Gartland, NAS Jax environmental director, and John Young, NAS Jax storm water manager, welcomed the group and showed them sus tainable practices throughout the station in the form of: ing, site. Gartland said that the stu dents seemed eager to see how sustainable environmental practices add to the quality of work and life aboard NAS Jax. Who knows . when some of these men and women grad uate, perhaps theyll go to work at Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast, located here at NAS Jax, said Gartland. Lambert said he looks for ward to bringing more UNF CCEC students to the base in the future. Students attending the outdoor sustainability tour included: Carrie Anne Tidwell, Brittany Edwards, Devin Strausbaugh, Corbin Olmstead, Caitlin Kengle, Mallory Schott, Briggs Kirby, Gabrielle Heinrich, Kevin OHalloran and Brett Hensley. From StaffTwenty NAS Jacksonville sail ors and civilians from the base operations, executive and envi ronmental departments volun teered March 7 to assist person nel from the City of Jacksonville Parks and Recreation and Public Works Departments to rejuvenate Hemming Plaza, the well-used park across from Jacksonville City Hall in down town Jacksonville. Sailors joined with volunteers from Downtown Vision Inc. and Greenscape of Jacksonville to remove all of the old bushes and vegetation in the planted areas of Hemming Plaza. The volunteers removed more than 500 bushes, plants and weeds in preparation for the City and Greenscape to replant the beds with new, more resilient and attractive plants and bushes later in the month. As the NAS Jax volunteers worked, they were greeted by both Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown and City of Jacksonville Military Affairs Director Victor Gillory, who enthusiastically thanked them for their labor and support. Hemming Plaza volun teers included: IC2(SW/AW) Jayson Bankhead, IT1 Connie Blevins, ET3 Drake Delcambre, ET2(SW) Daniel Dickens, Kevin Gartland, AME2 Ruby Gill, Angela Glass, ET2(SW) Aaron Keller, ET1(SW) Erik Paulsen, ET2(SW) Ashley Pledger, ET2(SW) Dustin Poitras, ET2(SW/AW) Brian Sinclitico, PR3 Latoya Skipper, Jody Smith, ET1(SW) Nicolas Stersic, ETSN Cody Utsler and Rana Utsler. This is another example of the strong mutual support by the City and Navy to improve the quality of life for the com munity. If you are interested in learning about volunteer opportunities in the communi ty, contact IT1 Connie Blevins at 542-8338. Photos by Angela Glass, NAS Jax Environmental DepartmentService Members and DOD civilians gather for a group photo prior to participat ing in a volunteer opportunity downtown Jacksonville. Mayor Alvin Brown offers his gratitude and appreciation for the individuals vol unteering their time for the removal of shrubs in preparation to replant beds with more resilient plants. NAS Jax volunteers help refurbish Hemming PlazaNAS Jax Service Members and DOD civilians pose for a photo after removing shrubs and other organic matter at Hemming Plaza on March 7. City of Jacksonville Military Affairs Director Victor Gillory thanks the volunteers for their support for the landscape project. UNF sustainability class tours basePhoto by John YoungDuring a March 10 tour, UNF Associate Professor Dr. David Lambert (left) described NAS Jax as an excellent outdoor sus tainability classroom. Near Naval Hospital Jacksonville and Mulberry Cove, he talked with students about developing test plots for sustainable landscaping.RecruitMilitary Veteran Job Fair Jacksonville Connecting with veteran-friendly WHAT: Special hiring event for veterans and military spouses WHEN: Thursday, March 27, 11 a.m. 3 p.m. WHERE: CONTACT: Jill Krabacher at 513-6777035 / jkrabacher@recruitmilitary.com This is a great opportunity to meet faceincluding USAA, Walgreens, Prudential Financial, Military Sealift Command, Schlumberger, Home Depot and many more. entrepreneurial and educational offerings. This event is sponsored by DeVry University and produced by RecruitMilitary.

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live enter tainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaokeFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per per son, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Jan. 18, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: Jan. 25, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Navy Run Training Program At the fitness center Running group meets every Tuesday at 4 p.m. 9th Annual Captain Chuck Cornett Navy Run April 5 at 8 a.m. Register online at www.1stplacesports. com/calendar.html Lifeguard Course Begins March 14 Sign-up at the base gymI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_mwritt@ navy.mil. ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Alhambra Dinner show $38 $50.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Jacksonville Suns available soon! Rivership Romance (includes dinner) $40$57.75 Disney On Ice $15 Funk Fest 2 Day Ticket $62 VIP $169 Motley Crew Concert Club seats $63.50 Gatornationals $32 $58 Wild Adventures $30 $70 while supplies last Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27,2014) $166 $194.50 Discover Disney Ticket Florida Resident Ticket Valid for sale through APRIL 12, 2014 Universal Orlando Military Special 3rd day free Nonresident 2014 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 THE ARTIST SERIES-BROADWAY IN JACKSONVILLE 2014 SEASON Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com instal lation $349-$369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St Augustine $4.25 $15.50 St Augustine Alligator Farm Nile Zipline $35.25 (free admission with reservation) St Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Half Hour Boggy Creek Airboat Rides $15.50 $20 Wild Florida Airboats (Kenansville, FL) $18 $46.75 Florida Ecosafaris $22.75 $52.75 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld Hotel properties, Universal Hotels and off prop erty hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for informa tion. Savannah Weekend Trip March 22 23 $40 per person Ripleys Believe It or Not Museum Trip St. Augustine March 29 at 2 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Spring Breakout Championship April 4 at 10 a.m. $40 per person Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty March 25 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests March 27 Mondays & Tuesdays Play 18-holes for $20, includes cart and green fees Not applicable on holidays Daily Special Play 18 holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Month of the Military Family Carnival April 12, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Allegheny Softball Field Easter Egg Hunt April 16, 7 p.m. McCaffrey Softball ComplexFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Learn to fly at NAS Jax Call for introduction flight Additional ratings are available including instrument, complex and commercial Find more info. online at jaxnfc.net From FFSCThe NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their fami lies. Preregistration is required at 5425745. If special accommodations or handi capped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2014: May 12-15 (5:30-10 p.m.), Aug. 18-19 (8 a.m.-4 p.m.), Aug. 20 (8 a.m.-12:30 p.m.), Nov. 17-20 (5:30-10 p.m.). (7:30 a.m.4:15 p.m.) -, March 24-28, April 7-11, May 5-9, May 19-23, June 9-13, June 23-27, July 7-11, July 21-25, Aug. 11-15, Aug. 25-29, Sept. 15-19, Oct. 20-24, Nov. 3-7, Dec. 1-5. (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) March 17-21, April 14-18, May 12-16, June 16-20, July 14-18, Aug. 18-22, Sept. 22-26, Oct. 27-31, Nov. 17-21, Dec. 8-12. (8:30 a.m.-noon) April 1, May 2, June 30, June 30, July 29, Aug. 4, Sept. 2, Oct. 8, Nov. 14, Dec. 22. (8-9:30 a.m.) April 2, May 28, July 1, Sept. 3, Nov. 12. (9:40 a.m.-noon) April 2, May 28, July 1, Sept. 3, Nov. 12. (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) April 29-30, Aug. 5-6, Nov. 24-25. (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) July 31. (1-4 p.m.) April 1, July 29, Oct.8. (1-3:30 p.m.) March 31, July 30, Oct. 7. (9-10:30 a.m.) April 4, July 30, Oct. 17. (1:30-3:30 p.m.) April 3, May 1, July 2, Aug. 7, Oct. 2, Nov. 6. (1:304 p.m.) May 8, July 10, Sept. 11, Nov. 13. April 7 (1-2:30 p.m.), July 29 (10-11:30 a.m.), Oct. 4 (1-2:30 p.m.) (9-11 a.m.) April 14, May 12, June 9, July 14, Aug. 11, Sept. 8, Oct. 6, Nov. 3, Dec. 8. (9-10:30 a.m.) April 8, May 13, June 10, July 8, Aug. 12, Sept. 9, Oct. 7, Nov. 4, Dec. 9. (8 a.m.-noon) May 20, 27, Sept. 23, 30. (8 a.m.-noon) March 31, April 28, May 19, June 30, July 28, Aug. 25, Sept. 29, Oct. 27, Nov. 24, Dec. 15. March 27 May 1 (Thursdays 11 a.m.1 p.m.), May 27 July 8 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.-no workshop June 3), July 29 Sept. 9 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.-no workshop Aug. 19), Sept. 25 Oct. 30 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.). (11 a.m.-1 p.m.) March 19, May 6, July 15, Sept. 9, Nov. 18. (1-3 p.m.) March 11, 18, 25; May 6, 13, 20, 27; July 1, 8, 15, 22; Sept. 9, 16, 23, 30; Nov. 4, 12, 18, 25. (1-4 p.m.) April 1, 8, 15, 22; June 3, 10, 17, 24; Aug. 5, 12, 19, 26; Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28. (9:30-11 a.m.) Every Wednesday (9 a.m.-3 p.m.) June 3, Sept. 16, Dec. 2. (10 a.m.-noon) March 25; April 1, 15, 29; May 13, 27; June 10, 24; July 15, 29; Aug. 12, 26; Sept. 9, 23; Oct. 7, 21; Nov. 4, 18; Dec. 2, 16. (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) May 15, July 17, Sept. 4, Nov. 5. (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) April 10, June 12, Aug. 14, Oct. 9, Dec. 4. To register for any of the above work shops, please call 542-5745.Fleet and Family Support Center offers life skills workshops JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014 13

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14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014 From StaffMen 19 & under: Joseph Westberry (20:04); Callum Horgan (43:38) 20-24: Daniel Ketchum (20:47); Cameron Morgan (21:51) 25-29: Berge Terzian (23:50); Jacob Mora (24:48) 30-34: Devin Riley(20:33); Allen Mathis (21:27) 35-39: Jeremy Judernatz (20:11); Brendan Lockard (22:01) 40-44: Timothy Covey (25:25); Justin Clancy (29:44) 45-49: Scott West (26:23); Edgar Twining (27:58) 50 & over: Steve Damit (22:29); Eliseo Rodriguez (24:50) Women 19 & under: Adriana LaVopa (31:05); Sabrina LaVopa (34:33) 20-24: Miranda Abbas (21:55); Annie Huynh (25:42) 25-29: Kaila Yetka (28:12); Jessica Barrera (30:02) 30-34: Sarah Little (26:26); Gina Judernatz(30:44) 35-39: Stephanie Edwards (27:16); Michelle Safford (27:53) 40-44: Katherine Sears (26:55); Elana Goes (30:47) 45-49: none 50 & over: Elisa Jacque (36:21); Dinah Ruiz (43:50) Top 3 Men Joseph Westberry (20:04); Jeremy Judernatz (20:11); Devin Riley (20:33) Top 3 Women Miranda Abbas (21:55); Annie Huynh (25:42); Sarah Little (26:26)Sand Volleyball League forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS due by March 28, play begins in April. Tournament March 24 The tournament is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD participation points for their command or third. Greybeard Softball League FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractor personnel at NAS Jacksonville. Games play on Tuesday & Thursday at 11:30 a.m. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required or the beginning of April.Intramural Softball League FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required or the beginning of April. FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians; DoD contractors; retirees; and dependents over 18. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for at the end of March or the beginning of April. Open to active duty, retirees, dependents over 18, selective reservists, DoD civilians and contractors. The tournament starts at 5 p.m. at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts on the corner of Allegheny Road and Birmingham Road. Call 542-2930 to sign up by April 25.Intramural Golf Summer League Meeting May 7Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. Meet at 11:30 a.m. at the golf or designated representative attend receive Intramural Basketball League Meeting May 14 Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective designated representative attend receive For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil StandingsAs of March 14Winter Golf Teams Wins Losses CNATTU Blue 4 0 NCTS 4 0 VP-45 4 0 FRCSE 3 1 Navy Band 3 1 VP-30 2 2 VP-10 1 2 CV-TSC/PSD 1 3 SERCC 1 3 FRCSE II 0 0 HS-11 0 1 CNATTU Gold 0 4Ultimate Frisbee Teams Wins Losses VP-30 Students 2 0 CV-TSC Ashore 2 0 HS-11 1 1 NAS Jax 1 1 NAVFAC/PWD 0 1 VP-10 0 1 Hitron 0 2Badminton Doubles Teams Wins Losses NAVHOSP MSU 5 0 NBHC Jax 4 0 MWR Dynamic Duo 3 1 NAVFAC Blue 3 1 NAVFAC Red 2 2 CV-TSC Ashore 1 2 FACSFAC2 1 2 FACSFAC-1 1 3 NAVFAC Orange 1 3 NAVFAC Gold 0 44-on-4 Flag Football Final StandingsTeams Wins Losses Vet Clinic 7 0 VR-58 6 1 NOSC 5 2 VP-26 5 2 VR-62 5 2 HSM-72 3 3 ASD Jax 3 4 FACSFAC 2 3 NavHosp IMC 2 5 CRS-10 1 5 VP-62 0 6 FRCSE 62A/690 0 7 Knowledge Base offers umbrella of DoD informationBy Terri Moon Cronk American Forces Press ServiceWhether its how to replace a lost military service medal, ship a package to overseas troops or get the details of the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act, theres a good chance the Defense Departments Knowledge Base will have the answers. A DoD information tool to answer public inquiries, the database offers about 18 pages of 180 Defense questions and answers that address the hottest topics of public concern, said Nancy Kuck, a public affairs specialist working in community and public outreach for the office of the assistant secretary of defense for public affairs. We are an avenue to ask questions, Kuck said of the Knowledge Base. Anyone can use the database, and Kuck encourages people to first look at Knowledge Bases frequently asked questions to find the information they need. If the answer to a question is not listed, informationseekers can submit questions and receive electronic responses. If the staff of three full-time employees doesnt know the answer to a question, they will research a topic and find the answer, Kuck said. The staff answers more than 40,000 inquiries a year submitted through the Knowledge Base and by letters, emails and phone calls, she said. Two of the most popular questions are how to replace an identification card, and how to obtain a DD 214, the certificate of release or discharge from active duty, she said. Additionally, if Kucks office sees a trend in ques tions or concerns -such as last years furlough -the staff researches and gathers the information for post ing on the Knowledge Base so its readily available to the public, she said. The Knowledge Base is the big umbrella of DoD information, although some questions are military service-specific, Kuck said, noting that directly con tacting the appropriate branch of service is sometimes faster to get an answer. If its service-specific, we encourage people to go to them, because they would know more than we would, she said. The public will find contact informa tion for various organizations at http://www.defense. gov/landing/comment.aspx, she added. Our team does its best to address the questions and concerns of the general public, Kuck said, because they have a voice, and we are there to answer them, Photos by Morgan KehnertAnd they're off! The 2014 Leprechaun Dash 5K was held March 14 at the NAS Jax Antenna Farm. The race attracted 134 runners.Lepreachaun Dash 5K age group winnersAWO Miranda Abbas of VP-30 was the first female runner to cross the finish line with a time of 21:55. AW03 Joseph Westberry of VP-30 was the first male runner to cross the finish line with a time of 20:04. Photo by Shannon LeonardWeight Loss Challenge Event participants gather in the NAS Jax Gym on March 18 to kick off the eight-week competition. In recognition of National Nutrition Month, NAS Jax Navy Fitness is hosting the Weight Loss Challenge Event. It's not just for those who want to lose weight, it's also for those who are very active already and want to earn points for being healthy and active. Each team consists of two members from the same command or department. Team members will keep track of their points for fitness activities, nutrition activities, and bonus point activities. The goal is to work to lose the most weight and earn the most points by participating in physical fitness, nutrition and other heart healthy actives. Awards will be given to the top team with the highest percentage of weight loss and total activity points. For more info, call 542-2930/3518.Nutrition and Fitness Program

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From Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsMarch is Navy Nutrition Month and the Navys Nutrition Office, part of the 21st Century Sailor Office, is commit ted to spreading the word on healthy eating. A recent article in Nutrition Journal suggests that people looking to take a dietary supplement already have some what of a healthy eating pattern with regular exercise in their routine. Supplements may be necessary if ade quate nutrition is not available through food due to reasons such as medical conditions that affect the digestive sys tem, food allergies, intolerances, or being on a medically supervised special diet with food restrictions. Otherwise, having a well-balanced dietary pattern with a variety of foods is adequate and more effective than tak ing supplements. Dietary supplement marketing claims to solve numerous health problems, from relieving symptoms of simple medical concerns like the common cold to stopping a heart attack dead in its tracts. If dietary supplements really worked and produced a true quick and lasting solution to any health concern, then we would all be in optimal health without the need to visit the doctor. The Los Angeles Times reported in 2013 that Americans spend just under $30 billion each year in dietary supple ments including vitamins, herbs, and other such products that promise more energy, weight loss, or more muscle mass. Its foolish to believe the marketing and hype surrounding a product with out doing the proper research. Some news articles claim supplements to be safe, where science and research may say otherwise. Supplement labeling and ingredients are not always accurate and sometimes misleading. Last year the DoD removed Jack3d and Oxyelite Pro, along with 17 other supplement brands, from the retail stores on military bases. This was because the label claimed one of the ingredients, geranium, as a natural plant derivative, when in actu ality, the real ingredient in these sup plements was 1,3-dimethylamylamine (DMAA), a synthetic drug used in the 1940s as a nasal decongestant. DMAA has been linked to severe side effects like heat injuries, seizures, brain hemorrhages, and heart problems. There may be numerous other supple ments currently on the market that have unknown and potentially harmful ingredients in them.Dietary supplementsPotentially unsafe without infoPhoto by Clark Pierce USAF KC-135 pilots practice landings at NAS JacksonvilleA U.S. Air Force KC-135 Stratotanker assigned to the 91st Air Refueling Squadron at MacDill AFB in Tampa, visited NAS Jacksonville March 11 to practice touch-andgo landings a maneuver that involves landing on a runway and taking off again without coming to a full stop. This allows many landings to be practiced in a short amount of time. By Cheryl MastersHealth promotion specialist, NH Jacksonville Wellness CenterTo mark National Nutrition Month, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles Health Promotion and Wellness Center offers nutrition displays at the hospital and Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville during the month of March. This years theme is Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right. The Wellness Center is display ing information on a variety of top ics including fitness, tobacco cessa tion, diabetes and nutritional foods. Resources and information are aimed at promoting living healthy lifestyles. Plus, on March 28, the Child Street Caf (located at NH Jacksonville) will have a special lunch in honor of National Nutrition Month. For more information or to sign up for one of the many health classes offered, call (904) 542-5292 or visit NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center located at Building 867, adjacent to the NAS Jacksonville MWR Fitness Center.National Nutrition MonthEnjoy the taste of eating right JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014 products are engineered to produce a high similar to mari juana, there have been reports of serious unwanted effects, including elevated blood pressure, racing heartbeat, and nausea. This is because spice comprises a group of com pounds that are structurally similar to marijuana but which can vary widely in their actu al effect on the body. This can cause significant health con cerns because the user cannot effectively gauge a safe dose to use or anticipate the effects of the products. Many individuals who have used these products had to be hospitalized and several indi viduals have died after smok ing or ingesting these prod ucts, said Bateh. he National Institute on Drug Abuse describes spice as herbal mixtures that produce expe riences similar to marijuana (cannabis). The products typi cally contain dried, shredded plant material and chemical additives that are responsible for their psychoactive (mindaltering) effects. The com pounds are typically marketed as safe, legal alternatives to marijuana and labeled not for human consumption. Newer synthetic drugs like Spice pose a threat to the Fleet and Warfighter because of their dangerous and unpredictable psychoactive effects, said Cmdr. Darryl Arfsten, NDSL Jacksonville commanding offi cer. While commanders have voiced concern over spice use among service members for years, NDSL Jacksonville did not have the ability to detect the compounds as part of rou tine urinalysis testing. Prior to December largescale testing for these drugs was not possible, said Arfsten. NDSL Jacksonville is now able to use a commercial test ing product to screen samples for the drugs. If a service mem bers sample tests presumptive ly positive in the screening test, the urine specimen is re-test ed using a highly specific and accurate confirmatory test that tells us the drug present and the amount present. Arfsten went on to explain that since December, the laboratory has been screening service mem ber urine samples for Spice compounds. Under the DoDs zero tol erance policy for drug abuse, Navy and Marine Corps per sonnel who wrongfully pos sess, use, promote, manufac ture or distribute designer drugs, products containing synthetic compounds or drug paraphernalia may be sub ject to punitive action under Articles 92 and 112a of the UCMJ, adverse administration action, or both. The addition of Spice com pounds to the DoD Drug Testing Panel will enhance warfighter readiness, deter drug use, prevent damage and destruction of Government property, and protect the lives and health of DoD service members, employees, and the greater public, said Arfsten. For more information about NDSL Jacksonville and drug testing go to www.med.navy. mil/sites/jaxdruglab SPICEFrom Page 8 By Miriam S. GalletNAS Jax Public Affairs OfficerMore than 20,000 people participated in this years Gate River Run events held Saturday at the Jacksonville Fairgrounds. Olympians, runners from all over the world and more than 200 military, DoD civilian and family members from various commands aboard NAS Jacksonville competed in the 15K. Others participated in the 5K and a one-mile fun run. This was the 21st consecutive year the race has been selected to host the U.S. 15K National Championship, which is the largest in the country in term of partici pants. This years course took the runners twice over the St. Johns River and through beautiful San Marco where hundreds of residents cheered and oak trees provided shade from the rapidly rising temperature. Right after mile-marker eight, the runners encoun tered the Green Monster. For those who were com mitted to completing the race, crossing the top of the bridge meant that the worst was over and the finish line was within reach. However, for those less fortu nate it meant defeat. The Hart Bridge, or Green Monster as it is common ly referred to in local running circles, didnt disap point the thousands of runners who crossed it, includ ing the hundreds of base participants. My run was really good, exclaimed VP-45 PRC Fernando Morales, who along with his wife, Eva, completed the run. The Green Monster was the hardest part of the race for me. The incline was a contributing factor to my muscle fatigue. According to NAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM) Brad Shepherd, this years race was more difficult. When I turned on to Atlantic Boulevard it hit me. The many small inclines through the neigh borhood streets accumulated and my legs were feeling it. However, once I crossed the bridge I new success was right around the corner, he said. This was his eighth time competing in the event. I really enjoy this event. Its well organized and I enjoyed the running camaraderie, added Shepherd. A joyjous participant of the 2014 Gate River Run 5K race was Navy Region Southeast Housing Department staff member Cherry Haseltine. The Gate River Run is an inspiring event. There is so much family participation and you can set your own pace. The weather was great, Haseltine said. We had so much fun and Im now looking forward to the Chuck Cornett Run at NAS Jax April 5. Every runner who crossed the finish line received a commemorative medal. The first man to cross the fin ish line was Benjamin True with a time of 43:04. In the womens gategory no one was more happy to cross the finish line than the 2008 Olympic bronze medalist Shalane Flanagan of Portland, Ore. She was the first woman to collect a medal with a recordbreaking time of 47:03. March 31 deadline for summer 2014 programs hosted at Yale, Harvard and University of MichiganBy Alex ForresterWarrior-Scholar Project Public AffairsThe Warrior-Scholar Project is now accepting applications from eligible military and recently separated veter ans planning on attending four-year colleges for its growing academic boot camp program. New courses will take place at Harvard University and the University of Michigan, joining the existing effort at Yale for more eligible veterans to attend this no-cost opportunity to pre pare them for academic success. Now entering its expansion phase after successful pilots in 2012 and 2013, WSP is seeking eligible veterans and service members to apply online until March 31st for the summer 2014 pro grams. Initially launched at Yale University in 2012, WSP hosts academic boot camps at Americas top universities in order to prepare veterans to succeed in college and become leaders on campus. During WSP, veterans attend 16 hours per day of intensive courses and dis cussions led by prominent professors, administrators and current student-vet erans on topics including: stances, in the military to the college environ ment, and other challenges that are inevitably confronted by non-traditional college students, especially veterans. Active duty personnel and recently separated veterans with an actionable plan to attend a four-year university are eligible to apply. Up to 24 veterans will be accepted to the WSP at Yale, and up to 12 veterans will be accepted to the newly launched WSP programs at Harvard and University of Michigan. WSP is offered completely free-ofcharge to those selected into the pro gram. Veterans who have completed WSP have continued on to their respective universities to earn top GPAs, serve on Student Council, and assume vari ous other leadership roles on campus. Most importantly, each veteran who has completed WSP and enrolled in college has stayed in college. Program Dates: Yale June 722; Harvard July 512; University of Michigan July 2028. aforrester@warrior-scholar.org. The Warrior-Scholar Project seeks to unlock veterans potential to not only succeed in college, but to be leaders in the classroom and on campus. WSP is an intensive donor-funded, two-weeklong academic boot camp hosted at Americas top universities to facilitate veterans transition from the military to college; increase veteran gradu ation rates; and prepare student-vet erans to be leaders in the classroom. Participants attend courses and discussions led by prominent professors, administrators, and current studentveterans on topics including academ ic reading and writing; adapting to changed social circumstances, translat tary to the college environment, and overcoming and embracing the chal lenges encountered as non-traditional college students. WSP aims to com pletely transform the way veterans view themselves as students. After a successful pilot program at Yale University, WSP is expanding to ensure more veter ans who start college, stay and succeed. Photos by Miriam S. GalletPRC(AW) Fernando Morales of VP-45 collects his 2014 Gate River Run 15K Championship Race souvenier glass from one of the volunteers during the pre-race packet pickup on March 14. More than 200 NAS Jacksonviile military and civilian personnel joined the 20,000 participants at this year's Gate River Run 15K Race on March 17 in Jacksonville.NAS Jax runners tame Green MonsterNavy Region Southeast staff members Yolanda Munoz (left) and Cheryl Haseltine are all smiles prior to the start of the 2014 Gate River Run 5K Race at the Jacksonville Fairgrounds.Veterans, enroll now for Academic Boot Camps U.S. and French navies exerciseThe French navy frigate FS Cassard (D614) prepares to pass alongside the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) during a scheduled exercise. George H.W. Bush is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility.U.S. Navy photo by Cmdr. Tom Winkler

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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, MARCH 20, 2014 I I D E NEW SKIPPERS VP-5 & VP-8 CoC Page 3 FURRY SECURITY Military Working Dogs Page 4 RIVER RUN 15K Sailors Join Civilians Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Awarded Battle E and Isbell TrophyBy Lt. j.g. Joseph BayoVP-26 PAOCommander, Naval Air Forces Atlantic (CNAL) recently recognized the Tridents of Patrol Squadron (VP) 26 as winner of both the 2013 Maritime Patrol Battle Efficiency Award, or Battle E and the 2013 Arnold Jay Isbell Trophy. Capturing both awards in a single year is a rare occurrence in the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force, but as the last NAS Jacksonville-based P-3C Orion squadron sched uled to transition to the P-8A Poseidon, VP-26 was given several unique operational opportunities in 2013, and they delivered with characteristic Trident Pride. The Battle E is presented annually to the CNAL unit in each aviation community that best demonstrates warfighting efficiency and operational proficiency. The Arnold J. Isbell Trophy By Clark PierceEditorThe South Carolina Army National Guard 1-151st Attack Reconnaissance Battalion detached a pair of AH-64D Apache helicopters to NAS Jacksonville March 11, where the HS-ll Dragonslayers hosted them for two days of joint Strike Coordination and Reconnaissance (SCAR) exercises. Maj. Antonn Simmons, officer in charge of the Army National Guard detachment said, This joint exercise is valuable because of the coor dination involved in working with dissimilar assets. It moves us forward to a new level of combat preparedness. Simmons added, When it comes to joint SCAR training, ours is the first AH-64D Apache battalion in the Army to become overwater and deck-landing qualified. Its part of our overwater program to give the Navy another asset to combat enemy surface ships and small attack boats. HS-11 Training Officer Lt. Cmdr. Justin Cobb scheduled time at the Pinecastle Range in the Ocala National Forest for two days of joint SCAR exercises with the Dragonslayers HH-60H From StaffBoeing welcomed the Mad Foxes of Patrol Squadron (VP) 5 to its P-8 Poseidon facilities on March 13. The P-8A squadron, which arrived at NAS Whidbey Island, Wash., earlier in the week, will be the second squadron to operationally deploy later this spring. While in the Puget Sound area, the VP-5 group, comprised of a flight crew, maintenance team and the command master chief, toured the P-8A assembly and mission systems installation facto ries, as well as the companys commercial 737 lines. Lt. Cmdr. Colette Lazenka, a 12-year Navy veteran, said the Mad Foxes, based at NAS Jacksonville, Fla., flew a P-8A to Whidbey Island to help pre pare for their upcoming deployment to Kadena, Japan. As part of our training here well fly a simulated anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare mission togeth er with three P-3C Orions, two EA-18G Growlers and two EA-6B Prowler air craft, Lazenka said. Between now and our deployment well work with carrier strike groups and other aircraft to practice tactics and missions. Lazenka added that shes heard a lot of positive feedback from the squadron currently deployed to Kadena. They love the P-8A and say its reli able and doing a great job. James Detwiler, Boeing P-8 business development director, said the visit was a good opportunity for VP-5 to get an up close look at how the aircraft are built, as well as see the pride the Boeing team takes in producing them. The Mad Foxes will eventually relieve the War Eagles of VP-16, which has been on deployment since November 2013. To date, Boeing had delivered 13 of the Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft to the Navy. VP-16 joins search for Malaysia Airlines flightCrew members on board a P-8A Poseidon assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 16 man their workstations March 16 while assisting in search and rescue operations for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. VP-16, home based at NAS Jacksonville, is deployed in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility supporting security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific. Photo by MC2 Eric PastorVP-26 recognized by CNALPhoto by Tech. Sgt. Jorge IntriagoA formation of U.S. Army AH-64D Apaches assigned to 1-151st Attack Reconnaissance Battalion, South Carolina Army National Guard, and a U.S. Navy HH-60H Seahawk assigned to the HS-11 "Dragonslayers" conducted joint training at the Navys Pinecastle Range, Fla., March 11-12. The units trained on anti-surface warfare and combat search and rescue, in preparation for the squadrons helicopter advance readiness program evaluation. Army-Navy exercise enhances helicopter flexibility and lethalityBoeing photo by Jim AndersonJames Detwiler, Boeing P-8 business development director (right), leads the U.S. Navy VP-5 "Mad Foxes" on a tour of the P-8A Poseidon mission systems installation factory. Mad Foxes visit P-8A programPhoto courtesy of VP-26A P-3C Orion assigned to the Tridents of VP-26 returned home to NAS Jax Dec. 10, 2013 from a seven-month deployment to the U.S. Pacific Command. Their deployment was the first integrated active-reserve P-3C deployment to the 7th Fleet area of responsibility.See Page 8 See Page 9

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014 SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-7789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley From StaffMarch 20 1833 Cmdr. Geisinger of Peacock negotiates first commercial treaty with King of Siam. 1922 Collier USS Jupiter (AC-3) recommissioned as USS Langley (CV-1), Navys first aircraft carrier. 1939 Naval Research Lab recom mends financing research program to obtain power from uranium. 2003 U.S. led Operation Iraqi Freedom continues with cruise missiles launched from Navy ships in the Red Sea and Persian Gulf. March 21 1917 Loretta Walsh becomes first female Navy petty officer when sworn in as Chief Yeoman. 1919 Navy installs and tests Sperry gyrocompass in aircraft. 1945 Bureau of Aeronautics initiates rocket-powered, surface-to-air guided missile. March 22 1820 Commodore Stephen Decatur dies after duel with Capt. James Barron. 1915 Naval Aviator replaces Navy Air Pilot for officers qualified as aviators. 1929 Navy ships protect Americans and their property during Mexican revo lution. March 23 1815 USS Hornet captures HMS Penguin in a battle lasting 22 minutes. 1882 Secretary of the Navy Hunt issues General Order No. 292 creating Office of Naval Intelligence. 1917 Launching of USS New Mexico (BB-40), the first dreadnought with tur bo-electric drive, at the New York Navy Yard. 1945 Carrier aircraft begin preassault strikes on Okinawa, stimulating a kamikaze response from the Japanese. 1958 First launching of simulated Polaris missile from submerged tactical launcher facility off California coast. 1965 Lt. Cmdr. John Young, pilot of Gemini 3 completed three orbits in 4 hours, 53 minutes. Recovery was by helicopters from USS Intrepid (CVS-11). March 24 1977 Initial service acceptance trials for the CH-53E Super Stallion were com pleted at NATC. The CH-53E has three turbine engines instead of two. It also carries mission loads of 16 tons compared to nine tons for the CH-53D. It has seven rotor blades instead of six and could seat 56 troops. March 25 1813 USS Essex takes Neryeda, first capture by U.S. Navy in Pacific. 1898 Assist. Secretary of the Navy Theodore Roosevelt proposes Navy investigate military application of Samuel Langleys flying machine beginning naval aviation. March 26 1942 Adm. King becomes both Chief of Naval Operations and Commander, U.S. Fleet. 1943 Battle of Komandorski Islands, prevents Japanese reinforcements from reaching Attu. 1966 Operation Jackstay is Navys first amphibious assault in Vietnams inland waters. 1968 Operation Bold Dragon III began in Mekong Delta. By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorSomewhere at the Pentagon, someone with a lot of medals on his chest is shaking his head, wonder ing why I was chosen to take the 2014 Navy Spouse Personal and Family Readiness Survey. Except, the letter inviting my participation stated I was randomly selected, and I believe it. Any top brass whos read my column knows Im quite outspoken about these things, and I imagine the chances of me being hand-selected are slim. In any case, its always startling to receive a letter from the Department of the Navy addressed to The Spouse of. Its even more startling when you realize the Navy is asking for your opinion. This felt like those teacher evaluations in college that cause students to panic: Should I be honest? Will it affect my grade? (As someone who has been on the receiving end of teacher evaluations, the answers are Yes and No.) But remember, I view the Navy somewhat like a relative. Often, I love to hate it. Later, I feel guilty about my anger (Think of all the Navy has given me!). However, Im currently in an intense annoyed-with-the-Navy phase due to things that were not addressed in the 2014 survey. So, although I very much appreciate the Navy reaching out to spouses, Im seizing this opportunity as my use extra sheets of paper if necessary for all those is-there-anything-else-youd-like-to-add type of ques tions. First, the positives. The survey shows the Navy is adjusting to the new millennium. Ive written before about the changing dynamics of military families and how Uncle Sam often is delayed keeping pace. There was a time when a military mans uniform was an asset courting a romantic partner. Because social norms kept many women inside the house as homemakers, marrying a military man did not necessarily mean abandoning an education or career. Indeed, marrying a military man meant the opportunity for excitement and world travel. Today, as women increasingly match men as bread winners for their families, a mans military uniform can be a liability. It signifies extra hurdles to the womans own career and retirement. The Navys survey addressed this. It asked about my ability to pursue a career and education. It also asked about our living situation, revealing that the Navy is aware more families are choosing a geo-bachelor situation (commuter marriage in the civilian world) to deal with frequent moves and to stabilize the military spouses own career. The survey asked about our children, too, and how they handle deployments. This is a relatively new arena for the Navy, as well. When my dad was deploying in the 1970s, the absent father wasnt unusual, military or not. But the role of dad has changed with newer generations. Increasingly, dads are expectedand wantto be equally involved in their childrens upbringing. This makes deployments even more burdensome on all sides. I appreciate the Navy looking for programs and services to ease these unique military-family issues. But here are some areas the survey didnt address. When it asked about mental health and barriers to our familys ability to find help when we need it, there was no room to answer, TRICARE wont cover the counselor who was helping me. They wanted me instead to go to someone 90 miles away. (More on this in a forthcoming column.) When the survey asked about length of deployments, it offered nothing on the topic of the timing of deployments. When Dustin last deployed, he was expected to report to Djibouti on Dec. 23. When he got there, the new command told him, basically, they were on holiday and hed start the next week. Now, someone somewhere knew this would happen to my husband. And yet they didnt adjust his report date and allow him to be with us for Christmas and then leave for deployment. Its the little inefficiencies here and there that wear down a spouse. Like paying to move a family from one coast to another and back again, when said fam ily, after being asked to rank preferences for their next command, requested to stay on the east coast anyway. Its these inefficiencies that affect retention (and really thats the Navys ultimate interest). So I have some questions of my own for the Navy; questions that impact our decision to stay in or get out: 1. Why do you ask us where we want to be stationed and then send us somewhere else? 2. Why do you charge leave for a geo-bachelor on shore duty with a desk job to go home and take care of his Navy family for the weekend? 3. Why do you encourage us to get help and then restrict who we can see? 4. Why doesnt lower-level management have the ability to foresee a dilemma (service member reporting for deployment on Dec. 23) and tweak it? 5. Why do you say families are important, but then you make redundant policies (see question 2) that put us last? Feel free to use as many extra sheets of paper as necessary. U.S. Navy photos USS New Mexico (BB-40) shown shortly aftere leaving the New York Navy Yard. She had a crew of 1,084 Sailors and main battle armament of 12 14-inch guns. New Mexico was escorting ships in the Atlantic when the Japanese struck Pearl Harbor, but spent the rest of World War II operating in the Pacific, where she took part in most major campaigns. After attending the 1945 for scrap. A CH-53E Super Stallion assigned to the "Condors" of HMH-464 lifts off the deck of USS Kearsarge (LHD 3) in March 2003 for another combat mission to re-supply the Marines fighting for control of Southern Iraq. Kearsarge was deployed to the Arabian Gulf in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. This Week in Navy History From the HomefrontThe Navys 2014 spouse survey misses some things Photo by Yan KennonExpanding health care servicesCapt. Gayle Shaffer, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles commanding officer, shakes hands with John Goldman, Carl Vinson Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center director, after signing an agreement on March 14 to expand and enhance active duty and veteran health care services in the Albany, Ga. area. The joint agreement will relo cate VA health care providers and services to NH Jacksonvilles Branch Health Clinic (BHC) Albany, aboard Marine Corps Logistics Base, to provide new ancillary services to veterans and increase staffing for existing BHC patients.

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By Lt. j.g. John BellezzaVP-5 Public AffairsCmdr. Gregory Petrovic will assume command of Patrol Squadron (VP) 5 from Cmdr. Matthew Pottenburgh during the change of command ceremony to be held March 20 in Hangar 117 at NAS Jacksonville. Pottenburgh assumed command of the Mad Foxes in May 2013 and led VP-5 through a highly successful tran sition from the P-3C Orion to the P-8A Poseidon. Through his leadership, the squadron achieved a near flawless Safe For Flight certification. The squadrons Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle (IDRC) will soon see the Mad Foxes preparing to deploy to the 7th Fleet area of responsibility. During their IDRC, VP-5 participated in numerous exercises, including the first-ever P-8A support of a Composite Unit Training Exercise (COMPTUEX) and Joint Force Exercise (JTFEX). The Mad Foxes accomplished this while flying in support of the USS George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group deployment certifica tion the largest COMPTUEX ever assembled. Additionally, the squad ron earned the 2013 Medical M Award, Naval Aviation News Grampaw Pettibone Award, and the Chief of Naval Operations Safety S during Pottenburghs tenure as commanding officer. His next assignment will be at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C, serving as a Naval Aviation Program Analyst in the Programming Division (N80) of the Chief of Naval Operations staff. Cmdr. Petrovic, a native of New Bern, N.C., graduated from the U. S. Naval Academy in 1996. His naval career has included tours at VP-9 in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, CTF-67 and C6F in Naples, Italy, aboard the USS George Washington (CVN 73) in Norfolk, Va., VP-30 and VP-45 at NAS Jacksonville, and in the J8 Division of the Joint Staff in at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. Later this year, Petrovic will lead VP-5 on deployment, as the Mad Foxes will relieve VP-16 in the 7th Fleet area of responsibility and become only the second Navy P-8A squadron to operate overseas. By MC2 Clay WhaleyVP-8 Public AffairsPatrol Squadron (VP) 8 and Commander Task Group (CTG) 57.2 will conduct a change of command ceremony in Bahrain on April 1, when Cmdr. Derek Adametz, will relieve Cmdr. Todd Libby, as the 66th commanding officer of the squadron. Adametz, who earned his Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Wisconsin, was commissioned through the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps program in May 1996. He was designated a naval aviator in February 1998. Adametz previous squadrons include the Pelicans of VP-45 and the Mad Foxes of VP-5, both located at NAS Jacksonville, and the Grey Knights of VP-46 located at NAS Whidbey Island, Wash. His other assignments include the Naval History and Heritage Command at the Washington D.C. Navy Yard, USS Nimitz (CVN 68), and the Naval Postgraduate School at Monterey, Calif., where he earned a Master of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering, with Distinction, and a minor in Applied Physics. Before reporting to VP-8, Adametz was the Military Assistant to the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Global Strategic Affairs, where he assisted in policy development and execution in the areas of: countering weapons of mass destruction; nuclear and missile defense policy; and DoD Cyber Security and Space issues. The event will mark the end of Libbys second tour as a Fighting Tiger, where he previously served as Legal, Readiness and Naval Flight Officer (NFO) Training Officer from 1997 to 2000. As commanding officer, Libby suc cessfully led the Fighting Tigers through a challenging InterDeployment Readiness Cycle while preparing for a multi-site deployment to Bahrain and El Salvador and various detachment sites. During Libbys tenure as CO, the Fighting Tigers have flown 432 sorties and 3,336 mishap-free flight hours. Following the change of command, Libby will transfer to the U.S. Northern Command in Colorado Springs, Colo. VP-8 is currently deployed to the Navys 4th and 5th Fleet areas of responsibility, conducting mari time security operations, supporting Operation Enduring Freedom and countering transnational organized crime. For more information about the VP-8 mission, history and biographies, visit our official homepage at: http://www. public.navy.mil/airfor/vp8/Pages/ default.aspx. VP-5 Mad Foxes change of command todayCmdr. Gregory Petrovic Cmdr. Matthew PottenburghVP-8 Fighting Tigers to conduct change of command in BahrainCmdr. Todd Libby Cmdr. Derek Adametz JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014 Dogs train to support Navys missionBy MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Public AffairsSix members of the NAS Jax Security Department K-9 Kennel train their Military Working Dogs (MWD) yearround to ensure these elite creatures maintain their mission readiness. MWDs undergo constant training, which include obedience, building search, scouting, bite work and detec tion. Kennel Supervisor MA1 Keith Danalewich said, We train to keep up with the ever changing security threats, such anti-terrorism/force protec tion (AT/FP). We are evaluated by the Naval Criminal Investigative Services Security Training Assistance and Assessment Team every other year. He added, There is always a constant threat out there and if we learn about something new we train our dogs are so their capable of handling that threat. Our dogs and handlers are constant ly learning to improve their skills. We train as a team to face any situation, whether its day or night, to familiarize them for any security scenario. Danalewich said, The dogs receive different rewards for good behavior. Our dogs only get toys when they per form a task well. When we are conducting detection work, we give our dogs a toy as a reward for discovering an odor. They also receive lots of affection and praise. According to Danalewich, when a handler transfers to a different com mand, they leave their dog behind for the next handler. This procedure is practiced to famil iarize the dogs with different handlers. Either one of them can move to the next team partner to certify and aid in their mission. A handler may work with his or her dog for a few months or a couple of years. The MWDs primary mission is base security, including AT/FP, said Danalewich. The dogs are great visual deterrents. Also, we are always con ducting detection searches around the base looking for explosives and drugs. The dogs need a lot of care, explained Danalewich. Handlers joke around and say they get better care of than we do. We have a veterinarian on base who is in charge of our dogs nutrition and their annual health assess ments, as well as dental checkups. Handlers are also responsible for the dogs daily grooming sessions and head-to-tail health inspections, as well as bathing and clipping claws. The best thing about our job is that we get to work with a dog all day, said Danalewich. That is the highlight for me. I have a great team here. The handlers all work together and get along. Its really like a small family. I know what my other handlers are thinking and they know what I am thinking. We all know what our dogs are good at which is important in order to set up the teams for success. MWDs for all the services go through basic training at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas. When assigned to their next command, each dog receives more in-depth training with its handler. Although a variety of breeds have been used by the military for decades, the ones that currently have dem onstrated to be the best for patrol and detection work are the German Shepherd, Dutch Shepherd and Belgian Mallinois. These breeds have the com bination of keen sense of smell, endur ance, speed, strength, courage, intel ligence and adaptability to complete their mission at NAS Jax Security Department. MA2 Andrew Barnhart said, I love working canine. Its a unique way to make a difference in anti-terrorism and force protection. Working canine allows you to get interesting deployments, like going down range, and get to actually save lives in the real world. In a realistic scenario, if theres an unknown per son hiding in a building, its an MWD team that is sent in. If a person jumps the base perimeter fence and takes off through the woods, one of our teams is assigned to track and subdue them. According to Barnhart, MWDs retire after an average of 8-10 years of service. Its current handler at the time has the option to adopt. However, if the handler chooses not to take the retired dog, it is put up for adoption. Southeast Regional Kennel Master MA1 Elliot Fiashi said, These dogs demonstrate the Navys Core Values by: showing honor the dog is loyal to its handler; through courage the dog will do what the handler tells them to even when they are frightened; and display ing commitment they wont quite the job until they are given the command. Members of the NAS Jax Security Military Working Dog Unit gather for a group photo in front of the kennels March 11. (From left) MASN Cheli Matlock with Pato, Kennel Supervisor MA1(EXW) Keith Danalewich, MA2 Andrew Barnhart with Anouk, MA2 Glenn Patton with Benny, MA2 Erick Ortiz with Zoran and MA2 Bryan Chiverton with Doly. MA2 Andrew Barnhart shoots an M4 rifle with his dog Anouk by his side as part of a drill to familiarize the Military Working Dog to loud noises. After completing obedience training with their assigned dogs on March 11, members of the NAS Jax Security Military Working Dog Unit fall in for a photo. (Front to left) Kennel Supervisor MA1(EXW) Keith Danalewich, MA2 Andrew Barnhart with MWD Anouk, MA2 Glenn Patton with Benny, MA2 Bryan Chiverton with Doly, MASN Cheli Matlock with Pato and MA2 Erick Ortiz with Zoran. MA1(EXW) Keith Danalewich and his dog, Doly, team up to investigate an empty building in search for a hidden suspect during a building search training exercise aboard NAS Jax. Military Working Dog Zoran is released by his handler MA2 Erick Ortiz to attack MA2 Andrew Barnhart during a building search training aboard NAS Jax. MA1(EXW) Keith Danalewich from NAS Jax Security Department (right) releases his Military Working Dog, Doly, to practice Dog Biting on MA2 Andrew Barnhart of the NAS Jax Security Department during a training session at the base.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014 5 MA2 Andrew Barnhart gives the command to his Military Working Dog, Anouk, to exit the vehicle. MA2 Erick Ortiz and his Military Working Dog, Zoran, work together to practice scouting through the woods as a training exercise. Military Working Dog, Doly, receives the command to guard as her handler MA1(EXW) Keith Danalewich performs a pat down on MA2 Andrew Barnhart as part of an exercise. MA2 Glenn Patton exercises his Military Working Dog, Benny, at the base track as part of the dogs daily conditioning routine. Military Working Dog, Zoran, attacks MA2 Andrew Barnhart, with his handler, MA2 Erick Ortiz monitoring the canine during the dog bite training. MASN Cheli Matlock from NAS Jax Security Department and her Military Working Dog, Pato, inspect a commercial truck for contraband prior to the vehicle driving aboard the Navy installation. MA2 Erick Ortiz firmly holds the lead of his Military Working Dog, Zoran, as the team is about to perform scouting exer cises. Military Working Dog, Gergo leads his handler, MA2 Bryan Chiverton in the direction of a hidden live explosive as part of a continuous training military working dogs must attend to stay familiar with various odors. Photos by MC2 Amanda CabasosMA2 Erick Ortiz from NAS Jax Security Department guides his Military Working Dog (MWD), Zoran, during explosive detective training in a warehouse aboard NAS Jax. The MWDs are required to undergo constant odor training to keep them from forgetting important familiar smells. MASN Cheli Matlock and her Military Working Dog, Pato, (right), stand by to make an appearance while MA2 Emenson Exilus checks vehicle ID cards at the base commercial gate entrance. Military Working Dog, Zoran, detects a hidden explosive and escorts his handler, MA2 Erick Ortiz to the location of the bomb with MA1(EXW) Keith Danalewich supervising the training. Military Working Dog, Benny, leads his handler in the direction of a hidden explosive as part of a training to test the canines ability to recognize familiar odors.

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By Lt. j.g. Torrey PlumVP-8 Public AffairsThe VP-8 Fighting Tigers participated in the Jacksonville, Fla. 15K Gate River Run from their dual deployment sites in Comalapa, El Salvador and Isa, Bahrain. Forty-three Fighting Tigers from both deployments sites registered for the race along with the local Jacksonville community on March 15. On the morning of the race, 23 Sailors in El Salvador ran a 15K course created at their base of operations. Due to logistics, the VP-8 Sailors in Isa, Bahrain will run their race on March 22. We feel it is important to stay connected to our commu nity even while we are away on deployment, said Ensign Mark Baden, a naval flight officer with VP-8. Though the 15K was a challenge for most of us, it enabled us to feel closer to our friends and loved ones back in the states. The satellite race was coordinated through 1st Place Sports, who helped with event details and delivery of race packets to the deployed Sailors. AT1 Jason Hersperger said, I think it is really great that 1st Place Sports can give VP-8 the opportunity to take part in the Gate River Run given our displaced location while deployed. It shows a real sense of the term Support the Troops or in our case, Sailors. Everybody was really excited to take part in this a great experience. The Gate River Run, former ly known as the Jacksonville River Run, is an annual 15 kilometer road running event in that attracts both competi tive and recreational runners. It has been the US National Championship 15K since 1994 and in 2007 became the largest 15K race in the country. It was voted as one of the top U.S. road races for the last 20 years by Runners World Magazine. The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 are currently deployed to the 4th and 5th Fleet areas of responsibility, assisting in the Counter Transnational Organized Crime mission and providing humanitarian assis tance. From Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsA change to personnel policy now allows detailers to write orders direct ing the transfer of Sailors up to six months prior to or after their Projected Rotation Date (PRD), according to NAVADMIN 058/14 released Mar 13. Additionally, shore duty Sailors in paygrades E-4 to E-9 may be pulled for Early Return to Sea Duty, after having completed at least 24-months ashore. A change to MILPERSMAN 1306-104 gives Navy detailers increased flexibil ity in filling anticipated fleet vacancies on time with a fully trained and quali fied relief. Although the use of the Voluntary Sea Duty Program, Sea Duty Incentive Pay, and the Chief Petty Officer Early Return to Sea programs have made progress in improving fleet manning, there are times when the number of fleet vacan cies and/or the associated training requirements for those positions do not align with the number or availability dates of Sailors in their orders negotia tion window. PRDs will not be adjusted and the current Career Management System/ Interactive Detailing (CMS/ID) appli cation and detailing policies remain unchanged. Sailors will still enter their CMS/ID order negotiation window nine months prior to their PRD. However, when they are selected for their next assignment, their orders may direct transfer earlier than the previous three months prior to four months after their PRD allowed. The actual transfer date will be determined by the commence ment of training for the prospective job and the date of the anticipated fleet vacancy they are being ordered to fill. Additionally, when the number of critical fleet vacancies exceeds the number of sea duty rollers, detailers may contact shore duty Sailors that are approaching or beyond 24-months ashore, and consider them for an early return to sea move. When being considered for an early return to sea require ment, Sailors will be contacted by their detailer, and their current command will be contacted by their placement coordinator, and they will be afforded a 30-day window to submit an impact statement for consideration regarding their early transfer. Also, nuclear enlisted sailors will have their initial sea tour PRDs set in accordance with their prescribed sea tour lengths. This change removes unnecessary administration from the ships, allows for more accurate personnel inventory reports and provides our Sailors with more accurate PRDs upon receipt of orders to their initial aircraft carrier sea tour. For more information, read the mes sage at www.npc.navy.mil.Increased assignment flexibility allows detailers to fill anticipated vacancies Fighting Tigers join River Run 15K from deployment sitesPhoto courtesy of VP-8Sailors assigned to the VP-8 "Fighting Tigers" currently on deployment in Comalapa, El Salvador, created their own rendition of the 15K Gate River Run on March 15. Everard Lord of the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) F414 engine shop gets his blood drawn by Phlebotomist Courtney Miller with The Blood Alliance during an FRCSE blood drive. Lord reached another milestone after his two-pint donation by hitting the four-gallon blood mark of giving "the gift of life." Photos by Kaylee LaRocqueFRCSE supports The Blood AllianceThe Blood Alliance Phlebotomist Courtney Miller checks the status of Alexander Aiken's line during a Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) blood drive on March 11. Aiken, who works at an FRCSE aircraft repair hangar, has donated blood for the past 10 years. A CFC Participant provided as a public service.While he works to defend our country, St. Jude works to save his son from a deadly disease.St. Jude patient, Aaron, with his father Lieutenant Commander, Scott 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014

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By Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsA longtime dream will finally come true for AS1(AW) Terry Yamin of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), when he attends Navy Officer Candidate School (OCS) this summer, followed by Navy aviator flight training. A native of Caracas, Venezuela, Yamin moved to Coral Springs, Fla. with his family at the age of nine. After graduating from J.P. Taravella High School, he joined the Navy in December 2005. I wanted a better life for my fam ily and myself, said Yamin. In high school, I developed an interest for the Navy. I had a goal of becoming a naval officer and the dream of becoming a pilot. After graduation, I knew that there was nothing else out there to get me closer to those goals, so I enlisted in the Navy. Yamin completed recruit training and AS A School before reporting on board USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) in June 2006. After attending AS C School, he transferred to FRCSE as a maintenance manager/technician. Yamin earned his Lean Six Sigma Black Belt certification, which extended his tour of duty assigned as the AIR Speed assistant leading petty officer. The AIR Speed office assists FRCSE teams with process improvement ini tiative to meet customer requirements efficiently and effectively. They use specific tools to promote continuous process improvements (CIP); advocate for cultural change through training, coaching and mentoring; and provide resources to identify and document work processes. My job is to mentor and run CIP projects, he explained. I am current ly running a Black Belt project for the F-18 center barrel plus replacement line, while mentoring five subprojects and three additional Green Belt projects. Yamin earned an associates degree from Florida State College at Jacksonville and a Bachelor of Science degree in Management Information Systems from Columbia College. He plans to attend OCS this summer, followed by pilot training. Im not sure what platform the Navy will give me, but Ill be happy with whatever aircraft they train me to fly, Yamin said enthusiastically. This is a great opportunity for me to provide for my family, reach my goals, and make positive impacts in the Navy. Yamin is grateful for the help he has received to make his dream come true. First and foremost, I have to thank God for all I have and my achievements, he said. I also have to thank my wife for supporting me and my son for being the reason to be the best I can be. He is thankful to FRCSE Commanding Officer Capt. John Kemna and Lt. Cmdr. Victor Feal, the produc tion support officer, for affording him challenging opportunities to excel and providing the support and guidance he needed when applying for the pro grams. He is also appreciative to the Naval officers and chiefs who mentored me, as well as those who said I couldnt do this, because they challenged me. It was not by surprise that AS1 Yamin was selected for OCS, said Feal. He is currently working on a Master Black Belt project and has more than 60 employees working for him on various other complex projects on the F/A-18 line. I am very proud of him and cant wait to see him commissioned. During his off-duty hours, Yamin spends time with his family, trains for cycling events with Team Navy Jax, rides his motorcycle and volunteers in the community. I love the Navy and hope to finish my career by having positively impacted readiness, said Yamin. By Lt. j.g. Shelby GreenNAVSUP FLCJ Corporate Communications NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville (FLCJ) worked diligent ly March 8 to clean and enhance the courtyard of their adopted school, Hyde Grove Elementary School, during an outdoor beautification project. Hyde Grove is a categorized Title I school, which is a special assistance program funded by the federal gov ernment. The program works to assist schools with high numbers of children from low-income families to ensure that they are provided the necessary resources to meet state academic stan dards. Each of the schools students participate in the free lunch program and the Blessings in a Backpack program, that allows the children to bring home a backpack filled with food on the week ends. The 15 volunteers brought their own supplies to rake leaves, dig-out old trees, tear down fences, and trim bushes. The school provided the ser vice members with mulch to spread and flowers to plant in the courtyard as a means of sprucing up the area. Several students passed by and were delighted with the transformation, so they asked to join the volunteers in helping make their school look great. This project was the pinnacle event of the partnership formed with the school last August that began with a school supply drive that garnered $450 worth of supplies. Throughout the school year NAVSUP FLCJ Wardroom members and their families attended numerous activities such as Crafts with Kris Kringle, Literacy Night, and Math Night to assist the teachers, students and par ents at these events, and to be positive role models for the children. Our children need role models, said Principal Royal. Something as sim ple as sitting to talk with them while planting flowers makes a huge impact. It is amazing to see that a single con versation can change a childs life we are very excited about our present and future relationship with FLCJ. The impact of this affiliation has not only been felt by the the school, but also by the FLCJ members involved as it reinforces command and Navy prin ciples of giving back to the community. The partnership with Hyde Grove reminds me of all that I do have, so my family and I enjoy assisting at the events, remarked Cmdr. Paul DeMeyer. FLCJ plans to continue supporting this well-deserving school throughout the rest of the school year and into the next. The principal and vice principal are both enthusiastic and thankful for the commands participation and both parties look eagerly to the future. NAVSUP FLCJ, one of eight Fleet Logistics Centers under NAVSUP Global Logistics Support (GLS), provides oper ational logistics, business and support services to the fleet, shore, and indus trial commands of the Navy, Coast Guard, Military Sealift command, and other Joint Allied Forces. Services include contracting, region al transportation, fuel, material man agement, household goods movement support, postal and consolidated mail, warehousing, global logistics and husbanding, hazardous material manage ment, and integrated logistics support. By Katrina GergelyNETPDTC Center Public Affairs The latest Advancement Examination Readiness Review (AERR) schedule and request for volunteers was announced March 12 by the Naval Education and Training Professional Development Technology Center (NETPDTC) in Pensacola. Detailed in Naval Administrative Message (NAVADMIN) 052/14, Navy chiefs (E7 to E9) on active duty, Full Time Support (FTS), and Reservists on Active Duty for Special Work (ADSW) are encouraged to apply and partici pate in the process that helps identify the most qualified advancement candidates. The Navy Advancement Center (NAC) AERR fleet liaison, Peter Pappas, coordinates with learning center rat ing managers, detailers, and Type Commander representatives to select the best nominees. Each enlisted rating has unique fleet subject matter expert (FSME) require ments calling for the right mix of skills FRCSE Sailor accepted to officer candidate schoolPhoto by Kaylee LaRocqueAS1(AW) Terry Yamin, (left) Fleet Readiness Center Southeast AirSpeed assistant leading petty officer, dis cusses continuous process improve ment projects on the F/A-18 Hornet maintenance, overhaul and repair line with AirSpeed Program Analyst Keith Probert at the military depot on March 5. Yamin recently learned of his acceptance to Navy Officer Candidate School and the pilot training program. Members of NAVSUP FLC Jax and their families transform Hyde Grove Elementary School's courtyard during a recent campus beautification day at their adopted school.Photo courtesy of Fleet Logistics Center JaxSupply Corps community partners with school for cleanup dayAdvancement exam readiness review panels seek rating Subject Matter ExpertsSee EXAM, Page 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014 7

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is awarded for anti-submarine and antisurface warfare excellence. The Tridents began 2013 in the second half of their 12-month Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle (IDRC). With the support of Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 11, they were preparing for an historic deploy ment to the 7th Fleet area of responsibility, where Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mark Sohaney would take charge of two task groups including aircrewmen and maintainers from two P-3C reserve squadrons and Whidbey Islands VP-1. In 2013, VP-26 also took on a lions share of the P-3C maintenance work load at NAS Jacksonville because three local squadrons were transitioning to the P-8A. VP-26 maintenance completed 14 modification line inductions, 15 aircraft acceptances, 13 aircraft transfers and 15 intermediate maintenance concept (IMC) inspections. In early 2013, when CPRW-11 was tasked to respond to a foreign out-ofarea deployer, they assigned VP-26 as the task group commander. Supported by NAS Jacksonvilles VP-30, VP-10, VP-16 and VP-62, the Tridents led a successful 24-hour operation for 19 con tinuous days. It is an honor to be a part of this outstanding organization, said Sohaney. These awards highlight for the rest of naval aviation the hard work and professionalism that I am privileged to wit ness every day. It is humbling to lead such great men and women. To see their efforts recognized in this way is truly rewarding. Also during the IDRC, VP-26 collabo rated with the CPRW-11 Weapons School to launch an AGM-84D Harpoon and AGM-65F Maverick from the same air craft on a single sortie. This team effort was the first time a CPRW-11 aircraft launched dissimilar anti-surface war fare missiles on a single flight. These experiences and an Advanced Readiness Program syllabus run by CPRW-11 weapons and tactics Instructors prepared VP-26 to per form superbly during its pre-deploy ment certifications an Operational Readiness Evaluation (ORE) and an Aviation Warfare Training Improvement Program (AWTIP) assessment during which VP-26 earned the highest scores in the Wing in 2013. During its U.S. 7th Fleet deployment, VP-26 assumed command of both Task Group 72.2 and Task Group 72.4. The squadron was augmented by six reserve crews from VP-62 and VP-69, as well as six crews from VP-1, maintaining 18 combat-proficient crews in theater throughout the deployment. VP-26s successful integration of air crews from four squadrons was unprecedented and established the model for future active-reserve integration. Overall, VP-26 led more than 533 active and reserve sailors, including 24 air crews and 12 aircraft achieving a 99.6 percent mission completion rate. The squadron also conducted 36 detachments to 14 countries and sup ported 28 multinational exercises and 20 U.S. maritime exercises. Among the highlights from this demanding sched ule were VP-26s interactions with allies and partners, including the Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) and Royal Australian Air Force. In July, VP-26 detached a P-3C to New Zealand, yield ing strategic gains as the first U.S. P-3 to fly there since 1984. In November, a combined active-reserve detach ment went to Chennai, India to support Exercise MALABAR-13. During that detachment a mixed crew of VP-62 and VP-26 aircrewmen conducted the first hot ASW turnover with a Russianmade TU-142. VP-26 also advanced the bilateral relationship with Japan and enhanced interoperability with the Japanese Maritime Defense Force (JMSDF), through numerous exchanges with JMSDF Patrol Squadrons 5 and 2 and hosting the three-star Commander, Fleet Air Force JMSDF at Kadena Air Base. These planned engagements are an important reason U.S. P-3Cs deploy to the Western Pacific, but Jacksonville squadrons also operate forward in order to respond rapidly to crises. VP-26 was deployed and responded superbly in October 2013 when Super Typhoon Haiyan devastated portions of the Philippines. Within hours of the government of the Philippines request for assistance, CTG 72.2 P-3Cs were on station to assess the damage. Aircrews and maintainers from VP-26 and VP-62 supported search and rescue missions and provided critical overhead imag ery to help those on the ground identify areas in need and deliver humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. Overall, VP-26 flew 4,268 flight hours with 412 hours of anti-submarine war fare contact time, and surpassed 51 years and 342,908 Class A mishap-free flight hours in 2013. The squadrons superlative performance across all maritime patrol and reconnaissance mis sion areas, unmatched maintenance effectiveness, and outstanding leader ship during the first integrated activereserve deployment were honored by CNAL with the 2013 Battle Efficiency Award and Arnold Jay Isbell Trophy. VP-26From Page 1and knowledge to support the AERR process, said Pappas. The chiefs who are selected to participate in their ratings AERR must compliment other panel members so all aspects of the rating are represented. The NAC works closely with each community and Learning Center to obtain the appropriate combination of panel members. The reviews are held at Saufley Field in Pensacola, Fla. and FSME travel is funded by NETPDTC. The reviews run one or two weeks in length with each rating being reviewed about every two years. Updates to the AERR schedule are published quarterly. According to NETPDTCs CMDCM Eric Riddle, each AERR volunteer plays a vital role as a rat ing FSME; chiefs who are selected are responsible for determining the content of E4 through E7 rating advancement exams. We have a dedicated staff of exam development profession als who know how to leverage the experience and rating expertise of our visiting chiefs, said Riddle. Before the FMSEs leave to go back to their commands, they tell me how rewarding the AERR experience has been, and many return to the NAC to participate in subsequent panels. Applications to serve as a FSME for advancement exam develop ment must be endorsed by the applicants commanding officer or officer in charge, as well as the command master chief, senior chief or chief of the boat prior to submission to NETPDTC. Chiefs with experience in multiple platforms or recent experience on a major rating skill-set are highly desirable. There are seven eligibility require ments listed in the nomination package. Potential applicants should contact the NETPDTC POC listed in the NAVADMIN to request a waiver if needed. For application forms and addi tional requirements, visit https:// www.nko.navy.mil/group/navyadvancement-center. EXAMFrom Page 7 By Bob SrokaNDSL JacksonvilleThe Navy Drug Screening Laboratory (NDSL) Jacksonville is at the forefront of the Department of Defense (DoD) effort to combat the negative effects of Spice on service members. The local command recently began testing urine samples for synthetic drugs commonly referred to as spice and sold under many names, includ ing fake weed, K2, Yucatan Fire, Skunk and Moon Rocks. It is one of six DoD urine drug-testing laboratories to do so. NDSL Jacksonville routinely tests more than 900,000 specimens from the Navy, Marine Corps and Army each year for marijuana, cocaine, opiates, amphet amines, designer amphetamines, ben zodiazepines and heroin. Dr. Ricky Bateh, a senior chemist at NDSL Jacksonville and scientific expert for military courts-martial and administrative hearings, warned that while spice Navy expands efforts to deter Spice useSee SPICE, Page 16 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014

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Seahawks and the Armys AH-64D Apache and the AH-64D Longbow Apache. The AH-64 Longbow Apache is a fourblade, twin-engine attack helicopter with a tandem cockpit for a two-man (pilot and co-pilot/gunner) crew. It features a nose-mounted sensor suite for target acquisition and night vision sys tems. It mounts radar-guided Hellfire airto-ground missiles, primarily used to destroy high-value targets with preci sion strikes. Other armaments include a 30mm automatic M230 chain gun located under the fuselage, air-to-air missiles and 70mm, 2.75-inch rockets. Both the Army and Navy helicopters were armed with Hellfire Captive Air Training Missiles to simulate the air-toground missile with a seeker head. In addition to Hellfire missiles, the Dragonslayers HH-60H Seahawk heli copters employed crew-served M240 machine guns. Cobb noted, Pinecastle Range has a moving land target (MLT) system a remote controlled truck that simulates a small boat threat. To detect the MLT and other targets, I served on board an HH-60 as the SCAR-C (coordinator) for the various exercises. The SCAR-C flies at a higher altitude to assign tasking to the other HH-60 and the Apaches. Looking to the future, Cobb said, Were working on new joint exer cises with the addition of an MH-60R Seahawk as the SCAR-C, because of its more sophisticated avionics. HS-11From Page 1 Photos by Clark Pierce An HH-60H Seahawk helicopter assigned to HS-11 approaches a landing zone March 11 behind an Army AH-64D Apache (left) and an Army AH-64D Longbow. Aircrew and maintainers with the South Carolina Army National Guard 1-151st Attack Reconnaissance Battalion perform a preflight inspection on an AH-64D Longbow Apache attack helicopter, March 11 on the NAS Jacksonville flight line. The AH-64D Apache weapons pylons can carry 16 Hellfire air-to-surface missiles, 70mm rockets and Sidewinder air-to-air missiles. A 30mm automatic M230 chain gun is located under the forward fuselage. One of two HH-60H Seahawk helicopters assigned to HS-11 that participated in joint exercises March 11-12 with a pair of AH-64D Apache helicopters from South Carolina Army National Guard 1-151st Attack Reconnaissance Battalion. An HS-11 move crew prepares to tow one of the squadron's Seahawk helicopters March 11 from their hangar to the flight line.Photo by Tech. Sgt. Jorge Intriago This Navy HH-60H Seahawk, assigned to the HS-11 "Dragonslayers" based at NAS Jax, is equipped with air-tosurface Hellfire missiles, as well as a crew-served M240 machine gun. Free Concert at NAS Jax featuring Gary Sinese & The Lt. Dan BandFrom Staff Deweys no tickets necessary. allowed. sions available. Deweys. DIRECTIONS: Enter base through Yorktown gate. Turn right on Gillis and look for Deweys event area to your right. By Lt. Brian MorganVP-30 Public Affairs OfficeCapt. Steven Vahsen, chief of staff U.S. Naval Academy, and VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Curtis Phillips, at the VP-30 Auditorium. The recipients com pleted the Undergraduate VP-30, earning their cov eted Wings of Gold. These newly winged aviators will now enroll Replacement Squadron Upon completion of the CAT I syllabus, they will report to operational Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance squad rons to begin their ini tial sea tours at either Whidbey Island, Wash. or Jacksonville. line begins with Aviation Preflight Introduction (API) instruction at NAS aviation officers under go a classroom syllabus and are taught the basics of naval aviation that includes aerodynamics, meteorology and princi ples of navigation. After completing API, for primary training at Training Squadron TEN NAS Pensacola. While assigned to from a classroom learn ing environment to initial airborne flight training in the T-6A Texan II. Upon completion of primary flight training at NAS Pensacola, officers who are selected for the pipeline report to VP-30 for specific aircraft training. VP-30 wings new Naval Flight Officers Photo courtesy of VP-30(From left) NFO Class 1307 (front row) Capt. Steven Vahsen, Ensign David Hernandez, Lt. j.g. Melissa Seets, Ensign Caroline Lockett, Ensign Sarah Freshwater and Capt. Curtis Phillips. (Back row) Ensign Anthony Melvin, Lt. j.g. Carson Burton, Ensign Daniel Bennet and Ensign Dan Almendrales. JOIN TODAY! ducks.org 800-45-DUCKS JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014 9

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By Lt. Megan DoonerU.S. 4th Fleet Public AffairsRear Adm. Sinclair Harris, com mander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet, was guest speaker March 3 at, The Last Good War: The Faces and Voices of World War II photo exhibition, at the Cultural Center in Ponte Vedra. This national exhibit, photographed and curated by Thomas Sanders, tells the story of World War II through photos and the words of its veterans. The brunch was attended by more than 60 WW II veterans and family members. Retired Petty Officer Second Class Robert Wise, at age 95, is the oldest living WW II veteran in Northeast Florida. He spoke with Harris about the pride he has in African-Americans being in the service. I was glad, as I was telling [Harris], that it was nice to see a high ranking African-American officer. Because when I was in, there was segrega tion and the (Naval) Academy usually washed them out. I am glad he made it. He was proud to see that I had served on submarines. There were only 2,400 African-Americans in the submarine force during WW II, said Wise. Retired Capt. Donald Miller also served in submarines and was involved in the battle of Leyte Gulf. Miller commented on how much he enjoyed the brunch and how meaning ful it was to be part of such a historical event. Very rewarding really, and very enjoyable. I appreciate that they took an interest in what we did. People in our country taking an interest is very heartwarming, said Miller. Harris spoke with both of these vet erans at the brunch and commented on his time with them. I had the great honor of meeting two of our WW II submarine shipmates. Both are still in fighting shape and continue to be great advocates for our great Navy. Both were very proud of their time in the Silent Service, said Harris. The exhibit will be on display at the Ponte Vedra Cultural Center until April 4. In conjunction with the national exhibit, the center is also hosting the Local Heroes exhibition, with photographs of local veterans submitted by members of the community. For more information, visit http:// www.ccpvb.org/the-last-good-warexhibition.html or call (904) 280-0614. From Commander Naval Air Force Reserve Public AffairsThe Nomads of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VR-62) transported a Seabee underwater construction team to and from Timor Leste where they were involved in a humanitarian assistance project in February. Underwater Construction Team 2 (UCT-2) Diving Detachment Bravo built a breakwater jetty on the shoreline of Dili, Timor Lestes capital. The pier will be will be used to accommodate sev eral local law enforcement 7-meter rigid hull inflatable boats (RHIBs). The jetty is 250 feet long and composed of armor stone, core stone and fill, which will shield the new pier from current and wave action. This will also provide the clearance depth for the RHIBs with an estimated maximum depth of 12 feet at the end of the jetty. Whether were hauling cargo, putting boots on the ground, or in this case, fins in the surf, we meet the logistics needs of the fleet more efficiently and effec tively than anyone else, said AWFCS Mike Wendelin, one of the VR-62 loadmasters. We can haul almost any combination of passengers and gear all over the world. When the Navy needs priority airlift, the VR community is there to get the job done. The UCT Teams have broad capabilities for build ing, maintaining and demolishing various waterfront facilities and in-water structures. The teams are made up of specialists from the various Seabee ratings who are also qualified divers. The Seabees of UCT-2 have the unique ability and dedication to perform quality underwater construc tion under various sea states and surrounding conditions, said Lt. Seth McGuire, UCT-2 executive officer. While this particular jobs construction may be new to a few of the crew, the more seasoned divers who have either done it before or built similar structures, will utilize their collective skills and experience to guide the projects success, and pass on knowledge to the newer divers. Another lift completed and the VR-62 Nomads are ready to move on to the next high priority mis sion. VR-62 is scheduled to detach to U.S. Central Command later in the spring. VR-62 is one of five Navy Reserve C-130T squad rons providing the U.S. Navy and other services with global logistics support for high priority cargo. VR-62 is based at NAS Jacksonville. U.S. 4th Fleet admiral speaks at WWII photo exhibitionPhotos courtesy of Cultural CenterCommander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris talked with veterans Robert Wise (left) and Donald Miller, during a WW II photo exhibition luncheon on March 3 at The Cultural Center at Ponte Vedra Beach. Commander. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris speaks to people attending a World War II photo exhibition at The Cultural Center at Ponte Vedra Beach.VR-62 Nomads move underwater construction team to Timor LestePhoto courtesy of VR-62A VR-62 C-130T logistics aircraft delivered Seabees and their gear to Timor Leste in Southeast Asia, where they constructed a breakwater jetty in the harbor of Dili, Timor Leste's capital. 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014

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By Lt. Jen WrightNECE Public AffairsFloridas hot months will be here soon, which means outdoor fun, cookouts and pesky mosquitoes. Mosquitoes may not be the first thing that comes to mind as the weather warms, but it is critical to be aware of diseases that insects can transmit. In Florida, it is important to be aware of West Nile virus (WNV) and dengue fever. In 2013, both WNV and dengue were found in Florida, so its essential that we edu cate the public regard ing disease symptoms and how to avoid being bitten by infected mosquitoes, said Lt. James Harwood at the Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) aboard NAS Jacksonville. The symptoms of WNV are flu-like and can include high fever, headache, neck stiffness, tremors and muscle weakness. Approximately one in 150 cases lead to serious illness such as nuerological disorders, convulsions, loss of vision and even death according to the CDC. Dengue, also known as Break Bone Fever, is a febrile disease characterized by high fevers, low blood platelet counts, nausea, vomiting and rash. Both of these diseases can be debilitating and lead to possible loss of life. However, effective preventative mea sures may be taken to avoid contracting disease. The rise of locally acquired dengue cases in Florida is particularly con cerning. Since the outbreak of 2009 in the Florida Keys, den gue cases transmitted by local mosquitoes have been on the rise. The Yellow Fever or Aedes aegypti mosquito is a respon sible for dengue transmission and breeds in close proxim ity to human housing. Ideal breeding sites include many artificial containers commonly found in urban backyards. Although local mosquito control districts and public health departments do a tre mendous job of controlling mosquitoes and other pests that carry disease, everyone must play a role to ensure their efforts are successful, said Capt. Eric Hoffman, NECE officer-in-charge. Simple preventive measures to include using repellents, avoiding outdoor activities around dusk/dawn, wearing long pants/shirts, eliminating standing water around your home. Ensuring screens on windows and around porches and pools are in good repair significantly reduce the risk of not only being bitten. One of the best ways to avoid WNV is to avoid con tact with mosquitoes as much as possible, said Lt. Marcus McDonough. This means applying DEET or picaradin on exposed skin and spraying clothing with permethrin. Be sure to wear long-sleeved, light-colored shirts and pants when outdoors or in places where mosquitoes may be present. Stay indoors at peak mosquito activity times, such as dawn and dusk and be sure to check that screens on windows and doors are in good repair. In order to keep mosquitoes away, be sure to dump water from any containers around your home. It is especially important during the rainy season since many disease carrying mosquitoes prefer to breed in small containers that temporarily hold water. More information can be found at the NECE home page at http://www.med.navy.mil/ sites/nmcphc/nece. Fight the bite early, avoid diseases from mosquitoesPhoto courtesy of NECEPetty Officer First Class Luis Santana uses a NECE dipper to make sure standing water at NAS Jacksonville is free of mosquito larvae. CDC photoSince 2009, dengue fever cases in Florida transmitted by local mosquitoes have been on the rise. Protect yourself during dawn and dusk. Sailors remove chocks from the landing gear of an MH-60R Seahawk helicopter on March 12. Assigned to the "Spartans" of NAS Jacksonville-based HSM-70, the helo prepares to lift from the flight deck of the guided-missile destroyer USS Ramage (DDG 61). Ramage is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. Photos by MC2 Jared KingHSM-70 on deploymentSailors assigned to the guided-missile destroyer USS Ramage (DDG 61) refuel an MH-60R Seahawk heli copter, Operated by the "Spartans" of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 70 on the flight deck of USS Ramage. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014 11

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12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014 From StaffUniversity of North Florida (UNF) students from the College of Computing, Engineering and Construction (CCEC), toured NAS Jax March 10 to see first hand, examples of green or environmentally sustainable Navy facilities and public works practices. UNF Associate Professor Dr. David Lambert, who teaches the CCEC honors course, Building Sustainable Cities, spearheaded the visit. Kevin Gartland, NAS Jax environmental director, and John Young, NAS Jax storm water manager, welcomed the group and showed them sus tainable practices throughout the station in the form of: ing, site. Gartland said that the stu dents seemed eager to see how sustainable environmental practices add to the quality of work and life aboard NAS Jax. Who knows . when some of these men and women graduate, perhaps theyll go to work at Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast, located here at NAS Jax, said Gartland. Lambert said he looks for ward to bringing more UNF CCEC students to the base in the future. Students attending the outdoor sustainability tour included: Carrie Anne Tidwell, Brittany Edwards, Devin Strausbaugh, Corbin Olmstead, Caitlin Kengle, Mallory Schott, Briggs Kirby, Gabrielle Heinrich, Kevin OHalloran and Brett Hensley. From StaffTwenty NAS Jacksonville sail ors and civilians from the base operations, executive and environmental departments volun teered March 7 to assist personnel from the City of Jacksonville Parks and Recreation and Public Works Departments to rejuvenate Hemming Plaza, the well-used park across from Jacksonville City Hall in downtown Jacksonville. Sailors joined with volunteers from Downtown Vision Inc. and Greenscape of Jacksonville to remove all of the old bushes and vegetation in the planted areas of Hemming Plaza. The volunteers removed more than 500 bushes, plants and weeds in preparation for the City and Greenscape to replant the beds with new, more resilient and attractive plants and bushes later in the month. As the NAS Jax volunteers worked, they were greeted by both Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown and City of Jacksonville Military Affairs Director Victor Gillory, who enthusiastically thanked them for their labor and support. Hemming Plaza volun teers included: IC2(SW/AW) Jayson Bankhead, IT1 Connie Blevins, ET3 Drake Delcambre, ET2(SW) Daniel Dickens, Kevin Gartland, AME2 Ruby Gill, Angela Glass, ET2(SW) Aaron Keller, ET1(SW) Erik Paulsen, ET2(SW) Ashley Pledger, ET2(SW) Dustin Poitras, ET2(SW/AW) Brian Sinclitico, PR3 Latoya Skipper, Jody Smith, ET1(SW) Nicolas Stersic, ETSN Cody Utsler and Rana Utsler. This is another example of the strong mutual support by the City and Navy to improve the quality of life for the com munity. If you are interested in learning about volunteer opportunities in the communi ty, contact IT1 Connie Blevins at 542-8338. Photos by Angela Glass, NAS Jax Environmental DepartmentService Members and DOD civilians gather for a group photo prior to participating in a volunteer opportunity downtown Jacksonville. Mayor Alvin Brown offers his gratitude and appreciation for the individuals volunteering their time for the removal of shrubs in preparation to replant beds with more resilient plants. NAS Jax volunteers help refurbish Hemming PlazaNAS Jax Service Members and DOD civilians pose for a photo after removing shrubs and other organic matter at Hemming Plaza on March 7. City of Jacksonville Military Affairs Director Victor Gillory thanks the volunteers for their support for the landscape project. UNF sustainability class tours basePhoto by John YoungDuring a March 10 tour, UNF Associate Professor Dr. David Lambert (left) described NAS Jax as an excellent outdoor sus tainability classroom. Near Naval Hospital Jacksonville and Mulberry Cove, he talked with students about developing test plots for sustainable landscaping.RecruitMilitary Veteran Job Fair Jacksonville Connecting with veteran-friendly WHAT: Special hiring event for veterans and military spouses WHEN: Thursday, March 27, 11 a.m. 3 p.m. WHERE: CONTACT: Jill Krabacher at 513-6777035 / jkrabacher@recruitmilitary.com This is a great opportunity to meet faceincluding USAA, Walgreens, Prudential Financial, Military Sealift Command, Schlumberger, Home Depot and many more. entrepreneurial and educational offerings. This event is sponsored by DeVry University and produced by RecruitMilitary.

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live entertainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaokeFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Jan. 18, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: Jan. 25, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Navy Run Training Program At the fitness center Running group meets every Tuesday at 4 p.m. 9th Annual Captain Chuck Cornett Navy Run April 5 at 8 a.m. Register online at www.1stplacesports. com/calendar.html Lifeguard Course Begins March 14 Sign-up at the base gymI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_mwritt@ navy.mil. ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Alhambra Dinner show $38 $50.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Jacksonville Suns available soon! Rivership Romance (includes dinner) $40$57.75 Disney On Ice $15 Funk Fest 2 Day Ticket $62 VIP $169 Motley Crew Concert Club seats $63.50 Gatornationals $32 $58 Wild Adventures $30 $70 while supplies last Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27,2014) $166 $194.50 Discover Disney Ticket Florida Resident Ticket Valid for sale through APRIL 12, 2014 Universal Orlando Military Special 3rd day free Nonresident 2014 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 THE ARTIST SERIES-BROADWAY IN JACKSONVILLE 2014 SEASON Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation $349-$369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St Augustine $4.25 $15.50 St Augustine Alligator Farm Nile Zipline $35.25 (free admission with reservation) St Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Half Hour Boggy Creek Airboat Rides $15.50 $20 Wild Florida Airboats (Kenansville, FL) $18 $46.75 Florida Ecosafaris $22.75 $52.75 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld Hotel properties, Universal Hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Savannah Weekend Trip March 22 23 $40 per person Ripleys Believe It or Not Museum Trip St. Augustine March 29 at 2 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Spring Breakout Championship April 4 at 10 a.m. $40 per person Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty March 25 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests March 27 Mondays & Tuesdays Play 18-holes for $20, includes cart and green fees Not applicable on holidays Daily Special Play 18 holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Month of the Military Family Carnival April 12, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Allegheny Softball Field Easter Egg Hunt April 16, 7 p.m. McCaffrey Softball ComplexFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Learn to fly at NAS Jax Call for introduction flight Additional ratings are available including instrument, complex and commercial Find more info. online at jaxnfc.net From FFSCThe NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregistration is required at 5425745. If special accommodations or handi capped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2014: May 12-15 (5:30-10 p.m.), Aug. 18-19 (8 a.m.-4 p.m.), Aug. 20 (8 a.m.-12:30 p.m.), Nov. 17-20 (5:30-10 p.m.). (7:30 a.m.4:15 p.m.) -, March 24-28, April 7-11, May 5-9, May 19-23, June 9-13, June 23-27, July 7-11, July 21-25, Aug. 11-15, Aug. 25-29, Sept. 15-19, Oct. 20-24, Nov. 3-7, Dec. 1-5. (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) March 17-21, April 14-18, May 12-16, June 16-20, July 14-18, Aug. 18-22, Sept. 22-26, Oct. 27-31, Nov. 17-21, Dec. 8-12. (8:30 a.m.-noon) April 1, May 2, June 30, June 30, July 29, Aug. 4, Sept. 2, Oct. 8, Nov. 14, Dec. 22. (8-9:30 a.m.) April 2, May 28, July 1, Sept. 3, Nov. 12. (9:40 a.m.-noon) April 2, May 28, July 1, Sept. 3, Nov. 12. (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) April 29-30, Aug. 5-6, Nov. 24-25. (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) July 31. (1-4 p.m.) April 1, July 29, Oct.8. (1-3:30 p.m.) March 31, July 30, Oct. 7. (9-10:30 a.m.) April 4, July 30, Oct. 17. (1:30-3:30 p.m.) April 3, May 1, July 2, Aug. 7, Oct. 2, Nov. 6. (1:304 p.m.) May 8, July 10, Sept. 11, Nov. 13. April 7 (1-2:30 p.m.), July 29 (10-11:30 a.m.), Oct. 4 (1-2:30 p.m.) (9-11 a.m.) April 14, May 12, June 9, July 14, Aug. 11, Sept. 8, Oct. 6, Nov. 3, Dec. 8. (9-10:30 a.m.) April 8, May 13, June 10, July 8, Aug. 12, Sept. 9, Oct. 7, Nov. 4, Dec. 9. (8 a.m.-noon) May 20, 27, Sept. 23, 30. (8 a.m.-noon) March 31, April 28, May 19, June 30, July 28, Aug. 25, Sept. 29, Oct. 27, Nov. 24, Dec. 15. March 27 May 1 (Thursdays 11 a.m.1 p.m.), May 27 July 8 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.-no workshop June 3), July 29 Sept. 9 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.-no workshop Aug. 19), Sept. 25 Oct. 30 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.). (11 a.m.-1 p.m.) March 19, May 6, July 15, Sept. 9, Nov. 18. (1-3 p.m.) March 11, 18, 25; May 6, 13, 20, 27; July 1, 8, 15, 22; Sept. 9, 16, 23, 30; Nov. 4, 12, 18, 25. (1-4 p.m.) April 1, 8, 15, 22; June 3, 10, 17, 24; Aug. 5, 12, 19, 26; Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28. (9:30-11 a.m.) Every Wednesday (9 a.m.-3 p.m.) June 3, Sept. 16, Dec. 2. (10 a.m.-noon) March 25; April 1, 15, 29; May 13, 27; June 10, 24; July 15, 29; Aug. 12, 26; Sept. 9, 23; Oct. 7, 21; Nov. 4, 18; Dec. 2, 16. (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) May 15, July 17, Sept. 4, Nov. 5. (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) April 10, June 12, Aug. 14, Oct. 9, Dec. 4. To register for any of the above workshops, please call 542-5745.Fleet and Family Support Center offers life skills workshops JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014 13

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14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014 From StaffMen 19 & under: Joseph Westberry (20:04); Callum Horgan (43:38) 20-24: Daniel Ketchum (20:47); Cameron Morgan (21:51) 25-29: Berge Terzian (23:50); Jacob Mora (24:48) 30-34: Devin Riley(20:33); Allen Mathis (21:27) 35-39: Jeremy Judernatz (20:11); Brendan Lockard (22:01) 40-44: Timothy Covey (25:25); Justin Clancy (29:44) 45-49: Scott West (26:23); Edgar Twining (27:58) 50 & over: Steve Damit (22:29); Eliseo Rodriguez (24:50) Women 19 & under: Adriana LaVopa (31:05); Sabrina LaVopa (34:33) 20-24: Miranda Abbas (21:55); Annie Huynh (25:42) 25-29: Kaila Yetka (28:12); Jessica Barrera (30:02) 30-34: Sarah Little (26:26); Gina Judernatz(30:44) 35-39: Stephanie Edwards (27:16); Michelle Safford (27:53) 40-44: Katherine Sears (26:55); Elana Goes (30:47) 45-49: none 50 & over: Elisa Jacque (36:21); Dinah Ruiz (43:50) Top 3 Men Joseph Westberry (20:04); Jeremy Judernatz (20:11); Devin Riley (20:33) Top 3 Women Miranda Abbas (21:55); Annie Huynh (25:42); Sarah Little (26:26)Sand Volleyball League forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS due by March 28, play begins in April. Tournament March 24 The tournament is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD participation points for their command or third. Greybeard Softball League FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractor personnel at NAS Jacksonville. Games play on Tuesday & Thursday at 11:30 a.m. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required or the beginning of April.Intramural Softball League FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required or the beginning of April. FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians; DoD contractors; retirees; and dependents over 18. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for at the end of March or the beginning of April. Open to active duty, retirees, dependents over 18, selective reservists, DoD civilians and contractors. The tournament starts at 5 p.m. at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts on the corner of Allegheny Road and Birmingham Road. Call 542-2930 to sign up by April 25.Intramural Golf Summer League Meeting May 7Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective reservists. Meet at 11:30 a.m. at the golf or designated representative attend receive Intramural Basketball League Meeting May 14 Open to NAS Jax active duty, command DoD, DoD contractors and selective designated representative attend receive For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil StandingsAs of March 14Winter Golf Teams Wins Losses CNATTU Blue 4 0 NCTS 4 0 VP-45 4 0 FRCSE 3 1 Navy Band 3 1 VP-30 2 2 VP-10 1 2 CV-TSC/PSD 1 3 SERCC 1 3 FRCSE II 0 0 HS-11 0 1 CNATTU Gold 0 4Ultimate Frisbee Teams Wins Losses VP-30 Students 2 0 CV-TSC Ashore 2 0 HS-11 1 1 NAS Jax 1 1 NAVFAC/PWD 0 1 VP-10 0 1 Hitron 0 2Badminton Doubles Teams Wins Losses NAVHOSP MSU 5 0 NBHC Jax 4 0 MWR Dynamic Duo 3 1 NAVFAC Blue 3 1 NAVFAC Red 2 2 CV-TSC Ashore 1 2 FACSFAC2 1 2 FACSFAC-1 1 3 NAVFAC Orange 1 3 NAVFAC Gold 0 44-on-4 Flag Football Final StandingsTeams Wins Losses Vet Clinic 7 0 VR-58 6 1 NOSC 5 2 VP-26 5 2 VR-62 5 2 HSM-72 3 3 ASD Jax 3 4 FACSFAC 2 3 NavHosp IMC 2 5 CRS-10 1 5 VP-62 0 6 FRCSE 62A/690 0 7 Knowledge Base offers umbrella of DoD informationBy Terri Moon Cronk American Forces Press ServiceWhether its how to replace a lost military service medal, ship a package to overseas troops or get the details of the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act, theres a good chance the Defense Departments Knowledge Base will have the answers. A DoD information tool to answer public inquiries, the database offers about 18 pages of 180 Defense questions and answers that address the hottest topics of public concern, said Nancy Kuck, a public affairs specialist working in community and public outreach for the office of the assistant secretary of defense for public affairs. We are an avenue to ask questions, Kuck said of the Knowledge Base. Anyone can use the database, and Kuck encourages people to first look at Knowledge Bases frequently asked questions to find the information they need. If the answer to a question is not listed, informationseekers can submit questions and receive electronic responses. If the staff of three full-time employees doesnt know the answer to a question, they will research a topic and find the answer, Kuck said. The staff answers more than 40,000 inquiries a year submitted through the Knowledge Base and by letters, emails and phone calls, she said. Two of the most popular questions are how to replace an identification card, and how to obtain a DD 214, the certificate of release or discharge from active duty, she said. Additionally, if Kucks office sees a trend in ques tions or concerns -such as last years furlough -the staff researches and gathers the information for posting on the Knowledge Base so its readily available to the public, she said. The Knowledge Base is the big umbrella of DoD information, although some questions are military service-specific, Kuck said, noting that directly con tacting the appropriate branch of service is sometimes faster to get an answer. If its service-specific, we encourage people to go to them, because they would know more than we would, she said. The public will find contact information for various organizations at http://www.defense. gov/landing/comment.aspx, she added. Our team does its best to address the questions and concerns of the general public, Kuck said, because they have a voice, and we are there to answer them, Photos by Morgan KehnertAnd they're off! The 2014 Leprechaun Dash 5K was held March 14 at the NAS Jax Antenna Farm. The race attracted 134 runners.Lepreachaun Dash 5K age group winnersAWO Miranda Abbas of VP-30 was the first female runner to cross the finish line with a time of 21:55. AW03 Joseph Westberry of VP-30 was the first male runner to cross the finish line with a time of 20:04. Photo by Shannon LeonardWeight Loss Challenge Event participants gather in the NAS Jax Gym on March 18 to kick off the eight-week competition. In recognition of National Nutrition Month, NAS Jax Navy Fitness is hosting the Weight Loss Challenge Event. It's not just for those who want to lose weight, it's also for those who are very active already and want to earn points for being healthy and active. Each team consists of two members from the same command or department. Team members will keep track of their points for fitness activities, nutrition activities, and bonus point activities. The goal is to work to lose the most weight and earn the most points by participating in physical fitness, nutrition and other heart healthy actives. Awards will be given to the top team with the highest percentage of weight loss and total activity points. For more info, call 542-2930/3518.Nutrition and Fitness Program

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From Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsMarch is Navy Nutrition Month and the Navys Nutrition Office, part of the 21st Century Sailor Office, is commit ted to spreading the word on healthy eating. A recent article in Nutrition Journal suggests that people looking to take a dietary supplement already have somewhat of a healthy eating pattern with regular exercise in their routine. Supplements may be necessary if adequate nutrition is not available through food due to reasons such as medical conditions that affect the digestive system, food allergies, intolerances, or being on a medically supervised special diet with food restrictions. Otherwise, having a well-balanced dietary pattern with a variety of foods is adequate and more effective than tak ing supplements. Dietary supplement marketing claims to solve numerous health problems, from relieving symptoms of simple medical concerns like the common cold to stopping a heart attack dead in its tracts. If dietary supplements really worked and produced a true quick and lasting solution to any health concern, then we would all be in optimal health without the need to visit the doctor. The Los Angeles Times reported in 2013 that Americans spend just under $30 billion each year in dietary supplements including vitamins, herbs, and other such products that promise more energy, weight loss, or more muscle mass. Its foolish to believe the marketing and hype surrounding a product with out doing the proper research. Some news articles claim supplements to be safe, where science and research may say otherwise. Supplement labeling and ingredients are not always accurate and sometimes misleading. Last year the DoD removed Jack3d and Oxyelite Pro, along with 17 other supplement brands, from the retail stores on military bases. This was because the label claimed one of the ingredients, geranium, as a natural plant derivative, when in actu ality, the real ingredient in these sup plements was 1,3-dimethylamylamine (DMAA), a synthetic drug used in the 1940s as a nasal decongestant. DMAA has been linked to severe side effects like heat injuries, seizures, brain hemorrhages, and heart problems. There may be numerous other supple ments currently on the market that have unknown and potentially harmful ingredients in them.Dietary supplementsPotentially unsafe without infoPhoto by Clark Pierce USAF KC-135 pilots practice landings at NAS JacksonvilleA U.S. Air Force KC-135 Stratotanker assigned to the 91st Air Refueling Squadron at MacDill AFB in Tampa, visited NAS Jacksonville March 11 to practice touch-andgo landings a maneuver that involves landing on a runway and taking off again without coming to a full stop. This allows many landings to be practiced in a short amount of time. By Cheryl MastersHealth promotion specialist, NH Jacksonville Wellness CenterTo mark National Nutrition Month, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles Health Promotion and Wellness Center offers nutrition displays at the hospital and Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville during the month of March. This years theme is Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right. The Wellness Center is display ing information on a variety of top ics including fitness, tobacco cessa tion, diabetes and nutritional foods. Resources and information are aimed at promoting living healthy lifestyles. Plus, on March 28, the Child Street Caf (located at NH Jacksonville) will have a special lunch in honor of National Nutrition Month. For more information or to sign up for one of the many health classes offered, call (904) 542-5292 or visit NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center located at Building 867, adjacent to the NAS Jacksonville MWR Fitness Center.National Nutrition MonthEnjoy the taste of eating right JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 20, 2014 products are engineered to produce a high similar to marijuana, there have been reports of serious unwanted effects, including elevated blood pressure, racing heartbeat, and nausea. This is because spice comprises a group of com pounds that are structurally similar to marijuana but which can vary widely in their actu al effect on the body. This can cause significant health con cerns because the user cannot effectively gauge a safe dose to use or anticipate the effects of the products. Many individuals who have used these products had to be hospitalized and several indi viduals have died after smok ing or ingesting these prod ucts, said Bateh. he National Institute on Drug Abuse describes spice as herbal mixtures that produce expe riences similar to marijuana (cannabis). The products typi cally contain dried, shredded plant material and chemical additives that are responsible for their psychoactive (mindaltering) effects. The com pounds are typically marketed as safe, legal alternatives to marijuana and labeled not for human consumption. Newer synthetic drugs like Spice pose a threat to the Fleet and Warfighter because of their dangerous and unpredictable psychoactive effects, said Cmdr. Darryl Arfsten, NDSL Jacksonville commanding offi cer. While commanders have voiced concern over spice use among service members for years, NDSL Jacksonville did not have the ability to detect the compounds as part of rou tine urinalysis testing. Prior to December largescale testing for these drugs was not possible, said Arfsten. NDSL Jacksonville is now able to use a commercial test ing product to screen samples for the drugs. If a service members sample tests presumptive ly positive in the screening test, the urine specimen is re-test ed using a highly specific and accurate confirmatory test that tells us the drug present and the amount present. Arfsten went on to explain that since December, the laboratory has been screening service mem ber urine samples for Spice compounds. Under the DoDs zero tol erance policy for drug abuse, Navy and Marine Corps per sonnel who wrongfully pos sess, use, promote, manufac ture or distribute designer drugs, products containing synthetic compounds or drug paraphernalia may be sub ject to punitive action under Articles 92 and 112a of the UCMJ, adverse administration action, or both. The addition of Spice com pounds to the DoD Drug Testing Panel will enhance warfighter readiness, deter drug use, prevent damage and destruction of Government property, and protect the lives and health of DoD service members, employees, and the greater public, said Arfsten. For more information about NDSL Jacksonville and drug testing go to www.med.navy. mil/sites/jaxdruglab SPICEFrom Page 8 By Miriam S. GalletNAS Jax Public Affairs OfficerMore than 20,000 people participated in this years Gate River Run events held Saturday at the Jacksonville Fairgrounds. Olympians, runners from all over the world and more than 200 military, DoD civilian and family members from various commands aboard NAS Jacksonville competed in the 15K. Others participated in the 5K and a one-mile fun run. This was the 21st consecutive year the race has been selected to host the U.S. 15K National Championship, which is the largest in the country in term of participants. This years course took the runners twice over the St. Johns River and through beautiful San Marco where hundreds of residents cheered and oak trees provided shade from the rapidly rising temperature. Right after mile-marker eight, the runners encoun tered the Green Monster. For those who were com mitted to completing the race, crossing the top of the bridge meant that the worst was over and the finish line was within reach. However, for those less fortu nate it meant defeat. The Hart Bridge, or Green Monster as it is commonly referred to in local running circles, didnt disap point the thousands of runners who crossed it, including the hundreds of base participants. My run was really good, exclaimed VP-45 PRC Fernando Morales, who along with his wife, Eva, completed the run. The Green Monster was the hardest part of the race for me. The incline was a contributing factor to my muscle fatigue. According to NAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM) Brad Shepherd, this years race was more difficult. When I turned on to Atlantic Boulevard it hit me. The many small inclines through the neigh borhood streets accumulated and my legs were feeling it. However, once I crossed the bridge I new success was right around the corner, he said. This was his eighth time competing in the event. I really enjoy this event. Its well organized and I enjoyed the running camaraderie, added Shepherd. A joyjous participant of the 2014 Gate River Run 5K race was Navy Region Southeast Housing Department staff member Cherry Haseltine. The Gate River Run is an inspiring event. There is so much family participation and you can set your own pace. The weather was great, Haseltine said. We had so much fun and Im now looking forward to the Chuck Cornett Run at NAS Jax April 5. Every runner who crossed the finish line received a commemorative medal. The first man to cross the finish line was Benjamin True with a time of 43:04. In the womens gategory no one was more happy to cross the finish line than the 2008 Olympic bronze medalist Shalane Flanagan of Portland, Ore. She was the first woman to collect a medal with a recordbreaking time of 47:03. March 31 deadline for summer 2014 programs hosted at Yale, Harvard and University of MichiganBy Alex ForresterWarrior-Scholar Project Public AffairsThe Warrior-Scholar Project is now accepting applications from eligible military and recently separated veter ans planning on attending four-year colleges for its growing academic boot camp program. New courses will take place at Harvard University and the University of Michigan, joining the existing effort at Yale for more eligible veterans to attend this no-cost opportunity to pre pare them for academic success. Now entering its expansion phase after successful pilots in 2012 and 2013, WSP is seeking eligible veterans and service members to apply online until March 31st for the summer 2014 pro grams. Initially launched at Yale University in 2012, WSP hosts academic boot camps at Americas top universities in order to prepare veterans to succeed in college and become leaders on campus. During WSP, veterans attend 16 hours per day of intensive courses and dis cussions led by prominent professors, administrators and current student-veterans on topics including: stances, in the military to the college environ ment, and other challenges that are inevitably confronted by non-traditional college students, especially veterans. Active duty personnel and recently separated veterans with an actionable plan to attend a four-year university are eligible to apply. Up to 24 veterans will be accepted to the WSP at Yale, and up to 12 veterans will be accepted to the newly launched WSP programs at Harvard and University of Michigan. WSP is offered completely free-ofcharge to those selected into the pro gram. Veterans who have completed WSP have continued on to their respective universities to earn top GPAs, serve on Student Council, and assume vari ous other leadership roles on campus. Most importantly, each veteran who has completed WSP and enrolled in college has stayed in college. Program Dates: Yale June 722; Harvard July 512; University of Michigan July 2028. aforrester@warrior-scholar.org. The Warrior-Scholar Project seeks to unlock veterans potential to not only succeed in college, but to be leaders in the classroom and on campus. WSP is an intensive donor-funded, two-weeklong academic boot camp hosted at Americas top universities to facilitate veterans transition from the military to college; increase veteran gradu ation rates; and prepare student-vet erans to be leaders in the classroom. Participants attend courses and discussions led by prominent professors, administrators, and current studentveterans on topics including academ ic reading and writing; adapting to changed social circumstances, translattary to the college environment, and overcoming and embracing the chal lenges encountered as non-traditional college students. WSP aims to com pletely transform the way veterans view themselves as students. After a successful pilot program at Yale University, WSP is expanding to ensure more veterans who start college, stay and succeed. Photos by Miriam S. GalletPRC(AW) Fernando Morales of VP-45 collects his 2014 Gate River Run 15K Championship Race souvenier glass from one of the volunteers during the pre-race packet pickup on March 14. More than 200 NAS Jacksonviile military and civilian personnel joined the 20,000 participants at this year's Gate River Run 15K Race on March 17 in Jacksonville.NAS Jax runners tame Green MonsterNavy Region Southeast staff members Yolanda Munoz (left) and Cheryl Haseltine are all smiles prior to the start of the 2014 Gate River Run 5K Race at the Jacksonville Fairgrounds.Veterans, enroll now for Academic Boot Camps U.S. and French navies exerciseThe French navy frigate FS Cassard (D614) prepares to pass alongside the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) during a scheduled exercise. George H.W. Bush is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility.U.S. Navy photo by Cmdr. Tom Winkler

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