Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
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Newspaper
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United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
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May 30, 2013
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Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
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Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
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Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
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Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 2014 I I D E BUDGET CHOICES $15 Billion Decrease Page 3 VP-45Pelicans Safe For Flight Pages 4 & 5 SCHOLARSHIPS Children Of Fallen Patriots Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com By Lt. Mark FlowerdewRAN 725 Squadron Public AffairsDelivery of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) MH-60R Seahawk Romeo capability took another step forward March 6, with the arrival of aircraft three and four at NAS Jacksonville. Crewed by joint RAN and U.S. Navy aircrews, the new aircraft departed the Lockheed Martin Assembly Plant in Owego, New York and made the long journey south where they were warmly greeted by RAN 725 Squadron personnel. Its great to welcome two new aircraft to the RAN fam ily. We cant wait to introduce them to Jacksonville and later in the year, to the Fleet Air Arm back in Australia, said RAN 725 Squadron Commanding Officer Cmdr. David Frost. So far, weve flown more than 100 hours in aircrafts one and two, and we look forward to having the new kids on the block taking some of the load, said Frost. Another bunch of aviation maintainers and aircrew also arrived at NAS Jacksonville recently, bringing the total number of Fleet Air Arm per sonnel to 95, with the final eight aircrew due to arrive over the next few months. Maintenance technicians will continue to undergo train ing at the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU), at NAS Jacksonville, while aircrew will be trained by Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 40 (HSM-40), at Naval Station Mayport. Complementing the new Romeos was the arrival of a maintenance training device dubbed the BROMEO, that Frost said would be used by maintenance sailors to conduct task book and journal progres sion. The Bromeo is a complete, functioning aircraft that will be used to train sailors who are undergoing initial trade training at RAN 725 Squadron. It will also be used to conduct annual escape training and Operational Flying Training ground familiarisation events. Finding opportunities to get hands-on training on in-ser vice aircraft can be challenging due to flying and operational commitments, so having the Bromeo will expedite training that will be more cost effec tive, explained Frost. Although it will not return to flying status, the Bromeo will be painted in Royal Australian Navy colors and will be subject to the airworthiness and main tenance requirements that the fleet of new MH-60R aircraft are required to meet. The Bromeo is built from an SH-60B (Bravo) helicopter air frame, similar to those oper ated by RAN 816 Squadron. It was re-manufactured into an MH-60R as a prototype, prior to the final design decision by the U.S. Navy. The airframe was resur rected from the U.S. Navys By MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Public AffairsNAS Jax and NS Mayport received Environmental Excellence Awards presented by Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) dur ing the Mayors Environmental Awards Luncheon at the Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens on March 6. The award recognizes the team efforts in successfully preventing vio lations and improving environmental compliance and sustainability at the local naval facilities. Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown said, This is a real important award. You know we pride ourselves on working with all of our stakeholders in our com munity to make Jacksonville a better place to live, work and raise a family and the environment is one of them. We like to make sure that people can enjoy our natural resources. We have the largest urban park system in the country, but we want it to be the best. Having more access to the river and our naturally pristine parks is important, so this award speaks volumes about our partnership and commitment to make Jacksonville the best place to live, work and raise a family. The base leadership of U.S. Navy facilities located in Jacksonville established the Northeast Florida Environmental Compliance Partnering Team in 2002. The vision for this team was, the Navy and regulatory community work ing together to achieve environmental excellence and accomplish individual organization missions. The Northeast Florida Environmental By Clark PierceEditorThis years Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) fund-raising drive began March 5 with an organizational kickoff at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center on board NAS Jacksonville. The annual fund drive generates donations to ben efit the local NMCRS an organization that assists hundreds of Sailors, Marines and their families each month. By donating to NMCRS, service members are tak ing care of their own, said Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Rick Williamson, who urged commanding officers, XOs and senior enlisted lead ers of installation and tenant commands to respond quickly and generously to the fund drive. As a young division officer, I learned of the power that NMCRS can bring to bear on problems involving finances and family dynamics. Fast forward 20 years and Im commanding officer of a frigate with an average crew age of 22 years and most of the same problems. Who do they turn to for guidance? Thats right, Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society. Theyre a force multiplier that can remove some burdens from the shoulders of commanding officers. Like everyone here today, including my wife, Robin, Im a believer in NMCRS. Thank you for your service. This fund drive will succeed because of your Sailor-to-Sailor efforts, said NAS Jax NMCRS Director Monika Woods. We cannot operate without our dedicated volun teers who step up at each command to lead this fund drive. To support you, we have more than a dozen cheerleaders at our NMCRS office in Building 13. NMCRS is famous for its interest-free Quick Assist Loans. And when our clients pay it back the money is turned around and used by another person in need, added Woods. So it really is service members taking care of service members. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander attended the kickoff with his wife, Pam, who, along with Robin Williamson, is an NMCRS hon orary chairman of volunteers, He told those in attendance, Fund drives have been challenging this past year. The spirit of giving has been dampened by furloughs and the government sequester. However, our Sailors have enjoyed a stable income throughout all of it. Please remember that NMCRS is really about Sailors helping Sailors so join me to revitalize that spirit of giving for this important Attention Gate River Run participants Jax Air News will be covering the event. NAS Jax Sailors and civilians running or walking in the March 15 Gate River Run/USA 15K Championship race are requested to meet at the event EXPO Center for a group photo at 7:30 a.m. For more info, e-mail NAS Jax Public Miriam.gallet@navy.mil. From Staff Photos courtesy of RAN 725 SquadronOn the seawall at NAS Jacksonville, Royal Australian Navy (RAN) 725 Squadron plane captains and aircrew go through the preflight checklist for their recently acquired MH-60R Seahawk helicopters, numbers three and four. Romeo capability continues to expand at NAS JaxNAS Jax and NS Mayport earn FDEP Environmental Excellence AwardsPhoto by MC2 Amanda CabasosJacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown (left) and Florida Department of Environmental Protection Assistant Director Jim Maher (right) present the FDEP Environmental Excellence Award to NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander (right center) and NS Mayport Commanding Officer Capt. Wesley McCall (left center) during the Mayors Environmental Awards Luncheon held at the Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens on March 6.NMCRS kicks off annual fund-raising drivePhoto by Clark Pierce (From left) Robin Williamson, NMCRS honorary chair man of volunteers; Jim Reid of NMCRS Jacksonville; Pam Undersander, NMCRS honorary chairman of vol unteers, and NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander, attended the March 5 kickoff for the annual Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society fund drive.See Page 8 See Page 8 See Page 8

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014 By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorMy favorite Doris story was about their new phone number in Boston. Her husband, Big Jack, was going to law school at Harvard, and neither of them had ever really lived outside of Alabama. Big Jack spent most of his days studying at the library. When he came home for dinner at their small apartment, it was just to get something Doris could throw between two pieces of bread. One night, after Big Jack had fallen asleep and Doris was putting away his coat, she found a folded piece of paper in his front pocket. It had a phone number written on it. Doris was sure Big Jack had a girlfriend, so she woke him up and demanded to know whose number he was keeping in his coat. Big Jack wouldnt say, but he smiled mischievously. This made Doris angrier. So she sat on the bed and threatened to sing Im Henry the VIII, I am endlessly until he confessed. Big Jack let Doris sing the whole night. The next morning, as he was leaving for school, he smiled and said, The number in my pocket is ours. Doris told me this while she patted my hand and I drifted off to sleep. When my grandparents came to visit, Doris always slept in my room, and Id ask her to hold my hand until I was asleep. I called her Doris because everyone else did. I never thought it was strange to use her first name. According to Doris, however, I pronounced it Darc until I moved up north with the Yankees and started pronouncing each syllable. Which brings me to my other favorite story about Doris. When our third son, Lindell, was born in 2007, Dustin was the one who called Doris to tell her the news. Because I lived with Doris and Big Jack while I was in college, Dustin had gotten to know them like his own. But it was late when he called that night, and Doris was confused. The baby is here, Dustin said. And weve named him Lindell Grant. Doris said, Well! and hung up the phone. The next morning, Doris called my brother, Will, and said, Imagine the nerve of that girl naming her baby after General Grant! Big Jack ought to be rolling over in his grave by now. No, the babys name is LINDELL Grant, Will told her. Not General Grant. Doris eventually forgave Dustin for that scare. Even though at our wedding Doris had pulled me aside at the last minute and said, Its not too late to back out, she would later refer to Dustin as her Number 2. We never knew who Number 1 was, but Dustin was glad to be counted among her favorites. Once Dustin and I had children and were living in Florida, long after Big Jack had died, we often went up to Alabama to get Doris and take her with us on trips to see my parents in Virginia. Doris would sing to my sons one of her standards: In a cabin in the woods, a little old man by the win dow stood . . Except, when Doris got to the part that goes, Help me, help me, help me, he said, or that hunter will shoot me dead, I out-sung her with, Or that hunter will steal my bed. Doris would stop singing and say, Thats not how it goes. Its Or that hunter Id out-sing her again. Then Doris would look at the boys and say some thing like, Now, your mother is all lopsided wompus. She can sing it anyway she wants, this way or the other way, but the song goes, Or that hunter will Again, Id out-sing her. Then Id smile as I looked in the rearview mirror and saw her patting baby Lindells hand, like she always did mine when I was going to sleep. Two weeks ago, Doris broke her hip. A few days later, she lay unresponsive in the hospital. The day before Doris 94th birthday, my mom asked me to write something to read at her funeral. None of us thought shed recover. Thats when I began this column. I couldnt remember the last time Doris and I had a good talk. The day she didnt remember the Boston phone number story, I stopped calling her as much. It was hard to hear her so confused. And in December, a phone message from her telling me that she will love me forever, one that I had saved for six years, was accidentally erased. I thought Id never hear her voice again. But the next day, on her birthday, Doris woke up. Over the phone she told me, Oh how I love you, and then she handed the phone to the nurse. Perhaps I should have deleted this column/funeral speech then. It seems premature now. Except, what a gift to have the chance to tell some one these things while she is still here with us. SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-7789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley This Week in Navy HistoryPhotos by Clark PierceHas it been two years already? The first Boeing P-8A Poseidon multi-mission aircraft (No. 428) assigned to the VP-30 "Pro's Nest" arrived at NAS Jacksonville March 5, 2012 as the sun was setting. A formal roll-out ceremony took place March 28 at the VP-30 Hangar. In March 2012, the first P-8A Poseidon (No. 428) was delivered to VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville. VP-30 is the Navy's fleet replacement squadron for both the P-3C Orion and the P-8A Poseidon. From StaffMarch 6 1822 USS Enterprise captures four pirate ships in Gulf of Mexico. 1862 USS Monitor departs New York City for Hampton Roads, Va. and his toric confrontation with CSS Virginia (ex-USS Merrimack). 1942 U.S. cruisers and destroyers bombard Vila and Munda, Solomon Islands, sinking two Japanese destroy ers. March 7 1958 Commissioning of USS Grayback (SSG574), the first submarine built from keel up with guided missile capability (Regulus II missile). 1960 USS Kearsarge (CVS-33) res cues four Russian soldiers from their adrift landing craft 1,000 miles from Midway Island. 1966 Department of Navy reorga nized into present structure under CNO. 1967 Brown water PBRs assists Operation Overload II in Rung Sat Zone, Vietnam. 1968 Operation Coronado XII begins in Mekong Delta, Vietnam. 1994 Sixty-three women receive orders to USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, the first combat ship to have women permanently assigned. March 8 1854 Commodore Matthew Perry opens treaty negotiations with Japan. 1862 Ironclad ram CSS Virginia destroys USS Cumberland and USS Congress. 1945 Phyllis Daley becomes first African-American ensign in Navy Nurse Corps. 1958 Battleship USS Wisconsin (BB64) is decommissioned, leaving the Navy without an active battleship for the first time since 1895. 1965 Seventh Fleet lands first major Marine units in South Vietnam at Danang. 1991 Lt. Kathy Owens became the last pilot (in a C-2 Greyhound) to land on the training carrier USS Lexington (CVT 16) that was decommissioned in November 1991. March 9 1798 Appointment of George Balfour as first U.S. Navy surgeon. 1847 Commodore David Connor leads successful amphibious assault near Vera Cruz, Mexico. 1862 First battle between ironclads, USS Monitor and CSS Virginia. 1914 Test of wind tunnel at Washington Navy Yard. March 10 1783 USS Alliance (Capt. John Barry) defeats HMS Sybil in final naval action of Revolution in West Indies waters. 1933 Pacific Fleet provides assis tance after earthquake at Long Beach, Calif. 1945 Navy and civilian nurses interned at Los Banos, Philippines flown back to CONUS. Navy nurses awarded Bronze Star. 1948 First use of jets assigned to operational squadron (VF-5A) on board aircraft carrier USS Boxer (CV 21) 1992 The Department of Defense announced its plan to withdraw from the Philippine Naval Facility at Subic Bay. March 11 1935 Birth of Naval Security Group when OP-20G became the Communications Security Group. 1941 President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs Lend-Lease Act. 1942 In a PT boat, Lt. Cmdr. John Bulkeley leaves the Philippines to take General Douglas MacArthur to Australia. 1983 The first fleet CH-53E Super Stallion delivered to the HM-12 Sea Dragons. The CH-53E transports heavier loads over longer distances than previous logistics helicopters. 1991 Saratoga and Midway battle groups depart the Persian Gulf for their homeports: Saratoga (CV 60) transited the Suez Canal en route to Mayport, Fla.; Midway (CV 41) traveled to Yokosuka, Japan. March 12 1917 American merchant ships to be armed in war zones. 1942 President Franklin D. Roosevelt designates Admiral Ernest J. King to serve as the Chief of Naval Operations, as well as the Commanderin-Chief, United States Fleet. 1956 First overseas deployment of Navy missile squadron, VA-83, on board USS Intrepid (CV 11). March 13 1895 Award of first submarine build ing contract to John P. Holland Torpedo Boat Co. 1917 Armed merchant ships autho rized to take action against U-boats. From the HomefrontAt 94, grandma Doris still fightingPhoto courtesy of Sarah SmileyWhether she was 24 or 94, Grandma Doris has aged extremely well. We all should be so fortunate.

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Navy budget request involved tough choicesNavy News ServiceThe Navy Depart-ments fiscal year 2015 budget request reflects tough, but responsible choices, a senior Navy official said at a March 5 Pentagon news conference. The budget request is part of the $495.6 billion defense budget proposal President Barack Obama submitted to Congress. Rear Adm. William Lescher, deputy assistant secretary of the Navy for budget, briefed report ers about the Navy and Marine Corps portion of the budget request. Our budget comes dur ing a period of increased fiscal austerity and uncer tainty, and at a time when the combatant command ers demand for naval forc es continues at very high levels, Lescher said. There were tough choices made in develop ing this budget, but it pro vides the resources that allow us to preserve our warfighting advantage in a thoughtful, responsible way. This years budget sub mission prioritizes fund ing for forward presence and continues to make critical investments in people and future capabil ities, the admiral said. The proposed bud get sustains presence by providing money for ship steaming, flight hours, maintenance and base operations. ready group and carrier strike group deployments. ballistic missile defensecapable destroyers joining the USS Donald Cook in Rota, Spain, in fiscal 2015, support for the rebalance to the Pacific, with $46.8 billion overall in opera tions and maintenance. Additional investments are proposed for retain ing sailors through the Quality of Service initia tive. The Navy seeks to reduce manning gaps at sea and improve the seato-shore flow of personnel. The Navy has also requested $38.4 billion for ship, aircraft, weap ons and other procure ment programs, including the littoral combat ship, P-8A Poseidon aircraft, Virginia-class submarines and the Mk-48 heavy weight torpedo. Research and develop ment priorities include the Ohio-class replace ment submarine, next generation jammer and Unmanned CarrierLaunched Airborne Surveillance and Strike, as well as developing elec tromagnetic spectrum and cyber capabilities. The Navys fiscal 2015 budget request is a $15 billion decrease from the level forecast in last years budget submission and is a $38 billion reduction over the Future Year Defense Plan from the fiscal 2014 presidential budget. Were confident this budget makes the right choices where needed, Lescher said. Within our fiscal limi tations, this is the bud get to continue to ensure nearand long-term wholeness, and to remain the worlds most capable Navy. Voting assistance workshop on March 24From StaffThe Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP) will conduct a voting assistance workshop aboard NAS Jacksonville March 24 from 8:30-10:30 a.m. in Deweys All Hands Club main ballroom. The Deweys complex is located in Building 608, between Gillis and Keily streets. Although primarily for voting assistance officers, the workshop is open to any interested persons. The point of contact for the FVAP workshop is Officer, Lt. Cmdr. Cheryl Aimestillman. Contact her at 542-3998 or at cheryl.aimestillman@navy.mil, or vote. jacksonville@navy.mil. Photo by Glenn FawcettDeputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Budget, Rear Adm. William Lescher, briefs the media on the Navy's fiscal year 2015 budget in the Pentagon Press Briefing Room on March 5. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014 By Lt. j.g. Joseph JohannesVP-45 Public Affairs OfficerThe Pelicans of VP-45 fin ished up their weeklong Safe for Flight (SFF) inspection Feb. 27 officially completing their transition to the Navys new maritime patrol aircraft, the P-8A Poseidon. In doing so, VP-45 becomes the Navys third operation al P-8A squadron, following in the footsteps of VP-16 and VP-5. Before they could official ly complete their transition to becoming an active duty squadron again, the Pelicans had to run the gauntlet of Safe for Flight, a grueling weeklong inspection by Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing-11. The inspectors checked everything from emergency drills to NATOPS jackets to make sure that VP-45 was up to fleet standards and could perform these drills safely, if a real world need ever arose. It was a challenging expe rience, said VP-45 Aviation Safety Officer Lt. Donnell Exum, But it is one that we were more than happy to undertake. The drills, which were meant to simulate incidents such as an aircraft mishap, both on the ground and in the air, pushed the maintainers of VP-45 to their limits. But in the end, the Pelicans came through with flying colors. Our many months of hard work paid off as VP45 accepted, met and conquered the challenges set forth by the CPRW-11 SFF inspection, remarked AMC Mario Caligiuri. The Pelicans success impressed everyone involved. After six months in the school house at VP-30 learn ing the P-8A inside and out, I am proud of the Pelicans, said VP-45 Executive Officer Cmdr. T.J. Grady. They went above and beyond my expectations dur ing this major transition end ing with the SFF. With their transition com plete, the VP-45 Pelicans are now preparing for their next deployment to Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, in the 7th Fleet area of responsibility. While they know that the future will be challenging, the Pelicans look forward to putting the skills they have learned dur ing their transition to the real world test that their upcoming deployment will bring. A VP-45 plane captain 45 directs the pilots of the P-8A Poseidon No.434 aircraft to the taxiway of NAS Jax. (From left) Lt. John Leeds of VP-45 reviews aircrew NATOPS jackets with Lt. James Milter an inspector of the program from CPRW-11. Milter is ensuring that the program is on track as a part of the command's final review to achieve P-8A Poseidon Safe for Flight status. AECS Edgar Mckibben and AE1 Stephen Bell of the VP-45 Pelicans Quality Assurance Division review the tracking/auditing of the maintenance departments programs with ADCS Austin Von Loh, an inspector from CPRW-11, as part of the command's final review to achieve P-8A Poseidon Safe for Flight status. LS2 Myles Premberton (left) of VP-45 discusses the proper labeling of tools with AMCS Craig Spivey (right) of CPRW-11 while he inspects the squadron's airframes division, as AWFC Shawn Swartz and AMC Billy Kime look on. AMCS Craig Spivey (right) of CPRW-11 inspects and discusses the layout of toolboxes in the VP-45 Airframes Division with AD1 Melvin Everett, AM2 Matthew Swyers, AWFC Shawn Swartz and AMC Billy Kime, as a part of the command's final review to achieve P-8A Poseidon Safe For Flight status. AWVC Jeffery Siegfried of CPRW-11 inspects the doc umentation, labeling and integrity of VP-45's survival equipment with PR2 Jamal Barconey, as PR2 Lauren Berman looks on. AD2 Nicolas Hernandez, a VP-45 plane captain, gives the pilots of the P-8A Poseidon aircraft the thumbs-up signal, indicating a good start of engines 1 and 2.VP-45 completes transition as third operational P-8A squadronADC Guylande Jeudy of CPRW-11 observes as AO3 Cameron Albright completes an operational inspection on one of his shop ladders, ensur ing that it is working within required parameters. AWVC Jeffery Siegfried of CPRW-11 inspects the label ing and integrity of VP-45's survival equipment with PR2 Jamal Barconey, as AME1 Scott Walker looks on.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014 5 With P-8A No. 434 in the background, the VP-45 "Pelicans" gather to celebrate their "Safe For Flight" certification on Feb. 27 at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 511.Photos by MC1 Michelle Lucht LSCS Howard West from CPRW-11 views the VP-45 Pelican's standard operating procedures and credit card expense tracking with LS2 Marielly Bell, ensur ing that the squadron is operating and annotating purchases properly. VP-45 Commanding Officer Cmdr. J.J. Brabazon congratulates his command for successfully qualifying for "Safe For Flight" status for maintaining and operating the P-8A Poseidon. Cmdr. Joe Testa from VP-30 hands VP-45 Plane Captain AD2 Nicolas Hernandez an aircraft safety pin during his pre-flight inspection of the P-8A Poseidon aircraft. AT2 Nicholas George removes the extension cord connecting the plane captain to the P-8A Poseidon flight deck allowing voice communications during engine start up, prior to take-off. P-8A Poseidon Plane Captain AD2 Nicolas Hernandez of VP-45 walks around with Cmdr. Joe Testa from VP-30 during his pre-flight inspection of the aircraft.

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By MC2 Ernest ScottCommander, Naval Air Force Atlantic, Public AffairsCommander, Naval Air Force Atlantic (CNAL) announced the selection of the Sea and Shore Sailors of the Year dur ing a luncheon aboard Naval Station Norfolk, March 6. Rear Adm. Mike Shoemaker, com mander, Naval Air Force Atlantic, announced AE1 Richard Fenters as the CNAL Shore Sailor of the Year and AWO1 Raul Gomez as the CNAL Sea Sailor of the Year. The two Sailors were selected from ten candidates representing more than 40,000 men and women serving in the sea and shore components within Naval Air Force Atlantic. Each represented their respective commands after being selected as that commands Sailor of the Year. Each of you here today has already won, said Shoemaker. You have been selected by your com mands as the very best of the best. Your presence here is a testimony to your individual accomplishments, and I salute you all. Fenters, a native of Attica, Ind., is assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron One at NAS Patuxent River, Md. He enlisted in the Navy in 1998. It is a privilege and honor to be rec ognized for the work and dedication of my Sailors, family, and friends, said Fenters. Gomez, a native of San Antonio, Texas, is assigned to Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing-11 at NAS Jacksonville, and serves as the operations lead petty officer. He enlist ed in the Navy in 2001. It feels absolutely amazing, said Gomez. Its been a great week. Ive met a lot of great Sailors who were equally deserving. Its a great honor and I am truly humbled to be representing all my mentors and junior Sailors who have helped me achieve this career mile stone. Both Sailors will advance to the next selection process to determine the Sailors of the Year for U.S. Fleet Forces Command. By MC3 Jeffrey MadlangbayanUSS George H.W. Bush Public AffairsThe newest Nimitz-Class aircraft carrier, USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), arrived in Antalya, Turkey for a scheduled port visit, March 9. HSM-70 Spartans, home based at NAS Jacksonville are embarked aboard Bush as part of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8. HSM-70 operates the MH-60R Seahawk helicopter. This port visit is designed to strengthen maritime security working with our Turkish part ners. The port visit will also give Sailors a chance to visit and explore Antalya with tours, including an evening banquet complete with Turkish musi cal instruments, a typical folk orchestra and a dance extrava ganza focusing on traditional Turkish and Antalya folklore, a trip to the spring waters at Pamukkale. I really look forward to going on the Antalya City tour to see all the sights and learn the rich history of this coun try, said RP1 Celeste Shield. George H.W. Bush will also host a reception for dignitaries and regional partners on board in order to foster international relations. This is the second port visit for George H.W. Bush since leaving Norfolk in February. It will provide the crew a once in a lifetime experience. A shop ping venture into Antalya pro vides Sailors with a look into the rich history and culture of the Turkish Nation. Sailors will have the opportunity to shop for many handmade prod ucts from local vendors such as scarves, clothes, ceramics, leather jackets, jewelry, carpets and handmade lamps. George H.W. Bush is on scheduled deployment as a part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group to support maritime security operations and theater security coopera tion efforts in the U.S. 6th fleet areas of operations. More than 1,700 person nel are assigned to Carrier Air Wing (CVW)-8, part of the George H.W. Bush Strike Group. CVW-8 includes the Golden Warriors of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 87, the Valions of VFA-15, the Fighting Black Lions of VFA-213, the Tomcatters of VFA-31, the Bear Aces of Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 124, the Garudas of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 134, the Tridents of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 9, the Rawhides of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 40, and the Spartans of Squadron (HSM) 70. Spartans and Bush arrives in TurkeyU.S. Nay photoA jet launches from the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) during its final predeployment evaluations, prior to its recent deployment to the U.lS. 5th and 6th Fleets areas of responsibility. The HSM-70 "Spartans helicopter squadron home based at NAS Jacksonville are embarked aboard Bush as part of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8. HSM-70 operates the MH-60R Seahawk helicopter.CNAL Selects Sailors of the Year include CPRW-11 Sailor 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014

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By MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax staff writerThomas Duvall an elec tronics technician at the Air Operations Department and Child and Youth Program (CYP) Assistant Training and Curriculum Specialist Amanda Johnson at Youth Activities Center were named NAS Jax Senior and Junior Civilians of the First Quarter respectively. Duvall is a subject matter expert on all navigation aids and landing air traffic control communication systems main tained by Ground Electronics Maintenance Division (GEMD). He provides training required by GEMD for the qualification of military duty watch techni cians. Duvall saved the divi sion $19,066 by repairing rather than purchasing two Approach Radar 400 hertz con verter circuits. When HSM-72 and HSM-74 reported they were experiencing static interference on the common traffic advisory fre quency, Duvall identified the problem, located the issue that came from the MH-60R heli copter that resulted in the pre vention of a possible aircraft accident. Assistant GEMD Officer Steve Harper at NAS Jax Air Operations said, Thomas Duvall is an outstanding tech nician. He consistently per forms great work for GEMD. Our job is to analyze and investigate any interference and communication problems. Duvall not only does that but also determines when our equipment isnt involved. He went outside of our guidelines to actively become involved in the investigation and trouble shooting of the MH-60R heli copter airframe. He not only determined this major problem of static frequency interferenc es at NAS Jax but also around the country, as well as over the ocean and other areas where helicopters operate. I never was expecting any thing like this, said Duvall. I was just doing my job and pro tecting the warfighter from any potential accidents in order to ensure safe flights through out the base. I love what I do. Every day is new and exciting and I look forward to coming to work, concluded Duvall. Amanda Johnson has devel oped and delivered training to all youth center staff that included steps and proce dures to identify and accom modate children with special needs who are participating in the various CYP programs. Johnson is sensitive to all dis abled and special-needs chil dren who attend programs at the Youth Activity Center. She has a gift and a way of con necting with these children that makes a difference in their lives. Johnson has the knowledge and ability to work with chil dren from every side of the spectrum. Since September 2013, when she became the assistant training and curric ulum specialist, she has cre ated a number of programs for children, parents and staff. Some programs include a few Muffins for Moms, Donuts for Dads and an open house for home-schooled children. More than 30 children and par ents have attended the open house program and as a result, the groups now meets monthly. According to CDC Director Mary Grenier, Johnsons contri butions to the CYP have been outstanding. Amanda has worked at the Youth Activities Center for 11 years and contributed greatly to the program, said Grenier. She attended college while being a full-time employee and earned her Bachelors degree in Elementary Education. She has moved up in our system and I expect her to continue to excel throughout her career here. Im very excited that she was selected COQ she certainly deserves it for everything she does for the children. Johnson said, Working with special-needs children is something I deeply love. I love working with all children, but I have a desire to learn about our children with special needs to help them better adapt to our programs offered at the youth center. We have children with autism and Down syndrome that come to the youth center who are especially important to me because I know they have a harder time adapting to life. I do my best to help these children get through the day. I try figuring out the best way to get them to interact with other children. I also try to find the best solution for parents to feel comfortable leaving their kids here. So I always com municate with them to assure them of their childs safety and inform them on what is going on throughout the day. According to Johnson, she was astounded when she dis covered she was receiving an award. It was exciting to be recognized. I didnt even know I was eligible for it. I was very honored. Ive just been doing my job that I love to do every day. And for others around me to recognize what I do and think its good is really heart warming. I couldnt have done it without the help from my counselors who work so well with the children here, as well as having great leadership to look up too. NAS Jax announces Senior, Junior Civilians of the First QuarterPhotos by MC2 Amanda CabasosChild and Youth Program Assistant Training and Curriculum Specialist Amanda Johnson at the Youth Activities Center (YAC) aboard NAS Jax on March 6. ET3 Katherine Morrow receives training from Electronics Technician Thomas Duvall, both from NAS Jax Air Operations Ground Electronics Maintenance Division, on how to use the Digital Audio Legal Recorder at the station's Air Traffic Control Tower. Photos by MC1 Brianna Dandridge(Right) Capt. Christopher Heaney, commander, Navy Recruiting Region East, visited Navy Recruiting District (NRD) Jacksonville Feb. 27-28. He was joined by Regional CMDCM Donald Massey as they met EN1(SW) Edward Burgess of the West Jacksonville recruiting station. In addition to Sailors and staff at headquarters, they visited recruiters from Navy Recruiting Stations Orange Park and East Jacksonville. RecruitersCapt. Christopher Heaney, commander, Navy Recruiting Region East, joined Cmdr. Brent Cower, Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville, on Feb. 28 to celebrate the history and culture of African-American and Black Sailors during African-American/Black History Month. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014 7

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Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Centre (AMARC), otherwise known as the Boneyard, where it was selected from retired Bromeo air frames. Select RAN person nel, the Bromeo, and five Romeos will return to Australia in late 2014 to form part of the MH-60R schoolhouse, currently under construction at HMAS Albatross. Compliance Partnering Team has met quarterly for more than 11 years to con tinuously develop and maintain a working relationship that identifies and executes new solutions for the Navy to help improve compliance with environmental regula tions, while ensuring the protection of pub lic health and safety. FDEP Assistant Director Jim Maher said, FDEP enthusiastically celebrates our pro gressive and innovative partnership with the U.S. Navy facilities in Northeast Florida. The NAS Jax and NS Mayport installations commitment to environmental excellence and sustainability have yielded record com pliance rates and resource conservation. Their leadership provides an example for assisting our progress with the St. Johns River and throughout the region. The team includes representatives from NAS Jax, NS Mayport, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast, the FDEPs Northeast District, the St. Johns River Water Management District and the City of Jacksonville. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander said, Its a real honor to receive this award, but this one is particu larly special because we did not start this project with the intent of wining an award, he said proudly. We started the project because it was the right thing to do. It was true recognition by the FDEP of our efforts to work with different agencies. It has truly been a successful relationship between our Navy and other agencies to cut down on a number of compliance issues. He concluded, Its a win-win situation because the Navy has accomplished its mis sion, as well as being a good steward of the environment and a good neighbor to sur rounding communities. Thank you. fund drive. Lt. Fred Pacifico, a submariner assigned to the CPRW-11 Weapons School, is serving his sec ond year as the NMCRS fund drive coordinator. When we talk numbers for Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, our fund raising goal is at least $2 per person, per month, for each active duty Sailor and Marine in your com mand. He explained that last year (2013), the fund drive brought in just over $309,000 representing 130 percent of the goal. One of the reasons I wanted to come back and lead the campaign again was that the Southeast Region is so large and theres so much to learn. With hindsight, Im eager to make the fund drive bigger as well as better. Pacifico has a history of supporting NMCRS. Hes volunteered as a case worker since 1999. I believe in the pro gram and I want it to suc ceed. Most young enlist ed survive from paycheck to paycheck and are liv ing on their own for the first time. When they need some emergency financial help to get home for events such as a funeral, their caseworker can cut them a check to cover expenses. When they return to base, their NMCRS caseworker works with them to cre ate a budget that will pay back the interest-free loan, said Pacifico. Each command on base is assigned a POC to ensure 100 percent con tact is made during the drive. Armed with allot ment forms, these key persons will visit with as many Sailors and Marines as possible to ensure everyone has an opportunity to donate to the NMCRS. Founded in 1904, the NMCRS is a private, nonprofit, charitable orga nization. It is sponsored by the Department of the Navy and operates nearly 241 offices ashore and afloat at Navy and Marine Corps bases throughout the world. During the 109 years the NMCRS has been operating, they have helped millions of people through loans and grants. NMCRS also offers other forms of assistance such as providing layettes or junior sea bags to new family members, a visiting nurse program to help new mothers, elderly individuals and anyone who needs a little extra help, and thrift shops offering low-cost clothing and household items. The 2014 fund drive runs through mid-May. Numerous fundrais ing events such as golf tournaments, car wash es, bake sales and spe cial raffles are planned throughout the next sev eral weeks. Volunteers are always needed at the society in a variety of different functions. Whether, its answering the phone, helping clients or teach ing classes, the society welcomes volunteers. Lt. Pacifico can be reached at 542-0730 or Alfred.a.pacifico@navy. mil. For more info, see your command NMCRS fund drive POC, or contact the NAS Jax NMCRS Office at 542-3515 or www.nmcrs funddrive.org/jackson ville. AWARDSFrom Page 1 RAN 725From Page 1 NMCRSFrom Page 1 Photo by Clark Pierce Lt. Fred Pacifico, a weapons school instructor at Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11, is serving his second year as the NMCRS fund drive coordinator. "I believe in NMCRS. It's a non-profit, Sailors-helping-Sailors organization. All we're asking for is $2 per month from every Sailor and Marine in your command," he said. By Lt. Chris Reintjes, JAGC, USNNAS JAX SJA OfficeOne of the most sacred of all athletic competitions is near ly here. Yes, thats right, its time for the NCAA Basketball Tournament known as March Madness! While it provides weeks of great basketball it can also lead to the violation of federal ethics rules against gambling. The middle of March marks an escalation of sports-mania for not only basketball enthusi asts, but also gambling enthu siasts. About $12 billion will be wagered during the three weeks of the tournament. The FBI estimates that illegal March Madness tournament wagers will be more than $2.5 billion. This does not account for the estimated $1 billion in wages paid to distracted work ers who are more focused on their bracket picks than on completing a fair days work. While betting a couple of bucks is often seen as a fun, social activity, if done at work, it can run afoul of federal regulations prohibiting gambling in the federal workplace. What constitutes gam -Here comes March Madness keep it legalSee GAMBLING, Page 16 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014

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By Valisa HarrisNAVAIR Womens Advisory GroupDuring March, the Navy is celebrating Womens History Month with the theme of Celebrating Women of Character, Courage and Commitment. Women have served in the Navy since 1811, when female nurses were first included among personnel in Navy hos pitals, leading to the estab lishment of the Navy Nurse Corps in 1908. In 1917, the Navy authorized the enlist ment of women. Designated as Yeomen (F), they unof ficially became known as Yeomenettes. Today, approximately 18 percent of Sailors and officers across the Navy are women. Here at the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR), almost one in four civilian employees is a woman. Showing character, courage and commitment leads some to not only open doors for aspir ing employees, they also help empower their protgs with the tools and confidence to take advantage of opportuni ties. Leslie Taylor, director of Flight Test Engineering and one of the 10 female Senior Executive Service (SES) mem bers at NAVAIR, reflected on the importance of mentorship. Early in my career, I met someone who made important contributions to my personal development and provided me significant opportunities to advance, Taylor said. She was, in fact, in the position I most wanted. This lady was Jessalyn Jessie Swann, at that time the branch head of Air Launched Ballistics, SA84, for those who were around in the old days. Jessie was my branch head and noticed in me the attri butes that she thought would serve well for such a position. Jessie was committed to the adage of training your replace ment. Much to my great for tune, she picked me as that person she would train, Taylor said. Swann taught Taylor the budget side of the business and other aspects Taylor needed to learn for a branch head posi tion. She took me under her wing and had more confidence in me than I had in myself, Taylor said. Her mentor ship and guidance started me on a leadership journey that has resulted in my becom ing the director of Flight Test Engineering. To Jessie, I am eternally grateful. Taylor serves as an execu tive champion for NAVAIRs Womens Advisory Group (WAG), a senior leadership group established in 2011 that guides, advises and supports NAVAIRs Executive Diversity Council in areas related to workforce diversity and inclu sion. Mentoring also played a key role in the career of Francine Juhlin. She cited Sara Branch, the electrical cable shop super visor at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast in Jacksonville, as helping her advancement. She did something that I hadnt seen before, Juhlin said. Sara asked if she could help with my professional development. After our conver sation, I became the unofficial work leader to acquire experi ence to put on my resume. Dont let the name fool you: WAG serves men and women equally. In addition to Taylor, the group is championed by Rear Adm. Paul Sohl, com mander, Fleet Readiness Centers and assistant com mander for Logistics and Industrial Operations, SES Jerry Short, NAVAIR comptrol ler and SES Toni Meier, director of the Logistics Management Integration Department. With national representation from all NAVAIR sites and disci plines, the WAG makes recom mendations to NAVAIR senior leaders on topics such as fam ily-friendly work policies, sci ence, technology, engineering and math initiatives, and men torship. For more information about the WAG, contact Rebecca Hampshire at 301-995-7919. Women making history at NAVAIRFrancine Juhlin, an aircraft electrical equipment worker, benefited from a relation ship with her former supervi sor and informal mentor, Sara Branch, whom she worked for in the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Cable Shop in 2013. Juhlin, a member of the Womens Advisory Group, is now leading a rapid improve ment event for the command to improve employee interview skills. Photos by Marsha ChildsSara Branch (left), an overhaul and repair supervisor at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), discusses a brake system repair with Bryce Willen on a T-44 fixed-wing monoplane whose mission is to train Navy and Marine Corps pilots. Branch infor mally mentors employees who are looking to enhance their job performance and progress in their career. Women of Note achieve four-star rank in any service in 2008. In December 2013, Vice Adm. Michelle Howard was nominated vice chief of naval operations. She is expected to be promoted in early 2014. Christine Fox has been named acting deputy defense secretary, the Air Force. Anti-Submarine Warfare, Assault and Special Mission Programs, NAVAIR when she was promoted in 2012. Officer SelectAT2(AW/SW) Robert Gelbart (right) inspects maintenance work by AT2 Michael Reilly in the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Communications/ Navigation Work Center. Gelbart recently was accepted into the Navy's Officer Program for FY-2015 .Photo by Kaylee LaRocque JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014 9

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By Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsFleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Commanding Officer Capt. John Kemna presented Michael Kerridge, FRCSE logistics man ager for air refueling stores and fuel containment/metrol ogy programs, with the Joint Civilian Service Achievement Award and the Joint Civilian Service Commendation Award from the Secretary of Defense Feb. 27. Kerridge earned the recog nition for exceptional merito rious achievement as director of logistics, Office of Security Cooperation-Iraq, Umm Qsar, Iraq from April 20 to Dec. 31, 2012 and from May 1 to Dec. 15, 2013. He provided logistics and base life support for more than 300 residents at the Office of Security Cooperation-Iraq by securing base access to ensure site logistics arrived unimped ed. As the contracting officer representative, Kerridge pro vided oversight for more than $46 million in contracted ser vices including resolving an issue regarding contaminated diesel fuel resulting in no losses of critical base services. As U.S. military facilities downsized and closed in Iraq, Kerridge acted as property accountability officer and pri mary hand receipt holder work ing to reconcile the property book. This included the inven tory of all contractor-managed, U.S. government-owned equip ment transitioning to the Iraqi government totaling nearly $21 million. He also coordinated with the 402nd Army Field Support Brigade and Defense Logistics Agency Disposition Services to demilitarize 2,186 equipment items; procured 360,000 gallons of diesel fuel, 11,040 gallons of gasoline for site power genera tion and 24,365 liters of drink ing water; and coordinated the transportation of cargo and military equipment to Kuwait. Kerridge, who has 35 years of federal service and has worked at FRCSE since 2007, says his two-year tour in Iraq was chal lenging but very rewarding. We worked 24/7, usually 18-hour days because there was always something to do, he said. We lived in a minimum security prison, and we werent allowed to go outside except by helicopter. So, we pretty much just worked and slept. It was a shock when I arrived there, but you had to get down and dirty in the job right away, he added. I was just put out there and told to do it. I wouldnt trade the experience for anything, because it really helped me grow as a person and gave me confidence in my abili ties. Im happy to say that our [U.S. military] transition back to the Iraqi government went very smoothly, so Im pretty proud of all I accomplished. FRCSE civilian recognized for duty in IraqPhoto courtesy of Michael KerridgeIn August 2012, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Logistics Manager Michael Kerridge drives a quad runner around a mili tary facility to check on supplies during his tour in with the Office of Security Cooperation-Iraq, Umm Qsar Iraq.Photo by Victor Pitts Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Commanding Officer Capt. John Kemna, right, presents Michael Kerridge, FRCSE logistics manager for air refueling stores/fuel contain ment and metrology programs, with a Joint Civilian Service Commendation Award Feb. 27 for exceptionally meritori ous achievement as director of logistics, Office of Security Cooperation-Iraq, Umm Qsar, Iraq from April 20 to Dec. 31, 2012. Like-new AngelFleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) artisans assemble before an F/A-18 Hornet Strike Fighter Feb. 28 flown by the U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron Blue Angels. The FRCSE team completed an engine mount support fitting repair, planned maintenance and modifications to the aircraft just in time for the squadrons first airshow in El Centro, Calif., March 15. The Blue Angels are scheduled to perform at NAS Jacksonville Oct. 25-26. Photo by Victor Pitts JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014 11

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By Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsNaval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) selects Dora Quinlan, the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) busi ness operations director, as the 2013 NAVAIR Mentor of the Year for FRCSE, a military avia tion maintenance, repair and overhaul depot. NAVAIR selected a mentor from each of the eight Fleet Readiness Centers to receive the first-ever mentor of year recognition based on their professional development, organizational awareness, career planning guidance and NAVAIR mentoring program participation. NAVAIR Deputy Commander Garry Newton expressed his appreciation for Quinlans personal commitment and far-reaching contributions to FRCSEs mentoring goals in a letter of appreciation presented to her by FRCSE Commanding Officer John Kemna Feb. 25. We are fortunate to have your dedication, energy and expertise to help us mentor our talented and diverse work force, said Newton in the cita tion. Quinlans federal service career covers more than 36 years including leadership positions in various fields of financial management, human capital development and industrial business operations. Her mentorship of numer ous employees involved in various organizational pro grams, such as NAVAIR Leadership Development program and Journey Leadership Development pro gram, Womens Advisory Group (WAG) and the FRCSE Workforce Engagement and Inclusion Team has demon strated the value of mentoring in the workplace. As the FRCSE business oper ations director, Quinlan is responsible for developing the commands strategic plan to increase capabilities and lever age business opportunities. She also educates her prot gs about NAVAIR and FRCSEs mission and their roles in delivering high quality prod ucts and value-added readi ness to the warfighting cus tomer. Quinlan is an active partici pant in the iMentor program designed to provide the work force the opportunity for per sonal growth, professional development and the transfer of knowledge and expertise through the mentoring rela tionships. She has participated in speed mentoring events, iMentor tool testing, a WAG interviewing skills project, and has provid ed numerous job rotation and shadowing opportunities to employees seeking job experi ences outside their work cen ters. I am honored to receive this prestigious award, said Quinlan. I am thankful for the many mentors throughout my career who took the time to provide professional and personal guidance towards my career development. Mentorship continues to be a critical part of my job, and I view it as my personal responsibility to pay it forward. I am so grateful for the mentors and mentees in my life. I have witnessed how mentoring relationships improve overall quality of life and mission effectiveness. In her free time, Quinlan assists with the St. Vincent DePaul Society and partici pates in various church activi ties. She also serves on the exec utive board of the Federal Managers Association, the oldest and largest manage ment organization in the gov ernment lobbying for federal employees. By Lt. Eric FrankCPRW-11 Public AffairsCommander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing-11 was back in the community again, on March 1 when Sailors from CPRW-11 came together to support John E. Ford Elementary School for their annual Greening of the Grounds event. Each spring, our local Sailors and their families join with John E. Ford teachers, staff, students and parents to beautify their school grounds. Over 300 plants, including an assortment of flowers, shrubs and other vegetation were planted during the event. This community outreach program allowed our Sailors to interact with our community and it also gives them the opportunity to teach young children about teamwork and leadership. During the event, Sailors from Wing-11 helped main tain two courtyards consisting of 16 flower boxes, one butterfly garden and one bat cave built by our Sailors. The Wings next planned event at the school is to build a greenhouse for students and teachers to enjoy learn ing about plant growth and anatomy. John E. Ford would like to extend a special Thank you to Lowes for providing the building mate rials and plants this year. Thanks also go out to all CPRW-11 Sailors who took time to lend a helping hand in the community as well as to the commands volun teer coordinator OS1 Jeffrey Williams for his coordina tion efforts with John E. Ford. The school students and staff also extended a thank you to CPRW-11 Sailors for their support over the past year, including the Back to School Book Drive that donated over 150 books to the John E. Ford Library and the CPRW-11 Holiday Basket Drive that provided Thanksgiving dinner to six families from the school. FRCSE Mentor of the Year announcedPhoto by Marsha ChildsFleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Commanding Officer Capt. John Kemna congratulates Operations Director Dora Quinlan March 3 in front of the FRCSE marquee announcing Quinlan as the Naval Air Systems Command 2013 Mentor of the Year for FRCSE. CPRW-11 greens local elementary school grounds(From left) OS1 Jeffrey Williams (TOC Jax) and AWO1 Raymond Schwegman (MTOC-9) led the green team from CPRW-11.Photos by OS3 Aja HickmanOne of the flower boxes planted by volunteers from CPRW-11 at John E. Ford Elementary School in Jacksonville. 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live enter tainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaokeFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Jan. 18, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: Jan. 25, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Navy Run Training Program At the fitness center Running group meets every Tuesday at 4 p.m. 9th Annual Captain Chuck Cornett Navy Run April 5 at 8 a.m. Register online at www.1stplacesports. com/calendar.html Lifeguard Course Begins March 14 Sign-up at the base gymI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Alhambra Dinner show $38 $50.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Jacksonville Suns available soon! Rivership Romance (includes dinner) $40$57.75 Disney On Ice $15 Funk Fest 2 Day Ticket $62 VIP $169 Motley Crew Concert Club seats $63.50 Gatornationals $32 $58 Wild Adventures $30 $70 while sup plies last Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27,2014) $166 $194.50 Discover Disney Ticket Florida Resident Ticket Valid for sale through APRIL 12, 2014 Universal Orlando Military Special 3rd day free Nonresident 2014 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 THE ARTIST SERIES-BROADWAY IN JACKSONVILLE 2014 SEASON Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation $349-$369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St Augustine $4.25 $15.50 St Augustine Alligator Farm Nile Zipline $35.25 (free admission with reservation) St Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Half Hour Boggy Creek Airboat Rides $15.50 $20 Wild Florida Airboats (Kenansville, FL) $18 $46.75 Florida Ecosafaris $22.75 $52.75 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld Hotel properties, Universal Hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Paintball Trip March 15 at 9 a.m. Savannah Weekend Trip March 22 23 $40 per person Ripleys Believe It or Not Museum Trip St. Augustine March 29 at 2 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Twilight League now forming Begins March 25 Team rosters are due on March 18 Spring Breakout Championship April 4 at 10 a.m. $40 per person Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty March 25 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests March 13 & 27Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Spring Break Camp March 17 21 and March 24 28 Register now at the youth centerFlying Club Call 777-8549 Learn to fly at NAS Jax Call for introduction flight Additional ratings are available includ ing instrument, complex and commer cial Find more info. online at jaxnfc.net NAVFAC Southeast helps shape the future through MATHCOUNTSBy Earl BittnerNAVFAC Southeast Public Affairs SpecialistNaval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast mili tary members and employees celebrat ed National Engineers Week by volun teering with the Florida Engineering Society (FES) MATHCOUNTS com petition held Feb. 28 at the University of North Florida (UNF) Arena in Jacksonville, Fla. I believe our nations future is predi cated upon our ability to meet science, technology, engineering and math ematics (STEM) education require ments today, said NAVFAC Southeast Executive Officer Capt. Scott Hurst. This is one way all those who partici pated from NAVFAC help shape that future. The MATHCOUNTS Competition is the only program of its kind, with live, in-person events for middle school stu dents competing in math. The event was open to Mathletes in a five-county area around Jacksonville. This year, 48 schools entered teams of up to 10 stu dents each. We [NAVFAC volunteers] welcomed the teams and chatted with them about the opportunities of an engineering education and encouraged them to con tinue to hone their math skills, said Katharine Martin, NAVFAC Southeast utilities technical branch supervisor and one of the 25 NAVFAC Southeast volunteers. The team of volunteers, including several Seabees, provided initial crowd control and guidance, and served as proctors and graders for the written portions of the tests. Jacksonville has one of the largest MATHCOUNTS competitions in the country and we have a great group of engineers, civilian and military alike, who volunteer their time to make the event happen, said Hurst. It is extremely important to support these middle schoolers and let them know what they are doing is important and will lead them to a successful future. Events are held in all 50 states, as well as U.S. territories and schools world wide through the U.S. Department of Defense and State Department. Competitions take place in more than 500 local chapters. The competition series is ideal for stu dents who have a talent and passion for math and who need to be challenged. Students engage in exciting, bee-style contests in which they compete against and alongside other bright, motivated students. At the local, state and national RecruitMilitary Veteran Job Fair Jacksonville WHAT: Special hiring event for veterans and military spouses WHEN: Thursday, March 27, 11 a.m. 3 p.m. WHERE: CONTACT: Jill Krabacher at 513-677-7035 / jkrabacher@recruitmilitary.com This is a great opportunity to meet face-to-face with veteran-friendly employers including USAA, Walgreens, Prudential Financial, Military Sealift Command, Schlumberger, Home Depot and many more. There will be national, regional and local job opportunities, as well as entrepreneurial and educational offerings. This event is sponsored by DeVry University and produced by RecruitMilitary. Photos by Katharine MartinNaval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast military members and civilians celebrated National Engineers Week by volunteering with the Florida Engineering Society (FES) MATHCOUNTS competition at the University of North Florida Arena in Jacksonville. NAVFAC Southeast Executive Officer Capt. Scott Hurst (left) and NAVFAC Southeast Supervisor of Utilities Allocation and Billing Kirk Drost (right) grade students answers to competition questions. Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Public Works Department FEAD Director Lt. Cmdr. Aaron Turke watches over students as they answer questions at the Florida Engineering Society (FES) MATHCOUNTS competition on Feb. 28 at the University of North Florida Arena in Jacksonville. Students engaged in exciting, "bee-style" contests in which they competed against other bright, motivated students. See MATHCOUNTS, Page 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014 13

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NOL celebrates 55 yearsLittle League is big at NAS Jax By MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Public AffairsThe Navy Ortega Lakeshore (NOL) Little League opened its 2014 baseball/ softball season March 8 at Blue Angel Field located aboard NAS Jacksonville. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander said, Baseball and softball are part of Americas national pastime and at this level of Little League I think its great the kids all get into it. What is important about the sport is that it builds commu nity by bringing parents, coaches and children together. They all work together to have a great experience and partici pate in something that has been around since the turn of the century. NOL President Fred Page was the master of ceremonies and opened the sea son by thanking the Navy band, military service members, civilians, coaches and volunteers that made NOL successful at NAS Jax. Page said, NOL has been at NAS Jax for 55 years, and during that time, the Navy has hosted thousands of young men and women. Its a real important part of many families lives that have grown up here. The 2014 Little League season is field ing more than 30 teams with kids rang ing from 4 to 16 years old. I played on NOL from when I was 8 years old until I was 15. It was special to me when my son became old enough to play out here. Ive coached for 10 years now. Since my son has graduated from Little League, I stepped up and took on the role of president. Undersander said, In this day and age of Xbox, its all the more important why we need to get kids doing real sports by keeping them active, staying healthy and developing strong bodies that is a big part of what NOL brings to commu nity. Keeping these kids engaged with a healthy friendly sport that develops them into young adults is important. The skipper then took to the mound and fired a strike to catcher Reedy Monahan. I spent a lot of time at baseball fields with my kids and going through games and ceremonies and I would have to say this is the best organized event Ive ever seen, said Undersander. Page urged the crowd to join him in applauding the support of Undersander and MWR Installation Program Director John Bushick. Page expressed his gratitude once again by thanking the coaches, umpires, dugout moms, concession workers, cleaning crew volunteers and the Navy. The Navy is our host and theres a ton of work that goes on by the Department of Defense and civilian employees, as well as military personnel. They main tain the fields, provide security, and clear people to get on base. Its a strenu ous collaboration and we all surely feel blessed to have these fields available to us. We thank the Navy for hosting us and we appreciate them for all the work they do. By Earl BittnerNAVFAC Southeast Public Affairs SpecialistA Donation Ceremony was held Feb. 13 for the turnover of a newly constructed and outfit ted disaster relief warehouse (DRW) in Freeport, Grand Bahamas. Participants included the Right Honorable Perry Christie, Prime Minister of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, and General Charles Jacoby Jr., Commander of the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) and United States Northern Command (USNORTHCOM), with attendees including NAVFAC Southeasts Tim Ryczek from NAS Jacksonville Public Works Department (PWD). Christie offered his sin cere thanks and gratitude to the United States government and noted that the donation goes a long way in helping the Bahamas emergency relief efforts and ensures that the Bahamas is better equipped to proactively address preventa tive measures for disaster miti gation. The United States and the Bahamas have a long his tory of friendship with each other.Throughout that history, our governments have part nered on many efforts together and the U.S. has always been kind to us, said Christie. I firmly believe that this ware house will be most beneficial to the people of Grand Bahama and the islands that are situ ated in the Northern Bahamas. We are happy that the ware house project has been suc cessfully completed.I sincerely promise that my government will do its best to use it to its fullest. This warehouse is an exam ple of our shared safety and security concerns and illus trates how fundamentally important citizen safety is to our two nations, said Jacoby during his first official visit to Grand Bahama. It is a true honor for us to play a part in supporting you in a most sacred endeavor to never be late in helping your citizens when disaster strikes. The $895,489 contract was designed and constructed under a NAVFAC Southeast contract awarded Sept. 12, 2012. I was very fortunate to be involved in this ceremony and felt extremely proud to have been a part of this project, said Tim Ryczek, PWD engi neering technician for the proj ect. Sometimes it is difficult to envision the impact of these Contingency Engineering proj ects during project develop ment and execution. It is even more diffcult to get a sense of the appreciation felt by the receipients of these humanitar ian assistance projects. This event was certainly indicative of the appreciation of the Bahamian people and their government. The poten tial impact this project will have in serving the northern Bahamian people with a level of disaster preparedness is huge and will provide them a level of preparedness they have never had in their history, said Ryczek. The DRW is 4,800 square feet and is equipped with an office/ meeting space, a secure storage space of 180 square feet, rest rooms, warehouse pilot stor age, 40-pallet racks, a 20-kilo watt gas generator and auto transfer switch, plus, a 1,000 gallon rainwater storage tank. During my stay in Freeport I got a sense that the community felt a little safer knowing that the DRW was there to serve them in time of disaster, said Ryczek. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersanders opens the 2014 Navy Ortega Lakeshore Little League season on March 8 with a perfect fast ball to catcher Reedy Monahan. Photos by MC2 Amanda Cabasos The annual Shotty Drew Sportsmanship Award, voted by the league's coaches, went to Kelly Tyre and Adam Smith. New disaster relief warehouse built for Freeport, Grand BahamasPhotos by Tim RyczekGeneral Charles Jacoby Jr., Commander of the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) and United States Northern Command (USNORTHCOM) (center) delivers remarks during the Feb. 13 celebration of the new disaster relief ware house located in Hawksbill, Grand Bahamas. It was built as part of USNORTHCOM Humanitarian Assistance Program. The new disaster relief warehouse (DRW) is located in Hawksbill, Grand Bahamas. The 4,800-sq.-ft. DRW is equipped with an office/meeting space and secure storage to support the U.S. Northern Commands Humanitarian Assistance Program. From MPA Public AffairsThe Maritime Patrol Association (MPA) has launched its online registration for the 2014 MPA Symposium this week in preparation for two full days of events that will celebrate this years theme of Transition: On Station. The 2014 MPA Symposium will take place April 10-11, aboard NAS Jacksonville. Symposium attend ees can register for a host of events, including the Scholarship Golf Tournament and 5K Run, Flight Suit Social, aircraft tours, and historical community pre sentations, as well as the annual Heritage Dinner. The guest speaker for the Heritage Dinner will be Adm. William Gortney, Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command. The program will highlight the recent accomplishments of the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF) as the community transitions to the new P-8A Poseidon and MQ-4C Triton aircraft. Additionally, two new MPRF Hall of Honor mem bers will be inducted at the Heritage Dinner. Guests, dressed in flight suits from the present and years past, will recognize the distinguished accomplishments of retired Rear Adm. Paul Mulloy and retired Cmdr. David Weisbrod, both of whom were selected from a group of outstanding and honorable individuals who have served the MPRF community. The transition theme of this years symposium captures how dynamic this time is for the MPRF com munity, said Capt. Sean Liedman, president of MPA. Our challenge is sustain our current level of opera tional commitments around the globe, while simul taneously transitioning between platforms and home base sites. We look forward to celebrating both our storied heritage and bright future with all of our sym posium attendees in April. Interested parties can receive more information about the 2014 MPA Symposium, as well as register online, by going to: www.maritimepatrolassociation. org/symposium A 501(c)(3) Florida non-profit corporation estab lished in 2011 and headquartered in Jacksonville, Fla., the Maritime Patrol Association plans on being Maritime Patrol Association opens registration for 2014 symposiumSee MPA, Page 16 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014

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Sand Volleyball League forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. Commands whose athletic rules and required paperwork. Soccer League Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. Contact the NAS Jacksonville Sports Department at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Rosters are due by the end of March. Leprechaun Dash 5k March 14 The run is free and open to all authorized points for their commands by participating. Sign up at NAS Jax Gym or the Fitness Source prior to the Feb. 7 deadline. The run is held on Perimeter Road at the end of Mustin Road, before the Antenna Farm at 11:30 a.m. Registration will also be held at the run site from 10:30-11:15 a.m. Awards will be given to the top male and top female runner for age groups: 19 & under; 20-24; 25-29; 30-34; 35-39; 40-44; 45-49; 50 & over. Kickball League meeting March 19 at noon Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. along with rules and required paperwork. Tournament March 24 The tournament is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractor women assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants will earn participation points for their command or third. Sign up by March 21. Greybeard Softball League Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractor personnel age 30 and older who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play on Tuesday & Thursday at 11:30 a.m. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Play begins at the end of March or the beginning of April. Intramural Softball League Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Play begins at the end of March or the beginning of April. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians; DoD contractors; retirees; and dependents over 18. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Play begins at the end of March or the beginning of April. Tournament April 28 Open to active duty, retirees, dependents over 18, selective reservists, DoD civilians and contractors. The tournament starts at 5 p.m. at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts on the corner of Allegheny Road and Birmingham Road. Call 542-2930 to sign up by April 25. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil StandingsAs of Feb. 21Winter Golf Teams Wins Losses CNATTU Blue 3 0 NCTS 3 0 VP-45 3 0 FRCSE 2 1 Navy Band 2 1 VP-30 2 1 CV-TSC/PSD 1 2 SERCC 1 2 VP-10 1 2 CNATTU Gold 0 3 Greybeard Basketball Teams Wins Losses VP-10 5 1 VP-30 5 2 NAVHOSP 4 2 VP-26 4 4 VP-5 3 1 FRCSE 3 3 NAVFAC 3 4 NCTS 0 7 Intramural Basketball Final Standings Team Wins Losses FRCSE 600 7 2 FRCSE 700 7 2 NAVHOSP 5 3 NAS Jax 4 3 VP-45 4 3 NAVHOSP Galley 4 4 VR-58 4 4 NCTS 4 5 VP-26 3 5 VP-10 3 5 FACSFAC 1 6 TPU/PCF 1 7 Badminton Doubles Team Wins Losses NAVHOSP MSU 4 0 NAVFAC Blue 3 0 NBHC Jax 3 0 MWR Dynamic Duo 2 1 NAVFAC Red 2 1 CV-TSC Ashore 1 2 FACSFAC-2 1 2 NAVFAC Green 1 2 FACSFAC-1 1 3 NAVFAC Gold 0 3 NAVFAC Orange 0 3 4-on-4 Flag Football Team Wins Losses Vet Clinic 6 0 VP-26 5 1 VR-58 5 1 NOSC 5 1 VR-62 4 2 ASD Jax 3 3 HSM-72 2 3 FACSFAC 1 3 CRS-10 1 4 NavHosp IMC 1 5 VP-62 0 5 FRCSE 62A/690 0 6 By Yan Kennon Naval Hospital Jacksonville Public Affairs Senior WriterNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville recognizes March as Social Work Month, themed All People Matter. The National Association of Social Workers (NASW) selected this years theme to help raise awareness about the American social work profes sions 116 years of commitment to improving conditions and quality of life opportunities for everyone. The roll as a social worker can be very challenging in a hospital setting, says Angela Hill, a 24-year social work fam ily advocacy representative and NH Jacksonvilles hospital dis charge planner. As discharge planner, it is my responsibility to procure and arrange delivery of spe cialized services such as termi nal care hospice, nursing home placement or specialized medi cal equipment for patients in need. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, five of every 10 social workers are employed in the health care and social sectors. Social workers are also employed at schools and gov ernment offices, performing a variety of workfrom cli ent advocates and educator of new skills, to counseling and connecting clients to essential resources within the commu nity. The social work profession was established in the 19th century to provide the skills and tools for immigrants and other susceptible people to escape economic and social poverty. NH Jacksonvilles team of licensed clinical social work ers at its hospital and Branch Health Clinics Key West and Mayport makes a positive dif ference in the quality of life for patients, and the families that support them through life challenges. NH Jacksonvilles priority since its founding in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. The command is comprised of the Navys third largest hos pital and five branch health clinics across Florida and Georgia. Of its patient popu lation about 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their families more than 62,000 are enrolled with a pri mary care manager at one of its facilities. To find out more, visit the command Web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax. Naval Hospital Jacksonville recognizes Social Work MonthPhoto by Jacob SippelAngela Hill, a social worker discharge planner at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvillel, discusses patient needs with a physician. NH Jacksonville, along with the National Association of Social Workers, recognizes March as Social Worker Month themed All People Matter. Medical Corps birthdayLt. Dian Daher, a Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville Family Medicine intern, and Capt. Larry Garsha, director for mental health, represent the young est and oldest NH Jacksonville Medical Corps offi cers during a cake-cutting celebration on March 7, commemorating the 143rd birthday of the Navy Medical Corps. The Medical Corps was established March 3, 1871, when the 41st Congress enacted the Appropriations Act establishing the Medical Corps as a separate entity and as a Staff Corps. Its mission is to provide medical care to U.S. Navy and Marine Corps personnel, their beneficiaries, and others entrusted to their care.Photo by Jacob Sippel Navy Jax Yacht Club (NJYC) members and guests departed Mulberry Cove Marina on March 2 to celebrate Mardi Gras and the beginning of the NJYC boating season. The NJYC meets the first Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. at the River Cove Catering & Conference Center. membership is open to active duty and retired military, DoD employees, and their families. The club's annual WAVES Regatta is March 22 on the St. Johns River with a race start time of 1 p.m. For more NJYC info, call 778-0805.Photo courtesy NJYCRafting up on the St. Johns River JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014 bling? Gambling is defined as any game of chance where the participant risks something of value for the chance to gain or win a prize. Common sports-relat ed examples include football pools, fantasy football leagues and March Madness basketball pools. If you provide consideration (i.e. something of mon etary value, no matter how small) for the opportunity to participate in a game of chance where, if it works out in your favor, you would receive something of value in return then you are gambling. Gambling includes wagers, raffles (with the exception of Navyapproved fundraising activities, such as Navy Marine Corps Relief Society raffles), lotteries, and other games of chance. Federal regulations prohibit all persons from partic ipating in such games for money, operating gambling devices, conducting lotteries, and selling or purchas ing number tickets in federal work spaces or during official duty time. Gambling with subordinates may also violate UCMJ, Article 133 (conduct unbecoming) and Article 134 (fraternization and/or gambling with subordinates). Bottom line: March Madness pools constitute gam bling. While gambling on NCAA tournament pools may be fun for some, it is prohibited in the Navy work place. For advice on all your command and organizational fundraising activities, please contact your local Staff Judge Advocate for advice at 542-2960. GAMBLINGFrom Page 8level, students win hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships and prizes every year. Martin believes continued support from role mod els, mentors and MATHCOUNTS competitions help increase the interest in mathematics for young schol ars. I became interested in engineering societies early in my career, said Martin. I was encouraged to explore the field and I became an engineer. I hope I can help these young scholars choose a career in engi neering. MATHCOUNTSFrom Page 13a premier professional organization representing the U.S. Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance commu nity by promoting the use of the patrol and recon naissance aircraft in the United States Navy. For more information, contact September Wilkerson, Executive Director, at (904) 563-4036 or info@maritimepatrolas sociation.org; or check out the MPA website at www. maritimepatrolassociation.org. MPAFrom Page 14 Photo by Clark PierceGround crews position a P-8A Poseidon next to a P-3C Orion on the apron outside Hangar 511 at NAS Jacksonville. The P-3/P-8 transition will be the subject of much conversation at the 2014 MPA Symposium that will take place April 10-11, aboard the station. By Nick Simeone American Forces Press ServiceTwo countries that have long concerned the United States in terms of national security North Korea and Iran are mentioned first in the 2014 Quadrennial Defense Review, a document that a senior Defense Department official told reporters March 7 has a renewed emphasis on protect ing the homeland. The congressionally mandat ed review of national defense strategy establishes priorities for defense spending, assets and a rebalancing of the mili tary in anticipation of the security challenges the nation is likely to face in the coming years, all in light of an increas ingly tight fiscal situation. In explaining the objectives to foreign journalists this week, Christine Wormuth, deputy undersecretary of defense for strategy, plans and force devel opment, said the United States remains concerned about North Korea in particular, which she called a major chal lenge for the United States in the Asia-Pacific region. The regime remains very insular and closed, and has engaged in a series of provoca tions, Wormuth said, adding that the United States is work ing closely with South Korea to ensure stability on the Korean Peninsula. I think weve developed, together with [South Korea], a counter-provocation plan thats designed to help us coordinate and respond to potential future provocations more effectively than ever before, she said. North Korea tested a longrange missile recently in what was described as a reaction to annual U.S. and South Korean military exercises. I think we feel confident that with the force that we have going forward and the strate gy that we have, that we will be able to meet our respon sibilities with [South Korea] to address threats that we might see from North Korea, Wormuth told reporters a day after the missile test. Wormuth called the U.S. mil itarys rebalance to the AsiaPacific region announced two years ago an important part of the U.S. strategy and said U.S. officials are paying close atten tion to Chinas military mod ernization. We would like to see more transparency in terms of Chinese intentions behind the various elements of its mod ernization, she said. China this week announced plans to increase defense spending by more than 12 per cent. The Quadrennial Defense Review also says the United States must stay ahead of the ballistic missile threat posed by Iran. To that end, Wormuth said, the strategy highlights the importance of investing in national missile defense in light of Irans growing capabili ties, and added that the strat egy anticipates a lot of contin ued instability in the Middle East in general, especially involving ongoing Sunni-Shia tensions and the consequenc es of revolutions rooted in the Arab Spring. By Phillip MilanoJU Director of News and PublicationsJacksonville University (JU) became the first higher education institution in the U.S. on Feb. 28 to partner with the Children of Fallen Patriots Foundation in awarding scholarships to students whose veteran par ents died in the line of duty. In a signing ceremony attended by military digni taries, members of the community, JU students, facul ty and staff, JU and officials with the nonprofit formal ized the agreement and welcomed other universities to join the program as well. Today we honor those children of the men and women who made the ultimate sacrifice for this coun try, JU President Tim Cost said. This ceremony represents another paver in the path as JU has fast become one of the most military friendly campuses in America. As part of the agreement, JU will provide a 40 per cent undergraduate tuition reduction per academic year for children of deceased veterans who meet JUs admissions requirements. Prospective students will be expected to demonstrate a minimum incoming grade point average (GPA) of 3.3, and each student will be expected to maintain a semester GPA of 3.0 or bet ter. Children of Fallen Patriots Foundation Executive Director John Coogan said the foundation, created in 2002 and now based in Jacksonville Beach, has awarded more than $6.5 million in scholarships to more than 400 surviving children. The nonprofit has already identified 5,000 of the estimated 15,000 chil dren who have lost a parent in the line of duty over the last 25 years. Given rising educational costs and uncertain economic times, our partnership with Jacksonville University is an extremely important one, as their scholarships will help to reduce our cost per student while allowing us to extend our fundraising dollars across more children, Coogan said. More impor tantly, it provides our children with an unbelievable opportunity to attend a world-class university that has set the standard in its commitment to our veterans and their families. Cost listed a number of developments showing that JU, whose student veterans make up more than 10 per cent of its enrollment of more than 4,000, has worked to make the campus as military friendly as possible. Among them: tion, with more than $5 million in VA benefits paid to JU student veterans in the 2012-13 academic year awarded by JU. one of only nine nationwide awarded funding $870,000 to implement a program that will offer sup port veterans excel as they pursue their Bachelors of Science in Nursing. Veterans Center The Defenders Den in its Founders Building March 25, creating a dedicated space for student veterans to gather, study and con nect. Kenzi Merck, Children of Fallen Patriots Foundation Program Administrator who lost her father in the line of duty in Iraq in 2005, received a standing ovation after describing how receiving one of the foundations scholarships shaped her future. Dad left behind three kids and a wife, so there was a financial burden on the family, she said. When we got the call from the Children of Fallen Patriots Foundation, it was the first time since he died that we cried tears of joy. Now I work for the foundation, and carry out my dads legacy. I thank JU for offering such an amazing opportunity to students who are going through what I went through. I am very proud to know that I made my dad proud, and I know these students will, too, when they come to Jacksonville University. For more about the Children of Fallen Patriots Foundation, visit www.fallenpatriots.org. Spring Gardening Tips March 13, 6:30 8:30 p.m. at free workshop about vegetables, fertilizer, pest control, lawn tips and more. Call 255-7450 or email Evie at epankok@coj.net to pre-register. Festival March 28 11 a.m. 3 p.m. at the Navy Federal Credit Union, across the street from the main gate of NAS Jacksonville. Meet retired Capt. JoEllen Drag Oslund, the Diocese of St. Augustine Eucharistic Congress March 28-29, at the Prime F. Osborn Convention Center, Jacksonville. Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, of the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston, is the keynote speaker and main celebrant. Jacksonville Jazz Festival May 22-25 at many locations downtown. Go to JaxJazzFest.com. Orange Park Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Post 5968 and its Auxiliary located at 187 Aurora Blvd. meets on the second Wednesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. VFW combat veterans and eligible service members from the Active, Guard or Reserve forces. Go to www.vfwpost5968. org or call 276-5968. N.E. Florida Chapter meets the third Wednesday of each month. Open to active duty and retirees of all military branches. Contact Johnnie.walsh@gmail.com or call 282-4650. meets the fourth Thursday of each month at 5 p.m. at Jacksonville Urban Cmdr. Paul Nix at 542-2518 or paul.nix@navy.mil.Association of Aviation Ordnancemen meets the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Center on Collins Road. For information, visit www.aao9. com. at NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) needs volunteers to assist military retirees and dependents. Work four hours a day, one day per week. Call 542-5790 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays to volunteer. a breast cancer support group at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, meets on the second Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. Call 542-7857 for more info. Navy Jacksonville Yacht Club is open to active duty, reserve and retired military, plus, active or retired DoD civilians. Call 778-0805 or email commodore@njyc.org COMPASS Spouse-to-Spouse Military Mentoring Program. Helping others help themselves. Visit www. gocompass.org for more info. Navy Wives Clubs of America DID No. 300 meets the Methodist Church, 2246 Blanding Blvd. Call 272-9489. Fleet Reserve Association Branch 290 monthly meeting Beach. Call 246-6855. National Active and Retired Federal Employees Westside Jacksonville Chapter 1984 meets at 1 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the Murray Hill United Methodist Church, (Fellowship Hall Building) at 4101 College Street. Call 786-7083. Retired Enlisted Association meets the fourth Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Hall at 7673 Blanding Blvd. Call 772-8622. DoD official: Quadrennial Review focus is protecting homeland JU partners with Children of Fallen Patriots Foundation scholarship program Photos by Donald dela TorreIn the most moving portion of the Feb. 28 cere mony, Kenzi Merck, the Children of Fallen Patriots Foundation Program administrator who lost her father in the line of duty in Iraq in 2005, received a standing ovation after describing how receiving one of the foundations scholarships shaped her future. Children of Fallen Patriots Foundation Executive Director John Coogan (left) and JU President Tim Cost sign the agreement making JU the first school partner in the U.S. in a program with the nonprofit to award scholarships to JU for students of deceased veterans. Community Calendar

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From Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Department of the Navy announced March 7 that women may now be assigned to previously closed positions in the Coastal Riverine Force, continuing in the Department of Defenses rescission of the 1994 Direct Ground Combat Definition and Assignment Rule. The 30-day Congressional notification requirement ended March 6, which now opens 267 Navy positions in the Coastal Riverine Force (CRF) for the assignment of women. The 267 Navy positions in the CRF small craft include both female officers and enlisted. Our continuing effort to maximize all professional opportunities for women in the Navy and Marine Corps takes another step with the opening the Coastal Riverine Force to female officers and Sailors, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. We consistently strive to ensure all Sailors and Marines, regardless of gender, have a path toward a success ful military career. This not only makes us better warfight ers, but it ensures our Navy and Marine Corps remains the fin est expeditionary fighting force in the world. With the opening of these billets to females, the only remaining community that is still closed to women is Special Warfare an issue Special Operations Command (SOCOM) and the Navy contin ue work on together. Thirteen women have been identified as the first can didates for the newly opened positions. Since last fall, nine enlisted women have been administratively assigned to Coastal Riverine Squadron (CRS) 2, Delta Company, 1st Platoon, located in Portsmouth, Va. The administrative assign ment was done to assist with management of the train ing cycle, in anticipation of Secretary of Defense and Congressional approval to open previously excluded billets to women. CRS-2 will be the first unit in the CRF to assign women to boats capable of the Riverine mission. The nine women in CRS-2 have completed the required training, have been screened for the billets, and all nine have been awarded their Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC). The end of the congressional notification period clears the way for these women to deploy with their squadron and poten tially be assigned as crewmem bers on boats. There are two other active component squadrons with the same mission: Coastal Riverine Squadron Four in Virginia Beach, Va., and Coastal Riverine Squadron Three, in San Diego. With the complex and intense training required of Coastal Riverine Sailors, and in preparation for the lifting of the women in combat exclusion, both Squadrons are imple menting plans to incorporate women into squadrons capable of the Riverine mission as soon as feasible. CRS-2 is scheduled to deploy this summer and is currently in pre-deployment training. CRS-4 recently returned from deployment and CRS-3, Delta Company, recently deployed. CRF operates in harbors, rivers, bays, across the litto rals and ashore. The primary mission of CRF is to conduct maritime security operations across all phases of military operations by defending high value assets, critical maritime infrastructure, ports and har bors both inland and on coastal waterways against enemies, and when commanded conduct offensive combat operations. By Defense Media Activity NavyThe Vice Chief of Naval Operations, Adm. Mark Ferguson, announced the next phase of Flag officer billet adjust ments March 7, projected to bring the Navy into compliance with Office of the Secretary of Defense guidance. The adjustments are in addition to the reduction of 35 Navy flag officer positions announced in August 2013. The phased reduction, elimination, or consolidation of flag officer billets is scheduled to be complete by March 2016 and will occur as the officers effect permanent change of station moves or retire. This plan will allow for 151 flag offi cers to fill Navy-specific billets and 64 Navy flag officers to fill existing requirements for joint billets. The overall Flag billet plan balances these adjustments across officer com munities, including Line, Restricted Line and Staff Corps. It also enables the Navy to provide more stability and predictability in the flag officer pro motion process while meeting statu tory requirements, Adm. Ferguson explained. Specific billets affected by this plan include: Eliminations The current billet is filled by an active duty Rear Adm. (lower half). (N2/N6I). The current billet is filled by an active duty Rear Adm. (lower half). U.S. Fleet Forces Command. The cur rent billet is filled by an active duty Rear Adm. (lower half). Shift from Active Duty to Reserves Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet will transition from an active duty Rear Adm. (upper half) to a recalled reservist of the same rank. Command for Global Logistics Support will transition from an active duty Rear Adm. (lower half) to a recalled reservist of the same rank. Increase in Seniority will increase in seniority from a Rear Adm. (lower half) to a Rear Adm. (upper half). The command will also become Information Dominance Forces Command, the Echelon II type com mander for the Information Dominance Corps. This increase in seniority allows for better management of senior officers in the Information Dominance career field. Anti-Submarine Warfare, Assault and Special Mission Programs (PEO-A) will increase in seniority from a Rear Adm. (lower half) to a Rear Adm. (upper half). This increase in seniority is commensu rate with the scope of responsibility for the billet and helps balance the acquisi tion corps billet structure. Billet shift Defense Command, a Rear Adm. (lower half), will shift to a new command, the Navy Surface Warfare Development Command and remain at the same rank. Merger and Elimination Space and Maritime Domain Awareness (OPNAV N2/N6E), previous ly commanded by a Rear Adm. (upper half), will merge with Commander, Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command. The new billet will be filled by a U.S. Navy Rear Adm. (lower half). The billet will be located at the Stennis Space Center in Mississippi. Our goal remains to operate more efficiently and effectively while strengthening our warfighting capabili ties. Shifting two billets to the Reserve Force recognizes their significant con tribution to combat operations, their operational expertise, and their inte grated service with the active duty component, Adm. Ferguson said. As warfare requirements evolve, we will continue to assess our flag officer billet structure while seeking opportunities to further integrate our Reserve and Active Duty components.VCNO announces further flag officer adjustmentsCoastal Riverine Force admits women to combat billets MCSN Heather M. PaapeChief Engineman Patricia Cooper, a student in the Riverine Combat Skills course (RCS), patrols the training grounds during a field train ing exercise in Camp Lejeune, N.C. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014 17

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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 2014 I I D E BUDGET CHOICES $15 Billion Decrease Page 3 VP-45Pelicans Safe For Flight Pages 4 & 5 SCHOLARSHIPS Children Of Fallen Patriots Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com By Lt. Mark FlowerdewRAN 725 Squadron Public AffairsDelivery of the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) MH-60R Seahawk Romeo capability took another step forward March 6, with the arrival of aircraft three and four at NAS Jacksonville. Crewed by joint RAN and U.S. Navy aircrews, the new aircraft departed the Lockheed Martin Assembly Plant in Owego, New York and made the long journey south where they were warmly greeted by RAN 725 Squadron personnel. Its great to welcome two new aircraft to the RAN fam ily. We cant wait to introduce them to Jacksonville and later in the year, to the Fleet Air Arm back in Australia, said RAN 725 Squadron Commanding Officer Cmdr. David Frost. So far, weve flown more than 100 hours in aircrafts one and two, and we look forward to having the new kids on the block taking some of the load, said Frost. Another bunch of aviation maintainers and aircrew also arrived at NAS Jacksonville recently, bringing the total number of Fleet Air Arm per sonnel to 95, with the final eight aircrew due to arrive over the next few months. Maintenance technicians will continue to undergo training at the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU), at NAS Jacksonville, while aircrew will be trained by Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 40 (HSM-40), at Naval Station Mayport. Complementing the new Romeos was the arrival of a maintenance training device dubbed the BROMEO, that Frost said would be used by maintenance sailors to conduct task book and journal progression. The Bromeo is a complete, functioning aircraft that will be used to train sailors who are undergoing initial trade training at RAN 725 Squadron. It will also be used to conduct annual escape training and Operational Flying Training ground familiarisation events. Finding opportunities to get hands-on training on in-ser vice aircraft can be challenging due to flying and operational commitments, so having the Bromeo will expedite training that will be more cost effec tive, explained Frost. Although it will not return to flying status, the Bromeo will be painted in Royal Australian Navy colors and will be subject to the airworthiness and maintenance requirements that the fleet of new MH-60R aircraft are required to meet. The Bromeo is built from an SH-60B (Bravo) helicopter air frame, similar to those oper ated by RAN 816 Squadron. It was re-manufactured into an MH-60R as a prototype, prior to the final design decision by the U.S. Navy. The airframe was resur rected from the U.S. Navys By MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Public AffairsNAS Jax and NS Mayport received Environmental Excellence Awards presented by Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) dur ing the Mayors Environmental Awards Luncheon at the Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens on March 6. The award recognizes the team efforts in successfully preventing vio lations and improving environmental compliance and sustainability at the local naval facilities. Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown said, This is a real important award. You know we pride ourselves on working with all of our stakeholders in our community to make Jacksonville a better place to live, work and raise a family and the environment is one of them. We like to make sure that people can enjoy our natural resources. We have the largest urban park system in the country, but we want it to be the best. Having more access to the river and our naturally pristine parks is important, so this award speaks volumes about our partnership and commitment to make Jacksonville the best place to live, work and raise a family. The base leadership of U.S. Navy facilities located in Jacksonville established the Northeast Florida Environmental Compliance Partnering Team in 2002. The vision for this team was, the Navy and regulatory community work ing together to achieve environmental excellence and accomplish individual organization missions. The Northeast Florida Environmental By Clark PierceEditorThis years Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) fund-raising drive began March 5 with an organizational kickoff at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center on board NAS Jacksonville. The annual fund drive generates donations to ben efit the local NMCRS an organization that assists hundreds of Sailors, Marines and their families each month. By donating to NMCRS, service members are tak ing care of their own, said Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Rick Williamson, who urged commanding officers, XOs and senior enlisted lead ers of installation and tenant commands to respond quickly and generously to the fund drive. As a young division officer, I learned of the power that NMCRS can bring to bear on problems involving finances and family dynamics. Fast forward 20 years and Im commanding officer of a frigate with an average crew age of 22 years and most of the same problems. Who do they turn to for guidance? Thats right, Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society. Theyre a force multiplier that can remove some burdens from the shoulders of commanding officers. Like everyone here today, including my wife, Robin, Im a believer in NMCRS. Thank you for your service. This fund drive will succeed because of your Sailor-to-Sailor efforts, said NAS Jax NMCRS Director Monika Woods. We cannot operate without our dedicated volun teers who step up at each command to lead this fund drive. To support you, we have more than a dozen cheerleaders at our NMCRS office in Building 13. NMCRS is famous for its interest-free Quick Assist Loans. And when our clients pay it back the money is turned around and used by another person in need, added Woods. So it really is service members taking care of service members. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander attended the kickoff with his wife, Pam, who, along with Robin Williamson, is an NMCRS honorary chairman of volunteers, He told those in attendance, Fund drives have been challenging this past year. The spirit of giving has been dampened by furloughs and the government sequester. However, our Sailors have enjoyed a stable income throughout all of it. Please remember that NMCRS is really about Sailors helping Sailors so join me to revitalize that spirit of giving for this important Attention Gate River Run participants Jax Air News will be covering the event. NAS Jax Sailors and civilians running or walking in the March 15 Gate River Run/USA 15K Championship race are requested to meet at the event EXPO Center for a group photo at 7:30 a.m. For more info, e-mail NAS Jax Public Miriam.gallet@navy.mil. From Staff Photos courtesy of RAN 725 SquadronOn the seawall at NAS Jacksonville, Royal Australian Navy (RAN) 725 Squadron plane captains and aircrew go through the preflight checklist for their recently acquired MH-60R Seahawk helicopters, numbers three and four. Romeo capability continues to expand at NAS JaxNAS Jax and NS Mayport earn FDEP Environmental Excellence AwardsPhoto by MC2 Amanda CabasosJacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown (left) and Florida Department of Environmental Protection Assistant Director Jim Maher (right) present the FDEP Environmental Excellence Award to NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander (right center) and NS Mayport Commanding Officer Capt. Wesley McCall (left center) during the Mayors Environmental Awards Luncheon held at the Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens on March 6.NMCRS kicks off annual fund-raising drivePhoto by Clark Pierce (From left) Robin Williamson, NMCRS honorary chairman of volunteers; Jim Reid of NMCRS Jacksonville; Pam Undersander, NMCRS honorary chairman of volunteers, and NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander, attended the March 5 kickoff for the annual Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society fund drive.See Page 8 See Page 8 See Page 8

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014 By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorMy favorite Doris story was about their new phone number in Boston. Her husband, Big Jack, was going to law school at Harvard, and neither of them had ever really lived outside of Alabama. Big Jack spent most of his days studying at the library. When he came home for dinner at their small apartment, it was just to get something Doris could throw between two pieces of bread. One night, after Big Jack had fallen asleep and Doris was putting away his coat, she found a folded piece of paper in his front pocket. It had a phone number written on it. Doris was sure Big Jack had a girlfriend, so she woke him up and demanded to know whose number he was keeping in his coat. Big Jack wouldnt say, but he smiled mischievously. This made Doris angrier. So she sat on the bed and threatened to sing Im Henry the VIII, I am endlessly until he confessed. Big Jack let Doris sing the whole night. The next morning, as he was leaving for school, he smiled and said, The number in my pocket is ours. Doris told me this while she patted my hand and I drifted off to sleep. When my grandparents came to visit, Doris always slept in my room, and Id ask her to hold my hand until I was asleep. I called her Doris because everyone else did. I never thought it was strange to use her first name. According to Doris, however, I pronounced it Darc until I moved up north with the Yankees and started pronouncing each syllable. Which brings me to my other favorite story about Doris. When our third son, Lindell, was born in 2007, Dustin was the one who called Doris to tell her the news. Because I lived with Doris and Big Jack while I was in college, Dustin had gotten to know them like his own. But it was late when he called that night, and Doris was confused. The baby is here, Dustin said. And weve named him Lindell Grant. Doris said, Well! and hung up the phone. The next morning, Doris called my brother, Will, and said, Imagine the nerve of that girl naming her baby after General Grant! Big Jack ought to be rolling over in his grave by now. No, the babys name is LINDELL Grant, Will told her. Not General Grant. Doris eventually forgave Dustin for that scare. Even though at our wedding Doris had pulled me aside at the last minute and said, Its not too late to back out, she would later refer to Dustin as her Number 2. We never knew who Number 1 was, but Dustin was glad to be counted among her favorites. Once Dustin and I had children and were living in Florida, long after Big Jack had died, we often went up to Alabama to get Doris and take her with us on trips to see my parents in Virginia. Doris would sing to my sons one of her standards: In a cabin in the woods, a little old man by the window stood . . Except, when Doris got to the part that goes, Help me, help me, help me, he said, or that hunter will shoot me dead, I out-sung her with, Or that hunter will steal my bed. Doris would stop singing and say, Thats not how it goes. Its Or that hunter Id out-sing her again. Then Doris would look at the boys and say some thing like, Now, your mother is all lopsided wompus. She can sing it anyway she wants, this way or the other way, but the song goes, Or that hunter will Again, Id out-sing her. Then Id smile as I looked in the rearview mirror and saw her patting baby Lindells hand, like she always did mine when I was going to sleep. Two weeks ago, Doris broke her hip. A few days later, she lay unresponsive in the hospital. The day before Doris 94th birthday, my mom asked me to write something to read at her funeral. None of us thought shed recover. Thats when I began this column. I couldnt remember the last time Doris and I had a good talk. The day she didnt remember the Boston phone number story, I stopped calling her as much. It was hard to hear her so confused. And in December, a phone message from her telling me that she will love me forever, one that I had saved for six years, was accidentally erased. I thought Id never hear her voice again. But the next day, on her birthday, Doris woke up. Over the phone she told me, Oh how I love you, and then she handed the phone to the nurse. Perhaps I should have deleted this column/funeral speech then. It seems premature now. Except, what a gift to have the chance to tell someone these things while she is still here with us. SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-7789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley This Week in Navy HistoryPhotos by Clark PierceHas it been two years already? The first Boeing P-8A Poseidon multi-mission aircraft (No. 428) assigned to the VP-30 "Pro's Nest" arrived at NAS Jacksonville March 5, 2012 as the sun was setting. A formal roll-out ceremony took place March 28 at the VP-30 Hangar. In March 2012, the first P-8A Poseidon (No. 428) was delivered to VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville. VP-30 is the Navy's fleet replacement squadron for both the P-3C Orion and the P-8A Poseidon. From StaffMarch 6 1822 USS Enterprise captures four pirate ships in Gulf of Mexico. 1862 USS Monitor departs New York City for Hampton Roads, Va. and his toric confrontation with CSS Virginia (ex-USS Merrimack). 1942 U.S. cruisers and destroyers bombard Vila and Munda, Solomon Islands, sinking two Japanese destroy ers. March 7 1958 Commissioning of USS Grayback (SSG574), the first submarine built from keel up with guided missile capability (Regulus II missile). 1960 USS Kearsarge (CVS-33) res cues four Russian soldiers from their adrift landing craft 1,000 miles from Midway Island. 1966 Department of Navy reorga nized into present structure under CNO. 1967 Brown water PBRs assists Operation Overload II in Rung Sat Zone, Vietnam. 1968 Operation Coronado XII begins in Mekong Delta, Vietnam. 1994 Sixty-three women receive orders to USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, the first combat ship to have women permanently assigned. March 8 1854 Commodore Matthew Perry opens treaty negotiations with Japan. 1862 Ironclad ram CSS Virginia destroys USS Cumberland and USS Congress. 1945 Phyllis Daley becomes first African-American ensign in Navy Nurse Corps. 1958 Battleship USS Wisconsin (BB64) is decommissioned, leaving the Navy without an active battleship for the first time since 1895. 1965 Seventh Fleet lands first major Marine units in South Vietnam at Danang. 1991 Lt. Kathy Owens became the last pilot (in a C-2 Greyhound) to land on the training carrier USS Lexington (CVT 16) that was decommissioned in November 1991. March 9 1798 Appointment of George Balfour as first U.S. Navy surgeon. 1847 Commodore David Connor leads successful amphibious assault near Vera Cruz, Mexico. 1862 First battle between ironclads, USS Monitor and CSS Virginia. 1914 Test of wind tunnel at Washington Navy Yard. March 10 1783 USS Alliance (Capt. John Barry) defeats HMS Sybil in final naval action of Revolution in West Indies waters. 1933 Pacific Fleet provides assis tance after earthquake at Long Beach, Calif. 1945 Navy and civilian nurses interned at Los Banos, Philippines flown back to CONUS. Navy nurses awarded Bronze Star. 1948 First use of jets assigned to operational squadron (VF-5A) on board aircraft carrier USS Boxer (CV 21) 1992 The Department of Defense announced its plan to withdraw from the Philippine Naval Facility at Subic Bay. March 11 1935 Birth of Naval Security Group when OP-20G became the Communications Security Group. 1941 President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs Lend-Lease Act. 1942 In a PT boat, Lt. Cmdr. John Bulkeley leaves the Philippines to take General Douglas MacArthur to Australia. 1983 The first fleet CH-53E Super Stallion delivered to the HM-12 Sea Dragons. The CH-53E transports heavier loads over longer distances than previous logistics helicopters. 1991 Saratoga and Midway battle groups depart the Persian Gulf for their homeports: Saratoga (CV 60) transited the Suez Canal en route to Mayport, Fla.; Midway (CV 41) traveled to Yokosuka, Japan. March 12 1917 American merchant ships to be armed in war zones. 1942 President Franklin D. Roosevelt designates Admiral Ernest J. King to serve as the Chief of Naval Operations, as well as the Commanderin-Chief, United States Fleet. 1956 First overseas deployment of Navy missile squadron, VA-83, on board USS Intrepid (CV 11). March 13 1895 Award of first submarine building contract to John P. Holland Torpedo Boat Co. 1917 Armed merchant ships autho rized to take action against U-boats. From the HomefrontAt 94, grandma Doris still fightingPhoto courtesy of Sarah SmileyWhether she was 24 or 94, Grandma Doris has aged extremely well. We all should be so fortunate.

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Navy budget request involved tough choicesNavy News ServiceThe Navy Depart-ments fiscal year 2015 budget request reflects tough, but responsible choices, a senior Navy official said at a March 5 Pentagon news conference. The budget request is part of the $495.6 billion defense budget proposal President Barack Obama submitted to Congress. Rear Adm. William Lescher, deputy assistant secretary of the Navy for budget, briefed report ers about the Navy and Marine Corps portion of the budget request. Our budget comes dur ing a period of increased fiscal austerity and uncer tainty, and at a time when the combatant command ers demand for naval forces continues at very high levels, Lescher said. There were tough choices made in develop ing this budget, but it provides the resources that allow us to preserve our warfighting advantage in a thoughtful, responsible way. This years budget sub mission prioritizes fund ing for forward presence and continues to make critical investments in people and future capabilities, the admiral said. The proposed bud get sustains presence by providing money for ship steaming, flight hours, maintenance and base operations. ready group and carrier strike group deployments. ballistic missile defensecapable destroyers joining the USS Donald Cook in Rota, Spain, in fiscal 2015, support for the rebalance to the Pacific, with $46.8 billion overall in opera tions and maintenance. Additional investments are proposed for retain ing sailors through the Quality of Service initia tive. The Navy seeks to reduce manning gaps at sea and improve the seato-shore flow of personnel. The Navy has also requested $38.4 billion for ship, aircraft, weap ons and other procure ment programs, including the littoral combat ship, P-8A Poseidon aircraft, Virginia-class submarines and the Mk-48 heavy weight torpedo. Research and develop ment priorities include the Ohio-class replace ment submarine, next generation jammer and Unmanned CarrierLaunched Airborne Surveillance and Strike, as well as developing electromagnetic spectrum and cyber capabilities. The Navys fiscal 2015 budget request is a $15 billion decrease from the level forecast in last years budget submission and is a $38 billion reduction over the Future Year Defense Plan from the fiscal 2014 presidential budget. Were confident this budget makes the right choices where needed, Lescher said. Within our fiscal limi tations, this is the bud get to continue to ensure nearand long-term wholeness, and to remain the worlds most capable Navy. Voting assistance workshop on March 24From StaffThe Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP) will conduct a voting assistance workshop aboard NAS Jacksonville March 24 from 8:30-10:30 a.m. in Deweys All Hands Club main ballroom. The Deweys complex is located in Building 608, between Gillis and Keily streets. Although primarily for voting assistance officers, the workshop is open to any interested persons. The point of contact for the FVAP workshop is Officer, Lt. Cmdr. Cheryl Aimestillman. Contact her at 542-3998 or at cheryl.aimestillman@navy.mil, or vote. jacksonville@navy.mil. Photo by Glenn FawcettDeputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Budget, Rear Adm. William Lescher, briefs the media on the Navy's fiscal year 2015 budget in the Pentagon Press Briefing Room on March 5. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014 By Lt. j.g. Joseph JohannesVP-45 Public Affairs OfficerThe Pelicans of VP-45 fin ished up their weeklong Safe for Flight (SFF) inspection Feb. 27 officially completing their transition to the Navys new maritime patrol aircraft, the P-8A Poseidon. In doing so, VP-45 becomes the Navys third operation al P-8A squadron, following in the footsteps of VP-16 and VP-5. Before they could official ly complete their transition to becoming an active duty squadron again, the Pelicans had to run the gauntlet of Safe for Flight, a grueling weeklong inspection by Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing-11. The inspectors checked everything from emergency drills to NATOPS jackets to make sure that VP-45 was up to fleet standards and could perform these drills safely, if a real world need ever arose. It was a challenging expe rience, said VP-45 Aviation Safety Officer Lt. Donnell Exum, But it is one that we were more than happy to undertake. The drills, which were meant to simulate incidents such as an aircraft mishap, both on the ground and in the air, pushed the maintainers of VP-45 to their limits. But in the end, the Pelicans came through with flying colors. Our many months of hard work paid off as VP45 accepted, met and conquered the challenges set forth by the CPRW-11 SFF inspection, remarked AMC Mario Caligiuri. The Pelicans success impressed everyone involved. After six months in the school house at VP-30 learn ing the P-8A inside and out, I am proud of the Pelicans, said VP-45 Executive Officer Cmdr. T.J. Grady. They went above and beyond my expectations dur ing this major transition ending with the SFF. With their transition com plete, the VP-45 Pelicans are now preparing for their next deployment to Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, in the 7th Fleet area of responsibility. While they know that the future will be challenging, the Pelicans look forward to putting the skills they have learned dur ing their transition to the real world test that their upcoming deployment will bring. A VP-45 plane captain 45 directs the pilots of the P-8A Poseidon No.434 aircraft to the taxiway of NAS Jax. (From left) Lt. John Leeds of VP-45 reviews aircrew NATOPS jackets with Lt. James Milter an inspector of the program from CPRW-11. Milter is ensuring that the program is on track as a part of the command's final review to achieve P-8A Poseidon Safe for Flight status. AECS Edgar Mckibben and AE1 Stephen Bell of the VP-45 Pelicans Quality Assurance Division review the tracking/auditing of the maintenance departments programs with ADCS Austin Von Loh, an inspector from CPRW-11, as part of the command's final review to achieve P-8A Poseidon Safe for Flight status. LS2 Myles Premberton (left) of VP-45 discusses the proper labeling of tools with AMCS Craig Spivey (right) of CPRW-11 while he inspects the squadron's airframes division, as AWFC Shawn Swartz and AMC Billy Kime look on. AMCS Craig Spivey (right) of CPRW-11 inspects and discusses the layout of toolboxes in the VP-45 Airframes Division with AD1 Melvin Everett, AM2 Matthew Swyers, AWFC Shawn Swartz and AMC Billy Kime, as a part of the command's final review to achieve P-8A Poseidon Safe For Flight status. AWVC Jeffery Siegfried of CPRW-11 inspects the documentation, labeling and integrity of VP-45's survival equipment with PR2 Jamal Barconey, as PR2 Lauren Berman looks on. AD2 Nicolas Hernandez, a VP-45 plane captain, gives the pilots of the P-8A Poseidon aircraft the thumbs-up signal, indicating a good start of engines 1 and 2.VP-45 completes transition as third operational P-8A squadronADC Guylande Jeudy of CPRW-11 observes as AO3 Cameron Albright completes an operational inspection on one of his shop ladders, ensuring that it is working within required parameters. AWVC Jeffery Siegfried of CPRW-11 inspects the label ing and integrity of VP-45's survival equipment with PR2 Jamal Barconey, as AME1 Scott Walker looks on.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014 5 With P-8A No. 434 in the background, the VP-45 "Pelicans" gather to celebrate their "Safe For Flight" certification on Feb. 27 at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 511.Photos by MC1 Michelle Lucht LSCS Howard West from CPRW-11 views the VP-45 Pelican's standard operating procedures and credit card expense tracking with LS2 Marielly Bell, ensuring that the squadron is operating and annotating purchases properly. VP-45 Commanding Officer Cmdr. J.J. Brabazon congratulates his command for successfully qualifying for "Safe For Flight" status for maintaining and operating the P-8A Poseidon. Cmdr. Joe Testa from VP-30 hands VP-45 Plane Captain AD2 Nicolas Hernandez an aircraft safety pin during his pre-flight inspection of the P-8A Poseidon aircraft. AT2 Nicholas George removes the extension cord connecting the plane captain to the P-8A Poseidon flight deck allowing voice communications during engine start up, prior to take-off. P-8A Poseidon Plane Captain AD2 Nicolas Hernandez of VP-45 walks around with Cmdr. Joe Testa from VP-30 during his pre-flight inspection of the aircraft.

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By MC2 Ernest ScottCommander, Naval Air Force Atlantic, Public AffairsCommander, Naval Air Force Atlantic (CNAL) announced the selection of the Sea and Shore Sailors of the Year dur ing a luncheon aboard Naval Station Norfolk, March 6. Rear Adm. Mike Shoemaker, com mander, Naval Air Force Atlantic, announced AE1 Richard Fenters as the CNAL Shore Sailor of the Year and AWO1 Raul Gomez as the CNAL Sea Sailor of the Year. The two Sailors were selected from ten candidates representing more than 40,000 men and women serving in the sea and shore components within Naval Air Force Atlantic. Each represented their respective commands after being selected as that commands Sailor of the Year. Each of you here today has already won, said Shoemaker. You have been selected by your commands as the very best of the best. Your presence here is a testimony to your individual accomplishments, and I salute you all. Fenters, a native of Attica, Ind., is assigned to Air Test and Evaluation Squadron One at NAS Patuxent River, Md. He enlisted in the Navy in 1998. It is a privilege and honor to be rec ognized for the work and dedication of my Sailors, family, and friends, said Fenters. Gomez, a native of San Antonio, Texas, is assigned to Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing-11 at NAS Jacksonville, and serves as the operations lead petty officer. He enlist ed in the Navy in 2001. It feels absolutely amazing, said Gomez. Its been a great week. Ive met a lot of great Sailors who were equally deserving. Its a great honor and I am truly humbled to be representing all my mentors and junior Sailors who have helped me achieve this career mile stone. Both Sailors will advance to the next selection process to determine the Sailors of the Year for U.S. Fleet Forces Command. By MC3 Jeffrey MadlangbayanUSS George H.W. Bush Public AffairsThe newest Nimitz-Class aircraft carrier, USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), arrived in Antalya, Turkey for a scheduled port visit, March 9. HSM-70 Spartans, home based at NAS Jacksonville are embarked aboard Bush as part of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8. HSM-70 operates the MH-60R Seahawk helicopter. This port visit is designed to strengthen maritime security working with our Turkish partners. The port visit will also give Sailors a chance to visit and explore Antalya with tours, including an evening banquet complete with Turkish musi cal instruments, a typical folk orchestra and a dance extravaganza focusing on traditional Turkish and Antalya folklore, a trip to the spring waters at Pamukkale. I really look forward to going on the Antalya City tour to see all the sights and learn the rich history of this coun try, said RP1 Celeste Shield. George H.W. Bush will also host a reception for dignitaries and regional partners on board in order to foster international relations. This is the second port visit for George H.W. Bush since leaving Norfolk in February. It will provide the crew a once in a lifetime experience. A shop ping venture into Antalya pro vides Sailors with a look into the rich history and culture of the Turkish Nation. Sailors will have the opportunity to shop for many handmade prod ucts from local vendors such as scarves, clothes, ceramics, leather jackets, jewelry, carpets and handmade lamps. George H.W. Bush is on scheduled deployment as a part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group to support maritime security operations and theater security coopera tion efforts in the U.S. 6th fleet areas of operations. More than 1,700 person nel are assigned to Carrier Air Wing (CVW)-8, part of the George H.W. Bush Strike Group. CVW-8 includes the Golden Warriors of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 87, the Valions of VFA-15, the Fighting Black Lions of VFA-213, the Tomcatters of VFA-31, the Bear Aces of Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 124, the Garudas of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 134, the Tridents of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 9, the Rawhides of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 40, and the Spartans of Squadron (HSM) 70. Spartans and Bush arrives in TurkeyU.S. Nay photoA jet launches from the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) during its final predeployment evaluations, prior to its recent deployment to the U.lS. 5th and 6th Fleets areas of responsibility. The HSM-70 "Spartans helicopter squadron home based at NAS Jacksonville are embarked aboard Bush as part of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8. HSM-70 operates the MH-60R Seahawk helicopter.CNAL Selects Sailors of the Year include CPRW-11 Sailor 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014

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By MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax staff writerThomas Duvall an elec tronics technician at the Air Operations Department and Child and Youth Program (CYP) Assistant Training and Curriculum Specialist Amanda Johnson at Youth Activities Center were named NAS Jax Senior and Junior Civilians of the First Quarter respectively. Duvall is a subject matter expert on all navigation aids and landing air traffic control communication systems maintained by Ground Electronics Maintenance Division (GEMD). He provides training required by GEMD for the qualification of military duty watch techni cians. Duvall saved the divi sion $19,066 by repairing rather than purchasing two Approach Radar 400 hertz converter circuits. When HSM-72 and HSM-74 reported they were experiencing static interference on the common traffic advisory fre quency, Duvall identified the problem, located the issue that came from the MH-60R heli copter that resulted in the prevention of a possible aircraft accident. Assistant GEMD Officer Steve Harper at NAS Jax Air Operations said, Thomas Duvall is an outstanding tech nician. He consistently per forms great work for GEMD. Our job is to analyze and investigate any interference and communication problems. Duvall not only does that but also determines when our equipment isnt involved. He went outside of our guidelines to actively become involved in the investigation and trouble shooting of the MH-60R heli copter airframe. He not only determined this major problem of static frequency interferenc es at NAS Jax but also around the country, as well as over the ocean and other areas where helicopters operate. I never was expecting any thing like this, said Duvall. I was just doing my job and protecting the warfighter from any potential accidents in order to ensure safe flights through out the base. I love what I do. Every day is new and exciting and I look forward to coming to work, concluded Duvall. Amanda Johnson has developed and delivered training to all youth center staff that included steps and proce dures to identify and accom modate children with special needs who are participating in the various CYP programs. Johnson is sensitive to all dis abled and special-needs chil dren who attend programs at the Youth Activity Center. She has a gift and a way of con necting with these children that makes a difference in their lives. Johnson has the knowledge and ability to work with chil dren from every side of the spectrum. Since September 2013, when she became the assistant training and curric ulum specialist, she has cre ated a number of programs for children, parents and staff. Some programs include a few Muffins for Moms, Donuts for Dads and an open house for home-schooled children. More than 30 children and parents have attended the open house program and as a result, the groups now meets monthly. According to CDC Director Mary Grenier, Johnsons contributions to the CYP have been outstanding. Amanda has worked at the Youth Activities Center for 11 years and contributed greatly to the program, said Grenier. She attended college while being a full-time employee and earned her Bachelors degree in Elementary Education. She has moved up in our system and I expect her to continue to excel throughout her career here. Im very excited that she was selected COQ she certainly deserves it for everything she does for the children. Johnson said, Working with special-needs children is something I deeply love. I love working with all children, but I have a desire to learn about our children with special needs to help them better adapt to our programs offered at the youth center. We have children with autism and Down syndrome that come to the youth center who are especially important to me because I know they have a harder time adapting to life. I do my best to help these children get through the day. I try figuring out the best way to get them to interact with other children. I also try to find the best solution for parents to feel comfortable leaving their kids here. So I always com municate with them to assure them of their childs safety and inform them on what is going on throughout the day. According to Johnson, she was astounded when she dis covered she was receiving an award. It was exciting to be recognized. I didnt even know I was eligible for it. I was very honored. Ive just been doing my job that I love to do every day. And for others around me to recognize what I do and think its good is really heart warming. I couldnt have done it without the help from my counselors who work so well with the children here, as well as having great leadership to look up too. NAS Jax announces Senior, Junior Civilians of the First QuarterPhotos by MC2 Amanda CabasosChild and Youth Program Assistant Training and Curriculum Specialist Amanda Johnson at the Youth Activities Center (YAC) aboard NAS Jax on March 6. ET3 Katherine Morrow receives training from Electronics Technician Thomas Duvall, both from NAS Jax Air Operations Ground Electronics Maintenance Division, on how to use the Digital Audio Legal Recorder at the station's Air Traffic Control Tower. Photos by MC1 Brianna Dandridge(Right) Capt. Christopher Heaney, commander, Navy Recruiting Region East, visited Navy Recruiting District (NRD) Jacksonville Feb. 27-28. He was joined by Regional CMDCM Donald Massey as they met EN1(SW) Edward Burgess of the West Jacksonville recruiting station. In addition to Sailors and staff at headquarters, they visited recruiters from Navy Recruiting Stations Orange Park and East Jacksonville. RecruitersCapt. Christopher Heaney, commander, Navy Recruiting Region East, joined Cmdr. Brent Cower, Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville, on Feb. 28 to celebrate the history and culture of African-American and Black Sailors during African-American/Black History Month. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014 7

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Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Centre (AMARC), otherwise known as the Boneyard, where it was selected from retired Bromeo air frames. Select RAN person nel, the Bromeo, and five Romeos will return to Australia in late 2014 to form part of the MH-60R schoolhouse, currently under construction at HMAS Albatross. Compliance Partnering Team has met quarterly for more than 11 years to con tinuously develop and maintain a working relationship that identifies and executes new solutions for the Navy to help improve compliance with environmental regula tions, while ensuring the protection of public health and safety. FDEP Assistant Director Jim Maher said, FDEP enthusiastically celebrates our pro gressive and innovative partnership with the U.S. Navy facilities in Northeast Florida. The NAS Jax and NS Mayport installations commitment to environmental excellence and sustainability have yielded record compliance rates and resource conservation. Their leadership provides an example for assisting our progress with the St. Johns River and throughout the region. The team includes representatives from NAS Jax, NS Mayport, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast, the FDEPs Northeast District, the St. Johns River Water Management District and the City of Jacksonville. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander said, Its a real honor to receive this award, but this one is particu larly special because we did not start this project with the intent of wining an award, he said proudly. We started the project because it was the right thing to do. It was true recognition by the FDEP of our efforts to work with different agencies. It has truly been a successful relationship between our Navy and other agencies to cut down on a number of compliance issues. He concluded, Its a win-win situation because the Navy has accomplished its mission, as well as being a good steward of the environment and a good neighbor to surrounding communities. Thank you. fund drive. Lt. Fred Pacifico, a submariner assigned to the CPRW-11 Weapons School, is serving his second year as the NMCRS fund drive coordinator. When we talk numbers for Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, our fund raising goal is at least $2 per person, per month, for each active duty Sailor and Marine in your command. He explained that last year (2013), the fund drive brought in just over $309,000 representing 130 percent of the goal. One of the reasons I wanted to come back and lead the campaign again was that the Southeast Region is so large and theres so much to learn. With hindsight, Im eager to make the fund drive bigger as well as better. Pacifico has a history of supporting NMCRS. Hes volunteered as a case worker since 1999. I believe in the pro gram and I want it to succeed. Most young enlist ed survive from paycheck to paycheck and are liv ing on their own for the first time. When they need some emergency financial help to get home for events such as a funeral, their caseworker can cut them a check to cover expenses. When they return to base, their NMCRS caseworker works with them to cre ate a budget that will pay back the interest-free loan, said Pacifico. Each command on base is assigned a POC to ensure 100 percent con tact is made during the drive. Armed with allot ment forms, these key persons will visit with as many Sailors and Marines as possible to ensure everyone has an opportunity to donate to the NMCRS. Founded in 1904, the NMCRS is a private, nonprofit, charitable orga nization. It is sponsored by the Department of the Navy and operates nearly 241 offices ashore and afloat at Navy and Marine Corps bases throughout the world. During the 109 years the NMCRS has been operating, they have helped millions of people through loans and grants. NMCRS also offers other forms of assistance such as providing layettes or junior sea bags to new family members, a visiting nurse program to help new mothers, elderly individuals and anyone who needs a little extra help, and thrift shops offering low-cost clothing and household items. The 2014 fund drive runs through mid-May. Numerous fundrais ing events such as golf tournaments, car wash es, bake sales and spe cial raffles are planned throughout the next sev eral weeks. Volunteers are always needed at the society in a variety of different functions. Whether, its answering the phone, helping clients or teach ing classes, the society welcomes volunteers. Lt. Pacifico can be reached at 542-0730 or Alfred.a.pacifico@navy. mil. For more info, see your command NMCRS fund drive POC, or contact the NAS Jax NMCRS Office at 542-3515 or www.nmcrs funddrive.org/jackson ville. AWARDSFrom Page 1 RAN 725From Page 1 NMCRSFrom Page 1 Photo by Clark Pierce Lt. Fred Pacifico, a weapons school instructor at Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11, is serving his second year as the NMCRS fund drive coordinator. "I believe in NMCRS. It's a non-profit, Sailors-helping-Sailors organization. All we're asking for is $2 per month from every Sailor and Marine in your command," he said. By Lt. Chris Reintjes, JAGC, USNNAS JAX SJA OfficeOne of the most sacred of all athletic competitions is near ly here. Yes, thats right, its time for the NCAA Basketball Tournament known as March Madness! While it provides weeks of great basketball it can also lead to the violation of federal ethics rules against gambling. The middle of March marks an escalation of sports-mania for not only basketball enthusiasts, but also gambling enthu siasts. About $12 billion will be wagered during the three weeks of the tournament. The FBI estimates that illegal March Madness tournament wagers will be more than $2.5 billion. This does not account for the estimated $1 billion in wages paid to distracted work ers who are more focused on their bracket picks than on completing a fair days work. While betting a couple of bucks is often seen as a fun, social activity, if done at work, it can run afoul of federal regulations prohibiting gambling in the federal workplace. What constitutes gam -Here comes March Madness keep it legalSee GAMBLING, Page 16 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014

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By Valisa HarrisNAVAIR Womens Advisory GroupDuring March, the Navy is celebrating Womens History Month with the theme of Celebrating Women of Character, Courage and Commitment. Women have served in the Navy since 1811, when female nurses were first included among personnel in Navy hos pitals, leading to the estab lishment of the Navy Nurse Corps in 1908. In 1917, the Navy authorized the enlist ment of women. Designated as Yeomen (F), they unof ficially became known as Yeomenettes. Today, approximately 18 percent of Sailors and officers across the Navy are women. Here at the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR), almost one in four civilian employees is a woman. Showing character, courage and commitment leads some to not only open doors for aspir ing employees, they also help empower their protgs with the tools and confidence to take advantage of opportuni ties. Leslie Taylor, director of Flight Test Engineering and one of the 10 female Senior Executive Service (SES) mem bers at NAVAIR, reflected on the importance of mentorship. Early in my career, I met someone who made important contributions to my personal development and provided me significant opportunities to advance, Taylor said. She was, in fact, in the position I most wanted. This lady was Jessalyn Jessie Swann, at that time the branch head of Air Launched Ballistics, SA84, for those who were around in the old days. Jessie was my branch head and noticed in me the attri butes that she thought would serve well for such a position. Jessie was committed to the adage of training your replacement. Much to my great for tune, she picked me as that person she would train, Taylor said. Swann taught Taylor the budget side of the business and other aspects Taylor needed to learn for a branch head posi tion. She took me under her wing and had more confidence in me than I had in myself, Taylor said. Her mentor ship and guidance started me on a leadership journey that has resulted in my becom ing the director of Flight Test Engineering. To Jessie, I am eternally grateful. Taylor serves as an execu tive champion for NAVAIRs Womens Advisory Group (WAG), a senior leadership group established in 2011 that guides, advises and supports NAVAIRs Executive Diversity Council in areas related to workforce diversity and inclu sion. Mentoring also played a key role in the career of Francine Juhlin. She cited Sara Branch, the electrical cable shop supervisor at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast in Jacksonville, as helping her advancement. She did something that I hadnt seen before, Juhlin said. Sara asked if she could help with my professional development. After our conversation, I became the unofficial work leader to acquire experi ence to put on my resume. Dont let the name fool you: WAG serves men and women equally. In addition to Taylor, the group is championed by Rear Adm. Paul Sohl, com mander, Fleet Readiness Centers and assistant com mander for Logistics and Industrial Operations, SES Jerry Short, NAVAIR comptrol ler and SES Toni Meier, director of the Logistics Management Integration Department. With national representation from all NAVAIR sites and disci plines, the WAG makes recommendations to NAVAIR senior leaders on topics such as fam ily-friendly work policies, sci ence, technology, engineering and math initiatives, and mentorship. For more information about the WAG, contact Rebecca Hampshire at 301-995-7919. Women making history at NAVAIRFrancine Juhlin, an aircraft electrical equipment worker, benefited from a relation ship with her former supervi sor and informal mentor, Sara Branch, whom she worked for in the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Cable Shop in 2013. Juhlin, a member of the Womens Advisory Group, is now leading a rapid improve ment event for the command to improve employee interview skills. Photos by Marsha ChildsSara Branch (left), an overhaul and repair supervisor at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), discusses a brake system repair with Bryce Willen on a T-44 fixed-wing monoplane whose mission is to train Navy and Marine Corps pilots. Branch informally mentors employees who are looking to enhance their job performance and progress in their career. Women of Note achieve four-star rank in any service in 2008. In December 2013, Vice Adm. Michelle Howard was nominated vice chief of naval operations. She is expected to be promoted in early 2014. Christine Fox has been named acting deputy defense secretary, the Air Force. Anti-Submarine Warfare, Assault and Special Mission Programs, NAVAIR when she was promoted in 2012. Officer SelectAT2(AW/SW) Robert Gelbart (right) inspects maintenance work by AT2 Michael Reilly in the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Communications/ Navigation Work Center. Gelbart recently was accepted into the Navy's Officer Program for FY-2015 .Photo by Kaylee LaRocque JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014 9

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By Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsFleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Commanding Officer Capt. John Kemna presented Michael Kerridge, FRCSE logistics man ager for air refueling stores and fuel containment/metrol ogy programs, with the Joint Civilian Service Achievement Award and the Joint Civilian Service Commendation Award from the Secretary of Defense Feb. 27. Kerridge earned the recog nition for exceptional merito rious achievement as director of logistics, Office of Security Cooperation-Iraq, Umm Qsar, Iraq from April 20 to Dec. 31, 2012 and from May 1 to Dec. 15, 2013. He provided logistics and base life support for more than 300 residents at the Office of Security Cooperation-Iraq by securing base access to ensure site logistics arrived unimped ed. As the contracting officer representative, Kerridge pro vided oversight for more than $46 million in contracted ser vices including resolving an issue regarding contaminated diesel fuel resulting in no losses of critical base services. As U.S. military facilities downsized and closed in Iraq, Kerridge acted as property accountability officer and pri mary hand receipt holder work ing to reconcile the property book. This included the inven tory of all contractor-managed, U.S. government-owned equip ment transitioning to the Iraqi government totaling nearly $21 million. He also coordinated with the 402nd Army Field Support Brigade and Defense Logistics Agency Disposition Services to demilitarize 2,186 equipment items; procured 360,000 gallons of diesel fuel, 11,040 gallons of gasoline for site power genera tion and 24,365 liters of drink ing water; and coordinated the transportation of cargo and military equipment to Kuwait. Kerridge, who has 35 years of federal service and has worked at FRCSE since 2007, says his two-year tour in Iraq was chal lenging but very rewarding. We worked 24/7, usually 18-hour days because there was always something to do, he said. We lived in a minimum security prison, and we werent allowed to go outside except by helicopter. So, we pretty much just worked and slept. It was a shock when I arrived there, but you had to get down and dirty in the job right away, he added. I was just put out there and told to do it. I wouldnt trade the experience for anything, because it really helped me grow as a person and gave me confidence in my abilities. Im happy to say that our [U.S. military] transition back to the Iraqi government went very smoothly, so Im pretty proud of all I accomplished. FRCSE civilian recognized for duty in IraqPhoto courtesy of Michael KerridgeIn August 2012, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Logistics Manager Michael Kerridge drives a quad runner around a military facility to check on supplies during his tour in with the Office of Security Cooperation-Iraq, Umm Qsar Iraq.Photo by Victor Pitts Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Commanding Officer Capt. John Kemna, right, presents Michael Kerridge, FRCSE logistics manager for air refueling stores/fuel contain ment and metrology programs, with a Joint Civilian Service Commendation Award Feb. 27 for exceptionally meritori ous achievement as director of logistics, Office of Security Cooperation-Iraq, Umm Qsar, Iraq from April 20 to Dec. 31, 2012. Like-new AngelFleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) artisans assemble before an F/A-18 Hornet Strike Fighter Feb. 28 flown by the U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron Blue Angels. The FRCSE team completed an engine mount support fitting repair, planned maintenance and modifications to the aircraft just in time for the squadrons first airshow in El Centro, Calif., March 15. The Blue Angels are scheduled to perform at NAS Jacksonville Oct. 25-26. Photo by Victor Pitts JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014 11

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By Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsNaval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) selects Dora Quinlan, the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) busi ness operations director, as the 2013 NAVAIR Mentor of the Year for FRCSE, a military aviation maintenance, repair and overhaul depot. NAVAIR selected a mentor from each of the eight Fleet Readiness Centers to receive the first-ever mentor of year recognition based on their professional development, organizational awareness, career planning guidance and NAVAIR mentoring program participation. NAVAIR Deputy Commander Garry Newton expressed his appreciation for Quinlans personal commitment and far-reaching contributions to FRCSEs mentoring goals in a letter of appreciation presented to her by FRCSE Commanding Officer John Kemna Feb. 25. We are fortunate to have your dedication, energy and expertise to help us mentor our talented and diverse work force, said Newton in the citation. Quinlans federal service career covers more than 36 years including leadership positions in various fields of financial management, human capital development and industrial business operations. Her mentorship of numer ous employees involved in various organizational pro grams, such as NAVAIR Leadership Development program and Journey Leadership Development pro gram, Womens Advisory Group (WAG) and the FRCSE Workforce Engagement and Inclusion Team has demon strated the value of mentoring in the workplace. As the FRCSE business oper ations director, Quinlan is responsible for developing the commands strategic plan to increase capabilities and leverage business opportunities. She also educates her prot gs about NAVAIR and FRCSEs mission and their roles in delivering high quality prod ucts and value-added readi ness to the warfighting cus tomer. Quinlan is an active partici pant in the iMentor program designed to provide the work force the opportunity for per sonal growth, professional development and the transfer of knowledge and expertise through the mentoring rela tionships. She has participated in speed mentoring events, iMentor tool testing, a WAG interviewing skills project, and has provid ed numerous job rotation and shadowing opportunities to employees seeking job experi ences outside their work cen ters. I am honored to receive this prestigious award, said Quinlan. I am thankful for the many mentors throughout my career who took the time to provide professional and personal guidance towards my career development. Mentorship continues to be a critical part of my job, and I view it as my personal responsibility to pay it forward. I am so grateful for the mentors and mentees in my life. I have witnessed how mentoring relationships improve overall quality of life and mission effectiveness. In her free time, Quinlan assists with the St. Vincent DePaul Society and partici pates in various church activi ties. She also serves on the exec utive board of the Federal Managers Association, the oldest and largest manage ment organization in the gov ernment lobbying for federal employees. By Lt. Eric FrankCPRW-11 Public AffairsCommander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing-11 was back in the community again, on March 1 when Sailors from CPRW-11 came together to support John E. Ford Elementary School for their annual Greening of the Grounds event. Each spring, our local Sailors and their families join with John E. Ford teachers, staff, students and parents to beautify their school grounds. Over 300 plants, including an assortment of flowers, shrubs and other vegetation were planted during the event. This community outreach program allowed our Sailors to interact with our community and it also gives them the opportunity to teach young children about teamwork and leadership. During the event, Sailors from Wing-11 helped main tain two courtyards consisting of 16 flower boxes, one butterfly garden and one bat cave built by our Sailors. The Wings next planned event at the school is to build a greenhouse for students and teachers to enjoy learn ing about plant growth and anatomy. John E. Ford would like to extend a special Thank you to Lowes for providing the building mate rials and plants this year. Thanks also go out to all CPRW-11 Sailors who took time to lend a helping hand in the community as well as to the commands volun teer coordinator OS1 Jeffrey Williams for his coordina tion efforts with John E. Ford. The school students and staff also extended a thank you to CPRW-11 Sailors for their support over the past year, including the Back to School Book Drive that donated over 150 books to the John E. Ford Library and the CPRW-11 Holiday Basket Drive that provided Thanksgiving dinner to six families from the school. FRCSE Mentor of the Year announcedPhoto by Marsha ChildsFleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Commanding Officer Capt. John Kemna congratulates Operations Director Dora Quinlan March 3 in front of the FRCSE marquee announcing Quinlan as the Naval Air Systems Command 2013 Mentor of the Year for FRCSE. CPRW-11 greens local elementary school grounds(From left) OS1 Jeffrey Williams (TOC Jax) and AWO1 Raymond Schwegman (MTOC-9) led the green team from CPRW-11.Photos by OS3 Aja HickmanOne of the flower boxes planted by volunteers from CPRW-11 at John E. Ford Elementary School in Jacksonville. 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live entertainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaokeFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Jan. 18, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: Jan. 25, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Navy Run Training Program At the fitness center Running group meets every Tuesday at 4 p.m. 9th Annual Captain Chuck Cornett Navy Run April 5 at 8 a.m. Register online at www.1stplacesports. com/calendar.html Lifeguard Course Begins March 14 Sign-up at the base gymI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Alhambra Dinner show $38 $50.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Jacksonville Suns available soon! Rivership Romance (includes dinner) $40$57.75 Disney On Ice $15 Funk Fest 2 Day Ticket $62 VIP $169 Motley Crew Concert Club seats $63.50 Gatornationals $32 $58 Wild Adventures $30 $70 while supplies last Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27,2014) $166 $194.50 Discover Disney Ticket Florida Resident Ticket Valid for sale through APRIL 12, 2014 Universal Orlando Military Special 3rd day free Nonresident 2014 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 THE ARTIST SERIES-BROADWAY IN JACKSONVILLE 2014 SEASON Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation $349-$369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St Augustine $4.25 $15.50 St Augustine Alligator Farm Nile Zipline $35.25 (free admission with reservation) St Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Half Hour Boggy Creek Airboat Rides $15.50 $20 Wild Florida Airboats (Kenansville, FL) $18 $46.75 Florida Ecosafaris $22.75 $52.75 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld Hotel properties, Universal Hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Paintball Trip March 15 at 9 a.m. Savannah Weekend Trip March 22 23 $40 per person Ripleys Believe It or Not Museum Trip St. Augustine March 29 at 2 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Twilight League now forming Begins March 25 Team rosters are due on March 18 Spring Breakout Championship April 4 at 10 a.m. $40 per person Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty March 25 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests March 13 & 27Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Spring Break Camp March 17 21 and March 24 28 Register now at the youth centerFlying Club Call 777-8549 Learn to fly at NAS Jax Call for introduction flight Additional ratings are available including instrument, complex and commercial Find more info. online at jaxnfc.net NAVFAC Southeast helps shape the future through MATHCOUNTSBy Earl BittnerNAVFAC Southeast Public Affairs SpecialistNaval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast mili tary members and employees celebrat ed National Engineers Week by volun teering with the Florida Engineering Society (FES) MATHCOUNTS com petition held Feb. 28 at the University of North Florida (UNF) Arena in Jacksonville, Fla. I believe our nations future is predicated upon our ability to meet science, technology, engineering and math ematics (STEM) education require ments today, said NAVFAC Southeast Executive Officer Capt. Scott Hurst. This is one way all those who partici pated from NAVFAC help shape that future. The MATHCOUNTS Competition is the only program of its kind, with live, in-person events for middle school stu dents competing in math. The event was open to Mathletes in a five-county area around Jacksonville. This year, 48 schools entered teams of up to 10 stu dents each. We [NAVFAC volunteers] welcomed the teams and chatted with them about the opportunities of an engineering education and encouraged them to continue to hone their math skills, said Katharine Martin, NAVFAC Southeast utilities technical branch supervisor and one of the 25 NAVFAC Southeast volunteers. The team of volunteers, including several Seabees, provided initial crowd control and guidance, and served as proctors and graders for the written portions of the tests. Jacksonville has one of the largest MATHCOUNTS competitions in the country and we have a great group of engineers, civilian and military alike, who volunteer their time to make the event happen, said Hurst. It is extremely important to support these middle schoolers and let them know what they are doing is important and will lead them to a successful future. Events are held in all 50 states, as well as U.S. territories and schools world wide through the U.S. Department of Defense and State Department. Competitions take place in more than 500 local chapters. The competition series is ideal for students who have a talent and passion for math and who need to be challenged. Students engage in exciting, bee-style contests in which they compete against and alongside other bright, motivated students. At the local, state and national RecruitMilitary Veteran Job Fair Jacksonville WHAT: Special hiring event for veterans and military spouses WHEN: Thursday, March 27, 11 a.m. 3 p.m. WHERE: CONTACT: Jill Krabacher at 513-677-7035 / jkrabacher@recruitmilitary.com This is a great opportunity to meet face-to-face with veteran-friendly employers including USAA, Walgreens, Prudential Financial, Military Sealift Command, Schlumberger, Home Depot and many more. There will be national, regional and local job opportunities, as well as entrepreneurial and educational offerings. This event is sponsored by DeVry University and produced by RecruitMilitary. Photos by Katharine MartinNaval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast military members and civilians celebrated National Engineers Week by volunteering with the Florida Engineering Society (FES) MATHCOUNTS competition at the University of North Florida Arena in Jacksonville. NAVFAC Southeast Executive Officer Capt. Scott Hurst (left) and NAVFAC Southeast Supervisor of Utilities Allocation and Billing Kirk Drost (right) grade students answers to competition questions. Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Public Works Department FEAD Director Lt. Cmdr. Aaron Turke watches over students as they answer questions at the Florida Engineering Society (FES) MATHCOUNTS competition on Feb. 28 at the University of North Florida Arena in Jacksonville. Students engaged in exciting, "bee-style" contests in which they competed against other bright, motivated students. See MATHCOUNTS, Page 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014 13

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NOL celebrates 55 yearsLittle League is big at NAS Jax By MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Public AffairsThe Navy Ortega Lakeshore (NOL) Little League opened its 2014 baseball/ softball season March 8 at Blue Angel Field located aboard NAS Jacksonville. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander said, Baseball and softball are part of Americas national pastime and at this level of Little League I think its great the kids all get into it. What is important about the sport is that it builds community by bringing parents, coaches and children together. They all work together to have a great experience and partici pate in something that has been around since the turn of the century. NOL President Fred Page was the master of ceremonies and opened the sea son by thanking the Navy band, military service members, civilians, coaches and volunteers that made NOL successful at NAS Jax. Page said, NOL has been at NAS Jax for 55 years, and during that time, the Navy has hosted thousands of young men and women. Its a real important part of many families lives that have grown up here. The 2014 Little League season is fielding more than 30 teams with kids rang ing from 4 to 16 years old. I played on NOL from when I was 8 years old until I was 15. It was special to me when my son became old enough to play out here. Ive coached for 10 years now. Since my son has graduated from Little League, I stepped up and took on the role of president. Undersander said, In this day and age of Xbox, its all the more important why we need to get kids doing real sports by keeping them active, staying healthy and developing strong bodies that is a big part of what NOL brings to commu nity. Keeping these kids engaged with a healthy friendly sport that develops them into young adults is important. The skipper then took to the mound and fired a strike to catcher Reedy Monahan. I spent a lot of time at baseball fields with my kids and going through games and ceremonies and I would have to say this is the best organized event Ive ever seen, said Undersander. Page urged the crowd to join him in applauding the support of Undersander and MWR Installation Program Director John Bushick. Page expressed his gratitude once again by thanking the coaches, umpires, dugout moms, concession workers, cleaning crew volunteers and the Navy. The Navy is our host and theres a ton of work that goes on by the Department of Defense and civilian employees, as well as military personnel. They main tain the fields, provide security, and clear people to get on base. Its a strenuous collaboration and we all surely feel blessed to have these fields available to us. We thank the Navy for hosting us and we appreciate them for all the work they do. By Earl BittnerNAVFAC Southeast Public Affairs SpecialistA Donation Ceremony was held Feb. 13 for the turnover of a newly constructed and outfitted disaster relief warehouse (DRW) in Freeport, Grand Bahamas. Participants included the Right Honorable Perry Christie, Prime Minister of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, and General Charles Jacoby Jr., Commander of the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) and United States Northern Command (USNORTHCOM), with attendees including NAVFAC Southeasts Tim Ryczek from NAS Jacksonville Public Works Department (PWD). Christie offered his sin cere thanks and gratitude to the United States government and noted that the donation goes a long way in helping the Bahamas emergency relief efforts and ensures that the Bahamas is better equipped to proactively address preventa tive measures for disaster mitigation. The United States and the Bahamas have a long his tory of friendship with each other.Throughout that history, our governments have part nered on many efforts together and the U.S. has always been kind to us, said Christie. I firmly believe that this ware house will be most beneficial to the people of Grand Bahama and the islands that are situ ated in the Northern Bahamas. We are happy that the ware house project has been suc cessfully completed.I sincerely promise that my government will do its best to use it to its fullest. This warehouse is an example of our shared safety and security concerns and illus trates how fundamentally important citizen safety is to our two nations, said Jacoby during his first official visit to Grand Bahama. It is a true honor for us to play a part in supporting you in a most sacred endeavor to never be late in helping your citizens when disaster strikes. The $895,489 contract was designed and constructed under a NAVFAC Southeast contract awarded Sept. 12, 2012. I was very fortunate to be involved in this ceremony and felt extremely proud to have been a part of this project, said Tim Ryczek, PWD engi neering technician for the project. Sometimes it is difficult to envision the impact of these Contingency Engineering proj ects during project develop ment and execution. It is even more diffcult to get a sense of the appreciation felt by the receipients of these humanitarian assistance projects. This event was certainly indicative of the appreciation of the Bahamian people and their government. The poten tial impact this project will have in serving the northern Bahamian people with a level of disaster preparedness is huge and will provide them a level of preparedness they have never had in their history, said Ryczek. The DRW is 4,800 square feet and is equipped with an office/ meeting space, a secure storage space of 180 square feet, rest rooms, warehouse pilot stor age, 40-pallet racks, a 20-kilo watt gas generator and auto transfer switch, plus, a 1,000 gallon rainwater storage tank. During my stay in Freeport I got a sense that the community felt a little safer knowing that the DRW was there to serve them in time of disaster, said Ryczek. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersanders opens the 2014 Navy Ortega Lakeshore Little League season on March 8 with a perfect fast ball to catcher Reedy Monahan. Photos by MC2 Amanda Cabasos The annual Shotty Drew Sportsmanship Award, voted by the league's coaches, went to Kelly Tyre and Adam Smith. New disaster relief warehouse built for Freeport, Grand BahamasPhotos by Tim RyczekGeneral Charles Jacoby Jr., Commander of the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) and United States Northern Command (USNORTHCOM) (center) delivers remarks during the Feb. 13 celebration of the new disaster relief ware house located in Hawksbill, Grand Bahamas. It was built as part of USNORTHCOM Humanitarian Assistance Program. The new disaster relief warehouse (DRW) is located in Hawksbill, Grand Bahamas. The 4,800-sq.-ft. DRW is equipped with an office/meeting space and secure storage to support the U.S. Northern Commands Humanitarian Assistance Program. From MPA Public AffairsThe Maritime Patrol Association (MPA) has launched its online registration for the 2014 MPA Symposium this week in preparation for two full days of events that will celebrate this years theme of Transition: On Station. The 2014 MPA Symposium will take place April 10-11, aboard NAS Jacksonville. Symposium attend ees can register for a host of events, including the Scholarship Golf Tournament and 5K Run, Flight Suit Social, aircraft tours, and historical community pre sentations, as well as the annual Heritage Dinner. The guest speaker for the Heritage Dinner will be Adm. William Gortney, Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command. The program will highlight the recent accomplishments of the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF) as the community transitions to the new P-8A Poseidon and MQ-4C Triton aircraft. Additionally, two new MPRF Hall of Honor mem bers will be inducted at the Heritage Dinner. Guests, dressed in flight suits from the present and years past, will recognize the distinguished accomplishments of retired Rear Adm. Paul Mulloy and retired Cmdr. David Weisbrod, both of whom were selected from a group of outstanding and honorable individuals who have served the MPRF community. The transition theme of this years symposium captures how dynamic this time is for the MPRF community, said Capt. Sean Liedman, president of MPA. Our challenge is sustain our current level of opera tional commitments around the globe, while simul taneously transitioning between platforms and home base sites. We look forward to celebrating both our storied heritage and bright future with all of our symposium attendees in April. Interested parties can receive more information about the 2014 MPA Symposium, as well as register online, by going to: www.maritimepatrolassociation. org/symposium A 501(c)(3) Florida non-profit corporation estab lished in 2011 and headquartered in Jacksonville, Fla., the Maritime Patrol Association plans on being Maritime Patrol Association opens registration for 2014 symposiumSee MPA, Page 16 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014

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Sand Volleyball League forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. Commands whose athletic rules and required paperwork. Soccer League Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. Contact the NAS Jacksonville Sports Department at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Rosters are due by the end of March. Leprechaun Dash 5k March 14 The run is free and open to all authorized points for their commands by participating. Sign up at NAS Jax Gym or the Fitness Source prior to the Feb. 7 deadline. The run is held on Perimeter Road at the end of Mustin Road, before the Antenna Farm at 11:30 a.m. Registration will also be held at the run site from 10:30-11:15 a.m. Awards will be given to the top male and top female runner for age groups: 19 & under; 20-24; 25-29; 30-34; 35-39; 40-44; 45-49; 50 & over. Kickball League meeting March 19 at noon Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. along with rules and required paperwork. Tournament March 24 The tournament is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractor women assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants will earn participation points for their command or third. Sign up by March 21. Greybeard Softball League Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractor personnel age 30 and older who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play on Tuesday & Thursday at 11:30 a.m. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Play begins at the end of March or the beginning of April. Intramural Softball League Forming Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Play begins at the end of March or the beginning of April. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians; DoD contractors; retirees; and dependents over 18. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Play begins at the end of March or the beginning of April. Tournament April 28 Open to active duty, retirees, dependents over 18, selective reservists, DoD civilians and contractors. The tournament starts at 5 p.m. at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts on the corner of Allegheny Road and Birmingham Road. Call 542-2930 to sign up by April 25. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil StandingsAs of Feb. 21Winter Golf Teams Wins Losses CNATTU Blue 3 0 NCTS 3 0 VP-45 3 0 FRCSE 2 1 Navy Band 2 1 VP-30 2 1 CV-TSC/PSD 1 2 SERCC 1 2 VP-10 1 2 CNATTU Gold 0 3 Greybeard Basketball Teams Wins Losses VP-10 5 1 VP-30 5 2 NAVHOSP 4 2 VP-26 4 4 VP-5 3 1 FRCSE 3 3 NAVFAC 3 4 NCTS 0 7 Intramural Basketball Final Standings Team Wins Losses FRCSE 600 7 2 FRCSE 700 7 2 NAVHOSP 5 3 NAS Jax 4 3 VP-45 4 3 NAVHOSP Galley 4 4 VR-58 4 4 NCTS 4 5 VP-26 3 5 VP-10 3 5 FACSFAC 1 6 TPU/PCF 1 7 Badminton Doubles Team Wins Losses NAVHOSP MSU 4 0 NAVFAC Blue 3 0 NBHC Jax 3 0 MWR Dynamic Duo 2 1 NAVFAC Red 2 1 CV-TSC Ashore 1 2 FACSFAC-2 1 2 NAVFAC Green 1 2 FACSFAC-1 1 3 NAVFAC Gold 0 3 NAVFAC Orange 0 3 4-on-4 Flag Football Team Wins Losses Vet Clinic 6 0 VP-26 5 1 VR-58 5 1 NOSC 5 1 VR-62 4 2 ASD Jax 3 3 HSM-72 2 3 FACSFAC 1 3 CRS-10 1 4 NavHosp IMC 1 5 VP-62 0 5 FRCSE 62A/690 0 6 By Yan Kennon Naval Hospital Jacksonville Public Affairs Senior WriterNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville recognizes March as Social Work Month, themed All People Matter. The National Association of Social Workers (NASW) selected this years theme to help raise awareness about the American social work profes sions 116 years of commitment to improving conditions and quality of life opportunities for everyone. The roll as a social worker can be very challenging in a hospital setting, says Angela Hill, a 24-year social work family advocacy representative and NH Jacksonvilles hospital dis charge planner. As discharge planner, it is my responsibility to procure and arrange delivery of spe cialized services such as terminal care hospice, nursing home placement or specialized medical equipment for patients in need. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, five of every 10 social workers are employed in the health care and social sectors. Social workers are also employed at schools and gov ernment offices, performing a variety of workfrom cli ent advocates and educator of new skills, to counseling and connecting clients to essential resources within the commu nity. The social work profession was established in the 19th century to provide the skills and tools for immigrants and other susceptible people to escape economic and social poverty. NH Jacksonvilles team of licensed clinical social work ers at its hospital and Branch Health Clinics Key West and Mayport makes a positive dif ference in the quality of life for patients, and the families that support them through life challenges. NH Jacksonvilles priority since its founding in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. The command is comprised of the Navys third largest hospital and five branch health clinics across Florida and Georgia. Of its patient popu lation about 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their families more than 62,000 are enrolled with a pri mary care manager at one of its facilities. To find out more, visit the command Web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax. Naval Hospital Jacksonville recognizes Social Work MonthPhoto by Jacob SippelAngela Hill, a social worker discharge planner at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvillel, discusses patient needs with a physician. NH Jacksonville, along with the National Association of Social Workers, recognizes March as Social Worker Month themed All People Matter. Medical Corps birthdayLt. Dian Daher, a Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville Family Medicine intern, and Capt. Larry Garsha, director for mental health, represent the young est and oldest NH Jacksonville Medical Corps offi cers during a cake-cutting celebration on March 7, commemorating the 143rd birthday of the Navy Medical Corps. The Medical Corps was established March 3, 1871, when the 41st Congress enacted the Appropriations Act establishing the Medical Corps as a separate entity and as a Staff Corps. Its mission is to provide medical care to U.S. Navy and Marine Corps personnel, their beneficiaries, and others entrusted to their care.Photo by Jacob Sippel Navy Jax Yacht Club (NJYC) members and guests departed Mulberry Cove Marina on March 2 to celebrate Mardi Gras and the beginning of the NJYC boating season. The NJYC meets the first Wednesday of each month at 6 p.m. at the River Cove Catering & Conference Center. membership is open to active duty and retired military, DoD employees, and their families. The club's annual WAVES Regatta is March 22 on the St. Johns River with a race start time of 1 p.m. For more NJYC info, call 778-0805.Photo courtesy NJYCRafting up on the St. Johns River JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014 bling? Gambling is defined as any game of chance where the participant risks something of value for the chance to gain or win a prize. Common sports-relat ed examples include football pools, fantasy football leagues and March Madness basketball pools. If you provide consideration (i.e. something of monetary value, no matter how small) for the opportunity to participate in a game of chance where, if it works out in your favor, you would receive something of value in return then you are gambling. Gambling includes wagers, raffles (with the exception of Navyapproved fundraising activities, such as Navy Marine Corps Relief Society raffles), lotteries, and other games of chance. Federal regulations prohibit all persons from participating in such games for money, operating gambling devices, conducting lotteries, and selling or purchasing number tickets in federal work spaces or during official duty time. Gambling with subordinates may also violate UCMJ, Article 133 (conduct unbecoming) and Article 134 (fraternization and/or gambling with subordinates). Bottom line: March Madness pools constitute gambling. While gambling on NCAA tournament pools may be fun for some, it is prohibited in the Navy workplace. For advice on all your command and organizational fundraising activities, please contact your local Staff Judge Advocate for advice at 542-2960. GAMBLINGFrom Page 8level, students win hundreds of thousands of dollars in scholarships and prizes every year. Martin believes continued support from role mod els, mentors and MATHCOUNTS competitions help increase the interest in mathematics for young scholars. I became interested in engineering societies early in my career, said Martin. I was encouraged to explore the field and I became an engineer. I hope I can help these young scholars choose a career in engineering. MATHCOUNTSFrom Page 13a premier professional organization representing the U.S. Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance commu nity by promoting the use of the patrol and recon naissance aircraft in the United States Navy. For more information, contact September Wilkerson, Executive Director, at (904) 563-4036 or info@maritimepatrolassociation.org; or check out the MPA website at www. maritimepatrolassociation.org. MPAFrom Page 14 Photo by Clark PierceGround crews position a P-8A Poseidon next to a P-3C Orion on the apron outside Hangar 511 at NAS Jacksonville. The P-3/P-8 transition will be the subject of much conversation at the 2014 MPA Symposium that will take place April 10-11, aboard the station. By Nick Simeone American Forces Press ServiceTwo countries that have long concerned the United States in terms of national security North Korea and Iran are mentioned first in the 2014 Quadrennial Defense Review, a document that a senior Defense Department official told reporters March 7 has a renewed emphasis on protect ing the homeland. The congressionally mandat ed review of national defense strategy establishes priorities for defense spending, assets and a rebalancing of the mili tary in anticipation of the security challenges the nation is likely to face in the coming years, all in light of an increasingly tight fiscal situation. In explaining the objectives to foreign journalists this week, Christine Wormuth, deputy undersecretary of defense for strategy, plans and force development, said the United States remains concerned about North Korea in particular, which she called a major challenge for the United States in the Asia-Pacific region. The regime remains very insular and closed, and has engaged in a series of provocations, Wormuth said, adding that the United States is work ing closely with South Korea to ensure stability on the Korean Peninsula. I think weve developed, together with [South Korea], a counter-provocation plan thats designed to help us coordinate and respond to potential future provocations more effectively than ever before, she said. North Korea tested a longrange missile recently in what was described as a reaction to annual U.S. and South Korean military exercises. I think we feel confident that with the force that we have going forward and the strate gy that we have, that we will be able to meet our respon sibilities with [South Korea] to address threats that we might see from North Korea, Wormuth told reporters a day after the missile test. Wormuth called the U.S. militarys rebalance to the AsiaPacific region announced two years ago an important part of the U.S. strategy and said U.S. officials are paying close attention to Chinas military mod ernization. We would like to see more transparency in terms of Chinese intentions behind the various elements of its mod ernization, she said. China this week announced plans to increase defense spending by more than 12 percent. The Quadrennial Defense Review also says the United States must stay ahead of the ballistic missile threat posed by Iran. To that end, Wormuth said, the strategy highlights the importance of investing in national missile defense in light of Irans growing capabilities, and added that the strat egy anticipates a lot of contin ued instability in the Middle East in general, especially involving ongoing Sunni-Shia tensions and the consequenc es of revolutions rooted in the Arab Spring. By Phillip MilanoJU Director of News and PublicationsJacksonville University (JU) became the first higher education institution in the U.S. on Feb. 28 to partner with the Children of Fallen Patriots Foundation in awarding scholarships to students whose veteran parents died in the line of duty. In a signing ceremony attended by military digni taries, members of the community, JU students, faculty and staff, JU and officials with the nonprofit formalized the agreement and welcomed other universities to join the program as well. Today we honor those children of the men and women who made the ultimate sacrifice for this country, JU President Tim Cost said. This ceremony represents another paver in the path as JU has fast become one of the most military friendly campuses in America. As part of the agreement, JU will provide a 40 per cent undergraduate tuition reduction per academic year for children of deceased veterans who meet JUs admissions requirements. Prospective students will be expected to demonstrate a minimum incoming grade point average (GPA) of 3.3, and each student will be expected to maintain a semester GPA of 3.0 or better. Children of Fallen Patriots Foundation Executive Director John Coogan said the foundation, created in 2002 and now based in Jacksonville Beach, has awarded more than $6.5 million in scholarships to more than 400 surviving children. The nonprofit has already identified 5,000 of the estimated 15,000 chil dren who have lost a parent in the line of duty over the last 25 years. Given rising educational costs and uncertain economic times, our partnership with Jacksonville University is an extremely important one, as their scholarships will help to reduce our cost per student while allowing us to extend our fundraising dollars across more children, Coogan said. More impor tantly, it provides our children with an unbelievable opportunity to attend a world-class university that has set the standard in its commitment to our veterans and their families. Cost listed a number of developments showing that JU, whose student veterans make up more than 10 percent of its enrollment of more than 4,000, has worked to make the campus as military friendly as possible. Among them: tion, with more than $5 million in VA benefits paid to JU student veterans in the 2012-13 academic year awarded by JU. one of only nine nationwide awarded funding $870,000 to implement a program that will offer support veterans excel as they pursue their Bachelors of Science in Nursing. Veterans Center The Defenders Den in its Founders Building March 25, creating a dedicated space for student veterans to gather, study and con nect. Kenzi Merck, Children of Fallen Patriots Foundation Program Administrator who lost her father in the line of duty in Iraq in 2005, received a standing ovation after describing how receiving one of the foundations scholarships shaped her future. Dad left behind three kids and a wife, so there was a financial burden on the family, she said. When we got the call from the Children of Fallen Patriots Foundation, it was the first time since he died that we cried tears of joy. Now I work for the foundation, and carry out my dads legacy. I thank JU for offering such an amazing opportunity to students who are going through what I went through. I am very proud to know that I made my dad proud, and I know these students will, too, when they come to Jacksonville University. For more about the Children of Fallen Patriots Foundation, visit www.fallenpatriots.org. Spring Gardening Tips March 13, 6:30 8:30 p.m., at free workshop about vegetables, fertilizer, pest control, lawn tips and more. Call 255-7450 or email Evie at epankok@coj.net to pre-register. Festival March 28 11 a.m. 3 p.m. at the Navy Federal Credit Union, across the street from the main gate of NAS Jacksonville. Meet retired Capt. JoEllen Drag Oslund, the Diocese of St. Augustine Eucharistic Congress March 28-29, at the Prime F. Osborn Convention Center, Jacksonville. Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, of the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston, is the keynote speaker and main celebrant. Jacksonville Jazz Festival May 22-25 at many locations downtown. Go to JaxJazzFest.com. Orange Park Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Post 5968 and its Auxiliary located at 187 Aurora Blvd. meets on the second Wednesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. VFW combat veterans and eligible service members from the Active, Guard or Reserve forces. Go to www.vfwpost5968. org or call 276-5968. N.E. Florida Chapter meets the third Wednesday of each month. Open to active duty and retirees of all military branches. Contact Johnnie.walsh@gmail.com or call 282-4650. meets the fourth Thursday of each month at 5 p.m. at Jacksonville Urban Cmdr. Paul Nix at 542-2518 or paul.nix@navy.mil.Association of Aviation Ordnancemen meets the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Center on Collins Road. For information, visit www.aao9. com. at NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) needs volunteers to assist military retirees and dependents. Work four hours a day, one day per week. Call 542-5790 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays to volunteer. a breast cancer support group at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, meets on the second Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. Call 542-7857 for more info. Navy Jacksonville Yacht Club is open to active duty, reserve and retired military, plus, active or retired DoD civilians. Call 778-0805 or email commodore@njyc.org COMPASS Spouse-to-Spouse Military Mentoring Program. Helping others help themselves. Visit www. gocompass.org for more info. Navy Wives Clubs of America DID No. 300 meets the Methodist Church, 2246 Blanding Blvd. Call 272-9489. Fleet Reserve Association Branch 290 monthly meeting Beach. Call 246-6855. National Active and Retired Federal Employees Westside Jacksonville Chapter 1984 meets at 1 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the Murray Hill United Methodist Church, (Fellowship Hall Building) at 4101 College Street. Call 786-7083. Retired Enlisted Association meets the fourth Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Hall at 7673 Blanding Blvd. Call 772-8622. DoD official: Quadrennial Review focus is protecting homeland JU partners with Children of Fallen Patriots Foundation scholarship program Photos by Donald dela TorreIn the most moving portion of the Feb. 28 cere mony, Kenzi Merck, the Children of Fallen Patriots Foundation Program administrator who lost her father in the line of duty in Iraq in 2005, received a standing ovation after describing how receiving one of the foundations scholarships shaped her future. Children of Fallen Patriots Foundation Executive Director John Coogan (left) and JU President Tim Cost sign the agreement making JU the first school partner in the U.S. in a program with the nonprofit to award scholarships to JU for students of deceased veterans. Community Calendar

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From Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Department of the Navy announced March 7 that women may now be assigned to previously closed positions in the Coastal Riverine Force, continuing in the Department of Defenses rescission of the 1994 Direct Ground Combat Definition and Assignment Rule. The 30-day Congressional notification requirement ended March 6, which now opens 267 Navy positions in the Coastal Riverine Force (CRF) for the assignment of women. The 267 Navy positions in the CRF small craft include both female officers and enlisted. Our continuing effort to maximize all professional opportunities for women in the Navy and Marine Corps takes another step with the opening the Coastal Riverine Force to female officers and Sailors, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. We consistently strive to ensure all Sailors and Marines, regardless of gender, have a path toward a success ful military career. This not only makes us better warfight ers, but it ensures our Navy and Marine Corps remains the fin est expeditionary fighting force in the world. With the opening of these billets to females, the only remaining community that is still closed to women is Special Warfare an issue Special Operations Command (SOCOM) and the Navy continue work on together. Thirteen women have been identified as the first can didates for the newly opened positions. Since last fall, nine enlisted women have been administratively assigned to Coastal Riverine Squadron (CRS) 2, Delta Company, 1st Platoon, located in Portsmouth, Va. The administrative assign ment was done to assist with management of the train ing cycle, in anticipation of Secretary of Defense and Congressional approval to open previously excluded billets to women. CRS-2 will be the first unit in the CRF to assign women to boats capable of the Riverine mission. The nine women in CRS-2 have completed the required training, have been screened for the billets, and all nine have been awarded their Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC). The end of the congressional notification period clears the way for these women to deploy with their squadron and potentially be assigned as crewmembers on boats. There are two other active component squadrons with the same mission: Coastal Riverine Squadron Four in Virginia Beach, Va., and Coastal Riverine Squadron Three, in San Diego. With the complex and intense training required of Coastal Riverine Sailors, and in preparation for the lifting of the women in combat exclusion, both Squadrons are imple menting plans to incorporate women into squadrons capable of the Riverine mission as soon as feasible. CRS-2 is scheduled to deploy this summer and is currently in pre-deployment training. CRS-4 recently returned from deployment and CRS-3, Delta Company, recently deployed. CRF operates in harbors, rivers, bays, across the litto rals and ashore. The primary mission of CRF is to conduct maritime security operations across all phases of military operations by defending high value assets, critical maritime infrastructure, ports and har bors both inland and on coastal waterways against enemies, and when commanded conduct offensive combat operations. By Defense Media Activity NavyThe Vice Chief of Naval Operations, Adm. Mark Ferguson, announced the next phase of Flag officer billet adjust ments March 7, projected to bring the Navy into compliance with Office of the Secretary of Defense guidance. The adjustments are in addition to the reduction of 35 Navy flag officer positions announced in August 2013. The phased reduction, elimination, or consolidation of flag officer billets is scheduled to be complete by March 2016 and will occur as the officers effect permanent change of station moves or retire. This plan will allow for 151 flag offi cers to fill Navy-specific billets and 64 Navy flag officers to fill existing requirements for joint billets. The overall Flag billet plan balances these adjustments across officer com munities, including Line, Restricted Line and Staff Corps. It also enables the Navy to provide more stability and predictability in the flag officer pro motion process while meeting statu tory requirements, Adm. Ferguson explained. Specific billets affected by this plan include: Eliminations The current billet is filled by an active duty Rear Adm. (lower half). (N2/N6I). The current billet is filled by an active duty Rear Adm. (lower half). U.S. Fleet Forces Command. The cur rent billet is filled by an active duty Rear Adm. (lower half). Shift from Active Duty to Reserves Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet will transition from an active duty Rear Adm. (upper half) to a recalled reservist of the same rank. Command for Global Logistics Support will transition from an active duty Rear Adm. (lower half) to a recalled reservist of the same rank. Increase in Seniority will increase in seniority from a Rear Adm. (lower half) to a Rear Adm. (upper half). The command will also become Information Dominance Forces Command, the Echelon II type com mander for the Information Dominance Corps. This increase in seniority allows for better management of senior officers in the Information Dominance career field. Anti-Submarine Warfare, Assault and Special Mission Programs (PEO-A) will increase in seniority from a Rear Adm. (lower half) to a Rear Adm. (upper half). This increase in seniority is commensurate with the scope of responsibility for the billet and helps balance the acquisition corps billet structure. Billet shift Defense Command, a Rear Adm. (lower half), will shift to a new command, the Navy Surface Warfare Development Command and remain at the same rank. Merger and Elimination Space and Maritime Domain Awareness (OPNAV N2/N6E), previous ly commanded by a Rear Adm. (upper half), will merge with Commander, Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command. The new billet will be filled by a U.S. Navy Rear Adm. (lower half). The billet will be located at the Stennis Space Center in Mississippi. Our goal remains to operate more efficiently and effectively while strengthening our warfighting capabilities. Shifting two billets to the Reserve Force recognizes their significant con tribution to combat operations, their operational expertise, and their inte grated service with the active duty component, Adm. Ferguson said. As warfare requirements evolve, we will continue to assess our flag officer billet structure while seeking opportunities to further integrate our Reserve and Active Duty components.VCNO announces further flag officer adjustmentsCoastal Riverine Force admits women to combat billets MCSN Heather M. PaapeChief Engineman Patricia Cooper, a student in the Riverine Combat Skills course (RCS), patrols the training grounds during a field train ing exercise in Camp Lejeune, N.C. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 13, 2014 17

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