Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
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Newspaper
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English
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United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
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Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
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30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

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Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
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Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
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Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
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UF00028307:02080


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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 2014 I I D E VP-16Singapore Air Show Page 3 NOMADS Delivering High-Priority Cargo Pages 4 & 5 NA VF AC SEUSACE Career Day Page 12Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Bush Carrier Strike Group enters 6th FleetHSM-70 embarked with CVW-8By MC3 Shaun GriffinUSS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) Public AffairsMore than 5,000 Sailors serving in the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group (GHWB CSG) arrived in the U.S. 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AOR), Feb. 24.Commanded by Rear Adm. DeWolfe Miller, GHWB CSG is comprised of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 22 and USS Truxtun (DDG 103), USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) and USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). Additionally, USS Arleigh Burke (DDG 51) arrived in the 6th Fleet AOR as an independent deployer. I am incredibly proud of the hard work and dedication these Sailors have put forth in preparation for this deployment, said Miller. This team is prepared to face any challenge that presents itself. While in the 6th Fleet AOR, CSG 2 and its accompanying units will provide a wide range of flexible capabilities in addi tion to building partnerships with allied countries through joint exercises and community relations projects. The versatility associated with George H. W. Bush and our embarked air wing allows for mission-tailored forces to be successful and represents our nations strength, capability and resolve, said Miller. GHWB CSG is deployed as part of the on-going rotation of forward-deployed forces to support maritime security operations and operate in international waters across the globe, along with other coalition maritime forces. The strike group is prepared to conduct a variety of missions, including forward naval pres ence, maritime security operations, and crisis response and theater security coop eration. More than 1,700 personnel are assigned to CVW-8, part of the George H.W. Bush Strike Group. CVW-8 includes the Golden Warriors of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 87, the Valions of VFA-15, the Fighting Black Lions of VFA-213, the Tomcatters of VFA-31, the Bear Aces of Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 124, the Garudas of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 134, the Tridents of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 9, the Rawhides of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 40, and the Spartans of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 70. The HSM-70 Spartans fly the MH-60R Seahawk helicopter. By Clark PierceEditorAnn Scott, wife of Gov. Rick Scott, vis ited two family oriented facilities Feb. 26 at NAS Jacksonville. She was wel comed aboard by NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander and his wife, Pam. Also greeting Scott were Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Rick Williamson and his wife, Robin. Undersander said, I learned that Mrs. Scott is an avid reader who spends time visiting students at schools across Florida, encouraging them to develop their reading and writing skills. I believe shell be impressed with what she sees today in our early learning programs at the NAS Jacksonville Child Development Center (CDC). Scott said that on a previous visit to the First Coast, she met NAS Jacksonville School Liaison Officer Dawn Mills, who invited her to check out installations CDC, as well as the Fleet and Family Support Center. Im just so glad to be on your base, said Scott. I was in the Jacksonville area today and its very important to me to visit our military bases whenever pos sible. We can never say thank you too much to our military personnel for their service and sacrifice to our great state and country. Its long been a tenet of Navy lead ership that family readiness is a vitally important component of mission read iness, said Williamson. We strive to provide a network of resources for our Navy families, in order to reassure our deployed Sailors that their loved ones are being supported. CDC Director Mary Grenier led the tour and explained, Our capacity is 298 children, and that includes Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten classes, infants (12 months and younger); 1-year-olds; 2-year-olds; and pre-school. Theres also a waiting list for each age group, includ ing a not-born-yet category. She noted, Our CDC also provides drop-in care for parents who need a few hours for appointments or other activi From StaffMilitary Saves Week Start Small Think Big kicked off Feb. 24 at the VP-30 auditorium aboard NAS Jax. Fifteen financial workshops were presented over four days to educate Sailors and families about an array of topics including: purchasing a vehicle, buying a home, credit management, planning for retirement, small steps to wealth, identity theft, insurance needs, paying for college, budgets and savings, deployment planning and more. On Feb. 27, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander welcomed attendees to the Family Re$ource Makeover Night at the MWR Youth Activities Center gym. The program included pre sentations from NAS Jax Legal Department, Fleet & Family Support Center (FFSC), VyStar Credit Union, TRICARE, Navy College Office, and Navy Marine Corps Relief Society. Free pizza, snacks and water were provided. Undersander was impressed with the turnout. I saw a number of dependents and ombudsmen, as well as active duty Sailors, preparing for a more secure financial future. Thats good because as we all know family financial readiness contributes directly to mission readiness. Attention Gate River Run participants NAS Jax Sailors and civilians competing in the March 15 Gate River Run/ USA 15K Championship race are requested to meet at the event EXPO Center for a group photo at 7:30 a.m. Miriam.gallet@navy.mil. From Staff Photo by Lt. Juan David GuerraThe aircraft carrier USS George H. W. Bush (CVN 77) transits the Strait of Gibraltar on Feb. 27. George H.W. Bush is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleets areas of responsibility. The HSM-70 "Spartans" helicopter squadron home based at NAS Jacksonville are embarked aboard Bush as part of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8. Floridas first lady proud of military familiesPhoto by Clark Pierce Florida's first lady Ann Scott (left) was greeted at the NAS Jax Child Developmnent Center on Feb. 26 by NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander; Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Rick Williamson; Robin Williamson and Pam Undersander. Scott told them that she loves working with children the future of Florida and was eager to tour the station's child development center. Sailors get smart about reaping financial benefitsPhoto by Shannon LeonardMike Williams, representing American Military University, speaks to AM2 Kate Hoover and AM2 Misty Graham, both of VP-45, about the benefits of continuing their education during the Military Saves Financial Fair at Dewey's on Feb. 28.See Page 9 See Page 9

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014 From StaffMarch 6 1822 USS Enterprise captures four pirate ships in Gulf of Mexico. 1862 USS Monitor departs New York City for Hampton Roads, Va. and his toric confrontation with CSS Virginia (ex-USS Merrimack). 1942 U.S. cruisers and destroyers bombard Vila and Munda, Solomon Islands, sinking two Japanese destroy ers. March 7 1958 Commissioning of USS Grayback (SSG574), the first submarine built from keel up with guided missile capability (Regulus II missile). 1960 USS Kearsarge (CVS-33) res cues four Russian soldiers from their adrift landing craft 1,000 miles from Midway Island. 1966 Department of Navy reorga nized into present structure under CNO. 1967 Brown water PBRs assists Operation Overload II in Rung Sat Zone, Vietnam. 1968 Operation Coronado XII begins in Mekong Delta, Vietnam. 1994 Sixty-three women receive orders to USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, the first combat ship to have women permanently assigned. March 8 1854 Commodore Matthew Perry opens treaty negotiations with Japan. 1862 Ironclad ram CSS Virginia destroys USS Cumberland and USS Congress. 1945 Phyllis Daley becomes first African-American ensign in Navy Nurse Corps. 1958 Battleship USS Wisconsin (BB64) is decommissioned, leaving the Navy without an active battleship for the first time since 1895. 1965 Seventh Fleet lands first major Marine units in South Vietnam at Danang. 1991 Lt. Kathy Owens became the last pilot (in a C-2 Greyhound) to land on the training carrier USS Lexington (CVT 16) that was decommissioned in November 1991. March 9 1798 Appointment of George Balfour as first U.S. Navy surgeon. 1847 Commodore David Connor leads successful amphibious assault near Vera Cruz, Mexico. 1862 First battle between ironclads, USS Monitor and CSS Virginia. 1914 Test of wind tunnel at Washington Navy Yard. March 10 1783 USS Alliance (Capt. John Barry) defeats HMS Sybil in final naval action of Revolution in West Indies waters. 1933 Pacific Fleet provides assis tance after earthquake at Long Beach, Calif. 1945 Navy and civilian nurses interned at Los Banos, Philippines flown back to CONUS. Navy nurses awarded Bronze Star. 1948 First use of jets assigned to operational squadron (VF-5A) on board aircraft carrier USS Boxer (CV 21) 1992 The Department of Defense announced its plan to withdraw from the Philippine Naval Facility at Subic Bay. March 11 1935 Birth of Naval Security Group when OP-20G became the Communications Security Group. 1941 President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs Lend-Lease Act. 1942 In a PT boat, Lt. Cmdr. John Bulkeley leaves the Philippines to take General Douglas MacArthur to Australia. 1983 The first fleet CH-53E Super Stallion delivered to the HM-12 Sea Dragons. The CH-53E transports heavier loads over longer distances than previous logistics helicopters. 1991 Saratoga and Midway battle groups depart the Persian Gulf for their homeports: Saratoga (CV 60) transited the Suez Canal en route to Mayport, Fla.; Midway (CV 41) traveled to Yokosuka, Japan. March 12 1917 American merchant ships to be armed in war zones. 1942 President Franklin D. Roosevelt designates Admiral Ernest J. King to serve as the Chief of Naval Operations, as well as the Commanderin-Chief, United States Fleet. 1956 First overseas deployment of Navy missile squadron, VA-83, on board USS Intrepid (CV 11). SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)5487789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley National Archives photosIn 1942, an NAS Jacksonville plane captain signals the pilot of start his port engine most likely an R-1830 Twin Wasp 14-cylin der radial. This workhorse of avaiation was flown by British and American forces during World War II and used extensively for troop (28 soldiers) transport, paratroop operations, glider towing and freight airlift. Notice the smaller Beechcraft Model 18 (SNB1) training aircraft in the background. In May of 1950, this pair of Grumman F8F Bearcat fighter aircraft, assigned to the "Red Rippers" Pratt & Whitney R-2800 radial engine, the Bearcat was the Navy's final piston-engined fighter air craft. This Week in Navy History By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorThe invitation read, The President and Mrs. Obama request the pleasure of the company of Ms. Smiley at a dinner. In the weeks leading up to the White House state dinner honoring French President Francois Hollande, this was probably my favorite part of the whole thing. After 37 years of being someones military depen dent, I was finally the principal invitee and my Navy commander husband would be my date. Not even the invitation with my name on it, how ever, could compare to the moment when Dustin after a day of work at the Pentagon, freshly showered, shaved and dressed in his formal mess dress uniform arrived in a car to pick me up at the hotel lobby. Thats when it hit me: we were going to the White House for a state dinner. But if the magnitude hadnt occurred to me then, it certainly would have when we arrived at the White House and went through the usual security check points, including standing before bomb-sniffing dogs, all while dressed in heels and a floor-length formal gown. Once that part was over, though, it felt like any other black-tie event where, you know, Mrs. Obamas Chief of Staff, Tina Tchen, is leading you through the East Colonnade to the famed Booksellers room of the White House. Which is to say, Id never in my life done anything like this. The first room Dustin and I explored in the White House was the library on the right. This is where we quickly huddled in a corner to pinch ourselves (We were at a state dinner what?) and talk about the movie theater we saw on the right before we were announced to the press pool (Us, announced to the press pool). In the library, we met Stephen Colbert from The Colbert Report and his wife, Evie. Colbert was just as I imagined him to be in real life: funny, yes, but also exceptionally humble, and gracious. Evie, is elegant and personable. We talked about kids, military fami lies and Dinner with the Smileys. Then we did what every other couple does in situations like this: swap phones to take pictures the whole will-you-takeour-picture thing in front of the shelves of books. Next, we went up the marble staircase and into the East Room. Beneath three enormous cut-glass chandeliers, Dustin and I gazed at famous portraits of Theodore Roosevelt and George Washington. Okay, I also gazed at Bradley Cooper standing between them. And here, in front of a portrait of Martha Custis Washington, we met Julia Louis Dreyfus. On our way to the Blue Room to meet the Obamas, we stumbled upon a man who looked very familiar to me. I stupidly asked, How do I know you? and then I learned what happens when you lose an election: people forget your name. But Rep. Paul Ryan couldnt have had a better sense of humor about my faux pas. In the receiving line, Dustin spoke French with Francois Hollande, and President Obama was gra cious as he thanked Dustin for his service. But, honestly, all politics aside, I cant say enough about the first lady. She is absolutely beautiful in real life, and she is astoundingly regular. By that I mean, she is not pretentious or overly formal. She embraced me in a warm hug, with no worries of messing up her gown, and she genuinely seemed excited to have us there. Outside, heated trollies waited to take us to a tent on the south lawn where the dinner was waiting. I was at first concerned about the tent, given the frigid temperatures. But if this elegantly lit room with florals hanging from the ceiling was a tent, then everything Ive ever camped in was merely a nylon sack. Our table was one away from the head table. Essentially, there was only the Rev. Al Sharpton between us and the Obamas. Well, Sharpton and about 400 different forks, spoons and goblets. And those were just next to my plate! Not really, but it felt that way. I had no idea which glass or silverware to use first. Dinner was elegant and 1,000-percent more impres sive than anything I served at Dinner with the Smileys. The meal was punctuated by us meeting Dr. Jill Biden and Bradley Cooper, followed by Sharpton dancing to the music of Mary J. Blige. The night ended the same way it began, with me and my man in uniform (even more handsome than Bradley Cooper) walking hand-in-hand down the sidewalk, past the security check-points, to a cab wait ing on 15th Street, and back to our regular lives. Despite knowing Dustin since we were babies, I never got to go to the prom with him. Im forever grateful he agreed to be my date for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to attend a state din ner. From the Homefront Spring forward one hourDaylight Saving Time begins Sunday, March 9. Reset your clocks and other timepieces ahead by one hour. From StaffThe Smileys attend the state dinner: Part 2

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By Lt. j.g Christi MorrisseyVP-16 Public Affairs OfficerIt wasnt the sleek fighters, menacing combat helicopters, or jumbo aircraft that created the most buzz at the recent Singapore Air Show. Instead, it was a modest aircraft parked toward the back of the ramp that caught the eyes of aviation enthu siasts and industry experts alike. In the first public static display of the aircraft in Singapore, Sailors from the VP-16 War Eagles showcased their P-8A Poseidon during the weeklong event at the Changi Exhibition Center. We came to show the Navys com mitment to regional partners and allies, and to highlight the Navys newest longrange anti-submarine warfare, antisurface warfare, intelligence, surveil lance, and reconnaissance aircraft. The air show is also a great opportunity to interact with visitors from across the region, said Cmdr. Dan Papp, execu tive officer of VP-16. Squadron members gave tours of the aircraft to military and civilian distin guished visitors, in addition to educat ing the public about the aircraft. AWO3 Delbert Smith, an electron ic warfare operator on the Poseidon, remarked on his interactions with air show visitors. It was great being able to give the public some insight into what I do as an operator and what we do as an air crew. I had the opportunity to speak with numerous school groups as well as individuals, providing them with basic facts of the aircraft. Many of them were surprised to learn that this large plane was able to hunt and track submarines, he said. Lt. Clayton Hunt, a senior pilot with the aircrew, commented on the abilities of the aircraft. I flew the P-3C Orion for a number of years, and it will always have a spe cial place in my heart, but the P-8A is a game-changer. The Poseidon can fly faster and higher, give us longer range and get us on station more rapidly. It carries a larger payload of sonobuoys, allowing us more versatility and the ability to stay longer on station, if required, he stated. In addition, our operators and main tainers are some of the finest in the U.S. Navy. We have been very happy with the performance of the aircraft thus far. Papp noted, The Asia-Pacific Theater is composed of predominantly littoral states and we are seeing an increased need for the maritime patrol mission. The P-8A is designed to fill this expand ing role, contributing daily to the stabil ity and security within the region. The P-8A is based on a Boeing 737 airframe, but it is a far cry from the pas senger jet from which it takes its shape. Possessing the capability to carry and fire Mk-54 torpedoes as well as AGM84D Harpoon missiles, the aircraft is also packed with the most modern avi onics, radar and sensor systems in the world, making the P-8A the most capa ble anti-submarine and anti-surface aircraft in the U.S. militarys arsenal today. The air show, which attracted more than 100,000 visitors on its two public show days (Feb. 15-16), was the largest aerospace and defense exhibition in the Asia-Pacific region, featuring more than 1,000 exhibitors from 47 countries and 279 delegations from 72 countries. This year, the United States was the feature country providing military aircraft for exhibit, including static displays and aerial performances by C-17 Globemaster III, P-8A Poseidon, MV-22 Osprey, C-130 Hercules, KC-135 Stratotanker, and F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft. VP-16 is in the midst of its first oper ational deployment with the P-8A Poseidon. They are currently operating from Kadena Airbase in Okinawa, Japan.War Eagles steal show in Singapore NHHC releases new logoBy MC1 Tim ComerfordNaval History and Heritage Command Communication and Outreach DivisionThe U.S. Navys Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) revealed the commands new logo Feb. 27, designed to represent its multifaceted mission. The symbolism of the logo is rich and reflective of the elements of the purpose of NHHC. The logos centerpiece is USS Constitution, the U.S. Navys oldest com missioned warship, which represents the Navys commitment to warfighting readiness from its earliest days on the worlds oceans. Furthermore the representation of Constitution embodies NHHCs dedica tion to preserving and protecting mari time history. The quill pen serves as a reminder that the practice of documenting and under standing history is an important element of the Navys course. The two compass roses which book end the commands name are traditional symbols of nautical navigation, symbol izing NHHCs ability to both interpret the Navys past and help provide direc tion to its future. The circular, infinite, rope border reflects how the Navys actions and deci sions today will be judged alongside those of the past. Together the elements of the logo capture NHHCs mission to reinforce naval historys relevance to its leader ship, the American public and Sailors, past and present, said Capt. Henry Hendrix, Ph.D. NHHCs director. We wanted a logo that better reflected that drive, and I believe that the logo does so perfectly. It shows that as the Navy moves forward in its missions, NHHC will be there offering the wisdom of Sailors past experiences to guide its course to success. NHHCs mission is to collect, preserve, protect, and make available the artifacts, documents, and art that embody our naval history and heritage for future gen erations. The new design incorporates ele ments of logos submitted to the com mand through its summer logo contest, which offered many artists, naval history enthusiasts and designers the oppor tunity to showcase their creativity and sense of style with a historic flair. The command received more than 40 logo submissions from people around the U.S. The winning design came from Nathan Quinn, a graphics specialist at the Defense Media Activity. The Naval History and Heritage Command, located at the Washington Navy Yard, is responsible for the pres ervation, analysis and dissemination of U.S. Naval history and heritage. It is composed of many activities includ ing the Navy Department Library, the Navy Archives, the Navy art and arti fact collections, underwater archaeol ogy, Navy history, nine museums, USS Constitution repair facility and the his toric ship Nautilus. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014 By AWFCS(NAC/SCW) Mike Wendelin VR-62 Public AffairsThe men and women of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VR)-62, flying the C-130T Hercules aircraft are proud of their heritage. Providing fleet logistics sup port via airfields around the globe creates a nomadic culture at VR-62 so our name is our mission, said CMDCM Freddy Pacheco. Were proud to fol low in the footsteps of Navy air transport units like VR-6 and VR-8 that participated in the Berlin Airlift. Home based at NAS Jacksonville, VR-62 is one of five Navy Reserve C-130T logistics squadrons. The Nomads are currently preparing a detach ment for CENTCOM later in this spring. VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Tony Scarpino put the Nomads mission in context when he said, VR-62 is pre pared to answer all calls in support of our Navy no matter if it is a disaster of epic propor tions, regional instability, or expeditionary surge the VR-62 Nomads deliver! The Nomads recently received word that they will become a five-aircraft squadron. Later this year the Marine Corps Reserve will transition from the C-130T to the C-130J platform. The Marines excess C-130Ts will be distributed to the five Navy C-130 squadrons in the Fleet Logistics Support Wing. We cant wait to get our new aircraft. This will give us a lit tle more flexibility to execute our mission, and we are looking forward to another record set ting year, said VR-62 Executive Officer Cmdr. Bryon Smith. In FY 2013 the Nomads logged 3,209 flight hours with the squadrons four aircraft. The Nomads flew in every geograph ic combatant command. In addition to normal detached operations at NAS Sigonella (EUCOM), NAF Atsugi (PACOM), and Bahrain (CENTCOM), the Nomads flew missions in Northern Command, Southern Command and Africa Command. This is normal operational tempo for the Nomads. In the course of flying those 3,209 hours, the Nomads com At NAS Jacksonville, VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Tony Scarpino addresses the "Nomads" after a FOD walkdown. Inside VR-62 spaces at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 1000, AD1 Bryan Wright checks the status of the tool check-out log. ATAN Jasmine Allen reviews berthing requests for the next drill weekend at NAS Jacksonville. NC1 Kenneth Swan works on Career Development Board documentation. During a PACOM mission, a Nomads C-130T lands on Kwajalein Atoll 70 years to the day after its lib eration from the Japanese by U.S. Forces. U.S. Army troops landed just below the approach to runway 6 on Feb. 4, 1944. Lt. Cmdr.Todd Nichols checks an approach plate prior to landing his C-130T Hercules logistics aircraft in PACOM. Lt. Cmdr. David Tambelini makes a navigation check, followed by a radio call while flying over the vast Pacific Ocean.VR-62 Nomads The Navys secret logistics weaponAWF2 Timothy Williams directs a K-Loader prior to unloading sonobouys at a EUCOM air facility. Under the watchful eye of AEC Brett Stroman, "Team Nomad" pushes a 5,000-pound ISU90 cargo container into place at NAF Atsugi, Japan. It's a tight yet secure fit for two diver recompression chambers being airlifted to Timor-Leste for a UCT-2 underwater construc tion project in PACOM. A VR-62 "Nomads" C-130T is packed with human cargo of a U.S. Marine Security Force enroute to Guam for PACOM training.See VR-62, Page 5

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014 5 pleted 207 missions and lifted in excess of 2.7 million pounds of cargo. In addition to Navy cargo, the VR-62 Nomads moved freight and equipment for the Army, Air Force and Marines, as well as the Royal Navy and Royal Australian armed forces. That averages out to 17 missions, 267 flight hours, 314,801 pounds of cargo lifted per month for the four-aircraft squadron. Since our squadron has no active duty counterpart, we take on the persona of an active duty squadron and fly like an active duty squadron, said VR-62 Operations Officer Lt. Cmdr. Mariusz Drozdzowski. The pace here is very up tempo. He explained, The Nomads fly two types of missions. The first is detached operations flying for the Combined Task Force for the combatant command where the Nomads are assigned. The Nomads have a normal detachment cycle to EUCOM, PACOM and CENTCOM every fiscal year. The second type of mission is called a NALO (Naval Aviation Logistics Office) mission that is tasked from NALO in New Orleans, La., which operates a data col lection and analysis system for airlift asset management and aircraft acquisition justification for Chief of Naval Operations. Missions usually originate or terminate in the Continental United States. Recently, the VR-62 Nomads assisted Underwater Construction Team Two (UCT-2) with an airlift of con struction and diving equipment, including two recom pression chambers, to Timor-Leste, a small country near Indonesia in Southeast Asia. VR-62 picked up the cargo and delivered it to the other side of the planet. The Nomads also flew UCT-2 personnel home when they completed their humanitar ian assistance mission five months later. The Nomads also delivered 46 tons of materials in support of Operation Damayan (relief efforts after typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines). The Nomads can move just about anything that will fit into the C-130T and get it to the other side of the planet in short order. The Nomad mission could not be accomplished without a superb maintenance department. In 2012, the Nomads won the Noel Davis Battle E award, the Golden Wrench and the Golden Anchor and are look ing forward to another award-winning performance this fiscal year. If youre a pilot looking for an aviation position in the Navy Reserve check out our smart phone link at:http://youtu.be/yJPwy6xKPEw. Photos by AWFCS(NAC/SCW) Mike Wendelin A VR-62 "Nomads" C-130T arrives at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, near Honolulu, Hawaii for fuel and rest. At Naval Air Facility Atsugi, Japan, AD3 Jordan Nauden prepares to mount a new propeller on a C-130T assigned to sister squadron VR-53. AME3 Michael Branscome secures a C-130T engine panel after completing conti nuity checks on engine fire bottles. AM3 Adam Hinricks practices his safety wiring technique during a lull in mainte nance activity at the VR-62 hangar. VR-62From Page 4 In the "Nomads" hangar at NAS Jacksonville, AD3 Alyssa LeMay reviews technical publications on her laptop, as ADAN Jada Wilson performs a turbine inspection. AWF1 Joshua Simmons attaches new safety wire dur ing enroute maintenance in PACOM.

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From Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsWith the semiannual Physical Fitness Assessment (PFA) upcoming, Navy Physical Readiness Program offi cials remind Sailors to verify their results in the Physical Readiness Information Management System (PRIMS). After each PFA, Sailors need to log into PRIMS and ensure their data is entered and accu rate, said Bill Moore, direc tor, Navy Physical Readiness Program. All commands are required to report their PFA data via PRIMS no later than 30 days after conducting the PFA in accordance with guidelines established in the Navys Physical Readiness Program instruction, OPNAVINST 6110.1J. Each Sailor must have a record for both PFA cycles in the year, even if the record reflects non-participation sta tus due to deployment, indi vidual augmentee, medical waiver, etc. Sailors need to verify their data within 60 days so that any corrections can be made by the Command Fitness Leader at the command level. After six months of PFA completion, record changes can only be made by PRIMS administrators at Navy Personnel Command, which requires a Letter of Correction from the individuals com manding officer, on letter head, that grants authorization to make the change. From Naval Hospital Jacksonville Public Affairs OfficeNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles award-winning Wellness Center and Health Promotions offers individ ual and group classes that center on improving your health. Classes include tobacco cessation, weight management, health, fitness and nutrition. The following classes are offered throughout the year: walk-in): Basic nutrition one-hour ment only): Body mass, exercise and basic nutrition two-day class (one individual session and one group ses sion) walk-in): Cholesterol management 90-minutes Healthy lifestyle/weight management six weeks (one hour per week) Weight management eight weeks (one hour per week) walk-in): Monday, 9 a.m.; Tuesday, 1 p.m.; Thursday, noon. For more information or to make an appointment, call 542-5292 or visit NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center located at Building 867, adjacent to the MWR fitness center. Sailors reminded to verify PRIMS dataNaval Hospital Jacksonville invites you to get fit in 2014 By Susan HensonCenter for Personal and Professional Development Public AffairsThe Center for Personal and Professional Development (CPPD) is asking Sailors to submit their Navy Tuition Assistance (TA) requests and now would be good said the director of Navy Voluntary Education (VOLED) March 3. According to Ernest DAntonio, CPPDs VOLED program director, the expenditure rate for TA funding is currently below normal levels, which means theres more funding available than usual at this time of the year. We use historical burn rates as a guide for allocating TA funding throughout the year, he said. We plan really well for routine years. After fur loughs and a government shutdown, Fiscal Year 2014 (FY-14) hasnt been a routine year, he said. Lt. Cmdr. Mark Wadsworth, direc tor of CPPD Support Site Saufley Field in Pensacola, Fla., leads the team that monitors CPPDs Navy TA spending. He said FY-14 TA execution is currently trailing FY-13s execution rate by just over $6 million year-to-date. We think a variety of things influ enced our being below the TA budget right now, said Wadsorth. Our exe cution rate dropped in October with the government shutdown and thats carried through the year. The usage rate steadily increased in November and December. But then it dropped back down in January, probably due to uncertainty with the federal bud get. Although we have funding now, the usage rate hasnt increased significantly since then. Sailors need to understand that their education benefits reset each year, and unused amounts dont carry over. DAntonio said, We want Sailors to continue to pursue their education and submit their TA requests -we work hard to allocate every TA dollar avail able to give Sailors the most opportuni ties to use their TA funding allotment for each fiscal year. He said more than 25,000 Sailors have used TA benefits so far this fiscal year and emphasized that a Sailors com mand is an important part of TA autho rizations because theyre the first step in the process after a Sailor submits a request. Its each commands responsibili ty to ensure their Sailors are aware of and meet all relevant TA policies, are comfortable with their Sailors ability to complete a requested course, and pro cess each Sailors TA request promptly, said DAntonio. A command approver can review a Sailors request and deny it if all Navy requirements arent met, if the Sailors performance isnt up to standards, or if the commands mission might not per mit the Sailor to complete the course. Ultimately, its the commanding offi cers decision, said DAntonio. DAntonio also recommended each command approver continually review the Sailors education progress. Our biggest reason for disapproval of TA requests is they arent received from the Sailors command approver prior to the course start date, as required by DOD instruction. Often when we review a TA request, a Sailor may be missing some of the TA prerequisites such as a current education counseling by a Navy College Office (NCO) or Virtual Education Center (VEC) counselor, or an individual education plan or degree plan on file, or missing a grade from a past course, he said. VOLED professionals work with Sailors to get the requirements in on time, but if the Sailors account is incomplete or not updated before the course start date, they are unable to fund the TA request, DAntonio said. So I repeat this message constantly: 30 days prior to the course start date is not too soon for Sailors to submit their TA request. In fact, a TA application can be submitted a year before the actual class start date, which will help ensure the Sailors TA request is funded and allows us to better manage expenditures. Tuition Assistance program funds waiting for SailorsSee TUITION ASSISTANCE, Page 16 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014

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From VP-10 Public AffairsVP-10 is deeply saddened by the tragic passing of one of our finest Red Lancers, AO2 Scott Everett Uebel on Feb. 7 at the age of 22. He is survived by his parents, Gary and Kelly Uebel, and his sisters Lindsey, Amanda and Kristen. Born and raised in South Bend, Ind., petty officer Uebel joined the Navy on Jan. 18, 2011 when he began Recruit Training followed by Aviation Ordnance A School. After successful completion of these rigorous schools, he joined the VP-10 Red Lancer family on June 30, 2011. The next month, Scott deployed with the squadron to Bahrain to support the Global War on Terrorism from July to December 2011. During the following 12-month training cycle, Uebel worked dili gently towards becoming one of VP-10s most qualified and dependable ordnancemen. His final deployment sent him to El Salvador, supporting Operation Martillo from December 2012 through June 2013. Possessing the finest qualities of a U.S. Navy Sailor, Uebel will always remain in the hearts of the Red Lancers. In addition to exemplifying the core values of honor, courage and commitment, his leadership, optimism, strong sense of humor, intelligence and drive all contrib uted to his remembrance as an exceptional friend, teammate and family member. The funeral service for Uebel was held Feb. 18 at the Welsheimer Family Funeral Home in South Bend, Ind., followed by his burial with Military Honors at Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens in Osceola, Ind. Petty Officer Uebel was further honored, with NAS Jacksonville Chaplain (Lt.) Andrew Hayler pre siding at a memorial service held at the All Saints Chapel aboard the station on Feb. 21. Those interested in sending con dolences to the Uebel family can send them to the address below for forwarding to the family: Patrol Squadron 10 Unit 60165 FPO AA 34099-5907 By MC2 Clay WhaleyVP-8 Public AffairsTwenty-two Sailors from VP-8s chapter of the Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) were invited to tour the Ahmed Al-Fateh Islamic Center Feb. 21. The complex is the nation al mosque for the Kingdom of Bahrain and symbolizes Bahrains religious identity. I think this was a great opportunity to take time out of our busy schedules to learn about the religious and cul tural identity of Bahrain said ATAN Nicholas Monastiero. I had a great time with my fel low Fighting Tigers CSADD members and look forward to more cultural enrichment opportunities in the future he added. The mosque offers tours for Bahrains non-Muslim resi dents and visiting military forces to promote the Kingdom of Bahrain as a modern and tolerant Muslim country. Construction of the mosque began Dec. 17, 1984 and was complete on June 2, 1988. The Grand Mosque occupies 69,965 square feet and the entire Ahmed Al-Fateh Islamic Center complex is more than 37 acres in size. The facility can accom modate in excess of 7,000 wor shipers during prayers. VP-8 is deployed to the U.S. Navys 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility conducting maritime security operations and supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. The VP-8 Fighting Tigers are home based at NAS Jacksonville. In MemoriamAO2 Scott Everett UebelJune 13, 1991 February 7, 2014AO2 Scott Everett UebelPhotos by MC2 Clay WhaleyVP-8s Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) chapter toured Bahrains Ahmed Al-Fateh Islamic Center on Feb. 21. It's the national mosque for the Kingdom of Bahrain and symbolizes Bahrains religious identity. VP-8 Sailors toured the ornate Ahmed Al-Fateh Islamic Center, and took time to sit and learn about Islamic history.VP-8 CSADD takes part in cultural exchange JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014 7

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By Yan KennonNH Jacksonville Public Affairs Senior WriterGetting the right patient-centered care at the right time is key to ensuring the best health care experience possi ble. Preventive, routine and urgent care is available to active duty, retirees and their families at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville its hospital and branch health clinics. Emergency room (ER) service is only available at its hospital. Before seeking urgent or emergency care, it is important to know the differ ence between the two and where to go receive the appropriate treatment. This can save patients time and taxpayers dollars. Urgent and Routine Patients with a minor cut, sprain, migraine, earache, rising fever, urinary tract infection or similar symptoms should make an appointment with their assigned primary care manager (PCM). Same-day appointments are put aside every day to ensure patients with urgent care needs are seen when they need to be seen. These conditions are consid ered non-emergent so the ER is not the place to get care. Emergent Patients should seek immedi ate emergency services if experienc ing symptoms such as severe bleeding, chest pain, severe eye injury, broken bone, inability to breathe, spinal cord injury or no pulse. An emergency is classified as a medi cal, maternity or psychiatric condition that would lead someone with aver age knowledge to believe that a seri ous medical condition exists; that the absence of immediate medical atten tion would result in a threat to life, limb or sight; severe painful symptoms that require immediate attention to relieve suffering; or when a person is at imme diate risk to self or others. NH Jacksonvilles ER uses the stan dard triage model where patients are seen based on the seriousness of their condition not the order of arrival. This means, if a patient with a nonemergent need visits the ER, they will wait until everyone with an emergent need is cared for. For all non-emergent care needs, patients should turn to their Medical Home Port team that places each enrolled patient in the center of a col laborative team of caregivers from doctors and nurses to case managers. Led by their primary care manager, the team focuses on each patients com prehensive health care needs pre ventive, urgent and routine. Plus, they have access to RelayHealth that pro vides 24/7 email access for non-urgent needs such as lab results, medication refills and appointments. Plus, it is easy to sign up, www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax (look for Medical Home Port information). The team approach improves access to care so patients can get appoint ments when they need them, enhanc es their care experience, meets their urgent care needs, improves health out comes by focusing on preventive care (which reduces hospitalizations and emergency room visits), and builds the relationship between patients and pro viders. And after hours, patients have access to the Nurse Advice Line: 800529-4677 on evenings, weekends and holidays to triage medical needs and direct patients to the appropriate level of care whether emergent, urgent or routine. Beginning in spring 2014, the 24/7 Nurse Advice Line will change to 800-TRICARE (874-2273). And to better server patients and offer appointment times when they need them, NH Jacksonvilles primary care teams are now open longer. Family Medicine (Green, Red, White and Yellow Teams), Internal Medicine (Blue Team) and Pediatrics (Purple Team) are now open Monday to Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. To make appointments, call the appointment line at 904-542-4677 or 800-529-4677, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Active Duty patients at Branch Health Clinic Jacksonvilles Silver Team can call 904-546-7094/7095, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. To find out more, visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax. Hospital clinics open longer hoursBy Yan KennonNaval Hospital Jacksonville Senior WriterNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles pri mary care teams are now open longer to better serve patients and offer appoint ment times when they need them. Family Medicine (Green, Red, White and Yellow Teams), Internal Medicine (Blue Team) and Pediatrics (Purple Team) are now open Monday to Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Patients with a primary care manager (PCM) at the hospital or branch health clinic are part of a Medical Home Port a collaborative team of caregivers (from doctors and nurses to case managers) led by the PCM. The team focuses on meeting all of the patients health care needs preventive, routine and urgent. To meet the PCMs on each of the com mands 14 Medical Home Port teams, visit the command website at www.med.navy. mil/sites/navalhospitaljax. Patients can reach their team by secure email, for non-urgent issues. Sign up for RelayHealth at www.relayhealth.com or on the commands website by clicking on Medical Home Port. At the hospital, patients can call the appointment line at 904-542-4677 or 800529-4677, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Active Duty patients at Branch Health Clinic Jacksonvilles Silver Team can call 904-546-7094/7095, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. After-hours nurse advice is available for patients at all sites at 904-542-4677 or 800-529-4677 on evenings, weekends and federal holidays. NH Jacksonvilles priority since its founding in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. The command is comprised of the Navys third largest hospital and five branch health clinics across Florida and Georgia. Of its patient population about 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their families more than 60,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. To find out more, visit the command Web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax.The right care, in the right place, at the right time Photos by Jacob Sippel Dental Health MonthTooth Fairy Jill Burnsed, a dental hygienist at Naval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Jacksonville, talks about the importance of oral hygiene to children at NAS Jacksonvilles Child Development Center (CDC). Dental staff from the hospital and NBHC Jacksonville visited the CDC on Feb. 25 as part of National Children's Dental Health Month to raise awareness about the importance of oral health. Lt. Darien Lazaro, a dentist at Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles Dental Clinic, teaches proper teeth brushing and flossing to children at NAS Jacksonvilles CDC. Dental staff from Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville give preschoolers Shane Baker (left) and Braxton Druding den tal hygiene kits during a visit to NAS Jacksonvilles Child Development Center. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014

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ties. In January, we provided care for 359 drop-in visits. Scott was impressed with what she saw. Mary Grenier and her team have created amazing programs at the CDC. All of my initiatives are with children, so seeing these happy kids and attentive caregivers is near and dear to my heart. Scotts assistant, Meghan Collins said, Mrs. Scott cares deeply about educa tion and has a deep commitment to kids. She believes that great readers become great learners. Also, in addi tion to her husband, she counts a num ber of family members who served in Americas armed forces so shes familiar with the military community and its challenges. The entourage then drove to the NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) where Scott met with FFSC Director Myrna Wilson and 10 ombudsmen from various commands. Wilson described the resources avail able at the center, including the Navy Ombudsman program. Wilson explained, The Navy Ombudsman Program was introduced in 1970 by CNO Adm. Elmo Zumwalt as a means to address issues and concerns unique to Navy families. Most ombuds men are the spouses of active duty members of a command. Our ombuds men are highly trained volunteers who are able to offer support and guidance to command families and to act as an official liaison between the command and its families. Ombudsmen are not meant to solve problems, but to direct the family member to the people who can help them solve their problems. Scott told the group, Having been a military wife, daughter and sister myself plus, having a brother who retired from the military after 35 years I appreciate the unique challenges that come with Navy life. Thank you for all you do to help make Navy families lives run as smoothly as possible. VISITFrom Page 1Military Saves Week wrapped up Feb. 28 at Deweys All Hands Club with the awarding of Poker Run checks to three Sailors. For the poker run, Military Saves Week participants attended at least five financial workshops where they were dealt a playing card. The best three poker hands received checks from VyStar Credit Union for $300, $100 and $100. Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Financial Educator Rufus Bundrige, who led the event team, said home buying and vehicle buying work shops were particularly popular. Our sponsors and presenters were all experts in their fields, said Bundrige. Its all about planting the seeds for a secure financial future. Kudos to everyone who took time to attend. Almost 640 Sailors, retirees and dependents took advantage of the free event sponsored by USAA, FIRST CMD, MOAA, TSP, NMAA, VYSTAR CU, NFCU, TOP PREPARATION, TRICARE, NMCRS, NAVY CAMPUS, FFSC AND MWR.Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government official ly endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. By MCC(AW/SW) Shawn Graham Center for Service Support Public AffairsThe Center for Service Support (CSS), announced Feb. 27 the development of new Personnel Qualification Standards (PQS) for the mass communication spe cialist (MC) rating. The current PQS was last updated in September 2009. A PQS is a compilation of the mini mum knowledge and skills an individu al must demonstrate in order to qualify to stand watches or perform other spe cific routine duties necessary for the safety, security or proper operation of a ship, aircraft or support system. MCCM(SW/AW) Melissa Weatherspoon, Navy Public Affairs Support Element (NPASE) West senior enlisted advisor (SEA) said the chief petty officers (CPOs) who developed the PQS were among the finest she had worked with in the Navy. We had old salts working with fairly new chiefs many of them, I had never met so I was excited to share their experiences and take in the knowledge they had gained over the years, said Weatherspoon. The younger chiefs brought a fresh perspective to the table, while the more senior folks shared years of experience and know-how in the development of qualifications for MCs in the Fleet. The whole vibe was how do guide our Sailors to be the best MCs they can be while giving our chiefs an awesome leadership and professional develop ment tool. According to Richard Rangel, Occupational Standards (OCCSTDs) and PQS model manager, the MC PQS was outdated and needed an addition of new qualifications due to the recent publication of the OCCSTDs. The MC community is very diverse, said Rangel. I think the dynamics of our group were good as well as the diversity in their professional experi ence. We hosted a very experienced group. I think the OCCSTDs should be the basis for everything we do and since the OCCSTDs were just published last year it helped a great deal in our approach to the new edits. The new PQS will reflect a more efficient and realistic PQS for the MC community. Occupational standards provide the common thread linking Navy work with Sailors. They are the building blocks for all Navy professional development and training tools, such as rate training manuals, personal qualification stan dards, course curricula and advance ment exams. Because of this, updating and maintaining OCCSTDs is critical to ensuring they accurately reflect what jobs Sailors in specific ratings are per forming throughout the fleet. According to Bill Peterson, CSS depu ty director of Operations, the MC com munity is entering a second wave of rat ing consolidation since the community formed in 2005. The updated PQS reflects our con tinuing effort to ensure new acces sions will be successful in the fleet, said Peterson. We will continue to amend PQS to help our Sailors devel op and hone skills that are relevant as operational requirements, equipment, and ratings change. The success of the PQS will not be determined by CSS, but will be determined by the fleet where Sailors work. Peterson said the electronic-only ver sions of the PQS booklets will be avail able on Navy Knowledge Online (NKO) by the end of the year. CSS and its learning sites provide Sailors with the knowledge and skills needed to support the fleets warfight ing mission. More than 300 staff and faculty work hand-in-hand with the fleet and are dedicated to ensure train ing is current and well-executed. Ten thousand Sailors graduate from CSS courses annually in the administration, logistics and media communities.CSS announce changes to Mass Communication Specialist PQS MILITARY SAVESFrom Page 1 Photo by Shannon Leonard Military Saves Week "Start Small Think Big" included the Family Re$ource Makeover Night on Feb. 27 in the youth activities center gym, where attendees were addressed by NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander. Photo by Clark Pierce In a toddler room at the NAS Jax Child Development Center, Sylvia McBride and Beth Osborne tell Ann Scott that their children love story time. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014 9

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By Morgan KehnertMorale, Welfare and Recreation DepartmentThe North Florida Hotel Lodging Associations 6th Annual ROSE Awards, Recognition of Service Excellence, were held Feb. 25 at the Renaissance Resort at the World Golf Village. The mission of the ROSE Award is to recognize front line hospi tality employees who exempli fy excellent customer service within the Northeast Florida area. The area encompasses morel than 40, 000 hospital ity employees within the coun ties of Duval, Flagler, St. Johns, Nassau, and Clay. This year, there were 160 employees nominated and 67 individuals selected as finalists in categories rang ing from Administrative Assistant to Ground and Water Transportation. NAS Jacksonvilles Navy Gateway Inns and Suites (NGIS) was the only military hotel with nominees in any of the categories. The five mem bers nominated from the NGIS staff were Joe Casiano, Merle Elbo, Falacity Gilbert, Amelita Foster and Steve Lowe. At the awards ceremony NGIS took home three wins, Merle Elbo, a 9-year laundry attendant won in her category of Guest Service: LaundrySelect Service Hotel, Falacity Gilbert, a 9-year front desk associate for Guest Service: Front DeskSelect Service Hotel and Amelita Foster, with 19 years of housekeep ing experience won for Guest Service: HousekeepingSelect Service Hotel. When asked about his staff and the awards they received this year, NGIS General Manager John Houdek, sound ed like a proud parent say ing, I was on cloud nine and so happy for my staff. To see their faces as their names were called will be a memory that will last a lifetime. The NGIS Jacksonville nominees were up against some of the best hotels in the five-county area and to have them be recognized as the best in their field for going above and beyond for the hotel guest was just an awesome feeling. 2014 Patient Guide now availableFrom Naval Hospital Jacksonville Public AffairsNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles new 2014 Patient Guide is now in-stock and available at all of its facilities its hospital and branch health clinics and at www.med.navy.mil/sites/naval hospitaljax. The guide provides patients with current information on Medical Home Port teams, urgent and emergency care, expect ing and new parent services, pharmacy and the many other services, programs and classes available at each NH Jacksonville health care facility. Get connected, like us www.facebook.com/ NavalHospitalJacksonville, follow us www.twitter.com/NHJax, watch us www.youtube.com/user/NavalHospitalJax and send an email to NHJaxConnect@med.navy.mil to sign up for email updates. Photos by Morgan KenhertThe staff representing NAS Jacksonville Navy Gateway Inns and Suites get ready to celebrate at the Renaissance Resort at the World Golf Village on Feb. 25, where the North Florida Hotel Lodging Association's Annual ROSE Awards were presented.NGIS hospitality pros bring home awardsNGIS ROSE awards winners (from left) Merle Elbo and her hus band, Celso, Amelita Foster, Falacity Gilbert and her husband, David, were all smiles as the three winners proudly displayed their awards. 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014

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By Lt. j.g. Torrey PlumVP-8 Public AffairsSailors from the VP-8 Fighting Tigers assigned to Cooperative Security Location Comalapa, El Salvador, hosted 105 students Feb. 7 and 10 from the Academia Britnica Cuscatleca (ABC) International School located in Santa Tecla. The VP-8 Sailors provided the thirdgrade students with a hands-on tour of the P-3C Orion aircraft and answered questions about serving in the U.S. Navy. The children were excited about the opportunity to explore the aircraft and maintenance spaces, said Lt. j.g. Luis Rodriguez, a VP-8 pilot. We are proud of our mission and always enjoy being able to share what we do with the local community. The ABC International School is a mixed bi-lingual and bi-cultural school. The student body is mostly Salvadorian with an increasing number of interna tional students attending the school. The Fighting Tigers are currently deployed to the 4th and 5th fleet areas of responsibility, assisting in counterdrug efforts and providing humanitar ian assistance. VP-8 is home based at NAS Jacksonville. By Lt. j.g. Torrey PlumVP8 Public AffairsSailors from Patrol Squadron (VP)-8 teamed up with Habitat for Humanity Feb. 22, to assist a local family in constructing a new home in Tapalhuaca, El Salvador. The 18 Sailors from VP-8, also known as the Fighting Tigers, mixed concrete, dug post holes, and built cinder block exterior walls. It was a great opportunity to serve a local family in a very tangible way, said Lt. j.g. Paxie Cordova, a pilot with VP-8. The familys gratitude and excitement at how much prog ress we made in one day made this experience truly reward ing. Habitat for Humanity International is a global Christian nongovernmental housing organization that brings together people of all races, nationalities and religions to build homes, communities and hope. We were really excited to get our hands dirty and do some thing good for the community said AO3 Christopher Lewis. I think our enthusiasm and team work made the day a great suc cess and I look forward to serv ing the local community in a similar capacity soon. Since 1976, Habitat has served more than 500,000 families by building and improving homes; by advocating for fair and just housing policies; and by pro viding training and access to resources to help families improve their shelter conditions. Habitat for Humanity El Salvador relies mostly on dona tions and volunteers to provide housing to families, many of whom have been displaced by natural disasters. Since they began aiding Latin America in 1979, Habitat for Humanity has helped provide more than 100,000 families with adequate housing. The Fighting Tigers, home based at NAS Jacksonville, are currently deployed to the 4th and 5th Fleets areas of respon sibility, assisting in the Counter Transnational Organized Crime mission and providing humani tarian assistance. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet supports U.S. Southern Commands joint and combined military operations by employ ing maritime forces in coopera tive maritime security opera tions. VP-8 Sailors work with Habitat for Humanity in El SalvadorPhoto courtsey of VP-8 Public Affairs"Fighting Tigers" construction volunteers take a short break at the local Habitat for Humanity job site.Educating young scholars about naval aviationPhoto by Lt. j.g. Torrey PlumVP-8 Sailors from Cooperative Security Location Comalapa, El Salvador educated students from the ABC International School about their P-3C patrol aircraft and its mission. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014 11

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By Earl BittnerNAVFAC Southeast Public AffairsNaval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast civil ians, contractors and military person nel participated in the Jacksonville District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) 2014 Engineering Career Day Feb. 21 in Jacksonville, Fla. More than 150 high school students, parents and teachers from 13 schools in northeast Florida attended the event and project competition. The daylong event was the largest yet for the Jacksonville District Corps of Engineers which has been co-spon soring this event with the Society of American Engineers (SAME) for the past 12 years. Its one of the major events of Northeast Florida Engineers Week held in February. Its great to see so many kids engaged and interested in engineering. It was a thrill for me to be able to be a part of todays activities, said NAVFAC Southeast Commanding Officer and SAME Jacksonville Post President, Capt. Christopher Kiwus. The competition promotes Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) a national edu cation program focused on preparing the workforce of tomorrow. The goal is that competition will inspire the schol ars efforts and energies toward careers in STEM fields in the future. The Engineering Career Day event challenged four-person student teams to compete in building and entering a take-home project, completing a sur prise project assigned the day of the event, and completing a trivia chal lenge. The judges consisted of leaders from NAVFAC Southeast, the USACE, CEOs of local architectural and engi neering firms, and professors and department heads from the University of Florida and University of North Florida, said NAVFAC Southeast Capital Improvements Business Line Coordinator and Chief Engineer Jack McCarthy, one of eight judges for the competition. Four-person teams made up of stu dents from local high schools interest ed in engineering competed in several elements, said McCarthy. The takehome project encouraged the students to explore the age-old art of artillery. The teams applied imagination and sound engineering to develop a launch er capable of propelling a standard, reg ulation ping pong ball at a target. Each team had 10 minutes to launch as many ping pong balls as they could at a target consisting of three different sized holes. Points were awarded for the number of balls that went through the holes. Aesthetics of the equipment was also a factor in determining the winner. The only constraint was that no explosive charges could be utilized or anything that would produce noxious gases. Other than that, the sky was the limit. These kids really used their imagi nation creating their artillery launch ers, claimed McCarthy. There was a surprise project that required the teams to build a bridge using an 8.5 by 11 inch piece of paper. The constructed bridge was required to span approximately 7.75 inches and the winner was chosen by noting which bridge was able to withstand supporting the greatest number of pennies before collapsing. It was amazing to see the creativity in this simple, yet challenging task. It was hard to believe the winning team loaded 255 pennies on their bridge before it collapsed, said McCarthy. Overall, it was a great day for engi neering and to witness the talented youth of our local high schools, said McCarthy. The following schools entered teams in the competition: Atlantic Coast High School, Bishop Kenny High School, Baldwin Middle Senior High School, Christs Church Academy, Eagles View Academy, Englewood High School, Fernandina Beach High School, Fletcher High School, Frank H. Peterson Academies, Providence School, Providence Extension Program, Robert E. Lee High School and Yulee High School. Eagle View Academy, Team A, was the overall winner of the competition. Eagle View Academy entered two teams this year. Both placed well in the competi tion resulting in Eagle View Academy taking home the James L. Garland Award for Engineering Excellence to display in their school all year. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) manages the planning, design, construction, con tingency engineering, real estate, envi ronmental, and public works support for U.S. Navy shore facilities around the world. We provide the Navys forc es with the operating, expeditionary, support and training bases they need. NAVFAC is a global organization with an annual volume of business in excess of $18 billion. NAVFAC Southeast Participates in USACE Engineering Career DayPhotos by Earl Bittner(From rightt) Naval Station (NS) Mayport Public Works Department (PWD) General Engineer Lt. Shawn Talley, NS Mayport PWD Construction Manager Lt. Oliver Wise and NAVFAC Southeast GIS Contractor Adam Kerr manned the NAFVAC Southeast exhib it booth, helping students with trivia challenge questions and discussing U.S. Navy engineering careers with students participating at the Jacksonville District U.S. Army Corp of Engineers 2014 Engineering Career Day held on Feb. 21.Naval Station Mayport Public Works Department General Engineer Lt. Shawn Talley (second from right) dis cussed the operation of a U.S. Navy Gatewing X100 Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) used for GIS mapping. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Capital Improvements Business Line Coordinator and Chief Engineer Jack McCarthy (top center) judges one of the student entrries artillery piec es during the Jacksonville District U.S. Army Corp of Engineers 2014 Engineering Career Day. The compe tition promotes Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics or STEM -a national education program focused on preparing the workforce of tomorrow by encouraging students today to study STEM.Photo by Ty EricksonThe winning team, Eagle View Academy, Team A, was awarded the James L. Garland Award for Engineering Excellence. (From left) Col. Alan Dodd, Jacksonville District Corps of Engineers District Commander; students Tucker Davis, Ryan Criswell, Ryan Stevens and Eric Rodich; Capt. Christopher Kiwus, president, SAME Jacksonville Post and NAVFAC Southeast commanding officer. FRCSE celebrates new CWO2Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Detachment Mayport Officer in Charge Cmdr. Michael Barriere (left) presents ASC(AW/SW) Michael Hopper of FRCSE Detachment Mayport support equipment division with the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal during his commissioning ceremony Feb. 28. Newly commissioned Chief Warrant Officer 2 Michael Hopper (right) of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Detachment Mayport renders his first salute as an officer to AS2(AW/SW) Walter Mims during his commissioning ceremony. Photos by Victor Pitts 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live enter tainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaokeFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Jan. 18, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: Jan. 25, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Navy Run Training Program At the fitness center Running group meets every Tuesday at 4 p.m. Biggest Loser Challenge 8 week program, teams of 2 Begins March 10 9th Annual Captain Chuck Cornett Navy Run April 5 at 8 a.m. Register online at www.1stplacesports. com/calendar.html Lifeguard Course Begins March 14 Sign-up at the base gymI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Alhambra Dinner show $38 $50.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Jacksonville Suns available soon! Rivership Romance (includes dinner) $40$57.75 Disney On Ice $15 Funk Fest 2 Day Ticket $62 VIP $169 Motley Crew Concert Club seats $63.50 Gatornationals $32 $58 Wild Adventures $30 $70 while sup plies last Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27,2014) $166 $194.50 Discover Disney Ticket Florida Resident Ticket Valid for sale through APRIL 12, 2014 Universal Orlando Military Special 3rd day free Nonresident 2014 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 THE ARTIST SERIES-BROADWAY IN JACKSONVILLE 2014 SEASON Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation $349-$369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St Augustine $4.25 $15.50 St Augustine Alligator Farm Nile Zipline $35.25 (free admission with reservation) St Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Half Hour Boggy Creek Airboat Rides $15.50 $20 Wild Florida Airboats (Kenansville, FL) $18 $46.75 Florida Ecosafaris $22.75 $52.75 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld Hotel properties, Universal Hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Neon Vibe Volunteer Trip March 8 Paintball Trip March 15 at 9 a.m. Savannah Weekend Trip March 22 23 $40 per personNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Twilight League now forming Begins March 25 Team rosters are due on March 18 Spring Breakout Championship April 4 at 10 a.m. $40 per person Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty March 11 & 25 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests March 13 & 27Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Spring Break Camp March 17 21 and March 24 28 Register now at the youth centerFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Learn to fly at NAS Jax Call for introduction flight Additional ratings are available includ ing instrument, complex and commer cial Find more info. online at jaxnfc.net From Navy League Mayport The Navy League of Mayport is celebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration dinner and pro gram. This is an All Services event featuring a joint color guard, All Services Missing Person table, the Navy Band with all the service songs, and numerous historical displays. Tickets are now on sale for this years event which will be held June 7, at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine.The keynote speaker is Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert. Veterans who served at the Battle of Midway and veterans of all branches who served in prior conflicts, as well as those current ly serving are invited to attend. Additionally, Medal of Honor recipients and former Prisoners of War who have heroically answered the call of duty will also be in attendance. Come meet these National Treasures and hear their adventures first hand. The evening promises to be emotional and patriotic, and pro vide an excellent opportunity to connect with survivors of what historians call one of the U. S. Navys greatest sea victories and the turning point of World War II in the Pacific. Ticket prices for active duty and spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50, O6 and above $65. Prices for Civilians and Retirees $65. The evening includes fine din ing and a memorable program. Uniform will be O4 and above dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below dinner dress white/dinner dress white jacket optional, and civilian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 5 p.m., with dinner served at 6 p.m. Tickets are mandatory and seating is reserved. Ticket sales end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before this date. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER. Tickets may be purchased from the following locations: NAVY LEAGUE MAYPORT Bob Price, 904-246-9982 or 904718-2118 E-mail: bpricex4@comcast.net NAVY LEAGUE ST AUGUSTINE Bill Dudley, 904-806-4712 or 904-794-7814 E-mail: anuday00@aol.com From Region Legal Service OfficeThe VITA Self Service will be available to active duty service members, retirees and dependents, Reservists (active 30 days or predemobili zation) and entitled for mer spouses from Feb. 4 through April 15. The service is for those whose adjust ed gross income doesnt exceed $57,000. Those who qualify under the Military One Source will be able file their taxes for free using the H&R Block software. Volunteer assistance will be onsite; however vol unteers are not permitted to prepare taxes. Those needing additional assistance outside the scope of the volunteers may be redirected to a nearby tax center. The tax center is located at NAS Jacksonville, Building 4, Room 108 (Ranger Street). The cen ter is open Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Tuesday and Thursday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. For ques tions or con cerns, please contact LN1 Clinton Washington at 542-5974 or email Clinton. washing ton@navy.mil. CNO is Battle of Midway keynote speaker June 7 Tax services available JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014 13

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By Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsThe Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Speed Mentoring program allows artisans from various work centers to interact with man agement and experienced personnel to discuss job path options and gain insight about the numerous career fields available. Speed mentoring is a fairly new concept adopted by the FRCSE Workforce Engagement and Inclusion Team, where a protg is paired with a mentor for several minutes to discuss topics, such as job conversion before moving to the next per son. We shift our sessions throughout the year to differ ent work centers targeting the artisans, explained FRCSE Training Specialist Mike Walter, who coordinates the program. Our mentors come from a broad variety of skill sets, such as engineering, advanced maintenance or logistics. We try to get that diversity which is extremely beneficial for our protgs, because they may not want to stay in their job path. They may be working on their degree in a different field and are looking for information about a new job. So we can pair them up with a certain men tor. According to Walter, the con cept was inspired by speed dating, where singles meet other singles for 5to 7-minute conversations before moving on to meet others. If you are looking for a pos sible career change or to learn about different skill sets, this is for you, stressed Walter. It does not however, guarantee a promotion. Mentors and protgs are always needed. We are look ing for mentors who have worked on the floor and are now in management positions to give guidance to others on the steps they took to get where they are now, he said. We are also looking for those who may be looking for a To date, about 100 artisans have signed up for the pro gram, which based on the feed back has been highly success ful. For former aircraft mechan ic, Eddie Esquivias, the speed mentoring session he attend ed inspired him to completely change his career aspirations. I think the program was very well presented and well thought out; the intentions were good and the results were even better, said Esquivias. It gave me motivation to seek another path and inspired me to enroll in college. I also applied for a new job in the training department and really enjoy my job. I probably wouldnt have done all this if I hadnt gone through the men toring session. Speed mentoring will rotate around FRCSE throughout the year the following dates: March 26, P-3 line; April 30, EA-6B/H-60/T-34 and Hangar 140 lines; May 28, 6F&G Logistics and Engineers; June 25, Plant Services; July 30, FRCSE Mayport Detachment; Aug. 27, Avionics; Sept. 24, Manufacturing and Oct. 29, Level II. For more information, con tact Walter at 790-5682. Speed mentoring promotes knowledge sharing at FRCSEPhotos courtesy of Manny EdlerDale Adams (left), an aircraft engine repairer at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) discusses career options with Ernestine Lawson, a chemist at the FRCSE Materials Engineering Laboratory, during a speed mentoring session at Cecil Commerce Center on Feb. 27. At Cecil Commerce Center, mentors from Fleet Readiness Center Southeast discuss career goals with protgs during a speed mentoring session. A mentor is paired with a protg for several minutes to offer advice, resources and strategies for achieving career aspirations before the protg moves to the next mentor. Introduction to Mentoring and Advanced Mentoring courses are being offered March 12 and March 13 respectively. The Introduction to Mentoring course provides new and experienced mentors with tools needed for successful mentoring. Advanced Mentoring courses offer techniques and methods to enhance mentoring skills. You must complete the Introduction to Mentoring course prior to taking the Advanced Mentoring course. For more information, have your training coordinator contact Rachel Conditt at 790-5685 or e-mail rachel.conditt.ctr@navy.mil. Lt. Cmdr. Michelle Perkins, a physician in the NH Jacksonville Pediatrics Clinic, believes that "patient safety starts with good communication."Patient Safety Awareness WeekPhotos by Jacob SippelSuzanne Newman, a refractive surgery technician in the NH Jacksonville Ophthalmology Clinic says, "Many of our patients have debilitating eye diseases that keep them from seeing things as simple as the waiting room chairs. Maneuvering can be very diffi cult for patients who are visually impaired, elderly or who need a cane or a walker to assist their mobility. It is our goal to make sure our patients are safe and protected from any accidents that may occur." Dr. Michael Maher, a family medi cine physician says, "Patient safety is an ongoing process that must con tinue to improve. Our hospital has established a culture of safety that I feel is one of a kind. I want Naval Hospital Jacksonville to be a place where I can bring my family and feel at ease about doing it." HM Edson Gonzalez works in the NH Jacksonville Cardiology Clinic. "As a corpsman working in an outpatient setting, I support patient safety by keeping the exam rooms and equip ment clean. I also prac tice good hand-washing technique to prevent the likelihood of spread ing bacteria that could cause harmful diseases. I also perform medication reconciliation on every patient to avoid the pos sibility of medical errors. I take pride in my job and do my best to ensure patient safety every day." Lt. Cmdr. Jimmy Trujillo, a nurse in the NH Jacksonville Orthopedics Clinic, says, "This week is a great time to re-engage with patients, fami lies and the healthcare community to advance patient safety and health care workforce safety to prevent harm to every one involved. Cmdr. Karen Follin, a clinical nurse specialist at the NH Jacksonville Emergency Department says, "Patients depend on us to provide safe and time ly care during their time of crisis. We understand that no one wants to visit us, but we want them to know we are here when they need us. We do this by actively listening to patient concerns and use a team approach for treatment. We pride ourselves on sustaining this performance each time a patient is in need because we value them and truly believe they are the reason we are here." 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014

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By Terri Moon CronkAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Departments new health care organization has exceeded its goals since standing up five months ago, top health care officials told the House Armed Services Committees personnel subcommittee Feb. 26. Dr. Jonathan Woodson, assistant sec retary for defense for health affairs, and Air Force Lt. Gen. (Dr.) Douglas Robb, director of the new Defense Health Agency, appeared before subcommit tee members to update them on DHAs progression. Both officials said the agency is ahead of expectations and goals. DHA was established after defense leaders organized a task force three years ago to look at how to make mili tary medicine more efficient, more effective and more affordable. The agency is an important reform in the Military Health System [and] a needed reform in this era of signifi cant challenges for [DoD] in American health care at large, Woodson said. Our national security and defense strategies must be supported by a strong, relevant, agile and forwardleaning Military Health System, he said. Good evidence exists that joint inte grated care improves results in com bat, Woodson said. If a service member is wounded in combat, a Navy corps man will often be the first to treat the patient, who is then transported while receiving critical care to a military medical center staffed by all three ser vices, where definitive, advanced care will be given by a multiservice health care team, he explained. The synchronized system tran scends service and command distinc tion [and] has resulted in the highest survival rates and the lowest case fatal ity rates in recorded warfare, Woodson said. [Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel] has outlined his priorities for managing the significant change needed in the com ing years, Woodson said. These include introducing institu tional reforms, re-evaluating military force planning construct, preparing for prolonged readiness challenges, protecting investments in emerging military capability, balancing forc es between active and reserves and reforming personnel and compensation policies. Woodson said he has six lines of effort to support Hagels priorities: System management with an enterprise focus; capabilities needed in the 21st century; partnerships; medical core structure; program, and Systems global health engagement requirement. Those efforts will help DoD meet its overwhelming aims of readiness, improve the health of people it serves, improve the experience of care in the military and responsibly manage costs, Woodson said. By modernizing management struc ture, DHA represents a major DoD milestone and is a starting point for comprehensive enterprise-wide reform, he said. There is dramatic change occurring in American health care that will affect how we do business, Woodson said, and require us to refresh our thinking of health, health care, and health care delivery systems. Rising costs, technology sub-spe cialization, information management access and workforce issues challenge the American health care system, he said. Health systems across the country including ours are focused on ways to reduce variation in care, improve patient safety and more effectively use health information technology to improve clinical decision-making and outcomes, Woodson said. Within the military, there are additional imperatives for designing an integrated health system which includes more joint phasing, joint oper ations and maintaining readiness. DoD Health Affairs, the Military Health System and DHA are partnered in such a process, he said. We have created agile governance for policy and enterprise-wide opera tional decision-making, Woodson said. We are holding ourselves account able using a disciplined process for identifying opportunities in using com ments [and] enterprise-wide perfor mance measures to see and check what we are doing. DHA uses the Government Accountability Offices approach to conduct business case analyses and business process re-engineering efforts, Woodson said. DHA director Robb said his agency stands as a supporting organization, ensuring that the combatant com manders and the service medical departments have the resource sup port to meet their missions. We have made significant progress in the first 150 days of this reform effort. And we are in-track with most of our major milestones, he said. The discipline and rigor necessary to do business also has given DHA insight into its most-challenging issues and in some cases has allowed it to rapidly introduce new processes, Robb told legislators. We have accelerated timelines for implementation and achieved savings, reduce variation and streamlined pro cesses earlier than initially projected, he said. One role of DHA is managing numer ous shared services that com bine activities like medical informa tion technology, medical logistics and Force. For example, Robb said, identifying and changing buying behaviors in med ical logistics is putting DoDs health care on a path to cover our investment costs and save over $10 million when we previously projected no savings for this year. Another $25 million in savings this fiscal year has been identified by con solidating service medical chief infor mation officers into DHA, he added. The most significant cost sav ings potential for the department still remains in the purchase health care sector, Robb said. Our efforts to improve the execution on the long-term systemic challenges, and how we better integrate our direct care and private-care health services delivery and contract for health care support. As the existing generation of is looking at reshaping contracts to take advantage of strategic sourcing, improving integration with military medical facilities, reducing unneces sary overhead, and achieving more sim plicity and flexibility for its patients and the government, the DHA director said. [Were] proud of the work we have accomplished, Robb said. But [were] even more eager to iden tify ways we can integrate our system on behalf of the incredible people that we are privileged to serve.Sand Volleyball League meeting March 12 at noonOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. Soccer League FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. Leprechaun Dash 5k March 14 over.Kickball League meeting March 19 at noonOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractor women assigned to a command Greybeard Softball League FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractor personnel NAS Jacksonville. Games play on Tuesday Intramural Softball League FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, Open to active duty, retirees, dependents over 18, selective reservists, DoD civilians For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil StandingsAs of Feb. 21 Greybeard Basketball 4-on-4 Flag Football ASD Jax 2 3 4-on-4 Flag Football ASD Jax 2 3 Intramural Basketball NAS Jax 3 3 Badminton Doubles New Defense Health Agency exceeds goals, officials say JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014 TUITION ASSISTANCEFrom Page 6DAntonio also stressed that Sailors should work closely with an NCO or VEC counselor to help them reach their educa tional goals. The VOLED team is here to help, bottom line. Our job is to work with Sailors, inform them about options, provide impartial counseling and point out avenues for Sailors to pursue their life-long educational and credentialing goals. According to CPPD Commanding Officer Capt. John Newcomer, Navy leaders are commit ted to providing Sailors with voluntary education opportunities. We know that edu cated Sailors are strong performers with welldeveloped critical think ing skills and the ability to make informed deci sions, said Newcomer. A college degree is an investment in a Sailor and a contributing factor in Navy mission accom plishment. By Cheryl Pellerin American Forces Press ServiceIn spotless aircraft hangars at two different military bases in southeastern Virginia Feb. 26, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel stood before several hundred airmen and soldiers, highlighting priorities in the Defense Departments fiscal year 2015 budget request and taking questions. The budget request which Hagel and Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, previewed Feb. 24 at the Pentagon is the first in 13 years that doesnt reflect a defense enterprise engaged in a foreign war, and in some of those years, two wars. With the defense budget poised to shrink by more than $75 billion over the next two years, the funding request recommends cuts in military spending in the coming year that include further reductions in troop strength and force structure in every military ser vice. And the outcome will be even more severe in fiscal 2016 if the severe budget cuts required by the Budget Control Act of 2011, known as seques tration, go forward with no congressional intervention on the departments behalf. Questions from the airmen at Langley Air Force Base and soldiers at Fort Eustis ranged from the plight of veterans, the future of the military retire ment system and the lifespan of the current force reduction to problems that could arise from a pre-World-War-II-sized Army, and how DOD will be able to keep quality soldiers in such an austere fiscal environ ment. As he addressed the service members, Hagel sought to reas sure them. This can be done if its done responsibly if its done the right way. Well make the case to Congress, he said, noting that Congress must be a part ner in managing the fiscal threats against the department. But it will impose more risks to our country [and] our force structure if were not given some longer-term relief from sequestration. This is about as direct and honest as I can be, and what Im telling you is what Im going to tell the Congress, the secretary continued. I owe that to you, . to tell you this face to face, so you know what Im thinking [and] you know what our leaders are thinking. At both bases, Hagel began by thanking the airmen, the soldiers and their families on behalf of President Barack Obama for their service and sacrifice. The secretary said he was on his way to a NATO defense ministers meeting in Brussels and stopped at the bases to get a sense from the service members what was on their minds. I try to do this as often as I can get outside Washington and listen to our men and women and try to understand better whats on your mind, what your concerns are, Hagel said. You help all our leaders with what you tell us, and I know your commanders here from the general on down feel the same way. Hagel especially wanted to talk about the depart ments piece of the presi dents fiscal year 2015 budget request, about which he said that he, Dempsey and DOD Comptroller Robert Hale would testify before the Senate and House armed services commit tees next week. The secretary said he want ed to explain what the depart ments senior leaders were focused on when they put the budget request together. You know the realities of sequestration, you know the realities of the fiscal restraints youre all dealing with [that] were all dealing with. And I suspect theyre not going to get much better over the next few years, Hagel said. So weve had to prepare our institution, weve had to plan strategically to protect our country as you do every day, and assure the president, assure the Congress, assure the American people, assure your families that they can count on us, that they can count on you, as they do every day, he added. Hagels top-line points, he said, were people, readiness, capability and capacity. In preparing the budget request, working on it togeth er month after month, he said, we focused on the bal ance of the force . and fac tored in all of whats required to defend this country at a time in the world thats complicat ed, uncertain and dangerous, and [likely] to stay that way for awhile. Despite such uncertainty, he said, some things are known. This budget that I will pres ent next week to the Congress is the first budget thats not a war-footing budget. . This budget will represent a differ ent environment, a different era, a different time, Hagel said. Thats not a small point, he added, because if were not budgeting and prioritizing for wars, . that means our pri orities have to be realigned and reset as to where were going to use our resources and where were going to deploy . and position our assets to protect our interests, whether its a shift in our presidents pos ture in the Asia-Pacific or the Middle East or North Africa. The world is dangerous everywhere, said Hagel, adding that he and the defense leader ship tried to frame the budgets strategic focus on that basis. Hagel told the service mem bers he wanted to address the budgets pay, compensa tion and retirement issues, because they are on the minds of service members and their families. He began with retire ment, saying department leaders decided not to recom mend changes on retirement until a retirement commis sion empaneled by Congress reports back to Congress and the Defense Department. We understand the impor tance of retirement plans, the secretary said, but Ive also agreed that any changes, if there are [change] recommen dations, would not apply in retirement to those now serv ing. On the issue of pay, he said, the department will continue to recommend pay increases. There will be a slight decrease in those increases, but its a cost of growth in a growth-of-increase recommen dation, he said, so make sure you understand that. On compensation and ben efits, Hagel said, the Defense Department would not close commissaries. What we are doing is rec ommending that the subsidies on commissaries gradually be phased out, like in our post exchanges. That means youll still get significant savings as that process goes forward. Nothing happens tomorrow, nothing happens next year this is a gradual process, the secretary explained. From this recommenda tion, he said, the department will exclude all overseas com missaries and those that are in remote areas where there are no other discount-store options to save money on groceries. Moving to the TRICARE health care plan, Hagel said the department is recommending consolidating its three systems into one system that will be more effective and efficient. This [will happen over a period of time and wont affect anything on base in health care, he said. Nor would it limit preferred provider options or change health care quality, he added. On health care co-pay increases, Hagel said, the bud get request contains no recom mended changes for activeduty service members. Family members and working-age retirees already have co-pay amounts, depending on their geographic locations and med ical services, he noted. For working-age retirees, we recommend a gradual increase for out-of-pocket expenses from around 8 percent today to no more than 11 percent a gradual increase . that we think is fair, the secretary added. Housing allowance subsidies for service members today are 100 percent, he said, and the department recommends over a five-year period to phase in an increase to 5 percent for outof-pocket expenses, with a 95 percent subsidy. Those are the recommenda tions weve made, Hagel said. We did this in coordination with all our senior enlisted leaders in each service, all the chiefs, all the secretaries. This was not a unilateral, arbitrary decision. It was a decision we made after a long deliberation. The secretary said he and the president would never submit a budget request to Congress and the American people that they didnt think could protect the countrys security. Were dangerously close to cutting into that now, he said, adding that Obama will request from Congress an extra $26 billion to shore up DOD readiness bled by recent severe and abrupt budget cuts. We cant get any closer down on [readiness] across the board, Hagel said, whether its the Air Force or the Army or steaming time in the Navy, so this is a defining time in our defense enterprise [that will determine] how we go for ward. The secretary added, But were going to protect what we have to protect, and were going to protect our people. Hagel talks with troops about 2015 Defense budget requestDoD Photo By Glenn Fawcett Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel chats with two U.S. Army drill sergeants during a photo op with troops units at Fort Eustis, Va., Feb. 25. Building 1 blood driveSailors made appointments for the Blood Alliance mobile donation bus on Feb.25 in front of the NAS Jacksonville Headquarters Building.Photos by Clark Pierce Blood Alliance Phlebotomist Jasmine Powell checks the progress of YNSA Arnick Alinaya's blood donation Feb. 25 for the NAS Jacksonville Building 1 blood drive.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014 17 By MC1 Michael WissNaval Station (NS) Mayport personnel put their force protection and antiterror ism skills to the test during the Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield (SC/CS 14) 2014 exercise February 20-28. SC-CS 14 is a force protec tion exercise conducted by Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFF) and Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) on all Navy instal lations in the Continental United States to enhance the training and readiness of Navy security personnel as well as establish a learning environment for security per sonnel to exercise functional plans and operational capa bilities. According to NS Mayport Anti-terrorism and Deputy Security Officer Ronald Novak, this exercise show cases the Mayport team working with other tenant commands, and civilian agencies in the event of a cri sis situation. We have to train our folks to be prepared for any crisis situation on short notice, he said. We need to be able to work with other tenant commands, ships and other agencies to be on the look out for terrorist activity. We take every threat seriously, with other situations that have happened in the world, you have to be ready because you can never tell where the threat might come from. Solid Curtain is an exer cise focused on command, control, and communication (C3) between all echelons Navy wide. Citadel Shield is an installation-level training exercise to test the ability of naval security forces during an emergency. The Citadel Shield of the Mayport exer cise involved an active shoot er who killed and injured sev eral personnel and held three people hostage. The Mayport NCIS team used negotiation tactics to be able to overtake the assail ant and defuse the situa tion. The Solid Curtain por tion involved a small boat attack on the USS Vicksburg (CG-69) home ported at NS Mayport. The attack was much like that of the USS Cole (DDG-67) bombing which killed 17 Sailors and injured 39 others on October 12, 2000. According to USS Vicksburg Operations Officer Lt Matthew Hamm, the exer cise was a great opportunity to test the readiness of the ships security team. This drill is an excellent opportunity to test our own organization, but also work ing with the base security department as well as with agencies off the base, he said. This is a once in a life time opportunity for a single ship to execute a real world situation, and how to respond to a casualty that we dont see or train for every day. Training is an important element of the readiness area of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative that consol idates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combat-effective force in the history of the Department. According to Novak, year round training keeps every one working together as a team to help counter any cri sis situation. We have to perform con tinuous training because the players change with Navy turnover, he said. The best thing we get out of this is to critique what we did right and what we did wrong. Hopefully we can continue to improve readiness and learn what needs to be done to handle any crisis situation. By Army Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone Marshall Jr. American Forces Press ServiceSpecial operations forces will be pre pared for any decision made on the post-2014 U.S. military presence in Afghanistan, the commander of U.S. Special Operations Command told Congress Feb. 27. Speaking to the House Armed Services Committee, Navy Adm. William McRaven cited great strides in dealing with current conflicts, pre paring for future conflicts, and with the state of his workforce. Socom continues to provide the worlds finest warriors to the fight in Afghanistan, he said. As we approach the end of 2014, your special operations forces will be able to adjust to whatever decisions are made regarding our future employment in that country. Earlier this week, President Barack Obama ordered Pentagon leaders to pre pare for the possibility of a full with drawal of U.S. forces from Afghanistan by the end of the year if a signed bilat eral security agreement is not in place. Globally, we are developing plans to better serve the geographic combat ant commanders, who, owing to the past 12 years of engagement in Iraq and Afghanistan, have gone underresourced with special operations forces, McRaven said. The admiral referred to Socom as the Defense Departments synchronizer for the planning of the war on terrorism, noting the work special operations forc es are doing to better coordinate activi ties locally, regionally and globally with both the geographic combatant com manders and the U.S. ambassadors. I believe the future of special opera tions will be in helping to build partner capacity with those willing nations who share our interests, he said. This will mean strengthening existing allied relationships, McRaven said, and building new ones. No nation alone can stem the rise of extremism, he said. We need our friends and allies more now than ever before. The admiral said Socoms future is inextricably linked to the generalpurpose force and government agencies outside DoD. The past 12 years have shown us that a whole-of-government effort is required to be successful, McRaven said. In special operations, we have always known that without our fellow soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines, we are destined to fail. McRaven said the command has also gone to great lengths to take care of what he called his most precious resource: his people. The preservation of the force and family . has already seen a marked improvement in the morale and wellbeing of those who serve in [special operations forces], he said. While there are still issues to be addressed, McRaven acknowledged, he expressed confidence in the health of the force and their families going for ward. I believe that we have laid the foun dation for keeping our force, and their families, strong and resilient into the future, he said. More about Adm. McRaven He is the ninth commander of United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM), headquartered at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla. USSOCOM ensures the readiness of joint special operations forces and, as directed, conducts opera tions worldwide. McRaven served from June 2008 to June 2011 as the 11th commander of Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC) headquartered at Fort Bragg, N.C. JSOC is charged to study special operations requirements and tech niques, ensure interoperability and equipment standardization, plan and conduct special operations exercises and training, and develop joint special operations tactics. McRaven served from June 2006 to March 2008 as commander, Special Operations Command Europe (SOCEUR). In addition to his duties as commander, SOCEUR, he was desig nated as the first director of the NATO Special Operations Forces Coordination Centre where he was charged with enhancing the capabilities and interop erability of all NATO Special Operations Forces. McRaven has commanded at every level within the special operations com munity, including assignments as depu ty commanding general for Operations at JSOC; commodore of Naval Special Warfare Group One; commander of SEAL Team Three; task group com mander in the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility; task unit com mander during Desert Storm and Desert Shield; squadron commander at Naval Special Warfare Development Group; and, SEAL platoon commander at Underwater Demolition Team 21/SEAL Team Four. McRavens diverse staff and interagen cy experience includes assignments as the director for Strategic Planning in the Office of Combating Terrorism on the National Security Council Staff; assess ment director at USSOCOM, on the staff of the Chief of Naval Operations, and the chief of staff at Naval Special Warfare Group One. McRavens professional educa tion includes assignment to the Naval Postgraduate School, where he helped establish, and was the first gradu ate from, the Special Operations/Low Intensity Conflict curriculum. Association meets March 5 at County Rd. 220, Fleming Island. Contact Stu Covey at 891-4099. at Dunn Ave., Jacksonville. Duval free workshop about vegetables, fertilizer, pest control, lawn tips and more. Call 255-7450 or email Evie at epankok@coj.net to pre-register. (VFW) Post 5968 and its Auxiliary located at 187 Aurora Blvd. meets on the second Wednesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. VFW is a noncomposed of combat veterans and eligible service members from the Active, Guard or Reserve forces. Go to www.vfwpost5968.org or call 276-5968. of America N.E. Florida Chapter meets the third Wednesday of each month. Open to active duty and retirees of all military branches. Contact Johnnie. walsh@gmail.com or call 2824650. Association meets the fourth Thursday of each month at 5 p.m. Jean-Pierre at 910-459-6858 or 2518 or paul.nix@navy.mil. Association of Aviation meets the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Center on Collins Road. For information, visit www. aao9.com. at NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) needs volunteers to assist military retirees and dependents. Work four hours a day, one day per week. Call 542-5790 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays to volunteer. a breast cancer support group at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, meets on the second Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. Call 542-7857 for more info. Navy Jacksonville Yacht Club is open to active duty, reserve and retired military, plus, active or retired DoD civilians. Call 778-0805 or email commodore@njyc.org Helping others help themselves. Visit www.gocompass.org for more info. meets the second Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at Blanding Blvd. Call 272-9489. Fleet Reserve Association Branch 290 monthly meeting is Mayport Rd., Atlantic Beach. Call 246-6855. National Active and Retired Federal Employees meets at 1 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the Murray Hill United Methodist Church, (Fellowship Hall Building) at 4101 College Street. Call 786-7083. Retired Enlisted Association meets the fourth Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Hall at 7673 Blanding Blvd. Call 772-8622. Voting assistance workshop March 24From StaffThe Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP) staff will con duct a voting assistance work shop aboard NAS Jacksonville March 24, 8:30-10:30 a.m. in Deweys All Hands Club main ballroom. The Deweys complex is locat ed in Building 608, between Gillis and Keily streets. Although primarily for voting assistance officers, the work shop is open to any interested persons. The point of contact for the FVAP workshop is the NAS Jacksonville Installation Voting Assistance Officer, Lt. Cmdr. Cheryl Aimestillman at 5423998 or at cheryl.aimestillman@ navy.mil, or vote.jacksonville@ navy.mil. Naval Station Mayport tests force protection skillsThe Security Department at Naval Station Mayport simu lates a small boat attack in the ship basin during Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014. Photos by MC2(SW) Marcus StanleySailors aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 68) work with firefighters from Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department during a mass casualty training exercise part of Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014 aboard Naval Station Mayport. Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield is a two-week, anti-ter rorism force protection exercise that test Navy installations on various crises in response to elevated force protection conditions due to active shooter/hostage situations, report of suspicious packages, vehicles or people. Hospital Corpsmen from Branch Medical Clinic at Naval Station Mayport assist Sailors from USS Vicksburg (CG 68) in a mass casualty training exercise during Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014. Sailors aboard the guid ed-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 68) discharge a fire hose over the side of the ship during a training exercise of Solid CurtainCitadel Shield 2014 at Naval Station Mayport. Adm. McRaven: Special Ops ready for post-2014 AfghanistanAdm. William McRaven Community Calendar

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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, MARCH 6, 2014 I I D E VP-16Singapore Air Show Page 3 NOMADS Delivering High-Priority Cargo Pages 4 & 5 NAVFAC SEUSACE Career Day Page 12Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Bush Carrier Strike Group enters 6th FleetHSM-70 embarked with CVW-8By MC3 Shaun GriffinUSS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) Public AffairsMore than 5,000 Sailors serving in the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group (GHWB CSG) arrived in the U.S. 6th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AOR), Feb. 24.Commanded by Rear Adm. DeWolfe Miller, GHWB CSG is comprised of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 22 and USS Truxtun (DDG 103), USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) and USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). Additionally, USS Arleigh Burke (DDG 51) arrived in the 6th Fleet AOR as an independent deployer. I am incredibly proud of the hard work and dedication these Sailors have put forth in preparation for this deployment, said Miller. This team is prepared to face any challenge that presents itself. While in the 6th Fleet AOR, CSG 2 and its accompanying units will provide a wide range of flexible capabilities in addition to building partnerships with allied countries through joint exercises and community relations projects. The versatility associated with George H. W. Bush and our embarked air wing allows for mission-tailored forces to be successful and represents our nations strength, capability and resolve, said Miller. GHWB CSG is deployed as part of the on-going rotation of forward-deployed forces to support maritime security operations and operate in international waters across the globe, along with other coalition maritime forces. The strike group is prepared to conduct a variety of missions, including forward naval pres ence, maritime security operations, and crisis response and theater security coop eration. More than 1,700 personnel are assigned to CVW-8, part of the George H.W. Bush Strike Group. CVW-8 includes the Golden Warriors of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 87, the Valions of VFA-15, the Fighting Black Lions of VFA-213, the Tomcatters of VFA-31, the Bear Aces of Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 124, the Garudas of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 134, the Tridents of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 9, the Rawhides of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 40, and the Spartans of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 70. The HSM-70 Spartans fly the MH-60R Seahawk helicopter. By Clark PierceEditorAnn Scott, wife of Gov. Rick Scott, visited two family oriented facilities Feb. 26 at NAS Jacksonville. She was wel comed aboard by NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander and his wife, Pam. Also greeting Scott were Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Rick Williamson and his wife, Robin. Undersander said, I learned that Mrs. Scott is an avid reader who spends time visiting students at schools across Florida, encouraging them to develop their reading and writing skills. I believe shell be impressed with what she sees today in our early learning programs at the NAS Jacksonville Child Development Center (CDC). Scott said that on a previous visit to the First Coast, she met NAS Jacksonville School Liaison Officer Dawn Mills, who invited her to check out installations CDC, as well as the Fleet and Family Support Center. Im just so glad to be on your base, said Scott. I was in the Jacksonville area today and its very important to me to visit our military bases whenever pos sible. We can never say thank you too much to our military personnel for their service and sacrifice to our great state and country. Its long been a tenet of Navy lead ership that family readiness is a vitally important component of mission read iness, said Williamson. We strive to provide a network of resources for our Navy families, in order to reassure our deployed Sailors that their loved ones are being supported. CDC Director Mary Grenier led the tour and explained, Our capacity is 298 children, and that includes Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten classes, infants (12 months and younger); 1-year-olds; 2-year-olds; and pre-school. Theres also a waiting list for each age group, including a not-born-yet category. She noted, Our CDC also provides drop-in care for parents who need a few hours for appointments or other activi From StaffMilitary Saves Week Start Small Think Big kicked off Feb. 24 at the VP-30 auditorium aboard NAS Jax. Fifteen financial workshops were presented over four days to educate Sailors and families about an array of topics including: purchasing a vehicle, buying a home, credit management, planning for retirement, small steps to wealth, identity theft, insurance needs, paying for college, budgets and savings, deployment planning and more. On Feb. 27, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander welcomed attendees to the Family Re$ource Makeover Night at the MWR Youth Activities Center gym. The program included pre sentations from NAS Jax Legal Department, Fleet & Family Support Center (FFSC), VyStar Credit Union, TRICARE, Navy College Office, and Navy Marine Corps Relief Society. Free pizza, snacks and water were provided. Undersander was impressed with the turnout. I saw a number of dependents and ombudsmen, as well as active duty Sailors, preparing for a more secure financial future. Thats good because as we all know family financial readiness contributes directly to mission readiness. Attention Gate River Run participants NAS Jax Sailors and civilians competing in the March 15 Gate River Run/ USA 15K Championship race are requested to meet at the event EXPO Center for a group photo at 7:30 a.m. Miriam.gallet@navy.mil. From Staff Photo by Lt. Juan David GuerraThe aircraft carrier USS George H. W. Bush (CVN 77) transits the Strait of Gibraltar on Feb. 27. George H.W. Bush is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleets areas of responsibility. The HSM-70 "Spartans" helicopter squadron home based at NAS Jacksonville are embarked aboard Bush as part of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8. Floridas first lady proud of military familiesPhoto by Clark Pierce Florida's first lady Ann Scott (left) was greeted at the NAS Jax Child Developmnent Center on Feb. 26 by NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander; Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Rick Williamson; Robin Williamson and Pam Undersander. Scott told them that she loves working with children the future of Florida and was eager to tour the station's child development center. Sailors get smart about reaping financial benefitsPhoto by Shannon LeonardMike Williams, representing American Military University, speaks to AM2 Kate Hoover and AM2 Misty Graham, both of VP-45, about the benefits of continuing their education during the Military Saves Financial Fair at Dewey's on Feb. 28.See Page 9 See Page 9

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014 From StaffMarch 6 1822 USS Enterprise captures four pirate ships in Gulf of Mexico. 1862 USS Monitor departs New York City for Hampton Roads, Va. and his toric confrontation with CSS Virginia (ex-USS Merrimack). 1942 U.S. cruisers and destroyers bombard Vila and Munda, Solomon Islands, sinking two Japanese destroy ers. March 7 1958 Commissioning of USS Grayback (SSG574), the first submarine built from keel up with guided missile capability (Regulus II missile). 1960 USS Kearsarge (CVS-33) res cues four Russian soldiers from their adrift landing craft 1,000 miles from Midway Island. 1966 Department of Navy reorga nized into present structure under CNO. 1967 Brown water PBRs assists Operation Overload II in Rung Sat Zone, Vietnam. 1968 Operation Coronado XII begins in Mekong Delta, Vietnam. 1994 Sixty-three women receive orders to USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, the first combat ship to have women permanently assigned. March 8 1854 Commodore Matthew Perry opens treaty negotiations with Japan. 1862 Ironclad ram CSS Virginia destroys USS Cumberland and USS Congress. 1945 Phyllis Daley becomes first African-American ensign in Navy Nurse Corps. 1958 Battleship USS Wisconsin (BB64) is decommissioned, leaving the Navy without an active battleship for the first time since 1895. 1965 Seventh Fleet lands first major Marine units in South Vietnam at Danang. 1991 Lt. Kathy Owens became the last pilot (in a C-2 Greyhound) to land on the training carrier USS Lexington (CVT 16) that was decommissioned in November 1991. March 9 1798 Appointment of George Balfour as first U.S. Navy surgeon. 1847 Commodore David Connor leads successful amphibious assault near Vera Cruz, Mexico. 1862 First battle between ironclads, USS Monitor and CSS Virginia. 1914 Test of wind tunnel at Washington Navy Yard. March 10 1783 USS Alliance (Capt. John Barry) defeats HMS Sybil in final naval action of Revolution in West Indies waters. 1933 Pacific Fleet provides assis tance after earthquake at Long Beach, Calif. 1945 Navy and civilian nurses interned at Los Banos, Philippines flown back to CONUS. Navy nurses awarded Bronze Star. 1948 First use of jets assigned to operational squadron (VF-5A) on board aircraft carrier USS Boxer (CV 21) 1992 The Department of Defense announced its plan to withdraw from the Philippine Naval Facility at Subic Bay. March 11 1935 Birth of Naval Security Group when OP-20G became the Communications Security Group. 1941 President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs Lend-Lease Act. 1942 In a PT boat, Lt. Cmdr. John Bulkeley leaves the Philippines to take General Douglas MacArthur to Australia. 1983 The first fleet CH-53E Super Stallion delivered to the HM-12 Sea Dragons. The CH-53E transports heavier loads over longer distances than previous logistics helicopters. 1991 Saratoga and Midway battle groups depart the Persian Gulf for their homeports: Saratoga (CV 60) transited the Suez Canal en route to Mayport, Fla.; Midway (CV 41) traveled to Yokosuka, Japan. March 12 1917 American merchant ships to be armed in war zones. 1942 President Franklin D. Roosevelt designates Admiral Ernest J. King to serve as the Chief of Naval Operations, as well as the Commanderin-Chief, United States Fleet. 1956 First overseas deployment of Navy missile squadron, VA-83, on board USS Intrepid (CV 11). SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)5487789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley National Archives photosIn 1942, an NAS Jacksonville plane captain signals the pilot of start his port engine most likely an R-1830 Twin Wasp 14-cylinder radial. This workhorse of avaiation was flown by British and American forces during World War II and used extensively for troop (28 soldiers) transport, paratroop operations, glider towing and freight airlift. Notice the smaller Beechcraft Model 18 (SNB1) training aircraft in the background. In May of 1950, this pair of Grumman F8F Bearcat fighter aircraft, assigned to the "Red Rippers" Pratt & Whitney R-2800 radial engine, the Bearcat was the Navy's final piston-engined fighter aircraft. This Week in Navy History By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorThe invitation read, The President and Mrs. Obama request the pleasure of the company of Ms. Smiley at a dinner. In the weeks leading up to the White House state dinner honoring French President Francois Hollande, this was probably my favorite part of the whole thing. After 37 years of being someones military depen dent, I was finally the principal invitee and my Navy commander husband would be my date. Not even the invitation with my name on it, how ever, could compare to the moment when Dustin after a day of work at the Pentagon, freshly showered, shaved and dressed in his formal mess dress uniform arrived in a car to pick me up at the hotel lobby. Thats when it hit me: we were going to the White House for a state dinner. But if the magnitude hadnt occurred to me then, it certainly would have when we arrived at the White House and went through the usual security check points, including standing before bomb-sniffing dogs, all while dressed in heels and a floor-length formal gown. Once that part was over, though, it felt like any other black-tie event where, you know, Mrs. Obamas Chief of Staff, Tina Tchen, is leading you through the East Colonnade to the famed Booksellers room of the White House. Which is to say, Id never in my life done anything like this. The first room Dustin and I explored in the White House was the library on the right. This is where we quickly huddled in a corner to pinch ourselves (We were at a state dinner what?) and talk about the movie theater we saw on the right before we were announced to the press pool (Us, announced to the press pool). In the library, we met Stephen Colbert from The Colbert Report and his wife, Evie. Colbert was just as I imagined him to be in real life: funny, yes, but also exceptionally humble, and gracious. Evie, is elegant and personable. We talked about kids, military fami lies and Dinner with the Smileys. Then we did what every other couple does in situations like this: swap phones to take pictures the whole will-you-takeour-picture thing in front of the shelves of books. Next, we went up the marble staircase and into the East Room. Beneath three enormous cut-glass chandeliers, Dustin and I gazed at famous portraits of Theodore Roosevelt and George Washington. Okay, I also gazed at Bradley Cooper standing between them. And here, in front of a portrait of Martha Custis Washington, we met Julia Louis Dreyfus. On our way to the Blue Room to meet the Obamas, we stumbled upon a man who looked very familiar to me. I stupidly asked, How do I know you? and then I learned what happens when you lose an election: people forget your name. But Rep. Paul Ryan couldnt have had a better sense of humor about my faux pas. In the receiving line, Dustin spoke French with Francois Hollande, and President Obama was gra cious as he thanked Dustin for his service. But, honestly, all politics aside, I cant say enough about the first lady. She is absolutely beautiful in real life, and she is astoundingly regular. By that I mean, she is not pretentious or overly formal. She embraced me in a warm hug, with no worries of messing up her gown, and she genuinely seemed excited to have us there. Outside, heated trollies waited to take us to a tent on the south lawn where the dinner was waiting. I was at first concerned about the tent, given the frigid temperatures. But if this elegantly lit room with florals hanging from the ceiling was a tent, then everything Ive ever camped in was merely a nylon sack. Our table was one away from the head table. Essentially, there was only the Rev. Al Sharpton between us and the Obamas. Well, Sharpton and about 400 different forks, spoons and goblets. And those were just next to my plate! Not really, but it felt that way. I had no idea which glass or silverware to use first. Dinner was elegant and 1,000-percent more impressive than anything I served at Dinner with the Smileys. The meal was punctuated by us meeting Dr. Jill Biden and Bradley Cooper, followed by Sharpton dancing to the music of Mary J. Blige. The night ended the same way it began, with me and my man in uniform (even more handsome than Bradley Cooper) walking hand-in-hand down the sidewalk, past the security check-points, to a cab waiting on 15th Street, and back to our regular lives. Despite knowing Dustin since we were babies, I never got to go to the prom with him. Im forever grateful he agreed to be my date for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to attend a state din ner. From the Homefront Spring forward one hourDaylight Saving Time begins Sunday, March 9. Reset your clocks and other timepieces ahead by one hour. From StaffThe Smileys attend the state dinner: Part 2

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By Lt. j.g Christi MorrisseyVP-16 Public Affairs OfficerIt wasnt the sleek fighters, menacing combat helicopters, or jumbo aircraft that created the most buzz at the recent Singapore Air Show. Instead, it was a modest aircraft parked toward the back of the ramp that caught the eyes of aviation enthu siasts and industry experts alike. In the first public static display of the aircraft in Singapore, Sailors from the VP-16 War Eagles showcased their P-8A Poseidon during the weeklong event at the Changi Exhibition Center. We came to show the Navys com mitment to regional partners and allies, and to highlight the Navys newest longrange anti-submarine warfare, antisurface warfare, intelligence, surveil lance, and reconnaissance aircraft. The air show is also a great opportunity to interact with visitors from across the region, said Cmdr. Dan Papp, execu tive officer of VP-16. Squadron members gave tours of the aircraft to military and civilian distin guished visitors, in addition to educat ing the public about the aircraft. AWO3 Delbert Smith, an electron ic warfare operator on the Poseidon, remarked on his interactions with air show visitors. It was great being able to give the public some insight into what I do as an operator and what we do as an air crew. I had the opportunity to speak with numerous school groups as well as individuals, providing them with basic facts of the aircraft. Many of them were surprised to learn that this large plane was able to hunt and track submarines, he said. Lt. Clayton Hunt, a senior pilot with the aircrew, commented on the abilities of the aircraft. I flew the P-3C Orion for a number of years, and it will always have a spe cial place in my heart, but the P-8A is a game-changer. The Poseidon can fly faster and higher, give us longer range and get us on station more rapidly. It carries a larger payload of sonobuoys, allowing us more versatility and the ability to stay longer on station, if required, he stated. In addition, our operators and maintainers are some of the finest in the U.S. Navy. We have been very happy with the performance of the aircraft thus far. Papp noted, The Asia-Pacific Theater is composed of predominantly littoral states and we are seeing an increased need for the maritime patrol mission. The P-8A is designed to fill this expanding role, contributing daily to the stability and security within the region. The P-8A is based on a Boeing 737 airframe, but it is a far cry from the passenger jet from which it takes its shape. Possessing the capability to carry and fire Mk-54 torpedoes as well as AGM84D Harpoon missiles, the aircraft is also packed with the most modern avionics, radar and sensor systems in the world, making the P-8A the most capable anti-submarine and anti-surface aircraft in the U.S. militarys arsenal today. The air show, which attracted more than 100,000 visitors on its two public show days (Feb. 15-16), was the largest aerospace and defense exhibition in the Asia-Pacific region, featuring more than 1,000 exhibitors from 47 countries and 279 delegations from 72 countries. This year, the United States was the feature country providing military aircraft for exhibit, including static displays and aerial performances by C-17 Globemaster III, P-8A Poseidon, MV-22 Osprey, C-130 Hercules, KC-135 Stratotanker, and F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft. VP-16 is in the midst of its first oper ational deployment with the P-8A Poseidon. They are currently operating from Kadena Airbase in Okinawa, Japan.War Eagles steal show in Singapore NHHC releases new logoBy MC1 Tim ComerfordNaval History and Heritage Command Communication and Outreach DivisionThe U.S. Navys Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) revealed the commands new logo Feb. 27, designed to represent its multifaceted mission. The symbolism of the logo is rich and reflective of the elements of the purpose of NHHC. The logos centerpiece is USS Constitution, the U.S. Navys oldest com missioned warship, which represents the Navys commitment to warfighting readiness from its earliest days on the worlds oceans. Furthermore the representation of Constitution embodies NHHCs dedica tion to preserving and protecting mari time history. The quill pen serves as a reminder that the practice of documenting and understanding history is an important element of the Navys course. The two compass roses which book end the commands name are traditional symbols of nautical navigation, symbol izing NHHCs ability to both interpret the Navys past and help provide direc tion to its future. The circular, infinite, rope border reflects how the Navys actions and decisions today will be judged alongside those of the past. Together the elements of the logo capture NHHCs mission to reinforce naval historys relevance to its leader ship, the American public and Sailors, past and present, said Capt. Henry Hendrix, Ph.D. NHHCs director. We wanted a logo that better reflected that drive, and I believe that the logo does so perfectly. It shows that as the Navy moves forward in its missions, NHHC will be there offering the wisdom of Sailors past experiences to guide its course to success. NHHCs mission is to collect, preserve, protect, and make available the artifacts, documents, and art that embody our naval history and heritage for future gen erations. The new design incorporates ele ments of logos submitted to the com mand through its summer logo contest, which offered many artists, naval history enthusiasts and designers the oppor tunity to showcase their creativity and sense of style with a historic flair. The command received more than 40 logo submissions from people around the U.S. The winning design came from Nathan Quinn, a graphics specialist at the Defense Media Activity. The Naval History and Heritage Command, located at the Washington Navy Yard, is responsible for the pres ervation, analysis and dissemination of U.S. Naval history and heritage. It is composed of many activities includ ing the Navy Department Library, the Navy Archives, the Navy art and arti fact collections, underwater archaeol ogy, Navy history, nine museums, USS Constitution repair facility and the his toric ship Nautilus. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014 By AWFCS(NAC/SCW) Mike Wendelin VR-62 Public AffairsThe men and women of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VR)-62, flying the C-130T Hercules aircraft are proud of their heritage. Providing fleet logistics sup port via airfields around the globe creates a nomadic culture at VR-62 so our name is our mission, said CMDCM Freddy Pacheco. Were proud to fol low in the footsteps of Navy air transport units like VR-6 and VR-8 that participated in the Berlin Airlift. Home based at NAS Jacksonville, VR-62 is one of five Navy Reserve C-130T logistics squadrons. The Nomads are currently preparing a detach ment for CENTCOM later in this spring. VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Tony Scarpino put the Nomads mission in context when he said, VR-62 is pre pared to answer all calls in support of our Navy no matter if it is a disaster of epic propor tions, regional instability, or expeditionary surge the VR-62 Nomads deliver! The Nomads recently received word that they will become a five-aircraft squadron. Later this year the Marine Corps Reserve will transition from the C-130T to the C-130J platform. The Marines excess C-130Ts will be distributed to the five Navy C-130 squadrons in the Fleet Logistics Support Wing. We cant wait to get our new aircraft. This will give us a lit tle more flexibility to execute our mission, and we are looking forward to another record set ting year, said VR-62 Executive Officer Cmdr. Bryon Smith. In FY 2013 the Nomads logged 3,209 flight hours with the squadrons four aircraft. The Nomads flew in every geographic combatant command. In addition to normal detached operations at NAS Sigonella (EUCOM), NAF Atsugi (PACOM), and Bahrain (CENTCOM), the Nomads flew missions in Northern Command, Southern Command and Africa Command. This is normal operational tempo for the Nomads. In the course of flying those 3,209 hours, the Nomads com At NAS Jacksonville, VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Tony Scarpino addresses the "Nomads" after a FOD walkdown. Inside VR-62 spaces at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 1000, AD1 Bryan Wright checks the status of the tool check-out log. ATAN Jasmine Allen reviews berthing requests for the next drill weekend at NAS Jacksonville. NC1 Kenneth Swan works on Career Development Board documentation. During a PACOM mission, a Nomads C-130T lands on Kwajalein Atoll 70 years to the day after its lib eration from the Japanese by U.S. Forces. U.S. Army troops landed just below the approach to runway 6 on Feb. 4, 1944. Lt. Cmdr.Todd Nichols checks an approach plate prior to landing his C-130T Hercules logistics aircraft in PACOM. Lt. Cmdr. David Tambelini makes a navigation check, followed by a radio call while flying over the vast Pacific Ocean.VR-62 Nomads The Navys secret logistics weaponAWF2 Timothy Williams directs a K-Loader prior to unloading sonobouys at a EUCOM air facility. Under the watchful eye of AEC Brett Stroman, "Team Nomad" pushes a 5,000-pound ISU90 cargo container into place at NAF Atsugi, Japan. It's a tight yet secure fit for two diver recompression chambers being airlifted to Timor-Leste for a UCT-2 underwater construction project in PACOM. A VR-62 "Nomads" C-130T is packed with human cargo of a U.S. Marine Security Force enroute to Guam for PACOM training.See VR-62, Page 5

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014 5 pleted 207 missions and lifted in excess of 2.7 million pounds of cargo. In addition to Navy cargo, the VR-62 Nomads moved freight and equipment for the Army, Air Force and Marines, as well as the Royal Navy and Royal Australian armed forces. That averages out to 17 missions, 267 flight hours, 314,801 pounds of cargo lifted per month for the four-aircraft squadron. Since our squadron has no active duty counterpart, we take on the persona of an active duty squadron and fly like an active duty squadron, said VR-62 Operations Officer Lt. Cmdr. Mariusz Drozdzowski. The pace here is very up tempo. He explained, The Nomads fly two types of missions. The first is detached operations flying for the Combined Task Force for the combatant command where the Nomads are assigned. The Nomads have a normal detachment cycle to EUCOM, PACOM and CENTCOM every fiscal year. The second type of mission is called a NALO (Naval Aviation Logistics Office) mission that is tasked from NALO in New Orleans, La., which operates a data col lection and analysis system for airlift asset management and aircraft acquisition justification for Chief of Naval Operations. Missions usually originate or terminate in the Continental United States. Recently, the VR-62 Nomads assisted Underwater Construction Team Two (UCT-2) with an airlift of con struction and diving equipment, including two recom pression chambers, to Timor-Leste, a small country near Indonesia in Southeast Asia. VR-62 picked up the cargo and delivered it to the other side of the planet. The Nomads also flew UCT-2 personnel home when they completed their humanitar ian assistance mission five months later. The Nomads also delivered 46 tons of materials in support of Operation Damayan (relief efforts after typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines). The Nomads can move just about anything that will fit into the C-130T and get it to the other side of the planet in short order. The Nomad mission could not be accomplished without a superb maintenance department. In 2012, the Nomads won the Noel Davis Battle E award, the Golden Wrench and the Golden Anchor and are look ing forward to another award-winning performance this fiscal year. If youre a pilot looking for an aviation position in the Navy Reserve check out our smart phone link at:http://youtu.be/yJPwy6xKPEw. Photos by AWFCS(NAC/SCW) Mike Wendelin A VR-62 "Nomads" C-130T arrives at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, near Honolulu, Hawaii for fuel and rest. At Naval Air Facility Atsugi, Japan, AD3 Jordan Nauden prepares to mount a new propeller on a C-130T assigned to sister squadron VR-53. AME3 Michael Branscome secures a C-130T engine panel after completing continuity checks on engine fire bottles. AM3 Adam Hinricks practices his safety wiring technique during a lull in maintenance activity at the VR-62 hangar. VR-62From Page 4 In the "Nomads" hangar at NAS Jacksonville, AD3 Alyssa LeMay reviews technical publications on her laptop, as ADAN Jada Wilson performs a turbine inspection. AWF1 Joshua Simmons attaches new safety wire during enroute maintenance in PACOM.

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From Navy Personnel Command Public AffairsWith the semiannual Physical Fitness Assessment (PFA) upcoming, Navy Physical Readiness Program offi cials remind Sailors to verify their results in the Physical Readiness Information Management System (PRIMS). After each PFA, Sailors need to log into PRIMS and ensure their data is entered and accu rate, said Bill Moore, direc tor, Navy Physical Readiness Program. All commands are required to report their PFA data via PRIMS no later than 30 days after conducting the PFA in accordance with guidelines established in the Navys Physical Readiness Program instruction, OPNAVINST 6110.1J. Each Sailor must have a record for both PFA cycles in the year, even if the record reflects non-participation sta tus due to deployment, indi vidual augmentee, medical waiver, etc. Sailors need to verify their data within 60 days so that any corrections can be made by the Command Fitness Leader at the command level. After six months of PFA completion, record changes can only be made by PRIMS administrators at Navy Personnel Command, which requires a Letter of Correction from the individuals com manding officer, on letter head, that grants authorization to make the change. From Naval Hospital Jacksonville Public Affairs OfficeNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles award-winning Wellness Center and Health Promotions offers individ ual and group classes that center on improving your health. Classes include tobacco cessation, weight management, health, fitness and nutrition. The following classes are offered throughout the year: walk-in): Basic nutrition one-hour ment only): Body mass, exercise and basic nutrition two-day class (one individual session and one group ses sion) walk-in): Cholesterol management 90-minutes Healthy lifestyle/weight management six weeks (one hour per week) Weight management eight weeks (one hour per week) walk-in): Monday, 9 a.m.; Tuesday, 1 p.m.; Thursday, noon. For more information or to make an appointment, call 542-5292 or visit NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center located at Building 867, adjacent to the MWR fitness center. Sailors reminded to verify PRIMS dataNaval Hospital Jacksonville invites you to get fit in 2014 By Susan HensonCenter for Personal and Professional Development Public AffairsThe Center for Personal and Professional Development (CPPD) is asking Sailors to submit their Navy Tuition Assistance (TA) requests and now would be good said the director of Navy Voluntary Education (VOLED) March 3. According to Ernest DAntonio, CPPDs VOLED program director, the expenditure rate for TA funding is currently below normal levels, which means theres more funding available than usual at this time of the year. We use historical burn rates as a guide for allocating TA funding throughout the year, he said. We plan really well for routine years. After fur loughs and a government shutdown, Fiscal Year 2014 (FY-14) hasnt been a routine year, he said. Lt. Cmdr. Mark Wadsworth, direc tor of CPPD Support Site Saufley Field in Pensacola, Fla., leads the team that monitors CPPDs Navy TA spending. He said FY-14 TA execution is currently trailing FY-13s execution rate by just over $6 million year-to-date. We think a variety of things influ enced our being below the TA budget right now, said Wadsorth. Our exe cution rate dropped in October with the government shutdown and thats carried through the year. The usage rate steadily increased in November and December. But then it dropped back down in January, probably due to uncertainty with the federal bud get. Although we have funding now, the usage rate hasnt increased significantly since then. Sailors need to understand that their education benefits reset each year, and unused amounts dont carry over. DAntonio said, We want Sailors to continue to pursue their education and submit their TA requests -we work hard to allocate every TA dollar avail able to give Sailors the most opportunities to use their TA funding allotment for each fiscal year. He said more than 25,000 Sailors have used TA benefits so far this fiscal year and emphasized that a Sailors com mand is an important part of TA authorizations because theyre the first step in the process after a Sailor submits a request. Its each commands responsibili ty to ensure their Sailors are aware of and meet all relevant TA policies, are comfortable with their Sailors ability to complete a requested course, and pro cess each Sailors TA request promptly, said DAntonio. A command approver can review a Sailors request and deny it if all Navy requirements arent met, if the Sailors performance isnt up to standards, or if the commands mission might not per mit the Sailor to complete the course. Ultimately, its the commanding offi cers decision, said DAntonio. DAntonio also recommended each command approver continually review the Sailors education progress. Our biggest reason for disapproval of TA requests is they arent received from the Sailors command approver prior to the course start date, as required by DOD instruction. Often when we review a TA request, a Sailor may be missing some of the TA prerequisites such as a current education counseling by a Navy College Office (NCO) or Virtual Education Center (VEC) counselor, or an individual education plan or degree plan on file, or missing a grade from a past course, he said. VOLED professionals work with Sailors to get the requirements in on time, but if the Sailors account is incomplete or not updated before the course start date, they are unable to fund the TA request, DAntonio said. So I repeat this message constantly: 30 days prior to the course start date is not too soon for Sailors to submit their TA request. In fact, a TA application can be submitted a year before the actual class start date, which will help ensure the Sailors TA request is funded and allows us to better manage expenditures. Tuition Assistance program funds waiting for SailorsSee TUITION ASSISTANCE, Page 16 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014

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From VP-10 Public AffairsVP-10 is deeply saddened by the tragic passing of one of our finest Red Lancers, AO2 Scott Everett Uebel on Feb. 7 at the age of 22. He is survived by his parents, Gary and Kelly Uebel, and his sisters Lindsey, Amanda and Kristen. Born and raised in South Bend, Ind., petty officer Uebel joined the Navy on Jan. 18, 2011 when he began Recruit Training followed by Aviation Ordnance A School. After successful completion of these rigorous schools, he joined the VP-10 Red Lancer family on June 30, 2011. The next month, Scott deployed with the squadron to Bahrain to support the Global War on Terrorism from July to December 2011. During the following 12-month training cycle, Uebel worked dili gently towards becoming one of VP-10s most qualified and dependable ordnancemen. His final deployment sent him to El Salvador, supporting Operation Martillo from December 2012 through June 2013. Possessing the finest qualities of a U.S. Navy Sailor, Uebel will always remain in the hearts of the Red Lancers. In addition to exemplifying the core values of honor, courage and commitment, his leadership, optimism, strong sense of humor, intelligence and drive all contrib uted to his remembrance as an exceptional friend, teammate and family member. The funeral service for Uebel was held Feb. 18 at the Welsheimer Family Funeral Home in South Bend, Ind., followed by his burial with Military Honors at Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens in Osceola, Ind. Petty Officer Uebel was further honored, with NAS Jacksonville Chaplain (Lt.) Andrew Hayler presiding at a memorial service held at the All Saints Chapel aboard the station on Feb. 21. Those interested in sending condolences to the Uebel family can send them to the address below for forwarding to the family: Patrol Squadron 10 Unit 60165 FPO AA 34099-5907 By MC2 Clay WhaleyVP-8 Public AffairsTwenty-two Sailors from VP-8s chapter of the Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) were invited to tour the Ahmed Al-Fateh Islamic Center Feb. 21. The complex is the nation al mosque for the Kingdom of Bahrain and symbolizes Bahrains religious identity. I think this was a great opportunity to take time out of our busy schedules to learn about the religious and cul tural identity of Bahrain said ATAN Nicholas Monastiero. I had a great time with my fel low Fighting Tigers CSADD members and look forward to more cultural enrichment opportunities in the future he added. The mosque offers tours for Bahrains non-Muslim resi dents and visiting military forces to promote the Kingdom of Bahrain as a modern and tolerant Muslim country. Construction of the mosque began Dec. 17, 1984 and was complete on June 2, 1988. The Grand Mosque occupies 69,965 square feet and the entire Ahmed Al-Fateh Islamic Center complex is more than 37 acres in size. The facility can accommodate in excess of 7,000 wor shipers during prayers. VP-8 is deployed to the U.S. Navys 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility conducting maritime security operations and supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. The VP-8 Fighting Tigers are home based at NAS Jacksonville. In MemoriamAO2 Scott Everett UebelJune 13, 1991 February 7, 2014AO2 Scott Everett UebelPhotos by MC2 Clay WhaleyVP-8s Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) chapter toured Bahrains Ahmed Al-Fateh Islamic Center on Feb. 21. It's the national mosque for the Kingdom of Bahrain and symbolizes Bahrains religious identity. VP-8 Sailors toured the ornate Ahmed Al-Fateh Islamic Center, and took time to sit and learn about Islamic history.VP-8 CSADD takes part in cultural exchange JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014 7

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By Yan KennonNH Jacksonville Public Affairs Senior WriterGetting the right patient-centered care at the right time is key to ensuring the best health care experience possi ble. Preventive, routine and urgent care is available to active duty, retirees and their families at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville its hospital and branch health clinics. Emergency room (ER) service is only available at its hospital. Before seeking urgent or emergency care, it is important to know the differ ence between the two and where to go receive the appropriate treatment. This can save patients time and taxpayers dollars. Urgent and Routine Patients with a minor cut, sprain, migraine, earache, rising fever, urinary tract infection or similar symptoms should make an appointment with their assigned primary care manager (PCM). Same-day appointments are put aside every day to ensure patients with urgent care needs are seen when they need to be seen. These conditions are consid ered non-emergent so the ER is not the place to get care. Emergent Patients should seek immedi ate emergency services if experienc ing symptoms such as severe bleeding, chest pain, severe eye injury, broken bone, inability to breathe, spinal cord injury or no pulse. An emergency is classified as a medical, maternity or psychiatric condition that would lead someone with aver age knowledge to believe that a seri ous medical condition exists; that the absence of immediate medical atten tion would result in a threat to life, limb or sight; severe painful symptoms that require immediate attention to relieve suffering; or when a person is at immediate risk to self or others. NH Jacksonvilles ER uses the stan dard triage model where patients are seen based on the seriousness of their condition not the order of arrival. This means, if a patient with a nonemergent need visits the ER, they will wait until everyone with an emergent need is cared for. For all non-emergent care needs, patients should turn to their Medical Home Port team that places each enrolled patient in the center of a col laborative team of caregivers from doctors and nurses to case managers. Led by their primary care manager, the team focuses on each patients comprehensive health care needs pre ventive, urgent and routine. Plus, they have access to RelayHealth that pro vides 24/7 email access for non-urgent needs such as lab results, medication refills and appointments. Plus, it is easy to sign up, www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax (look for Medical Home Port information). The team approach improves access to care so patients can get appoint ments when they need them, enhanc es their care experience, meets their urgent care needs, improves health outcomes by focusing on preventive care (which reduces hospitalizations and emergency room visits), and builds the relationship between patients and pro viders. And after hours, patients have access to the Nurse Advice Line: 800529-4677 on evenings, weekends and holidays to triage medical needs and direct patients to the appropriate level of care whether emergent, urgent or routine. Beginning in spring 2014, the 24/7 Nurse Advice Line will change to 800-TRICARE (874-2273). And to better server patients and offer appointment times when they need them, NH Jacksonvilles primary care teams are now open longer. Family Medicine (Green, Red, White and Yellow Teams), Internal Medicine (Blue Team) and Pediatrics (Purple Team) are now open Monday to Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. To make appointments, call the appointment line at 904-542-4677 or 800-529-4677, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Active Duty patients at Branch Health Clinic Jacksonvilles Silver Team can call 904-546-7094/7095, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. To find out more, visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax. Hospital clinics open longer hoursBy Yan KennonNaval Hospital Jacksonville Senior WriterNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles pri mary care teams are now open longer to better serve patients and offer appoint ment times when they need them. Family Medicine (Green, Red, White and Yellow Teams), Internal Medicine (Blue Team) and Pediatrics (Purple Team) are now open Monday to Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Patients with a primary care manager (PCM) at the hospital or branch health clinic are part of a Medical Home Port a collaborative team of caregivers (from doctors and nurses to case managers) led by the PCM. The team focuses on meeting all of the patients health care needs preventive, routine and urgent. To meet the PCMs on each of the com mands 14 Medical Home Port teams, visit the command website at www.med.navy. mil/sites/navalhospitaljax. Patients can reach their team by secure email, for non-urgent issues. Sign up for RelayHealth at www.relayhealth.com or on the commands website by clicking on Medical Home Port. At the hospital, patients can call the appointment line at 904-542-4677 or 800529-4677, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Active Duty patients at Branch Health Clinic Jacksonvilles Silver Team can call 904-546-7094/7095, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. After-hours nurse advice is available for patients at all sites at 904-542-4677 or 800-529-4677 on evenings, weekends and federal holidays. NH Jacksonvilles priority since its founding in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. The command is comprised of the Navys third largest hospital and five branch health clinics across Florida and Georgia. Of its patient population about 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their families more than 60,000 are enrolled with a primary care manager at one of its facilities. To find out more, visit the command Web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax.The right care, in the right place, at the right time Photos by Jacob Sippel Dental Health MonthTooth Fairy Jill Burnsed, a dental hygienist at Naval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Jacksonville, talks about the importance of oral hygiene to children at NAS Jacksonvilles Child Development Center (CDC). Dental staff from the hospital and NBHC Jacksonville visited the CDC on Feb. 25 as part of National Children's Dental Health Month to raise awareness about the importance of oral health. Lt. Darien Lazaro, a dentist at Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles Dental Clinic, teaches proper teeth brushing and flossing to children at NAS Jacksonvilles CDC. Dental staff from Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville give preschoolers Shane Baker (left) and Braxton Druding den tal hygiene kits during a visit to NAS Jacksonvilles Child Development Center. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014

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ties. In January, we provided care for 359 drop-in visits. Scott was impressed with what she saw. Mary Grenier and her team have created amazing programs at the CDC. All of my initiatives are with children, so seeing these happy kids and attentive caregivers is near and dear to my heart. Scotts assistant, Meghan Collins said, Mrs. Scott cares deeply about educa tion and has a deep commitment to kids. She believes that great readers become great learners. Also, in addi tion to her husband, she counts a number of family members who served in Americas armed forces so shes familiar with the military community and its challenges. The entourage then drove to the NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) where Scott met with FFSC Director Myrna Wilson and 10 ombudsmen from various commands. Wilson described the resources avail able at the center, including the Navy Ombudsman program. Wilson explained, The Navy Ombudsman Program was introduced in 1970 by CNO Adm. Elmo Zumwalt as a means to address issues and concerns unique to Navy families. Most ombudsmen are the spouses of active duty members of a command. Our ombuds men are highly trained volunteers who are able to offer support and guidance to command families and to act as an official liaison between the command and its families. Ombudsmen are not meant to solve problems, but to direct the family member to the people who can help them solve their problems. Scott told the group, Having been a military wife, daughter and sister myself plus, having a brother who retired from the military after 35 years I appreciate the unique challenges that come with Navy life. Thank you for all you do to help make Navy families lives run as smoothly as possible. VISITFrom Page 1Military Saves Week wrapped up Feb. 28 at Deweys All Hands Club with the awarding of Poker Run checks to three Sailors. For the poker run, Military Saves Week participants attended at least five financial workshops where they were dealt a playing card. The best three poker hands received checks from VyStar Credit Union for $300, $100 and $100. Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Financial Educator Rufus Bundrige, who led the event team, said home buying and vehicle buying workshops were particularly popular. Our sponsors and presenters were all experts in their fields, said Bundrige. Its all about planting the seeds for a secure financial future. Kudos to everyone who took time to attend. Almost 640 Sailors, retirees and dependents took advantage of the free event sponsored by USAA, FIRST CMD, MOAA, TSP, NMAA, VYSTAR CU, NFCU, TOP PREPARATION, TRICARE, NMCRS, NAVY CAMPUS, FFSC AND MWR.Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government official ly endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. By MCC(AW/SW) Shawn Graham Center for Service Support Public AffairsThe Center for Service Support (CSS), announced Feb. 27 the development of new Personnel Qualification Standards (PQS) for the mass communication specialist (MC) rating. The current PQS was last updated in September 2009. A PQS is a compilation of the mini mum knowledge and skills an individual must demonstrate in order to qualify to stand watches or perform other spe cific routine duties necessary for the safety, security or proper operation of a ship, aircraft or support system. MCCM(SW/AW) Melissa Weatherspoon, Navy Public Affairs Support Element (NPASE) West senior enlisted advisor (SEA) said the chief petty officers (CPOs) who developed the PQS were among the finest she had worked with in the Navy. We had old salts working with fairly new chiefs many of them, I had never met so I was excited to share their experiences and take in the knowledge they had gained over the years, said Weatherspoon. The younger chiefs brought a fresh perspective to the table, while the more senior folks shared years of experience and know-how in the development of qualifications for MCs in the Fleet. The whole vibe was how do guide our Sailors to be the best MCs they can be while giving our chiefs an awesome leadership and professional develop ment tool. According to Richard Rangel, Occupational Standards (OCCSTDs) and PQS model manager, the MC PQS was outdated and needed an addition of new qualifications due to the recent publication of the OCCSTDs. The MC community is very diverse, said Rangel. I think the dynamics of our group were good as well as the diversity in their professional experi ence. We hosted a very experienced group. I think the OCCSTDs should be the basis for everything we do and since the OCCSTDs were just published last year it helped a great deal in our approach to the new edits. The new PQS will reflect a more efficient and realistic PQS for the MC community. Occupational standards provide the common thread linking Navy work with Sailors. They are the building blocks for all Navy professional development and training tools, such as rate training manuals, personal qualification stan dards, course curricula and advance ment exams. Because of this, updating and maintaining OCCSTDs is critical to ensuring they accurately reflect what jobs Sailors in specific ratings are per forming throughout the fleet. According to Bill Peterson, CSS deputy director of Operations, the MC com munity is entering a second wave of rating consolidation since the community formed in 2005. The updated PQS reflects our con tinuing effort to ensure new acces sions will be successful in the fleet, said Peterson. We will continue to amend PQS to help our Sailors devel op and hone skills that are relevant as operational requirements, equipment, and ratings change. The success of the PQS will not be determined by CSS, but will be determined by the fleet where Sailors work. Peterson said the electronic-only versions of the PQS booklets will be avail able on Navy Knowledge Online (NKO) by the end of the year. CSS and its learning sites provide Sailors with the knowledge and skills needed to support the fleets warfight ing mission. More than 300 staff and faculty work hand-in-hand with the fleet and are dedicated to ensure training is current and well-executed. Ten thousand Sailors graduate from CSS courses annually in the administration, logistics and media communities.CSS announce changes to Mass Communication Specialist PQS MILITARY SAVESFrom Page 1 Photo by Shannon Leonard Military Saves Week "Start Small Think Big" included the Family Re$ource Makeover Night on Feb. 27 in the youth activities center gym, where attendees were addressed by NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander. Photo by Clark Pierce In a toddler room at the NAS Jax Child Development Center, Sylvia McBride and Beth Osborne tell Ann Scott that their children love story time. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014 9

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By Morgan KehnertMorale, Welfare and Recreation DepartmentThe North Florida Hotel Lodging Associations 6th Annual ROSE Awards, Recognition of Service Excellence, were held Feb. 25 at the Renaissance Resort at the World Golf Village. The mission of the ROSE Award is to recognize front line hospi tality employees who exemplify excellent customer service within the Northeast Florida area. The area encompasses morel than 40, 000 hospital ity employees within the counties of Duval, Flagler, St. Johns, Nassau, and Clay. This year, there were 160 employees nominated and 67 individuals selected as finalists in categories rang ing from Administrative Assistant to Ground and Water Transportation. NAS Jacksonvilles Navy Gateway Inns and Suites (NGIS) was the only military hotel with nominees in any of the categories. The five mem bers nominated from the NGIS staff were Joe Casiano, Merle Elbo, Falacity Gilbert, Amelita Foster and Steve Lowe. At the awards ceremony NGIS took home three wins, Merle Elbo, a 9-year laundry attendant won in her category of Guest Service: LaundrySelect Service Hotel, Falacity Gilbert, a 9-year front desk associate for Guest Service: Front DeskSelect Service Hotel and Amelita Foster, with 19 years of housekeep ing experience won for Guest Service: HousekeepingSelect Service Hotel. When asked about his staff and the awards they received this year, NGIS General Manager John Houdek, sounded like a proud parent say ing, I was on cloud nine and so happy for my staff. To see their faces as their names were called will be a memory that will last a lifetime. The NGIS Jacksonville nominees were up against some of the best hotels in the five-county area and to have them be recognized as the best in their field for going above and beyond for the hotel guest was just an awesome feeling. 2014 Patient Guide now availableFrom Naval Hospital Jacksonville Public AffairsNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles new 2014 Patient Guide is now in-stock and available at all of its facilities its hospital and branch health clinics and at www.med.navy.mil/sites/naval hospitaljax. The guide provides patients with current information on Medical Home Port teams, urgent and emergency care, expect ing and new parent services, pharmacy and the many other services, programs and classes available at each NH Jacksonville health care facility. Get connected, like us www.facebook.com/ NavalHospitalJacksonville, follow us www.twitter.com/NHJax, watch us www.youtube.com/user/NavalHospitalJax and send an email to NHJaxConnect@med.navy.mil to sign up for email updates. Photos by Morgan KenhertThe staff representing NAS Jacksonville Navy Gateway Inns and Suites get ready to celebrate at the Renaissance Resort at the World Golf Village on Feb. 25, where the North Florida Hotel Lodging Association's Annual ROSE Awards were presented.NGIS hospitality pros bring home awardsNGIS ROSE awards winners (from left) Merle Elbo and her husband, Celso, Amelita Foster, Falacity Gilbert and her husband, David, were all smiles as the three winners proudly displayed their awards. 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014

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By Lt. j.g. Torrey PlumVP-8 Public AffairsSailors from the VP-8 Fighting Tigers assigned to Cooperative Security Location Comalapa, El Salvador, hosted 105 students Feb. 7 and 10 from the Academia Britnica Cuscatleca (ABC) International School located in Santa Tecla. The VP-8 Sailors provided the thirdgrade students with a hands-on tour of the P-3C Orion aircraft and answered questions about serving in the U.S. Navy. The children were excited about the opportunity to explore the aircraft and maintenance spaces, said Lt. j.g. Luis Rodriguez, a VP-8 pilot. We are proud of our mission and always enjoy being able to share what we do with the local community. The ABC International School is a mixed bi-lingual and bi-cultural school. The student body is mostly Salvadorian with an increasing number of interna tional students attending the school. The Fighting Tigers are currently deployed to the 4th and 5th fleet areas of responsibility, assisting in counterdrug efforts and providing humanitar ian assistance. VP-8 is home based at NAS Jacksonville. By Lt. j.g. Torrey PlumVP8 Public AffairsSailors from Patrol Squadron (VP)-8 teamed up with Habitat for Humanity Feb. 22, to assist a local family in constructing a new home in Tapalhuaca, El Salvador. The 18 Sailors from VP-8, also known as the Fighting Tigers, mixed concrete, dug post holes, and built cinder block exterior walls. It was a great opportunity to serve a local family in a very tangible way, said Lt. j.g. Paxie Cordova, a pilot with VP-8. The familys gratitude and excitement at how much prog ress we made in one day made this experience truly reward ing. Habitat for Humanity International is a global Christian nongovernmental housing organization that brings together people of all races, nationalities and religions to build homes, communities and hope. We were really excited to get our hands dirty and do some thing good for the community said AO3 Christopher Lewis. I think our enthusiasm and teamwork made the day a great suc cess and I look forward to serv ing the local community in a similar capacity soon. Since 1976, Habitat has served more than 500,000 families by building and improving homes; by advocating for fair and just housing policies; and by pro viding training and access to resources to help families improve their shelter conditions. Habitat for Humanity El Salvador relies mostly on dona tions and volunteers to provide housing to families, many of whom have been displaced by natural disasters. Since they began aiding Latin America in 1979, Habitat for Humanity has helped provide more than 100,000 families with adequate housing. The Fighting Tigers, home based at NAS Jacksonville, are currently deployed to the 4th and 5th Fleets areas of respon sibility, assisting in the Counter Transnational Organized Crime mission and providing humani tarian assistance. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet supports U.S. Southern Commands joint and combined military operations by employ ing maritime forces in coopera tive maritime security opera tions. VP-8 Sailors work with Habitat for Humanity in El SalvadorPhoto courtsey of VP-8 Public Affairs"Fighting Tigers" construction volunteers take a short break at the local Habitat for Humanity job site.Educating young scholars about naval aviationPhoto by Lt. j.g. Torrey PlumVP-8 Sailors from Cooperative Security Location Comalapa, El Salvador educated students from the ABC International School about their P-3C patrol aircraft and its mission. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014 11

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By Earl BittnerNAVFAC Southeast Public AffairsNaval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast civil ians, contractors and military person nel participated in the Jacksonville District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) 2014 Engineering Career Day Feb. 21 in Jacksonville, Fla. More than 150 high school students, parents and teachers from 13 schools in northeast Florida attended the event and project competition. The daylong event was the largest yet for the Jacksonville District Corps of Engineers which has been co-spon soring this event with the Society of American Engineers (SAME) for the past 12 years. Its one of the major events of Northeast Florida Engineers Week held in February. Its great to see so many kids engaged and interested in engineering. It was a thrill for me to be able to be a part of todays activities, said NAVFAC Southeast Commanding Officer and SAME Jacksonville Post President, Capt. Christopher Kiwus. The competition promotes Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) a national education program focused on preparing the workforce of tomorrow. The goal is that competition will inspire the schol ars efforts and energies toward careers in STEM fields in the future. The Engineering Career Day event challenged four-person student teams to compete in building and entering a take-home project, completing a sur prise project assigned the day of the event, and completing a trivia chal lenge. The judges consisted of leaders from NAVFAC Southeast, the USACE, CEOs of local architectural and engi neering firms, and professors and department heads from the University of Florida and University of North Florida, said NAVFAC Southeast Capital Improvements Business Line Coordinator and Chief Engineer Jack McCarthy, one of eight judges for the competition. Four-person teams made up of stu dents from local high schools interest ed in engineering competed in several elements, said McCarthy. The takehome project encouraged the students to explore the age-old art of artillery. The teams applied imagination and sound engineering to develop a launcher capable of propelling a standard, regulation ping pong ball at a target. Each team had 10 minutes to launch as many ping pong balls as they could at a target consisting of three different sized holes. Points were awarded for the number of balls that went through the holes. Aesthetics of the equipment was also a factor in determining the winner. The only constraint was that no explosive charges could be utilized or anything that would produce noxious gases. Other than that, the sky was the limit. These kids really used their imagi nation creating their artillery launch ers, claimed McCarthy. There was a surprise project that required the teams to build a bridge using an 8.5 by 11 inch piece of paper. The constructed bridge was required to span approximately 7.75 inches and the winner was chosen by noting which bridge was able to withstand supporting the greatest number of pennies before collapsing. It was amazing to see the creativity in this simple, yet challenging task. It was hard to believe the winning team loaded 255 pennies on their bridge before it collapsed, said McCarthy. Overall, it was a great day for engi neering and to witness the talented youth of our local high schools, said McCarthy. The following schools entered teams in the competition: Atlantic Coast High School, Bishop Kenny High School, Baldwin Middle Senior High School, Christs Church Academy, Eagles View Academy, Englewood High School, Fernandina Beach High School, Fletcher High School, Frank H. Peterson Academies, Providence School, Providence Extension Program, Robert E. Lee High School and Yulee High School. Eagle View Academy, Team A, was the overall winner of the competition. Eagle View Academy entered two teams this year. Both placed well in the competi tion resulting in Eagle View Academy taking home the James L. Garland Award for Engineering Excellence to display in their school all year. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) manages the planning, design, construction, con tingency engineering, real estate, envi ronmental, and public works support for U.S. Navy shore facilities around the world. We provide the Navys forc es with the operating, expeditionary, support and training bases they need. NAVFAC is a global organization with an annual volume of business in excess of $18 billion. NAVFAC Southeast Participates in USACE Engineering Career DayPhotos by Earl Bittner(From rightt) Naval Station (NS) Mayport Public Works Department (PWD) General Engineer Lt. Shawn Talley, NS Mayport PWD Construction Manager Lt. Oliver Wise and NAVFAC Southeast GIS Contractor Adam Kerr manned the NAFVAC Southeast exhib it booth, helping students with trivia challenge questions and discussing U.S. Navy engineering careers with students participating at the Jacksonville District U.S. Army Corp of Engineers 2014 Engineering Career Day held on Feb. 21.Naval Station Mayport Public Works Department General Engineer Lt. Shawn Talley (second from right) dis cussed the operation of a U.S. Navy Gatewing X100 Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) used for GIS mapping. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Capital Improvements Business Line Coordinator and Chief Engineer Jack McCarthy (top center) judges one of the student entrries artillery piec es during the Jacksonville District U.S. Army Corp of Engineers 2014 Engineering Career Day. The compe tition promotes Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics or STEM -a national education program focused on preparing the workforce of tomorrow by encouraging students today to study STEM.Photo by Ty EricksonThe winning team, Eagle View Academy, Team A, was awarded the James L. Garland Award for Engineering Excellence. (From left) Col. Alan Dodd, Jacksonville District Corps of Engineers District Commander; students Tucker Davis, Ryan Criswell, Ryan Stevens and Eric Rodich; Capt. Christopher Kiwus, president, SAME Jacksonville Post and NAVFAC Southeast commanding officer. FRCSE celebrates new CWO2Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Detachment Mayport Officer in Charge Cmdr. Michael Barriere (left) presents ASC(AW/SW) Michael Hopper of FRCSE Detachment Mayport support equipment division with the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal during his commissioning ceremony Feb. 28. Newly commissioned Chief Warrant Officer 2 Michael Hopper (right) of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Detachment Mayport renders his first salute as an officer to AS2(AW/SW) Walter Mims during his commissioning ceremony. Photos by Victor Pitts 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live entertainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaokeFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Jan. 18, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: Jan. 25, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Navy Run Training Program At the fitness center Running group meets every Tuesday at 4 p.m. Biggest Loser Challenge 8 week program, teams of 2 Begins March 10 9th Annual Captain Chuck Cornett Navy Run April 5 at 8 a.m. Register online at www.1stplacesports. com/calendar.html Lifeguard Course Begins March 14 Sign-up at the base gymI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Alhambra Dinner show $38 $50.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Jacksonville Suns available soon! Rivership Romance (includes dinner) $40$57.75 Disney On Ice $15 Funk Fest 2 Day Ticket $62 VIP $169 Motley Crew Concert Club seats $63.50 Gatornationals $32 $58 Wild Adventures $30 $70 while supplies last Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27,2014) $166 $194.50 Discover Disney Ticket Florida Resident Ticket Valid for sale through APRIL 12, 2014 Universal Orlando Military Special 3rd day free Nonresident 2014 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 THE ARTIST SERIES-BROADWAY IN JACKSONVILLE 2014 SEASON Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation $349-$369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St Augustine $4.25 $15.50 St Augustine Alligator Farm Nile Zipline $35.25 (free admission with reservation) St Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Half Hour Boggy Creek Airboat Rides $15.50 $20 Wild Florida Airboats (Kenansville, FL) $18 $46.75 Florida Ecosafaris $22.75 $52.75 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld Hotel properties, Universal Hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Neon Vibe Volunteer Trip March 8 Paintball Trip March 15 at 9 a.m. Savannah Weekend Trip March 22 23 $40 per personNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Twilight League now forming Begins March 25 Team rosters are due on March 18 Spring Breakout Championship April 4 at 10 a.m. $40 per person Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty March 11 & 25 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests March 13 & 27Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Spring Break Camp March 17 21 and March 24 28 Register now at the youth centerFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Learn to fly at NAS Jax Call for introduction flight Additional ratings are available including instrument, complex and commercial Find more info. online at jaxnfc.net From Navy League Mayport The Navy League of Mayport is celebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration dinner and pro gram. This is an All Services event featuring a joint color guard, All Services Missing Person table, the Navy Band with all the service songs, and numerous historical displays. Tickets are now on sale for this years event which will be held June 7, at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine.The keynote speaker is Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert. Veterans who served at the Battle of Midway and veterans of all branches who served in prior conflicts, as well as those currently serving are invited to attend. Additionally, Medal of Honor recipients and former Prisoners of War who have heroically answered the call of duty will also be in attendance. Come meet these National Treasures and hear their adventures first hand. The evening promises to be emotional and patriotic, and pro vide an excellent opportunity to connect with survivors of what historians call one of the U. S. Navys greatest sea victories and the turning point of World War II in the Pacific. Ticket prices for active duty and spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50, O6 and above $65. Prices for Civilians and Retirees $65. The evening includes fine din ing and a memorable program. Uniform will be O4 and above dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below dinner dress white/dinner dress white jacket optional, and civilian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 5 p.m., with dinner served at 6 p.m. Tickets are mandatory and seating is reserved. Ticket sales end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before this date. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER. Tickets may be purchased from the following locations: NAVY LEAGUE MAYPORT Bob Price, 904-246-9982 or 904718-2118 E-mail: bpricex4@comcast.net NAVY LEAGUE ST AUGUSTINE Bill Dudley, 904-806-4712 or 904-794-7814 E-mail: anuday00@aol.com From Region Legal Service OfficeThe VITA Self Service will be available to active duty service members, retirees and dependents, Reservists (active 30 days or predemobili zation) and entitled for mer spouses from Feb. 4 through April 15. The service is for those whose adjust ed gross income doesnt exceed $57,000. Those who qualify under the Military One Source will be able file their taxes for free using the H&R Block software. Volunteer assistance will be onsite; however vol unteers are not permitted to prepare taxes. Those needing additional assistance outside the scope of the volunteers may be redirected to a nearby tax center. The tax center is located at NAS Jacksonville, Building 4, Room 108 (Ranger Street). The cen ter is open Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Tuesday and Thursday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. For ques tions or con cerns, please contact LN1 Clinton Washington at 542-5974 or email Clinton. washing ton@navy.mil. CNO is Battle of Midway keynote speaker June 7 Tax services available JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014 13

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By Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsThe Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Speed Mentoring program allows artisans from various work centers to interact with man agement and experienced personnel to discuss job path options and gain insight about the numerous career fields available. Speed mentoring is a fairly new concept adopted by the FRCSE Workforce Engagement and Inclusion Team, where a protg is paired with a mentor for several minutes to discuss topics, such as job conversion before moving to the next per son. We shift our sessions throughout the year to differ ent work centers targeting the artisans, explained FRCSE Training Specialist Mike Walter, who coordinates the program. Our mentors come from a broad variety of skill sets, such as engineering, advanced maintenance or logistics. We try to get that diversity which is extremely beneficial for our protgs, because they may not want to stay in their job path. They may be working on their degree in a different field and are looking for information about a new job. So we can pair them up with a certain men tor. According to Walter, the concept was inspired by speed dating, where singles meet other singles for 5to 7-minute conversations before moving on to meet others. If you are looking for a possible career change or to learn about different skill sets, this is for you, stressed Walter. It does not however, guarantee a promotion. Mentors and protgs are always needed. We are look ing for mentors who have worked on the floor and are now in management positions to give guidance to others on the steps they took to get where they are now, he said. We are also looking for those who may be looking for a To date, about 100 artisans have signed up for the pro gram, which based on the feedback has been highly success ful. For former aircraft mechan ic, Eddie Esquivias, the speed mentoring session he attend ed inspired him to completely change his career aspirations. I think the program was very well presented and well thought out; the intentions were good and the results were even better, said Esquivias. It gave me motivation to seek another path and inspired me to enroll in college. I also applied for a new job in the training department and really enjoy my job. I probably wouldnt have done all this if I hadnt gone through the men toring session. Speed mentoring will rotate around FRCSE throughout the year the following dates: March 26, P-3 line; April 30, EA-6B/H-60/T-34 and Hangar 140 lines; May 28, 6F&G Logistics and Engineers; June 25, Plant Services; July 30, FRCSE Mayport Detachment; Aug. 27, Avionics; Sept. 24, Manufacturing and Oct. 29, Level II. For more information, con tact Walter at 790-5682. Speed mentoring promotes knowledge sharing at FRCSEPhotos courtesy of Manny EdlerDale Adams (left), an aircraft engine repairer at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) discusses career options with Ernestine Lawson, a chemist at the FRCSE Materials Engineering Laboratory, during a speed mentoring session at Cecil Commerce Center on Feb. 27. At Cecil Commerce Center, mentors from Fleet Readiness Center Southeast discuss career goals with protgs during a speed mentoring session. A mentor is paired with a protg for several minutes to offer advice, resources and strategies for achieving career aspirations before the protg moves to the next mentor. Introduction to Mentoring and Advanced Mentoring courses are being offered March 12 and March 13 respectively. The Introduction to Mentoring course provides new and experienced mentors with tools needed for successful mentoring. Advanced Mentoring courses offer techniques and methods to enhance mentoring skills. You must complete the Introduction to Mentoring course prior to taking the Advanced Mentoring course. For more information, have your training coordinator contact Rachel Conditt at 790-5685 or e-mail rachel.conditt.ctr@navy.mil. Lt. Cmdr. Michelle Perkins, a physician in the NH Jacksonville Pediatrics Clinic, believes that "patient safety starts with good communication."Patient Safety Awareness WeekPhotos by Jacob SippelSuzanne Newman, a refractive surgery technician in the NH Jacksonville Ophthalmology Clinic says, "Many of our patients have debilitating eye diseases that keep them from seeing things as simple as the waiting room chairs. Maneuvering can be very difficult for patients who are visually impaired, elderly or who need a cane or a walker to assist their mobility. It is our goal to make sure our patients are safe and protected from any accidents that may occur." Dr. Michael Maher, a family medi cine physician says, "Patient safety is an ongoing process that must continue to improve. Our hospital has established a culture of safety that I feel is one of a kind. I want Naval Hospital Jacksonville to be a place where I can bring my family and feel at ease about doing it." HM Edson Gonzalez works in the NH Jacksonville Cardiology Clinic. "As a corpsman working in an outpatient setting, I support patient safety by keeping the exam rooms and equip ment clean. I also prac tice good hand-washing technique to prevent the likelihood of spread ing bacteria that could cause harmful diseases. I also perform medication reconciliation on every patient to avoid the possibility of medical errors. I take pride in my job and do my best to ensure patient safety every day." Lt. Cmdr. Jimmy Trujillo, a nurse in the NH Jacksonville Orthopedics Clinic, says, "This week is a great time to re-engage with patients, fami lies and the healthcare community to advance patient safety and healthcare workforce safety to prevent harm to every one involved. Cmdr. Karen Follin, a clinical nurse specialist at the NH Jacksonville Emergency Department says, "Patients depend on us to provide safe and time ly care during their time of crisis. We understand that no one wants to visit us, but we want them to know we are here when they need us. We do this by actively listening to patient concerns and use a team approach for treatment. We pride ourselves on sustaining this performance each time a patient is in need because we value them and truly believe they are the reason we are here." 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014

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By Terri Moon CronkAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Departments new health care organization has exceeded its goals since standing up five months ago, top health care officials told the House Armed Services Committees personnel subcommittee Feb. 26. Dr. Jonathan Woodson, assistant secretary for defense for health affairs, and Air Force Lt. Gen. (Dr.) Douglas Robb, director of the new Defense Health Agency, appeared before subcommit tee members to update them on DHAs progression. Both officials said the agency is ahead of expectations and goals. DHA was established after defense leaders organized a task force three years ago to look at how to make mili tary medicine more efficient, more effective and more affordable. The agency is an important reform in the Military Health System [and] a needed reform in this era of signifi cant challenges for [DoD] in American health care at large, Woodson said. Our national security and defense strategies must be supported by a strong, relevant, agile and forwardleaning Military Health System, he said. Good evidence exists that joint inte grated care improves results in com bat, Woodson said. If a service member is wounded in combat, a Navy corps man will often be the first to treat the patient, who is then transported while receiving critical care to a military medical center staffed by all three ser vices, where definitive, advanced care will be given by a multiservice health care team, he explained. The synchronized system tran scends service and command distinc tion [and] has resulted in the highest survival rates and the lowest case fatality rates in recorded warfare, Woodson said. [Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel] has outlined his priorities for managing the significant change needed in the com ing years, Woodson said. These include introducing institu tional reforms, re-evaluating military force planning construct, preparing for prolonged readiness challenges, protecting investments in emerging military capability, balancing forc es between active and reserves and reforming personnel and compensation policies. Woodson said he has six lines of effort to support Hagels priorities: System management with an enterprise focus; capabilities needed in the 21st century; partnerships; medical core structure; program, and Systems global health engagement requirement. Those efforts will help DoD meet its overwhelming aims of readiness, improve the health of people it serves, improve the experience of care in the military and responsibly manage costs, Woodson said. By modernizing management struc ture, DHA represents a major DoD milestone and is a starting point for comprehensive enterprise-wide reform, he said. There is dramatic change occurring in American health care that will affect how we do business, Woodson said, and require us to refresh our thinking of health, health care, and health care delivery systems. Rising costs, technology sub-spe cialization, information management access and workforce issues challenge the American health care system, he said. Health systems across the country including ours are focused on ways to reduce variation in care, improve patient safety and more effectively use health information technology to improve clinical decision-making and outcomes, Woodson said. Within the military, there are additional imperatives for designing an integrated health system which includes more joint phasing, joint operations and maintaining readiness. DoD Health Affairs, the Military Health System and DHA are partnered in such a process, he said. We have created agile governance for policy and enterprise-wide opera tional decision-making, Woodson said. We are holding ourselves account able using a disciplined process for identifying opportunities in using comments [and] enterprise-wide perfor mance measures to see and check what we are doing. DHA uses the Government Accountability Offices approach to conduct business case analyses and business process re-engineering efforts, Woodson said. DHA director Robb said his agency stands as a supporting organization, ensuring that the combatant com manders and the service medical departments have the resource sup port to meet their missions. We have made significant progress in the first 150 days of this reform effort. And we are in-track with most of our major milestones, he said. The discipline and rigor necessary to do business also has given DHA insight into its most-challenging issues and in some cases has allowed it to rapidly introduce new processes, Robb told legislators. We have accelerated timelines for implementation and achieved savings, reduce variation and streamlined pro cesses earlier than initially projected, he said. One role of DHA is managing numerous shared services that com bine activities like medical informa tion technology, medical logistics and Force. For example, Robb said, identifying and changing buying behaviors in medical logistics is putting DoDs health care on a path to cover our investment costs and save over $10 million when we previously projected no savings for this year. Another $25 million in savings this fiscal year has been identified by con solidating service medical chief infor mation officers into DHA, he added. The most significant cost sav ings potential for the department still remains in the purchase health care sector, Robb said. Our efforts to improve the execution on the long-term systemic challenges, and how we better integrate our direct care and private-care health services delivery and contract for health care support. As the existing generation of is looking at reshaping contracts to take advantage of strategic sourcing, improving integration with military medical facilities, reducing unneces sary overhead, and achieving more simplicity and flexibility for its patients and the government, the DHA director said. [Were] proud of the work we have accomplished, Robb said. But [were] even more eager to identify ways we can integrate our system on behalf of the incredible people that we are privileged to serve.Sand Volleyball League meeting March 12 at noonOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. Soccer League FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. Leprechaun Dash 5k March 14 over.Kickball League meeting March 19 at noonOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractor women assigned to a command Greybeard Softball League FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractor personnel NAS Jacksonville. Games play on Tuesday Intramural Softball League FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, Open to active duty, retirees, dependents over 18, selective reservists, DoD civilians For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil StandingsAs of Feb. 21 Greybeard Basketball 4-on-4 Flag Football ASD Jax 2 3 4-on-4 Flag Football ASD Jax 2 3 Intramural Basketball NAS Jax 3 3 Badminton Doubles New Defense Health Agency exceeds goals, officials say JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014 TUITION ASSISTANCEFrom Page 6DAntonio also stressed that Sailors should work closely with an NCO or VEC counselor to help them reach their educa tional goals. The VOLED team is here to help, bottom line. Our job is to work with Sailors, inform them about options, provide impartial counseling and point out avenues for Sailors to pursue their life-long educational and credentialing goals. According to CPPD Commanding Officer Capt. John Newcomer, Navy leaders are commit ted to providing Sailors with voluntary education opportunities. We know that edu cated Sailors are strong performers with welldeveloped critical think ing skills and the ability to make informed deci sions, said Newcomer. A college degree is an investment in a Sailor and a contributing factor in Navy mission accom plishment. By Cheryl Pellerin American Forces Press ServiceIn spotless aircraft hangars at two different military bases in southeastern Virginia Feb. 26, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel stood before several hundred airmen and soldiers, highlighting priorities in the Defense Departments fiscal year 2015 budget request and taking questions. The budget request which Hagel and Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, previewed Feb. 24 at the Pentagon is the first in 13 years that doesnt reflect a defense enterprise engaged in a foreign war, and in some of those years, two wars. With the defense budget poised to shrink by more than $75 billion over the next two years, the funding request recommends cuts in military spending in the coming year that include further reductions in troop strength and force structure in every military service. And the outcome will be even more severe in fiscal 2016 if the severe budget cuts required by the Budget Control Act of 2011, known as seques tration, go forward with no congressional intervention on the departments behalf. Questions from the airmen at Langley Air Force Base and soldiers at Fort Eustis ranged from the plight of veterans, the future of the military retire ment system and the lifespan of the current force reduction to problems that could arise from a pre-World-War-II-sized Army, and how DOD will be able to keep quality soldiers in such an austere fiscal environ ment. As he addressed the service members, Hagel sought to reassure them. This can be done if its done responsibly if its done the right way. Well make the case to Congress, he said, noting that Congress must be a part ner in managing the fiscal threats against the department. But it will impose more risks to our country [and] our force structure if were not given some longer-term relief from sequestration. This is about as direct and honest as I can be, and what Im telling you is what Im going to tell the Congress, the secretary continued. I owe that to you, . to tell you this face to face, so you know what Im thinking [and] you know what our leaders are thinking. At both bases, Hagel began by thanking the airmen, the soldiers and their families on behalf of President Barack Obama for their service and sacrifice. The secretary said he was on his way to a NATO defense ministers meeting in Brussels and stopped at the bases to get a sense from the service members what was on their minds. I try to do this as often as I can get outside Washington and listen to our men and women and try to understand better whats on your mind, what your concerns are, Hagel said. You help all our leaders with what you tell us, and I know your commanders here from the general on down feel the same way. Hagel especially wanted to talk about the depart ments piece of the presi dents fiscal year 2015 budget request, about which he said that he, Dempsey and DOD Comptroller Robert Hale would testify before the Senate and House armed services committees next week. The secretary said he want ed to explain what the depart ments senior leaders were focused on when they put the budget request together. You know the realities of sequestration, you know the realities of the fiscal restraints youre all dealing with [that] were all dealing with. And I suspect theyre not going to get much better over the next few years, Hagel said. So weve had to prepare our institution, weve had to plan strategically to protect our country as you do every day, and assure the president, assure the Congress, assure the American people, assure your families that they can count on us, that they can count on you, as they do every day, he added. Hagels top-line points, he said, were people, readiness, capability and capacity. In preparing the budget request, working on it togeth er month after month, he said, we focused on the bal ance of the force . and factored in all of whats required to defend this country at a time in the world thats complicat ed, uncertain and dangerous, and [likely] to stay that way for awhile. Despite such uncertainty, he said, some things are known. This budget that I will present next week to the Congress is the first budget thats not a war-footing budget. . This budget will represent a differ ent environment, a different era, a different time, Hagel said. Thats not a small point, he added, because if were not budgeting and prioritizing for wars, . that means our pri orities have to be realigned and reset as to where were going to use our resources and where were going to deploy . and position our assets to protect our interests, whether its a shift in our presidents pos ture in the Asia-Pacific or the Middle East or North Africa. The world is dangerous everywhere, said Hagel, adding that he and the defense leadership tried to frame the budgets strategic focus on that basis. Hagel told the service mem bers he wanted to address the budgets pay, compensa tion and retirement issues, because they are on the minds of service members and their families. He began with retirement, saying department leaders decided not to recom mend changes on retirement until a retirement commis sion empaneled by Congress reports back to Congress and the Defense Department. We understand the impor tance of retirement plans, the secretary said, but Ive also agreed that any changes, if there are [change] recommen dations, would not apply in retirement to those now serv ing. On the issue of pay, he said, the department will continue to recommend pay increases. There will be a slight decrease in those increases, but its a cost of growth in a growth-of-increase recommen dation, he said, so make sure you understand that. On compensation and ben efits, Hagel said, the Defense Department would not close commissaries. What we are doing is rec ommending that the subsidies on commissaries gradually be phased out, like in our post exchanges. That means youll still get significant savings as that process goes forward. Nothing happens tomorrow, nothing happens next year this is a gradual process, the secretary explained. From this recommenda tion, he said, the department will exclude all overseas com missaries and those that are in remote areas where there are no other discount-store options to save money on groceries. Moving to the TRICARE health care plan, Hagel said the department is recommending consolidating its three systems into one system that will be more effective and efficient. This [will happen over a period of time and wont affect anything on base in health care, he said. Nor would it limit preferred provider options or change health care quality, he added. On health care co-pay increases, Hagel said, the bud get request contains no recommended changes for activeduty service members. Family members and working-age retirees already have co-pay amounts, depending on their geographic locations and medical services, he noted. For working-age retirees, we recommend a gradual increase for out-of-pocket expenses from around 8 percent today to no more than 11 percent a gradual increase . that we think is fair, the secretary added. Housing allowance subsidies for service members today are 100 percent, he said, and the department recommends over a five-year period to phase in an increase to 5 percent for outof-pocket expenses, with a 95 percent subsidy. Those are the recommenda tions weve made, Hagel said. We did this in coordination with all our senior enlisted leaders in each service, all the chiefs, all the secretaries. This was not a unilateral, arbitrary decision. It was a decision we made after a long deliberation. The secretary said he and the president would never submit a budget request to Congress and the American people that they didnt think could protect the countrys security. Were dangerously close to cutting into that now, he said, adding that Obama will request from Congress an extra $26 billion to shore up DOD readiness bled by recent severe and abrupt budget cuts. We cant get any closer down on [readiness] across the board, Hagel said, whether its the Air Force or the Army or steaming time in the Navy, so this is a defining time in our defense enterprise [that will determine] how we go for ward. The secretary added, But were going to protect what we have to protect, and were going to protect our people. Hagel talks with troops about 2015 Defense budget requestDoD Photo By Glenn Fawcett Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel chats with two U.S. Army drill sergeants during a photo op with troops units at Fort Eustis, Va., Feb. 25. Building 1 blood driveSailors made appointments for the Blood Alliance mobile donation bus on Feb.25 in front of the NAS Jacksonville Headquarters Building.Photos by Clark Pierce Blood Alliance Phlebotomist Jasmine Powell checks the progress of YNSA Arnick Alinaya's blood donation Feb. 25 for the NAS Jacksonville Building 1 blood drive.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014 17 By MC1 Michael WissNaval Station (NS) Mayport personnel put their force protection and antiterror ism skills to the test during the Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield (SC/CS 14) 2014 exercise February 20-28. SC-CS 14 is a force protection exercise conducted by Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFF) and Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) on all Navy instal lations in the Continental United States to enhance the training and readiness of Navy security personnel as well as establish a learning environment for security personnel to exercise functional plans and operational capa bilities. According to NS Mayport Anti-terrorism and Deputy Security Officer Ronald Novak, this exercise show cases the Mayport team working with other tenant commands, and civilian agencies in the event of a crisis situation. We have to train our folks to be prepared for any crisis situation on short notice, he said. We need to be able to work with other tenant commands, ships and other agencies to be on the look out for terrorist activity. We take every threat seriously, with other situations that have happened in the world, you have to be ready because you can never tell where the threat might come from. Solid Curtain is an exer cise focused on command, control, and communication (C3) between all echelons Navy wide. Citadel Shield is an installation-level training exercise to test the ability of naval security forces during an emergency. The Citadel Shield of the Mayport exer cise involved an active shooter who killed and injured several personnel and held three people hostage. The Mayport NCIS team used negotiation tactics to be able to overtake the assail ant and defuse the situa tion. The Solid Curtain por tion involved a small boat attack on the USS Vicksburg (CG-69) home ported at NS Mayport. The attack was much like that of the USS Cole (DDG-67) bombing which killed 17 Sailors and injured 39 others on October 12, 2000. According to USS Vicksburg Operations Officer Lt Matthew Hamm, the exer cise was a great opportunity to test the readiness of the ships security team. This drill is an excellent opportunity to test our own organization, but also work ing with the base security department as well as with agencies off the base, he said. This is a once in a lifetime opportunity for a single ship to execute a real world situation, and how to respond to a casualty that we dont see or train for every day. Training is an important element of the readiness area of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative that consolidates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combat-effective force in the history of the Department. According to Novak, year round training keeps every one working together as a team to help counter any crisis situation. We have to perform con tinuous training because the players change with Navy turnover, he said. The best thing we get out of this is to critique what we did right and what we did wrong. Hopefully we can continue to improve readiness and learn what needs to be done to handle any crisis situation. By Army Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone Marshall Jr. American Forces Press ServiceSpecial operations forces will be prepared for any decision made on the post-2014 U.S. military presence in Afghanistan, the commander of U.S. Special Operations Command told Congress Feb. 27. Speaking to the House Armed Services Committee, Navy Adm. William McRaven cited great strides in dealing with current conflicts, pre paring for future conflicts, and with the state of his workforce. Socom continues to provide the worlds finest warriors to the fight in Afghanistan, he said. As we approach the end of 2014, your special operations forces will be able to adjust to whatever decisions are made regarding our future employment in that country. Earlier this week, President Barack Obama ordered Pentagon leaders to prepare for the possibility of a full with drawal of U.S. forces from Afghanistan by the end of the year if a signed bilat eral security agreement is not in place. Globally, we are developing plans to better serve the geographic combat ant commanders, who, owing to the past 12 years of engagement in Iraq and Afghanistan, have gone underresourced with special operations forces, McRaven said. The admiral referred to Socom as the Defense Departments synchronizer for the planning of the war on terrorism, noting the work special operations forces are doing to better coordinate activities locally, regionally and globally with both the geographic combatant com manders and the U.S. ambassadors. I believe the future of special opera tions will be in helping to build partner capacity with those willing nations who share our interests, he said. This will mean strengthening existing allied relationships, McRaven said, and building new ones. No nation alone can stem the rise of extremism, he said. We need our friends and allies more now than ever before. The admiral said Socoms future is inextricably linked to the generalpurpose force and government agencies outside DoD. The past 12 years have shown us that a whole-of-government effort is required to be successful, McRaven said. In special operations, we have always known that without our fellow soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines, we are destined to fail. McRaven said the command has also gone to great lengths to take care of what he called his most precious resource: his people. The preservation of the force and family . has already seen a marked improvement in the morale and wellbeing of those who serve in [special operations forces], he said. While there are still issues to be addressed, McRaven acknowledged, he expressed confidence in the health of the force and their families going for ward. I believe that we have laid the foun dation for keeping our force, and their families, strong and resilient into the future, he said. More about Adm. McRaven He is the ninth commander of United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM), headquartered at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla. USSOCOM ensures the readiness of joint special operations forces and, as directed, conducts operations worldwide. McRaven served from June 2008 to June 2011 as the 11th commander of Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC) headquartered at Fort Bragg, N.C. JSOC is charged to study special operations requirements and tech niques, ensure interoperability and equipment standardization, plan and conduct special operations exercises and training, and develop joint special operations tactics. McRaven served from June 2006 to March 2008 as commander, Special Operations Command Europe (SOCEUR). In addition to his duties as commander, SOCEUR, he was desig nated as the first director of the NATO Special Operations Forces Coordination Centre where he was charged with enhancing the capabilities and interoperability of all NATO Special Operations Forces. McRaven has commanded at every level within the special operations community, including assignments as deputy commanding general for Operations at JSOC; commodore of Naval Special Warfare Group One; commander of SEAL Team Three; task group com mander in the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility; task unit com mander during Desert Storm and Desert Shield; squadron commander at Naval Special Warfare Development Group; and, SEAL platoon commander at Underwater Demolition Team 21/SEAL Team Four. McRavens diverse staff and interagency experience includes assignments as the director for Strategic Planning in the Office of Combating Terrorism on the National Security Council Staff; assess ment director at USSOCOM, on the staff of the Chief of Naval Operations, and the chief of staff at Naval Special Warfare Group One. McRavens professional educa tion includes assignment to the Naval Postgraduate School, where he helped establish, and was the first gradu ate from, the Special Operations/Low Intensity Conflict curriculum. Association meets March 5 at County Rd. 220, Fleming Island. Contact Stu Covey at 891-4099. at Dunn Ave., Jacksonville. Duval free workshop about vegetables, fertilizer, pest control, lawn tips and more. Call 255-7450 or email Evie at epankok@coj.net to pre-register. (VFW) Post 5968 and its Auxiliary located at 187 Aurora Blvd. meets on the second Wednesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. VFW is a noncomposed of combat veterans and eligible service members from the Active, Guard or Reserve forces. Go to www.vfwpost5968.org or call 276-5968. of America N.E. Florida Chapter meets the third Wednesday of each month. Open to active duty and retirees of all military branches. Contact Johnnie. walsh@gmail.com or call 2824650. Association meets the fourth Thursday of each month at 5 p.m. Jean-Pierre at 910-459-6858 or 2518 or paul.nix@navy.mil. Association of Aviation meets the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Center on Collins Road. For information, visit www. aao9.com. at NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) needs volunteers to assist military retirees and dependents. Work four hours a day, one day per week. Call 542-5790 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays to volunteer. a breast cancer support group at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, meets on the second Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. Call 542-7857 for more info. Navy Jacksonville Yacht Club is open to active duty, reserve and retired military, plus, active or retired DoD civilians. Call 778-0805 or email commodore@njyc.org Helping others help themselves. Visit www.gocompass.org for more info. meets the second Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at Blanding Blvd. Call 272-9489. Fleet Reserve Association Branch 290 monthly meeting is Mayport Rd., Atlantic Beach. Call 246-6855. National Active and Retired Federal Employees meets at 1 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the Murray Hill United Methodist Church, (Fellowship Hall Building) at 4101 College Street. Call 786-7083. Retired Enlisted Association meets the fourth Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Hall at 7673 Blanding Blvd. Call 772-8622. Voting assistance workshop March 24From StaffThe Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP) staff will con duct a voting assistance work shop aboard NAS Jacksonville March 24, 8:30-10:30 a.m. in Deweys All Hands Club main ballroom. The Deweys complex is located in Building 608, between Gillis and Keily streets. Although primarily for voting assistance officers, the work shop is open to any interested persons. The point of contact for the FVAP workshop is the NAS Jacksonville Installation Voting Assistance Officer, Lt. Cmdr. Cheryl Aimestillman at 5423998 or at cheryl.aimestillman@ navy.mil, or vote.jacksonville@ navy.mil. Naval Station Mayport tests force protection skillsThe Security Department at Naval Station Mayport simulates a small boat attack in the ship basin during Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014. Photos by MC2(SW) Marcus StanleySailors aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 68) work with firefighters from Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Department during a mass casualty training exercise part of Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014 aboard Naval Station Mayport. Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield is a two-week, anti-terrorism force protection exercise that test Navy installations on various crises in response to elevated force protection conditions due to active shooter/hostage situations, report of suspicious packages, vehicles or people. Hospital Corpsmen from Branch Medical Clinic at Naval Station Mayport assist Sailors from USS Vicksburg (CG 68) in a mass casualty training exercise during Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014. Sailors aboard the guid ed-missile cruiser USS Vicksburg (CG 68) discharge a fire hose over the side of the ship during a training exercise of Solid CurtainCitadel Shield 2014 at Naval Station Mayport. Adm. McRaven: Special Ops ready for post-2014 AfghanistanAdm. William McRaven Community Calendar

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 6, 2014