Jax air news

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Jax air news
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Newspaper
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United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
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Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
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30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

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Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
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Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
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Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2014 I I D E VP-10/CANADA Cold Weather Missions Page 12 HONORING IAS Getting It Done One-By-One Page 7 2015 BUDGET Military Cuts Are Coming Page 13Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com By Twilla SmithNavy Region Southeast Public AffairsAs part of Exercise Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014 (SC-CS 14) being held Navy wide Feb. 18-28, Naval Hospital Jacksonville and the headquarters of Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) were targets of an active shooter workplace violence drill on consecutive days beginning Feb. 19 at the hospital. NAS Jacksonville Installation Training Officer Jim Butters views this training as crucial. Unlike most emergency response incidents, whether they are real-world or exercises, an active shooter incident provides little to no warning therefore, it is extremely important that all personnel, including first responders, know their respective responsibilities and preplanned responses. The active shooter drill on Feb. 20 at CNRSE was one of many such drills occurring at mili tary installations throughout the region during SC-CS 14. Blanks fired inside CNRSE Building 919 created the sound of a real gun. Soon, emergency messages by phone and email alerted military personnel and civilian employees throughout the facility. For this exercise, CNRSE Force Protection, Operations and Training Departments, the NAS Jacksonville security and fire departments, and members of the Jacksonville Sheriffs Office all responded to the active shooter scenario. As the scenario unfolded, CNRSE staff mem bers evacuated in an orderly fashion. Some employees reacted to electronic and telephone notifications, while others heard more simu lated gunfire in the building. Security personnel responded to the scene within minutes, evaluated the situation, and implemented their emergency response proce dures. A shelter in place order was issued for all base personnel, including housing residents. Members of NAS Jacksonvilles Fleet and Family Support Center staff activated to provide sup port to military and civilian members and their families. Once they confirmed that an active shoot er was in the building, the combined security force sealed the perimeter and began locating wounded personnel and fatalities. The shooter was eventually located and subdued by security responders. When the shooter had been neutralized and the all-clear was passed, fire rescue and emergency medical responders treated the wounded. The key to minimizing injuries is the initial notification and alerting mechanisms that are in place and that was one of our key objectives for the drill conducted today, said Butters. The most important job of NAS Jacksonvilles security personnel is to neutralize the threat and clear the building so medical response teams can enter. Securitys approach is the same By MCC Elizabeth ThompsonThe Chief of Navy Reserve spoke with Sailors about issues facing the reserves and recognized personnel for their accom plishments during a Feb. 20-22 visit to Jacksonville. During her visit, Vice Adm. Robin Braun met with commanding officers from Navy Operational Support Center (NOSC) Jacksonville, held an all-hands call and vis ited different commands to learn about the needs of locally drilling Sailors. She met with Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet, and with Reserve Sailors supporting the command on NS Mayport. She also spoke at the change of command ceremony for HSL-60. Ways to improve training, unit and overall reserve force manning, and mission capabil ities were top areas of discussion throughout the visit. More than 150 Sailors attended the allhands call at NAS Jacksonville to hear about the latest developments in the Navy Reserves, to exchange information on chal lenges Sailors face in maintaining unit readiness, and to discuss possible ways to improve training and procedures. I always get great information when I come out to the NOSCs or the regions, from Sailors who are working with the fleet and have challenges, and I want to hear what sort of things you recommend we do, Braun told participants. In a meeting with commanding officers, Braun received reports on how units support the active component in NOSC Jacksonvilles area of responsibility and on how reserve billets are manned. Two commands highlighted at the meet ing were Littoral Combat Ship Seaframe and Littoral Combat Ship Mine Countermeasure Mission Module Mayport, which provided pre-commissioning availability support aboard USS Coronado (LCS 4) from Jan. 31 to Feb. 12. Over that time period, 37 reserv ists assisted their active duty counter parts with Anti-Terrorism Force Protection watch standing, completion of 602 Planned Maintenance System checks in five work By Clark PierceEditorMaster Chief of the Navy (MCPON) Mike Stevens met with the chief petty officers (CPOs) of NAS Jacksonville and its tenant commands to discuss Navy ethics as well as news reports from across the Department of Defense of incidents involving unethical behavior. Stevens was welcomed at Deweys All Hands Club by NAS Jacksonville CMDCM(AW/ SW) Brad Shepherd and Commander Navy Region Southeast CMDCM(AW/SW) Mack Ellis. In 2013, it was announced that dozens of Air Force nucle ar missile officers allegedly cheated on exams, highlighting a series of security lapses and slip-ups that have plagued the ICBM corps. Later, it was announced that senior instructors at the Navys nuclear propulsion school in Charleston, S.C., were suspend ed from duty for alleged cheat ing on exams meant to qualify them to train others to operate naval nuclear power reactors. Adm. Jonathan Greenert, the chief of naval operations, told reporters at a Feb. 4 Pentagon news briefing, that he was upset to learn of the breakdown in discipline. To say I am disap pointed would be an under statement, Greenert said. We expect more from our Sailors especially our senior Sailors. Adm. John Richardson, director of the Navys nuclear propulsion program, said the alleged cheating came to light when a senior enlisted Sailor at the Charleston training site reported the cheating to higher authorities. Richardson said the unidentified Sailor recognized that this was wrong and chose to report it. Stevens told the audience that with the recent incidents hap pening across the Department of Defense, the Secretary of Defense could conclude that theres an epidemic of undisci plined behavior, however, he is assured that isnt the case with the Navy. In fact, he said, each branch of the military has been ordered to take a hard look at their eth ics codes and that, soon, the Pentagon will appoint a gener al officer to head up an ethics initiative much like those that have been developed for suicide and sexual assault prevention. CNO and I understand that the Navy by itself has some Active shooter drills test commands at NAS JaxPhoto by MC2(SW) Marcus Stanley First responders MA2 Glenn Patton, MA3 Amanda Nicks and MA2 Andrew Bernhart, from NAS Jacksonville Security Department, clear rooms and hallways as they search for an armed suspect in Building 919, the headquarters of Commander Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE).Photo by MCC Elizabeth ThompsonChief of Navy Reserve Vice Adm. Robin Braun answers questions Feb. 22 during an informal all-hands call at Fourth Navy Expeditionary Logistics Regiment at Blount Island, located on the St. Johns River. The all-hands call was part of a visit by Braun to local units assigned to Navy Operational Support Command Jacksonville, so Sailors could hear about the latest developments in the Navy Reserves, exchange information on challenges reservists face in maintaining unit readiness, and discuss possible ways to improve training and procedures. Chief of Navy Reserve meets with Jacksonville-area SailorsPhoto by Clark Pierce Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Mike Stevens held an all-chiefs meeting Feb. 21 at Dewey's aboard NAS Jacksonville. Topics of discussion included integrity, trust and Sailorization.MCPON talks integrity with chiefs messSee Page 4 See Page 8 See Page 8

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014 SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)5487789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley From StaffThese 1913 photos show Navy Curtiss flying boats at Fishermans Point on Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Lt. John Towers, a graduate of the Curtiss Flying School in 1911, arrived Jan. 10, 1913 and took command of the new aviation camp. Four large tents served as hangars for Curtiss A-2 and C-1 flying boats. On March 6, 1913, Towers was ordered to prepare an air search for a hostile fleet approaching the Cuban coast. This flight became the first tactical maneuver involving naval aircraft. Towers spotted approaching destroy ers without himself being detected. Because his radio malfunctioned, Towers landed beside the flagship and notified the admiral that a hostile force was approaching. From the aviation camp, Towers and his fellow Navy pilots explored the potential of their planes to serve Navy aerial reconnaissance, bombing, pho tography and radio communications needs. In the ocean waters off Cuba they were able to spot submarines at depths of up to 40 feet. Towers was officially designated as Naval Aviator No. 3 in 1915. Hes also credited with the development of the naval aviator badge, which was designed in 1917. In 1960, the NAS Jacksonville airfield was named Towers Field in recog nition of Towers exemplary service in developing naval aviation through World War I and World War II. From StaffFeb. 27 The seaplane tender USS Langley (AV3), formerly the first aircraft carrier of the U.S. Navy, was sunk by Japanese air attack while ferrying 32 Army Air Force P-40s to Tjilatjap, Java. Feb. 28 1893 Launching of USS Indiana (BB1), first true battleship in U.S. Navy. 1980 Blue crew of USS Francis Scott Key (SSBN-657) launches four Trident I (C-4) missiles in first operational test. Feb. 29 1944 Consolidated PB4Y Privateers from squadrons VB-108, VB-109 and VD-3 conduct a low-level bombing raid against Japanese positions on Wake Island. 1968 Four North Vietnamese trawl ers attempting to simultaneously infil trate supplies into South Vietnam were detected. Three of the trawlers were sunk the following day and one escaped. March 1 1942 U-656 becomes the first German submarine of World War II to be sunk by naval air power (VP-82). 1954 First of six detonations in Operation Castle nuclear test. March 2 1859 Launch of USS Saginaw at Mare Island (northeast of San Francisco), the first Navy ship built on Americas West Coast. 1867 Navy Civil Engineer Corps established. 1899 Act of Congress creates the rank Admiral of the Navy for George Dewey. 1973 Women begin pilot training to U.S. Navy. March 3 1776 First amphibious landing operation. Continental naval squadron under Commodore Esek Hopkins lands Sailors and Marines, commanded by Capt. Samuel Nicholas, on New Providence Island in the Bahamas, to capture urgently needed ordnance and gunpowder. 1871 Navy Medical Corps estab lished. 1883 Congress authorizes four mod ern ships of steel, three cruisers: Atlanta, Boston and Chicago, plus, dispatch boat Dolphin. 1915 Office of Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) established. 1915 Congress creates Federal Naval Reserve. 1960 USS Sargo returns to Hawaii from arctic cruise of 11,000 miles, 6,003 miles under the polar ice. March 4 1911 The first funds for Naval Aviation are appropriated, providing $25,000 to the Bureau of Navigation for experimental work in the development of aviation for naval purposes. 1925 Congress authorizes restoration of USS Constitution. 1947 Operation High Jump, air operations in Antarctica, ends. 1963 Navy C-130 Hercules aircraft completes 12-day rescue operation of critically ill Danish seaman from Danish freighter off the coast of Antarctica. March 5 1913 Tests held at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by Navy Air Pilot Lt. John Towers reported that submarines were visible from the air at depths from 30 to 40 feet. 1942 The name Seabees and insignia officially authorized. 1943 USS Bogue (CVE-9) begins first anti-submarine operations by an escort carrier. By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorWhen the first invitation came via e-mail, I thought it was a joke. I mean, how often does one get an invitation to the White House? Then the formal invitation, printed on the finest paper Ive ever held, arrived in the mail. Still, I did a double take. But a quick phone call to the White House Social Office con firmed that it was true. I had been invited to the state dinner in honor of French President Francois Hollande. And when I say I was invited, thats what I mean. The invita tion read, The President and Mrs. Obama request the pleasure of the company of Ms. Smiley at a din ner. Not Commander Smiley. Not Commander and Mrs. Smiley. But Ms. Smiley. This is an important detail for someone who has been labeled a military dependent for 37 years. After countless times being my Navy husbands +1 I was finally the principal invitee and he was my date. The next morning, I went out in search of a dress. And two weeks later, my three sons, my mother (who coincidentally was visiting us in Maine but lives in Virginia), and the dress were stuffed in my mini-van like the Clampetts. We were headed to Washington, D.C. to meet Dustin, who was already there working at the Pentagon. Because I was also invited to the official arrival ceremony the morning before the state dinner, I decided to take the boys out of school and bring them along for a frontrow seat to history our familys personal history and the countrys. Of course, this meant another har ried trip to buy the boys appropri ate clothes for such an event. It was frigid the morning of the French presidents arrival, and my boys Les Miserables-inspired caps and pea coats provided little warmth. But we live in Maine, so we smiled as we exited the cab at 15th and Pennsylvania Streets and tried to look hardy. Getting into the White House, even for an event thats taking place on the lawn, is a complicat ed endeavor. It requires multiple checkpoints and scanners, most of which takes place outside in the cold. Our toes would be frozen by the time we entered the famous Booksellers room in the White House. But before that, still outside in the cold, our hearts were warmed when we saw our own congress man and previous Dinner with the Smileys guest, Rep. Mike Michaud (Maine), walking down the path between the U.S. Treasury Department and the White House. My youngest son, Lindell, ran to him like a favorite uncle. And then the most amazing thing (if youre a 7-year-old boy who loves dogs) happened a White House staff er came through with the First Familys Portuguese Water Dogs, Bo and Sunny. Forget the congressman or the White House, Lindell was in the presence of dogs, and it was the highlight of his day. Sure, most kids dont get to stand in the Booksellers room of the White House or have a front-row view of an official arrival ceremony, but all Lindell wanted to do was pet those dogs again. Inside the White House, aides gave us French and American flags before we exited onto the South Lawn, and back out in the cold, for the official ceremony. It was a sea of flags, pageantry, uniforms, honor guards, and the always impressive Marine Corps Band, led by Drum Major Master Gunnery Sgt. William Browne. Despite our military fam ily history, the boys had never seen such a display. They hardly noticed that we waited nearly 45 minutes in the bitter cold for the ceremony to begin. And yes, the boys saw our presi dent and the French president, as well as the first lady and many other dignitaries, but what might have been the most education al of all for them was the young Marine standing in formation who fainted within 10 feet of us. This happens more often than people might expect if a soldier locks his knees. What is exceptional, how ever, is how much pride these men and women take in their duty to the president that almost noth ing changes when a soldier goes down. The soldiers on either side still stand stiff as boards, and the downed soldier stays in place until help arrives. In this case, the Secret Service got to him first. When he stood up, there was blood on his face. My boys turned to their dad, also in uniform, with eyes big as sau cers. Later, he would talk to them about the duty, pride and honor those soldiers feel for their position; why no other solider could move to help the downed man; and why the man who fainted would rather collapse and bust open his face than shirk his duty to the country and the president. Impressive indeed. But for Lindell, still not as memorable as meeting Bo and Sunny. Next week: Dustin and I arrive at the state dinner.Naval aviation pioneer John Towers heads mission This Week in Navy HistoryU.S. Navy photos From the HomefrontThe Smileys attend the state dinner (Part 1) Photo by Clark PierceHonors to LaRocqueThe NAS Jax Environmental Department recently presented NAS Jax Public Affairs Specialist Kaylee LaRocque (fourth from right) with a placque in recognition of her significant contributions to the station's environmental program. Her numerous environmental articles published in Jax Air News focused on how station departments and tenant commands can incorporate environmental com pliance and conservation into daily operations. LaRocque recently accepted a public affairs posi tion at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast.

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FRCSE announces Sailor of the YearBy Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsAS1(AW/SW) Johnny Opdenbosch has been selected as the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) 2013 Sailor of the Year (SOY). He is currently attached to FRCSE Detachment Mayport Ground Support Equipment (900) division where he works as division production control supervisor, main production control supervisor and quality assurance (QA) leading petty officer (LPO). It is an honor to have represented FRCSE Detachment Mayport among Jacksonville and Detachment Key West, said Opdenbosch. However, the greatest honor is to have been selected as FRCSE Sailor of the Year. This accomplishment serves as recognition of the hard work and performance of the entire detachment. Opdenbosch was selected as SOY for expertly managing the daily production efforts of 39 work centers in six divisions culminating in the training and qualifi cation of four production controllers. He spearheaded the detachments Naval Aviation Maintenance pro gram (NAMP) baseline system ensuring directive adherence through the detachment bringing 11 pro grams back to on-track status. He continually audits and monitors the divisions and 42 NAMPs analyzing trends and implementing controls for compliance. He also acts as a collateral duty inspector and provides mentoring and guidance to the QA supervisor on QA and NAMP programs and procedures. A native of Barranquilla, Columbia, Opdenbosch moved to North Bergen, N.J. after graduating high school and enlisted in the U.S. Navy in April 1999. After completing boot camp at Recruit Training Center, Great Lakes, Ill., he attended Aviation Support Equipment A School in Pensacola, Fla. Opdenbosch reported to USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) in January 2000 where he was advanced to third and second class petty officer. In January 2004, he transferred to the Center of Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jacksonville as a C school instructor. Two years later, Opdenbosch reported to FRCSE where he was selected Sailor of the Third Quarter. In January 2008, he transferred to VP-26 where he served as line division LPO, QA representative and mainte nance control coordinator/safe-for-flight supervisor. He advanced to first class petty officer. Opdenbosch reported to FRCSE Detachment Mayport in 2012. During his tour, he led four first class petty officers and one chief petty officer in completing production control qualification, provided technical and NAMP support to the civilian mainte nance detachment at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center, Andros Island, Bahamas. At Detachment Mayport, Opdenboschs collateral duties include serving as First Class Petty Officers Association president organizing events to raise money for the commands children holiday party and coordinating Adopt-A-Highway cleanups; command lead financial specialist; and AIR Speed representa tive facilitating/instructing AIR Speed and Lean Six Sigma concepts (Yellow/Green Belt) to 76 officers and enlisted Sailors. Opdenbosch is married with two children. While off duty, he enjoys spending time with his family, build ing and flying remote control airplanes, playing guitar and fishing. He is also currently working on his bachelors degree in technical management with EmbryRiddle Aeronautical University. His future plans are to make chief petty officer and subsequently become a chief warrant officer AD1(AW) Christopher Chinery (left) and AS1(AW/SW) Johnny Opdenbosch verify a serial number on a cold section module that contains the compressor of a T700 helicopter engine assembly at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Detachment (DET) Mayport Feb. 6. Opdenbosch, the Ground Support Equipment (900) division production control supervisor and Quality Assurance leading petty officer, is the FRCSE 2013 Sailor of the Year. Photo by Victor Pitts JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014 regardless of the type of building. The full cooperation and support by CNRSE leadership and staff resulted in a quality exercise from which everyone benefitted, said Butters. The active shooter scenario was a planned exercise that had the look and feel of a real world event. The exercise was not held in response to a specific threat. According to Butters, every effort was made to ensure minimal impact to the installations normal operations. The Department of Homeland Security website describes an active shooter as an individual actively engaged in killing or attempting to kill people in a confined and populated area, typically through the use of firearms. The website also provides a What Can You Do course for the public that can be downloaded at http:// www.dhs.gov/active-shooter-preparedness. SHOOTERFrom Page 1The NAS Jacksonville Emergency Operations Center served as the command and communications hub for the on-site incident commander, security response team, medical personnel and the public affairs officer who kept local media informed. NAS Jacksonville Police are trained to provide rapid response and apprehension during an active shooter scenario. This three-person response team works to clear a room of office cubicles on Feb. 20 in their search of Building 919. A team of first responders from NAS Jacksonville Security Department systematically cleared offices and cubicles in Building 919 during their search for an active shooter, as well as victims. An NAS Jacksonville Security Department Petty Officer waits for the signal to move forward Feb. 20 from a stairwell in Building 919. CNRSE personnel who fled Building 919 during the Feb. 20 active shooter drill, mustered at the NAS Jax Public Works Department to await the "all clear."

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014 5 MA3 Alycia Delgado, from NAS Jacksonville Security, remains alert for mock aggressors at Naval Hospital Jacksonville on Feb. 19 during Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014. The exercise is an annual anti-terrorism and force protection drill that allows security, fire department and various tenant commands to work together during force protection scenarios. Photos by MC2(SW) Marcus Stanley, Twilla Smith, Jacob Sippel and Clark PierceThe active shooter role player at both Naval Hospital Jacksonville Building 2080 and CNRSE Building 919 was MA1(SW/AW) James Williams, who was eventually subdued by NAS Jacksonville Security Department responders. MA3 Alycia Delgado protects mock wounded personnel during a drill at Naval Hospital Jacksonville Feb. 19 as part of the Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014 anti-terrorism/force protection exercise that tests Navy installations throughout the continental U.S. MA1(SW/AW) James Williams portrayed the simulated active shooter at both the Feb. 19 Naval Hospital Jacksonville Building 2080 and the Feb. 20 CNRSE Building 919 Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014 exercises. (From left) HM Jonathon Stallworth and HMSA Christian Cage-Williams, from Naval Hospital Jacksonville, treat a childsize mannequin Feb. 19 during exercise Solid CurtainCitadel Shield 2014. MA3 Amanda Nicks and MA2 Andrew Bernhart discover a simulated victim, CNRSE employee Jon Vondette, unresponsive in his office at Building 919. (From left) MA2 Andrew Bernhart, DoD Patrolman Malcom Watson and MA3 Alycia Delgado clear a hallway of simulated bad guys and innocent person nel at Naval Hospital Jacksonville Feb. 19 dur ing Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield. (From left) MA3 Amanda Nicks, DoD Patrolman Mark McGinty, MA2 Glenn Patton and MA2 Andrew Bernhart continue clearing hallways and cubicles in Building 919 after discovering a mock casualty.

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By Christianne WittenChief of Chaplains Public AffairsChief of Chaplains Rear Adm. Mark Tidd announced the release of the Department of the Navy (DoN) Strategic Plan for Religious Ministry 2014-2019, Feb. 10. Chaplains play a vital role for our Navy and Marine Corps team, providing counsel, building hope, and increas ing the resilience of our force, Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus states in the strategic plan. Navy chaplains and religious program specialists operate across a broad spectrum of environments to fulfill the mission of the Chaplain Corps to inspire hope and strengthen spiritual well being through the delivery and coordination of effective religious ministry at sea and ashore. The DoN Strategic Plan for Religious Ministry 20142019 was carefully designed to support the priorities of the Secretary of the Navy, Chief of Naval Operations, Commandant of the Marine Corps, and Commandant of the Coast Guard. The plan also advances Professional Naval Chaplaincy and expands on the goals of the previous strategic plan released in 2008, Tidd said. Part of Be Ready is hav ing the opportunity to prac tice ones faith wherever our Shipmates serve. Whether at home or operating forward, our Navy chaplains play a vital role in ensuring our Sailors, Civilians, and families have the resilience to meet every chal lenge they face, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert states in the strategic plan. Gen. James Amos, comman dant of the Marine Corps, also remarked in the strategic plan that chaplains are invaluable when it comes to ensuring we keep faith with our Marines, our Sailors, and our families. Navy chaplains support the religious freedom of Sailors, Marines, Coast Guardsmen, DoN Civilians, and families as well as support commanders as they carry out their charge of command by: religious ministry plete confidentiality, dignity, respect, and compassion cers on the accommodation of religious needs; the spiritual well-being of service members and families; a moral and ethical command climate; and religious matters that affect the commands mission. The strategic plan will focus on leveraging these core capa bilities to meet three strategic goals: serve our people, engage with leadership, and meet professional standards, Tidd explained. When professional religious ministry is delivered effective ly, chaplains can help inspire hope, strengthen spiritual well being, increase personal resilience, and enhance mis sion readiness across the Naval Service, Tidd added. The strategic plan will serve as the foundation for policy and programming for the pro fessional delivery of religious ministry across the Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard. It will also inform and shape the development of pro fessional standards for chaplains and religious program specialists. Every chaplain oversees a command religious program which can address health of force issues that impact resil ience and readiness in a meaningful, substantive way, he added. Each chaplain has a role to play in aligning their com mand religious program to support the commanders mission and intent as well as the DoN Strategic Plan for Religious Ministry 2014-2019, Tidd said. The Navy Chaplains Corps is currently comprised of 1,056 chaplains in both the active and reserve components, rep resenting more than 100 faith groups and religious organiza tions. About your Chief of Navy Chaplains Rear Adm. Tidd comes from a career Navy family and is a graduate of Williams College in Williamstown, Mass. He received his Master of Divinity from Fuller Theological Seminary and a Master of Theology from Princeton Theological Seminary. He is a graduate of the National War College in Washington, DC, with a Master of Science in National Security Strategy and a graduate of the Marine Corps Command and Staff College and the Armed Forces Staff College. Tidds Navy tours include NAS Moffett Field, Calif. with Patrol Wing 10 and the USS Reeves (CG 24), homeported in Yokosuka, Japan. During his time on board, Reeves visited Qingdao, China, as part of the firstport visit by U.S. warships to that country in 39 years. He went on to serve as dep uty command chaplain on the USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). Marine Corps tours include 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marines, and the division staff of 2nd Marine Division, Camp Lejeune, N.C., deploying to Southwest Asia in support of Operation Desert Storm. He served at Marine Corps Combat Development Command as the chaplain for the Marine Corps Brig and the Base Security Battalion and later returned to 2nd Marine Division as the division chap lain. Tidd has served in lead ership positions on the chief of Chaplains staff as the branch head for Professional Development and Religious Programs and as the Advanced Training officer at Navy Chaplain School. Tidd was assigned as the force chaplain for U.S. Naval Forces Central Command and the fleet chaplain for U.S. 5th Fleet, headquartered in the Kingdom of Bahrain. After serving as command chaplain for the U.S. European Command, he became deputy chief of Navy Chaplains and Chaplain of the Marine Corps. Tidd assumed his current duties as the 25th chief of Navy Chaplains on Aug. 27,010.Tidd announces DoN Strategic Plan for Religious Ministry Rear Adm. Mark Tidd By Terri Moon CronkAmerican Forces Press ServiceBecause Defense Department leaders believe per sonal financial readiness equals mission readiness, officials want service members to set a goal, make a plan and save automatically in the Military Saves Week campaign now underway. Military Saves is a year-long campaign with DoD partner the Consumer Federation of America as part of the larger America Saves effort, said Barbara Thompson, director of the Defense Departments office of family policy and children and youth. DoD over last 10 years has had a very robust financial readiness campaign, Thompson said of the totalforce program, which began in 2003. Military Saves encourages service members and their families to take a pledge to reduce debt and set up automatic savings programs for necessities such as retirement, emergency and contingency savings. The first step in attaining financial security is making a commitment to changing personal spending and savings habits, Thompson noted. Financial readiness is equated with mission readi ness within DoD, she added, because when a service DoD stresses cutting debt, saving more in Military Saves WeekSee MILITARY SAVES, Page 8 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014

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By MC2 Amanda CabasosStaff WriterNaval Air Station Jacksonville and the Northeast Florida Navy League Council hosted the 12th bi-annual Individual Augmentee (IA) Recognition Luncheon Feb. 20 at the stations River Cove Catering and Conference Center. Twenty-three spouses joined 53 IAs from base and tenant commands, as well as Blount Island Command. The event was sponsored by the Northeast Florida Navy League, Rotary Club of Orange Park, Rotary Club of Orange Park Sunrise, and the Marine Corps League. The luncheon kicked off with the singing of the national anthem by HMC Gloria Cardona, and the invocation by NAS Jacksonville Chaplain (Lt.) Andrew Hayler. Music was provided by Navy Band Southeast Brass Quintet. As awardees and command repre sentatives enjoyed their lunch, NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander welcomed the guests and thanked the IAs for their dedicated service. We are here today to honor the men and women who have returned from IA duty. I congratulate them for com pleting such rigorous assignments that were often outside of what they were trained to do as a Sailor or Marine. In all cases they served the joint force and our country with honor and distinc tion. And by doing so reflected a great credit upon themselves and the Navy and Marine Corps team. He then introduced Commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris as the guest speaker. Harris said, I appreciate having the opportunity to be here today to honor our shipmates. Having served as an IA myself in 2010 to Pakistan and several other places, I truly appreciate these IAs and their spouses for the sacrific es made during the separation. Today we have more than 3,100 Sailors who are forward deployed supporting the other branches of service to complete the mission. Doing Gods work in undescribable places. These IAs are part of that long lineage of service members deploying and they should be very proud that they are showing the rest of the world that they are the best of what our Navy is all about. IA guest speaker Cmdr. Jorge Brito, M.D., is an orthopedic Surgeon who deployed from Naval Hospital Jacksonville to Camp Holland, a base located in the southern region of Afghanistan. Brito said, Its an honor and a priv ilege to be able to deploy. It was also something that I wanted to put behind me. It comes with sacrifices. What IA Sailors do is make the best of it when we are deployed, because we cant control what happens to us but we can control how we feel about it and what we do with it. That is what a lot of us IAs do, as well as our families. We find ways to make the best of it. He explained, Deployments are an experience with contradictions. We get to provide support. We get to do something that we were trained to do and a part of us is anxious to do it. On the other hand you leave your fam ily behind which is extremely difficult. Its also a disruption to your surgical practices as a surgeon. It is very differ ent working out in the field. It makes it tough when leaving and coming back, but on the other hand it is a tremendous opportunity to serve. I was able to treat war injuries and as a surgeon that is a great thing. On the other hand you see some horrific things. I was able to treat the local population while I was there. And the patients are very grate ful for the medical help. That was one of the highlights of my experience. The challenge though was you dont always know who is your friend or enemy. PS1(SW/AW) Princess Bacote from PSD Jacksonville said, I have recent ly returned from Camp Lemonnier in Djibouti Africa where I aided ser vice members from all the branches when they arrived in country. I issued ID cards and fixed pay issues. We also aided in many volunteer efforts such as building orphanages and feeding the hungry children on the street. I thought it was a great opportunity going to Africa because it really opened my eyes in what is going on around the world. To close out the luncheon, each IA was presented with a special plaque, a Boots on the Ground coin from the Northeast Florida Navy League Council, and thank-you letters from U.S. Senators Bill Nelson and Marco Rubio and U.S. Representatives Ander Crenshaw and Corrine Brown. Each spouse was also presented with a rose courtesy of the Navy Exchange. The IA Recognition Luncheon was first held at NAS Jax in 2008 and ini tiated by the Northeast Florida Navy League Council. The Navy League has been privi leged to honor more than 1,850 IAs over the past six years. Our Sailors have left their families to take on a mission that was not expected of them but they have stepped up on a voluntary basis to meet the challenge. We feel very privileged to honor our Sailors and their spouses for their sacrifice in the continuing War on Terrorism, said Mike McGrath, former national director, Navy League of the United States. Individual Augmentees recognizedPhotos by MC2 Amanda CabasosIndividual Augmentees from NAS Jax commands, along with their spouses, members of the Northeast Florida Navy League Council, Rotary Club of Orange Park and Rotary Club of Orange Park Sunrise gather for a photo after the luncheon. Guest Speaker Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet commends the 53 Individual Augmentees (IA) for their outstanding service during the NAS Jacksonville IA Recognition Luncheon held on base Feb. 20. Orthopedic Surgeon Cmdr. Jorge Brito from Naval Hospital Jacksonville speaks at the IA Recognition Luncheon and expresses his personal experience deploying to Afghanistan. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014 7

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8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014 member has financial difficulty, it can affect job per formance. DoD feels so strongly about [financial readiness], every major installation and family support center will have personal financial managers to provide counseling and education to service members and their families, Thompson said, adding that installa tion banks and credit unions also are committed to increasing financial literacy. Taking a pledge to reduce debt and save money has become a tradition for service members, families and DoD civilians to make a commitment to themselves, Thompson said. The pledge can be taken online or publicly during a major installation event during Military Saves Week. Last year, we had over 29,000 [people] take the pledge, and thats exciting, she noted. Thompson said pledging to save and developing plans to do so are individual. Some people might save a set amount of money each payday, while others devote a percentage, for example. Thompson also emphasized that developing a financial readiness plan is a family affair, and said the sooner children are introduced to the habit of saving and spending wisely, the earlier they will learn sound financial skills. Everyone needs to have financial education, she said. The traditional Thrift Savings Plan and its Roth IRA TSP counterpart offer painless avenues to automati cally save, and the TSP plans are among DoDs pillars of its military family readiness campaign, Thompson said. The TSP gives you an opportunity to think about your long-term future [such as] retirement, because we think its far away, but its not, she said. Every day, you need to start thinking about saving for retirement. Offering resources such as TSP shows how serious DoD is about its troops saving and reducing debt for their successes in life, Thompson added. In the past 10 years, the numbers of service mem bers and their families enrolling in the [traditional] TSP and the new Roth TSP have increased, Thompson said, calling that development very exciting. The Military OneSource website is another resource for help with financial planning, offering online financial tools and up to 12 sessions per monetary issue for face-to-face or telephone financial counsel ing, she said. About 65 percent of troops and families have emergency savings plans, Thompson said. Thats impor tant. Our message is getting across about how important savings is, she added. Overall, having a family financial preparedness plan is something service members and their fami lies should have first and foremost on their minds, Thompson emphasized. Your financial stability is going to make sure your family is secure, and that you dont have to worry unnecessarily about something you do have control over, she said. MILITARY SAVESFrom Page 6 By Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceDefense Secretary Chuck Hagel has ordered the under secretary of defense for policy to develop a plan to reorganize the departments POW/MIA accounting effort, Pentagon press secretary Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby said Feb. 20. Hagel issued a memo direct ing Michael Lumpkin, the act ing undersecretary, to develop a plan within 30 days to increase to the maximum extent possible the numbers of missing service personnel accounted for annu ally, while ensuring timely and accurate information is provided their families. Kirby said the goal is to consolidate relevant department assets into a single organization with oversight of and accountability for the entire mission of accounting for missing personnel. In addition, the plan will pro pose ways to increase the num ber of identifications, improve transparency for families and expand the case file system to include all missing personnel, including those from World War II. The secretary expects this plan to recommend changes ranging from civilian and mil itary personnel to contracting, facilities, budgets, and oversight of laboratory operations, Kirby said. Hes also asked all services, combatant commands and rel evant DoD components to assist Mr. Lumpkin with anything he needs in this effort. Hagels memo is consistent with congressional legislation and will continue to be informed by analysis that DoD and other governmental agencies have conducted. The plan will also incorporate suggestions and rec ommendations offered to DoD by military and veteran service organizations. This remains a top priority for the secretary and for this department, Kirby said. In fact, we believe it is a sacred obligation. We take it seriously, and were going to keep it at. Were going to keep improv ing.Hagel orders revamp of POW/MIA effortcenters, and 145 equipment validations. Braun praised the work aboard the Coronado and stressed the importance of supporting the LCS community as the Navy continues to consider Navy Station Mayport as the future homeport for about 1,000 Sailors and 14 new LCS ships estimated to join the fleet by 2020. The work you are doing is proof that this program is the right way to go, said Braun. I commend you on the excellent work you are doing. While at NAS Jacksonville, Braun toured spaces at Information Dominance Corps Region Southeast. During a pinning cer emony at the command, she recognized two reservists for their com pletion of the Enlisted Information Domination Warfare Specialist Program. Braun also traveled to Blount Island on the St. Johns River, where she toured spaces of the Fourth Navy Expeditionary Logistics Regiment (4th NELR) recognized three Sailors for their completion of the Enlisted Expeditionary Warfare Specialist Program, participated in advanced cargo simulator training. NELR serves as the headquarters element for two Navy cargo han dling battalions and one expedi tionary communications detach ment comprised of about 660 fulltime and selected reservists from 10 bases throughout Navy Region Southeast. YN1(EXW/AW) Keith Henley, one of the Sailors pinned Feb. 22, said he appreciated the time Braun took to interact with reservists and see some of the training 4th NELR does onsite. To have Vice Adm. Braun take time out of her schedule to visit a smaller command and have the cargo handlers get some one-onone time with her is always good, Henley said. NOSC Jacksonville provides sup port to approximately 2,000 Sailors in 66 units at seven locations, including NAS Jacksonville; Naval Station Mayport; Blount Island; Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay; Naval Support Activity Naples, Italy; Stuttgart Army Airfield, Germany; and Royal Air Force Molesworth, England. CHIEFFrom Page 1problems but that we dont have a systemic problem. I know from the stats within our CPO Mess, and the Navy as a whole, that conduct issues are flat or trending down. Thats why I say that we in the Navy are not experiencing an epidemic of ethical problems. But whenever we do recognize an integrity based problem big or small it must be immediately addressed, said Stevens. Why must ethical problems be addressed quickly and firmly? Im asking you for the single, key word that goes with integrity. A number of CPOs from the audience voiced, almost in unison, trust. Stevens responded, Someone help me here. Why is trust is so important? A female CPO stood and said, Ultimately, we put our lives on the line, so we must trust each other to have our backs. If not, our mission cannot be accomplished. But I trust every brother and sister here today to have my back and Ill do the same for them. Violation of our integrity erodes public trust, called out another chief. We have to be mindful of what we say and how we say it in the age of public media. Another chief told the assembly that lack of disci pline can expose Sailors to the threat of blackmail which can create a security risk for confidential information. There are lots of bad actors out there who want intelligence from our spaces. If they find some one with an ethical or moral problem, they can hold it over you until you give them something they want. MCPON was so impressed by the chief, he urged the audience to please give him a round of applause! He went on to explain, I met with 800 chief petty officers the other day in Norfolk. We talked for 90 minutes and not one person, myself included, made that point. Thats why Im here today. Because nobody knows better than those who live the dream every single day. For more than 120 years, when the Navy faces a challenge, we always turn to our chiefs mess. Its in our DNA to handle problems. We take on challenges with vigor and passion because thats what we do. Nobody is better positioned to manage change in any other branch of Americas armed forces. We bring the ability and experience to effectively communicate with every rank in the Navy from a seaman apprentice to the CNO, said Stevens. One more CPO stood and said, Our common val ues have always been integrity and trust. We create the tempo of a command, and that means we set the standards of commitment, performance, achievement and, yes, integrity which simply means knowing right from wrong. Navy Code of EthicsDO DO NOT MCPONFrom Page 1 Photos by MCC Elizabeth Thompson Chief of Navy Reserve Vice Adm. Robin Braun asks reservists to raise their hand if they had been mobilized at least once in their Navy career. More than 150 Sailors, assigned to units at Navy Operational Support Command Jacksonville, attended the Feb. 22 all-hands call to hear about the latest developments in the Navy Reserves, to exchange information on challenges Sailors face in maintaining unit readiness, and to discuss possible ways to improve training and procedures. Chief of Navy Reserve Vice Adm. Robin Braun poses for a group photo after an all-hands call held at NAS Jacksonville. More than 150 Sailors, assigned to units at Navy Operational Support Command Jacksonville, attended the all-hands call to hear about the latest developments in the Navy Reserves, exchange information on challenges Sailors face in maintaining unit readiness, and discuss possible ways to improve training and procedures.

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By ET1 Patrick HorganFACSFACJAX PAOThirteen sailors from Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility, Jacksonville (FACSFACJAX) volunteered on Feb. 6 at Veterans Farm Jacksonville (veteransfarm. org). The event was led by FACSFACJAX Executive Officer Cmdr. Shannon Parker, and Command Senior Chief Petty Officer ATCS Eric Elkin. The crew assisted the farm staff with clearing two fields that consisted of cutting and removing downed trees and limbs. After a half-day of hard work, the FACSFACJAX team was thanked by farm manager Steve Ellsberry, The amount of work that your team completed in five hours has saved us over three months of preparation for the upcoming fellowship pro gram. The Veterans Farm mission is to help disabled combat veter ans reintegrate back into soci ety through the use of horticulture therapy while working together in a relaxed, natural environment. Veterans enrolled in the sixmonth fellowship program work as a team to develop solutions that will enable them to overcome physical and mental barriers. Their goal is to help veterans make a social connection with the civilian community by hav ing them grow and sell fruits and vegetables at farmers mar kets, U-pick and commercial markets. One of their pillars is to educate the community about the health benefits of eating organic food. We want to follow a model that will help create a healthier nation. Who better to lead the way than our nations veter ans? asked Ellsberry. Another goal is to provide a combination of work, therapy, education and socialization through sustainable agricultur al training. Veterans Farm collaborates and works with local farm ers, organic associations, community business lead ers, the University of Florida Agriculture Department and the Veterans Affairs work ther apy program. Veterans Farm will be host ing volunteer events on April 20 and May 18 from 8 a.m. to noon. Command volunteer events can be scheduled Monday thru Friday. For more information, go to: info@veteransfarm.com. Large groups are welcome as well as students needing com munity volunteer hours for high school or college. Visit Veterans Farm at 9526 Argyle Forest Blvd., Jacksonville 32222. Photo by Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast artisans in actionFleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Commanding Officer Capt. John Kemna (left) discusses the capabilities of the Easily Manipulated Mechanical Arm (EMMA) with FRCSE Fiberglass Worker Jerry Lackey (right) and Chris Chiang of Temple Allen Industries at the FRCSE Paint Hangar on Feb. 21. Emma reproduces the motions of a human operator to sand parts protecting the artisan from continual stress and vibration induced injuries caused by manual sanding. The machine produces a smooth finish at a sanding rate five times greater than manual sanding, while capturing dust particles in its integrated vacuum system.Photo by Victor PittsRobert Aceves (left), the EA-6B and trainer aircraft deputy product manager, and Capt. Horacio Fernandez, incoming Chief of Naval Air Training (CNATRA), look on as Bill Connelly, the trainer aircraft program manager, points out wear and tear on a lower nacelle duct removed from a T-44 Pegasus trainer at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast on Feb. 13. Artisans at the military depot are per forming aircraft conditional inspections to ensure aircraft reliability. Sailors volunteer for farm work Photos courtesy of FACSFACJAX A group of FACSFACJAX volunteers, led by Executive Officer Cmdr. Shannon Parker (left, second row kneeling and CMDCS Eric Elkin (left, third row standing), put in a day's hard labor to create new plantable acreage at Veterans Farm. OSSR Taylor Carden discovered a goat locker at the Veterans Farm. (From left) ET2 Jeremy Pugh, IT3 Daniel Ketchum and AC1 Greg Klein work to get dead trees into manageable pieces. (From back) YN3 Tquondra Harris, LSC Terry Loeffelholz and ET2 Jeremy Pugh carry a long tree limb to be cut into fire wood. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014 9

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Energy reduction bar set highThe Building Energy Monitors from various tenant commands were joined by NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker (far left) Feb. 18 to discuss energy management goals and practices for the station. Photos by MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Installation Energy Manager Josh Bass leads the quarterly Building Energy Monitor meeting at the base public works department conference room. The gathering was an informative meeting that included energy reduction goals and various methods to use power more efficiently. Photos by Morgan Kehnert 'Aerobathon' delivers fun and fitnessAR Chanay George of VP-45 displays her high kick during the step class taught by Terry Crawford at the MWR "2014 Aerobathan" held at the NAS Jax Wellness Center. Amare Harris, who attended the Aerobathon with his father, was able to pick up the step moves very quickly. The MWR "2014 Aerobathon" featured six different heart-pumping classes. During the 30-minute Zumba class, instructor CeCe Hartsell (right) energized her standing room only class. With 85 participants, the MWR "2014 Aerobathon" was a sweaty success. The spin class was full for the entire two hours. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014 11

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By Lt. j.g. Brendan McGoey and Lt. j.g. Jeremy TijerinaVP-10 Public AffairsThe Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) 405 Long Range Patrol Squadron based in Nova Scotia, hosted a detachment of VP-10, Red Lancers from Jan. 24-30 for exercise Atlantic Shield 2014. The event focused on antisubmarine warfare and antisurface warfare missions. Despite having to overcome the severe weather conditions that often plague the area, the detachment proved to be a rewarding and memorable experience for crewmembers. The Red Lancers sent Combat Aircrew (CAC)-9, led by Lt. Dean Legidakes, with a maintenance contingent led by AZC Natalia Luchetti. Lt. Cmdr. Larry Blankenship, the detachment officer in charge, oversaw the operations as the crew achieved outstanding success. Throughout their time in Canada, the Red Lancer crew completed multiple missions, only having to cancel their first scheduled event due to extremely adverse weather conditions off the coast of Nova Scotia. However, CAC-9 and RCAF Squadron 405 were able to complete all of their neces sary qualifications and train ing requirements during the follow-on flights. The complet ed missions provided the Red Lancers with the opportunity to experience real-time, inter nationally coordinated opera tions with the RCAFs own version of the P-3C Orion, the CP-140 Aurora. Unsure of what to expect, Lt. j.g. Ryan Mackey, the tactical coordinator for the crew, was impressed with how smoothly the operations were executed. Working with the Canadians felt just like working with our guys back in the states. Communication and coordination meshed perfectly, he said. To celebrate the conclu sion of Atlantic Shield 2014, the detachment was treated to a celebration hosted by their RCAF counterparts. The gra cious hosts provided din ner as the crews, along with the maintenance personnel, shared experiences and trad ed squadron patches with one another. Squadron 405 really went above and beyond for us the entire time we were there. They were nothing but welcom ing and hospitable. Im look ing forward to any upcoming opportunity we may have to work with them again, said Lt. Andrew Knott, the patrol plane pilot for CAC-9. VP-10 is home based at NAS Jacksonville, and is currently doing work-ups for their next deployment that will send them to the 4th and 5th Fleets. Photo courtesy of VP-10Members of VP-10 and 405 LRP Squadron celebrate the final event of Atlantic Shield 2014 at the Royal Canadien Air Force base in Nova Scotia.Red Lancers visit the Great White North From Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsFleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Human Resources Program Administrator Tammie Wells, 45, passed away Feb. 22 at Orange Park Medical Center. Wells, a Jacksonville native, gradu ated from William M. Raines Senior High School in 1986. She enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps in October 1987, completing recruit training at Parris Island, S.C. in February 1987. Wells worked in the administrative field during her service as a Marine, retiring as a gunnery sergeant in April 2007. Wells never saw combat as an administrative chief, however her ser vice as the casualty assistance calls officer from 2002-07 in Jacksonville included assisting seven families who lost loved ones serving on active duty. Her job consisted of accompanying a chaplain to the familys home to noti fy the next-of-kin and provide details of the cause of death. She explained death benefits and served as a liaison between the funeral home and family. Her military decorations included the Meritorious Service Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (two awards), Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (five awards), Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal and various unit commendations, letters of appre ciations and meritorious masts. After retiring from the Marine Corps, she joined the FRCSE team in 2007 working as a management technician in the legal office until assuming her last position as pro gram administrator in the Human Resources Office in 2008. Wells also served the community in numerous capacities including acting as secretary for the Montford Point Marine Association Chapter No. 29 and American Legion Post No. 197, and assisted with many youth pro grams at Grace Baptist Missionary Church. A viewing for family and friends will be held Feb. 28 at 5 p.m. at James Graham Mortuary, 3631 Moncrief Rd., Jacksonville, Fla. 32209. The funeral service will be held March 1 at noon at Grace Baptist Missionary Church, 1553 East 21st Street, Jacksonville, Fla. 32205. Wells will be buried with full mil itary honors at the Jacksonville National Cemetery March 3. In MemoriamWells Photos by Jacob Sippel HM2 Merrian Calzado presents Florida State College at Jacksonvilles Chief Financial Officer Cleve Warren with a plaque on Feb. 20, on behalf of Naval Hospital Jacksonville, during the commands African-American/Black History Month celebration. Civil Rights in America was the theme of this years celebration. Cleve Warren, chief financial officer at Florida State College at Jacksonville, and guest speaker for Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles African American/Black History Month celebration Feb. 20, spoke about the past, present and future of African Americans. Civil Rights in America was the theme of this years celebration.African American/Black History Month celebration 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014

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By Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department can no longer put off slowing the growth of military personnel costs, and the fiscal year 2015 budget request DoD is rec ommending to the president begins that process, defense leaders said Feb. 24. Saying they are ready to take on the hard task of curb ing growth in compensation, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, previewed the fiscal 2015 budget request for reporters. Hagel said all defense lead ers agreed to a holistic and comprehensive approach to compensation changes. Continuous piecemeal chang es will only magnify uncertainty and doubts among our ser vice members about whether promised benefits will be there in the future, he said. Dempsey also stressed this in his remarks. I know this weighs heavily on the minds of our men and women in uni form and on their families, he said. Our force is extraor dinarily accepting of change. They are less understanding of piecemeal approaches. They want and they deserve pre dictability. Military and civilian com pensation accounts for 50 per cent of the DoD budget. This has put the department out of balance, the defense leaders said, and the department must invest to ensure service mem bers are well-equipped and well-trained to handle future challenges. All savings from compensa tion reforms will help keep service members properly trained and equipped, they added. The budget request recommends a 1 percent increase in military pay, and it freezes pay for gen eral and flag officers. Hagel and Dempsey stressed that no one in uniform will see a pay cut. Rather, they explained, the push is to slow growth to put pay and benefits on a more sustainable path. Total pay and benefits increased 40 percent faster than the private sector between 2001 and 2012, and while that was the right thing to do at the time, we cant continue at that rate over the long term, Hagel said. In addition to pay, the budget request begins the process to slow the growth rate of tax-free basic housing allowances. This will continue for five years until the allowances cover about 95 percent of the average service members housing expens es. Again, no one will see a decrease in their basic house allowance, Hagel said. DoD also would no longer reimburse service members for renters insurance. This change will happen slowly, so that no ones hous ing allowances will actually go down, Hagel said, noting that the process also will consider differences in the relative cost of living, so service members in high-rent areas wont be adversely affected. Under the request, the department will not shut down any commissaries, but will cut subsidies for some of them, the secretary said. Over three years, we will reduce by $1 billion the annu al direct subsidy provided to military commissaries, which now totals $1.4 billion, he said. We are not shutting down commissaries. All com missaries will still get free rent and pay no taxes. They will be able to continue to provide a very good deal to service members and retirees much like our post exchanges, which do not receive direct subsidies. Overseas commissaries and those in remote locations will continue receiving direct sub sidies. DoD will simplify and mod ernize the TRICARE health insurance program by con solidating plans and adjust ing deductibles and co-pays in ways that encourage mem bers to use the most affordable means of care such as military treatment facilities, preferred providers, and generic prescriptions, the secretary said. We will ask retirees and some active-duty family mem bers to pay a little more in their deductibles and co-pays, but their benefits will remain affordable, as they should be, he said. To protect the most vulnerable, under this plan medically retired service members, their families, and the survivors of service members who die on active duty would not pay the annual participa tion fees charged to other retirees, and would pay a smaller share of the costs for health care than other retirees. Under the budget recommen dation, the average military retiree would go from paying 8 percent of health care costs out of pocket to paying 11 per cent. Retirees old enough to use Medicare and who choose to have TRICARE as well, even tually would be asked to pay a little bit more to enroll in TRICARE, Hagel said. The approach encourages retirees to use free military facilities if they are close to home, which provide outstanding care and are often under used, the secretary said. The compensation proposals do not recommend any changes to the military retirement ben efits for those now in the ser vices, Hagel said. We are awaiting the results of the Military Compensation and Retirement Modernization Commission, which is expected to present its report in February 2015, before pursuing reforms in this area, he added. But DOD continues to support the principle of grandfathering for any future changes to military retirement plans. Hagel said the proposals were carefully crafted to reform mili tary compensation in a fair, responsible, and sustainable way. We recognize that no one serving our nation in uniform is overpaid for what they do for our country, he added. But if we continue on the current course without making these modest adjustments now, the choices will only grow more difficult and painful down the road. We will inevitably have to either cut into compensation even more deeply and abruptly, or we will have to deprive our men and women of the train ing and equipment they need to succeed in battle. Either way, we would be breaking faith with our people. And the president and I will not allow that to happen. By Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceDefense officials continue to urge Afghan President Hamid Karzai to sign the Bilateral Security Agreement with the United States, Pentagon press sec retary Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby said Feb. 20. We continue to believe it would be enormously helpful to have a bilateral security agreement as soon as possible, Kirby said during a Pentagon news conference. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has said he would like to have the agreement signed by an upcoming NATO Defense Ministerial. That meeting is next week, Kirby said. Karzai has said he will leave it to his successor to sign the document, which if done soon will allow for the United States and other NATO nations to plan for Operation Resolute Support -to train, advise and assist mission that is set to begin Jan. 1. 2015. Without an agreement were going to have to start planning for a complete withdrawal, but were not at that point right now, Kirby said. Pentagon officials are also studying a Center for Naval Analysis report com missioned by the Defense Department that concludes the Taliban will strengthen after the NATO combat mission ends, and that the Afghan military should be larger than currently projected. One of the reasons why the alliance is interested in the resolute support mission post-2014 is to help improve the capabilities of the Afghan national security forces, the admiral said in response to questions about the reports conclu sions. Its a commitment we made long ago. Its a commitment were trying to make now on the ground in Afghanistan to improve their capacity and capabil ity. Afghan forces are in the lead for combat operations throughout the country, the admiral said. They and NATO never dismiss the Taliban insurgency or the threat the Taliban pose not just to the United States and its allies, but to the Afghan people. The CNA report will inform DoD leaders as the mission continues, Kirby said.DoD takes holistic view of slowing military compensation growthPentagon: U.S./Afghan agreement remains a priority JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014 13

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14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014 DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live entertainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaokeFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Jan. 18, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: Jan. 25, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Navy Run Training Program At the fitness center Running group meets every Tuesday at 4 p.m. Biggest Loser Challenge 8 week program, teams of 2 Begins March 10 9th Annual Captain Chuck Cornett Navy Run April 5 at 8 a.m. Register online at www.1stplacesports. com/calendar.html Lifeguard Course Begins March 14 Sign-up at the base gymI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Alhambra Dinner show $38 $50.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Jacksonville Suns available soon! Rivership Romance (includes dinner) $40$57.75 Disney On Ice $15 Funk Fest 2 Day Ticket $62 VIP $169 Motley Crew Concert Club seats $63.50 Gatornationals $32 $58 Wild Adventures $30 $70 while supplies last Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27,2014) $166 $194.50 Discover Disney Ticket Florida Resident Ticket Valid for sale through APRIL 12, 2014 Universal Orlando Military Special 3rd day free Nonresident 2014 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 THE ARTIST SERIES-BROADWAY IN JACKSONVILLE 2014 SEASON Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation $349-$369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St Augustine $4.25 $15.50 St Augustine Alligator Farm Nile Zipline $35.25 (free admission with reservation) St Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Half Hour Boggy Creek Airboat Rides $15.50 $20 Wild Florida Airboats (Kenansville, FL) $18 $46.75 Florida Ecosafaris $22.75 $52.75 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld Hotel properties, Universal Hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Ladies Day Out March 1 at 1:30 p.m. Neon Vibe Volunteer Trip March 8 Paintball Trip March 15 at 9 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Twilight League now forming Begins March 25 Team rosters are due on March 18 Spring Breakout Championship April 4 at 10 a.m. $40 per person Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty March 11 & 25 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests March 13 & 27Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you!Flying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person From Region Legal Service OfficeThe VITA Self Service will be available to active duty service members, retirees and dependents, Reservists (active 30 days or predemobilization) and entitled for mer spouses from Feb. 4 through April 15. The service is for those whose adjusted gross income doesnt exceed $57,000. Those who qualify under the Military One Source will be able file their taxes for free using the H&R Block software. Volunteer assistance will be onsite; however volunteers are not permitted to prepare taxes. Those needing additional assis tance outside the scope of the vol unteers may be redirected to a nearby tax center. The tax center is located at NAS Jacksonville, Building 4, Room 108 (Ranger Street). The center is open Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Tuesday and Thursday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. For questions or concerns, please contact LN1 Clinton Washington at 542-8038 or e-mail Clinton.wash ington@navy.mil. From FFSC The NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to ser vice members and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2014: p.m.), Aug. 18-19 (8 a.m.-4 p.m.), Aug. 20 (8 a.m.-12:30 p.m.), Nov. 17-20 (5:30-10 p.m.). Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) March 10-14, March 24-28, April 7-11, May 5-9, May 19-23, June 9-13, June 23-27, July 7-11, July 21-25, Aug. 11-15, Aug. 25-29, Sept. 15-19, Oct. 20-24, Nov. 3-7, Dec. 1-5. Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) March 17-21, April 14-18, May 12-16, June 16-20, July 14-18, Aug. 18-22, Sept. 22-26, Oct. 27-31, Nov. 17-21, Dec. 8-12. April 1, May 2, June 30, June 30, July 29, Aug. 4, Sept. 2, Oct. 8, Nov. 14, Dec. 22. (8-9:30 a.m.) April 2, May 28, July 1, Sept. 3, Nov. 12. noon) April 2, May 28, July 1, Sept. 3, Nov. 12. April 29-30, Aug. 5-6, Nov. 24-25. a.m.-4 p.m.) July 31. (1-4 p.m.) April 1, July 29, Oct.8. March 31, July 30, Oct. 7. a.m.) April 4, July 30, Oct. 17. May 1, July 2, Aug. 7, Oct. 2, Nov. 6. 6, May 8, July 10, Sept. 11, Nov. 13. p.m.), July 29 (10-11:30 a.m.), Oct. 4 (1-2:30 p.m.) 14, May 12, June 9, July 14, Aug. 11, Sept. 8, Oct. 6, Nov. 3, Dec. 8. March 11, April 8, May 13, June 10, July 8, Aug. 12, Sept. 9, Oct. 7, Nov. 4, Dec. 9. noon) May 20, 27, Sept. 23, 30. March 31, April 28, May 19, June 30, July 28, Aug. 25, Sept. 29, Oct. 27, Nov. 24, Dec. 15. May 1 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.), May 27 July 8 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.-no workshop June 3), July 29 Sept. 9 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.-no workshop Aug. 19), Sept. 25 Oct. 30 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.). March 19, May 6, July 15, Sept. 9, Nov. 18. 11, 18, 25; May 6, 13, 20, 27; July 1, 8, 15, 22; Sept. 9, 16, 23, 30; Nov. 4, 12, 18, 25. 22; June 3, 10, 17, 24; Aug. 5, 12, 19, 26; Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28. a.m.) Every Wednesday 3, Sept. 16, Dec. 2. April 1, 15, 29; May 13, 27; June 10, 24; July 15, 29; Aug. 12, 26; Sept. 9, 23; Oct. 7, 21; Nov. 4, 18; Dec. 2, 16. Orientation (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) March 13, May. 15, July 17, Sept. 4, Nov. 5. April 10, June 12, Aug. 14, Oct. 9, Dec. 4.To register for any of the above workshops, please call 542-5745. Tax services availableFFSC offers life skills workshops

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Valentines Day 5K age-group winnersFrom StaffMen 19 & under: Austin Reynolds (22:56); Joshua Steverson (24:22) Men 20-24: Matthew Burke (17:34); Jacob Schmit (19:37) Men 25-29: Robert Bobmard (18:53); Chris Fleck (1956) Men 30-34: Erik Koenig (19:12); Vincent Sonson (20:56) Men 35-39: Joe Kovacocy (21:01); Brendan Lockard (22:05) Men 40-44: Andy Patterson (18:05); Jack Parker (20:09) Men: 45-49 Edgar Twining (24:42); Martin Milligan (24:50) Men: 50 & over: John Metzgar (17:37); John Mann (23:41) Women 19 & under: Ashley Pleace (45:08) Women 20-24: Miranda Abbas (22:02); Jennifer Dominguez (22:58) Women 25-29: Rachel Korzeb (25:30); Danielle Robinson (25:35) Women 30-34: Melissa Gomez (22:33); Sarah Little (27:11) Women 35-39: Charlotte Miller (24:15); Stephanie Edwards (27:34) Women 40-44: Susn Heinz (27:57); Krista Willim (29:01) Women 45-49: Denise Metzgar (23:29); Tamara Lugenbeal (31:59) Women 50 & over: Deanna Falls (30:04); Iris Pabon (30:20) Top-3 Men: Matthew Burke (17:34); John Metzgar (17:37); Andy Patterson (18:05) Top-3 Women: Miranda Abbas (22:02); Melissa Gomez (22:33); Jennifer Dominguez (22:58) Sand Volleyball League meeting March 12 at noonOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS paperwork.Leprechaun Dash 5k March 14 The run is free and open to all authorized gym patrons. participating. Sign up at NAS Jax Gym or the Fitness Source prior to the Feb. 7 deadline. The run is held on Perimeter Road at the end of Mustin Road, before the Antenna Farm at 11:30 a.m. Registration will also be held at the run site from 10:30-11:15 a.m. Awards will be given to the top male and top female runner for age groups: 19 & under; 20-24; 25-29; 30-34; 35-39; 4044; 45-49; 50 & over.Kickball League meeting March 19 at noonOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS paperwork. Tennis Tournament March 24 The tournament is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractor women assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants will earn or third. Sign up by March 21.Greybeard Softball League FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractor personnel age 30 and older who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play on Tuesday & Thursday at 11:30 a.m. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Rosters due by March 7. Play begins at the end of March or the beginning of April.Intramural Softball League FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Rosters are due by March 7. Play begins at the end of March or the beginning of April.Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians; DoD contractors; retirees; and dependents over 18. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Rosters are due by March 7. Play begins at the end of March or the beginning of April. Tournament April 28Open to active duty, retirees, dependents over 18, selective reservists, DoD civilians and contractors. The tournament starts at 5 p.m. at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts on the corner of Allegheny Road and Birmingham Road. Call 5422930 to sign up by April 25. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil StandingsAs of Feb. 214-on-4 Flag Football NOSC 4 0 Vet Clinic 4 0 VR-58 4 0 VP-26 3 1 VR-62 3 1 HSM-72 2 1 ASD Jax 1 3 NavHosp IMC 1 3 FACSFAC 0 2 CRS-10 0 3 FRCSE 62A/690 0 4 VP-62 0 4Intramural Basketball FRCSE 700 5 1 FRCSE 600 4 2 NAVHOSP 4 2 NCTS 4 3 NAVHOSP Galley 3 3 VP-10 3 3 NAS Jax 2 3 VP-45 2 3 VR-58 2 3 VP-26 2 4 FACSFAC 1 4 TPU/PCF 1 4Greybeard Basketball NAVHOSP 4 1 VP-30 4 1 VP-10 3 1 NAVFAC 3 3 VP-26 3 3 FRCSE 2 2 VP-5 1 1 NCTS 0 5Badminton Doubles CV-TSC Ashore 1 0 FACSFAC-2 1 0 NAVFAC Red 1 0 NAVFAC Blue 1 0 NAVHOSP MSU 1 0 NBHC Jax 1 0 FACSFAC-1 0 1 MWR Dynamic Duo 0 1 NAVFAC Gold 0 1 NAVFAC Green 0 1 NAVFAC Orange 0 1 CNATTU Blue 3 0 NCTS 3 0 VP-45 3 0 FRCSE 2 1 Navy Band 2 1 VP-30 2 1 CV-TSC/PSD 1 2 SERCC 1 2 VP-10 1 2 CNATTU Gold 0 3 Photos by Morgan KehnertOn your marks . . More than 250 runners showed up for the NAS Jax Valentine's Day 5K on Feb. 14. Most competitors fell in love with the sunny sky and moderate temperature. AWOAN Miranda Abbas of VP-30 was the first female runner to cross the Valentine's Day 5K Run finish line with a time of 22:02. 1st Lt. Matthew Burke of the U.S. Army was the top finisher in the Feb. 14 Valentine's Day 5K with a time of 17:34. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014 American Forces Press ServicePresident Barack Obama will award 24 Army veterans the Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry during a White House ceremony March 18. These veterans will receive the Medal of Honor in recognition of their valor during major combat operations in World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War, according to a White House news release. Each of these soldiers bravery was previously recognized by award of the Distinguished Service Cross, the nations second highest military award. That award will be upgraded to the Medal of Honor in recognition of their gallantry, intrepidity and heroism above and beyond the call of duty. In 2002, Congress, through the Defense Authorization Act, called for a review of Jewish American and Hispanic American veteran war records from World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War, to ensure those deserving the Medal of Honor were not denied because of prejudice, accord ing to the release. During the review, records of several soldiers of neither Jewish nor Hispanic descent were also found to display criteria worthy of the Medal of Honor. The 2002 Act was amended to allow these soldiers to be honored with the upgrade in addition to the Jewish and Hispanic American soldiers. The President will award the Medal of Honor to: the Medal of Honor for his courageous actions while serving as radio telephone operator in Company C, 1st Battalion (Airmobile), 501st Infantry, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile) during search and clear mission near Tam Ky, Republic of Vietnam. the Medal of Honor for his courageous actions while serving as commander of a strike force drawn from Company D, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, during combat operations against an armed enemy in the vicinity of Chi Lang, Republic of Vietnam, on September 17, 1969. receive the Medal of Honor for his courageous actions while serving as the company commander, Detachment B-36, Company A, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces during combat operations against an armed enemy in Phuoc Long Province, Republic of Vietnam, on September 1, 1969. The President will posthumously award the Medal of Honor to the fol lowing individuals who distinguished themselves by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty while serving during the Vietnam War: the Medal of Honor for his courageous actions while serving as an acting team leader for Company B, 1st Battalion, 2nd Infantry, 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Lai Khe, Republic of Vietnam, on December 8, 1968. receive the Medal of Honor posthu mously for his courageous actions while serving as a rifleman with Company D, 2nd Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) during combat operations against an armed enemy in Phuoc Long Province, Republic of Vietnam, on August 12, 1969. will receive the Medal of Honor post humously for his courageous actions while serving as an acting Platoon Leader in Company D, 1st Battalion, 505th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 82nd Airborne Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Ap Tan Hoa, Republic of Vietnam, on April 4, 1969. the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as a Machinegunner in Company C, 1st Battalion (Mechanized), 5th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division dur ing combat operations against an armed enemy near Ph Romeas Hek, Cambodia, on May 12, 1970. the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as an acting M-60 machine gunner in Company E, 2nd Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) during combat operations against an armed enemy in the Republic of Vietnam on April 10, 1969. The following individuals distin guished themselves by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty while serving during the Korean War: the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serv ing as an acting machine gunner in 3rd Squad, 2nd Platoon, Company B, 187th Airborne Infantry Regiment during combat operations against an armed enemy in Kangdong, Korea, on November 25, 1950. the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as an Acting Rifleman in Company A, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Chorwon, Korea, on August 1, 1952. the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving with Company I, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Tabu-dong, Korea, on September 3, 1950. the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as an assistant machine gunner with Company M, 5th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Yangpyong, Korea, on March 6 and 7, 1951. receive the Medal of Honor posthu mously for his courageous actions while serving as a member of Company L, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Kalma-Eri, Korea, on April 28, 1951. receive the Medal of Honor posthu mously for his courageous actions while serving as a member of Company F, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Waegwan, Korea, on September 4, 1950. the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serv ing as an automatic rifleman with 2nd Platoon, Company G, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Changyong-ni, Korea, on May 23, 1951. Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as an automatic rifleman with Company F, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division in Chorwon, Korea, on September 21, 1952. Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while leading 1st Platoon, Company G, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division in Kumsong, Korea, on October 19, 1951. The following individuals distin guished themselves by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty while serving during World War II: Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving with Company C, 8th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Schevenhutte, Germany, on December 3, 1944. Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serv ing with Company D, 2d Battalion, 507th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 17th Airborne Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Amfreville, France, on June 9, 1944. will receive the Medal of Honor post humously for his courageous actions while serving as the squad leader of a rifle squad with 2d Platoon, Company L, 180th Infantry, 45th Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Aprilia, Italy, on May 27 and 28, 1944. the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serv ing as a squad leader in Company C, 30th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy near St. Die, France, on November 7, 1944. receive the Medal of Honor post humously for his courageous actions while serving as a platoon sergeant with Company B, 350th Infantry, 88th Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy on Mt. Battaglia, Italy, on October 4, 1944. the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as a section leader for Company H, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Heistern, Germany on November 18, 1944. will receive the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as the commander of Company E, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, during combat operations against an armed enemy near Lure, France, on September 17, 1944. The Medal of Honor is awarded to members of the Armed Forces who distinguish themselves conspicuously by gallantry above and beyond the call of duty while: enemy of the United States; involving conflict with an opposing foreign force; engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party. From Navy League Mayport The Navy League of Mayport is celebrat ing the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration dinner and program. This is an All Services event featuring a joint color guard, All Services Missing Person table, the Navy Band with all the service songs, and numerous historical dis plays. Tickets are now on sale for this years event which will be held June 7, at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine.The keynote speak er is Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert. Veterans who served at the Battle of Midway and veterans of all branches who served in prior con flicts, as well as those currently serving are invited to attend. Additionally, Medal of Honor recipients and former Prisoners of War who have heroically answered the call of duty will also be in attendance. Come meet these National Treasures and hear their adventures first hand. The evening promises to be emotional and patriotwith survivors of what historians call one of the U. S. Navys greatest sea victories and the turning point of World War II in the Pacific. Ticket prices for active duty and spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50, O6 and above $65. Prices for Civilians and Retirees $65. The evening includes fine dining and a memo rable program. Uniform will be O4 and above dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below dinner dress white/dinner dress white jacket optional, and civil ian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 5 p.m., with dinner served at 6 p.m. Tickets are mandatory and seating is reserved. Ticket sales end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before this date. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER. Tickets may be purchased from the following locations: NAVY LEAGUE MAYPORT Bob Price, 904-246-9982 or 904-718-2118 NAVY LEAGUE ST AUGUSTINE Bill Dudley, 904-806-4712 or 904-794-7814 American Forces Press ServiceU.S. Department of Agriculture Deputy Secretary Krysta Harden and Navy Adm. William McRaven signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) Feb. 21 between the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Special Operations Command to increase support services for military families. The MOU allows the USDA-supported Cooperative work directly with SOCOM to conduct research and develop programs for military families of SOCOM units on issues such as personal financial manage ment, health and nutrition, child care and youth empowerment, USDA said in a news release. The USDA and the DoD have a longstanding relationship in support of service members and their families, Harden said in the release. port to SOCOM Forces by developing programs that help improve the quality of life for military family members, Harden said. From offering workshops about financial management to creating positive youth development environments for military kids, to promoting healthy lifestyles, the USDA stands at the ready to serve. We are very grateful for USDAs support to our special operations warriors and their families, McRaven said. One of the fundamentals of spe cial operations is that people are more important by facilitating access to valuable and credible family support programs and research through land grant universities, USDA will play a vital role in strengthening our forces resiliency and mission readiness. The MOU builds on a current MOU between USDA and the DoD to strengthen child, youth and family programs for military personnel and their families, according to the release. That agreement, the release said, was signed in 2010 by Dr. Roger Beachy, former director of USDAs National Institute of Food and Agriculture, and Dr. Clifford Stanley, then-undersecretary of defense for personnel and readiness. Under that agreement, the release said, the USDAGrant Universities and DOD are engaged in a 10-year tise in support of military families.Obama to award Medal of Honor to 24 Army veterans Photos by Jacob SippelCongressional staffers tour Naval Hospital Jax Capt. William Todd (right), Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville director of surgical services, and Capt. Gayle Shaffer, NH Jacksonville commanding offi cer, lead a tour for U.S. Representative Ander Crenshaws staff. The delegation (from the left: Lt. Kent McLaughlin, defense legislative fellow; Jackie Smith, district director; and Erica Striebel, chief of staff) toured physical therapy, occupational therapy, operating suites and maternal infant units. HM Kaylin Jones of Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles occupational therapy ices Jill Lawsons forearm while U.S. Representative Ander Crenshaws staff tours the facility on Feb. 20. CNO is Battle of Midway keynote speaker June 7USDA, U.S. Special Operations support military families JOIN TODAY! ducks.org 800-45-DUCKS A CFC participant provided as a public service

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2014 Patient Guide now availableFrom Naval Hospital Jacksonville Public AffairsNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles new 2014 Patient Guide is now in-stock and available at all of its facilities its hospi tal and branch health clinics and at www. med.navy.mil/sites/ navalhospitaljax The guide pro vides patients with current information on Medical Home Port teams, urgent and emergency care, expecting and new parent services, pharmacy and the many other services, programs and classes available at each NH Jacksonville health care facility. Get connected, like us www.facebook.com/ NavalHospitalJacksonville follow us www.twitter.com/NHJax, watch us www.youtube.com/user/NavalHospitalJax and send an email to NHJaxConnect@med.navy.mil to sign up for email updates. By Cherie HuntingtonDeCA public affairs specialist The annual Military Saves Week campaign, now running through March 1, aims to encourage military members and their families to save, by reflecting the theme: Set a goal, make a plan, save automatically. As a campaign partner, the Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA) offers savings every day by delivering 30 percent or more savings on groceries. We sell at cost since we provide a non pay benefit earned through mili tary service, said Randy Chandler, DeCAs director of sales. Shopping consistently at your commissary saves you money without the hassle and expense of driving all over town looking for items on sale. Commissary shoppers also use cou pons to achieve even higher savings, he said. Last year, they redeemed nearly 100 million coupons for customer savings of about $91 million. Our customers know coupons equate to cash, Chandler said. And the Commissary Rewards Card delivers even more savings via paperless cou pons to download onto your card. In addition to digital coupons, patrons can also find special commis sary promotions offered through the rewards card program. For more information or to register for a rewards card, visit https://deca.cou ponselectionpage.com/offers/all. Commissary customers can always go to the DeCA website, http://www. commissaries.com, to find information about whats on sale at their local commissary through the Shopping Aisle tab, and they can also access the Exclusive Savings link to find more coupons, specials, promotions, sales and healthy recipes. The Military Saves website offers tips on saving money, living well and spending less. Not surprisingly, many ideas call for more meals made at home and brown bag lunches for work and school, and the commissary can sim plify those efforts. Easy, economical meals at home save money, but leftovers compound the value by providing future ready-to-heat meals, especially when chili or hearty soups grace the menu. This can turn a $25 meal out on the town into a $5 meal made with good health in mind. Toting lunch to work doesnt have to be boring, and the commissary can help keep the lunch box interesting as well as economical. Its easy to bag fresh, crisp veggies for snacks, and protein-packed Greek yogurt makes a perfect light lunch. No refrigerator available? Shelf-stable, heat-and-eat entrees in lunchtime por tions can be stored in a desk drawer. Not only during Military Saves Week but year round, commissaries world wide support the campaign by provid ing information on personal financial awareness and preparing nutritious meals for less. Military Saves is part of the Department of Defenses Financial Readiness Campaign to encourage military families to save money every month. Customers can join Military Saves via Facebook, Twitter, Web page and monthly newsletter. Visit http://www.militarysaves.org for more information. Saves Week is every day at your commissaryDeCA photo by Leslie BrownA shopper at the Vogelweh, Germany, Commissary holds up her Commissary Rewards Card. Commissary patrons have downloaded more than 2.5 mil lion coupons since the program began in 2012. Coupons usage helps shoppers save even more on their grocery bills. Photo by Jacob SippelGreat American Spit OutHM3 Julian Vincent (left), from Naval Hospital Jacksonville Wellness Center, explains the negative impacts of smokeless tobacco to AWO3 Phillip Reynolds during the "Great American Spit Out" health fair at NAS Jacksonvilles Flight Line Cafe. The annual Great American Spit Out campaign raises awareness to the health dangers of smokeless tobacco. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014 17

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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2014 I I D E VP-10/CANADA Cold Weather Missions Page 12 HONORING IAS Getting It Done One-By-One Page 7 2015 BUDGET Military Cuts Are Coming Page 13Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com By Twilla SmithNavy Region Southeast Public AffairsAs part of Exercise Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014 (SC-CS 14) being held Navy wide Feb. 18-28, Naval Hospital Jacksonville and the head quarters of Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) were targets of an active shooter workplace violence drill on consecutive days beginning Feb. 19 at the hospital. NAS Jacksonville Installation Training Officer Jim Butters views this training as crucial. Unlike most emergency response incidents, whether they are real-world or exercises, an active shooter incident provides little to no warning therefore, it is extremely important that all personnel, including first responders, know their respective responsibilities and preplanned responses. The active shooter drill on Feb. 20 at CNRSE was one of many such drills occurring at mili tary installations throughout the region during SC-CS 14. Blanks fired inside CNRSE Building 919 created the sound of a real gun. Soon, emer gency messages by phone and email alerted mil itary personnel and civilian employees through out the facility. For this exercise, CNRSE Force Protection, Operations and Training Departments, the NAS Jacksonville security and fire departments, and members of the Jacksonville Sheriffs Office all responded to the active shooter scenario. As the scenario unfolded, CNRSE staff mem bers evacuated in an orderly fashion. Some employees reacted to electronic and telephone notifications, while others heard more simu lated gunfire in the building. Security personnel responded to the scene within minutes, evaluated the situation, and implemented their emergency response proce dures. A shelter in place order was issued for all base personnel, including housing residents. Members of NAS Jacksonvilles Fleet and Family Support Center staff activated to provide sup port to military and civilian members and their families. Once they confirmed that an active shoot er was in the building, the combined security force sealed the perimeter and began locating wounded personnel and fatalities. The shooter was eventually located and subdued by security responders. When the shooter had been neutral ized and the all-clear was passed, fire rescue and emergency medical responders treated the wounded. The key to minimizing injuries is the initial notification and alerting mechanisms that are in place and that was one of our key objectives for the drill conducted today, said Butters. The most important job of NAS Jacksonvilles security personnel is to neutralize the threat and clear the building so medical response teams can enter. Securitys approach is the same By MCC Elizabeth ThompsonThe Chief of Navy Reserve spoke with Sailors about issues facing the reserves and recognized personnel for their accom plishments during a Feb. 20-22 visit to Jacksonville. During her visit, Vice Adm. Robin Braun met with commanding officers from Navy Operational Support Center (NOSC) Jacksonville, held an all-hands call and vis ited different commands to learn about the needs of locally drilling Sailors. She met with Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet, and with Reserve Sailors supporting the command on NS Mayport. She also spoke at the change of command ceremony for HSL-60. Ways to improve training, unit and overall reserve force manning, and mission capabil ities were top areas of discussion throughout the visit. More than 150 Sailors attended the allhands call at NAS Jacksonville to hear about the latest developments in the Navy Reserves, to exchange information on chal lenges Sailors face in maintaining unit readiness, and to discuss possible ways to improve training and procedures. I always get great information when I come out to the NOSCs or the regions, from Sailors who are working with the fleet and have challenges, and I want to hear what sort of things you recommend we do, Braun told participants. In a meeting with commanding officers, Braun received reports on how units support the active component in NOSC Jacksonvilles area of responsibility and on how reserve billets are manned. Two commands highlighted at the meet ing were Littoral Combat Ship Seaframe and Littoral Combat Ship Mine Countermeasure Mission Module Mayport, which provided pre-commissioning availability support aboard USS Coronado (LCS 4) from Jan. 31 to Feb. 12. Over that time period, 37 reserv ists assisted their active duty counter parts with Anti-Terrorism Force Protection watch standing, completion of 602 Planned Maintenance System checks in five work By Clark PierceEditorMaster Chief of the Navy (MCPON) Mike Stevens met with the chief petty officers (CPOs) of NAS Jacksonville and its tenant commands to discuss Navy ethics as well as news reports from across the Department of Defense of incidents involving unethical behavior. Stevens was welcomed at Deweys All Hands Club by NAS Jacksonville CMDCM(AW/ SW) Brad Shepherd and Commander Navy Region Southeast CMDCM(AW/SW) Mack Ellis. In 2013, it was announced that dozens of Air Force nucle ar missile officers allegedly cheated on exams, highlighting a series of security lapses and slip-ups that have plagued the ICBM corps. Later, it was announced that senior instructors at the Navys nuclear propulsion school in Charleston, S.C., were suspend ed from duty for alleged cheat ing on exams meant to qualify them to train others to operate naval nuclear power reactors. Adm. Jonathan Greenert, the chief of naval operations, told reporters at a Feb. 4 Pentagon news briefing, that he was upset to learn of the breakdown in discipline. To say I am disap pointed would be an under statement, Greenert said. We expect more from our Sailors especially our senior Sailors. Adm. John Richardson, director of the Navys nuclear propulsion program, said the alleged cheating came to light when a senior enlisted Sailor at the Charleston training site reported the cheating to higher authorities. Richardson said the unidentified Sailor recognized that this was wrong and chose to report it. Stevens told the audience that with the recent incidents hap pening across the Department of Defense, the Secretary of Defense could conclude that theres an epidemic of undisci plined behavior, however, he is assured that isnt the case with the Navy. In fact, he said, each branch of the military has been ordered to take a hard look at their eth ics codes and that, soon, the Pentagon will appoint a gener al officer to head up an ethics initiative much like those that have been developed for suicide and sexual assault prevention. CNO and I understand that the Navy by itself has some Active shooter drills test commands at NAS JaxPhoto by MC2(SW) Marcus Stanley First responders MA2 Glenn Patton, MA3 Amanda Nicks and MA2 Andrew Bernhart, from NAS Jacksonville Security Department, clear rooms and hallways as they search for an armed suspect in Building 919, the headquarters of Commander Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE).Photo by MCC Elizabeth ThompsonChief of Navy Reserve Vice Adm. Robin Braun answers questions Feb. 22 during an infor mal all-hands call at Fourth Navy Expeditionary Logistics Regiment at Blount Island, located on the St. Johns River. The all-hands call was part of a visit by Braun to local units assigned to Navy Operational Support Command Jacksonville, so Sailors could hear about the latest developments in the Navy Reserves, exchange information on challenges reserv ists face in maintaining unit readiness, and discuss possible ways to improve training and procedures. Chief of Navy Reserve meets with Jacksonville-area SailorsPhoto by Clark Pierce Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Mike Stevens held an all-chiefs meeting Feb. 21 at Dewey's aboard NAS Jacksonville. Topics of discussion included integrity, trust and Sailorization.MCPON talks integrity with chiefs messSee Page 4 See Page 8 See Page 8

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014 SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)5487789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley From StaffThese 1913 photos show Navy Curtiss flying boats at Fishermans Point on Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Lt. John Towers, a graduate of the Curtiss Flying School in 1911, arrived Jan. 10, 1913 and took command of the new aviation camp. Four large tents served as hangars for Curtiss A-2 and C-1 flying boats. On March 6, 1913, Towers was ordered to prepare an air search for a hostile fleet approaching the Cuban coast. This flight became the first tacti cal maneuver involving naval aircraft. Towers spotted approaching destroy ers without himself being detected. Because his radio malfunctioned, Towers landed beside the flagship and notified the admiral that a hostile force was approaching. From the aviation camp, Towers and his fellow Navy pilots explored the potential of their planes to serve Navy aerial reconnaissance, bombing, pho tography and radio communications needs. In the ocean waters off Cuba they were able to spot submarines at depths of up to 40 feet. Towers was officially designated as Naval Aviator No. 3 in 1915. Hes also credited with the development of the naval aviator badge, which was designed in 1917. In 1960, the NAS Jacksonville airfield was named Towers Field in recog nition of Towers exemplary service in developing naval aviation through World War I and World War II. From StaffFeb. 27 The seaplane tender USS Langley (AV3), formerly the first aircraft carrier of the U.S. Navy, was sunk by Japanese air attack while ferrying 32 Army Air Force P-40s to Tjilatjap, Java. Feb. 28 1893 Launching of USS Indiana (BB1), first true battleship in U.S. Navy. 1980 Blue crew of USS Francis Scott Key (SSBN-657) launches four Trident I (C-4) missiles in first operational test. Feb. 29 1944 Consolidated PB4Y Privateers from squadrons VB-108, VB-109 and VD-3 conduct a low-level bombing raid against Japanese positions on Wake Island. 1968 Four North Vietnamese trawl ers attempting to simultaneously infil trate supplies into South Vietnam were detected. Three of the trawlers were sunk the following day and one escaped. March 1 1942 U-656 becomes the first German submarine of World War II to be sunk by naval air power (VP-82). 1954 First of six detonations in Operation Castle nuclear test. March 2 1859 Launch of USS Saginaw at Mare Island (northeast of San Francisco), the first Navy ship built on Americas West Coast. 1867 Navy Civil Engineer Corps established. 1899 Act of Congress creates the rank Admiral of the Navy for George Dewey. 1973 Women begin pilot training to U.S. Navy. March 3 1776 First amphibious landing opera tion. Continental naval squadron under Commodore Esek Hopkins lands Sailors and Marines, commanded by Capt. Samuel Nicholas, on New Providence Island in the Bahamas, to capture urgently needed ordnance and gunpow der. 1871 Navy Medical Corps estab lished. 1883 Congress authorizes four mod ern ships of steel, three cruisers: Atlanta, Boston and Chicago, plus, dispatch boat Dolphin. 1915 Office of Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) established. 1915 Congress creates Federal Naval Reserve. 1960 USS Sargo returns to Hawaii from arctic cruise of 11,000 miles, 6,003 miles under the polar ice. March 4 1911 The first funds for Naval Aviation are appropriated, providing $25,000 to the Bureau of Navigation for experimental work in the development of aviation for naval purposes. 1925 Congress authorizes restoration of USS Constitution. 1947 Operation High Jump, air opera tions in Antarctica, ends. 1963 Navy C-130 Hercules aircraft completes 12-day rescue operation of critically ill Danish seaman from Danish freighter off the coast of Antarctica. March 5 1913 Tests held at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by Navy Air Pilot Lt. John Towers reported that submarines were visible from the air at depths from 30 to 40 feet. 1942 The name Seabees and insig nia officially authorized. 1943 USS Bogue (CVE-9) begins first anti-submarine operations by an escort carrier. By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorWhen the first invitation came via e-mail, I thought it was a joke. I mean, how often does one get an invitation to the White House? Then the formal invitation, printed on the finest paper Ive ever held, arrived in the mail. Still, I did a double take. But a quick phone call to the White House Social Office con firmed that it was true. I had been invited to the state dinner in honor of French President Francois Hollande. And when I say I was invited, thats what I mean. The invita tion read, The President and Mrs. Obama request the pleasure of the company of Ms. Smiley at a din ner. Not Commander Smiley. Not Commander and Mrs. Smiley. But Ms. Smiley. This is an important detail for someone who has been labeled a military dependent for 37 years. After countless times being my Navy husbands +1 I was finally the principal invitee and he was my date. The next morning, I went out in search of a dress. And two weeks later, my three sons, my mother (who coincidentally was visiting us in Maine but lives in Virginia), and the dress were stuffed in my mini-van like the Clampetts. We were headed to Washington, D.C. to meet Dustin, who was already there working at the Pentagon. Because I was also invited to the official arrival ceremony the morn ing before the state dinner, I decid ed to take the boys out of school and bring them along for a frontrow seat to history our familys personal history and the countrys. Of course, this meant another har ried trip to buy the boys appropri ate clothes for such an event. It was frigid the morning of the French presidents arrival, and my boys Les Miserables-inspired caps and pea coats provided little warmth. But we live in Maine, so we smiled as we exited the cab at 15th and Pennsylvania Streets and tried to look hardy. Getting into the White House, even for an event thats taking place on the lawn, is a complicat ed endeavor. It requires multiple checkpoints and scanners, most of which takes place outside in the cold. Our toes would be frozen by the time we entered the famous Booksellers room in the White House. But before that, still outside in the cold, our hearts were warmed when we saw our own congress man and previous Dinner with the Smileys guest, Rep. Mike Michaud (Maine), walking down the path between the U.S. Treasury Department and the White House. My youngest son, Lindell, ran to him like a favorite uncle. And then the most amazing thing (if youre a 7-year-old boy who loves dogs) happened a White House staff er came through with the First Familys Portuguese Water Dogs, Bo and Sunny. Forget the congress man or the White House, Lindell was in the presence of dogs, and it was the highlight of his day. Sure, most kids dont get to stand in the Booksellers room of the White House or have a front-row view of an official arrival ceremony, but all Lindell wanted to do was pet those dogs again. Inside the White House, aides gave us French and American flags before we exited onto the South Lawn, and back out in the cold, for the official ceremony. It was a sea of flags, pageantry, uniforms, honor guards, and the always impressive Marine Corps Band, led by Drum Major Master Gunnery Sgt. William Browne. Despite our military fam ily history, the boys had never seen such a display. They hardly noticed that we waited nearly 45 minutes in the bitter cold for the ceremony to begin. And yes, the boys saw our presi dent and the French president, as well as the first lady and many other dignitaries, but what might have been the most education al of all for them was the young Marine standing in formation who fainted within 10 feet of us. This happens more often than people might expect if a soldier locks his knees. What is exceptional, how ever, is how much pride these men and women take in their duty to the president that almost noth ing changes when a soldier goes down. The soldiers on either side still stand stiff as boards, and the downed soldier stays in place until help arrives. In this case, the Secret Service got to him first. When he stood up, there was blood on his face. My boys turned to their dad, also in uniform, with eyes big as sau cers. Later, he would talk to them about the duty, pride and honor those soldiers feel for their position; why no other solider could move to help the downed man; and why the man who fainted would rather col lapse and bust open his face than shirk his duty to the country and the president. Impressive indeed. But for Lindell, still not as memo rable as meeting Bo and Sunny. Next week: Dustin and I arrive at the state dinner.Naval aviation pioneer John Towers heads mission This Week in Navy HistoryU.S. Navy photos From the HomefrontThe Smileys attend the state dinner (Part 1) Photo by Clark PierceHonors to LaRocqueThe NAS Jax Environmental Department recently presented NAS Jax Public Affairs Specialist Kaylee LaRocque (fourth from right) with a placque in recognition of her significant contributions to the station's environmental program. Her numerous environmental articles published in Jax Air News focused on how station departments and tenant commands can incorporate environmental com pliance and conservation into daily operations. LaRocque recently accepted a public affairs posi tion at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast.

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FRCSE announces Sailor of the YearBy Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsAS1(AW/SW) Johnny Opdenbosch has been selected as the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) 2013 Sailor of the Year (SOY). He is currently attached to FRCSE Detachment Mayport Ground Support Equipment (900) division where he works as division production control super visor, main production control supervisor and quality assurance (QA) leading petty officer (LPO). It is an honor to have represented FRCSE Detachment Mayport among Jacksonville and Detachment Key West, said Opdenbosch. However, the greatest honor is to have been selected as FRCSE Sailor of the Year. This accomplishment serves as recognition of the hard work and performance of the entire detachment. Opdenbosch was selected as SOY for expertly man aging the daily production efforts of 39 work centers in six divisions culminating in the training and qualifi cation of four production controllers. He spearheaded the detachments Naval Aviation Maintenance pro gram (NAMP) baseline system ensuring directive adherence through the detachment bringing 11 pro grams back to on-track status. He continually audits and monitors the divisions and 42 NAMPs analyzing trends and implementing controls for compliance. He also acts as a collateral duty inspector and provides mentoring and guidance to the QA supervisor on QA and NAMP programs and procedures. A native of Barranquilla, Columbia, Opdenbosch moved to North Bergen, N.J. after graduating high school and enlisted in the U.S. Navy in April 1999. After completing boot camp at Recruit Training Center, Great Lakes, Ill., he attended Aviation Support Equipment A School in Pensacola, Fla. Opdenbosch reported to USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63) in January 2000 where he was advanced to third and sec ond class petty officer. In January 2004, he transferred to the Center of Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jacksonville as a C school instructor. Two years later, Opdenbosch reported to FRCSE where he was selected Sailor of the Third Quarter. In January 2008, he transferred to VP-26 where he served as line division LPO, QA representative and mainte nance control coordinator/safe-for-flight supervisor. He advanced to first class petty officer. Opdenbosch reported to FRCSE Detachment Mayport in 2012. During his tour, he led four first class petty officers and one chief petty officer in com pleting production control qualification, provided technical and NAMP support to the civilian mainte nance detachment at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center, Andros Island, Bahamas. At Detachment Mayport, Opdenboschs collateral duties include serving as First Class Petty Officers Association president organizing events to raise money for the commands children holiday party and coordinating Adopt-A-Highway cleanups; command lead financial specialist; and AIR Speed representa tive facilitating/instructing AIR Speed and Lean Six Sigma concepts (Yellow/Green Belt) to 76 officers and enlisted Sailors. Opdenbosch is married with two children. While off duty, he enjoys spending time with his family, build ing and flying remote control airplanes, playing guitar and fishing. He is also currently working on his bach elors degree in technical management with EmbryRiddle Aeronautical University. His future plans are to make chief petty officer and subsequently become a chief warrant officer AD1(AW) Christopher Chinery (left) and AS1(AW/SW) Johnny Opdenbosch verify a serial number on a cold section module that contains the compressor of a T700 helicopter engine assembly at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Detachment (DET) Mayport Feb. 6. Opdenbosch, the Ground Support Equipment (900) division production control supervisor and Quality Assurance leading petty officer, is the FRCSE 2013 Sailor of the Year. Photo by Victor Pitts JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014 regardless of the type of building. The full cooperation and support by CNRSE leadership and staff resulted in a quality exercise from which everyone benefitted, said Butters. The active shooter scenario was a planned exercise that had the look and feel of a real world event. The exercise was not held in response to a specific threat. According to Butters, every effort was made to ensure minimal impact to the installations normal operations. The Department of Homeland Security website describes an active shooter as an individual actively engaged in killing or attempting to kill people in a confined and populated area, typically through the use of firearms. The website also provides a What Can You Do course for the public that can be downloaded at http:// www.dhs.gov/active-shooter-preparedness. SHOOTERFrom Page 1The NAS Jacksonville Emergency Operations Center served as the command and communications hub for the on-site incident commander, security response team, medical personnel and the public affairs officer who kept local media informed. NAS Jacksonville Police are trained to provide rapid response and apprehension during an active shooter scenario. This three-person response team works to clear a room of office cubicles on Feb. 20 in their search of Building 919. A team of first responders from NAS Jacksonville Security Department systematically cleared offices and cubicles in Building 919 during their search for an active shooter, as well as victims. An NAS Jacksonville Security Department Petty Officer waits for the signal to move forward Feb. 20 from a stairwell in Building 919. CNRSE personnel who fled Building 919 during the Feb. 20 active shooter drill, mustered at the NAS Jax Public Works Department to await the "all clear."

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014 5 MA3 Alycia Delgado, from NAS Jacksonville Security, remains alert for mock aggressors at Naval Hospital Jacksonville on Feb. 19 during Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014. The exercise is an annual anti-ter rorism and force protection drill that allows security, fire department and various tenant commands to work together during force protec tion scenarios. Photos by MC2(SW) Marcus Stanley, Twilla Smith, Jacob Sippel and Clark PierceThe active shooter role player at both Naval Hospital Jacksonville Building 2080 and CNRSE Building 919 was MA1(SW/AW) James Williams, who was eventually sub dued by NAS Jacksonville Security Department responders. MA3 Alycia Delgado protects mock wounded personnel during a drill at Naval Hospital Jacksonville Feb. 19 as part of the Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014 anti-terrorism/force pro tection exercise that tests Navy installations throughout the continental U.S. MA1(SW/AW) James Williams portrayed the simulated active shooter at both the Feb. 19 Naval Hospital Jacksonville Building 2080 and the Feb. 20 CNRSE Building 919 Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014 exercises. (From left) HM Jonathon Stallworth and HMSA Christian Cage-Williams, from Naval Hospital Jacksonville, treat a childsize mannequin Feb. 19 dur ing exercise Solid CurtainCitadel Shield 2014. MA3 Amanda Nicks and MA2 Andrew Bernhart discover a simulated victim, CNRSE employee Jon Vondette, unresponsive in his office at Building 919. (From left) MA2 Andrew Bernhart, DoD Patrolman Malcom Watson and MA3 Alycia Delgado clear a hallway of simulated bad guys and innocent person nel at Naval Hospital Jacksonville Feb. 19 dur ing Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield. (From left) MA3 Amanda Nicks, DoD Patrolman Mark McGinty, MA2 Glenn Patton and MA2 Andrew Bernhart continue clearing hallways and cubicles in Building 919 after discovering a mock casualty.

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By Christianne WittenChief of Chaplains Public AffairsChief of Chaplains Rear Adm. Mark Tidd announced the release of the Department of the Navy (DoN) Strategic Plan for Religious Ministry 2014-2019, Feb. 10. Chaplains play a vital role for our Navy and Marine Corps team, providing counsel, building hope, and increas ing the resilience of our force, Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus states in the strategic plan. Navy chaplains and religious program specialists operate across a broad spectrum of environments to fulfill the mis sion of the Chaplain Corps to inspire hope and strengthen spiritual well being through the delivery and coordination of effective religious ministry at sea and ashore. The DoN Strategic Plan for Religious Ministry 20142019 was carefully designed to support the priorities of the Secretary of the Navy, Chief of Naval Operations, Commandant of the Marine Corps, and Commandant of the Coast Guard. The plan also advances Professional Naval Chaplaincy and expands on the goals of the previous strategic plan released in 2008, Tidd said. Part of Be Ready is hav ing the opportunity to prac tice ones faith wherever our Shipmates serve. Whether at home or operating forward, our Navy chaplains play a vital role in ensuring our Sailors, Civilians, and families have the resilience to meet every chal lenge they face, Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert states in the strategic plan. Gen. James Amos, comman dant of the Marine Corps, also remarked in the strategic plan that chaplains are invaluable when it comes to ensuring we keep faith with our Marines, our Sailors, and our families. Navy chaplains support the religious freedom of Sailors, Marines, Coast Guardsmen, DoN Civilians, and families as well as support commanders as they carry out their charge of command by: religious ministry plete confidentiality, dignity, respect, and compassion cers on the accommodation of religious needs; the spiritual well-being of service members and families; a moral and ethi cal command climate; and reli gious matters that affect the commands mission. The strategic plan will focus on leveraging these core capa bilities to meet three strategic goals: serve our people, engage with leadership, and meet professional standards, Tidd explained. When professional religious ministry is delivered effective ly, chaplains can help inspire hope, strengthen spiritual well being, increase personal resilience, and enhance mis sion readiness across the Naval Service, Tidd added. The strategic plan will serve as the foundation for policy and programming for the pro fessional delivery of religious ministry across the Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard. It will also inform and shape the development of pro fessional standards for chaplains and religious program specialists. Every chaplain oversees a command religious program which can address health of force issues that impact resil ience and readiness in a mean ingful, substantive way, he added. Each chaplain has a role to play in aligning their com mand religious program to support the commanders mission and intent as well as the DoN Strategic Plan for Religious Ministry 2014-2019, Tidd said. The Navy Chaplains Corps is currently comprised of 1,056 chaplains in both the active and reserve components, rep resenting more than 100 faith groups and religious organiza tions. About your Chief of Navy Chaplains Rear Adm. Tidd comes from a career Navy family and is a graduate of Williams College in Williamstown, Mass. He received his Master of Divinity from Fuller Theological Seminary and a Master of Theology from Princeton Theological Seminary. He is a graduate of the National War College in Washington, DC, with a Master of Science in National Security Strategy and a graduate of the Marine Corps Command and Staff College and the Armed Forces Staff College. Tidds Navy tours include NAS Moffett Field, Calif. with Patrol Wing 10 and the USS Reeves (CG 24), homeported in Yokosuka, Japan. During his time on board, Reeves visited Qingdao, China, as part of the firstport visit by U.S. warships to that country in 39 years. He went on to serve as dep uty command chaplain on the USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). Marine Corps tours include 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marines, and the division staff of 2nd Marine Division, Camp Lejeune, N.C., deploying to Southwest Asia in support of Operation Desert Storm. He served at Marine Corps Combat Development Command as the chaplain for the Marine Corps Brig and the Base Security Battalion and later returned to 2nd Marine Division as the division chap lain. Tidd has served in lead ership positions on the chief of Chaplains staff as the branch head for Professional Development and Religious Programs and as the Advanced Training officer at Navy Chaplain School. Tidd was assigned as the force chaplain for U.S. Naval Forces Central Command and the fleet chaplain for U.S. 5th Fleet, headquartered in the Kingdom of Bahrain. After serving as command chaplain for the U.S. European Command, he became deputy chief of Navy Chaplains and Chaplain of the Marine Corps. Tidd assumed his current duties as the 25th chief of Navy Chaplains on Aug. 27,010.Tidd announces DoN Strategic Plan for Religious Ministry Rear Adm. Mark Tidd By Terri Moon CronkAmerican Forces Press ServiceBecause Defense Department leaders believe per sonal financial readiness equals mission readiness, officials want service members to set a goal, make a plan and save automatically in the Military Saves Week campaign now underway. Military Saves is a year-long campaign with DoD partner the Consumer Federation of America as part of the larger America Saves effort, said Barbara Thompson, director of the Defense Departments office of family policy and children and youth. DoD over last 10 years has had a very robust finan cial readiness campaign, Thompson said of the totalforce program, which began in 2003. Military Saves encourages service members and their families to take a pledge to reduce debt and set up automatic savings programs for necessities such as retirement, emergency and contingency savings. The first step in attaining financial security is mak ing a commitment to changing personal spending and savings habits, Thompson noted. Financial readiness is equated with mission readi ness within DoD, she added, because when a service DoD stresses cutting debt, saving more in Military Saves WeekSee MILITARY SAVES, Page 8 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014

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By MC2 Amanda CabasosStaff WriterNaval Air Station Jacksonville and the Northeast Florida Navy League Council hosted the 12th bi-annual Individual Augmentee (IA) Recognition Luncheon Feb. 20 at the stations River Cove Catering and Conference Center. Twenty-three spouses joined 53 IAs from base and tenant commands, as well as Blount Island Command. The event was sponsored by the Northeast Florida Navy League, Rotary Club of Orange Park, Rotary Club of Orange Park Sunrise, and the Marine Corps League. The luncheon kicked off with the singing of the national anthem by HMC Gloria Cardona, and the invocation by NAS Jacksonville Chaplain (Lt.) Andrew Hayler. Music was provided by Navy Band Southeast Brass Quintet. As awardees and command repre sentatives enjoyed their lunch, NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander welcomed the guests and thanked the IAs for their dedicated service. We are here today to honor the men and women who have returned from IA duty. I congratulate them for com pleting such rigorous assignments that were often outside of what they were trained to do as a Sailor or Marine. In all cases they served the joint force and our country with honor and distinc tion. And by doing so reflected a great credit upon themselves and the Navy and Marine Corps team. He then introduced Commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris as the guest speaker. Harris said, I appreciate having the opportunity to be here today to honor our shipmates. Having served as an IA myself in 2010 to Pakistan and several other places, I truly appreciate these IAs and their spouses for the sacrific es made during the separation. Today we have more than 3,100 Sailors who are forward deployed supporting the other branches of service to complete the mission. Doing Gods work in unde scribable places. These IAs are part of that long lineage of service members deploying and they should be very proud that they are showing the rest of the world that they are the best of what our Navy is all about. IA guest speaker Cmdr. Jorge Brito, M.D., is an orthopedic Surgeon who deployed from Naval Hospital Jacksonville to Camp Holland, a base located in the southern region of Afghanistan. Brito said, Its an honor and a priv ilege to be able to deploy. It was also something that I wanted to put behind me. It comes with sacrifices. What IA Sailors do is make the best of it when we are deployed, because we cant control what happens to us but we can control how we feel about it and what we do with it. That is what a lot of us IAs do, as well as our families. We find ways to make the best of it. He explained, Deployments are an experience with contradictions. We get to provide support. We get to do something that we were trained to do and a part of us is anxious to do it. On the other hand you leave your fam ily behind which is extremely difficult. Its also a disruption to your surgical practices as a surgeon. It is very differ ent working out in the field. It makes it tough when leaving and coming back, but on the other hand it is a tremendous opportunity to serve. I was able to treat war injuries and as a surgeon that is a great thing. On the other hand you see some horrific things. I was able to treat the local population while I was there. And the patients are very grate ful for the medical help. That was one of the highlights of my experience. The challenge though was you dont always know who is your friend or enemy. PS1(SW/AW) Princess Bacote from PSD Jacksonville said, I have recent ly returned from Camp Lemonnier in Djibouti Africa where I aided ser vice members from all the branches when they arrived in country. I issued ID cards and fixed pay issues. We also aided in many volunteer efforts such as building orphanages and feeding the hungry children on the street. I thought it was a great opportunity going to Africa because it really opened my eyes in what is going on around the world. To close out the luncheon, each IA was presented with a special plaque, a Boots on the Ground coin from the Northeast Florida Navy League Council, and thank-you letters from U.S. Senators Bill Nelson and Marco Rubio and U.S. Representatives Ander Crenshaw and Corrine Brown. Each spouse was also presented with a rose courtesy of the Navy Exchange. The IA Recognition Luncheon was first held at NAS Jax in 2008 and ini tiated by the Northeast Florida Navy League Council. The Navy League has been privi leged to honor more than 1,850 IAs over the past six years. Our Sailors have left their families to take on a mission that was not expected of them but they have stepped up on a voluntary basis to meet the challenge. We feel very privileged to honor our Sailors and their spouses for their sacrifice in the continuing War on Terrorism, said Mike McGrath, former national director, Navy League of the United States. Individual Augmentees recognizedPhotos by MC2 Amanda CabasosIndividual Augmentees from NAS Jax commands, along with their spouses, mem bers of the Northeast Florida Navy League Council, Rotary Club of Orange Park and Rotary Club of Orange Park Sunrise gather for a photo after the luncheon. Guest Speaker Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet commends the 53 Individual Augmentees (IA) for their outstanding service during the NAS Jacksonville IA Recognition Luncheon held on base Feb. 20. Orthopedic Surgeon Cmdr. Jorge Brito from Naval Hospital Jacksonville speaks at the IA Recognition Luncheon and expresses his personal experience deploying to Afghanistan. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014 7

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8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014 member has financial difficulty, it can affect job per formance. DoD feels so strongly about [financial readiness], every major installation and family support center will have personal financial managers to provide counseling and education to service members and their families, Thompson said, adding that installa tion banks and credit unions also are committed to increasing financial literacy. Taking a pledge to reduce debt and save money has become a tradition for service members, families and DoD civilians to make a commitment to themselves, Thompson said. The pledge can be taken online or publicly during a major installation event during Military Saves Week. Last year, we had over 29,000 [people] take the pledge, and thats exciting, she noted. Thompson said pledging to save and developing plans to do so are individual. Some people might save a set amount of money each payday, while others devote a percentage, for example. Thompson also emphasized that developing a financial readiness plan is a family affair, and said the sooner children are introduced to the habit of saving and spending wisely, the earlier they will learn sound financial skills. Everyone needs to have financial education, she said. The traditional Thrift Savings Plan and its Roth IRA TSP counterpart offer painless avenues to automati cally save, and the TSP plans are among DoDs pillars of its military family readiness campaign, Thompson said. The TSP gives you an opportunity to think about your long-term future [such as] retirement, because we think its far away, but its not, she said. Every day, you need to start thinking about saving for retire ment. Offering resources such as TSP shows how serious DoD is about its troops saving and reducing debt for their successes in life, Thompson added. In the past 10 years, the numbers of service mem bers and their families enrolling in the [traditional] TSP and the new Roth TSP have increased, Thompson said, calling that development very exciting. The Military OneSource website is another resource for help with financial planning, offering online financial tools and up to 12 sessions per monetary issue for face-to-face or telephone financial counsel ing, she said. About 65 percent of troops and families have emer gency savings plans, Thompson said. Thats impor tant. Our message is getting across about how impor tant savings is, she added. Overall, having a family financial preparedness plan is something service members and their fami lies should have first and foremost on their minds, Thompson emphasized. Your financial stability is going to make sure your family is secure, and that you dont have to worry unnecessarily about something you do have control over, she said. MILITARY SAVESFrom Page 6 By Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceDefense Secretary Chuck Hagel has ordered the under secretary of defense for policy to develop a plan to reorganize the departments POW/MIA accounting effort, Pentagon press secretary Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby said Feb. 20. Hagel issued a memo direct ing Michael Lumpkin, the act ing undersecretary, to develop a plan within 30 days to increase to the maximum extent possible the numbers of missing service personnel accounted for annu ally, while ensuring timely and accurate information is provided their families. Kirby said the goal is to consol idate relevant department assets into a single organization with oversight of and accountability for the entire mission of account ing for missing personnel. In addition, the plan will pro pose ways to increase the num ber of identifications, improve transparency for families and expand the case file system to include all missing personnel, including those from World War II. The secretary expects this plan to recommend changes ranging from civilian and mil itary personnel to contracting, facilities, budgets, and oversight of laboratory operations, Kirby said. Hes also asked all services, combatant commands and rel evant DoD components to assist Mr. Lumpkin with anything he needs in this effort. Hagels memo is consistent with congressional legislation and will continue to be informed by analysis that DoD and other governmental agencies have conducted. The plan will also incorporate suggestions and rec ommendations offered to DoD by military and veteran service organizations. This remains a top priority for the secretary and for this depart ment, Kirby said. In fact, we believe it is a sacred obligation. We take it seri ously, and were going to keep it at. Were going to keep improv ing.Hagel orders revamp of POW/MIA effortcenters, and 145 equipment valida tions. Braun praised the work aboard the Coronado and stressed the importance of supporting the LCS community as the Navy continues to consider Navy Station Mayport as the future homeport for about 1,000 Sailors and 14 new LCS ships estimated to join the fleet by 2020. The work you are doing is proof that this program is the right way to go, said Braun. I commend you on the excellent work you are doing. While at NAS Jacksonville, Braun toured spaces at Information Dominance Corps Region Southeast. During a pinning cer emony at the command, she recog nized two reservists for their com pletion of the Enlisted Information Domination Warfare Specialist Program. Braun also traveled to Blount Island on the St. Johns River, where she toured spaces of the Fourth Navy Expeditionary Logistics Regiment (4th NELR) recognized three Sailors for their completion of the Enlisted Expeditionary Warfare Specialist Program, participated in advanced cargo simulator training. NELR serves as the headquarters element for two Navy cargo han dling battalions and one expedi tionary communications detach ment comprised of about 660 fulltime and selected reservists from 10 bases throughout Navy Region Southeast. YN1(EXW/AW) Keith Henley, one of the Sailors pinned Feb. 22, said he appreciated the time Braun took to interact with reservists and see some of the training 4th NELR does onsite. To have Vice Adm. Braun take time out of her schedule to visit a smaller command and have the cargo handlers get some one-onone time with her is always good, Henley said. NOSC Jacksonville provides sup port to approximately 2,000 Sailors in 66 units at seven locations, including NAS Jacksonville; Naval Station Mayport; Blount Island; Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay; Naval Support Activity Naples, Italy; Stuttgart Army Airfield, Germany; and Royal Air Force Molesworth, England. CHIEFFrom Page 1problems but that we dont have a systemic problem. I know from the stats within our CPO Mess, and the Navy as a whole, that conduct issues are flat or trend ing down. Thats why I say that we in the Navy are not experiencing an epidemic of ethical problems. But whenever we do recognize an integrity based problem big or small it must be immediately addressed, said Stevens. Why must ethical problems be addressed quickly and firmly? Im asking you for the single, key word that goes with integrity. A number of CPOs from the audience voiced, almost in unison, trust. Stevens responded, Someone help me here. Why is trust is so important? A female CPO stood and said, Ultimately, we put our lives on the line, so we must trust each other to have our backs. If not, our mission cannot be accom plished. But I trust every brother and sister here today to have my back and Ill do the same for them. Violation of our integrity erodes public trust, called out another chief. We have to be mindful of what we say and how we say it in the age of public media. Another chief told the assembly that lack of disci pline can expose Sailors to the threat of blackmail which can create a security risk for confidential infor mation. There are lots of bad actors out there who want intelligence from our spaces. If they find some one with an ethical or moral problem, they can hold it over you until you give them something they want. MCPON was so impressed by the chief, he urged the audience to please give him a round of applause! He went on to explain, I met with 800 chief petty officers the other day in Norfolk. We talked for 90 minutes and not one person, myself included, made that point. Thats why Im here today. Because nobody knows better than those who live the dream every single day. For more than 120 years, when the Navy faces a challenge, we always turn to our chiefs mess. Its in our DNA to handle problems. We take on challenges with vigor and passion because thats what we do. Nobody is better positioned to manage change in any other branch of Americas armed forces. We bring the ability and experience to effectively communicate with every rank in the Navy from a seaman appren tice to the CNO, said Stevens. One more CPO stood and said, Our common val ues have always been integrity and trust. We create the tempo of a command, and that means we set the standards of commitment, performance, achievement and, yes, integrity which simply means knowing right from wrong. Navy Code of EthicsDO DO NOT MCPONFrom Page 1 Photos by MCC Elizabeth Thompson Chief of Navy Reserve Vice Adm. Robin Braun asks reservists to raise their hand if they had been mobilized at least once in their Navy career. More than 150 Sailors, assigned to units at Navy Operational Support Command Jacksonville, attended the Feb. 22 all-hands call to hear about the latest developments in the Navy Reserves, to exchange information on challenges Sailors face in maintaining unit readiness, and to discuss possible ways to improve training and procedures. Chief of Navy Reserve Vice Adm. Robin Braun poses for a group photo after an all-hands call held at NAS Jacksonville. More than 150 Sailors, assigned to units at Navy Operational Support Command Jacksonville, attended the all-hands call to hear about the latest developments in the Navy Reserves, exchange information on challenges Sailors face in maintaining unit readiness, and discuss possible ways to improve training and procedures.

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By ET1 Patrick HorganFACSFACJAX PAOThirteen sailors from Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility, Jacksonville (FACSFACJAX) volunteered on Feb. 6 at Veterans Farm Jacksonville (veteransfarm. org). The event was led by FACSFACJAX Executive Officer Cmdr. Shannon Parker, and Command Senior Chief Petty Officer ATCS Eric Elkin. The crew assisted the farm staff with clearing two fields that consisted of cutting and removing downed trees and limbs. After a half-day of hard work, the FACSFACJAX team was thanked by farm manager Steve Ellsberry, The amount of work that your team completed in five hours has saved us over three months of preparation for the upcoming fellowship pro gram. The Veterans Farm mission is to help disabled combat veter ans reintegrate back into soci ety through the use of horticul ture therapy while working together in a relaxed, natural environment. Veterans enrolled in the sixmonth fellowship program work as a team to develop solu tions that will enable them to overcome physical and mental barriers. Their goal is to help veterans make a social connection with the civilian community by hav ing them grow and sell fruits and vegetables at farmers mar kets, U-pick and commercial markets. One of their pillars is to edu cate the community about the health benefits of eating organ ic food. We want to follow a model that will help create a healthier nation. Who better to lead the way than our nations veter ans? asked Ellsberry. Another goal is to provide a combination of work, therapy, education and socialization through sustainable agricultur al training. Veterans Farm collaborates and works with local farm ers, organic associations, community business lead ers, the University of Florida Agriculture Department and the Veterans Affairs work ther apy program. Veterans Farm will be host ing volunteer events on April 20 and May 18 from 8 a.m. to noon. Command volunteer events can be scheduled Monday thru Friday. For more information, go to: info@veteransfarm.com. Large groups are welcome as well as students needing com munity volunteer hours for high school or college. Visit Veterans Farm at 9526 Argyle Forest Blvd., Jacksonville 32222. Photo by Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast artisans in actionFleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Commanding Officer Capt. John Kemna (left) discusses the capabilities of the Easily Manipulated Mechanical Arm (EMMA) with FRCSE Fiberglass Worker Jerry Lackey (right) and Chris Chiang of Temple Allen Industries at the FRCSE Paint Hangar on Feb. 21. Emma reproduces the motions of a human operator to sand parts protecting the artisan from contin ual stress and vibration induced injuries caused by manual sanding. The machine produces a smooth finish at a sanding rate five times greater than manual sand ing, while capturing dust particles in its integrated vacuum system.Photo by Victor PittsRobert Aceves (left), the EA-6B and trainer aircraft deputy product manager, and Capt. Horacio Fernandez, incoming Chief of Naval Air Training (CNATRA), look on as Bill Connelly, the trainer aircraft program manager, points out wear and tear on a lower nacelle duct removed from a T-44 Pegasus trainer at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast on Feb. 13. Artisans at the military depot are per forming aircraft conditional inspections to ensure aircraft reliability. Sailors volunteer for farm work Photos courtesy of FACSFACJAX A group of FACSFACJAX volunteers, led by Executive Officer Cmdr. Shannon Parker (left, second row kneeling and CMDCS Eric Elkin (left, third row standing), put in a day's hard labor to create new plantable acreage at Veterans Farm. OSSR Taylor Carden discovered a goat locker at the Veterans Farm. (From left) ET2 Jeremy Pugh, IT3 Daniel Ketchum and AC1 Greg Klein work to get dead trees into manageable pieces. (From back) YN3 Tquondra Harris, LSC Terry Loeffelholz and ET2 Jeremy Pugh carry a long tree limb to be cut into fire wood. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014 9

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Energy reduction bar set highThe Building Energy Monitors from various tenant commands were joined by NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker (far left) Feb. 18 to discuss energy management goals and practices for the station. Photos by MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Installation Energy Manager Josh Bass leads the quarterly Building Energy Monitor meeting at the base public works department conference room. The gathering was an informative meeting that included energy reduction goals and various methods to use power more efficiently. Photos by Morgan Kehnert 'Aerobathon' delivers fun and fitnessAR Chanay George of VP-45 displays her high kick during the step class taught by Terry Crawford at the MWR "2014 Aerobathan" held at the NAS Jax Wellness Center. Amare Harris, who attended the Aerobathon with his father, was able to pick up the step moves very quickly. The MWR "2014 Aerobathon" featured six different heart-pumping classes. During the 30-minute Zumba class, instructor CeCe Hartsell (right) energized her standing room only class. With 85 participants, the MWR "2014 Aerobathon" was a sweaty success. The spin class was full for the entire two hours. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014 11

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By Lt. j.g. Brendan McGoey and Lt. j.g. Jeremy TijerinaVP-10 Public AffairsThe Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) 405 Long Range Patrol Squadron based in Nova Scotia, hosted a detachment of VP-10, Red Lancers from Jan. 24-30 for exercise Atlantic Shield 2014. The event focused on antisubmarine warfare and antisurface warfare missions. Despite having to overcome the severe weather conditions that often plague the area, the detachment proved to be a rewarding and memorable experience for crewmembers. The Red Lancers sent Combat Aircrew (CAC)-9, led by Lt. Dean Legidakes, with a maintenance contingent led by AZC Natalia Luchetti. Lt. Cmdr. Larry Blankenship, the detachment officer in charge, oversaw the operations as the crew achieved outstand ing success. Throughout their time in Canada, the Red Lancer crew completed multiple missions, only having to cancel their first scheduled event due to extremely adverse weather conditions off the coast of Nova Scotia. However, CAC-9 and RCAF Squadron 405 were able to complete all of their neces sary qualifications and train ing requirements during the follow-on flights. The complet ed missions provided the Red Lancers with the opportunity to experience real-time, inter nationally coordinated opera tions with the RCAFs own version of the P-3C Orion, the CP-140 Aurora. Unsure of what to expect, Lt. j.g. Ryan Mackey, the tactical coordinator for the crew, was impressed with how smoothly the operations were executed. Working with the Canadians felt just like working with our guys back in the states. Communication and coordina tion meshed perfectly, he said. To celebrate the conclu sion of Atlantic Shield 2014, the detachment was treated to a celebration hosted by their RCAF counterparts. The gra cious hosts provided din ner as the crews, along with the maintenance personnel, shared experiences and trad ed squadron patches with one another. Squadron 405 really went above and beyond for us the entire time we were there. They were nothing but welcom ing and hospitable. Im look ing forward to any upcoming opportunity we may have to work with them again, said Lt. Andrew Knott, the patrol plane pilot for CAC-9. VP-10 is home based at NAS Jacksonville, and is currently doing work-ups for their next deployment that will send them to the 4th and 5th Fleets. Photo courtesy of VP-10Members of VP-10 and 405 LRP Squadron celebrate the final event of Atlantic Shield 2014 at the Royal Canadien Air Force base in Nova Scotia.Red Lancers visit the Great White North From Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsFleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Human Resources Program Administrator Tammie Wells, 45, passed away Feb. 22 at Orange Park Medical Center. Wells, a Jacksonville native, gradu ated from William M. Raines Senior High School in 1986. She enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps in October 1987, completing recruit training at Parris Island, S.C. in February 1987. Wells worked in the administrative field during her service as a Marine, retiring as a gunnery sergeant in April 2007. Wells never saw combat as an administrative chief, however her ser vice as the casualty assistance calls officer from 2002-07 in Jacksonville included assisting seven families who lost loved ones serving on active duty. Her job consisted of accompanying a chaplain to the familys home to noti fy the next-of-kin and provide details of the cause of death. She explained death benefits and served as a liaison between the funeral home and family. Her military decorations included the Meritorious Service Medal, Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (two awards), Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal (five awards), Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal and various unit commendations, letters of appre ciations and meritorious masts. After retiring from the Marine Corps, she joined the FRCSE team in 2007 working as a management technician in the legal office until assuming her last position as pro gram administrator in the Human Resources Office in 2008. Wells also served the community in numerous capacities including acting as secretary for the Montford Point Marine Association Chapter No. 29 and American Legion Post No. 197, and assisted with many youth pro grams at Grace Baptist Missionary Church. A viewing for family and friends will be held Feb. 28 at 5 p.m. at James Graham Mortuary, 3631 Moncrief Rd., Jacksonville, Fla. 32209. The funeral service will be held March 1 at noon at Grace Baptist Missionary Church, 1553 East 21st Street, Jacksonville, Fla. 32205. Wells will be buried with full mil itary honors at the Jacksonville National Cemetery March 3. In MemoriamWells Photos by Jacob Sippel HM2 Merrian Calzado presents Florida State College at Jacksonvilles Chief Financial Officer Cleve Warren with a plaque on Feb. 20, on behalf of Naval Hospital Jacksonville, during the commands African-American/Black History Month celebration. Civil Rights in America was the theme of this years celebra tion. Cleve Warren, chief financial officer at Florida State College at Jacksonville, and guest speaker for Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles African American/Black History Month celebration Feb. 20, spoke about the past, present and future of African Americans. Civil Rights in America was the theme of this years celebration.African American/Black History Month celebration 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014

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By Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe Defense Department can no longer put off slowing the growth of military personnel costs, and the fiscal year 2015 budget request DoD is rec ommending to the president begins that process, defense leaders said Feb. 24. Saying they are ready to take on the hard task of curb ing growth in compensation, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, previewed the fiscal 2015 budget request for reporters. Hagel said all defense lead ers agreed to a holistic and comprehensive approach to compensation changes. Continuous piecemeal chang es will only magnify uncertain ty and doubts among our ser vice members about whether promised benefits will be there in the future, he said. Dempsey also stressed this in his remarks. I know this weighs heavily on the minds of our men and women in uni form and on their families, he said. Our force is extraor dinarily accepting of change. They are less understanding of piecemeal approaches. They want and they deserve pre dictability. Military and civilian com pensation accounts for 50 per cent of the DoD budget. This has put the department out of balance, the defense leaders said, and the department must invest to ensure service mem bers are well-equipped and well-trained to handle future challenges. All savings from compensa tion reforms will help keep ser vice members properly trained and equipped, they added. The budget request recommends a 1 percent increase in military pay, and it freezes pay for gen eral and flag officers. Hagel and Dempsey stressed that no one in uniform will see a pay cut. Rather, they explained, the push is to slow growth to put pay and benefits on a more sustainable path. Total pay and benefits increased 40 percent faster than the private sector between 2001 and 2012, and while that was the right thing to do at the time, we cant continue at that rate over the long term, Hagel said. In addition to pay, the budget request begins the process to slow the growth rate of tax-free basic housing allowances. This will continue for five years until the allowances cover about 95 percent of the average service members housing expens es. Again, no one will see a decrease in their basic house allowance, Hagel said. DoD also would no longer reimburse service members for renters insurance. This change will happen slowly, so that no ones hous ing allowances will actually go down, Hagel said, noting that the process also will consider differences in the relative cost of living, so service members in high-rent areas wont be adversely affected. Under the request, the department will not shut down any commissaries, but will cut subsidies for some of them, the secretary said. Over three years, we will reduce by $1 billion the annu al direct subsidy provided to military commissaries, which now totals $1.4 billion, he said. We are not shutting down commissaries. All com missaries will still get free rent and pay no taxes. They will be able to continue to provide a very good deal to service mem bers and retirees much like our post exchanges, which do not receive direct subsidies. Overseas commissaries and those in remote locations will continue receiving direct sub sidies. DoD will simplify and mod ernize the TRICARE health insurance program by con solidating plans and adjust ing deductibles and co-pays in ways that encourage mem bers to use the most affordable means of care such as military treatment facilities, preferred providers, and generic prescrip tions, the secretary said. We will ask retirees and some active-duty family mem bers to pay a little more in their deductibles and co-pays, but their benefits will remain affordable, as they should be, he said. To protect the most vulnerable, under this plan medically retired service mem bers, their families, and the survivors of service members who die on active duty would not pay the annual participa tion fees charged to other retir ees, and would pay a smaller share of the costs for health care than other retirees. Under the budget recommen dation, the average military retiree would go from paying 8 percent of health care costs out of pocket to paying 11 per cent. Retirees old enough to use Medicare and who choose to have TRICARE as well, even tually would be asked to pay a little bit more to enroll in TRICARE, Hagel said. The approach encourages retirees to use free military facilities if they are close to home, which provide outstand ing care and are often under used, the secretary said. The compensation proposals do not recommend any changes to the military retirement ben efits for those now in the ser vices, Hagel said. We are awaiting the results of the Military Compensation and Retirement Modernization Commission, which is expected to present its report in February 2015, before pursuing reforms in this area, he added. But DOD continues to support the principle of grandfathering for any future changes to military retirement plans. Hagel said the proposals were carefully crafted to reform mili tary compensation in a fair, responsible, and sustainable way. We recognize that no one serving our nation in uniform is overpaid for what they do for our country, he added. But if we continue on the current course without making these modest adjustments now, the choices will only grow more difficult and painful down the road. We will inevitably have to either cut into compensation even more deeply and abruptly, or we will have to deprive our men and women of the train ing and equipment they need to succeed in battle. Either way, we would be breaking faith with our people. And the presi dent and I will not allow that to happen. By Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceDefense officials continue to urge Afghan President Hamid Karzai to sign the Bilateral Security Agreement with the United States, Pentagon press sec retary Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby said Feb. 20. We continue to believe it would be enormously helpful to have a bilateral security agreement as soon as possible, Kirby said during a Pentagon news con ference. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel has said he would like to have the agreement signed by an upcoming NATO Defense Ministerial. That meeting is next week, Kirby said. Karzai has said he will leave it to his successor to sign the document, which if done soon will allow for the United States and other NATO nations to plan for Operation Resolute Support -to train, advise and assist mission that is set to begin Jan. 1. 2015. Without an agreement were going to have to start planning for a complete withdrawal, but were not at that point right now, Kirby said. Pentagon officials are also studying a Center for Naval Analysis report com missioned by the Defense Department that concludes the Taliban will strength en after the NATO combat mission ends, and that the Afghan military should be larger than currently projected. One of the reasons why the alliance is interested in the resolute support mission post-2014 is to help improve the capabilities of the Afghan national secu rity forces, the admiral said in response to questions about the reports conclu sions. Its a commitment we made long ago. Its a commitment were trying to make now on the ground in Afghanistan to improve their capacity and capabil ity. Afghan forces are in the lead for com bat operations throughout the country, the admiral said. They and NATO never dismiss the Taliban insurgency or the threat the Taliban pose not just to the United States and its allies, but to the Afghan people. The CNA report will inform DoD lead ers as the mission continues, Kirby said.DoD takes holistic view of slowing military compensation growthPentagon: U.S./Afghan agreement remains a priority JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014 13

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14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014 DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live enter tainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and kara okeFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Jan. 18, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: Jan. 25, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Navy Run Training Program At the fitness center Running group meets every Tuesday at 4 p.m. Biggest Loser Challenge 8 week program, teams of 2 Begins March 10 9th Annual Captain Chuck Cornett Navy Run April 5 at 8 a.m. Register online at www.1stplacesports. com/calendar.html Lifeguard Course Begins March 14 Sign-up at the base gymI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Alhambra Dinner show $38 $50.50 Jacksonville Sharks $25 Jacksonville Suns available soon! Rivership Romance (includes dinner) $40$57.75 Disney On Ice $15 Funk Fest 2 Day Ticket $62 VIP $169 Motley Crew Concert Club seats $63.50 Gatornationals $32 $58 Wild Adventures $30 $70 while supplies last Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27,2014) $166 $194.50 Discover Disney Ticket Florida Resident Ticket Valid for sale through APRIL 12, 2014 Universal Orlando Military Special 3rd day free Nonresident 2014 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 THE ARTIST SERIES-BROADWAY IN JACKSONVILLE 2014 SEASON Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com instal lation $349-$369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St Augustine $4.25 $15.50 St Augustine Alligator Farm Nile Zipline $35.25 (free admission with reservation) St Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Half Hour Boggy Creek Airboat Rides $15.50 $20 Wild Florida Airboats (Kenansville, FL) $18 $46.75 Florida Ecosafaris $22.75 $52.75 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld Hotel properties, Universal Hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restrict ed to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Ladies Day Out March 1 at 1:30 p.m. Neon Vibe Volunteer Trip March 8 Paintball Trip March 15 at 9 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Twilight League now forming Begins March 25 Team rosters are due on March 18 Spring Breakout Championship April 4 at 10 a.m. $40 per person Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty March 11 & 25 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests March 13 & 27Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you!Flying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person From Region Legal Service OfficeThe VITA Self Service will be available to active duty service members, retirees and dependents, Reservists (active 30 days or predemobilization) and entitled for mer spouses from Feb. 4 through April 15. The service is for those whose adjusted gross income doesnt exceed $57,000. Those who qualify under the Military One Source will be able file their taxes for free using the H&R Block software. Volunteer assistance will be onsite; however volunteers are not permitted to prepare taxes. Those needing additional assis tance outside the scope of the vol unteers may be redirected to a nearby tax center. The tax center is located at NAS Jacksonville, Building 4, Room 108 (Ranger Street). The center is open Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Tuesday and Thursday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. For questions or concerns, please contact LN1 Clinton Washington at 542-8038 or e-mail Clinton.wash ington@navy.mil. From FFSC The NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to ser vice members and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2014: p.m.), Aug. 18-19 (8 a.m.-4 p.m.), Aug. 20 (8 a.m.-12:30 p.m.), Nov. 17-20 (5:30-10 p.m.). Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) March 10-14, March 24-28, April 7-11, May 5-9, May 19-23, June 9-13, June 23-27, July 7-11, July 21-25, Aug. 11-15, Aug. 25-29, Sept. 15-19, Oct. 20-24, Nov. 3-7, Dec. 1-5. Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) March 17-21, April 14-18, May 12-16, June 16-20, July 14-18, Aug. 18-22, Sept. 22-26, Oct. 27-31, Nov. 17-21, Dec. 8-12. April 1, May 2, June 30, June 30, July 29, Aug. 4, Sept. 2, Oct. 8, Nov. 14, Dec. 22. (8-9:30 a.m.) April 2, May 28, July 1, Sept. 3, Nov. 12. noon) April 2, May 28, July 1, Sept. 3, Nov. 12. April 29-30, Aug. 5-6, Nov. 24-25. a.m.-4 p.m.) July 31. (1-4 p.m.) April 1, July 29, Oct.8. March 31, July 30, Oct. 7. a.m.) April 4, July 30, Oct. 17. May 1, July 2, Aug. 7, Oct. 2, Nov. 6. 6, May 8, July 10, Sept. 11, Nov. 13. p.m.), July 29 (10-11:30 a.m.), Oct. 4 (1-2:30 p.m.) 14, May 12, June 9, July 14, Aug. 11, Sept. 8, Oct. 6, Nov. 3, Dec. 8. March 11, April 8, May 13, June 10, July 8, Aug. 12, Sept. 9, Oct. 7, Nov. 4, Dec. 9. noon) May 20, 27, Sept. 23, 30. March 31, April 28, May 19, June 30, July 28, Aug. 25, Sept. 29, Oct. 27, Nov. 24, Dec. 15. May 1 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.), May 27 July 8 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.-no workshop June 3), July 29 Sept. 9 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.-no workshop Aug. 19), Sept. 25 Oct. 30 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.). March 19, May 6, July 15, Sept. 9, Nov. 18. 11, 18, 25; May 6, 13, 20, 27; July 1, 8, 15, 22; Sept. 9, 16, 23, 30; Nov. 4, 12, 18, 25. 22; June 3, 10, 17, 24; Aug. 5, 12, 19, 26; Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28. a.m.) Every Wednesday 3, Sept. 16, Dec. 2. April 1, 15, 29; May 13, 27; June 10, 24; July 15, 29; Aug. 12, 26; Sept. 9, 23; Oct. 7, 21; Nov. 4, 18; Dec. 2, 16. Orientation (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) March 13, May. 15, July 17, Sept. 4, Nov. 5. April 10, June 12, Aug. 14, Oct. 9, Dec. 4.To register for any of the above workshops, please call 542-5745. Tax services availableFFSC offers life skills workshops

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Valentines Day 5K age-group winnersFrom StaffMen 19 & under: Austin Reynolds (22:56); Joshua Steverson (24:22) Men 20-24: Matthew Burke (17:34); Jacob Schmit (19:37) Men 25-29: Robert Bobmard (18:53); Chris Fleck (1956) Men 30-34: Erik Koenig (19:12); Vincent Sonson (20:56) Men 35-39: Joe Kovacocy (21:01); Brendan Lockard (22:05) Men 40-44: Andy Patterson (18:05); Jack Parker (20:09) Men: 45-49 Edgar Twining (24:42); Martin Milligan (24:50) Men: 50 & over: John Metzgar (17:37); John Mann (23:41) Women 19 & under: Ashley Pleace (45:08) Women 20-24: Miranda Abbas (22:02); Jennifer Dominguez (22:58) Women 25-29: Rachel Korzeb (25:30); Danielle Robinson (25:35) Women 30-34: Melissa Gomez (22:33); Sarah Little (27:11) Women 35-39: Charlotte Miller (24:15); Stephanie Edwards (27:34) Women 40-44: Susn Heinz (27:57); Krista Willim (29:01) Women 45-49: Denise Metzgar (23:29); Tamara Lugenbeal (31:59) Women 50 & over: Deanna Falls (30:04); Iris Pabon (30:20) Top-3 Men: Matthew Burke (17:34); John Metzgar (17:37); Andy Patterson (18:05) Top-3 Women: Miranda Abbas (22:02); Melissa Gomez (22:33); Jennifer Dominguez (22:58) Sand Volleyball League meeting March 12 at noonOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS paperwork.Leprechaun Dash 5k March 14 The run is free and open to all authorized gym patrons. participating. Sign up at NAS Jax Gym or the Fitness Source prior to the Feb. 7 deadline. The run is held on Perimeter Road at the end of Mustin Road, before the Antenna Farm at 11:30 a.m. Registration will also be held at the run site from 10:30-11:15 a.m. Awards will be given to the top male and top female runner for age groups: 19 & under; 20-24; 25-29; 30-34; 35-39; 4044; 45-49; 50 & over.Kickball League meeting March 19 at noonOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS paperwork. Tennis Tournament March 24 The tournament is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractor women assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants will earn or third. Sign up by March 21 .Greybeard Softball League FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractor personnel age 30 and older who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play on Tuesday & Thursday at 11:30 a.m. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Rosters due by March 7. Play begins at the end of March or the beginning of April.Intramural Softball League FormingOpen to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Rosters are due by March 7. Play begins at the end of March or the beginning of April.Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians; DoD contractors; retirees; and dependents over 18. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Rosters are due by March 7. Play begins at the end of March or the beginning of April. Tournament April 28Open to active duty, retirees, dependents over 18, selective reservists, DoD civilians and contractors. The tournament starts at 5 p.m. at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts on the corner of Allegheny Road and Birmingham Road. Call 5422930 to sign up by April 25. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil StandingsAs of Feb. 214-on-4 Flag Football NOSC 4 0 Vet Clinic 4 0 VR-58 4 0 VP-26 3 1 VR-62 3 1 HSM-72 2 1 ASD Jax 1 3 NavHosp IMC 1 3 FACSFAC 0 2 CRS-10 0 3 FRCSE 62A/690 0 4 VP-62 0 4Intramural Basketball FRCSE 700 5 1 FRCSE 600 4 2 NAVHOSP 4 2 NCTS 4 3 NAVHOSP Galley 3 3 VP-10 3 3 NAS Jax 2 3 VP-45 2 3 VR-58 2 3 VP-26 2 4 FACSFAC 1 4 TPU/PCF 1 4Greybeard Basketball NAVHOSP 4 1 VP-30 4 1 VP-10 3 1 NAVFAC 3 3 VP-26 3 3 FRCSE 2 2 VP-5 1 1 NCTS 0 5Badminton Doubles CV-TSC Ashore 1 0 FACSFAC-2 1 0 NAVFAC Red 1 0 NAVFAC Blue 1 0 NAVHOSP MSU 1 0 NBHC Jax 1 0 FACSFAC-1 0 1 MWR Dynamic Duo 0 1 NAVFAC Gold 0 1 NAVFAC Green 0 1 NAVFAC Orange 0 1 CNATTU Blue 3 0 NCTS 3 0 VP-45 3 0 FRCSE 2 1 Navy Band 2 1 VP-30 2 1 CV-TSC/PSD 1 2 SERCC 1 2 VP-10 1 2 CNATTU Gold 0 3 Photos by Morgan KehnertOn your marks . . More than 250 runners showed up for the NAS Jax Valentine's Day 5K on Feb. 14. Most competitors fell in love with the sunny sky and moderate temperature. AWOAN Miranda Abbas of VP-30 was the first female runner to cross the Valentine's Day 5K Run finish line with a time of 22:02. 1st Lt. Matthew Burke of the U.S. Army was the top finisher in the Feb. 14 Valentine's Day 5K with a time of 17:34. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014 American Forces Press ServicePresident Barack Obama will award 24 Army veterans the Medal of Honor for conspicuous gallantry during a White House ceremony March 18. These veterans will receive the Medal of Honor in recognition of their valor during major combat operations in World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War, according to a White House news release. Each of these soldiers bravery was previously recognized by award of the Distinguished Service Cross, the nations second highest military award. That award will be upgraded to the Medal of Honor in recognition of their gallantry, intrepidity and heroism above and beyond the call of duty. In 2002, Congress, through the Defense Authorization Act, called for a review of Jewish American and Hispanic American veteran war records from World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War, to ensure those deserving the Medal of Honor were not denied because of prejudice, accord ing to the release. During the review, records of several soldiers of neither Jewish nor Hispanic descent were also found to display criteria worthy of the Medal of Honor. The 2002 Act was amended to allow these soldiers to be honored with the upgrade in addition to the Jewish and Hispanic American soldiers. The President will award the Medal of Honor to: the Medal of Honor for his courageous actions while serving as radio telephone operator in Company C, 1st Battalion (Airmobile), 501st Infantry, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile) during search and clear mission near Tam Ky, Republic of Vietnam. the Medal of Honor for his courageous actions while serving as commander of a strike force drawn from Company D, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, during combat operations against an armed enemy in the vicinity of Chi Lang, Republic of Vietnam, on September 17, 1969. receive the Medal of Honor for his cou rageous actions while serving as the company commander, Detachment B-36, Company A, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces during combat operations against an armed enemy in Phuoc Long Province, Republic of Vietnam, on September 1, 1969. The President will posthumously award the Medal of Honor to the fol lowing individuals who distinguished themselves by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty while serving during the Vietnam War: the Medal of Honor for his courageous actions while serving as an acting team leader for Company B, 1st Battalion, 2nd Infantry, 1st Brigade, 1st Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Lai Khe, Republic of Vietnam, on December 8, 1968. receive the Medal of Honor posthu mously for his courageous actions while serving as a rifleman with Company D, 2nd Battalion, 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) during combat operations against an armed enemy in Phuoc Long Province, Republic of Vietnam, on August 12, 1969. will receive the Medal of Honor post humously for his courageous actions while serving as an acting Platoon Leader in Company D, 1st Battalion, 505th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 82nd Airborne Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Ap Tan Hoa, Republic of Vietnam, on April 4, 1969. the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as a Machinegunner in Company C, 1st Battalion (Mechanized), 5th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division dur ing combat operations against an armed enemy near Ph Romeas Hek, Cambodia, on May 12, 1970. the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as an acting M-60 machine gunner in Company E, 2nd Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) during combat operations against an armed enemy in the Republic of Vietnam on April 10, 1969. The following individuals distin guished themselves by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty while serving during the Korean War: the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serv ing as an acting machine gunner in 3rd Squad, 2nd Platoon, Company B, 187th Airborne Infantry Regiment during combat operations against an armed enemy in Kangdong, Korea, on November 25, 1950. the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as an Acting Rifleman in Company A, 23d Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Chorwon, Korea, on August 1, 1952. the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving with Company I, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Tabu-dong, Korea, on September 3, 1950. the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as an assistant machine gunner with Company M, 5th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Yangpyong, Korea, on March 6 and 7, 1951. receive the Medal of Honor posthu mously for his courageous actions while serving as a member of Company L, 65th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Kalma-Eri, Korea, on April 28, 1951. receive the Medal of Honor posthu mously for his courageous actions while serving as a member of Company F, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Waegwan, Korea, on September 4, 1950. the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serv ing as an automatic rifleman with 2nd Platoon, Company G, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Changyong-ni, Korea, on May 23, 1951. Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as an automatic rifleman with Company F, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division in Chorwon, Korea, on September 21, 1952. Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while leading 1st Platoon, Company G, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division in Kumsong, Korea, on October 19, 1951. The following individuals distin guished themselves by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty while serving during World War II: Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving with Company C, 8th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Schevenhutte, Germany, on December 3, 1944. Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serv ing with Company D, 2d Battalion, 507th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 17th Airborne Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Amfreville, France, on June 9, 1944. will receive the Medal of Honor post humously for his courageous actions while serving as the squad leader of a rifle squad with 2d Platoon, Company L, 180th Infantry, 45th Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Aprilia, Italy, on May 27 and 28, 1944. the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serv ing as a squad leader in Company C, 30th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy near St. Die, France, on November 7, 1944. receive the Medal of Honor post humously for his courageous actions while serving as a platoon sergeant with Company B, 350th Infantry, 88th Infantry Division during combat opera tions against an armed enemy on Mt. Battaglia, Italy, on October 4, 1944. the Medal of Honor posthumously for his courageous actions while serving as a section leader for Company H, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division during combat operations against an armed enemy in Heistern, Germany on November 18, 1944. will receive the Medal of Honor posthu mously for his courageous actions while serving as the commander of Company E, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, during combat operations against an armed enemy near Lure, France, on September 17, 1944. The Medal of Honor is awarded to members of the Armed Forces who dis tinguish themselves conspicuously by gallantry above and beyond the call of duty while: enemy of the United States; involving conflict with an opposing for eign force; engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party. From Navy League Mayport The Navy League of Mayport is celebrat ing the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration dinner and program. This is an All Services event featuring a joint color guard, All Services Missing Person table, the Navy Band with all the service songs, and numerous historical dis plays. Tickets are now on sale for this years event which will be held June 7, at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine.The keynote speak er is Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert. Veterans who served at the Battle of Midway and veterans of all branches who served in prior con flicts, as well as those currently serving are invited to attend. Additionally, Medal of Honor recipients and former Prisoners of War who have heroically answered the call of duty will also be in attendance. Come meet these National Treasures and hear their adventures first hand. The evening promises to be emotional and patriot with survivors of what historians call one of the U. S. Navys greatest sea victories and the turning point of World War II in the Pacific. Ticket prices for active duty and spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50, O6 and above $65. Prices for Civilians and Retirees $65. The evening includes fine dining and a memo rable program. Uniform will be O4 and above din ner dress white jacket; O3 and below dinner dress white/dinner dress white jacket optional, and civil ian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 5 p.m., with dinner served at 6 p.m. Tickets are mandatory and seating is reserved. Ticket sales end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before this date. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER. Tickets may be purchased from the follow ing locations: NAVY LEAGUE MAYPORT Bob Price, 904-246-9982 or 904-718-2118 NAVY LEAGUE ST AUGUSTINE Bill Dudley, 904-806-4712 or 904-794-7814 American Forces Press ServiceU.S. Department of Agriculture Deputy Secretary Krysta Harden and Navy Adm. William McRaven signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) Feb. 21 between the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Special Operations Command to increase support services for military families. The MOU allows the USDA-supported Cooperative work directly with SOCOM to conduct research and develop programs for military families of SOCOM units on issues such as personal financial manage ment, health and nutrition, child care and youth empowerment, USDA said in a news release. The USDA and the DoD have a longstanding rela tionship in support of service members and their families, Harden said in the release. port to SOCOM Forces by developing programs that help improve the quality of life for military family members, Harden said. From offering workshops about financial management to creating positive youth development environments for military kids, to promoting healthy lifestyles, the USDA stands at the ready to serve. We are very grateful for USDAs support to our special operations warriors and their families, McRaven said. One of the fundamentals of spe cial operations is that people are more important by facilitating access to valuable and credible family support programs and research through land grant universities, USDA will play a vital role in strength ening our forces resiliency and mission readiness. The MOU builds on a current MOU between USDA and the DoD to strengthen child, youth and family programs for military personnel and their families, according to the release. That agreement, the release said, was signed in 2010 by Dr. Roger Beachy, former director of USDAs National Institute of Food and Agriculture, and Dr. Clifford Stanley, then-undersec retary of defense for personnel and readiness. Under that agreement, the release said, the USDAGrant Universities and DOD are engaged in a 10-year tise in support of military families.Obama to award Medal of Honor to 24 Army veterans Photos by Jacob SippelCongressional staffers tour Naval Hospital Jax Capt. William Todd (right), Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville director of surgical services, and Capt. Gayle Shaffer, NH Jacksonville commanding offi cer, lead a tour for U.S. Representative Ander Crenshaws staff. The delegation (from the left: Lt. Kent McLaughlin, defense legislative fellow; Jackie Smith, district director; and Erica Striebel, chief of staff) toured physical therapy, occupational therapy, operating suites and maternal infant units. HM Kaylin Jones of Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles occupational therapy ices Jill Lawsons forearm while U.S. Representative Ander Crenshaws staff tours the facility on Feb. 20. CNO is Battle of Midway keynote speaker June 7USDA, U.S. Special Operations support military families JOIN TODAY! ducks.org 800-45-DUCKS A CFC participant provided as a public service

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2014 Patient Guide now availableFrom Naval Hospital Jacksonville Public AffairsNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles new 2014 Patient Guide is now in-stock and available at all of its facilities its hospi tal and branch health clinics and at www. med.navy.mil/sites/ navalhospitaljax The guide pro vides patients with current information on Medical Home Port teams, urgent and emergency care, expecting and new parent services, pharmacy and the many other services, programs and classes available at each NH Jacksonville health care facility. Get connected, like us www.facebook.com/ NavalHospitalJacksonville follow us www.twitter.com/NHJax, watch us www.youtube.com/user/NavalHospitalJax and send an email to NHJaxConnect@med.navy.mil to sign up for email updates. By Cherie HuntingtonDeCA public affairs specialist The annual Military Saves Week campaign, now running through March 1, aims to encourage military members and their families to save, by reflecting the theme: Set a goal, make a plan, save automatically. As a campaign partner, the Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA) offers sav ings every day by delivering 30 percent or more savings on groceries. We sell at cost since we provide a non pay benefit earned through mili tary service, said Randy Chandler, DeCAs director of sales. Shopping consistently at your com missary saves you money without the hassle and expense of driving all over town looking for items on sale. Commissary shoppers also use cou pons to achieve even higher savings, he said. Last year, they redeemed nearly 100 million coupons for customer savings of about $91 million. Our customers know coupons equate to cash, Chandler said. And the Commissary Rewards Card delivers even more savings via paperless cou pons to download onto your card. In addition to digital coupons, patrons can also find special commis sary promotions offered through the rewards card program. For more information or to register for a rewards card, visit https://deca.cou ponselectionpage.com/offers/all. Commissary customers can always go to the DeCA website, http://www. commissaries.com, to find information about whats on sale at their local com missary through the Shopping Aisle tab, and they can also access the Exclusive Savings link to find more coupons, spe cials, promotions, sales and healthy recipes. The Military Saves website offers tips on saving money, living well and spending less. Not surprisingly, many ideas call for more meals made at home and brown bag lunches for work and school, and the commissary can sim plify those efforts. Easy, economical meals at home save money, but leftovers compound the value by providing future ready-to-heat meals, especially when chili or hearty soups grace the menu. This can turn a $25 meal out on the town into a $5 meal made with good health in mind. Toting lunch to work doesnt have to be boring, and the commissary can help keep the lunch box interesting as well as economical. Its easy to bag fresh, crisp veggies for snacks, and protein-packed Greek yogurt makes a perfect light lunch. No refrigerator available? Shelf-stable, heat-and-eat entrees in lunchtime por tions can be stored in a desk drawer. Not only during Military Saves Week but year round, commissaries world wide support the campaign by provid ing information on personal financial awareness and preparing nutritious meals for less. Military Saves is part of the Department of Defenses Financial Readiness Campaign to encourage military families to save money every month. Customers can join Military Saves via Facebook, Twitter, Web page and monthly newsletter. Visit http://www.militarysaves.org for more information. Saves Week is every day at your commissaryDeCA photo by Leslie BrownA shopper at the Vogelweh, Germany, Commissary holds up her Commissary Rewards Card. Commissary patrons have downloaded more than 2.5 mil lion coupons since the program began in 2012. Coupons usage helps shoppers save even more on their grocery bills. Photo by Jacob SippelGreat American Spit OutHM3 Julian Vincent (left), from Naval Hospital Jacksonville Wellness Center, explains the nega tive impacts of smokeless tobacco to AWO3 Phillip Reynolds during the "Great American Spit Out" health fair at NAS Jacksonvilles Flight Line Cafe. The annual Great American Spit Out campaign raises awareness to the health dangers of smokeless tobacco. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 27, 2014 17

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