Jax air news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jax air news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note:
Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID:
UF00028307:02078


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2014 I I D E QUALITY AWARD Naval Hospital Jacksonville Page 6 GRUNT! PUSH! Powerlifters Compete Pages 4 & 5 MILITARY SAVES Weeklong Financial Fair Page 12Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com By MC1 Jay PughSailors assigned to the War Eagles of Patrol Squadron (VP)-16 showcased the P-8A Poseidon aircraft during the recent Singapore Air Show Asias largest aerospace and defense exhibition. The United States was the inaugural fea tured country this year. VP-16 became the first maritime patrol and recon naissance aviation squadron to transition to the Poseidon from the P-3 Orion in 2012. The squadron operates six P-8s that began its inaugural deploy ment to Japan in December 2013. We came to show the Navys commitment to regional part ners and allies, and to high light the Navys newest longrange, anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface warfare, intelli gence, surveillance and recon naissance aircraft. The air show is also a great opportunity to interact with visitors from across the region, said Cmdr. Dan Papp, executive officer of VP-16. Built on the Boeing 737 air frame, the P-8A is the most advanced anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare aircraft in the world. A true multi-mission aircraft, it also provides supe rior maritime intelligence, sur veillance and reconnaissance capability. Papp highlighted the P-8As many technological advances over the legacy P-3C aircraft, which is nearing the end of its service life. The P-8A has a maximum speed of 490 knots, a ceiling of 41,000 feet, and provides a range of more than 1,200 nautical miles with four hours on station. It can deliver a number of weapons, includ ing MK-54 torpedoes and Harpoon missiles, as well as 126 internal sonobuoys. The P-8 gets aircrew on station faster and flies higher en route which leads to fuel sav ings. We can go a longer range, carry a larger payload of sono buoys for submarine warfare. The airframe is extremely reli able, which means mainte nance issues are almost nonexistent, said Papp. The aircrews situational awareness far surpassed what we did as a P-3 crew. This leads to a distinct tactical advantage on station and leads to a greater awareness from a safety perspective. The Sailors of VP-16 answered hundreds of ques By Ensign Kiley ProvenzanoUSS Gettysburg (CG 64) Public AffairsHelicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 74, Det. 2, embarked aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) in the Arabian Gulf, success fully conducted its 1,000th flight hour of the current deployment, Jan. 17. One thousand flight hours is an incredible feat, and it would not be possible without the dedication of the air crew and the skill of our maintainers, said HSM-74 Swamp Foxes Lt. Cmdr. Jack Clark, the detachments officer in charge. Without their attention to detail, precision and many long nights, we would not have been able to reach this point. Behind the flight hours are two sides of operation, the maintainers and the operators. The air maintenance crew completes approximately ten hours of maintenance for every hour of flight. Our birds fly nightly, so maintaining their systems is an absolute priority, said AE1 William Winistorfer. Boatswains mates, damage control men, hospital corpsmen, ships servicemen and the pilots and officers controlling the landing all come together to make flight operations a priority for the ship. Part of that support continues with in the aircraft. Flying every hour with the pilots are aviation warfare systems operators, controlling all of the mis sion equipment. AWR2 Britt Turner has flown 275 hours this deployment. It has been a busy deployment, said Turner. Being able to operate daily has been an incredible experience and opportunity. Inside the ship, the combat infor mation center plays a large role and logs just as many hours as the pilots. Operations specialists serve as the antisubsurface tactical controllers (ASTAC) P-8A Poseidon showcased at Singapore Air ShowPhoto by MC1 Jay Pugh A P-8A Poseidon from the "War Eagles" of Patrol Squadron (VP)-16, is on display at the Singapore Air Show. The Singapore Air Show is Asia's largest aerospace and defense exhibition.Gettysburg-embarked Swamp Foxes complete 1,000 flight hours By Clark PierceEditorA ground breaking ceremony was held Feb. 11 aboard NAS Jacksonville for the MQ-4C Triton Mission Control Center. The $16 million construction project was awarded by Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast to Whitesell-Green Inc., a small business headquartered in Pensacola,Fla. The Triton, formerly known as the Broad Area Maritime Surveillance (BAMS) unmanned aircraft system (UAS), is expected to enable American and allied warriors by providing opera tional commanders the real-time information they require to fight and win. The Triton Mission Control Center project includes a two-story structure with two electromagnetic, interfer ence-shielded mission control systems, Triton Mission Control Center construction underwayPhoto by Clark Pierce Breaking ground for the MQ-4C Triton UAS Mission Control Center on Feb. 11 were (from left) NAS Jacksonville Public Works Officer Cmdr. Anant Patel; NAS Jacksonville Public Works Civil Engineer Celio Cedeno; William Whitesell, V.P. of Whitesell-Green; NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander; Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing-11 Capt. Sean Liedman; VP-10 Executive Officer Cmdr. James Johnston; Joseph Strickland, deputy director of MQ-4C Department; Hugh Simmons, project superintendent of Whitesell-Green; and Mike Vorburger, NAVFAC Southeast FEAD engineering technician.Photo illustration courtesy of NAVFAC SoutheastAn architect's rendering of the new MQ-4C Triton UAS Mission Control Center slated for completion by December at NAS Jacksonville.See VP-16, Page 8 See Page 9 See Page 9 Photo by MC3 Lorenzo Burleson Lt. j.g. Joe Gramata operates the landing signal officer station Nov. 22, 2013 during the recovery of a "Swamp Foxes" MH-60R Seahawk on the flight deck of the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) in the Gulf of Oman.

PAGE 2

SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)5487789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley From StaffFeb. 20 1815 USS Constitution, under Capt. Charles Stewart, captures HMS Cyane and sloop-of-war Levant. 1962 USMC Lt. Col. John Glenn becomes first American to orbit Earth. His flight in Friendship 7 (Mercury 6) consisted of three orbits in 88 minutes at a velocity of 17,544 mph. Recovery was by USS Noa (DD-841). 1974 First Lockheed S-3A Viking ASW carrier jet is assigned to VS-41 Shamrocks. Feb. 21 1944 Marines with support of naval bombardment and carrier aircraft secure Eniwetok atoll. 1945 USSBismark Sea (CVE-95) struck by a kamikaze off Iwo Jima and sunk in 90 minutes with loss of 318 men. USSSaratoga (CV-3) struck by five kamikazes but survived with loss of 123 Sailors. Bismark Sea was last carrier lost in combat during World War II. Feb. 22 1865 Rear Adm. Porters gunboats bombard Wilmington, N.C. into sur render. 1870 After arriving on USS Nipsic, and supported by USS Guard and USS Nyack, the Darien Expedition, com manded by Cmdr.Thomas Selfridge Jr., begins active operations ashore at Caldonia Bay to survery the Isthmus of Panama for an interoceanic ship canal. 1909 Great White Fleet returns from round the world cruise to Hampton Roads, Va. 1943 USS Iowa (BB-61), the lead ship of the last class of American fast battleships, is commissioned. 1974 Lt. j.g. Barbara Ann Allen becomes first Navy designated female aviator. Feb. 23 1795 U.S. Navy Office of Purveyor of Supplies is established. This is the Navy Supply Corps Birthday. 1919 Launching of Osmond Ingram (DD-255), first Navy ship named for an enlisted man. 1944 Carrier groups under Adm. Spruance attack Saipan, Tinian and Rota in the Marianas. 1945 Marines and a Navy hospi tal corpsman raise U.S. flag atop Mt. Suribachi on Iwo Jima. Feb. 24 1813 USS Hornet, under Capt. James Lawrence, captures HMS Peacock. 1942 A strike force composed of the carrier USS Enterprise and its cruiser and destroyer screen, and led by Vice Adm. William Halsey, attacked Wake Island. 1944 The first detection of a sub merged enemy submarine by the use of MAD gear was made by PBYs of VP-63. On a MAD barrier patrol of the approaches to the Strait of Gibraltar, they attacked the German U-761 with bombs. With the assistance of two ships and aircraft from two other squadrons, the submarine was sunk. Feb. 25 1861 USS Saratoga, member of U.S. African Squadron, captures slaver sloop Express. 1933 Commissioning of USS Ranger, first true aircraft carrier. 1959 USS Galveston fires first Talos surface-to-air missile. Feb. 26 1811 Congress authorizes first naval hospital. 1913 Approval of experimental wind tunnel for Navy. 1944 Sue Sophia Dauser, super intendent of the Navy Nurse Corps is first woman in Navy to achieve rank of Captain. By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorPeople who regularly read this column often say they feel like they know me and my children Ford, Owen and Lindell. They even feel like they know our dog, Sparky, But Ive never had anyone say they feel like they know my husband, Dustin. Maybe I dont write about him enough. I mean, I write about what he does for work and how it impacts our lives, but I dont write about who Dustin is as a person. So, Id like you to meet Dustin Smiley, the man I almost stupidly wanted to return. See, I have this problem with buyers remorse. As soon as I get something, I begin to question if I really wanted it. Im the kind of person who leaves tags on her clothes for several days just in case. I beat myself up over possibly bad purchasing decisions, whether its for a toothbrush or a car. And 14 years ago, I felt that way about getting married. Dustin jokes that if he had been a pair of pants, I might have returned him. I was so conflicted about this major life decision that my jaw locked shut two days after our wedding. I ate through a straw for 24 hours. But Dustin well, he never questioned anything. He was as sure about us as he is that the Earth circles the sun. Admittedly, I was quite unlovable back then, but Dustin never gave up. When you were at your most unlovable, Dustin once said, I just loved you more to get you through it. This was the first of what Ive come to call Dustinisms stunning and insightful observations about our life and the world in general. They are stunning because Dustin has been trained by the military for nearly 20 years, and, you know, insight isnt a course taught at the Naval Academy. Yet this is perhaps the most important point about Dustin: although he is an excellent military officer, he is an even better person. His gift is with people. More Dustinisms: No one is all good or all bad. No situation is as good or as bad as it seems. The truth is usually somewhere in the middle. Being extreme in either direction usually comes full circle so that a person is eventually arguing for a side they thought they were against. People just want to be heard. You make the dress beautiful, not the other way around. That last one is an all-time favorite. Today, if I had to liken Dustin to something, it would not be a pair pants that I want to return. It would be a loyal golden retriever. I mean this in the most loving way possible. You know that saying, Someday I hope to be the person my dog thinks I am? Well, I feel the same way about my husband: Someday I hope to be the person Dustin thinks I am. In a word, Dustin is steady. While I bounce up and down like the peaks on an EKG printout, Dustin remains a solid, even line. And he loves me like no one else ever has. (Well, except for my 7-year-old, but hell grow out of it.) Its been this way since we were kids. We have known each other since the day I was born, and because my dad was deployed at the time and Dustin and his family lived down the street, Ive actually known Dustin longer than Ive known my dad. In elementary school, Dustin was a hall patrol. He in his orange vest and sensible tennis shoes told me to walk, dont run through the hallways. Back then, Dustin wasnt the handsome man that he is now, and I rarely made eye contact. If I had a daughter today, I would tell her that the unassuming, quiet boy with a good job (like hall patrol) and kind smile is the one she should keep her eye on. Someday, after years of braces and growth spurts, he will show up on her doorstep and take her breath away. But I have three boys and no daughters, so I tell them this instead. Be patient and be a good person. Your day will come. In January, Dustin (again) helped me through a difficult time. One night I asked him, Why are you so good to me? Because I promised God a long time ago that I will always take care of you, he said. Aw, another Dustinism. But here comes another great thing about Dustin: hes wicked funny, too. Even when hes not trying to be. How will I ever repay you? I said. Well, you could start by [long list of things]. I smiled through my tears and thought, Im glad I took the tags off this one. Hes a keeper.U.S. Navy photosA Grumman S-2A Tracker assigned to the "Tromboners" of anti-submarine squadron VS-29. The squadron was assigned to Anti-Submarine Carrier Air Group 53 aboard the aircraft carrier USS Kearsarge (CVS-33). The Tromboners flew the S-2A from 1960 to 1963. NAS North Island, Calif. Fleet replacement squadron VS-41 accepted the aircraft that incorporated the latest sensors, computer-based data processing, display and weapons control systems. The S-3B version incorporated new technology for increased radar detection range and classification, advanced acoustic processing and Harpoon missile capability.The S-3 replaced the propeller-driven S-2 Tracker that was the Navys primary carrier-based submarine hunter for more than 20 years. The S-3 was retired in 2009 after 35 years of service. This Week in Navy History13 years later, meet Dustin From the Homefront From StaffFrom Feb. 18-28, NAS Jacksonville will participate in Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014. This annual train ing exercise will be conducted on naval bases and installations throughout the continental United States. The exercise is designed to enhance the training and readiness of naval security forces to respond to threats against installations and units and is not a response to any specific threat but is a regularly scheduled exercise. According to NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander, these annual training scenari os provide an important opportunity to test the air stations anti-terrorism/force protection (AT/FP) response. Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014 will give us a significant learning opportunity because it will involve coordination of NAS Jax security and fire depart ments, along with various other tenant commands, Undersander explained. Also, the base Emergency Operations Center will be activated, enabling us to see first hand the efficiency our first responders and basewide communication protocols. Measures are in place to minimize disruptions to normal base operations, but there may be times when the exercise causes increased traffic near the installation, as well as delays in base access. For more information about Exercise Solid CurtainCitadel Shield 2014, contact the NAS Jacksonville Public Affairs Office at (904) 542-5588.NAS Jax to participate in Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014

PAGE 3

From StaffAfter successfully completing Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) classroom training for the past 18 months officers, chiefs, enlist ed and civilian members of the NAS Jacksonville SAPR team took the next step to validate the sexual assault response and reporting procedures currently in place at NAS Jacksonville. The primary factors in planning the SAPR drill were to develop a scenario that would maintain the utmost privacy of a real-world victim, test that our procedures enabled the victim to feel con fident and secure, and that they receive the proper information without disclosing any personal information. Installation Training Officer Jim Butters, stated, The sequence of events and interaction of our role-player with the quarterdeck watchstander, unit victim advocate, and Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) provided some very valuable information that will not only help NAS Jacksonvilles procedures but will be important to the development of the SAPR program. For any person who is a victim of sexual assault, we want to stress that your privacy and choice are important and our goal is to make sure you are safe and not threatened. When making a report, it is important to take into account the following: 1. Do you want to talk to a national or local victim advocate? 2. Do you want to talk to a civilian or unit victim advocate? 3. Do you want to talk to the police or Navy Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS)? 4. Do you want to have a medical and/ or forensic exam regardless of your reporting option? You may not have the answers to those questions now or at the time of a sexual assault and that is why the victim advocates and SARC are there to assist you. Their contact information can be obtained by calling the NAS Jacksonville Quarterdeck at 542-2338.Photo by MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Sailors recognizedNAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander recognized several outstanding Sailors for their hard work and professionalism during All Hands Quarters held Feb. 14 at Hangar 117. (From left) Lt. Ryan Platt, CS2(SW) Robert Laughton, CS2 David Tiberio, CS1(SW) Marnika Ash and ET3 Christopher Heywood. NAS Jacksonville conducts SAPR drill JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014 3

PAGE 4

4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014 Powerlifters compete at Fitness CenterFrom NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation More than 90 spectators were on hand at the NAS Jacksonville Fitness Center Feb. 8 for the stations first powerlifting competition. Powerlifting is a strength sport consisting of three events: squat, bench press, and deadlift. All competitors are given three attempts in each event to lift the highest weight possible. At the end of three events, the highest weight lifted for each event is combined to determine the total amount of weight lifted by each competitor. Winners of each weight class were determined using the Wilks formula, which is based on the total weight lifted and the individuals body weight. Each competitor was required to weigh in before the competition in order to use the Wilks formula. The event attracted 30 men and three women who were divided into weight classes. For the womens division, the weight classes were: lightweight 0-125lbs; middleweight: 126-165; and heavyweight 166+. For the mens division, the weight classes were: lightweight 0-145; middleweight 146-225; and the heavyweight 226+. There were three judges for the competition: Division; state powerlifting competitor; national qualifier in powerlifting. medics from First Coast Navy Fire & Emergency Services were on hand to assist with any medical emergencies. said this was a great event for the powerlifting com munity and are eager for more events like this. Thirty men and three women entered the inaugural NAS Jacksonville Powerlifting Competition on Feb. 8 at the base fitness center. Lightweight class competitor Amiee Johnson concentrates in the squat rack as she lifts 115 pounds. In the women's heavyweight class, Patricia Thuestad entered the squat stand and lifted 200 pounds. Women's heavyweight class winner Patricia Thuestad recorded a deadlift of 275 pounds. In the women's middleweight class, Celeste Bowie performed a deadlift of 175 pounds. Chad Hutchens takes his turn in the squat rack where he pressed 335 pounds and took second place in the middleweight class. Spotters stand by as Patricia Thuestad moves 145 pounds in the bench press at the NAS Jacksonville Powerlifting Competition Feb. 8 at the base fitness center.

PAGE 5

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014 5 M M: FIRST HM C G, N H J B r, Sf rn, Dtb r SECOND ATC Ct H, HSM-n B r, Sf r, Dtb nr THIRD S M, DD B r, Sf r, Dtb r M H: FIRST GSEC B W, TPU/PCF B n, Sf r, Dtb r SECOND HNSN L Bt, NBHC J B r, Sf r, Dtb rn THIRD AWV E P, VP-n B r, Sf nr, Dtb n W L: FIRST A J, tt B n, Sf r, Dtb n W M: FIRST LS ATA C B, RAN r Sft B nn, Sf r, Dtb r W H: FIRST AD P Tt, FRCSE B r, Sf nn, Dtb r POWERLIFTING RESULTS PHOTOS COURTESY OF MW R Winners of the 2014 NAS Jacksonville Powerlifting Competition held on Feb. 8 at the base fitness center. (From left) Patricia Thuestad, Aimee Johnson, Celeste Bowie, Bryain Williams, Chad Hutchens, Lewis Bradshaw, Evelio Perez, Stephen Myer and Curtis Gaines. Amiee Johnson performed a deadlift of 160 pounds at the inaugural NAS Jacksonville Powerlifting Competition on Feb. 8 at the base fitness center. Bryain Williams won the heavyweight deadlift by moving 675 pounds. Heavyweight Bryain Williams at the squat rack. He topped out at 635 pounds. Stephen Meyer took third place in the middleweight class. He moved 445 pounds in the deadlift. Two spotters lower free weights for heavyweight Bryain Williams on the bench press. Women's middleweight class competitor Celeste Bowie gets her hands positioned just right before her bench press of 100 pounds. Curtis Gaines impressed judges and his competition with his deadlift of 465 pounds. Placing first in the mens middleweight class, Curtis Gaines pressed 450 pounds in the squat.

PAGE 6

By Jim Garamone American Forces Press ServiceThe Navy will continue to work on two defense secretarydirected reviews, including one to ensure that ethical behav ior is paramount in the service, Navy Adm. Jonathan Greenert, chief of naval operations (CNO), said in a video blog posted Feb 13. Greenert said the service will work with the Air Force to take an overall look at the nuclear enterprise. The two services maintain the nuclear triad of bomb ers, submarines and missiles. Senior leaders are concerned about the enterprise after alle gations of cheating on a profi ciency test for nuclear launch officers at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont., as well as on exams for nuclear reactor watch per sonnel at Charleston Naval Base, S.C. Greenert said his service will look at personnel programs, specifically, at how we bring people into the nuclear weap ons program, how we certify them, train them and the per sonnel reliability program and thats about maintaining pro ficiency and certification to be one that works around nuclear weapons. The Navy also will look at previous studies. It adopted some recommendations of a 2008 report by former Defense Secretary James Schlesinger and a 2008 report by Adm. Kirkland Donald on nuclear weapons management. We took on some of those actions, Greenert said. The question is how are we doing? CNO promised to look to the future to make sure we have the values embedded into the fiber of those programs. A second result of the Malmstrom and Charleston incidents entails a thorough look at Navy values, the CNO said. Were going to look at our values, at our integrity, at our character and make sure we are not talking past each other, he said. I dont think we have an ethics problem across the Navy, but I think we need to reinforce our core values and our core com mitment, he said. The admiral repeated several times that integrity is the foundation of what were about, and that sailors need to talk about this commitment. While these discussions need to be part of the Navy training program, Greenert said, he sees this as going way beyond. We need to talk about it in the ready rooms, we need to talk about it on the bridges of our ships, we need to talk about it on our squadron flight lines, in the hangar bays and in our build ings, he said. And we need to commit to it full-time, because integrity is the foundation of what were about. Sailors have to have the honor to not lie, cheat or steal and the courage to stand up when they see someone lying, cheating or stealing, the admiral said. We have to have the com mitment to the institution to remember it is not just about our shipmates its not just about taking care of them it is about committing to the insti tution, he added. When we raised our right hands, we said we would support and defend the Constitution against all enemies foreign and domestic and we will bear true faith and allegiance to the Constitution. And that means the institution. By Yan Kennon NH Jacksonville Public Affairs Senior WriterOn the heels of its recent Joint Commission reaccreditation and Bureau of Medicine and Surgery Medical Inspector General (MEDIG) inspection, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville its hospital and five branch health clinics was awarded the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) Level III recognition for its Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) Feb. 14. Through sequestration, reduced budgets and civilian furloughs this past year, Naval Hospital Jacksonville continued to provide our nations heroes and their families with world-class health care, said Capt. Gayle Shaffer, NH Jacksonville commanding officer. This recognition and accreditation demon strates that our Medical Home Port teams are making a positive difference in the lives of our patients. NCQA Level III, the nations highest level of rec ognition for patient-centric care, was awarded to all primary care clinics (Family Medicine, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics) at the hospital and all five of its branch health clinics. The Navys approach to the PCMH is Medical Home Port, which places patients in the center of a collaborative team of caregivers from doc tors to nurses and case managers led by the primary care manager. Founded in 1990, NCQA is a private not-forprofit organization that works to improve health care quality. Earning The Joint Commission Gold Seal of Approval during its re-accreditation process in January, NH Jacksonville was recognized for its con tinuing compliance with the Joint Commissions stateof-the-art, national standards of care. In achieving Joint Commission accredita tion, Naval Hospital Jacksonville has demonstrated its commitment to the highest level of care for its patients, said Mark Pelletier, the Joint Commissions Division of Accreditation and Certification Operations chief operating officer. The Joint Commission is the nations oldest and largest standards-setting and accrediting body in health care. Founded in 1951, it accredits more than 20,000 health systems in the U.S. The MEDIG team, after reviewing 60 programs (from research ethics to patient access) in January, offered a resounding endorsement of the commands safe, high-quality medical treatment. CNO stresses integrity to SailorsPhoto by MCC(SW/EXW) Peter LawlorChief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert and Director of the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Adm. John Richardson held a press conference to address allega tions of a cheating incident on a written exam at the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Command in Charleston, S.C. Greenert and Richardson said the investigation is ongoing in order to substantiate the allegations and hold those accountable. The Navy will continue to train and execute its mission while holding its Sailors to set standards of conduct.Naval Hospital Jacksonville awarded NCQA recognition 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014

PAGE 7

Joins CVW-7 supporting CSG-8By Lt. j.g. Taylor MunroPublic Affairs OffierIn a Feb. 1 ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 1122, Helicopter Strike Maritime Squadron (HSM)-72 trans ferred to the operational con trol of Carrier Air Wing (CVW)7 located at NAS Oceana, Va. CVW-7 Commanding Officer Capt. Terry Morris said HSM72 will be a valuable asset to the air wing and strike group capable of providing both antisurface and anti-submarine warfare. The Proud Warriors were formerly known as HSL-42 before being re-designated as HSM-72 in January 2013. That was in conjunction with the squadrons transition from the SH-60B Seahawk to the more capable multi-mission MH-60R Seahawk. Previously, the Proud Warriors were under the con trol of Commander, Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing Atlantic. HSM-72 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Derek Fleck said, Our transition to CVW-7 will bring new opportuni ties as HSM-72 moves away from detached expeditionary deployments to having the entire squadron deploy with a single carrier strike group. Morris reported to CVW-7 in August 2011 as deputy com mander and took command of the air wing in December 2012. CVW-7, along with the Eisenhower, is projected to deploy in the future with Carrier Strike Group (CSG)-8. Until then, the Proud Warriors will focus their training on integrating with CVW-7 and working with their sis ter squadron, Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC)-5, based at Naval Station Norfolk, Va. CVW-7, assigned to air craft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), was commissioned in 1943 at Alameda Naval Air Station, Calif., as Carrier Air Group (CAG)-18, and embarked on board USS Intrepid (CV-11). In 1963, CAG-18 was re-designat ed as CVW-7. Over the years, CVW-7 par ticipated in combat operations that helped win battles such as Leyte Gulf in World War II, multiple raids on North Korean territory in 1952, and strikes into North Vietnam from Yankee Station while attached to the USS Independence in 1965. More recently, CVW-7 flew missions in support of opera tions Desert Shield, Deny Flight, Southern Watch, Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. By MC1 Elliott FabrizioChief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Chief of Naval Personnel (CNP) is scheduled to talk with Sailors around the world in an All Hands Call broadcasting and streaming online live March 5 at 2 p.m. EST. Vice Adm. Bill Moran, CNP, and Fleet Master Chief for Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education (MPT&E) April Beldo will update Sailors on the issues that affect them and their families and open the floor to live questions from fleet via satellite and social media. Sailors are encouraged to begin sending in ques tions and comments now by tweeting @USNPeople or emailing usnpeople@gmail.com. The programs and policies under the office of the chief of naval personnel directly impact Sailors and include the following: More than just asking questions, Moran and Beldo encourage Sailors to use this opportunity to share their feedback whats working in the fleet, what isnt and what ideas do they have to make our existing policies better. The event will be broadcast on the Armed Forces Network (AFN), Direct to Sailor (DTS) and The Pentagon Channel (TPC). Online streaming will be available at www.navy. mil. HSM-72 under new managementPhoto by Lt. j.g. Taylor MunroCommander, CVW-7 Capt. Terry Morris presents the Proud Warriors' most recent check-in, AR Jake Sanders, the CVW-7 command coin on Feb. 1 at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 1122.CNP to answer Sailors questions, respond to feedback, in worldwide All-Hands Call Photo by Joy SamselVice Adm. William Moran, Chief of Naval Personnel, delivers remarks during the Naval Education and Training Command change of command ceremony at the National Museum of Naval Aviation at Naval Air Atation Pensacola. Rear Adm. Don Quinn retired after nearly 35 years of service and turned over command to Rear Adm. Michael White. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014 7

PAGE 8

tions from show attendees about the capabilities of the P-8A. Exhibitors included more than 60 of the worlds top-100 aerospace companies, the largest number of exhibitors in the shows history with more than 1,000 participating companies from 47 countries. Other U.S. military aircraft displayed at the exhibition included two F-16 Fighting Falcons, two MV-22 Ospreys, a C-17 Globemaster, a KC-135 Stratotanker and a C-130J Super Hercules. Its been an honor for the War Eagles to participate. Weve truly enjoyed the opportunity to showcase the Poseidon and our men and women who maintain and crew it, said Papp. VP-16From Page 1 Photo by MC1 Jay PughCmdr. Dan Papp (left) gives a tour of a P-8A Poseidon from the "War Eagles" of Patrol Squadron (VP)-16 to Capt. Paul Foster, commanding offi cer of Navy Region Center Singapore, during the Singapore Air Show. Photo courtesy of RLSO SoutheastFood bank volunteersSailors recently volunteered at the Jacksonville warehouse of Second Harvest North Florida food bank. (From left) LN2 Stephanie Burton, LN1 Lynn Farquhar, LN2 Elena Goes, LN2 Raquel Castillo, LN1 Jonathan High, LN2 Jacques Benoit, LN1 Chad Cahoy, LNCS Jaclyn Woodall, YN2 Shantil Reed, and LNC Keary Mondrik. From NAS Jax Multi-Cultural Awareness CommitteeDr. Carter G. Woodson lived and wrote in a time when America considered itself to be Anglo-White. African-Americans were kept apart from the rest of American society. At best, they were treated as second-class citizens. Woodson, in combating such degradation and to promote the value of AfricanAmerican history, began publish ing the Journal of Negro History in 1916. The observation of Negro History Week, an initiative led by Woodson to recognize the contri butions of African-Americans to our country, began in 1926. Its goal was to foster a better understand ing of the African-American expe rience. He choose thesecond week of February to coincide with the birthdays of abolitionist Frederick Douglass and President Abraham Lincoln, two people who had dramatic impact on the lives of African-Americans. The observation was expand ed to include the whole month in 1976, and has since become com monly referred to as Black History or African-American History Month. It is celebrated and recognized as a Department of Defense national observance. In Woodsons book, The MisEducation of the Negro (1933), he tenders information about his life experiences with some of his fellow educated negroes. He decried that some of his fel low African-Americans would not buy goods and services from black businessmen, because the edu cated the African-American was taught that the black person had no value. Educated African-Americans went back to their community illequipped to teach each other, for they acquired a disdain for their own. Thus, they became mis-educat ed. Woodson saw the education that the African-American practiced in his time as oppressive. He believed in self-reliance as a major component of self-respect, making the black person rise above their situation by their own merit, and developing the AfricanAmericans natural gifts whatever they maybe. Only by becoming self-reli ant and self-respecting would the black race be contributors to American society. The American culture and the military have made quite a transformation since Woodson published his first book in 1916. President Harry S. Truman imple mented Executive Order 9981 in 1948, which desegregated the military. Today, the image of America is not a monolithic white-only cul ture but a multicultural pluralistic society. Instead of melting other cultures into the melting pot to form one preferred culture, America has become a nation in which the various cultures are appreciated for their contributions to enhance our country. Now the American dream is open to all persons of various nationalities, races, cultures and creeds. Carter G. Woodsons impact on Black History Month 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014

PAGE 9

a tactical operations cen ter and numerous roof top antennas. The 30,986-sq.-ft. struc ture will feature a stucco finish over reinforced mason ry walls. The project also includes constructing anten na infrastructure at NAS Jacksonvilles south anten nas site. Located at the northwest corner of Saratoga Avenue and Jason Street, the MQ-4C Triton UAS Mission Control Center will fall under con trol of Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW)-11 based at NAS Jacksonville. The Navy announced in October 2013 the establish ment of Unmanned Patrol Squadron (VUP)-19 at NAS Jacksonville to operate and maintain the MQ-4C Triton UAS. VUP-19 will provide the organizational framework for mission con trol, mission planning and data analysis from NAS Jacksonville. The Triton UAS will be operated by crews consist ing of P-8A Poseidon pilots, naval flight officers and aviation warfare operators using the mission control system at NAS Jacksonville. The new facility is projected to be rated as Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) Silver by the U.S. Green Building Council. The parking area will utilize porous pavers for regular, handicapped and carpool spaces. The project is scheduled for completion by December 2014. TRITONFrom Page 1and have worked alongside the pilots for the duration of the deployment. Being in an operational environment is one of the most rewarding parts of my job, said OS1 Ronald Wierzbic, one of the ASTAC controllers. I love tasking the helicopter pilots to identify contacts. I love controlling aircraft. In addition to reaching the 1,000th flight hour, this deployment has seen sev eral milestones reached for the detachment: they com pleted six maintenance inspections and function al check flights, achieved more than 2,000 deck hits in 2013, three pilots earned qualifications as helicopter aircraft commanders (HAC) and two more pilots are on a path to qualify before the end of deployment. This HAC qualifica tion is complex and it often takes pilots several months to feel confident before they begin the final board ing process, said pilot, Lt. j.g. Joe Granata. It is about feeling comfortable enough with the regulations, pro cedures and equipment to operate the helicopter safe ly. In the end that is a HACs priority. HSM-74 Det. 2 will remain aboard Gettysburg until the ship returns to homeport. Gettysburg is current ly deployed with Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting mari time security operations and theater security coop eration in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. The HSM-74 Swamp Foxes are home based at NAS Jacksonville. HSM-74From Page 1 (From left) MACM(SW) Edward Santiago, MA2 Erick Ortiz, military working dog (MWD) Zoran, MA2 Glenn Patton, MWD Benny, Lt. Jeff Thacker, MA2 Bryan Chiverton, MWD Gergo, MA1(EXW) Keith Danalewich, MWD Doly and Lt. Ryan Platt from NAS Jax Security Department welcome Chiverton and MWD Gergo Feb. 13 after an eight-month deployment to Afghanistan.Photos by MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax welcomes home IA SailorNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander welcomes MA2 Bryan Chiverton, and his military working dog Gergo, back to the NAS Jax Security Department after he served an eight-month IA tour in Afghanistan. Chiverton and Gergo were assigned bomb detection and patrolling for Camp Arena and Shindand Air Base located in the Herat Province of Afghanistan. Chiverton said, "It was an interesting experience deploying to Afghanistan. I learned a lot and it was great to be able to help out on the mission. Training and confidence is real important when you are deployed. I gained a real appreciation for America. I really missed my family, but I gained another one over there. You need a family there in order to get through the missions on a daily basis." JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014 9

PAGE 10

By Lt. j.g. Joseph Bayo VP-26 PAOLt. j.g. Lindsey Asdal and Lt. Daryl Abriam recently qualified as VP-26s newest Patrol Plane Commander (PPC) and Tactical Coordinator (TACCO), respectively. These are the key qualifications that a new pilot and naval flight officer strive to earn during their first operational tour at a maritime patrol squadron. This is a major achievement for both as it was accomplished in just 16 months. VP-26 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mark Sohaney described the accomplishment as a great exam ple of initiative, dedication and professionalism that we should all try to emulate. Asdal graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 2010 with a Bachelor of Arts in International Relations and was designated a naval aviator in December 2011. She checked in at VP-26 in October 2012 alongside Abriam after completing initial training in the P-3C Orion at VP-30. Asdal, a native of Chester, N.J., is one of five sisters, and is one of four who now serve in the Navy. Theirs is the only family to have four daughters attend the U.S. Naval Academy. While three of the sisters Lindsey, Ashley and Kirsten have already been commissioned, the youngest, Charlotte, is a Plebe with the class of 2017. Abriam was born and raised on the small, yet renowned, whitesand-beach island of Boracay in the Western Visayas region of the Philippines. At the age of 14 he with family moved to Las Vegas, Nevada. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 2008 with a Bachelor of Science in Aeronautical Engineering. Abriam was winged in 2012 after successfully complet ing primary and advanced heli copter pilot training with VT-2 and HT-18. He also completed NFO training with VT-10 and VP-30. Asdal and Abriams recent qualifications mark their beginning as PPC and TACCO of VP-26s Combat Aircrew (CAC)-6. They will con tinue to lead their CAC through the maritime patrol advanced readi ness program (ARP), designed to sharpen advanced anti-submarine warfare and crew coordination skills, as the Tridents focus on gaining and maintaining combat readiness in preparation for their deployment in 2015. Uniform changes approvedFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Chief of Naval Personnel announced the following uniform changes in a NAVADMIN released Feb 7. Wear of the NWU Type III for deployment and pre-deployment training has been approved for the following 12 commands: Navy Chaplains serving in units authorized to wear the Navy Working Uniform (NWU) Type II and III can wear the Chaplain Corps Staff Insignia on these uniforms. The embroidered insignia will be sewn above the rank tab on the shirt. Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) will sell the insignia begin ning in April. Navy Expeditionary Supply Corps Officer (NESCO) Warfare Insignia was approved for wear by Supply Corps officers with a 310X, 651X, or 751X designator that are assigned to Navy Expeditionary Combat Command or Naval Special Warfare units and who have successfully completed the qualification requirements outlined in OPNAVINST 1412.15. A new Navy Security Forces Badges (NESCO) warfare insignia will available for purchase in NEXCOM and Navy Exchange Uniform Centers and the Navy Exchange Uniform Support Center this June. To ensure proper control and authenticity of the new NSF metal badges, the fourth scroll (line 4) of the badge will be engraved with a four digit number by Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support (DLATS). Metal badges are authorized to be worn on all uniforms. Embroidered badges are authorized to be worn on the Navy Working Uniform (NWU Type I, II, and III) only. Deadline for the mandatory wear of the new NSF badge and patches is Oct. 1. Fleet feedback directly impacts uniform chang es. Sailors may send a letter with uniform policy change recommendations through their chain of command to the Uniform Board. Recommendations should reflect Navy-wide application with an eye towards standardization and uniform policy reduction. Endorsements of uniform change proposals are required by each echelon. Clay County Veterans Services Office helps vets, familiesFrom Clay County Veterans Service OfficeThe Clay County Veterans Service Office is now located on the second floor of the Clay County Administration Building at 477 Houston Street, office location at 1565 CR 315 has been closed. The office is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The Clay County Veterans Service Office is staffed with a full time veterans service officer and a part-time veterans program assistant who are both available and eager to assist veterans and/ or family members with filing claims and other related needs. Part of Clay Countys heritage is the countys strong ties to the military dating back to the early 1800s. Today, there are more than 24,000 veter ans who call Clay County home. These veterans represent service to our nation from World War II through the current conflicts as well as decades of service during peacetime. To make an appointment, please call (904) 2696326. Tridents qualify new PPC and TACCOPhotos by MC2 Jesse SharpVP-26 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mark Sohaney (left) presents a new P-3C Tactical Coordinator (TACCO) uniform patch to Lt. Daryl Abriam. Lt. Daryl Abriam is greeted by fellow VP-26 "Tridents" after qualifying as a new P-3C Tactical Coordinator. Cmdr. Mark Sohaney, commanding officer of VP-26, presents Lt. j.g. Lindsey Asdal with a flight suit patch celebrating her qualification as a P-3C Patrol Plane Commander. Lt. j.g. Lindsey Asdal is showered with water and handshakes in celebration of her qualification as a Patrol Plane Commander at the "Tridents" of VP-26. 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014

PAGE 11

By MCCS(AW) William LoveladyCommander Naval Air Force Reserve Public AffairsThe Navy Reserve is searching for more than a few of the best pilots who are ready to leave active duty, but still looking to fly Navy. Just about every reserve squadron needs a constant flow of highly qualified applicants, said Cmdr. Dave Bowen, the reserve component community manager for pilot accessions. A squadron with about 25 officers aboard needs one or two new accessions a year but if we have a zero year that becomes a problem. Reserve pilots are recruited by holding pilot selec tion boards. Squadrons that have positions to fill will send out a quarterly notice announcing the convening of a board. A lot of the pilots who apply have known about the squadrons for a long time by word of mouth and have already rushed the squadron by coming to visit on a drill weekend and introducing themselves, said Bowen. Its important for new pilots to visit the squadron and meet the wardroom in order to put faces with names and see if they are a good fit or not. Because of the long and costly training pipeline, there are no direct accessions for Navy Reserve pilots. They have to come from the fleet and their skills are incredibly perishable. Our ideal candidate is a junior officer who just finished a tactical or instructor tour, said Bowen. We want to grab that pilot and his skills that were honed in the fleet and retain it in the reserve. Pilots who have been away from active duty for a few years, even if they are flying commercially, may not have the current skill sets needed to get back in the cockpit of an F/A-18 Hornet or F-5 Tiger. Were not looking for people who barely meet standards. It is our job to provide experienced and wellqualified pilots to meet fleet and operational support requirements, said Bowen. Our reserve pilots are highly experienced operators and thats what the Navy needs from uswhether flying tactical missions in support of combatant commanders or flying in adversary squadrons to train our junior pilots just arriving in the fleet. The other challenge Bowen faces with bringing new pilots to the Navy Reserve is the lack of awareness of the opportunities. No commanding officer wants to lose his best people, so when a pilot is considering leaving active duty, there may not be a lot of resources forthcoming, said Bowen. For some pilots the only exposure they have to the reserve component is if the squadron has a reserve squadron augment unit. Bowen, a graduate of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, spent more than 10 years on active duty as an F/A-18 Hornet pilot and a T-45 Goshawk instructor. I transitioned to the reserves eight and a half years ago, flying the F-5 Tiger, and began my department head tour at VFC-111 at NAS Key West, Fla., said Bowen. Now Im the commanding officer of the 3rd Fleet Maritime Operations detachment at Las Vegas, but I still fly as a guest pilot with VFC-111. For me, I get to enjoy the best of both worlds a civilian career in aviation, as well as continuing my Navy career flying fighters part time. One pilot who recently joined the Navy Reserve is Lt. Amelia Leeds, a P-3 pilot with the VP-62 Broad Arrows at NAS Jacksonville, Fla. After serving almost nine years on active duty in the Navy, Leeds did an inter-service transfer from the Navy to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Corps where she flew the WP-3D Orion; a modified P-3 used for collecting weather information. After leaving NOAA, Leeds became an air inter diction agent/pilot for U.S. Customs and Border Protection, before she joined the Navy Reserve in 2011. I found out about the reserves through numer ous sources, but mainly other pilots from work, said Leeds. I went through a recruiter at NOSC (Navy Operational Support Center) at NAS Jacksonville and put a pilot package together that was given to VP-62. A big lesson learned is that I wished I had put in a package sooner. I encourage anyone who was active-duty to join the reserves. It is a great way to continue to serve your country. For those aviators coming toward the end of their active duty commitments, transitioning to a reserve component squadron is easier than one might imag ine. There are open billets in almost every community and squadrons regularly hold pilot selection boards. The best time for a pilot to begin the process is within six months of leaving active duty. Interested aviators are encouraged to con tact the squadrons they are most interested in and find out the time of its next drill weekend. We encourage anyone interested in joining a reserve squadron to come to a drill weekend, meet the pilots, the commanding officer and get a feel for the commute, if they arent planning to live local, Bowen said. This is a chance to talk to fellow aviators who have recently joined the squadron and get a lot of questions answered on issues like pay and benefits and work-life balance. Pilot selection boards are usually held at the wing level at least biannually. Reserve squadron COs and senior reserve pilots typically review applicant records and make recommendations to the air wing com mander before billets are offered to the selectees. Consideration is given to officer and tactical perfor mance, recent experience and willingness to meet participation expectations. Selected aviators should then contact the career transition office at the Bureau of Naval Personnel and request assistance in affiliating with the Navy Reserve. The transition office will work with reserve squadrons and manage the required paperwork for transfer to the desired reserve component. Newly selected reserve aviators can expect a short period of active duty orders to complete the basic familiarization and tactical training syllabus on their new aircraft, if required. Once this is complet ed, participation requirements will vary according to squadron and mission. Many reserve squadrons have recently seen a decline in qualified applicants because many aviators are remaining on active duty, combined with a general lack of awareness in reserve squadron opportunities. We understand that there are a few misconceptions and a lot of unanswered questions concerning being a part of a reserve squadron, said Bowen. Were trying to get the word out that these are some of the best opportunities to stay in the cockpit and enjoy the ready room camaraderie on a part-time basis. Some of the recurring questions highlighted in recent years are: I apply? to be selected? mute work if I dont want to live local? at the squadron? I dont want to be away from my family for too long--thats why I left active duty. ered for one of the tactical squadrons? Ill receive. The answers to these questions might surprise you, said Bowen. The bottom line is that we have reserve aviators from a variety of civilian professions living all over the country. There are a lot of resources available to get people to the squadron and most are flexible with individual participation concerns. Commander, Navy Air Forces Reserve (CNAFR), has community managers for the Tactical Support Wing that flies F/A-18, F-5, EA-6B/EA-18G aircraft and the Fleet Logistics Support Wing that flies the C-40A, C-37, C-20 and C-130 aircraft. CNAFR also has two VP squadrons that fly P-3Cs and three helicopter squad rons that fly the HH-60H and the SH-60B. Increasing the flow of qualified pilots into Navy ReservePhotos by Adrienne Downing Flying the F-5N Tiger, VFC-111 "Sundowners" operate as part of the U.S. Navy Reserve Fleet Adversary Program, providing dissimilar air combat training to fleet strike fighter and Marine fighter attack squadrons. Cmdr. Dave Bowen still flies the F-5N Tiger as a guest pilot with VFC-111 based at NAS Key West. Photo by William Lovelady Lt. Amelia Leeds, a P-3C Orion pilot with the VP-62 Broad Arrows, joined the Navy Reserve after nine years of active duty service with the Navy's Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force.Photo by AWFCS(NAC/SCW) Mike WendelinLt. Tim Berryhill, a former Marine Corps C-130 Hercules pilot, is now a reservist with the VR-62 "Nomads" based at NAS Jacksonville. In this 2013 photo, he climbs his C-130T aircraft past Mount Suribachi on the island of Iwo Jima in the Pacific.See RESERVES, Page 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014 11

PAGE 12

By MC3 Shaun GriffinUSS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) Carrier Strike Group (GHWB CSG) departed Naval Station Norfolk for its second deployment Feb. 15. The strike group, led by the Navys newest aircraft carrier, George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), and its nearly 6,000 Sailors; is scheduled to conduct opera tions in the U.S. Navys 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. The deployment is part of an ongo ing rotation of U.S. forces supporting maritime security operations in inter national waters around the globe. Working with allied and partner maritime forces, GHWB CSG units will focus heavily on maritime security operations and theater security coop eration efforts which help establish conditions for regional stability. This team has worked hard in preparation for this deployment and is ready to go, said Rear Adm. John Aquilino, commander of GHWB CSG. The dedication and commitment shown by our Sailors will serve the country well in support of our global national interests. The five ships and eight aircraft squadrons of GHWB CSG consist of approximately 6,000 Sailors who have spent the last year conducting intensive training and certification exercises to establish a safe, cohesive organization capable of performing a wide variety of missions across the globe, ranging from counter-piracy and ground support operations to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. The George H.W. Bush Strike Group consists of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 2, Carrier Air Wing (CVW)-8, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 22 staff and George H.W. Bush. This is the second deployment for the Navys last Nimitz-class nuclearpowered aircraft carrier, which recently became combat ready after the suc cessful completion of Composite Unit Training Exercise and Joint Force Exercise. I am very pleased that all essential training has been completed, said Commanding Officer Capt. Andrew Loiselle. During this long workup period, excellence has been the standard set by the crew, and I am confident that we are the best prepared carrier to go on deployment. Squadrons attached to CVW-8 include: VFA-15 Valions, VFA87 Golden Warriors, VFA-31 Tomcatters, VFA-213 Black Lions, VAW-124 Bear Aces, VAQ-134 Garudas, VRC-40 Rawhides, HSC-9 Tridents and HSM-70 Spartans who are home based at NAS Jacksonville. George H.W. Bush was commis sioned Jan. 10, 2009 as the 10th and last Nimitz-Class aircraft carrier. Named after the 41st U.S. President, USS George H.W. Bush is the only aircraft carrier in the fleet with a living namesake. Chief of Naval Air Training (CNATRA) also offers reserve aviators and flight officers the opportunity to train avia tors. If youre interested in flying with the Navy Reserve, reach out to one of the squadrons that can direct you to a community manager. We hope to make the entire Naval Aviation community more aware of the close support relationship that exists between the active and reserve com ponents and let aviators know about the benefits of being part of a reserve squadron, said Bowen. Pilots coming off of active duty have the tactical and instructional skills that we want to retain and in return give them the enjoyment and quality of service to our country that is unmatched in any civilian job. RESERVESFrom Page 11 Finance Makeover Re$ource Night ADDRESSING THE NEEDS OF MILITARY FAMILIES AND PLANTING THE SEEDS FOR A SECURE FUTURE FREE child care will be provided onsite. Space is limited and pre registration is required. To register for child care: Call (904) 542 4718 and ask for Christianne Provide childs name, contact information for sponsor, emergency contact information To ensure your spot register as soon as possible. All registrations for child care must be received by 3pm on February 20th. Sponsored by: Keys to Financial Success for Military Families C O M E J O I N U S FREE pizza and drinks FREE child care Guest Speakers Resources Tips for Financial Success W h e r e : Youth Activity Center 2069 Mustin Road NAS Jacksonville W h e n : Thursday, Feb 27, 2014 6pm 8pm F o r m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n o n t h i s g r e a t e v e n t p l e a s e c a l l R u f u s B u n d r i g e a t ( 9 0 4 ) 5 4 2 4 9 7 6 Photo by MC3 Andrew SchneiderThe aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) departs Naval Station Norfolk Feb. 15 for its scheduled deployment as the flagship for Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 2 in support of maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. USS George H.W. Bush departs for 2nd deployment 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014

PAGE 13

DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live entertainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaokeFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Jan. 18, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: Jan. 25, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Swim to Cuba Aquatic Program At the Indoor Pool Teams complete 30,000 laps and team members receive a t-shirt! Navy Run Training Program At the fitness center Running group meets every Tuesday at 4 p.m. Biggest Loser Challenge 8 week program, teams of 2 Begins March 10 Aerobathon featuring TRX, spin, muscle max, boot camp, step, yoga, HIT and Zumba Feb. 15, 10 a.m. noon Fitness CenterI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Gatornationals March 1416 $30 $58 Disney Jr. Live $15 $29 Monster Jam $22 $42 Wild Adventures $30 $70 Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket $166 $194.50 Universal Orlando $114 $169.50 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Daytona 500 $62 $209 Drive 4COPD 300 $55 Budweiser Duels $55 Sprint Unlimited $30 $55 Rolex 24 $32 $65 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 The Artist Series Broadway in Jacksonville 2014 season, select shows Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2014 season, select shows Armed Forces Vacation Club www.afv club.com $349 $369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 Ripleys St. Augustine $4.25 $7.50 St. Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Wild Florida Airboats $17 $46.50 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels located near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Karaoke at Deweys Feb. 21 at 7 p.m. $7.95 pizza your way and $.50 wings! Daytona 500 Trip Feb. 23 at 10 a.m. $40 per person Military Saves Week Feb. 24 28 Take the pledge to save money! NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Daily Twilight Golf Special Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1 p.m. Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty Feb. 25 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests Feb. 27Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you!Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractors assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Players earn participation points for their command or third. Register by Feb. 26. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. along with rules and required paperwork.The run is free and open to all authorized points for their commands by participating. Sign up at NAS Jax Gym or the Fitness Source prior to the Feb. 7 deadline. The run is held on Perimeter Road at the end of Mustin Road, before the Antenna Farm at 11:30 a.m. Registration will also be held at the run site from 10:30-11:15 a.m. Awards will be given to the top male and top female runner for age groups: 19 & under; 20-24; 25-29; 30-34; 35-39; 40-44; 45-49; 50 & over. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. along with rules and required paperwork. The tournament is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractor women assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants will earn participation points for their command or third. Sign up by March 21. The tournament is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractor women assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants will earn participation points for their command or third. Sign up by March 21. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractor personnel age 30 and older who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play on Tuesday & Thursday at 11:30 a.m. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Rosters due by March 7. Play begins at the end of March or the beginning of April. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Rosters are due by March 7. Play begins at the end of March or the beginning of April. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians; DoD contractors; retirees; and dependents over 18. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Rosters are due by March 7. Play begins at the end of March or the beginning of April. Open to active duty, retirees, dependents over 18, selective reservists, DoD civilians and contractors. The tournament starts at 5 p.m. at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts on the corner of Allegheny Road and Birmingham Road. Call 542-2930 to sign up by April 25. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil StandingsAs of Feb. 14Teams Wins Losses CNATTU Blue 2 0 Navy Band 2 0 NCTS 2 0 VP-45 2 0 CV-TSC Ashore 1 1 FRCSE 1 1 VP-10 1 1 VP-30 1 1 CNATTU Gold 0 2 PSD Jax 0 2 SERCC 0 2 VR-58 0 2Teams Wins Losses VP-10 3 0 VP-30 3 1 NAVHOSP 3 1 FRCSE 2 2 NAVFAC 2 3 VP-26 2 3 NCTS 0 4Teams Wins Losses FRCSE 600 4 1 FRCSE 700 4 1 NAVHOSP 3 2 VP-10 3 2 VP-45 2 2 NAVHOSP Galley 2 3 NCTS 2 3 VR-58 2 3 FACSFAC 1 3 NAS Jax 1 3 TPU/PCF 1 3 VP-26 1 4Teams Wins Losses NOSC 3 0 Vet Clinic 3 0 VP-26 3 0 VR-58 3 0 HSM-72 2 0 VR-62 2 1 FACSFAC 0 1 CRS-10 0 2 ASD Jax 0 3 FRCSE 62A/690 0 3 NavHosp IMC 0 3 VP-62 0 3 NAS Jax Sports JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014 13

PAGE 14

14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014 TRICARE ends walk-in admin services at 189 FacilitiesBy Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceTRICARE military health plan ser vice centers will end administrative walk-in services in the United States on April 1, Pentagon officials said recently. While the 189 facilities will stop taking walk-ins, beneficiaries can accomplish any administrative task online or by phone, said Pentagon spokesman Army Col. Steve Warren. TRICARE service centers overseas are not affected, Warren said. The change will not let me repeat that will not affect any TRICARE medical benefit or health care ser vice, he emphasized. What it will do is allow the department to save $250 million over the next five years, allowing TRICARE to invest in more important services. Fifty percent of the visits to the centers are for inand out-processing and requests to change primary care providers, and the rest involve billingrelated questions, officials said. The Defense Department spends roughly $50 million a year on these services, and this type of customer service can be handled more efficiently by phone or online, they added. TRICARE gets about 38,000 hits per day on its website. Officials have run tests to ensure the website and call center can handle the expected increase in volume. The TRICARE service centers have been around since the 1990s, and contractors staff them, Warren said. This is being driven by the fact that technology has gotten so much bet ter, he added. Customers who need the type of assistance that was being done in these walk-in service centers can quickly and efficiently receive help online or via phone, he said. Beneficiaries can get more information and sign up for updates at http:// www.tricare.mil/tsc. By Jeanne Casey NH Jax Deputy Public Affairs Officer While TRICARE Service Centers walk-in service ends April 1, the same services are still available online and by phone. Visit www.tricare.mil or www.huma na-military.com, or call (800) 444-5445. Beneficiaries can change their pri mary care manager (PCM), compare plans, enroll in a plan, see whats cov ered, check on referrals and claims, and more. When moving with permanent change of station orders, its even pos sible to request a PCM change before leaving the current command. And for patients already residing in the area, PCMs are now available at Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles hospital and branch health clinics, thanks to the return of staff from deployment with the wind-down of a decade of war. Access to care is improved, with the hospitals primary care clinics staying open until 7 p.m., Monday to Thursday. Patients can securely e-mail their PCM, by signing up at www.relayhealth.com. Patients can also meet the PCMs at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax by clicking on Medical Home Port. PCMs lead the Medical Home Port care teams, which focus on meeting all of the patients preventive, routine and urgent health needs. For complex issues that dont get resolved on the website or phone, patients can also call or visit TRICARE Health Benefits Advisors (HBAs) to discuss options. HBAs work for the hos pital and branch health clinics, unlike the website and phone staff who work for TRICAREs regional contractor (Humana Military). So patients need to make any chang es at www.tricare.mil, www.huma na-military.com or (800) 444-5445. Unfortunately, HBAs are unable to do this on patients behalf. HBAs are located on the first floor of the hospitals central tower, next to Patient Relations call (904) 542-9164 or (904) 542-9165. By Yan KennonNaval Hospital Jacksonville Senior WriterNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville main pharmacy patients now have the option of drop ping off prescriptions to be filled and picking them up later. Now patients have the choice to check-in, drop-off prescrip tions and return two hours or later to pick-up the prescrip tion. Patients can select the Pick up later button at the ticket kiosk, give the pharmacist their phone number, and return to windows six or seven for pickup two hours or later; its that simple. We understand that many of our patients have busy lives, said Lt. Vincent Jones, NH Jacksonville Outpatient Pharmacy division officer. This service allows those patients to take care of more pressing business and return at a later time to pick-up their prescriptions. Jones went on to say that outpatient pharmacy has also seen a slight decrease in wait time, for patients who choose to wait for their prescription, since the implementation of the drop-off service. NH Jacksonville Outpatient Pharmacy hours are Monday Friday, 7:30 a.m. 6 p.m. and Saturday, 8 a.m. 3:30 p.m. The drop-off service is available up until two hours prior to closing time. For drop-offs made within the last two hours of the day, pick-up is available the next day. In addition to this new pharmacy option, the hospital offers new expanded hours, and all patients now have email access to their care team. At the hospital, Family Medicine (Green, Red, White and Yellow Teams), Internal Medicine (Blue Team) and Pediatrics (Purple Team) are now open Monday to Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Hospital patients can call the appoint ment line at 904-542-4677 or 800-529-4677, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. to schedule an appointment. Naval Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville patients can call 904-546-7094 from 7 a.m. 4 p.m. to schedule an appoint ment. After-hours nurse advice is available for all enrolled patients at 542-4677 or 800529-4677 on evenings, weekends and federal holidays. Patients can reach their team by RelayHealth secure email, for non-urgent issues. Sign up at www.relayhealth. com or on the commands website by clicking on Medical Home Port. TRICARE services: still available online and by phonePhoto by Jacob SippelA Sailor logs onto www.tricare.mil for a permanent change of station move.Naval Hospital Jacksonville pharmacy: Drop-off now and pick-up later optionPhoto by Jacob Sippel HN Doneric Jefferson, a Naval Hospital Jacksonville pharmacy technician, dispenses Christine Andersons medication prescription at the hospitals main pharmacy. Now patients have the choice to drop-off prescriptions and return two hours or later to pick-up the prescription.

PAGE 15

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014 15 By Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsProving that hard work and dedication really do pay off, AZ3 William Bailey of the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Ground Support Equipment Division was recently notified that he had been accepted to attend the U.S. Naval Academy. Its been a long process, but Im so excited on being accept ed to attend such a prestigious Ivy League school. Its defi nitely a dream come true, said Bailey. A native of Milton, Fla., Bailey joined the Navy in January 2013. I graduated from high school and took some college classes but really wanted to travel and see the world. I also wanted to work in a structured environ ment, so I thought joining the Navy was a good idea, he said. After completing boot camp at Recruit Training Center, Great Lakes, Ill. and AZ A school in Meridian, Miss., Bailey reported to FRCSE in June 2013. My job is to assist the Ground Electronics Support team with their maintenance records for the equipment, organizing the publications and log books regarding main tenance data and preparing reports, he said. I really enjoy working here because of the people. They have been tremendously sup portive of my decision and helped me with my package. I really appreciate them helping me through the process. Once he made the decision to apply to the academy last June, Bailey began the process to complete his package. I had to get recommenda tions from my department head and the commanding officer and go through several medical screenings. I also went in front of board of officers who grilled me on my qualifications and offered me advice on my future goals. Bailey plans to study aero space engineering at the acad emy and make the Navy his career. This is definitely my future. My family is very excited for me, especially my grandfather who is a retired AZ senior chief. When I joined the Navy, he said that I need to outrank him. So when I told him I was going to outrank him and become an officer because I was accepted into the naval academy, he was so happy for me. According to his supervi sor, AZC(AW/SW) LaToyna Crawford, Bailey is a top-notch Sailor and she is proud of his achievement. Petty Officer Bailey has an extremely promising career as a naval officer. He possesses the maturity, character and values that are essential for suc cessful leadership. He will definitely be a welcome addition to any and all wardrooms, said Crawford. So what advice does Bailey offer to those contemplating following his career path? Never give up. I have always lived by the belief that goals are never unobtainable, he said. As long as you have the drive and determination, anything is possible, he said. There will always be hurdles and roadblocks along the way, but great leaders are defined by their ability to jump over those hurdles and crash through the roadblocks. Just keep your mind on what you want to achieve, and before you know it, youll be at the finish line with an accomplish ment you can be proud of. By MC1 Fletcher GibsonNavy Parachute Team Public AffairsThe U.S. Navy Parachute Demonstration Team, the Leap Frogs, released their 2014 show season schedule that includes sporting events, air shows and Navy-sponsored Fleet Weeks. The team is scheduled to perform at 28 events in 16 states, ranging from New York to Hawaii. We hit the training pretty hard this winter, said Lt. Dan Gibson, the teams officer in charge, and now were ready to show everyone what we can do. The eight-man team is made up of members of Naval Special Warfare, including a select group of Sea, Air and Land commandos (SEALs) extensively trained in parachuting. The Leap Frogs aerial performances demonstrate the high-altitude jumps, inair maneuverability, and linked-canopy teamwork for which the team is famous. The show season kicks off March 3 with a Joint Military Capabilities Demonstration in New Orleans and wraps up with San Diegos annual Holiday Bowl football game Dec. 29. Some of these places are old favor ites, and its always good to revisit these areas, Gibson said. Others weve never been to before, or at least not recently, and bring the joy of parachute demonstrations to a whole new audience. The full schedule can be viewed at www.leapfrogs.sealswcc.com. From FFSCThe NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or handi capped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2014: May 12-15 (5:30-10 p.m.), Aug. 18-19 (8 a.m.-4 p.m.), Aug. 20 (8 a.m.-12:30 p.m.), Nov. 17-20 (5:30-10 p.m.). (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) Feb. 24-28, March 10-14, March 2428, April 7-11, May 5-9, May 19-23, June 9-13, June 23-27, July 7-11, July 21-25, Aug. 11-15, Aug. 25-29, Sept. 15-19, Oct. 20-24, Nov. 3-7, Dec. 1-5. (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) March 17-21, April 14-18, May 12-16, June 16-20, July 14-18, Aug. 18-22, Sept. 22-26, Oct. 27-31, Nov. 17-21, Dec. 8-12. (8:30 a.m.-noon) Feb. 21, April 1, May 2, June 30, June 30, July 29, Aug. 4, Sept. 2, Oct. 8, Nov. 14, Dec. 22. (8-9:30 a.m.) April 2, May 28, July 1, Sept. 3, Nov. 12. (9:40 a.m.-noon) April 2, May 28, July 1, Sept. 3, Nov. 12. (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) April 29-30, Aug. 5-6, Nov. 24-25. (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) July 31. (1-4 p.m.) April 1, July 29, Oct.8. (1-3:30 p.m.) March 31, July 30, Oct. 7. (9-10:30 a.m.) April 4, July 30, Oct. 17. (1:30-3:30 p.m.) April 3, May 1, July 2, Aug. 7, Oct. 2, Nov. 6. (1:30-4 p.m.) March 6, May 8, July 10, Sept. 11, Nov. 13. April 7 (1-2:30 p.m.), July 29 (10-11:30 a.m.), Oct. 4 (1-2:30 p.m.) (9-11 a.m.) March 10, April 14, May 12, June 9, July 14, Aug. 11, Sept. 8, Oct. 6, Nov. 3, Dec. 8. (9-10:30 a.m.) March 11, April 8, May 13, June 10, July 8, Aug. 12, Sept. 9, Oct. 7, Nov. 4, Dec. 9. (8 a.m.-noon) May 20, 27, Sept. 23, 30. (8 a.m.noon) Feb. 24, March 31, April 28, May 19, June 30, July 28, Aug. 25, Sept. 29, Oct. 27, Nov. 24, Dec. 15. March 27 May 1 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.), May 27 July 8 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.-no workshop June 3), July 29 Sept. 9 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.-no workshop Aug. 19), Sept. 25 Oct. 30 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.). (11 a.m.-1 p.m.) March 19, May 6, July 15, Sept. 9, Nov. 18. (1-3 p.m.) March 4, 11, 18, 25; May 6, 13, 20, 27; July 1, 8, 15, 22; Sept. 9, 16, 23, 30; Nov. 4, 12, 18, 25. (1-4 p.m.) Feb. 25; April 1, 8, 15, 22; June 3, 10, 17, 24; Aug. 5, 12, 19, 26; Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28. (9:30-11 a.m.) Every Wednesday (9 a.m.-3 p.m.) FRCSE Sailor accepted to Naval AcademyPhoto by Kaylee LaRocqueAZ3 William Bailey (right) reviews maintenance requirements with AS3 Jesse Fisher at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Ground Support Equipment (900) Division on Feb. 12. Bailey was recently accepted to the U.S. Naval Academy. Photo by MC2 Luke EastmanLt. (SEAL) Dan Gibson, a member of the U.S. Navy parachute demonstration team, the Leap Frogs, touches down in Qualcomm Stadium during the opening ceremonies of this years Holiday Bowl game, where members of the US Marine Corps stand by to unfurl the football field-sized American flag. The Leap Frogs are based in San Diego and perform aerial parachute demonstrations around the nation in support of Naval Special Warfare and Navy recruiting. Navy Parachute Team releases 2014 show scheduleMC2 Kathryn MacdonaldU.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels, performs the Barrel Roll Break over Naval Air Facility (NAF) El Centro, Calif. on Feb. 8. The Blue Angels are conducting winter training where the pilots must complete 120 practice flights before kicking off the 2014 air show season at NAF El Centro, March 15. The squadron is scheduled to perform at NAS Jacksonville Oct. 25 26.FFSC offers life skills workshops Check us out online www.jaxairnews.com See FFSC, Page 16

PAGE 16

16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014 March 4, June 3, Sept. 16, Dec. 2. (10 a.m.-noon) Feb. 25; March 11, 25; April 1, 15, 29; May 13, 27; June 10, 24; July 15, 29; Aug. 12, 26; Sept. 9, 23; Oct. 7, 21; Nov. 4, 18; Dec. 2, 16. (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) March 13, May. 15, July 17, Sept. 4, Nov. 5. (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) April 10, June 12, Aug. 14, Oct. 9, Dec. 4.To register for any of the above workshops, please call 542-5745. FFSCFrom Page 15 From the Department of Veterans Affairs The Veterans Affairs (VA) Department launched a new online tool to make it easier for veterans, ser vice members and family members to calculate their Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits and learn more about VAs approved colleges, universities and other education and training programs across the country Feb. 4. We are pleased that Post-9/11 veterans are taking advantage of this significant benefit program, said Allison Hickey, undersecretary of veterans affairs for benefits. The new GI Bill Comparison Tool will help future beneficiaries as they make decisions about what education or training program best fits their needs. The GI Bill Comparison Tool provides key information about college affordability and brings together information from more than 17 different online sources and three federal agencies, including the number of students receiving VA education benefits at each school. It is one item in a series of resources VA is launching in response to President Barack Obamas Executive Order 13607, which directs agencies to implement and promote Principles of Excellence for education institutions that interact with veterans, service members and their families, and to ensure beneficiaries have the information they need to make educated choices about VA education benefits and approved programs, VA officials said. Recently, VA also instituted a GI Bill online com plaint system, designed to collect feedback from vet erans, service members and their families who are experiencing problems with educational institutions receiving funding from federal military and veterans educational benefits programs, including benefits programs provided by the Post-9/11 GI Bill and the Defense Departments military tuition assistance program. The executive order, signed April 27, 2012, directs federal agencies to provide meaningful cost and quality information on schools, prevent deceptive recruiting practices and provide high-quality academic and student support services. VA works closely with partner institutions to ensure the GI Bill beneficia ries needs are met, officials said, noting that more than 5,000 education institutions have agreed to the Principles of Excellence. The Post-9/11 GI Bill is a comprehensive education benefit created by Congress in 2008. In general, veterans and service members who have served on active duty for 90 or more days since Sept. 10, 2001, are eligible. Since 2009, VA has distributed more than $30 billion in the form of tuition and other education-related payments to more than 1 million veterans, service members and their families, as well as to the universities, colleges and trade schools they attend. From Navy League Mayport The Navy League of Mayport is cel ebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration din ner and program. This is an All Services event featuring a joint color guard, All Services Missing Person table, the Navy Band with all the service songs, and numerous historical displays. Tickets are now on sale for this years event which will be held June 7, at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. The keynote speak er is Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert. Veterans who served at the Battle of Midway and veterans of all branches who served in prior conflicts, as well as those currently serving are invited to attend. Additionally, Medal of Honor recipients and former Prisoners of War who have heroically answered the call of duty will also be in attendance. Come meet these National Treasures and hear their adventures first hand. The evening promises to be emotional and patriotic, and provide an excellent opportunity to connect with survivors of what historians call one of the U. S. Navys greatest sea victories and the turning point of World War II in the Pacific. Ticket prices for active duty and spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50, O6 and above $65. Prices for Civilians and Retirees $65. The evening includes fine dining and a memorable program. Uniform will be O4 and above dinner dress white jacket; O3 and below dinner dress white/ dinner dress white jacket optional, and civilian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 5 p.m., with dinner served at 6 p.m. Tickets are manda tory and seating is reserved. Ticket sales end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before this date. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER Tickets may be purchased from the following locations: NAVY LEAGUE MAYPORT Bob Price, 904-246-9982 or 904-718-2118 E-mail: bpricex4@comcast.net NAVY LEAGUE ST AUGUSTINE Bill Dudley, 904-806-4712 or 904-794-7814 E-mail: anuday00@aol.com By Ed BarkerNaval Education and Training Command Public AffairsDelivering on their goal of providing access to Navy training anytime, any place, the Navy Education and Training Command and the Sea Warrior Program Office announced Feb. 13 the availability of direct Internet access to Navy e-Learning (NeL) content. Most Navy Learners were pre viously accessing NeL through Navy Knowledge Online, said Hank Reeves, NeL project director. That was a multi-step process that is now significantly streamlined with the ability to access courses directly, with out going through NKO. Using the direct NeL link of https:// www.aas.prod.nel.training.navy. mil will take you directly to the My Learning and Course Catalog tabs of the NeL learning management system after login. Going directly to NeL will make searching for their desired content much easier, said Brenda McCreary, NKO service desk manager. If you enter through NKO and use the NKO search engine looking for courses, you may get numerous returns that arent very helpful. Going directly to NeL lets you use their search engine and that gets you strictly learning-related returns, streamlining finding the course you are looking for. Although direct access to NeL is available through the Internet, a Common Access Card (CAC) is still required for NeL login. Courses on NeL have been standardized to run using the Internet Explorer (IE) browser. Many of our courses take advantage of the latest in multi-media content to improve the learning experience, Reeves added. In order to ensure compatibility with these courses, NeL provides con figuration guides for many of the lat est versions of IE. NeL also provides a plug-in analyzer to help customers confirm they are able to access and run the multi-media content, and both of these services are on one page. To access them, customers may simply click on the Browser Configuration link, located in the NeL Help section, on the right-hand side of the My Learning page. According to Reeves, NeL is the worlds largest learning management system in terms of volume. Virtually every Sailor, government civilian and contractor uses NeL to keep current with required General Military Training, including the newlyupdated Department of Defense Cyber Awareness Challenge Course, said Reeves. Last year, the Cyber Awareness Challenge course had more than 232,000 completions, and last year we had more than four million completions for all courses. From the beginning, it was a goal as we implemented our new Learning Management System to offer direct access to our NeL users in addition to access through NKO, added Reeves. Although NKO was designed as a one-stop-shop portal for the lions share of Navy electronic content, allowing access options for our customers only makes sense. Since 2001, Sailors have depend ed on Navy e-Learning (NeL) to help advance their careers and stay current with training requirements. Courses range from Privacy and Personally Identifiable Information Awareness Training required of all Sailors, Marines, civilians, and contractors to specific training for individual units. Trainees using NeL complete between four and five million online courses annually from an offering of more than 8,700 courses. The Naval Education and Training Command relies on NeL for use in schoolhouses for individual skills and skill refresher training.VA launches online tool to calculate Post-9/11 GI Bill benefitsCNO is Battle of Midway keynote speaker June 7Navy e-Learning now offers direct access

PAGE 17

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014 17 By Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe independent Response Systems to Adult Sexual Assault Crimes Panel has accepted a subcommittee recommen dation Jan. 30 that senior military commanders retain authority for referring these crimes to courts-martial. DoD officials have long maintained that the authority is needed to main tain good order and discipline, and that commanders will be integral to ending sexual assault in the ranks. The Role of the Commander Subcommittee took an in-depth look at the issue before coming up with the recommendation. One member of the subcommittee Elizabeth Hillman dissented, but the full panel voted to accept the recommendations 7-2. Based on all information considered to this point, a strong majority of the subcommittee members agrees the evi dence does not support a conclusion that removing the authority to convene courts-martial from senior command ers will reduce the incidence of sexual assault or increase reporting of sexu al assaults in the armed forces, Judge Barbara S. Jones, the chair of the Role of the Commander Subcommittee, wrote in a letter released today. Jones went on to say that evidence does not support the conclusion that removing commanders from the pro cess will increase victims confidence in the system. The conclusion of the panel is that commanders must play a central role in preventing sexual assault by establish ing command climates that ensure subordinates are trained in and embrace their moral and legal obligations, and by emphasizing the role of accountability at all levels of the organization. The panel also noted that victims of sexual assault have other channels out side the chain of command. Military personnel in the United States may always call civilian authori ties, healthcare professionals or other civilian agencies to report a sexual assault, the memorandum states. In addition to Jones, the other members of the panel are: Elizabeth Holtzman, retired Army Gen. Carter Ham, retired Navy Vice Adm. James Houck, retired Army Maj. Gen. John Altenburg, University of California Professor Elizabeth Hillman, South Texas University Professor Geoffrey Corn, Air Force Col. Lisa Turner and Joye Frost. Photographs of WWII veterans needed for community exhibit From The Cultural CenterThe Last Good War: The Faces and Voices of World War II, written and photographed by Thomas Sanders, is a special exhibit that has traveled across America bringing to life stories of valor and horror from World War II veterans. The exhibit will be on display at the Cultural Center at Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. Feb. 28 through April 4. To add a local viewpoint and coincide with this powerful national exhibit, The Cultural Center will create a local heroes exhibition in their community gallery and exhibit photographs of the World War II veterans from families in the Jacksonville community. Local residents are asked to drop off a framed 8x10 military photograph of someone in their family who served during World War II. Frames must have a notch or hanging wire attached on the back of the frame. Be sure to clearly iden tify who the subject is and what branch of the service they served and perhaps where they were stationed. Securely attach your name and phone number to the back of the frame. Drop the framed photograph off at The Cultural Center at Ponte Vedra Beach, 50 Executive Way, Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. by Feb. 17. Photographs can be picked up April 7. For more information, call Judy Hixenbaugh at 904280-0614, Ext. 202 or e-mail jhixenbaugh@ccpvb.org. Tax services availableFrom Region Legal Service OfficeThe VITA Self Service will be available to active duty service members, retirees and dependents, Reservists (active 30 days or pre-demobilization) and entitled former spouses from Feb. 4 through April 15. The service is for those whose adjusted gross income doesnt exceed $57,000. Those who qualify under the Military One Source will be able file their taxes for free using the H&R Block software. Volunteer assistance will be onsite; however volunteers are not permitted to prepare taxes. Those needing additional assistance outside the scope of the volunteers may be redirected to a nearby tax center. The tax center is located at NAS Jacksonville, Building 4, Room 108 (Ranger Street). The center is open Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Tuesday and Thursday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. For questions or concerns, please contact LN1 Clinton Washington at 542-5974 or email Clinton. washington@navy.mil. (VFW) Post 5968 and its Auxiliary located at 187 Aurora Blvd. meets on the second Wednesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. VFW combat veterans and eligible service members from the Active, Guard or Reserve forces. For information on events or membership, go to www.vfwpost5968.org or call 2765968. N.E. Florida Chapter meets the third Wednesday of each month. Open to active duty and retirees of all military branches. Contact Johnnie.walsh@gmail.com or call 282-4650. meets the fourth Thursday of each month at 5 p.m. at Jacksonville Urban mil. meets the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Center on Collins Road. For information, visit www.aao9. com. at NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) needs volunteers to assist military retirees and dependents. Work four hours a day, one day per week. Call 542-5790 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays to volunteer. a breast cancer support group at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, meets on the second Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. Call 542-7857 for more info. is open to active duty, reserve and retired military, plus, active or retired DoD civilians. Call 778-0805 or email commodore@njyc.org Helping others help themselves. Visit www. gocompass.org for more info. meets the Methodist Church, 2246 Blanding Blvd. Call 272-9489. monthly meeting Beach. Call 246-6855. meets at 1 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the Murray Hill United Methodist Church, (Fellowship Hall Building) at 4101 College Street. Call 786-7083. meets the fourth Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Hall at 7673 Blanding Blvd. Call 772-8622. Photos by MC2(SW) Marcus StanleyFrom the pier at Naval Station Mayport, family and friends look on as the guidedmissile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) departs for deployment on Feb. 15 in support of maritime security operations in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. This deployment is part of a regular rotation of forces to support maritime security operations, provide crisis response capability, and increase theater security. The ship will join USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) as part of Carrier Strike Group 2.Photo by MC2(SW) Marcus StanleyFamily and friends look on from the pier at Naval Station Mayport on Feb. 15 as the guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) prepares to set sail for deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. The ship will join the USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) carrier strike group. This deployment is part of a regular rotation of forces to support maritime security operations, and provide crisis response capability. Pierside farewells at MayportCommanders should keep sex assault courts-martial authority Community Calendar

PAGE 18

18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014

PAGE 19

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014 19

PAGE 20

20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014



PAGE 1

www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2014 I I D E QUALITY AWARD Naval Hospital Jacksonville Page 6 GRUNT! PUSH! Powerlifters Compete Pages 4 & 5 MILITARY SAVES Weeklong Financial Fair Page 12Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com By MC1 Jay PughSailors assigned to the War Eagles of Patrol Squadron (VP)-16 showcased the P-8A Poseidon aircraft during the recent Singapore Air Show Asias largest aerospace and defense exhibition. The United States was the inaugural fea tured country this year. VP-16 became the first maritime patrol and recon naissance aviation squadron to transition to the Poseidon from the P-3 Orion in 2012. The squadron operates six P-8s that began its inaugural deploy ment to Japan in December 2013. We came to show the Navys commitment to regional part ners and allies, and to high light the Navys newest longrange, anti-submarine warfare, anti-surface warfare, intelli gence, surveillance and recon naissance aircraft. The air show is also a great opportuni ty to interact with visitors from across the region, said Cmdr. Dan Papp, executive officer of VP-16. Built on the Boeing 737 air frame, the P-8A is the most advanced anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare aircraft in the world. A true multi-mission aircraft, it also provides supe rior maritime intelligence, sur veillance and reconnaissance capability. Papp highlighted the P-8As many technological advances over the legacy P-3C aircraft, which is nearing the end of its service life. The P-8A has a maximum speed of 490 knots, a ceiling of 41,000 feet, and provides a range of more than 1,200 nautical miles with four hours on station. It can deliver a number of weapons, includ ing MK-54 torpedoes and Harpoon missiles, as well as 126 internal sonobuoys. The P-8 gets aircrew on sta tion faster and flies higher en route which leads to fuel sav ings. We can go a longer range, carry a larger payload of sono buoys for submarine warfare. The airframe is extremely reli able, which means mainte nance issues are almost nonexistent, said Papp. The aircrews situational awareness far surpassed what we did as a P-3 crew. This leads to a distinct tactical advantage on station and leads to a great er awareness from a safety per spective. The Sailors of VP-16 answered hundreds of ques By Ensign Kiley ProvenzanoUSS Gettysburg (CG 64) Public AffairsHelicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 74, Det. 2, embarked aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) in the Arabian Gulf, success fully conducted its 1,000th flight hour of the current deployment, Jan. 17. One thousand flight hours is an incredible feat, and it would not be pos sible without the dedication of the air crew and the skill of our maintainers, said HSM-74 Swamp Foxes Lt. Cmdr. Jack Clark, the detachments officer in charge. Without their attention to detail, precision and many long nights, we would not have been able to reach this point. Behind the flight hours are two sides of operation, the maintainers and the operators. The air maintenance crew completes approximately ten hours of maintenance for every hour of flight. Our birds fly nightly, so maintaining their systems is an absolute priority, said AE1 William Winistorfer. Boatswains mates, damage control men, hospital corpsmen, ships service men and the pilots and officers control ling the landing all come together to make flight operations a priority for the ship. Part of that support continues with in the aircraft. Flying every hour with the pilots are aviation warfare systems operators, controlling all of the mis sion equipment. AWR2 Britt Turner has flown 275 hours this deployment. It has been a busy deployment, said Turner. Being able to operate daily has been an incredible experience and opportunity. Inside the ship, the combat infor mation center plays a large role and logs just as many hours as the pilots. Operations specialists serve as the antisubsurface tactical controllers (ASTAC) P-8A Poseidon showcased at Singapore Air ShowPhoto by MC1 Jay Pugh A P-8A Poseidon from the "War Eagles" of Patrol Squadron (VP)-16, is on display at the Singapore Air Show. The Singapore Air Show is Asia's largest aerospace and defense exhibition.Gettysburg-embarked Swamp Foxes complete 1,000 flight hours By Clark PierceEditorA ground breaking ceremony was held Feb. 11 aboard NAS Jacksonville for the MQ-4C Triton Mission Control Center. The $16 million construction project was awarded by Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast to Whitesell-Green Inc., a small business headquartered in Pensacola,Fla. The Triton, formerly known as the Broad Area Maritime Surveillance (BAMS) unmanned aircraft system (UAS), is expected to enable American and allied warriors by providing opera tional commanders the real-time infor mation they require to fight and win. The Triton Mission Control Center project includes a two-story structure with two electromagnetic, interfer ence-shielded mission control systems, Triton Mission Control Center construction underwayPhoto by Clark Pierce Breaking ground for the MQ-4C Triton UAS Mission Control Center on Feb. 11 were (from left) NAS Jacksonville Public Works Officer Cmdr. Anant Patel; NAS Jacksonville Public Works Civil Engineer Celio Cedeno; William Whitesell, V.P. of Whitesell-Green; NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander; Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing-11 Capt. Sean Liedman; VP-10 Executive Officer Cmdr. James Johnston; Joseph Strickland, deputy director of MQ-4C Department; Hugh Simmons, project superintendent of Whitesell-Green; and Mike Vorburger, NAVFAC Southeast FEAD engineering technician.Photo illustration courtesy of NAVFAC SoutheastAn architect's rendering of the new MQ-4C Triton UAS Mission Control Center slated for completion by December at NAS Jacksonville.See VP-16, Page 8 See Page 9 See Page 9 Photo by MC3 Lorenzo Burleson Lt. j.g. Joe Gramata operates the landing signal officer station Nov. 22, 2013 dur ing the recovery of a "Swamp Foxes" MH-60R Seahawk on the flight deck of the guided-missile cruiser USS Gettysburg (CG 64) in the Gulf of Oman.

PAGE 2

SAPR Assistance Available 24/7The DOD Safe Helpline may be reached by phone 1-877-995-5247, text 55-247 or via the app on iOs. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Civilian SAPR Victim Advocate 24/7 Duty phone is (904) 910-9075. The Naval Air Station Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)5487789. The Naval Station Mayport Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Duty phone is (904)548-8392. Civilian Community Sexual Assault Services may be obtained by calling (904) 721-RAPE or 721-7273. Commands are encouraged to post their Unit SAPR Victim Advocates name and after hours Duty phone number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. Chaplains may be reached for support (904) 542-3051 or Duty phone (904) 614-7385 Fleet and Family Support Center may be reached for counseling services 1-866-293-2776 The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley From StaffFeb. 20 1815 USS Constitution, under Capt. Charles Stewart, captures HMS Cyane and sloop-of-war Levant. 1962 USMC Lt. Col. John Glenn becomes first American to orbit Earth. His flight in Friendship 7 (Mercury 6) consisted of three orbits in 88 minutes at a velocity of 17,544 mph. Recovery was by USS Noa (DD-841). 1974 First Lockheed S-3A Viking ASW carrier jet is assigned to VS-41 Shamrocks. Feb. 21 1944 Marines with support of naval bombardment and carrier aircraft secure Eniwetok atoll. 1945 USSBismark Sea (CVE-95) struck by a kamikaze off Iwo Jima and sunk in 90 minutes with loss of 318 men. USSSaratoga (CV-3) struck by five kamikazes but survived with loss of 123 Sailors. Bismark Sea was last carrier lost in combat during World War II. Feb. 22 1865 Rear Adm. Porters gunboats bombard Wilmington, N.C. into sur render. 1870 After arriving on USS Nipsic, and supported by USS Guard and USS Nyack, the Darien Expedition, com manded by Cmdr.Thomas Selfridge Jr., begins active operations ashore at Caldonia Bay to survery the Isthmus of Panama for an interoceanic ship canal. 1909 Great White Fleet returns from round the world cruise to Hampton Roads, Va. 1943 USS Iowa (BB-61), the lead ship of the last class of American fast battle ships, is commissioned. 1974 Lt. j.g. Barbara Ann Allen becomes first Navy designated female aviator. Feb. 23 1795 U.S. Navy Office of Purveyor of Supplies is established. This is the Navy Supply Corps Birthday. 1919 Launching of Osmond Ingram (DD-255), first Navy ship named for an enlisted man. 1944 Carrier groups under Adm. Spruance attack Saipan, Tinian and Rota in the Marianas. 1945 Marines and a Navy hospi tal corpsman raise U.S. flag atop Mt. Suribachi on Iwo Jima. Feb. 24 1813 USS Hornet, under Capt. James Lawrence, captures HMS Peacock. 1942 A strike force composed of the carrier USS Enterprise and its cruiser and destroyer screen, and led by Vice Adm. William Halsey, attacked Wake Island. 1944 The first detection of a sub merged enemy submarine by the use of MAD gear was made by PBYs of VP-63. On a MAD barrier patrol of the approaches to the Strait of Gibraltar, they attacked the German U-761 with bombs. With the assistance of two ships and aircraft from two other squadrons, the submarine was sunk. Feb. 25 1861 USS Saratoga, member of U.S. African Squadron, captures slaver sloop Express. 1933 Commissioning of USS Ranger, first true aircraft carrier. 1959 USS Galveston fires first Talos surface-to-air missile. Feb. 26 1811 Congress authorizes first naval hospital. 1913 Approval of experimental wind tunnel for Navy. 1944 Sue Sophia Dauser, super intendent of the Navy Nurse Corps is first woman in Navy to achieve rank of Captain. By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorPeople who regularly read this column often say they feel like they know me and my children Ford, Owen and Lindell. They even feel like they know our dog, Sparky, But Ive never had anyone say they feel like they know my husband, Dustin. Maybe I dont write about him enough. I mean, I write about what he does for work and how it impacts our lives, but I dont write about who Dustin is as a per son. So, Id like you to meet Dustin Smiley, the man I almost stupidly wanted to return. See, I have this problem with buyers remorse. As soon as I get something, I begin to question if I really wanted it. Im the kind of person who leaves tags on her clothes for several days just in case. I beat myself up over possibly bad purchasing decisions, whether its for a toothbrush or a car. And 14 years ago, I felt that way about getting married. Dustin jokes that if he had been a pair of pants, I might have returned him. I was so conflicted about this major life decision that my jaw locked shut two days after our wedding. I ate through a straw for 24 hours. But Dustin well, he never questioned anything. He was as sure about us as he is that the Earth circles the sun. Admittedly, I was quite unlovable back then, but Dustin never gave up. When you were at your most unlovable, Dustin once said, I just loved you more to get you through it. This was the first of what Ive come to call Dustinisms stunning and insightful observations about our life and the world in general. They are stun ning because Dustin has been trained by the military for nearly 20 years, and, you know, insight isnt a course taught at the Naval Academy. Yet this is perhaps the most important point about Dustin: although he is an excellent military officer, he is an even better person. His gift is with people. More Dustinisms: No one is all good or all bad. No situation is as good or as bad as it seems. The truth is usually somewhere in the middle. Being extreme in either direction usually comes full circle so that a person is eventually arguing for a side they thought they were against. People just want to be heard. You make the dress beautiful, not the other way around. That last one is an all-time favorite. Today, if I had to liken Dustin to something, it would not be a pair pants that I want to return. It would be a loyal golden retriever. I mean this in the most loving way possible. You know that saying, Someday I hope to be the person my dog thinks I am? Well, I feel the same way about my husband: Someday I hope to be the per son Dustin thinks I am. In a word, Dustin is steady. While I bounce up and down like the peaks on an EKG printout, Dustin remains a solid, even line. And he loves me like no one else ever has. (Well, except for my 7-year-old, but hell grow out of it.) Its been this way since we were kids. We have known each other since the day I was born, and because my dad was deployed at the time and Dustin and his fam ily lived down the street, Ive actually known Dustin longer than Ive known my dad. In elementary school, Dustin was a hall patrol. He in his orange vest and sensible tennis shoes told me to walk, dont run through the hallways. Back then, Dustin wasnt the handsome man that he is now, and I rarely made eye contact. If I had a daughter today, I would tell her that the unassuming, quiet boy with a good job (like hall patrol) and kind smile is the one she should keep her eye on. Someday, after years of braces and growth spurts, he will show up on her doorstep and take her breath away. But I have three boys and no daughters, so I tell them this instead. Be patient and be a good person. Your day will come. In January, Dustin (again) helped me through a diffi cult time. One night I asked him, Why are you so good to me? Because I promised God a long time ago that I will always take care of you, he said. Aw, another Dustinism. But here comes another great thing about Dustin: hes wicked funny, too. Even when hes not trying to be. How will I ever repay you? I said. Well, you could start by [long list of things]. I smiled through my tears and thought, Im glad I took the tags off this one. Hes a keeper.U.S. Navy photosA Grumman S-2A Tracker assigned to the "Tromboners" of anti-submarine squad ron VS-29. The squadron was assigned to Anti-Submarine Carrier Air Group 53 aboard the aircraft carrier USS Kearsarge (CVS-33). The Tromboners flew the S-2A from 1960 to 1963. NAS North Island, Calif. Fleet replacement squadron VS-41 accepted the aircraft that incorporated the latest sensors, computer-based data processing, display and weapons control systems. The S-3B version incorporated new technology for increased radar detection range and classification, advanced acoustic processing and Harpoon missile capability.The S-3 replaced the propeller-driven S-2 Tracker that was the Navys primary carrier-based submarine hunter for more than 20 years. The S-3 was retired in 2009 after 35 years of service. This Week in Navy History13 years later, meet Dustin From the Homefront From StaffFrom Feb. 18-28, NAS Jacksonville will participate in Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014. This annual train ing exercise will be conducted on naval bases and installations throughout the continental United States. The exercise is designed to enhance the training and readiness of naval security forces to respond to threats against installations and units and is not a response to any specific threat but is a regularly scheduled exercise. According to NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander, these annual training scenari os provide an important opportunity to test the air stations anti-terrorism/force protection (AT/FP) response. Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014 will give us a sig nificant learning opportunity because it will involve coordination of NAS Jax security and fire depart ments, along with various other tenant commands, Undersander explained. Also, the base Emergency Operations Center will be activated, enabling us to see first hand the efficiency our first responders and basewide communication protocols. Measures are in place to minimize disruptions to normal base operations, but there may be times when the exercise causes increased traffic near the installa tion, as well as delays in base access. For more information about Exercise Solid CurtainCitadel Shield 2014, contact the NAS Jacksonville Public Affairs Office at (904) 542-5588.NAS Jax to participate in Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014

PAGE 3

From StaffAfter successfully completing Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) classroom training for the past 18 months officers, chiefs, enlist ed and civilian members of the NAS Jacksonville SAPR team took the next step to validate the sexual assault response and reporting procedures cur rently in place at NAS Jacksonville. The primary factors in planning the SAPR drill were to develop a scenario that would maintain the utmost privacy of a real-world victim, test that our pro cedures enabled the victim to feel con fident and secure, and that they receive the proper information without disclosing any personal information. Installation Training Officer Jim Butters, stated, The sequence of events and interaction of our role-player with the quarterdeck watchstander, unit victim advocate, and Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) provided some very valuable information that will not only help NAS Jacksonvilles procedures but will be important to the development of the SAPR program. For any person who is a victim of sex ual assault, we want to stress that your privacy and choice are important and our goal is to make sure you are safe and not threatened. When making a report, it is important to take into account the following: 1. Do you want to talk to a national or local victim advocate? 2. Do you want to talk to a civilian or unit victim advocate? 3. Do you want to talk to the police or Navy Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS)? 4. Do you want to have a medical and/ or forensic exam regardless of your reporting option? You may not have the answers to those questions now or at the time of a sexual assault and that is why the vic tim advocates and SARC are there to assist you. Their contact information can be obtained by calling the NAS Jacksonville Quarterdeck at 542-2338.Photo by MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Sailors recognizedNAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander recognized several outstanding Sailors for their hard work and professionalism during All Hands Quarters held Feb. 14 at Hangar 117. (From left) Lt. Ryan Platt, CS2(SW) Robert Laughton, CS2 David Tiberio, CS1(SW) Marnika Ash and ET3 Christopher Heywood. NAS Jacksonville conducts SAPR drill JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014 3

PAGE 4

4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014 Powerlifters compete at Fitness CenterFrom NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation More than 90 spectators were on hand at the NAS Jacksonville Fitness Center Feb. 8 for the stations first powerlifting competition. Powerlifting is a strength sport consisting of three events: squat, bench press, and deadlift. All competi tors are given three attempts in each event to lift the highest weight possible. At the end of three events, the highest weight lifted for each event is combined to determine the total amount of weight lifted by each competitor. Winners of each weight class were determined using the Wilks formula, which is based on the total weight lifted and the individuals body weight. Each competi tor was required to weigh in before the competition in order to use the Wilks formula. The event attracted 30 men and three women who were divided into weight classes. For the womens division, the weight classes were: lightweight 0-125lbs; middleweight: 126-165; and heavyweight 166+. For the mens division, the weight classes were: lightweight 0-145; middleweight 146-225; and the heavyweight 226+. There were three judges for the competition: Division; state powerlifting competitor; national qualifier in powerlifting. medics from First Coast Navy Fire & Emergency Services were on hand to assist with any medical emergencies. said this was a great event for the powerlifting com munity and are eager for more events like this. Thirty men and three women entered the inaugural NAS Jacksonville Powerlifting Competition on Feb. 8 at the base fitness center. Lightweight class competitor Amiee Johnson concentrates in the squat rack as she lifts 115 pounds. In the women's heavyweight class, Patricia Thuestad entered the squat stand and lifted 200 pounds. Women's heavyweight class winner Patricia Thuestad recorded a deadlift of 275 pounds. In the women's middleweight class, Celeste Bowie performed a deadlift of 175 pounds. Chad Hutchens takes his turn in the squat rack where he pressed 335 pounds and took second place in the middleweight class. Spotters stand by as Patricia Thuestad moves 145 pounds in the bench press at the NAS Jacksonville Powerlifting Competition Feb. 8 at the base fitness center.

PAGE 5

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014 5 M M: FIRST HM C G, N H J B r, Sf rn, Dtb r SECOND ATC Ct H, HSM-n B r, Sf r, Dtb nr THIRD S M, DD B r, Sf r, Dtb r M H: FIRST GSEC B W, TPU/PCF B n, Sf r, Dtb r SECOND HNSN L Bt, NBHC J B r, Sf r, Dtb rn THIRD AWV E P, VP-n B r, Sf nr, Dtb n W L: FIRST A J, tt B n, Sf r, Dtb n W M: FIRST LS ATA C B, RAN r Sft B nn, Sf r, Dtb r W H: FIRST AD P Tt, FRCSE B r, Sf nn, Dtb r POWERLIFTING RESULTS PHOTOS COURTESY OF MW R Winners of the 2014 NAS Jacksonville Powerlifting Competition held on Feb. 8 at the base fitness center. (From left) Patricia Thuestad, Aimee Johnson, Celeste Bowie, Bryain Williams, Chad Hutchens, Lewis Bradshaw, Evelio Perez, Stephen Myer and Curtis Gaines. Amiee Johnson performed a deadlift of 160 pounds at the inaugural NAS Jacksonville Powerlifting Competition on Feb. 8 at the base fitness center. Bryain Williams won the heavyweight deadlift by moving 675 pounds. Heavyweight Bryain Williams at the squat rack. He topped out at 635 pounds. Stephen Meyer took third place in the middleweight class. He moved 445 pounds in the deadlift. Two spotters lower free weights for heavyweight Bryain Williams on the bench press. Women's middleweight class competitor Celeste Bowie gets her hands positioned just right before her bench press of 100 pounds. Curtis Gaines impressed judges and his competition with his deadlift of 465 pounds. Placing first in the mens middleweight class, Curtis Gaines pressed 450 pounds in the squat.

PAGE 6

By Jim Garamone American Forces Press ServiceThe Navy will continue to work on two defense secretarydirected reviews, including one to ensure that ethical behav ior is paramount in the service, Navy Adm. Jonathan Greenert, chief of naval operations (CNO), said in a video blog posted Feb 13. Greenert said the service will work with the Air Force to take an overall look at the nuclear enterprise. The two services maintain the nuclear triad of bomb ers, submarines and missiles. Senior leaders are concerned about the enterprise after alle gations of cheating on a profi ciency test for nuclear launch officers at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Mont., as well as on exams for nuclear reactor watch per sonnel at Charleston Naval Base, S.C. Greenert said his service will look at personnel programs, specifically, at how we bring people into the nuclear weap ons program, how we certify them, train them and the per sonnel reliability program and thats about maintaining pro ficiency and certification to be one that works around nuclear weapons. The Navy also will look at previous studies. It adopted some recommendations of a 2008 report by former Defense Secretary James Schlesinger and a 2008 report by Adm. Kirkland Donald on nuclear weapons management. We took on some of those actions, Greenert said. The question is how are we doing? CNO promised to look to the future to make sure we have the values embedded into the fiber of those programs. A second result of the Malmstrom and Charleston incidents entails a thorough look at Navy values, the CNO said. Were going to look at our values, at our integrity, at our character and make sure we are not talking past each other, he said. I dont think we have an eth ics problem across the Navy, but I think we need to reinforce our core values and our core com mitment, he said. The admiral repeated several times that integrity is the foun dation of what were about, and that sailors need to talk about this commitment. While these discussions need to be part of the Navy training program, Greenert said, he sees this as going way beyond. We need to talk about it in the ready rooms, we need to talk about it on the bridges of our ships, we need to talk about it on our squadron flight lines, in the hangar bays and in our build ings, he said. And we need to commit to it full-time, because integrity is the foundation of what were about. Sailors have to have the honor to not lie, cheat or steal and the courage to stand up when they see someone lying, cheating or stealing, the admiral said. We have to have the com mitment to the institution to remember it is not just about our shipmates its not just about taking care of them it is about committing to the insti tution, he added. When we raised our right hands, we said we would support and defend the Constitution against all ene mies foreign and domestic and we will bear true faith and alle giance to the Constitution. And that means the institution. By Yan Kennon NH Jacksonville Public Affairs Senior WriterOn the heels of its recent Joint Commission reaccreditation and Bureau of Medicine and Surgery Medical Inspector General (MEDIG) inspection, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville its hospital and five branch health clinics was awarded the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) Level III recognition for its Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) Feb. 14. Through sequestration, reduced budgets and civilian furloughs this past year, Naval Hospital Jacksonville continued to provide our nations heroes and their families with world-class health care, said Capt. Gayle Shaffer, NH Jacksonville commanding officer. This recognition and accreditation demon strates that our Medical Home Port teams are making a positive difference in the lives of our patients. NCQA Level III, the nations highest level of rec ognition for patient-centric care, was awarded to all primary care clinics (Family Medicine, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics) at the hospital and all five of its branch health clinics. The Navys approach to the PCMH is Medical Home Port, which places patients in the center of a collaborative team of caregivers from doc tors to nurses and case managers led by the primary care manager. Founded in 1990, NCQA is a private not-forprofit organization that works to improve health care quality. Earning The Joint Commission Gold Seal of Approval during its re-accreditation process in January, NH Jacksonville was recognized for its con tinuing compliance with the Joint Commissions stateof-the-art, national standards of care. In achieving Joint Commission accredita tion, Naval Hospital Jacksonville has demonstrated its commitment to the highest level of care for its patients, said Mark Pelletier, the Joint Commissions Division of Accreditation and Certification Operations chief operating officer. The Joint Commission is the nations oldest and largest standards-setting and accrediting body in health care. Founded in 1951, it accredits more than 20,000 health systems in the U.S. The MEDIG team, after reviewing 60 programs (from research ethics to patient access) in January, offered a resounding endorsement of the commands safe, high-quality medical treatment. CNO stresses integrity to SailorsPhoto by MCC(SW/EXW) Peter LawlorChief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert and Director of the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Adm. John Richardson held a press conference to address allega tions of a cheating incident on a written exam at the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Command in Charleston, S.C. Greenert and Richardson said the investigation is ongoing in order to substan tiate the allegations and hold those accountable. The Navy will continue to train and execute its mission while holding its Sailors to set standards of conduct.Naval Hospital Jacksonville awarded NCQA recognition 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014

PAGE 7

Joins CVW-7 supporting CSG-8By Lt. j.g. Taylor MunroPublic Affairs OffierIn a Feb. 1 ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 1122, Helicopter Strike Maritime Squadron (HSM)-72 trans ferred to the operational con trol of Carrier Air Wing (CVW)7 located at NAS Oceana, Va. CVW-7 Commanding Officer Capt. Terry Morris said HSM72 will be a valuable asset to the air wing and strike group capable of providing both antisurface and anti-submarine warfare. The Proud Warriors were formerly known as HSL-42 before being re-designated as HSM-72 in January 2013. That was in conjunction with the squadrons transition from the SH-60B Seahawk to the more capable multi-mission MH-60R Seahawk. Previously, the Proud Warriors were under the con trol of Commander, Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing Atlantic. HSM-72 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Derek Fleck said, Our transition to CVW-7 will bring new opportuni ties as HSM-72 moves away from detached expeditionary deployments to having the entire squadron deploy with a single carrier strike group. Morris reported to CVW-7 in August 2011 as deputy com mander and took command of the air wing in December 2012. CVW-7, along with the Eisenhower, is projected to deploy in the future with Carrier Strike Group (CSG)-8. Until then, the Proud Warriors will focus their training on integrating with CVW-7 and working with their sis ter squadron, Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC)-5, based at Naval Station Norfolk, Va. CVW-7, assigned to air craft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), was commissioned in 1943 at Alameda Naval Air Station, Calif., as Carrier Air Group (CAG)-18, and embarked on board USS Intrepid (CV-11). In 1963, CAG-18 was re-designat ed as CVW-7. Over the years, CVW-7 par ticipated in combat operations that helped win battles such as Leyte Gulf in World War II, multiple raids on North Korean territory in 1952, and strikes into North Vietnam from Yankee Station while attached to the USS Independence in 1965. More recently, CVW-7 flew missions in support of opera tions Desert Shield, Deny Flight, Southern Watch, Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. By MC1 Elliott FabrizioChief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Chief of Naval Personnel (CNP) is scheduled to talk with Sailors around the world in an All Hands Call broadcasting and streaming online live March 5 at 2 p.m. EST. Vice Adm. Bill Moran, CNP, and Fleet Master Chief for Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education (MPT&E) April Beldo will update Sailors on the issues that affect them and their families and open the floor to live questions from fleet via satellite and social media. Sailors are encouraged to begin sending in ques tions and comments now by tweeting @USNPeople or emailing usnpeople@gmail.com. The programs and policies under the office of the chief of naval personnel directly impact Sailors and include the following: More than just asking questions, Moran and Beldo encourage Sailors to use this opportunity to share their feedback whats working in the fleet, what isnt and what ideas do they have to make our existing poli cies better. The event will be broadcast on the Armed Forces Network (AFN), Direct to Sailor (DTS) and The Pentagon Channel (TPC). Online streaming will be available at www.navy. mil. HSM-72 under new managementPhoto by Lt. j.g. Taylor MunroCommander, CVW-7 Capt. Terry Morris presents the Proud Warriors' most recent check-in, AR Jake Sanders, the CVW-7 command coin on Feb. 1 at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 1122.CNP to answer Sailors questions, respond to feedback, in worldwide All-Hands Call Photo by Joy SamselVice Adm. William Moran, Chief of Naval Personnel, delivers remarks during the Naval Education and Training Command change of command ceremony at the National Museum of Naval Aviation at Naval Air Atation Pensacola. Rear Adm. Don Quinn retired after nearly 35 years of service and turned over com mand to Rear Adm. Michael White. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014 7

PAGE 8

tions from show attendees about the capabilities of the P-8A. Exhibitors included more than 60 of the worlds top-100 aerospace companies, the largest number of exhibitors in the shows history with more than 1,000 participating companies from 47 countries. Other U.S. military aircraft displayed at the exhibition included two F-16 Fighting Falcons, two MV-22 Ospreys, a C-17 Globemaster, a KC-135 Stratotanker and a C-130J Super Hercules. Its been an honor for the War Eagles to partici pate. Weve truly enjoyed the opportunity to show case the Poseidon and our men and women who maintain and crew it, said Papp. VP-16From Page 1 Photo by MC1 Jay PughCmdr. Dan Papp (left) gives a tour of a P-8A Poseidon from the "War Eagles" of Patrol Squadron (VP)-16 to Capt. Paul Foster, commanding offi cer of Navy Region Center Singapore, during the Singapore Air Show. Photo courtesy of RLSO SoutheastFood bank volunteersSailors recently volunteered at the Jacksonville warehouse of Second Harvest North Florida food bank. (From left) LN2 Stephanie Burton, LN1 Lynn Farquhar, LN2 Elena Goes, LN2 Raquel Castillo, LN1 Jonathan High, LN2 Jacques Benoit, LN1 Chad Cahoy, LNCS Jaclyn Woodall, YN2 Shantil Reed, and LNC Keary Mondrik. From NAS Jax Multi-Cultural Awareness CommitteeDr. Carter G. Woodson lived and wrote in a time when America con sidered itself to be Anglo-White. African-Americans were kept apart from the rest of American society. At best, they were treated as second-class citizens. Woodson, in combating such degradation and to promote the value of AfricanAmerican history, began publish ing the Journal of Negro History in 1916. The observation of Negro History Week, an initiative led by Woodson to recognize the contri butions of African-Americans to our country, began in 1926. Its goal was to foster a better understand ing of the African-American expe rience. He choose thesecond week of February to coincide with the birthdays of abolitionist Frederick Douglass and President Abraham Lincoln, two people who had dramatic impact on the lives of African-Americans. The observation was expand ed to include the whole month in 1976, and has since become com monly referred to as Black History or African-American History Month. It is celebrated and recognized as a Department of Defense national observance. In Woodsons book, The MisEducation of the Negro (1933), he tenders information about his life experiences with some of his fellow educated negroes. He decried that some of his fel low African-Americans would not buy goods and services from black businessmen, because the edu cated the African-American was taught that the black person had no value. Educated African-Americans went back to their community illequipped to teach each other, for they acquired a disdain for their own. Thus, they became mis-educat ed. Woodson saw the education that the African-American practiced in his time as oppressive. He believed in self-reliance as a major component of self-respect, making the black person rise above their situation by their own merit, and developing the AfricanAmericans natural gifts whatever they maybe. Only by becoming self-reli ant and self-respecting would the black race be contributors to American society. The American culture and the military have made quite a transformation since Woodson published his first book in 1916. President Harry S. Truman imple mented Executive Order 9981 in 1948, which desegregated the mili tary. Today, the image of America is not a monolithic white-only cul ture but a multicultural pluralis tic society. Instead of melting other cultures into the melting pot to form one preferred culture, America has become a nation in which the vari ous cultures are appreciated for their contributions to enhance our country. Now the American dream is open to all persons of various nationalities, races, cultures and creeds. Carter G. Woodsons impact on Black History Month 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014

PAGE 9

a tactical operations cen ter and numerous roof top antennas. The 30,986-sq.-ft. struc ture will feature a stucco fin ish over reinforced mason ry walls. The project also includes constructing anten na infrastructure at NAS Jacksonvilles south anten nas site. Located at the northwest corner of Saratoga Avenue and Jason Street, the MQ-4C Triton UAS Mission Control Center will fall under con trol of Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW)-11 based at NAS Jacksonville. The Navy announced in October 2013 the establish ment of Unmanned Patrol Squadron (VUP)-19 at NAS Jacksonville to operate and maintain the MQ-4C Triton UAS. VUP-19 will provide the organizational framework for mission con trol, mission planning and data analysis from NAS Jacksonville. The Triton UAS will be operated by crews consist ing of P-8A Poseidon pilots, naval flight officers and aviation warfare operators using the mission control system at NAS Jacksonville. The new facility is project ed to be rated as Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) Silver by the U.S. Green Building Council. The parking area will utilize porous pavers for regular, handicapped and carpool spaces. The project is scheduled for completion by December 2014. TRITONFrom Page 1and have worked alongside the pilots for the duration of the deployment. Being in an operational environment is one of the most rewarding parts of my job, said OS1 Ronald Wierzbic, one of the ASTAC controllers. I love tasking the helicopter pilots to iden tify contacts. I love control ling aircraft. In addition to reaching the 1,000th flight hour, this deployment has seen sev eral milestones reached for the detachment: they com pleted six maintenance inspections and function al check flights, achieved more than 2,000 deck hits in 2013, three pilots earned qualifications as helicopter aircraft commanders (HAC) and two more pilots are on a path to qualify before the end of deployment. This HAC qualifica tion is complex and it often takes pilots several months to feel confident before they begin the final board ing process, said pilot, Lt. j.g. Joe Granata. It is about feeling comfortable enough with the regulations, pro cedures and equipment to operate the helicopter safe ly. In the end that is a HACs priority. HSM-74 Det. 2 will remain aboard Gettysburg until the ship returns to homeport. Gettysburg is current ly deployed with Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting mari time security operations and theater security coop eration in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. The HSM-74 Swamp Foxes are home based at NAS Jacksonville. HSM-74From Page 1 (From left) MACM(SW) Edward Santiago, MA2 Erick Ortiz, military working dog (MWD) Zoran, MA2 Glenn Patton, MWD Benny, Lt. Jeff Thacker, MA2 Bryan Chiverton, MWD Gergo, MA1(EXW) Keith Danalewich, MWD Doly and Lt. Ryan Platt from NAS Jax Security Department welcome Chiverton and MWD Gergo Feb. 13 after an eight-month deployment to Afghanistan.Photos by MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax welcomes home IA SailorNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander welcomes MA2 Bryan Chiverton, and his mili tary working dog Gergo, back to the NAS Jax Security Department after he served an eight-month IA tour in Afghanistan. Chiverton and Gergo were assigned bomb detection and patrolling for Camp Arena and Shindand Air Base located in the Herat Province of Afghanistan. Chiverton said, "It was an interesting experience deploying to Afghanistan. I learned a lot and it was great to be able to help out on the mission. Training and confidence is real important when you are deployed. I gained a real appreciation for America. I really missed my family, but I gained another one over there. You need a family there in order to get through the missions on a daily basis." JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014 9

PAGE 10

By Lt. j.g. Joseph Bayo VP-26 PAOLt. j.g. Lindsey Asdal and Lt. Daryl Abriam recently qualified as VP-26s newest Patrol Plane Commander (PPC) and Tactical Coordinator (TACCO), respectively. These are the key qualifications that a new pilot and naval flight officer strive to earn during their first operational tour at a maritime patrol squadron. This is a major achievement for both as it was accomplished in just 16 months. VP-26 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mark Sohaney described the accomplishment as a great exam ple of initiative, dedication and professionalism that we should all try to emulate. Asdal graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 2010 with a Bachelor of Arts in International Relations and was designated a naval aviator in December 2011. She checked in at VP-26 in October 2012 alongside Abriam after com pleting initial training in the P-3C Orion at VP-30. Asdal, a native of Chester, N.J., is one of five sisters, and is one of four who now serve in the Navy. Theirs is the only family to have four daughters attend the U.S. Naval Academy. While three of the sis ters Lindsey, Ashley and Kirsten have already been commissioned, the youngest, Charlotte, is a Plebe with the class of 2017. Abriam was born and raised on the small, yet renowned, whitesand-beach island of Boracay in the Western Visayas region of the Philippines. At the age of 14 he with family moved to Las Vegas, Nevada. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 2008 with a Bachelor of Science in Aeronautical Engineering. Abriam was winged in 2012 after successfully complet ing primary and advanced heli copter pilot training with VT-2 and HT-18. He also completed NFO training with VT-10 and VP-30. Asdal and Abriams recent quali fications mark their beginning as PPC and TACCO of VP-26s Combat Aircrew (CAC)-6. They will con tinue to lead their CAC through the maritime patrol advanced readi ness program (ARP), designed to sharpen advanced anti-submarine warfare and crew coordination skills, as the Tridents focus on gaining and maintaining combat readiness in preparation for their deployment in 2015. Uniform changes approvedFrom Chief of Naval Personnel Public AffairsThe Chief of Naval Personnel announced the fol lowing uniform changes in a NAVADMIN released Feb 7. Wear of the NWU Type III for deployment and pre-deployment training has been approved for the following 12 commands: Navy Chaplains serving in units authorized to wear the Navy Working Uniform (NWU) Type II and III can wear the Chaplain Corps Staff Insignia on these uniforms. The embroidered insignia will be sewn above the rank tab on the shirt. Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) will sell the insignia begin ning in April. Navy Expeditionary Supply Corps Officer (NESCO) Warfare Insignia was approved for wear by Supply Corps officers with a 310X, 651X, or 751X designator that are assigned to Navy Expeditionary Combat Command or Naval Special Warfare units and who have successfully completed the qualifica tion requirements outlined in OPNAVINST 1412.15. A new Navy Security Forces Badges (NESCO) warfare insignia will available for purchase in NEXCOM and Navy Exchange Uniform Centers and the Navy Exchange Uniform Support Center this June. To ensure proper control and authenticity of the new NSF metal badges, the fourth scroll (line 4) of the badge will be engraved with a four digit number by Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support (DLATS). Metal badges are authorized to be worn on all uniforms. Embroidered badges are authorized to be worn on the Navy Working Uniform (NWU Type I, II, and III) only. Deadline for the mandatory wear of the new NSF badge and patches is Oct. 1. Fleet feedback directly impacts uniform chang es. Sailors may send a letter with uniform policy change recommendations through their chain of command to the Uniform Board. Recommendations should reflect Navy-wide application with an eye towards standardization and uniform policy reduction. Endorsements of uniform change proposals are required by each echelon. Clay County Veterans Services Office helps vets, familiesFrom Clay County Veterans Service OfficeThe Clay County Veterans Service Office is now located on the second floor of the Clay County Administration Building at 477 Houston Street, office location at 1565 CR 315 has been closed. The office is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The Clay County Veterans Service Office is staffed with a full time veterans service officer and a part-time veterans program assistant who are both available and eager to assist veterans and/ or family members with filing claims and other related needs. Part of Clay Countys heritage is the countys strong ties to the military dating back to the early 1800s. Today, there are more than 24,000 veter ans who call Clay County home. These veterans represent service to our nation from World War II through the current conflicts as well as decades of service during peacetime. To make an appointment, please call (904) 2696326. Tridents qualify new PPC and TACCOPhotos by MC2 Jesse SharpVP-26 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mark Sohaney (left) presents a new P-3C Tactical Coordinator (TACCO) uniform patch to Lt. Daryl Abriam. Lt. Daryl Abriam is greeted by fellow VP-26 "Tridents" after qualifying as a new P-3C Tactical Coordinator. Cmdr. Mark Sohaney, commanding officer of VP-26, presents Lt. j.g. Lindsey Asdal with a flight suit patch celebrating her qualification as a P-3C Patrol Plane Commander. Lt. j.g. Lindsey Asdal is showered with water and handshakes in celebra tion of her qualification as a Patrol Plane Commander at the "Tridents" of VP-26. 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014

PAGE 11

By MCCS(AW) William LoveladyCommander Naval Air Force Reserve Public AffairsThe Navy Reserve is searching for more than a few of the best pilots who are ready to leave active duty, but still looking to fly Navy. Just about every reserve squadron needs a constant flow of highly qualified applicants, said Cmdr. Dave Bowen, the reserve component community manager for pilot accessions. A squadron with about 25 officers aboard needs one or two new accessions a year but if we have a zero year that becomes a problem. Reserve pilots are recruited by holding pilot selec tion boards. Squadrons that have positions to fill will send out a quarterly notice announcing the convening of a board. A lot of the pilots who apply have known about the squadrons for a long time by word of mouth and have already rushed the squadron by coming to visit on a drill weekend and introducing themselves, said Bowen. Its important for new pilots to visit the squadron and meet the wardroom in order to put faces with names and see if they are a good fit or not. Because of the long and costly training pipeline, there are no direct accessions for Navy Reserve pilots. They have to come from the fleet and their skills are incredibly perishable. Our ideal candidate is a junior officer who just fin ished a tactical or instructor tour, said Bowen. We want to grab that pilot and his skills that were honed in the fleet and retain it in the reserve. Pilots who have been away from active duty for a few years, even if they are flying commercially, may not have the current skill sets needed to get back in the cockpit of an F/A-18 Hornet or F-5 Tiger. Were not looking for people who barely meet stan dards. It is our job to provide experienced and wellqualified pilots to meet fleet and operational support requirements, said Bowen. Our reserve pilots are highly experienced operators and thats what the Navy needs from uswhether flying tactical missions in support of combatant commanders or flying in adver sary squadrons to train our junior pilots just arriving in the fleet. The other challenge Bowen faces with bringing new pilots to the Navy Reserve is the lack of awareness of the opportunities. No commanding officer wants to lose his best peo ple, so when a pilot is considering leaving active duty, there may not be a lot of resources forthcoming, said Bowen. For some pilots the only exposure they have to the reserve component is if the squadron has a reserve squadron augment unit. Bowen, a graduate of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, spent more than 10 years on active duty as an F/A-18 Hornet pilot and a T-45 Goshawk instructor. I transitioned to the reserves eight and a half years ago, flying the F-5 Tiger, and began my department head tour at VFC-111 at NAS Key West, Fla., said Bowen. Now Im the commanding officer of the 3rd Fleet Maritime Operations detachment at Las Vegas, but I still fly as a guest pilot with VFC-111. For me, I get to enjoy the best of both worlds a civilian career in aviation, as well as continuing my Navy career flying fighters part time. One pilot who recently joined the Navy Reserve is Lt. Amelia Leeds, a P-3 pilot with the VP-62 Broad Arrows at NAS Jacksonville, Fla. After serving almost nine years on active duty in the Navy, Leeds did an inter-service transfer from the Navy to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Corps where she flew the WP-3D Orion; a modified P-3 used for collecting weather information. After leaving NOAA, Leeds became an air inter diction agent/pilot for U.S. Customs and Border Protection, before she joined the Navy Reserve in 2011. I found out about the reserves through numer ous sources, but mainly other pilots from work, said Leeds. I went through a recruiter at NOSC (Navy Operational Support Center) at NAS Jacksonville and put a pilot package together that was given to VP-62. A big lesson learned is that I wished I had put in a pack age sooner. I encourage anyone who was active-duty to join the reserves. It is a great way to continue to serve your country. For those aviators coming toward the end of their active duty commitments, transitioning to a reserve component squadron is easier than one might imag ine. There are open billets in almost every community and squadrons regularly hold pilot selection boards. The best time for a pilot to begin the process is within six months of leaving active duty. Interested aviators are encouraged to con tact the squadrons they are most interested in and find out the time of its next drill weekend. We encourage anyone interested in joining a reserve squadron to come to a drill weekend, meet the pilots, the commanding officer and get a feel for the commute, if they arent planning to live local, Bowen said. This is a chance to talk to fellow aviators who have recently joined the squadron and get a lot of questions answered on issues like pay and benefits and work-life balance. Pilot selection boards are usually held at the wing level at least biannually. Reserve squadron COs and senior reserve pilots typically review applicant records and make recommendations to the air wing com mander before billets are offered to the selectees. Consideration is given to officer and tactical perfor mance, recent experience and willingness to meet participation expectations. Selected aviators should then contact the career transition office at the Bureau of Naval Personnel and request assistance in affiliating with the Navy Reserve. The transition office will work with reserve squadrons and manage the required paperwork for transfer to the desired reserve component. Newly selected reserve aviators can expect a short period of active duty orders to complete the basic familiarization and tactical training syllabus on their new aircraft, if required. Once this is complet ed, participation requirements will vary according to squadron and mission. Many reserve squadrons have recently seen a decline in qualified applicants because many aviators are remaining on active duty, combined with a general lack of awareness in reserve squadron opportunities. We understand that there are a few misconceptions and a lot of unanswered questions concerning being a part of a reserve squadron, said Bowen. Were trying to get the word out that these are some of the best opportunities to stay in the cockpit and enjoy the ready room camaraderie on a part-time basis. Some of the recurring questions highlighted in recent years are: I apply? to be selected? mute work if I dont want to live local? at the squadron? I dont want to be away from my fam ily for too long--thats why I left active duty. ered for one of the tactical squadrons? Ill receive. The answers to these questions might surprise you, said Bowen. The bottom line is that we have reserve aviators from a variety of civilian professions living all over the country. There are a lot of resources available to get people to the squadron and most are flexible with individual participation concerns. Commander, Navy Air Forces Reserve (CNAFR), has community managers for the Tactical Support Wing that flies F/A-18, F-5, EA-6B/EA-18G aircraft and the Fleet Logistics Support Wing that flies the C-40A, C-37, C-20 and C-130 aircraft. CNAFR also has two VP squadrons that fly P-3Cs and three helicopter squad rons that fly the HH-60H and the SH-60B. Increasing the flow of qualified pilots into Navy ReservePhotos by Adrienne Downing Flying the F-5N Tiger, VFC-111 "Sundowners" operate as part of the U.S. Navy Reserve Fleet Adversary Program, providing dissimilar air combat training to fleet strike fighter and Marine fighter attack squadrons. Cmdr. Dave Bowen still flies the F-5N Tiger as a guest pilot with VFC-111 based at NAS Key West. Photo by William Lovelady Lt. Amelia Leeds, a P-3C Orion pilot with the VP-62 Broad Arrows, joined the Navy Reserve after nine years of active duty service with the Navy's Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force.Photo by AWFCS(NAC/SCW) Mike WendelinLt. Tim Berryhill, a former Marine Corps C-130 Hercules pilot, is now a reservist with the VR-62 "Nomads" based at NAS Jacksonville. In this 2013 photo, he climbs his C-130T aircraft past Mount Suribachi on the island of Iwo Jima in the Pacific.See RESERVES, Page 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014 11

PAGE 12

By MC3 Shaun GriffinUSS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) Carrier Strike Group (GHWB CSG) departed Naval Station Norfolk for its second deployment Feb. 15. The strike group, led by the Navys newest aircraft carrier, George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), and its nearly 6,000 Sailors; is scheduled to conduct opera tions in the U.S. Navys 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. The deployment is part of an ongo ing rotation of U.S. forces supporting maritime security operations in inter national waters around the globe. Working with allied and partner maritime forces, GHWB CSG units will focus heavily on maritime security operations and theater security coop eration efforts which help establish con ditions for regional stability. This team has worked hard in prepa ration for this deployment and is ready to go, said Rear Adm. John Aquilino, commander of GHWB CSG. The dedication and commitment shown by our Sailors will serve the country well in support of our global national interests. The five ships and eight aircraft squadrons of GHWB CSG consist of approximately 6,000 Sailors who have spent the last year conducting intensive training and certification exercises to establish a safe, cohesive organization capable of performing a wide variety of missions across the globe, ranging from counter-piracy and ground support operations to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. The George H.W. Bush Strike Group consists of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 2, Carrier Air Wing (CVW)-8, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 22 staff and George H.W. Bush. This is the second deployment for the Navys last Nimitz-class nuclearpowered aircraft carrier, which recently became combat ready after the suc cessful completion of Composite Unit Training Exercise and Joint Force Exercise. I am very pleased that all essential training has been completed, said Commanding Officer Capt. Andrew Loiselle. During this long workup period, excellence has been the standard set by the crew, and I am confident that we are the best prepared carrier to go on deployment. Squadrons attached to CVW-8 include: VFA-15 Valions, VFA87 Golden Warriors, VFA-31 Tomcatters, VFA-213 Black Lions, VAW-124 Bear Aces, VAQ-134 Garudas, VRC-40 Rawhides, HSC-9 Tridents and HSM-70 Spartans who are home based at NAS Jacksonville. George H.W. Bush was commis sioned Jan. 10, 2009 as the 10th and last Nimitz-Class aircraft carrier. Named after the 41st U.S. President, USS George H.W. Bush is the only aircraft carrier in the fleet with a living namesake. Chief of Naval Air Training (CNATRA) also offers reserve aviators and flight officers the opportunity to train avia tors. If youre interested in flying with the Navy Reserve, reach out to one of the squadrons that can direct you to a com munity manager. We hope to make the entire Naval Aviation community more aware of the close support relationship that exists between the active and reserve com ponents and let aviators know about the benefits of being part of a reserve squadron, said Bowen. Pilots coming off of active duty have the tactical and instructional skills that we want to retain and in return give them the enjoyment and quality of ser vice to our country that is unmatched in any civilian job. RESERVESFrom Page 11 Finance Makeover Re$ource Night ADDRESSING THE NEEDS OF MILITARY FAMILIES AND PLANTING THE SEEDS FOR A SECURE FUTURE FREE child care will be provided onsite. Space is limited and pre registration is required. To register for child care: Call (904) 542 4718 and ask for Christianne Provide childs name, contact information for sponsor, emergency contact information To ensure your spot register as soon as possible. All registrations for child care must be received by 3pm on February 20th. Sponsored by: Keys to Financial Success for Military Families C O M E J O I N U S FREE pizza and drinks FREE child care Guest Speakers Resources Tips for Financial Success W h e r e : Youth Activity Center 2069 Mustin Road NAS Jacksonville W h e n : Thursday, Feb 27, 2014 6pm 8pm F o r m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n o n t h i s g r e a t e v e n t p l e a s e c a l l R u f u s B u n d r i g e a t ( 9 0 4 ) 5 4 2 4 9 7 6 Photo by MC3 Andrew SchneiderThe aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) departs Naval Station Norfolk Feb. 15 for its scheduled deployment as the flagship for Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 2 in support of maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. USS George H.W. Bush departs for 2nd deployment 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014

PAGE 13

DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live enter tainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaokeFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Jan. 18, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: Jan. 25, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Swim to Cuba Aquatic Program At the Indoor Pool Teams complete 30,000 laps and team members receive a t-shirt! Navy Run Training Program At the fitness center Running group meets every Tuesday at 4 p.m. Biggest Loser Challenge 8 week program, teams of 2 Begins March 10 Aerobathon featuring TRX, spin, muscle max, boot camp, step, yoga, HIT and Zumba Feb. 15, 10 a.m. noon Fitness CenterI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Gatornationals March 1416 $30 $58 Disney Jr. Live $15 $29 Monster Jam $22 $42 Wild Adventures $30 $70 Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket $166 $194.50 Universal Orlando $114 $169.50 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Daytona 500 $62 $209 Drive 4COPD 300 $55 Budweiser Duels $55 Sprint Unlimited $30 $55 Rolex 24 $32 $65 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 The Artist Series Broadway in Jacksonville 2014 season, select shows Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2014 season, select shows Armed Forces Vacation Club www.afv club.com $349 $369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 Ripleys St. Augustine $4.25 $7.50 St. Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Wild Florida Airboats $17 $46.50 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels located near attrac tions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restrict ed to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Karaoke at Deweys Feb. 21 at 7 p.m. $7.95 pizza your way and $.50 wings! Daytona 500 Trip Feb. 23 at 10 a.m. $40 per person Military Saves Week Feb. 24 28 Take the pledge to save money! NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Daily Twilight Golf Special Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1 p.m. Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty Feb. 25 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests Feb. 27Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you!Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractors assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Players earn participation points for their command or third. Register by Feb. 26 Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. along with rules and required paperwork.The run is free and open to all authorized points for their commands by participating. Sign up at NAS Jax Gym or the Fitness Source prior to the Feb. 7 deadline. The run is held on Perimeter Road at the end of Mustin Road, before the Antenna Farm at 11:30 a.m. Registration will also be held at the run site from 10:30-11:15 a.m. Awards will be given to the top male and top female runner for age groups: 19 & under; 20-24; 25-29; 30-34; 35-39; 40-44; 45-49; 50 & over. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. along with rules and required paperwork. The tournament is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractor women assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants will earn participation points for their command or third. Sign up by March 21 The tournament is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractor women assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants will earn participation points for their command or third. Sign up by March 21 Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractor personnel age 30 and older who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play on Tuesday & Thursday at 11:30 a.m. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Rosters due by March 7. Play begins at the end of March or the beginning of April. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Rosters are due by March 7. Play begins at the end of March or the beginning of April. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians; DoD contractors; retirees; and dependents over 18. Games play in the evenings. Contact the gym at 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Rosters are due by March 7. Play begins at the end of March or the beginning of April. Open to active duty, retirees, dependents over 18, selective reservists, DoD civilians and contractors. The tournament starts at 5 p.m. at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts on the corner of Allegheny Road and Birmingham Road. Call 542-2930 to sign up by April 25. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil StandingsAs of Feb. 14Teams Wins Losses CNATTU Blue 2 0 Navy Band 2 0 NCTS 2 0 VP-45 2 0 CV-TSC Ashore 1 1 FRCSE 1 1 VP-10 1 1 VP-30 1 1 CNATTU Gold 0 2 PSD Jax 0 2 SERCC 0 2 VR-58 0 2Teams Wins Losses VP-10 3 0 VP-30 3 1 NAVHOSP 3 1 FRCSE 2 2 NAVFAC 2 3 VP-26 2 3 NCTS 0 4Teams Wins Losses FRCSE 600 4 1 FRCSE 700 4 1 NAVHOSP 3 2 VP-10 3 2 VP-45 2 2 NAVHOSP Galley 2 3 NCTS 2 3 VR-58 2 3 FACSFAC 1 3 NAS Jax 1 3 TPU/PCF 1 3 VP-26 1 4Teams Wins Losses NOSC 3 0 Vet Clinic 3 0 VP-26 3 0 VR-58 3 0 HSM-72 2 0 VR-62 2 1 FACSFAC 0 1 CRS-10 0 2 ASD Jax 0 3 FRCSE 62A/690 0 3 NavHosp IMC 0 3 VP-62 0 3 NAS Jax Sports JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014 13

PAGE 14

14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014 TRICARE ends walk-in admin services at 189 FacilitiesBy Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceTRICARE military health plan ser vice centers will end administrative walk-in services in the United States on April 1, Pentagon officials said recently. While the 189 facilities will stop taking walk-ins, beneficiaries can accomplish any administrative task online or by phone, said Pentagon spokesman Army Col. Steve Warren. TRICARE service centers overseas are not affected, Warren said. The change will not let me repeat that will not affect any TRICARE medical benefit or health care ser vice, he emphasized. What it will do is allow the department to save $250 million over the next five years, allowing TRICARE to invest in more important services. Fifty percent of the visits to the cen ters are for inand out-processing and requests to change primary care pro viders, and the rest involve billingrelated questions, officials said. The Defense Department spends roughly $50 million a year on these services, and this type of customer service can be handled more efficiently by phone or online, they added. TRICARE gets about 38,000 hits per day on its website. Officials have run tests to ensure the website and call center can handle the expected increase in volume. The TRICARE service centers have been around since the 1990s, and contractors staff them, Warren said. This is being driven by the fact that technology has gotten so much bet ter, he added. Customers who need the type of assistance that was being done in these walk-in service centers can quickly and efficiently receive help online or via phone, he said. Beneficiaries can get more informa tion and sign up for updates at http:// www.tricare.mil/tsc. By Jeanne Casey NH Jax Deputy Public Affairs Officer While TRICARE Service Centers walk-in service ends April 1, the same services are still available online and by phone. Visit www.tricare.mil or www.huma na-military.com, or call (800) 444-5445. Beneficiaries can change their pri mary care manager (PCM), compare plans, enroll in a plan, see whats cov ered, check on referrals and claims, and more. When moving with permanent change of station orders, its even pos sible to request a PCM change before leaving the current command. And for patients already residing in the area, PCMs are now available at Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles hospital and branch health clinics, thanks to the return of staff from deployment with the wind-down of a decade of war. Access to care is improved, with the hospitals primary care clinics staying open until 7 p.m., Monday to Thursday. Patients can securely e-mail their PCM, by signing up at www.relayhealth.com. Patients can also meet the PCMs at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax by clicking on Medical Home Port. PCMs lead the Medical Home Port care teams, which focus on meeting all of the patients preventive, routine and urgent health needs. For complex issues that dont get resolved on the website or phone, patients can also call or visit TRICARE Health Benefits Advisors (HBAs) to dis cuss options. HBAs work for the hos pital and branch health clinics, unlike the website and phone staff who work for TRICAREs regional contractor (Humana Military). So patients need to make any chang es at www.tricare.mil, www.huma na-military.com or (800) 444-5445. Unfortunately, HBAs are unable to do this on patients behalf. HBAs are locat ed on the first floor of the hospitals cen tral tower, next to Patient Relations call (904) 542-9164 or (904) 542-9165. By Yan KennonNaval Hospital Jacksonville Senior WriterNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville main pharmacy patients now have the option of drop ping off prescriptions to be filled and picking them up later. Now patients have the choice to check-in, drop-off prescrip tions and return two hours or later to pick-up the prescrip tion. Patients can select the Pick up later button at the ticket kiosk, give the pharmacist their phone number, and return to windows six or seven for pickup two hours or later; its that simple. We understand that many of our patients have busy lives, said Lt. Vincent Jones, NH Jacksonville Outpatient Pharmacy division officer. This service allows those patients to take care of more pressing business and return at a later time to pick-up their prescriptions. Jones went on to say that out patient pharmacy has also seen a slight decrease in wait time, for patients who choose to wait for their prescription, since the implementation of the drop-off service. NH Jacksonville Outpatient Pharmacy hours are Monday Friday, 7:30 a.m. 6 p.m. and Saturday, 8 a.m. 3:30 p.m. The drop-off service is avail able up until two hours prior to closing time. For drop-offs made within the last two hours of the day, pick-up is available the next day. In addition to this new phar macy option, the hospital offers new expanded hours, and all patients now have email access to their care team. At the hospital, Family Medicine (Green, Red, White and Yellow Teams), Internal Medicine (Blue Team) and Pediatrics (Purple Team) are now open Monday to Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Hospital patients can call the appoint ment line at 904-542-4677 or 800-529-4677, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. to schedule an appointment. Naval Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville patients can call 904-546-7094 from 7 a.m. 4 p.m. to schedule an appoint ment. After-hours nurse advice is available for all enrolled patients at 542-4677 or 800529-4677 on evenings, week ends and federal holidays. Patients can reach their team by RelayHealth secure email, for non-urgent issues. Sign up at www.relayhealth. com or on the commands web site by clicking on Medical Home Port. TRICARE services: still available online and by phonePhoto by Jacob SippelA Sailor logs onto www.tricare.mil for a permanent change of station move.Naval Hospital Jacksonville pharmacy: Drop-off now and pick-up later optionPhoto by Jacob Sippel HN Doneric Jefferson, a Naval Hospital Jacksonville pharmacy technician, dispenses Christine Andersons medication prescrip tion at the hospitals main pharmacy. Now patients have the choice to drop-off prescriptions and return two hours or later to pick-up the prescription.

PAGE 15

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014 15 By Kaylee LaRocqueFleet Readiness Center Southeast Public AffairsProving that hard work and dedication really do pay off, AZ3 William Bailey of the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Ground Support Equipment Division was recently notified that he had been accepted to attend the U.S. Naval Academy. Its been a long process, but Im so excited on being accept ed to attend such a prestigious Ivy League school. Its defi nitely a dream come true, said Bailey. A native of Milton, Fla., Bailey joined the Navy in January 2013. I graduated from high school and took some college classes but really wanted to travel and see the world. I also wanted to work in a structured environ ment, so I thought joining the Navy was a good idea, he said. After completing boot camp at Recruit Training Center, Great Lakes, Ill. and AZ A school in Meridian, Miss., Bailey reported to FRCSE in June 2013. My job is to assist the Ground Electronics Support team with their maintenance records for the equipment, organizing the publications and log books regarding main tenance data and preparing reports, he said. I really enjoy working here because of the people. They have been tremendously sup portive of my decision and helped me with my package. I really appreciate them helping me through the process. Once he made the decision to apply to the academy last June, Bailey began the process to complete his package. I had to get recommenda tions from my department head and the commanding officer and go through several medical screenings. I also went in front of board of officers who grilled me on my qualifications and offered me advice on my future goals. Bailey plans to study aero space engineering at the acad emy and make the Navy his career. This is definitely my future. My family is very excited for me, especially my grandfather who is a retired AZ senior chief. When I joined the Navy, he said that I need to outrank him. So when I told him I was going to outrank him and become an officer because I was accepted into the naval academy, he was so happy for me. According to his supervi sor, AZC(AW/SW) LaToyna Crawford, Bailey is a top-notch Sailor and she is proud of his achievement. Petty Officer Bailey has an extremely promising career as a naval officer. He possesses the maturity, character and val ues that are essential for suc cessful leadership. He will defi nitely be a welcome addition to any and all wardrooms, said Crawford. So what advice does Bailey offer to those contemplating following his career path? Never give up. I have always lived by the belief that goals are never unobtainable, he said. As long as you have the drive and determination, anything is possible, he said. There will always be hurdles and roadblocks along the way, but great leaders are defined by their ability to jump over those hurdles and crash through the roadblocks. Just keep your mind on what you want to achieve, and before you know it, youll be at the fin ish line with an accomplish ment you can be proud of. By MC1 Fletcher GibsonNavy Parachute Team Public AffairsThe U.S. Navy Parachute Demonstration Team, the Leap Frogs, released their 2014 show season schedule that includes sporting events, air shows and Navy-sponsored Fleet Weeks. The team is scheduled to perform at 28 events in 16 states, ranging from New York to Hawaii. We hit the training pretty hard this winter, said Lt. Dan Gibson, the teams officer in charge, and now were ready to show everyone what we can do. The eight-man team is made up of members of Naval Special Warfare, including a select group of Sea, Air and Land commandos (SEALs) extensively trained in parachuting. The Leap Frogs aerial performances demonstrate the high-altitude jumps, inair maneuverability, and linked-canopy teamwork for which the team is famous. The show season kicks off March 3 with a Joint Military Capabilities Demonstration in New Orleans and wraps up with San Diegos annual Holiday Bowl football game Dec. 29. Some of these places are old favor ites, and its always good to revisit these areas, Gibson said. Others weve never been to before, or at least not recently, and bring the joy of parachute demonstrations to a whole new audience. The full schedule can be viewed at www.leapfrogs.sealswcc.com. From FFSCThe NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or handi capped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2014: May 12-15 (5:30-10 p.m.), Aug. 18-19 (8 a.m.-4 p.m.), Aug. 20 (8 a.m.-12:30 p.m.), Nov. 17-20 (5:30-10 p.m.). (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) Feb. 24-28, March 10-14, March 2428, April 7-11, May 5-9, May 19-23, June 9-13, June 23-27, July 7-11, July 21-25, Aug. 11-15, Aug. 25-29, Sept. 15-19, Oct. 20-24, Nov. 3-7, Dec. 1-5. (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) March 17-21, April 14-18, May 12-16, June 16-20, July 14-18, Aug. 18-22, Sept. 22-26, Oct. 27-31, Nov. 17-21, Dec. 8-12. (8:30 a.m.-noon) Feb. 21, April 1, May 2, June 30, June 30, July 29, Aug. 4, Sept. 2, Oct. 8, Nov. 14, Dec. 22. (8-9:30 a.m.) April 2, May 28, July 1, Sept. 3, Nov. 12. (9:40 a.m.-noon) April 2, May 28, July 1, Sept. 3, Nov. 12. (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) April 29-30, Aug. 5-6, Nov. 24-25. (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) July 31. (1-4 p.m.) April 1, July 29, Oct.8. (1-3:30 p.m.) March 31, July 30, Oct. 7. (9-10:30 a.m.) April 4, July 30, Oct. 17. (1:30-3:30 p.m.) April 3, May 1, July 2, Aug. 7, Oct. 2, Nov. 6. (1:30-4 p.m.) March 6, May 8, July 10, Sept. 11, Nov. 13. April 7 (1-2:30 p.m.), July 29 (10-11:30 a.m.), Oct. 4 (1-2:30 p.m.) (9-11 a.m.) March 10, April 14, May 12, June 9, July 14, Aug. 11, Sept. 8, Oct. 6, Nov. 3, Dec. 8. (9-10:30 a.m.) March 11, April 8, May 13, June 10, July 8, Aug. 12, Sept. 9, Oct. 7, Nov. 4, Dec. 9. (8 a.m.-noon) May 20, 27, Sept. 23, 30. (8 a.m.noon) Feb. 24, March 31, April 28, May 19, June 30, July 28, Aug. 25, Sept. 29, Oct. 27, Nov. 24, Dec. 15. March 27 May 1 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.), May 27 July 8 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.-no workshop June 3), July 29 Sept. 9 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.-no workshop Aug. 19), Sept. 25 Oct. 30 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.). (11 a.m.-1 p.m.) March 19, May 6, July 15, Sept. 9, Nov. 18. (1-3 p.m.) March 4, 11, 18, 25; May 6, 13, 20, 27; July 1, 8, 15, 22; Sept. 9, 16, 23, 30; Nov. 4, 12, 18, 25. (1-4 p.m.) Feb. 25; April 1, 8, 15, 22; June 3, 10, 17, 24; Aug. 5, 12, 19, 26; Oct. 7, 14, 21, 28. (9:30-11 a.m.) Every Wednesday (9 a.m.-3 p.m.) FRCSE Sailor accepted to Naval AcademyPhoto by Kaylee LaRocqueAZ3 William Bailey (right) reviews maintenance requirements with AS3 Jesse Fisher at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Ground Support Equipment (900) Division on Feb. 12. Bailey was recently accepted to the U.S. Naval Academy. Photo by MC2 Luke EastmanLt. (SEAL) Dan Gibson, a member of the U.S. Navy parachute demonstration team, the Leap Frogs, touches down in Qualcomm Stadium during the open ing ceremonies of this years Holiday Bowl game, where members of the US Marine Corps stand by to unfurl the football field-sized American flag. The Leap Frogs are based in San Diego and perform aerial parachute demonstra tions around the nation in support of Naval Special Warfare and Navy recruit ing. Navy Parachute Team releases 2014 show scheduleMC2 Kathryn MacdonaldU.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels, performs the Barrel Roll Break over Naval Air Facility (NAF) El Centro, Calif. on Feb. 8. The Blue Angels are conducting winter training where the pilots must complete 120 practice flights before kicking off the 2014 air show season at NAF El Centro, March 15. The squadron is scheduled to perform at NAS Jacksonville Oct. 25 26.FFSC offers life skills workshops Check us out online www.jaxairnews.com See FFSC, Page 16

PAGE 16

16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014 March 4, June 3, Sept. 16, Dec. 2. (10 a.m.-noon) Feb. 25; March 11, 25; April 1, 15, 29; May 13, 27; June 10, 24; July 15, 29; Aug. 12, 26; Sept. 9, 23; Oct. 7, 21; Nov. 4, 18; Dec. 2, 16. (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) March 13, May. 15, July 17, Sept. 4, Nov. 5. (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) April 10, June 12, Aug. 14, Oct. 9, Dec. 4.To register for any of the above workshops, please call 542-5745. FFSCFrom Page 15 From the Department of Veterans Affairs The Veterans Affairs (VA) Department launched a new online tool to make it easier for veterans, ser vice members and family members to calculate their Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits and learn more about VAs approved colleges, universities and other education and training programs across the country Feb. 4. We are pleased that Post-9/11 veterans are taking advantage of this significant benefit program, said Allison Hickey, undersecretary of veterans affairs for benefits. The new GI Bill Comparison Tool will help future beneficiaries as they make decisions about what edu cation or training program best fits their needs. The GI Bill Comparison Tool provides key informa tion about college affordability and brings together information from more than 17 different online sourc es and three federal agencies, including the number of students receiving VA education benefits at each school. It is one item in a series of resources VA is launching in response to President Barack Obamas Executive Order 13607, which directs agencies to implement and promote Principles of Excellence for education insti tutions that interact with veterans, service members and their families, and to ensure beneficiaries have the information they need to make educated choices about VA education benefits and approved programs, VA officials said. Recently, VA also instituted a GI Bill online com plaint system, designed to collect feedback from vet erans, service members and their families who are experiencing problems with educational institutions receiving funding from federal military and veterans educational benefits programs, including benefits programs provided by the Post-9/11 GI Bill and the Defense Departments military tuition assistance pro gram. The executive order, signed April 27, 2012, directs federal agencies to provide meaningful cost and qual ity information on schools, prevent deceptive recruit ing practices and provide high-quality academic and student support services. VA works closely with partner institutions to ensure the GI Bill beneficia ries needs are met, officials said, noting that more than 5,000 education institutions have agreed to the Principles of Excellence. The Post-9/11 GI Bill is a comprehensive education benefit created by Congress in 2008. In general, veter ans and service members who have served on active duty for 90 or more days since Sept. 10, 2001, are eligi ble. Since 2009, VA has distributed more than $30 bil lion in the form of tuition and other education-related payments to more than 1 million veterans, service members and their families, as well as to the universi ties, colleges and trade schools they attend. From Navy League Mayport The Navy League of Mayport is cel ebrating the 72nd Anniversary of the Battle of Midway Commemoration din ner and program. This is an All Services event featuring a joint color guard, All Services Missing Person table, the Navy Band with all the service songs, and numerous historical displays. Tickets are now on sale for this years event which will be held June 7, at the Renaissance World Golf Village Resort in St. Augustine. The keynote speak er is Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert. Veterans who served at the Battle of Midway and veterans of all branches who served in prior conflicts, as well as those currently serving are invited to attend. Additionally, Medal of Honor recipients and former Prisoners of War who have heroically answered the call of duty will also be in attendance. Come meet these National Treasures and hear their adventures first hand. The evening promises to be emotional and patriotic, and provide an excellent opportunity to connect with survivors of what historians call one of the U. S. Navys greatest sea victories and the turning point of World War II in the Pacific. Ticket prices for active duty and spouses: E-6 and below $25; E-7 to O3 $40; O4 to O5 $50, O6 and above $65. Prices for Civilians and Retirees $65. The evening includes fine dining and a memorable program. Uniform will be O4 and above dinner dress white jack et; O3 and below dinner dress white/ dinner dress white jacket optional, and civilian is black tie or business attire. Cocktails begin at 5 p.m., with dinner served at 6 p.m. Tickets are manda tory and seating is reserved. Ticket sales end May 30, unless seating capacity is reached before this date. Make checks payable to NAVY LEAGUE MIDWAY DINNER Tickets may be purchased from the following locations: NAVY LEAGUE MAYPORT Bob Price, 904-246-9982 or 904-718-2118 E-mail: bpricex4@comcast.net NAVY LEAGUE ST AUGUSTINE Bill Dudley, 904-806-4712 or 904-794-7814 E-mail: anuday00@aol.com By Ed BarkerNaval Education and Training Command Public AffairsDelivering on their goal of providing access to Navy training anytime, any place, the Navy Education and Training Command and the Sea Warrior Program Office announced Feb. 13 the availability of direct Internet access to Navy e-Learning (NeL) content. Most Navy Learners were pre viously accessing NeL through Navy Knowledge Online, said Hank Reeves, NeL project director. That was a multi-step process that is now significantly streamlined with the ability to access courses directly, with out going through NKO. Using the direct NeL link of https:// www.aas.prod.nel.training.navy. mil will take you directly to the My Learning and Course Catalog tabs of the NeL learning management system after login. Going directly to NeL will make searching for their desired content much easier, said Brenda McCreary, NKO service desk manager. If you enter through NKO and use the NKO search engine looking for courses, you may get numerous returns that arent very helpful. Going directly to NeL lets you use their search engine and that gets you strictly learning-relat ed returns, streamlining finding the course you are looking for. Although direct access to NeL is avail able through the Internet, a Common Access Card (CAC) is still required for NeL login. Courses on NeL have been standardized to run using the Internet Explorer (IE) browser. Many of our courses take advantage of the latest in multi-media content to improve the learning experience, Reeves added. In order to ensure compatibility with these courses, NeL provides con figuration guides for many of the lat est versions of IE. NeL also provides a plug-in analyzer to help customers con firm they are able to access and run the multi-media content, and both of these services are on one page. To access them, customers may sim ply click on the Browser Configuration link, located in the NeL Help section, on the right-hand side of the My Learning page. According to Reeves, NeL is the worlds largest learning management system in terms of volume. Virtually every Sailor, government civilian and contractor uses NeL to keep current with required General Military Training, including the newlyupdated Department of Defense Cyber Awareness Challenge Course, said Reeves. Last year, the Cyber Awareness Challenge course had more than 232,000 completions, and last year we had more than four million completions for all courses. From the beginning, it was a goal as we implemented our new Learning Management System to offer direct access to our NeL users in addition to access through NKO, added Reeves. Although NKO was designed as a one-stop-shop portal for the lions share of Navy electronic content, allowing access options for our customers only makes sense. Since 2001, Sailors have depend ed on Navy e-Learning (NeL) to help advance their careers and stay current with training requirements. Courses range from Privacy and Personally Identifiable Information Awareness Training required of all Sailors, Marines, civilians, and contractors to specific training for individual units. Trainees using NeL complete between four and five million online courses annually from an offering of more than 8,700 courses. The Naval Education and Training Command relies on NeL for use in schoolhouses for individual skills and skill refresher training.VA launches online tool to calculate Post-9/11 GI Bill benefitsCNO is Battle of Midway keynote speaker June 7Navy e-Learning now offers direct access

PAGE 17

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014 17 By Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceThe independent Response Systems to Adult Sexual Assault Crimes Panel has accepted a subcommittee recommen dation Jan. 30 that senior military com manders retain authority for referring these crimes to courts-martial. DoD officials have long maintained that the authority is needed to main tain good order and discipline, and that commanders will be integral to ending sexual assault in the ranks. The Role of the Commander Subcommittee took an in-depth look at the issue before coming up with the recommendation. One member of the subcommittee Elizabeth Hillman dissented, but the full panel voted to accept the recommendations 7-2. Based on all information considered to this point, a strong majority of the subcommittee members agrees the evi dence does not support a conclusion that removing the authority to convene courts-martial from senior command ers will reduce the incidence of sexual assault or increase reporting of sexu al assaults in the armed forces, Judge Barbara S. Jones, the chair of the Role of the Commander Subcommittee, wrote in a letter released today. Jones went on to say that evidence does not support the conclusion that removing commanders from the pro cess will increase victims confidence in the system. The conclusion of the panel is that commanders must play a central role in preventing sexual assault by establish ing command climates that ensure sub ordinates are trained in and embrace their moral and legal obligations, and by emphasizing the role of accountability at all levels of the organization. The panel also noted that victims of sexual assault have other channels out side the chain of command. Military personnel in the United States may always call civilian authori ties, healthcare professionals or other civilian agencies to report a sexual assault, the memorandum states. In addition to Jones, the other members of the panel are: Elizabeth Holtzman, retired Army Gen. Carter Ham, retired Navy Vice Adm. James Houck, retired Army Maj. Gen. John Altenburg, University of California Professor Elizabeth Hillman, South Texas University Professor Geoffrey Corn, Air Force Col. Lisa Turner and Joye Frost. Photographs of WWII veterans needed for community exhibit From The Cultural CenterThe Last Good War: The Faces and Voices of World War II, written and photographed by Thomas Sanders, is a special exhibit that has traveled across America bringing to life stories of valor and horror from World War II veterans. The exhibit will be on display at the Cultural Center at Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. Feb. 28 through April 4. To add a local viewpoint and coincide with this powerful national exhibit, The Cultural Center will create a local heroes exhibition in their community gallery and exhibit photographs of the World War II veterans from families in the Jacksonville community. Local residents are asked to drop off a framed 8x10 military photograph of someone in their family who served during World War II. Frames must have a notch or hanging wire attached on the back of the frame. Be sure to clearly iden tify who the subject is and what branch of the service they served and perhaps where they were stationed. Securely attach your name and phone number to the back of the frame. Drop the framed photograph off at The Cultural Center at Ponte Vedra Beach, 50 Executive Way, Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. by Feb. 17. Photographs can be picked up April 7. For more information, call Judy Hixenbaugh at 904280-0614, Ext. 202 or e-mail jhixenbaugh@ccpvb.org. Tax services availableFrom Region Legal Service OfficeThe VITA Self Service will be available to active duty service members, retirees and dependents, Reservists (active 30 days or pre-demobilization) and entitled former spouses from Feb. 4 through April 15. The ser vice is for those whose adjusted gross income doesnt exceed $57,000. Those who qualify under the Military One Source will be able file their taxes for free using the H&R Block software. Volunteer assistance will be onsite; however volunteers are not permitted to prepare taxes. Those needing additional assistance outside the scope of the volunteers may be redirected to a nearby tax center. The tax center is located at NAS Jacksonville, Building 4, Room 108 (Ranger Street). The center is open Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Tuesday and Thursday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. For questions or concerns, please contact LN1 Clinton Washington at 542-5974 or email Clinton. washington@navy.mil. (VFW) Post 5968 and its Auxiliary located at 187 Aurora Blvd. meets on the second Wednesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. VFW combat veterans and eligible service members from the Active, Guard or Reserve forces. For information on events or membership, go to www.vfwpost5968.org or call 2765968. N.E. Florida Chapter meets the third Wednesday of each month. Open to active duty and retirees of all military branches. Contact Johnnie.walsh@gmail.com or call 282-4650. meets the fourth Thursday of each month at 5 p.m. at Jacksonville Urban mil. meets the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Center on Collins Road. For information, visit www.aao9. com. at NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) needs volunteers to assist military retirees and dependents. Work four hours a day, one day per week. Call 542-5790 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. weekdays to volunteer. a breast cancer support group at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, meets on the second Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. Call 542-7857 for more info. is open to active duty, reserve and retired military, plus, active or retired DoD civilians. Call 778-0805 or email commodore@njyc.org Helping others help themselves. Visit www. gocompass.org for more info. meets the Methodist Church, 2246 Blanding Blvd. Call 272-9489. monthly meeting Beach. Call 246-6855. meets at 1 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at the Murray Hill United Methodist Church, (Fellowship Hall Building) at 4101 College Street. Call 786-7083. meets the fourth Wednesday of each month at 1 p.m. at the Fleet Reserve Hall at 7673 Blanding Blvd. Call 772-8622. Photos by MC2(SW) Marcus StanleyFrom the pier at Naval Station Mayport, family and friends look on as the guidedmissile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58) departs for deployment on Feb. 15 in support of maritime security operations in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. This deployment is part of a regular rotation of forces to support maritime security operations, provide crisis response capability, and increase theater security. The ship will join USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) as part of Carrier Strike Group 2.Photo by MC2(SW) Marcus StanleyFamily and friends look on from the pier at Naval Station Mayport on Feb. 15 as the guided-missile destroyer USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) prepares to set sail for deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. The ship will join the USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) carrier strike group. This deployment is part of a regular rotation of forces to support maritime security operations, and pro vide crisis response capability. Pierside farewells at MayportCommanders should keep sex assault courts-martial authority Community Calendar

PAGE 18

18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014

PAGE 19

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014 19

PAGE 20

20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 20, 2014