Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
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Newspaper
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English
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Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
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Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
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30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

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Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
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Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
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Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
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UF00028307:02077


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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014 I I D E VP-45Keeping Jax Beautiful Page 3 HELPING HEARTS Naval Hospital Jax Page 4 HS-11Replenishing Roosevelt Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com NAS Jax to join in Solid CurtainCitadel Shield 2014From Staff From Feb. 17-28, NAS Jacksonville will participate in Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014. This annu al training exercise will be conducted on naval bases and installations throughout the continental United States. The exercise is designed to enhance the training and readiness of naval security forces to respond to threats against installations and units and is not a response to any specific threat but is a regularly scheduled exercise. According to NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander, these annual training scenarios provide an important opportunity to test the air stations anti-terrorism/force protection (AT/FP) response. Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014 will give us a significant learning opportunity because it will involve coordination of NAS Jax security and fire departments, along with various other tenant commands, Undersander explained. Also, the base Emergency Operations Center will be activated, enabling us to see first hand the efficiency of our first responders and base-wide communication protocols. Measures are in place to minimize disruptions to normal base operations, but there may be times when the exercise causes increased traffic near the installation, as well as delays in base access. For more information about Exercise Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014, contact the NAS Jacksonville Public Affairs Office at (904) 542-5588. File PhotoRescue personnel from First Coast Navy Fire & Emergency Services at NAS Jax load an injured (simulated) VP-30 aircrewman with a leg injury into an ambulance as part of Exercise Citadel Shield 2013. By Clark PierceEditorThe Spartans of HSM-70 will depart their home base of NAS Jacksonville Feb. 14 to join Carrier Air Wing (CVW)-8 on board the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) as well as the three other ships that comprise Carrier Strike Group (CSG 2). Of the squadrons 11 MH-60R Seahawk helicopters, five will operate from Bush and six will operate from three surface com batants attached to CSG 2: guidedmissile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58); guided-missile destroyer Roosevelt (DDG 80); and guidedmissile destroyer USS Truxton (DDG 103). The squadron was previously scheduled to deploy with Bush in July 2013 but government sequester issues pushed the deployment back to this month. In an interview at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 1122, HSM70 Executive Officer Cmdr. Jeremy Vaughn said, During that time, we reset our training plan to seven months, which included exercises at Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center in the Bahamas, followed by NAS Fallon, Nevada, for air wing warfare training. We also supported CSG 2s Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) and Joint Task Force Exercise. He added that all the squadrons aircraft are up and fully mission capable for the scheduled 9-1/2 month deployment. HSM-70 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Matt Schnappauf was unavailable for an interview. Skipper Schnappauf and I cant say enough about our skilled maintainers. During COMPTUEX, we flew 26 percent of the air wings sorties, which put a lot of hours on our helicopters. During the past couple of months, our maintainers put in a lot of hours to ensure all systems are ready to go for every Seahawk, said Vaughn. We also recently completed operational stress control (OSC) awareness training, which aims to teach Sailors how to recognize signs and symptoms of stress in themselves and others and how to manage operational stress, said Vaughn. The OSC instructors are very capable in bringing their message down to the deckplate level Williamson signs Military Saves Week proclamationBy MC1(SW) Greg JohnsonNavy Region Southeast Public AffairsRear Adm. Rick Williamson, commander, Navy Region Southeast, signed a proclamation in sup Fire & Emergency Services recognized for regional excellenceFrom StaffThe First Coast Navy Fire & Emergency Services (F&ES), which is comprised of the NAS Jacksonville and NS Mayport Fire Departments, has been selected as Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Fire Department of the Year (Large Category) for the third time in the past four years. On Feb. 5, Jim LaConte, program director of CNRSE F&ES announced the 2013 Navy F&ES award winners recognized for outstanding performance by F&ES teams and individuals. NAS Jacksonville and NS Mayport Fire Chief Mark File photo During a base-wide drill in March 2012, then acting First Coast Navy Fire & Emergency Services Fire Chief Mark Brusoe, left, and assistant James Gray man the incident command post that responded to a simulated explosion at NAS Jax Bachelor Enlisted Housing. Photo by Clark PierceHSM-70 Executive Officer Cmdr. Jeremy Vaughn has a rare "quiet moment" in NAS Jax Hangar 1122 with the squadron's full complement of 11 MH-60R Seahawk helicopters. The squadron departed Feb. 10 to join Carrier Air Wing (CVW)-8 on board the aircraft carrier George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). The deployment is scheduled to last for more than nine months. Spartans lift from NAS Jax for Carrier Strike Group 2 Photo by MC1 Greg JohnsonCommander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Rear Adm. Rick Williamson signs a proclamation rec ognizing Military Saves Week in front of members of the CNRSE Family Readiness Program. Military Saves Week runs from Feb. 24 through March 1 and is intended to encourage service members to build wealth and reduce debt. Photo by Clark PierceSome of the 104 members of First Coast Fire & Emergency Services (Consolidated NAS Jacksonville/NS Mayport) celebrate on Feb. 7 their selec tion as Commander Navy Region Southeast "Fire Department of the Year" (Large Category). It is the department's third win in the past four years.See Page 7 See Page 9 See Page 8

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014 By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorTo the Littlest Boy in the Striped Shirts, I knew from the first time you spilled apple juice in your lap at the kitchen table that we were going to be great friends. These other people, the bigger ones, they never spill. They eat all their food, and usually right in front of me. They sit on the couch and eat that turkey sandwich one delicious bite at a time. And I watch. Oh, yeah, I watch. But you, buddy, you always leave something for me. You walk around with your sandwich held real close precariously close, some might say to the ground. The turkey slides out of the bread, and sometimes you leave a trail. I like to think you do this on purpose. And, yes, in case youre wondering, when I snatch the sandwich out of your hand, Im doing that on purpose, too. I wasnt sure when I first got here, though. You were even smaller then. You slept in my bed and put my tennis ball in your mouth. Your mom didnt like that very much. Neither did I. I wasnt sure if you were a puppy or I was small human. Then I followed you onto the couch and that cleared things up: no one with fur is allowed on the furniture. You dont have fur, that is obvious, but have these people making the rules seen your sticky hands? You liked to line me up with stuffed animals the same ones Id try to eat later (Note to Self: the stuffed bird is off limits. Chewing him will end with me in my cage in the basement) and you read stories to us. You read made-up words that werent on the page, but it didnt matter. All I heard was turkey sandwich, turkey sandwich anyway. In the backyard, you thought I could play soccer and baseball. You cheered every time I accidentally took the ball to the side fence. Yeah, I figured this out. Sadly, I would have done so much more for just a little bit more turkey. While everyone else makes me sit, stay or shake for a treat, you gave me bones just for show ing up. When you called my name, it wasnt because you wanted to know where I was. You actually wanted to talk to me. To play with me. And thats why I came running. But you are growing now, Littlest Boy. Your pants dont smell so bad. (Ok, I mean, good. Your pants actually smelled good to me back then.) But you still slip turkey underneath the kitchen table. For that alone, I will follow you to the ends of the earth. Or, at least the driveway. Those bigger boys are growing, too, and it worries me. Littlest Boy in the Striped Shirts, will you someday shut your bedroom door, too? Will you step over me while you talk on the phone with your friends? Will you eat everything on your plate, ask for more, and not notice me staring up at you? Although, I must say that I have the oldest one trained well. I ring the bells hanging on the back door, and he lets me out. It doesnt matter if hes upstairs, in the basement or on the phone. He would probably come out of the shower to open the door for me. I ring the bells, he comes running. Fascinating! But Littlest Boy in the Striped Shirts, I think he gets paid for this. You are gone more often now, and I am home alone. I peruse your bedroom you know, just in case you left some bite-sized Legos or puzzle pieces on the floor there. I see your stuffed bird taunting me from the top book shelf, and I smell everything that is you. Sometimes, I nap in your room. I dream about when you used to read to me. If I jerk my legs in my sleep, thats when Im running with you, the Littlest Boy in the Striped Shirts, in the backyard. Then, when I hear you coming home (I can hear you a mile away, kid I think everyone can), I run to the steps and wait. Your backpack holds all the smells of your adventure: books, pencils, snack time, dirty tennis shoes and friends who also have sticky hands. You are busy in the afternoons now. You have sports to play and friends houses to go to. I spend a lot of time watching out the front window for you. I miss your sandwiches, but I also miss you. And that is why my favorite part of the day is bed time. You wait until Im in my spot next to your bed, and then you read aloud a bedtime story. You check often to make sure Im still there, guarding you as your eyes start to close. Dont worry Littlest Boy in the Striped Shirts. I am here. And I will be here as long as you will have me. From StaffFeb. 13 1854 Adm. Perry anchors off Yokosuka, Japan to receive Emperors reply to treaty proposal. 1913 Naval Radio Station, Arlington, Va. begins operations. 1945 First Navy units to enter Manila Bay since 1942. 1968 Operation Coronado XI begins in Mekong Delta. Feb. 14 1778 John Paul Jones in USS Ranger receives first official salute to U.S. Stars and Strips flag by European country, at Quiberon, France. 1813 USS Essex becomes first U.S. warship to round Cape Horn and enter the Pacific Ocean. 1814 USS Constitution captures British Lovely Ann and Pictou. 1840 Officers from USS Vincennes make first landing in Antarctica on floating ice. Feb. 15 1856 USS Supply, commanded by Lt. David Dixon Porter, sails from Smyrna, Syria, bound for Indianola, Texas, with a load of 21 camels intended for experimental use in the American desert west of the Rockies. 1898 Battleship USS Maine explodes in Havana Harbor. Feb. 16 1804 Lt. Stephen Decatur, with vol unteers from frigate USS Constitution and schooner USS Enterprise, enters Tripoli harbor by night in the ketch USS Intrepid to burn the captured frig ate USS Philadelphia. Decaturs raid succeeds without American losses. Englands Lord Nelson calls this the most daring act of the age. 1815 USS Constitution captures HMS Susannah. 1967 Operation River Raider begins in Mekong Delta. Feb. 17 1864 Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley sinks USS Housatonic in Charleston harbor. 1942 First Navy Construction Battalion (Seabees) arrives Bora Bora. 1944 Carrier aircraft strike Japanese fleet at Truk, sinks ships and destroys aircraft. Feb. 18 1846 General order on Port and Starboard because Larboard and Starboard sound confusingly simi lar, the word Port was substituted for Larboard. 1944 Amphibious force under Rear Adm. Hill lands troops on Engebi Island, Eniwetok. 1955 First of 14 detonations, Operation Teapot nuclear test. Feb. 19 1814 USS Constitution captures British brig Catherine. 1945 Marines with naval gun fire support land on Iwo Jima; island secured March 16. 1981 Fleet Replacement Squadron VFA-125 is the first squadron to receive the new F/A-18 Hornet strike fighter for training fleet operators. The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley SAPR Assistance Available 24/7If local sexual assault victim assistance is needed or requested, please call the following numbers in order. If none of the three are immediately available, please leave a message or contact the DOD Safe Helpline for immediate assistance. services for victims. The DOD Safe Helpline may be the app on iOs. number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. U.S. Navy PhotoThe F/A-18 Hornet is a twin engine, multi-mission tactical aircraft. The F/A-18A and C are single-seat aircraft. The F/A-18B and D are dual, tandem-seaters. The B model is used primarily for training, while the D model is used for attack, tactical air control, forward air control and reconnaissance squadrons. The latest models, the E and F Super Hornets, were rolled out at McDonnell Douglas in September of 1995. The E is a single-seater and the F is a two-seater. Compared to the original A through D models, Super Hornet has longer range and increased survivability/lethality.Photo by MC2 John Wagner Jr.An EA-18G Growler assigned to the "Cougars" of VAQ-139 approaches the flight Growler is the fourth major variant of the F/A-18 family of aircraft that combines the proven F/A-18F Super Hornet platform with a sophisticated electronic warfare suite. The first Growler test aircraft went into production in October 2004 and made its first flight in August 2006. This Week in Navy History From StaffIn the Commander, Navy Region Southeast Senior and Junior Sailors of the First Quarter 2014 article pub lished on Feb. 6, the photos were incorrectly identified. Here are the correct photo cap tions. We regret this error. From the HomefrontFamily dogs letter to his boy IT2(SW) Keston Adharsingh NC1(SW) Vladimir Arias-Martinez Correction

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Pelicans continue to clean up Jacksonville through Adopt-A-Road ProgramBy Lt. j.g. Joseph JohannesVP-45 Public Affairs OfficerThe VP-45 Pelicans were honored by Jacksonville City Councilman Jim Love Friday for their tireless work as part of the Beautify Jacksonville Adopt-ARoad program Jan. 31. Love met with members of the Pelican Team and helped dedicate a sign signifying VP-45s commitment to cleaning up the Jacksonville area. As part of the Adopt-A-Road program, the Pelicans are responsible for maintaining approximately a mile of Argyle Forest Blvd in Orange Park, Fla. As part of the adoption, the Pelicans took over the responsi bility of removing any trash that had accumulated and making sure that the area looked clean and neat. Squadron members took this responsibility to heart and set about making this little stretch of road their own. Making several visits over a two-month period, the Pelicans were responsible for removing more than 40 bags of trash from the roadside. We really want ed to give back to the community, said AME1 Scott Walker, who took the lead in organizing the program at VP-45. Coming up through the ranks, I noticed a lack of community service opportunities in my com mands and I wanted to change that here in VP-45. In recognition of their hard work, the Pelicans were honored by Love with a sign recognizing their achievement in cleaning up the Jacksonville streets. You have all shown a love of country, serving in the military, said the councilman, now youre also showing your love for your community. The ceremony was a great experience for those who attended, showing that their hard work was greatly appreciated by all in the community. The Pelicans now look forward to their next opportunity to beautify their stretch of Jacksonville road and give back to the Jacksonville community. SAR information meeting Feb. 19 From Naval Facilities Engineering Command SoutheastNAS Jacksonville announces an informational meeting to review the U. S. Navy proposal to establish a small defined search and rescue (SAR) training area in the St. Johns River off shore of NAS Jacksonville, that would limit public access in order to support congressional mandated search and rescue training. Establishment of SAR training area would prevent anchoring of objects, such as crab traps, or unmanned vessels in the training area to help trainees avoid injury and prevent equipment damage. All fishermen, boaters and the general public are invited to attend the meeting Feb. 19, from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the South Mandarin Library, 12125 San Jose Boulevard, Jacksonville 32223. For further information about this public meeting send an email to stephen.biemiller@navy.mil. Public comments will be accepted until March 31, at NAVFAC_SE_SAR_PROJ@navy.mil or via regular mail at NAVFACSE SAR Training Area, NEPA Program Manager (EV21), P.O. Box 30, Jacksonville, Fla. 322120030. IA Luncheon set for Feb 20From FFSCNAS Jacksonville and the Northeast Florida Navy League Councils will host the NAS Jacksonville Individual Augmentee (IA) Recognition Luncheon Feb. 20 at 11 a.m. at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center. All NAS Jacksonville and ten ant command Sailors who have returned from an IA assignment since May 1, 2013 will be recognized during the event. The guest speaker will be Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ 4th Fleet. There is no cost for the IA Sailor or Marine and their spouse. The cost for other military and civil ian guests is $10. Tickets may be purchased at the Fleet and Family Support Center, Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. -3 p.m. The deadline to purchase tickets is Feb. 13. Child care will be provided at the Child Development Center for children of IAs and spouses in attendance. Families should call 542-9075, 30 days in advance to secure their drop-in space. To RSVP, contact your command CIAC or Bobby Johns at bobby.johns.ctr@navy.mil For more information, call 542-5637. Photo courtesy of VP-45VP-45 "Pelicans" discuss the Adopt-A-Road program with City Councilman Jim Love during their recent clean up. From left, VP-45 Commanding Officer Cmdr. John Brabazon, Cmdr. T.J. Grady, Love, AME1 Scott Walker and NC1 Natalie France. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014 By Yan KennonNaval Hospital Jacksonville Senior Writer February is American Heart Month an important month in the fight against heart dis ease. Heart disease is caused by plaque buildup in the walls of arteries, causing narrowing and blood flow restriction. It remains the nations num ber one killer for both men and women, taking the lives of about 715,000 Americans every year approximately one out of every four deaths. It can also result in serious illness, disability and decreased quality of life. Everyone is potentially at risk for heart disease, but it is pre ventable and controllable, said Capt. Paula Chamberlain, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles director for public health. Controllable risk factors for heart disease include: smoking, obesity and overweight, physi cal inactivity, diabetes mellitus, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. Other controllable risks include stress, alcohol and nutrition. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cardiovascular dis ease (including heart disease and stroke) costs the U.S. $312.6 billion each yearto include the costs of healthcare services, medications and lost productiv ity. Making healthy choices such as good nutrition, weight management and exercise can significantly decrease the prob ability of heart disease, said Chamberlain. Chamberlain went on to say that non-active children are also at risk for heart disease, Research has proven that children need at least 60 min utes of physical activity every day to reduce the risk of devel oping heart disease. National Wear Red Daya day to raise awareness for the fight against heart disease in women is also held in February. National Wear Red Day was began in 2003, when the American Heart Association and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute took action against heart disease, a disease that kills more women than all forms of cancer combined. As a result of their efforts, 21 percent fewer women are dying from heart disease and 23 per cent more women are aware that this disease is the single most health threat to women. NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center, located next to NAS Jacksonvilles Fitness Center, offers a variety of health related classes, available to active duty, retirees and their families. Classes include Healthy Heart, which teaches healthy lifestyles and cholesterol and blood pres sure management; Choose My Plate, to provide overviews on losing weight the healthy way; ShipShape, an eight-week weight loss program (active duty and civilians); Sail A Weigh, a sixweek weight loss program (civilians only); health fitness assessments; and, Tobacco Cessation, to assist smokers with quitting.For more information, call the NH Jacksonville Wellness Center at 904-542-5292/5293. American Heart Month: The fight against heart diseaseAE1 Daniel Flynn, from Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, rides a stationary bicycle at Naval Hospital Jacksonville. February is American Heart Month, a time to raise awareness about heart disease and how to prevent it both at home and in the community. Physical activity can help maintain a healthy weight as well as lower cholesterol and blood pressure. HM3 Jose Ramirez, from Naval Hospital Jacksonville, fixes himself a healthy meal for lunch at the hospital's galley. February is Healthy Heart Month, part of the fight against heart disease, which kills about 715,000 Americans every year. Good nutrition, weight management and exercise can significantly decrease the probability of heart disease. Cynthia Millard, a registered dietician at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, advises patient Jose Vasquez about food and nutrition and its effect on overall health Feb. 13. February is American Healthy Heart Month, part of the fight against heart disease, which kills about 715,000 Americans every year. Good nutrition, weight management and exercise can significantly decrease the probability of heart disease. Naval Hospital Jacksonville's CS2Paul Serna pre pares salad bar vegetables for the evening meal in galley. February is American Healthy Heart Month, part of the fight against heart disease, which kills about 715,000 Americans every year. Good nutrition, weight management and exercise can significantly decrease the probability of heart disease.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014 5 By Naval Hospital Jacksonville Q: Why should I be concerned if my blood pressure is high? A: High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a direct contributor to heart disease. Many people unfortunately do not have any signs or symptoms but may still be at risk. Some risk factors are a family history of hypertension, smoking, diabetes, high cholesterol or being overweight. Exercise, eating more fruits and vegetables and lowering salt intake in your diet may help, but sometimes this is not enough and medication is needed. Talk with your primary care manager to see if you have or are at risk for hypertension.Ask the Doc is written by Naval Hospital Jacksonville providers from its hos pital and five branch health clinics in Florida and Georgia. This was written by Laura Kyer, a certified physician assistant from Naval Branch Health Clinic Key West.If you have a question for a physician, dentist, phar macist or optometrist, please send it to jax publicaffairs@ med.navy.mil.Ask the Doc: Blood pressure concerns Photos by Jacob Sippel February is American Healthy Heart Month, part of the fight against heart disease, which kills about 715,000 Americans every year. Good nutrition, weight management and exercise can significantly decrease the probability of heart disease. Leslie Fiala, a registered dietician at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, discusses healthy eating tips during a diabetes class. Patients can take diabetes nutrition to help with meal planning and controlling their blood sugar. February is American Heart Month, a time to raise awareness about preventing heart disease. HM2 Merrian Calzado, a cardiovascular technician at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, conducts an echocardiogram on Kelly Duff. February is American Heart Month, part of the fight against heart disease which causes one in four deaths in women and men each year. Charlene Rees, a nurse educator at Naval Hospital Jacksonville's Wellness Center, shows AD2 Michael Jordan, from Fleet Readiness Southeast, the amount of tar that enters the human body after a year of smoking. February is American Heart Month, a time to raise awareness about heart disease. Smoking is a leading risk factor for heart disease. HN Doneric Jefferson, Naval Hospital Jacksonville pharmacy technician, dis penses Christine Anderson's medication prescription at the hospital's pharmacy. February is American Heart Month, a time to raise awareness about heart dis ease. It's important to take medications as prescribed for high blood pressure, cholesterol and diabetes. Heart disease is the number one killer of women in the U.S. Celestia Thomason, a registered nurse at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, monitors CS2 Tiffany Northcutt's heart during a stress echocardiography, a test that uses ultrasound imaging to show how well the heart muscles are functioning.

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By MC2 Amanda CabasosStaff writerFlush with return ing patrons, the NAS Jax Commissary kicked off the first weekend of February with a sales record of more than $1 million. Commissary Store Director Larry Bentley said, It was the perfect storm. It was the combination of custom ers receiving their first-of-themonth paycheck and Super Bowl weekend events that contributed to the largest sales volume of the year. On Feb. 1, the day prior to the Super Bowl, sales escalated to more than $381, 000 marking an 8 percent increase over last years sales during the same time frame. According to Bentley, it took the combined efforts of the stores more than 300 govern ment employees, contractors, baggers, distributors and venders. He added, Its a qual ity of life benefit where you can come in here and receive a 30 percent savings compared to your grocery bill anywhere else. The commissary system is the number one reason why service members reenlist. Bentley explains, The com missary goods are sold at cost. What this means is, what I buy the products for is what I sell them for, he added. Many people think there is a markup on items, however, we only have a 5 percent surcharge tagged on to the end of the bill which is used for new stores, renovations, bags, replacing shopping carts, store supplies, etc. According to Bentley, com missary is mandated by con gress to be appropriately funded at $1.4 billion a year, to ensure low prices on goods. We are the ninth-largest sales volume store in the world out of 257 commissaries, said Bentley. Our meat department sometimes ranks second or third in sales in the world. Retired Air Force Master Sgt. Mike Moran said, Ive been shopping at the commissary since 1966 and I will continue to shop here. You cant beat the commissary system for their prices, especially the meat department. And the customer service here is outstanding. The commissary has to con tinue buying in bulk to keep up with the demands of nearly 80,000 customers who drive the average sales volume to $5.5 million a month. I shop at the commissary because there are certain things that you cant find at the other stores such as Hispanic and other ethnic items, said Navy spouse Amarilis Blankenship. I believe we do a tremen dous job here in supporting the service members and their families, said Bentley. I have to give all the credit to my staff. They are the people that make it happen. I am their cheerleader, and I am the one that has to drive the store, but the staff members are the folks here every day. Not only do I have a passion for the job, but I ensure you that they have a passion for their jobs too, because we are serving the finest military in the world.For more information on the Defense Commissary Agency, visit www.commissaries.com. NAS Jax Commissary marks sales recordPhotos by MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Commissary Sales Clerk Sybil Lewis checks out gro ceries for retired Air Force Master Sgt. Mike Moran during his weekly visit to the base supermarket on Feb. 5. Customers unload their grocery carts at the NAS Jax Commissary which recently set a sales record of more than $1 million. NAS Jax Commissary Store Clerk Nikol Eng serves IS2 April Hootman of U.S. Navy Central Command Intelligence Unit 0174, Information Dominace Corps Region Southeast, at the base commissary on Feb. 8. USO celebrates renovationNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander (second from right) and Jacksonville USO Chairman of the Board John Curtin (second from left) cut the ribbon to officially reopen the newly renovated NAS Jacksonville USO as Thaddeus Foster (left), principal partner of Taco Bell, and Ashley Furniture Home Store CEO Howard Fineman (right) look on Feb. 6. I am really excited about the new USO," said Greater Jacksonville Area USO Executive Director Mike OBrien. The center has really been transformed for our troops who come in here as well as for all of our volunteers and staff members. It is a whole new facility. According to OBrien, the renovations cost more than $20,000 and included new flooring, paint and furniture courtesy of the Armed Forces Family Foundation, Taco Bell and Ashley Furniture Home Store. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. Photo by MC2 Amanda Cabasos 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014

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in order to help build resiliency in our Sailors and their families. The squadrons ombudsmen and family readiness group have also done a lot to help prepare the Sailors for deployment. Social media such as the HSM-70 facebook page and tools such as email and Skype as well as the oldfashioned care package will keep the Spartans stay in touch with home. Vaughn concluded, Skipper Schnappauf and I want to pass along our sincere thanks to every command at NAS Jacksonville that has assisted HSM-70 in our preparation to join the Bush Carrier Strike Group. Squadrons attached to CVW-8 include: VFA-15 Valions, VFA87 Golden Warriors, VFA-31 Tomcatters, VFA-213 Black Lions, VAW-124 Bear Aces, VAQ-134 Garudas, VRC-40 Rawhides, HSC-9 Tridents and HSM-70 Spartans. SPARTANSFrom Page 1 MH-60R SeahawkThe MH-60R Seahawk is the most capable anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and anti-surface warfare (ASuW) helicopter in the world. Equipped with advanced mission systems and sensors, the MH-60R detects and prosecutes submarines in littoral and open ocean scenarios. Working alone or jointly with other MH-60R or MH-60S aircraft, these helicopter platforms form unique squadrons designed to protect todays carrier strike groups. During deployment, the HSM-70 Spartans will work with the HSC-9 Tridents who fly the MH-60S Seahawk primarily for search-and-rescue, MEDEVAC, utility and vertical replenishment mission. Photos by Clark PierceAT2 Nester Talcott tops off a shipping carton filled with "cranial" headgear and safety vests. AE3 Steven Virden and AM3 Daniela Dale tie down a ladder ontop of a carton of MH-60R maintenance tools. Spartans in the HSM-70 Ordnance Division prepare to secure four wood crates containing GAU-21 crewserved .50-caliber machine guns. HSM-70 Executive Officer Cmdr. Jeremy Vaughn congratulates AM3 Justin Banks for his involvement with the paint scheme of Spartan No. 700 the squadron's "show bird." Plane captains in the Spartans' line shack secure cruise boxes onto pallets Feb. 7 for shipment to Norfolk, Va. The cargo will be loaded on board the aircraft carrier George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (From left) AM1 Robert Orzescu, AM2 Matthew Ellison, AM2 Eric Clairday and (not shown) AM3 Justin Banks were the design-and-paint crew of the squadron's MH-60R "show bird." It took four coat ings of paint, topped by a clear coat, to achieve the distinctive appearance. (From left) AT3 Samuel Agustin and AT1 Andrew Parker check a hand-held ROVER (Remote Operational Video Enhanced Receiver) in the cockpit of an MH-60R helicopter assigned to the Spartans of HSM-70. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014 7

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Brusoe remarked, This award is largely due to the outstanding performance of our 104 firefighters, paramedics and emergency medical technicians (EMTs). He noted, In 2013, we augmented the NSB Kings Bay Fire Department as they manned up for advanced submarine emergency response saving the Navy almost $1 million in personnel costs. We also sup ported major music concerts and other events at NS Mayport, in addition to training for shipboard emergencies. We provide service not only to the two naval bases, but also to the Pinecastle Range Complex, and Outlying Landing Field Whitehouse. The department also converted its ambulance ser vice to advanced life support (ALS) transport; main tained memorandums of understanding with local counties to provide mutual aid response; hosted specialized hazardous materials and technical rescue teams at training events; provided CPR/automated external defibrillator (AED) training for base secu rity and Navy Exchange personnel; and assisted home ported ships at NS Mayport with annual fire hose testing. First Coast Navy F&ES Firefighter/EMT Justin Uhrmacher said, Our leadership is dedicated to training. We expect a lot from each other and perform as expected. Theres a lot of fire and rescue expertise here and we demonstrated that in 2013 with a number of successful ALS runs, confined-space and highangle rescues. Elizabeth Lynch is a First Coast Navy F&ES firefighter/EMT who said the CNRSE Fire Department of the Year award was indicative of the goal-oriented leadership at NAS Jax and NS Mayport. Our paramedics are all certified for ALS, which allows us to transport victims to hospitals off base when needed. First Coast Navy F&ES Firefighter Joey Fields said, This department is always moving up when it comes to building proficiency and teamwork. As we build our careers, we also train up to expand our capabilities. Brusoe added, We also have a superb fire preven tion program at NAS Jax and NS Mayport. They do an outstanding job educating the public on fire safety through lectures and demonstrations. They are also responsible for inspecting every building on base for fire hazards. Firefighters at both bases also spend many hours training to increase their proficiencies in emergency situations. Some of this certified training includes advanced life support, hazardous materials, rappel ling, damage control and evacuation on board ships, and exercising with the mobile aircraft live fire trainer. The core competencies of First Coast Navy F&ES are: First Coast Navy F&ES will represent CNRSE in the upcoming Commander, Navy Installations Command F&ES competition. Each region may submit nominations in 11 catego ries: Large, Medium and Small Fire Department of the Year; Fire Prevention Program of the Year; Fire Service Instructor of the Year; Heroism Award; Military and Civilian Firefighter; and Military and Civilian Fire Officer of the Year. The winners in those categories are the Navy nominees for the corresponding DoD F&ES Awards. The EMS Provider of the Year and Navy Fire Chief of the Year are Navy only awards. FIRE AWARDFrom Page 1 By MC1 Brianna DandridgeA Navy Recruiting District (NRD) Jacksonville recruiter received national recognition as the Navy Recruiting Command Diversity Officer Recruiter of the Year for 2013. LS1 Cesar Serna, was recognized Feb. 7 from among his peers for performing exemplary service in recruiting the next generation of Sailors. Born in South America and raised in Summit, N.J., Serna has been in the Navy for more than 12 years. According to Serna, the key to being a successful recruiter is to stay focused, motivated and flexible. As the diversity officer for Navy Operational Support Command Orlando, Serna recruits the best of the nations young men and women and ensures the proper screening and processing of all applicants. Using my life story as an example of what you can do in the Navy has also helped me succeed in recruiting, Serna said. He is humbled and thankful for receiving the award. As recruiters continue to fill positions in the fleet, it is important to reach diverse communities and resources to find qualified men and women to join the Navy. I love the fact that the Navy offers unique oppor tunities to people that would never have had them available, said Serna. As a recruiter, you can see the immediate impact you can make in your community. Serna passes both mentorship and leadership down to the young men and women he puts into the Navy. Newly accepted candidates have a great many ques tions about the career path ahead of them. I use different resources available, like prior col legiates already in the fleet and recruiting officers to help them get a better sense of what they should expect, said Serna. According to him, the most challenging aspect of recruiting is to ensure quality men and women are entering the military. The Navy benefits from getting the best applicants and therefore more competitive Sailors. According to Chief of Naval Operations Jonathan Greenert, diversity within our force will be viewed as an integral part of the Navys effectiveness in warf ighting, operating forward and being ready. Being able to speak Spanish has allowed me to relate to minority groups and associations at the schools, said Serna. I find pride in our new genera tion looking to serve our nation for patriotic reasons vice monetary incentives. The dedication of recruiters provides both a fit and diverse force to military service. NRC consists of a command headquarters, two Navy Recruiting Regions and 26 Navy Recruiting Districts that serve more than 1,500 recruiting stations across the country. NRD Jacksonville Sailor named Recruiter of the YearPhoto by Morgan KehnertTop NGIS employee recognizedNavy Gateway Inns and Suites General Manager John Houdek (right) presents Judith Saflor, lead front desk associate with the Employee of the Year 2013 award on Feb. 3. Saflor's attention to detail and her "never quit" attitude ensured that all front desk associates were certified through the Commander, Navy Installations Command Certification program ahead of schedule while continuing to excel in her role as lead associ ate. Without hesitation, she effortlessly stepped into the position of front office manager while her supervisor was out for an extended absence. During that time, her leadership and supervisory skills kept the operation running smoothly. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014

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port of Military Saves Week at NAS Jacksonville Feb. 6. Military Saves Week runs from Feb. 24 through March 1 and is intended to encourage service members to make responsible financial decisions to build wealth and reduce debt. The proclamation officially recog nizes the week and calls on all service members throughout the Southeast Region to take action to improve their individual and household financial situations. Personal financial stability is an important issue for all of our Sailors, Williamson said. Its very difficult for Sailors and families who are experi encing financial difficulties to focus on the mission. Our goal with Military Saves Week is to encourage everyone to assess their financial situation and ask themselves what they can be doing to improve it. We have financial advi sors and resources available through the Fleet and Family Support Centers (FFSC) for those who could use a little help. Military Saves is a social marketing campaign to persuade, motivate and encourage military families to save money every month and to convince leaders to be aggressive in promoting automatic savings. It is a part of the Department of Defense (DoD) Financial Readiness Campaign and has been a partner with DoD since 2003. The campaign has been a success for more than ten years now, said Carol Lucius, Southeast Region work and family life coordinator. If a Sailor has a certain financial goal, whether its setting up an emergency cash fund, get ting out of debt or saving for retirement, Military Saves can help them develop those goals and take action. The program focuses on helping service members achieve their finan cial goals by providing savings advice, financial tools and resources, and motivation. According to Lucius, the pro gram has a tremendous impact on service members because they routinely face extraordinary circumstances. Deployments and frequent moves can be big financial strains on military households and good financial plan ning for both events is essential for success, Lucius said. FFSC person al financial managers (PFM), who are accredited financial counselors, will sit down with a family and help them execute a comprehensive financial planning worksheet to illustrate their current financial situation and to help them plan for the future. Whether a family is in good financial shape or not, PFMs will work with them to improve their financial situation. The Military Saves campaign is not only targeted at service members, but at the entire family, because spouses and children also play a huge role in overall financial stability, Lucius said. The personal financial readiness of our service members and their fami lies directly supports mission readiness, and engaging our military spouses is important, as they play a vital role in maintaining financial discipline and stability within a military family, she said. Another important aspect of the campaign is helping kids develop financial skills. The Military Youth Saves program is specifically designed to encourage kids and teens to develop good savings habits at a young age. According to Williamson, raising awareness about Military Saves and promoting effective financial planning and decision making is the responsibility of all leaders throughout the region, not only during Military Saves Week, but year round. I think its important for leaders at all levels of the chain of command to spread awareness about the Military Saves program and the resources available to our Sailors, Williamson said. While we look to observe Military Saves Week later on this month, responsible financial planning is a year-round effort and there is always somewhere to turn for Sailors in need of assist ance. I encourage leaders throughout the region to make sure that message is heard. Service members or dependents that would like more information about resources and services offered through Military Saves, or organizations who would like to find out how they can support the program, should contact their local FFSC. In addition, more informa tion is available at http://www.militar ysaves.org/. MILITARY SAVESFrom Page 1 Finance Makeover Re$ource Night ADDRESSING THE NEEDS OF MILITARY FAMILIES AND PLANTING THE SEEDS FOR A SECURE FUTURE FREE child care will be provided onsite. Space is limited and pre registration is required. To register for child care: Call (904) 542 4718 and ask for Christianne Provide childs name, contact information for sponsor, emergency contact information To ensure your spot register as soon as possible. All registrations for child care must be received by 3pm on February 20th. Sponsored by: Keys to Financial Success for Military Families C O M E J O I N U S FREE pizza and drinks FREE child care Guest Speakers Resources Tips for Financial Success W h e r e : Youth Activity Center 2069 Mustin Road NAS Jacksonville W h e n : Thursday, Feb 27, 2014 6pm 8pm F o r m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n o n t h i s g r e a t e v e n t p l e a s e c a l l R u f u s B u n d r i g e a t ( 9 0 4 ) 5 4 2 4 9 7 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014 9

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From staff Jesse LeRoy Brown was born in Hattiesburg, Miss. on Oct. 13, 1926. Educated in the pub lic schools of Hattiesburg, he attended Ohio State University College of Engineering, prior to enlisting in the U.S. Naval Reserve on July 8, 1946. Brown reported for active duty the following year at Glenview, Ill. His enlistment was terminated to accept appointment as Midshipman, U.S. Navy, and on Apr. 9, 1947, he reported to the Navy PreFlight School, Ottumwa, Iowa, for flight training. Ensign Brown received further flight training at NAS Pensacola, Fla. He was detached June 22, 1948 to NAS Jacksonville, Fla. for duty with Fighter Advanced Training Unit (VF-ATU) 2 flying the Grumman F6F Hellcat. Brown was designated a naval aviator (heavier-than-air) Oct. 21, 1948. Wearing his new wings of gold, Brown report ed to Fighter Squadron (VF) 32 on Jan. 4, 1949, where he flew the F4U-4 Corsair and sub sequently deployed with his squadron on USS Leyte (CV32). He took the oath of his com missioning at sea, adminis tered by Capt. W. I. Erdmann, commanding officer of the Leyte, in June 1949. Ensign Brown flew 20 missions while assigned to VF-32, with the Leyte having joined the 7th Fleet by then, in the combat operating area off the northeast coast of Korea. For this service, Brown earned the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps Air Medal. The citation reads: For meritorious achieve ment in aerial flight as pilot of a fighter plane in Fighter Squadron 32, attached to the USS Leyte, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from Oct. 12. to Nov. 7, 1950. Completing 10 missions during this period, Ensign Brown participated in close-air support flights and carried out daring bombing and strafing attacks against enemy lines of communication, transporta tion facilities, military instilla tions and troop concentrations at Wonsan, Chongjin, Songjin and Sinanju. Leading his section in the face of hostile antiaircraft fire, he vigorously pressed home his attacks, thereby contribut ing materially to the success of his division in inflicting seri ous losses upon the enemy and in providing effective support for friendly ground forces. His courage, skilled airmanship and unswerving devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Brown was also the first African-American Naval officer to loose his life in combat. On Dec. 4, 1950, while flying with Lt. j.g. Thomas Hudner Jr. in close-air support for Marines fighting near the Chosin Reservoir, Browns plane was hit by enemy gunfire and crashed. Hudner crash-landed his own plane nearby to help the injured pilot. Risking his own life to save Brown, who was trapped in the burning wreck age, Hudner packed snow bare handedly around the fuselage while under continuing enemy attack, but in vain. Ensign Brown was entitled to the Korean Service Medal. He was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart Medal and the Distinguished Flying Cross. His citation for the DFC reads: For heroism and extraor dinary achievement in aerial flight as a fighter pilot and section leader in VF-32, attached to the USS Leyte, in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Korean Area from Oct. 12 to Dec. 4, 1950. Participating in 20 air strikes during this period, Ensign Brown led his section in daring attacks on enemy military instilla tions, lines of communica tions, transportation facilities and troop concentrations at Chosin Reservoir, Ta-ku-shan, Manpojin, Lin-chiang, Sinuiju, Kesan, Wonsan, Chongjin, Songjin, Kilchu and Sinanju. Flying in support of units of the 1st Marine Division sur rounded by enemy in the vicinity of the Chosin Reservoir, he pressed home numerous attacks on hostile troops mov ing to attack our forces, con tinuing his aggressive behav ior runs despite heavy opposi tion until his plane was fatally struck by enemy anti-aircraft fire. His exceptional courage, airmanship and devotion to duty in the face of great danger reflect this highest credit upon Ensign Brown and the United States Naval Service. He gal lantly gave his life for his country. The first U.S. Navy ship to be named in honor of a black Navy officer was named in honor of Brown. USS Jesse L. Brown (DE 1089), a Knox-class ocean escort ship, was launched March 18, 1972 at Avondale Shipyards in Westwego, La. She was designed to operate as an anti-submarine ship, a screening unit, or as a patrol or convoy ship. Upon commissioning early in 1973, she was homeported at Newport, R.I., as a unit of Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla Two. Ensign Browns widow served as sponsor of the ship, and the principle address was given by Capt. Thomas Hudner Jr. In July 1975, she was reclassified as a frigate and designated FF-1089. Her career was spent with the Atlantic Fleet, and included several deployments to the Mediterranean Sea, the Persian Gulf and northern European waters. Jesse L. Brown was trans ferred to the Naval Reserve in January 1992, and was redesignated FFT-1089. Jesse L. Brown was decom missioned in July 1994 and transferred to the Egyptian Navy, in which she served as Damietta (F-961). Remembering the Navys first black combat aviatorU.S. Navy photoEnsign Jesse Leroy Brown (third from left), becomes the first African-American to receive his aviator wings through the Naval Aviation Cadet Program during a graduation ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Oct. 23, 1948. During the Korean Conflict, his squadron (VF-32) operated from USS Leyte (CV-32), flying F4U-4 Corsair fighters in support of United Nations forces. On Dec. 4, 1950, while on a close-air support mission near the Chosin Reservoir, Brown's plane was hit by enemy anti-aircraft fire and crashed. Despite heroic efforts by other aviators, he could not be rescued and died in his aircraft. Brown was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for his combat service in the Korean Conflict.Photo by MC3 Mikelle SmithMedal of Honor recipient retired Capt. Thomas Hudner salutes as taps is played during the Centennial of Naval Aviation Wreath Laying Ceremony held Dec. 1, 2011 at the United States Navy Memorial in Washington D.C. Hudner received the medal of honor for his heroic efforts as he attempted to rescue Ensign Jesse Brown during the Korean War. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014 11

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XO reaches new heights in GEMD spot inspectionBy Clark PierceEditorNAS Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker visited the Ground Electronics Maintenance Division (GEMD) recently to perform quality assurance compliance for the tactical air navigation (TACAN) system that military pilots use to determine bearing and distance to an airfield. Division LCPO Jose Luna explained, Many maintenance procedures require maintenance and material management (3M) spot checks to ensure compliance with proper maintenance procedures. This is key to maintaining aviation safety at NAS Jacksonville. After reviewing the TACAN maintenance records, well drive Capt. Wanamaker to the TACAN tower near the middle of the airfield where he will review the 3M requirement cards and then perform a bottom-totop visual inspection, said Luna. Wanamaker said that he performs periodic 3M inspections at different departments throughout the base. Unlike the galley, the barracks or the air ter minal, todays inspection is challenging because it requires me to climb aloft about 70 feet with a GEMD maintainer. Wearing a safety harness is mandatory, so we should be safe and secure. He added, The Navys 3M program is very impor tant in maintaining readiness. Ill be performing a visual quality assurance check of a recent TACAN maintenance procedure. The NAS Jacksonville GEMD provides inspection, maintenance and repair of airfield navigation aids, radar, communications and ancillary electronic equipment, including runway lighting. GEMD also performs periodic testing, maintenance and repair of air traffic control navigational aids and VHF/UHF communications. NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker looks on as IC2 Jayson Bankhead performs a communications check inside the station's TACAN tower facility.Photos by Clark Pierce(From left) ETSN Cody Utsler, NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker and ET1 Nic Stersic unload climbing safety harnesses prior to going 70 feet aloft to the TACAN beacon. Their inspection com plete, NAS Jax Executive Officer Howard Wanamaker and IC2 Jayson Bankhead check safety harnesses before descending. IC2 Jayson Bankhead reviews documents of the most recent spot check for the tactical air navigation (TACAN) sys tem Jan. 31 with NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker. IC2 Jayson Bankhead leads the way up the NAS Jax TACAN tower as NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker awaits his turn. With their inspection complete, IC2 Jayson Bankhead and NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker carefully descend from the airfield TACAN tower. 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaokeFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Jan. 18, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: Jan. 25, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Swim to Cuba Aquatic Program At the Indoor Pool Teams complete 30,000 laps and team members receive a t-shirt! Navy Run Training Program At the Fitness Source Running group meets every Tuesday at 4 p.m. Biggest Loser Challenge Eight-week program, teams of two Begins March 10 Aerobathon featuring TRX, spin, muscle max, boot camp, step, yoga, HIT and Zumba Feb. 15, 10 a.m. noon Fitness CenterI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Gatornationals March 1416 $30 $58 Disney Jr. Live $15 $29 Monster Jam $22 $42 Wild Adventures $30 $70 Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket $166 $194.50 Universal Orlando $114 $169.50 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Daytona 500 $62 $209 Drive 4COPD 300 $55 Budweiser Duels $55 Sprint Unlimited $30 $55 Rolex 24 $32 $65 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 The Artist Series Broadway in Jacksonville 2014 season, select shows Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2014 season, select shows Armed Forces Vacation Club www.afv club.com $349 $369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 Ripleys St. Augustine $4.25 $7.50 St. Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Wild Florida Airboats $17 $46.50 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels located near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Habitat for Humanity Volunteer Trip Feb. 15 at 8 a.m. Daytona 500 Trip Feb. 23 at 10 a.m. $40 per person Military Saves Week Feb. 2428 Take the pledge to save money!NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Daily Twilight Golf Special Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1 p.m. Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty Feb. 25 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests Feb. 13 & 27Mulberry Cove Marina Call 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you!Flying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person Photo by Morgan KehnertGolf expoSherman Turner tests out an Adams' Hybrid at the NAS Jax Golf Course Driving Range during the golf expo Feb. 7. Nine vendors were on hand to discuss new equipment and allow patrons to test out clubs. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014 13

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By Yan KennonNaval Hospital Jacksonville Senior WriterDid you know that Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles award -winning Wellness Center and Health Promotions offers individual and group classes that center on improving your health? Classes include tobacco cessation, weight management, health fitness and nutrition. The following classes are offered throughout the year: Choose My Plate (appointment or walk-in): Basic nutrition one-hour Health Fitness Assessment (appoint ment only): Body mass, exercise and basic nutrition two-day class (one individual session and one group ses sion) Healthy Heart (appointment or walk-in): Cholesterol management 90-minutes Sail A Weigh (appointment only): Healthy lifestyle/weight management six weeks (one hour per week) Ship Shape (appointment only): Weight management eight weeks (one hour per week) Tobacco Cessation (appointment or walk-in): Monday, 9 a.m.; Tuesday, 1 p.m.; Thursday, noon. For more information or to make an appointment, call 542-5292 or visit NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center locat ed at Building 867, adjacent to the NAS Jacksonville Fitness Source. By Yan KennonNH Jacksonville Senior WriterNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles primary care teams are now open lon ger to better serve patients and offer appointment times when they need them. Family Medicine (Green, Red, White and Yellow Teams), Internal Medicine (Blue Team) and Pediatrics (Purple Team) are now open Monday to Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Patients with a primary care man ager (PCM) at the hospital or branch health clinic are part of a Medical Home Porta collaborative team of caregiv ers (from doctors and nurses to case managers) led by the PCM. The team focuses on meeting all of the patients health care needspreventive, routine and urgent. To meet the PCMs on each of the commands 14 Medical Home Port teams, visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/navalhospi taljax Patients can reach their team by secure email, for non-urgent issues. Sign up for RelayHealth at www.relay health.com or on the commands web site by clicking on Medical Home Port. At the hospital, patients can call the appointment line at 542-4677 or 800529-4677, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Active duty patients at Branch Health Clinic Jacksonvilles Silver Team can call 546-7094/7095, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. After-hours nurse advice is available for patients at all sites at 542-4677 or 800-529-4677 on evenings, weekends and federal holidays.The run is free and open to all authorized points for their commands by participating. Sign up at NAS Jax Gym or the Fitness Source prior to the Feb. 7 deadline. The run is held on Perimeter Road at the end of Mustin Road, before the Antenna Farm at 11:30 a.m. Registration will also be held at the run site from 10:30-11:15 a.m. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. Call 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Play begins the week of Feb. 24. is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractor personnel ages 30 and older who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games are played on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 11:30 or designated representative attend will rules and required paperwork. active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play in the evening. Commands whose Cup points along with rules and required paperwork. active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, DoD contractors, retirees, and dependents over 18. Games play in the or designated representative attend the along with rules and required paperwork. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Players earn participation points for their command or third. Register by Feb. 19. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractors assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Players earn participation points for their command or third. Register by Feb. 26. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. along with rules and required paperwork. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. along with rules and required paperwork. The tournament is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractor women assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants will earn participation points for their command or third. Sign up by March 21. The tournament is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractor women assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants will earn participation points for their command or third. Register by March 21. Open to active duty, retirees, dependents over 18, selective reservists, DoD civilians and contractors. The tournament starts at 5 p.m. at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts on the corner of Allegheny Road and Birmingham Road. Call 542-2930 to sign up by April 25. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil Standings As of Feb. 7 HSM-72 2 0 NOSC 2 0 Vet Clinic 2 0 VP-26 2 0 VR-58 2 0 VR-62 1 1 CRS-10 0 1 FACSFAC 0 1 ASD Jax 0 2 FRCSE 62A/690 0 2 NavHosp IMC 0 2 VP-62 0 2 CNATTU Blue 1 0 CV-TSC Ashore 1 0 FRCSE 1 0 Navy Band 1 0 NCTS 1 0 VP-45 1 0 CNATTU Gold 0 1 PSD Jax 0 1 SERCC 0 1 VP-10 0 1 VP-30 0 1 VR-58 0 1 VP-10 3 0 VP-30 3 1 NAVHOSP 2 1 FRCSE 2 2 VP-26 2 2 FLCJ 1 2 NAVFAC 1 3 NCTS 0 3 FRCSE 600 3 1 FRCSE 700 3 1 NAVHOSP 3 1 VP-10 3 1 NAVHOSP Galley 2 2 VR-58 2 2 NAS Jax 1 1 TPU/PCF 1 2 VP-45 1 2 VP-26 1 3 NCTS 1 3 FACSFAC 0 3 File photoGreat American Spit OutHM3 James Freeman (left) explains to HM1 Jack Green some of the negative impacts smokeless tobacco can have on the mouth at the Great American Spit Out display at Naval Hospital Jacksonville in February 2013. The annual Great American Spit Out occurs in February as a means to raise awareness of the dangers associated with smokeless tobacco. Hospital clinics open longer hoursNaval Hospital Jacksonville invites you to get fit in 2014 NAS Jax Sports 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014 From StaffAngela Glass, assistant natural resources manager at NAS Jacksonville, participated in the Water Education Festival Feb.1 at the Museum of Science and History (MOSH) that was attended by more than 1,800 persons. Our Enviroscape model was used to show how pollutants from everyday activities affects the St. Johns River including methods to clean up oil and other toxic spills from the water, said Glass. Another demonstration showed how homeowners may increase the flow of nutrients into the river by over-fer tilizing which can lead to toxic algal blooms. When a bloom decomposes, it reduces oxygen levels in the river and may detrimentally affect other forms of marine life. The festival was sponsored the City of Jacksonvilles Environmental Protection Board. Displays and resources included: access to MOSH exhibits; marine wildlife touch tank; animal encounters with MOSH resident ani mals; kids games and crafts; and boat tours on the St. Johns River. By Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceOn the E-ring of the Pentagon hangs a picture of the Mercury 7 NASAs first group of astronauts. All were military test pilots: Marine Corps Maj. John Glenn, Navy Cmdr. Alan Shepherd, Air Force Maj. Gus Grissom, Air Force Maj. Gordon Cooper, Navy Cmdr. Wally Schirra, Navy Cmdr. Scott Carpenter and Air Force Maj. Deke Slayton. The military tie remains strong in the astronaut corps today, as NASAs new class of astronauts has six serv ing military officers. The group visited the Pentagon last week and met with Navy Adm. James Winnefeld Jr., the vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Air Force Lt. Col. Tyler Hague, Navy Lt. Cmdr. Josh Cassada, Navy Lt. Cmdr. Victor Glover, Marine Corps Maj. Nicole Mann, Army Maj. Anne McClain and Army Lt. Col. (Dr.) Andrew Morgan are the military members of the class. Drs. Jessica Meir and Christina Hammock are the civilians. The military astronauts like just about anyone else in the services today bring the experience of operating in Iraq. Hague worked to detect or jam improvised explosive devices. McClain flew helicopters in and around Kirkuk and Tal Afar. Morgan was a flight doctor who deployed with the 3rd Special Forces Group to Iraq. Until the inclusion of this class, the United States had fewer than 50 active astronauts. They serve in a variety of jobs, including at Mission Control in Houston or as liaisons with commercial space vendors. Others live and work with the Russian space agency. Those astronauts train in Star City outside Moscow, and at the launch facilities at Baikonur. All of the new astronauts are learning Russian, a development that probably would surprise the Mercury astronauts, who were selected at the height of the Cold War. It was a tough process to be selected. More than 6,100 applications went to NASA in 2011. For some, it wasnt the first experience. Hague, for example, first applied to be an astronaut in 2003. It boils down to two rounds of inter views, and the interviews consist of a lot of medical screening, Hague said. Theres not a lot of time away from service during the selection process. Hague said he almost forgot he had submitted an application when he was notified he had been selected. His packet had to go through the Air Force and NASA. His civilian colleagues had it a bit easier. Hammock, one of the civilians, said she simply filled out a resume on the USAJobs website and submitted it. The astronauts have begun their two years of training before their first flight into space. There are only a few slots for U.S. astronauts per year aboard the International Space Station. Some could be involved in development and testing of new spacecraft. And one could be landing on Mars someday. You never know where a gov ernment job can take you. Red Lancers bid farewell to ChisholmBy Lt. Charles SandfordVP-10 Public AffairsAVCM Clay Chisholm retired from the U.S. Navy Jan. 10, in a ceremony that capped a career that spanned 30 years, 10 deployments, and eight commands. Upon graduating from high school in Albuquerque, N.M., Chisholm worked various construction jobs until deciding to enlist in the Navy in 1984. He report ed to Naval Training Command in Great Lakes, Ill. embarking on a journey that would be more fulfilling than he could have ever imagined. After completing A school and a fleet replacement squadron as an aviation electricians mate (AE), he reported to VAW-112 where he completed the USS Kitty Hawks around the world final cruise. Photos courtesy of NAS Jax Environmental DepartmentOn a table-top display, NAS Jax Assistant Natural Resources Manager Angela Glass (left) demonstrates how pollution affects people, animals and plants along the St. Jonhs River.Base supports water education festival(Left) Angela Glass, assistant natural resources manager at NAS Jax, shows youths and parents at MOSH on Feb.1 how pollutants from everyday activities can harm the St. Johns River.Photos by MC3 Brian FloodHS-11 helps replenish An SH-60F Seahawk helicopter assigned to the "Dragonslayers" of HS-11 lifts a pallet of supplies from the Military Sealift Command fleet replenish ment oiler USNS Kanawha (T-AO 196) and delivers it to the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) during a Jan. 30 vertical replenishment. Theodore Roosevelt is underway conducting training in preparation for a future deployment. Forklift drivers aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) wait for an SH-60F Seahawk helicopter assigned to the Dragonslayers of Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 11 to drop off a palate of supplies during a Jan. 30 vertical replenishment. Theodore Roosevelt is underway in the Atlantic conducting training. Photo by MCSA Matthew YoungAn SH-60H Seahawk helicopter assigned to the "Dragonslayers" of HS-11, flies over the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) on Jan. 30 during a vertical replenishment-at-sea. Photo by MC2 Kristin M. SchusterVice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO) Adm. Mark Ferguson receives a signed 8-ball from three visiting astronauts from NASA's 2013 astronaut candidate class at the Pentagon.New astronaut class visits PentagonPhotos courtesy of VP-10VP-10's AVCM Clay Chisholm is accompanied by his wife, Eileen, as he is piped ashore for the last time at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 117. AVCM Clay Chisholm hugs his daughter, Amanda Smith, as his son, Joe, looks on after he presented them with certificates of appreciation and flowers.See VP-10 RETIREMENT, Page 17

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014 17 In 1990, he joined the Wallbangers of VAW-117, deploying twice in support of Operation Desert Storm and Desert Shield. After a two-year tour, he departed VAW-117 as a first class petty officer and Sailor of the Year who returned to Albuquerque for an unforgettable recruiting tour in his home town. Rejoining the world of naval aviation, Chief Petty Officer Chisholm reported to VS-32 and got his first taste of run ning the show as maintenance control chief a position he would not relin quish for the remainder of his storied career. He then reported to VAW-120 in Norfolk, Va. During a detachment to NAS Key West, he was promoted to senior chief petty officer. In 2002, he returned to NAS Jacksonville, checking in with the VS-22 Checkmates. After another successful tour, Chisholm reported to Naval Personnel Command (NPC) in Millington, Tenn., where he assumed the position of placement coordinator for the P-3C community. While at NPC, he achieved the rank of master chief petty officer and was promoted to detailer in charge of all maintenance master chiefs across the entire Navy. In 2012, he reported to his final command, the Red Lancers of VP-10. As the squadrons MMCPO, he made two deployments, supervising the care and maintenance of more than 60 aircraft. Under his guidance the VP-10 main tenance team completed more than 20,000 man hours of labor. Chisholm led the Red Lancers main tainers with commitment and determination, upholding the the squadrons tradition of maintenance excellence. In what would be his final Aviation Maintenance Inspection, he led the Red Lancers to the highest score across the MPRA community within the pre vious 18 months receiving a Bravo Zulu from Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group. VP-10 Command Master Chief (CMDCM) Teri Zehnacker summed it up best during his retirement ceremony. Today the Navy and the Red Lancers bid farewell to an awesome main tenance master chief who is a leader, mentor, friend and Shipmate. We are thankful for his service to our country and our Navy. He will be missed by all those with whom he served. VP-10 RETIREMENTFrom Page 16 From Secretary of the Navy Public AffairsTraveling to both Brisbane and the Australian capital of Canberra, Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus met with U.S. and Australian government and military officials to reinforce the alliance between the two countries. The United States and Australia have an historic and extensive relationship, one that has been an anchor of peace and stability in the Asia-Pacific region, said Mabus. From exercises like RIMPAC and Talisman Saber to per sonnel exchanges at sea and ashore, our countries oper ate together cooperatively and seamlessly to enhance global and regional security, while building on shared experiences and strengthening our partner ship. In Brisbane, he met with the Australian Armys First Division leadership, the com mand responsible for the Joint Deployable Force Headquarters that oversees large-scale amphibious operations and training activities. While in Canberra, Mabus met with Australian Minister of Defense David Johnston, Secretary for Defense Dennis Richardson, Chief of Defense Force Gen. David Hurley, and Chief of Navy Vice Adm. Ray Griggs, along with members for their staffs where they dis cussed regional relationships, fleet operations and shipbuild ing, and energy initiatives. In addition to meeting with officials, Mabus participated in a wreath-laying ceremony at the Royal Australian Naval Memorial, Canberra, that hon ors sailors who have served in defense of their country. Mabus visit represents a continuation of the Department of the Navys focus on building partnerships designed to help distribute the burden of secur ing the global maritime domain based on alliances, shared val ues and mutual trust. From Navy Region Southeast Public AffairsGiving back to the commu nity is nothing new to Sailors. What volunteers often discover, however, is that they receive as much as they give. Sailors assigned to Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) found this to be true when they volunteered their time for a service project at the Ronald McDonald House in Jacksonville on Feb. 5. During the project, partici pants helped replace light bulbs and clean light covers on three floors of the facility, which provides lodging and support ser vices for critically ill, chroni cally ill and seriously injured children and their families. Volunteer efforts like this are very important to us, said Fay Weiss, Ronald McDonald House Charities of Jacksonville outreach coordinator. Were a 30-bedroom house with a small staff, so we rely heavily on the community and volunteer groups that come in to assist with meals, maintenance or housekeeping. Our volunteers are essential to serving our mission. According to MC1(SW) Greg Johnson, CNRSE volunteer coordinator, the project was an opportunity for Sailors to build camaraderie while having a positive effect on the local community. I think its important for the Navy to maintain a strong presence in the community because we have the peo ple and resources to have an impact, Johnson said. When you visit a place like this, it puts into perspective how much you take for granted. The families and children here are probably going through a tougher time than most of us could imagine and this house is here to make that time a little less stressful. Hopefully our efforts contrib ute to that goal. The house is located about a block away from Wolfson Childrens Hospital and Nemours Childrens Clinic, where many of the children receive treatment. While guests are asked to give a $10-pernight donation for the duration of their stay, no family is turned away if they cannot make the payment. Since opening in 1988, the house has served more than 32,000 families. In addition to providing lodging and reduced travel expenses for families, it also facilitates an emotionallysupportive environment where families can connect with oth ers who may be going through similar situations, Weiss said. I think spending the day out here and helping out with what we can is the very least we can do, said RPSN(SW) Abraham Dukuly, a volunteer. For us, it is a small contribu tion, but it still means a lot to the staff here. Its absolutely a rewarding experience, consid ering the mission of the Ronald McDonald House. The house operates solely on donations from the local com munity and volunteer projects and has shared a particularly special relationship with the local military, Weiss said. We are so grateful to our military volunteers, Weiss said. They are so dedicated to whatever it is they are asked to do, whether its gardening and raking leaves in the courtyard or cleaning indoors. According to Weiss, those efforts are appreciated not only by the houses staff, but by the families who stay there as well. What is extraordinary about military volunteers is their effect on the families, Weiss said. A lot of families realize they are enlisted, and for ser vice members to take the time to do this, it demonstrates to them that there are armies of people out there who care about what they are going through. One of the volunteers under stood firsthand why families who stay at the house appreci ate volunteer efforts. QMC(SW) William Chase has stayed at the house twice once in 1999 when his first son was born premature and again in 2001, when his second son was born pre mature. Without the Ronald McDonald House, we would have had to pay for months of hotel bills, Chase said. Not to mention, they provide trans portation services and a vari ety of other things at the house, such as arts and craft nights for the kids and all kinds of other activities. Its important because it takes away some of the stress surrounding the situation and lets you just concen trate on your child. Thats why I feel like I want to give back to the charity. I try to volunteer every chance I get. Ronald McDonald House Charities was founded in 1974. The first house opened in Philadelphia and was funded by McDonalds restaurant pro ceeds donated by local owners. Today, there are 309 houses in more than 50 countries world wide. MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax staff writerFor individuals in search of great deals and inexpensive items, the Not New Shop is available for service members, retired military and spous es, located at the NAS Jax Main Gate, Building 13. The thrift shop is operated by members of the Navy Wives Clubs of America, No. 86, a non-profit organi zation comprised mainly of wives of enlisted Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard Personnel. The shop accepts donated items such as military uniforms, civilian clothes, baby necessities, household goods, toys and other various knick knacks. We are here to serve our service members, said Chris McCloskey, one of the chairmen of the thrift shop. All of our uniforms and other items are donated to us by generous people. We resell them to our military members and families as low cost. CS2(SW) Samuel McKever, of Naval Hospital Jacksonville said, I am here today to look for a pair of pants for my dress blue uniform. Ive been here a few times and every time I come, I always find what I am looking for. I would recommend the thrift shop to anyone. The thrift shop is open every Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tax forms are available for those interested in donating items. According to McCloskey, many ser vice members are unaware of the base thrift shop. We would like to spread the word to let service members know we are here, said McCloskey. We know some service members cant afford uniforms and this is a good way find the items they might need. I know that when my husband was in the service, the prices were high back then. We want service members to feel good and leave here with some money still in their pockets. Retired Navy Seabee Edward Ross said, This is my first time here and I am actually glad I stopped by because the thrift shop has a lot of things to offer. According to McCloskey, there is a thrift shop on or near almost all the military installations and she advises service members to check their base every time they relocate. For more information, please call 5421582. Mabus concludes Australia visitPhoto by MC1 Arif PataniSecretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus reviews Royal Australian Navy personnel during a visit to Australian defense headquarters in the countrys capital. Mabus is in the region to meet with Sailors and Marines, and civilian and military officials, as part of a multi-nation visit to the U.S. Pacific, European, and Central Command areas of responsibility.Photo by Clark PierceOne of the Royal Australian Navy's 725 Squadron MH-60R Seahawk helicopters prepares to lift off from the seawall of NAS Jacksonville, Fla. When training is complete, RAN will operate 24 Romeos seven for its training squadron (725) and 17 for its operational squadron (816) that will deploy on board RAN surface combatants. NAS Jax plays a partFrom Staff CNRSE Sailors volunteer to brighten Jacksonville Ronald McDonald HousePhoto by MC1 Greg JohnsonRP2(SW) Abraham Dukuly removes a light cover while replacing light bulbs during a Commander, Navy Region Southeast volunteer effort at the Ronald McDonald House in Jacksonville. Base thrift store available for service membersPhotos by MC2 Amanda CabasosChris McCloskey of the Not New Shop, manages transactions for CS2(SW) Samuel McKever of Naval Hospital Jacksonville on Feb. 4. Naval Flight Officer Lt. j.g. Levi Blackwell of VP-45, checks out some uniforms in search of a flight suit at the Not New Shop.

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www.cnic.navy.mil/jacksonville www.jaxairnews.com ACKSONVILLE F LA THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014 I I D E VP-45Keeping Jax Beautiful Page 3 HELPING HEARTS Naval Hospital Jax Page 4 HS-11Replenishing Roosevelt Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com NAS Jax to join in Solid CurtainCitadel Shield 2014From Staff From Feb. 17-28, NAS Jacksonville will participate in Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014. This annu al training exercise will be conducted on naval bases and installations throughout the continental United States. The exercise is designed to enhance the training and readiness of naval security forces to respond to threats against installations and units and is not a response to any specific threat but is a regularly scheduled exercise. According to NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander, these annual training scenarios provide an important opportunity to test the air stations anti-terrorism/force protection (AT/FP) response. Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014 will give us a significant learning opportunity because it will involve coordination of NAS Jax security and fire departments, along with various other tenant com mands, Undersander explained. Also, the base Emergency Operations Center will be activated, enabling us to see first hand the efficiency of our first responders and base-wide communication protocols. Measures are in place to minimize disruptions to normal base operations, but there may be times when the exercise causes increased traffic near the installation, as well as delays in base access. For more information about Exercise Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield 2014, contact the NAS Jacksonville Public Affairs Office at (904) 542-5588. File PhotoRescue personnel from First Coast Navy Fire & Emergency Services at NAS Jax load an injured (simulated) VP-30 aircrewman with a leg injury into an ambulance as part of Exercise Citadel Shield 2013. By Clark PierceEditorThe Spartans of HSM-70 will depart their home base of NAS Jacksonville Feb. 14 to join Carrier Air Wing (CVW)-8 on board the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) as well as the three other ships that comprise Carrier Strike Group (CSG 2). Of the squadrons 11 MH-60R Seahawk helicopters, five will operate from Bush and six will operate from three surface com batants attached to CSG 2: guidedmissile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58); guided-missile destroyer Roosevelt (DDG 80); and guidedmissile destroyer USS Truxton (DDG 103). The squadron was previously scheduled to deploy with Bush in July 2013 but government seques ter issues pushed the deployment back to this month. In an interview at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 1122, HSM70 Executive Officer Cmdr. Jeremy Vaughn said, During that time, we reset our training plan to seven months, which included exercises at Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center in the Bahamas, followed by NAS Fallon, Nevada, for air wing warfare train ing. We also supported CSG 2s Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) and Joint Task Force Exercise. He added that all the squadrons aircraft are up and fully mission capable for the scheduled 9-1/2 month deployment. HSM-70 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Matt Schnappauf was unavailable for an interview. Skipper Schnappauf and I cant say enough about our skilled main tainers. During COMPTUEX, we flew 26 percent of the air wings sorties, which put a lot of hours on our helicopters. During the past couple of months, our maintainers put in a lot of hours to ensure all systems are ready to go for every Seahawk, said Vaughn. We also recently completed operational stress control (OSC) awareness training, which aims to teach Sailors how to recognize signs and symptoms of stress in themselves and others and how to manage operational stress, said Vaughn. The OSC instructors are very capable in bringing their mes sage down to the deckplate level Williamson signs Military Saves Week proclamationBy MC1(SW) Greg JohnsonNavy Region Southeast Public AffairsRear Adm. Rick Williamson, commander, Navy Region Southeast, signed a proclamation in sup Fire & Emergency Services recognized for regional excellenceFrom StaffThe First Coast Navy Fire & Emergency Services (F&ES), which is comprised of the NAS Jacksonville and NS Mayport Fire Departments, has been select ed as Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Fire Department of the Year (Large Category) for the third time in the past four years. On Feb. 5, Jim LaConte, program director of CNRSE F&ES announced the 2013 Navy F&ES award winners recognized for outstanding performance by F&ES teams and individuals. NAS Jacksonville and NS Mayport Fire Chief Mark File photo During a base-wide drill in March 2012, then act ing First Coast Navy Fire & Emergency Services Fire Chief Mark Brusoe, left, and assistant James Gray man the incident command post that responded to a simulated explosion at NAS Jax Bachelor Enlisted Housing. Photo by Clark PierceHSM-70 Executive Officer Cmdr. Jeremy Vaughn has a rare "quiet moment" in NAS Jax Hangar 1122 with the squadron's full complement of 11 MH-60R Seahawk helicopters. The squadron departed Feb. 10 to join Carrier Air Wing (CVW)-8 on board the aircraft carrier George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). The deployment is scheduled to last for more than nine months. Spartans lift from NAS Jax for Carrier Strike Group 2 Photo by MC1 Greg JohnsonCommander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Rear Adm. Rick Williamson signs a proclamation rec ognizing Military Saves Week in front of members of the CNRSE Family Readiness Program. Military Saves Week runs from Feb. 24 through March 1 and is intended to encourage service members to build wealth and reduce debt. Photo by Clark PierceSome of the 104 members of First Coast Fire & Emergency Services (Consolidated NAS Jacksonville/NS Mayport) celebrate on Feb. 7 their selec tion as Commander Navy Region Southeast "Fire Department of the Year" (Large Category). It is the department's third win in the past four years.See Page 7 See Page 9 See Page 8

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014 By Sarah SmileySpecial ContributorTo the Littlest Boy in the Striped Shirts, I knew from the first time you spilled apple juice in your lap at the kitchen table that we were going to be great friends. These other people, the bigger ones, they never spill. They eat all their food, and usually right in front of me. They sit on the couch and eat that turkey sandwich one delicious bite at a time. And I watch. Oh, yeah, I watch. But you, buddy, you always leave something for me. You walk around with your sandwich held real close precariously close, some might say to the ground. The turkey slides out of the bread, and some times you leave a trail. I like to think you do this on purpose. And, yes, in case youre wondering, when I snatch the sandwich out of your hand, Im doing that on purpose, too. I wasnt sure when I first got here, though. You were even smaller then. You slept in my bed and put my tennis ball in your mouth. Your mom didnt like that very much. Neither did I. I wasnt sure if you were a puppy or I was small human. Then I followed you onto the couch and that cleared things up: no one with fur is allowed on the furniture. You dont have fur, that is obvious, but have these people making the rules seen your sticky hands? You liked to line me up with stuffed animals the same ones Id try to eat later (Note to Self: the stuffed bird is off limits. Chewing him will end with me in my cage in the basement) and you read stories to us. You read made-up words that werent on the page, but it didnt matter. All I heard was turkey sandwich, tur key sandwich anyway. In the backyard, you thought I could play soccer and baseball. You cheered every time I accidentally took the ball to the side fence. Yeah, I figured this out. Sadly, I would have done so much more for just a little bit more turkey. While everyone else makes me sit, stay or shake for a treat, you gave me bones just for show ing up. When you called my name, it wasnt because you wanted to know where I was. You actually wanted to talk to me. To play with me. And thats why I came running. But you are growing now, Littlest Boy. Your pants dont smell so bad. (Ok, I mean, good. Your pants actually smelled good to me back then.) But you still slip turkey underneath the kitchen table. For that alone, I will follow you to the ends of the earth. Or, at least the driveway. Those bigger boys are growing, too, and it worries me. Littlest Boy in the Striped Shirts, will you someday shut your bedroom door, too? Will you step over me while you talk on the phone with your friends? Will you eat everything on your plate, ask for more, and not notice me staring up at you? Although, I must say that I have the oldest one trained well. I ring the bells hanging on the back door, and he lets me out. It doesnt matter if hes upstairs, in the basement or on the phone. He would probably come out of the shower to open the door for me. I ring the bells, he comes running. Fascinating! But Littlest Boy in the Striped Shirts, I think he gets paid for this. You are gone more often now, and I am home alone. I peruse your bedroom you know, just in case you left some bite-sized Legos or puzzle pieces on the floor there. I see your stuffed bird taunting me from the top book shelf, and I smell everything that is you. Sometimes, I nap in your room. I dream about when you used to read to me. If I jerk my legs in my sleep, thats when Im running with you, the Littlest Boy in the Striped Shirts, in the backyard. Then, when I hear you coming home (I can hear you a mile away, kid I think everyone can), I run to the steps and wait. Your backpack holds all the smells of your adventure: books, pencils, snack time, dirty ten nis shoes and friends who also have sticky hands. You are busy in the afternoons now. You have sports to play and friends houses to go to. I spend a lot of time watching out the front window for you. I miss your sandwiches, but I also miss you. And that is why my favorite part of the day is bed time. You wait until Im in my spot next to your bed, and then you read aloud a bedtime story. You check often to make sure Im still there, guarding you as your eyes start to close. Dont worry Littlest Boy in the Striped Shirts. I am here. And I will be here as long as you will have me. From StaffFeb. 13 1854 Adm. Perry anchors off Yokosuka, Japan to receive Emperors reply to treaty proposal. 1913 Naval Radio Station, Arlington, Va. begins operations. 1945 First Navy units to enter Manila Bay since 1942. 1968 Operation Coronado XI begins in Mekong Delta. Feb. 14 1778 John Paul Jones in USS Ranger receives first official salute to U.S. Stars and Strips flag by European country, at Quiberon, France. 1813 USS Essex becomes first U.S. warship to round Cape Horn and enter the Pacific Ocean. 1814 USS Constitution captures British Lovely Ann and Pictou. 1840 Officers from USS Vincennes make first landing in Antarctica on floating ice. Feb. 15 1856 USS Supply, commanded by Lt. David Dixon Porter, sails from Smyrna, Syria, bound for Indianola, Texas, with a load of 21 camels intended for experi mental use in the American desert west of the Rockies. 1898 Battleship USS Maine explodes in Havana Harbor. Feb. 16 1804 Lt. Stephen Decatur, with vol unteers from frigate USS Constitution and schooner USS Enterprise, enters Tripoli harbor by night in the ketch USS Intrepid to burn the captured frig ate USS Philadelphia. Decaturs raid succeeds without American losses. Englands Lord Nelson calls this the most daring act of the age. 1815 USS Constitution captures HMS Susannah. 1967 Operation River Raider begins in Mekong Delta. Feb. 17 1864 Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley sinks USS Housatonic in Charleston harbor. 1942 First Navy Construction Battalion (Seabees) arrives Bora Bora. 1944 Carrier aircraft strike Japanese fleet at Truk, sinks ships and destroys aircraft. Feb. 18 1846 General order on Port and Starboard because Larboard and Starboard sound confusingly simi lar, the word Port was substituted for Larboard. 1944 Amphibious force under Rear Adm. Hill lands troops on Engebi Island, Eniwetok. 1955 First of 14 detonations, Operation Teapot nuclear test. Feb. 19 1814 USS Constitution captures British brig Catherine. 1945 Marines with naval gun fire support land on Iwo Jima; island secured March 16. 1981 Fleet Replacement Squadron VFA-125 is the first squadron to receive the new F/A-18 Hornet strike fighter for training fleet operators. The JAX AIR NEWS is an authorized publication for members of the Military Services. Contents of the JAX AIR NEWS do not necessarily reflect the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the Department of the Navy. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts or supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense, or The Florida Times-Union, of the products and services advertised. Everything advertised in the publication S hall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. If a violation or refraction of this equal opportunity policy by an advertiser is confirmed, the publisher shall refuse to print advertising from that source until the violation is corrected. The deadline for all story and photo submissions is close of business the Friday before publication, and can be sent to jaxairnews@ comcast.net. The deadline for classified submissions is noon Monday. Questions or comments can be directed to the editor. The JAX AIR NEWS can be reached at (904) 542-3531, fax (904) 542-1534, e-mail JaxAirNews@ comcast.net or write the JAX AIR NEWS, Box 2, NAS Jacksonville, Fla., 32212-5000. The JAX AIR NEWS is published by The Florida Times-Union, a private firm in no way connected with the U. S. Navy under exclusive written agreement with the U. S. Naval Air Station, Jacksonville, Florida. It is published every Thursday by The Florida Times-Union, whose offices are at 1 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville, FL 32202. Estimated readership over 32,000. Distribution by The Florida Times-Union. Advertisements are solicited by the publisher and inquiries regarding advertisements should be directed to: Ellen S. Rykert, Publisher 904-359-4168Advertising Sales Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd Public Affairs Officer Miriam S. Gallet Editor Clark Pierce Staff Writer MC2 Amanda Cabasos AE2 Samantha Jones Design/Layout George Atchley SAPR Assistance Available 24/7If local sexual assault victim assistance is needed or requested, please call the following numbers in order. If none of the three are immediately available, please leave a message or contact the DOD Safe Helpline for immediate assistance. services for victims. The DOD Safe Helpline may be the app on iOs. number visible in the commands to be accessible to sexual assault victims. U.S. Navy PhotoThe F/A-18 Hornet is a twin engine, multi-mission tactical aircraft. The F/A-18A and C are single-seat aircraft. The F/A-18B and D are dual, tandem-seaters. The B model is used primarily for training, while the D model is used for attack, tactical air control, forward air control and reconnaissance squadrons. The latest models, the E and F Super Hornets, were rolled out at McDonnell Douglas in September of 1995. The E is a single-seater and the F is a two-seater. Compared to the origi nal A through D models, Super Hornet has longer range and increased survivabil ity/lethality.Photo by MC2 John Wagner Jr.An EA-18G Growler assigned to the "Cougars" of VAQ-139 approaches the flight Growler is the fourth major variant of the F/A-18 family of aircraft that combines the proven F/A-18F Super Hornet platform with a sophisticated electronic warfare suite. The first Growler test aircraft went into production in October 2004 and made its first flight in August 2006. This Week in Navy History From StaffIn the Commander, Navy Region Southeast Senior and Junior Sailors of the First Quarter 2014 article pub lished on Feb. 6, the photos were incorrectly identified. Here are the correct photo cap tions. We regret this error. From the HomefrontFamily dogs letter to his boy IT2(SW) Keston Adharsingh NC1(SW) Vladimir Arias-Martinez Correction

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Pelicans continue to clean up Jacksonville through Adopt-A-Road ProgramBy Lt. j.g. Joseph JohannesVP-45 Public Affairs OfficerThe VP-45 Pelicans were honored by Jacksonville City Councilman Jim Love Friday for their tireless work as part of the Beautify Jacksonville Adopt-ARoad program Jan. 31. Love met with members of the Pelican Team and helped dedicate a sign signifying VP-45s commitment to cleaning up the Jacksonville area. As part of the Adopt-A-Road program, the Pelicans are responsible for maintaining approximately a mile of Argyle Forest Blvd in Orange Park, Fla. As part of the adoption, the Pelicans took over the responsi bility of removing any trash that had accumulated and making sure that the area looked clean and neat. Squadron members took this responsibility to heart and set about making this little stretch of road their own. Making several visits over a two-month period, the Pelicans were responsible for removing more than 40 bags of trash from the roadside. We really want ed to give back to the community, said AME1 Scott Walker, who took the lead in organizing the program at VP-45. Coming up through the ranks, I noticed a lack of community service opportunities in my com mands and I wanted to change that here in VP-45. In recognition of their hard work, the Pelicans were honored by Love with a sign recognizing their achievement in cleaning up the Jacksonville streets. You have all shown a love of country, serving in the military, said the councilman, now youre also showing your love for your community. The ceremony was a great experience for those who attended, showing that their hard work was greatly appreciated by all in the community. The Pelicans now look forward to their next opportunity to beautify their stretch of Jacksonville road and give back to the Jacksonville community. SAR information meeting Feb. 19 From Naval Facilities Engineering Command SoutheastNAS Jacksonville announces an informational meeting to review the U. S. Navy proposal to establish a small defined search and rescue (SAR) training area in the St. Johns River off shore of NAS Jacksonville, that would limit public access in order to support con gressional mandated search and rescue training. Establishment of SAR training area would prevent anchoring of objects, such as crab traps, or unmanned vessels in the training area to help trainees avoid inju ry and prevent equipment damage. All fishermen, boaters and the general public are invited to attend the meeting Feb. 19, from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the South Mandarin Library, 12125 San Jose Boulevard, Jacksonville 32223. For further information about this public meeting send an email to stephen.biemiller@navy.mil. Public comments will be accepted until March 31, at NAVFAC_SE_SAR_PROJ@navy.mil or via regular mail at NAVFACSE SAR Training Area, NEPA Program Manager (EV21), P.O. Box 30, Jacksonville, Fla. 322120030. IA Luncheon set for Feb 20From FFSCNAS Jacksonville and the Northeast Florida Navy League Councils will host the NAS Jacksonville Individual Augmentee (IA) Recognition Luncheon Feb. 20 at 11 a.m. at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center. All NAS Jacksonville and ten ant command Sailors who have returned from an IA assignment since May 1, 2013 will be recognized during the event. The guest speaker will be Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ 4th Fleet. There is no cost for the IA Sailor or Marine and their spouse. The cost for other military and civil ian guests is $10. Tickets may be purchased at the Fleet and Family Support Center, Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. -3 p.m. The deadline to purchase tickets is Feb. 13. Child care will be provided at the Child Development Center for children of IAs and spouses in attendance. Families should call 542-9075, 30 days in advance to secure their drop-in space. To RSVP, contact your command CIAC or Bobby Johns at bobby.johns.ctr@navy.mil For more informa tion, call 542-5637. Photo courtesy of VP-45VP-45 "Pelicans" discuss the Adopt-A-Road program with City Councilman Jim Love during their recent clean up. From left, VP-45 Commanding Officer Cmdr. John Brabazon, Cmdr. T.J. Grady, Love, AME1 Scott Walker and NC1 Natalie France. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014 By Yan KennonNaval Hospital Jacksonville Senior Writer February is American Heart Month an important month in the fight against heart dis ease. Heart disease is caused by plaque buildup in the walls of arteries, causing narrowing and blood flow restriction. It remains the nations num ber one killer for both men and women, taking the lives of about 715,000 Americans every year approximately one out of every four deaths. It can also result in serious illness, disability and decreased quality of life. Everyone is potentially at risk for heart disease, but it is pre ventable and controllable, said Capt. Paula Chamberlain, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles director for public health. Controllable risk factors for heart disease include: smoking, obesity and overweight, physi cal inactivity, diabetes mellitus, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. Other controllable risks include stress, alcohol and nutrition. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cardiovascular dis ease (including heart disease and stroke) costs the U.S. $312.6 billion each yearto include the costs of healthcare services, medications and lost productiv ity. Making healthy choices such as good nutrition, weight management and exercise can significantly decrease the prob ability of heart disease, said Chamberlain. Chamberlain went on to say that non-active children are also at risk for heart disease, Research has proven that children need at least 60 min utes of physical activity every day to reduce the risk of devel oping heart disease. National Wear Red Daya day to raise awareness for the fight against heart disease in women is also held in February. National Wear Red Day was began in 2003, when the American Heart Association and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute took action against heart disease, a disease that kills more women than all forms of cancer combined. As a result of their efforts, 21 percent fewer women are dying from heart disease and 23 per cent more women are aware that this disease is the single most health threat to women. NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center, located next to NAS Jacksonvilles Fitness Center, offers a variety of health related classes, available to active duty, retirees and their families. Classes include Healthy Heart, which teaches healthy lifestyles and cholesterol and blood pres sure management; Choose My Plate, to provide overviews on losing weight the healthy way; ShipShape, an eight-week weight loss program (active duty and civilians); Sail A Weigh, a sixweek weight loss program (civil ians only); health fitness assess ments; and, Tobacco Cessation, to assist smokers with quitting.For more information, call the NH Jacksonville Wellness Center at 904-542-5292/5293. American Heart Month: The fight against heart diseaseAE1 Daniel Flynn, from Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, rides a stationary bicycle at Naval Hospital Jacksonville. February is American Heart Month, a time to raise awareness about heart disease and how to prevent it both at home and in the community. Physical activity can help maintain a healthy weight as well as lower cholesterol and blood pressure. HM3 Jose Ramirez, from Naval Hospital Jacksonville, fixes himself a healthy meal for lunch at the hospital's galley. February is Healthy Heart Month, part of the fight against heart disease, which kills about 715,000 Americans every year. Good nutrition, weight management and exercise can significantly decrease the prob ability of heart disease. Cynthia Millard, a registered dietician at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, advises patient Jose Vasquez about food and nutrition and its effect on overall health Feb. 13. February is American Healthy Heart Month, part of the fight against heart disease, which kills about 715,000 Americans every year. Good nutrition, weight manage ment and exercise can significantly decrease the probability of heart disease. Naval Hospital Jacksonville's CS2Paul Serna pre pares salad bar vegetables for the evening meal in galley. February is American Healthy Heart Month, part of the fight against heart disease, which kills about 715,000 Americans every year. Good nutrition, weight management and exercise can significantly decrease the probability of heart disease.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014 5 By Naval Hospital Jacksonville Q: Why should I be concerned if my blood pressure is high? A: High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a direct contributor to heart disease. Many people unfortunately do not have any signs or symptoms but may still be at risk. Some risk factors are a family history of hypertension, smoking, diabetes, high cholesterol or being overweight. Exercise, eating more fruits and vegetables and lowering salt intake in your diet may help, but sometimes this is not enough and medication is needed. Talk with your primary care manager to see if you have or are at risk for hypertension.Ask the Doc is written by Naval Hospital Jacksonville providers from its hos pital and five branch health clinics in Florida and Georgia. This was written by Laura Kyer, a certified physician assistant from Naval Branch Health Clinic Key West.If you have a question for a physician, dentist, phar macist or optometrist, please send it to jax publicaffairs@ med.navy.mil .Ask the Doc: Blood pressure concerns Photos by Jacob Sippel February is American Healthy Heart Month, part of the fight against heart dis ease, which kills about 715,000 Americans every year. Good nutrition, weight management and exercise can significantly decrease the probability of heart dis ease. Leslie Fiala, a registered dietician at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, discusses healthy eating tips during a diabetes class. Patients can take diabetes nutrition to help with meal planning and controlling their blood sugar. February is American Heart Month, a time to raise awareness about preventing heart disease. HM2 Merrian Calzado, a cardiovascular technician at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, conducts an echocardiogram on Kelly Duff. February is American Heart Month, part of the fight against heart disease which causes one in four deaths in women and men each year. Charlene Rees, a nurse educator at Naval Hospital Jacksonville's Wellness Center, shows AD2 Michael Jordan, from Fleet Readiness Southeast, the amount of tar that enters the human body after a year of smoking. February is American Heart Month, a time to raise awareness about heart disease. Smoking is a leading risk factor for heart disease. HN Doneric Jefferson, Naval Hospital Jacksonville pharmacy technician, dis penses Christine Anderson's medication prescription at the hospital's pharmacy. February is American Heart Month, a time to raise awareness about heart dis ease. It's important to take medications as prescribed for high blood pressure, cholesterol and diabetes. Heart disease is the number one killer of women in the U.S. Celestia Thomason, a registered nurse at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, monitors CS2 Tiffany Northcutt's heart during a stress echocardiography, a test that uses ultrasound imaging to show how well the heart muscles are functioning.

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By MC2 Amanda CabasosStaff writerFlush with return ing patrons, the NAS Jax Commissary kicked off the first weekend of February with a sales record of more than $1 million. Commissary Store Director Larry Bentley said, It was the perfect storm. It was the combination of custom ers receiving their first-of-themonth paycheck and Super Bowl weekend events that contributed to the largest sales volume of the year. On Feb. 1, the day prior to the Super Bowl, sales escalated to more than $381, 000 marking an 8 percent increase over last years sales during the same time frame. According to Bentley, it took the combined efforts of the stores more than 300 govern ment employees, contractors, baggers, distributors and vend ers. He added, Its a qual ity of life benefit where you can come in here and receive a 30 percent savings compared to your grocery bill anywhere else. The commissary system is the number one reason why service members reenlist. Bentley explains, The com missary goods are sold at cost. What this means is, what I buy the products for is what I sell them for, he added. Many people think there is a markup on items, however, we only have a 5 percent surcharge tagged on to the end of the bill which is used for new stores, renovations, bags, replacing shopping carts, store supplies, etc. According to Bentley, com missary is mandated by con gress to be appropriately funded at $1.4 billion a year, to ensure low prices on goods. We are the ninth-largest sales volume store in the world out of 257 commissaries, said Bentley. Our meat department sometimes ranks second or third in sales in the world. Retired Air Force Master Sgt. Mike Moran said, Ive been shopping at the commissary since 1966 and I will continue to shop here. You cant beat the commissary system for their prices, especially the meat department. And the customer service here is outstanding. The commissary has to con tinue buying in bulk to keep up with the demands of nearly 80,000 customers who drive the average sales volume to $5.5 million a month. I shop at the commissary because there are certain things that you cant find at the other stores such as Hispanic and other ethnic items, said Navy spouse Amarilis Blankenship. I believe we do a tremen dous job here in supporting the service members and their families, said Bentley. I have to give all the credit to my staff. They are the people that make it happen. I am their cheerlead er, and I am the one that has to drive the store, but the staff members are the folks here every day. Not only do I have a passion for the job, but I ensure you that they have a passion for their jobs too, because we are serving the finest military in the world.For more information on the Defense Commissary Agency, visit www.commissaries.com. NAS Jax Commissary marks sales recordPhotos by MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax Commissary Sales Clerk Sybil Lewis checks out gro ceries for retired Air Force Master Sgt. Mike Moran during his weekly visit to the base supermarket on Feb. 5. Customers unload their grocery carts at the NAS Jax Commissary which recently set a sales record of more than $1 million. NAS Jax Commissary Store Clerk Nikol Eng serves IS2 April Hootman of U.S. Navy Central Command Intelligence Unit 0174, Information Dominace Corps Region Southeast, at the base com missary on Feb. 8. USO celebrates renovationNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander (second from right) and Jacksonville USO Chairman of the Board John Curtin (second from left) cut the ribbon to officially reopen the newly renovated NAS Jacksonville USO as Thaddeus Foster (left), principal partner of Taco Bell, and Ashley Furniture Home Store CEO Howard Fineman (right) look on Feb. 6. I am really excited about the new USO," said Greater Jacksonville Area USO Executive Director Mike OBrien. The center has really been transformed for our troops who come in here as well as for all of our volunteers and staff members. It is a whole new facility. According to OBrien, the renovations cost more than $20,000 and included new flooring, paint and furniture courtesy of the Armed Forces Family Foundation, Taco Bell and Ashley Furniture Home Store. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. Photo by MC2 Amanda Cabasos 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014

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in order to help build resiliency in our Sailors and their families. The squadrons ombudsmen and family readiness group have also done a lot to help prepare the Sailors for deployment. Social media such as the HSM-70 facebook page and tools such as email and Skype as well as the oldfashioned care package will keep the Spartans stay in touch with home. Vaughn concluded, Skipper Schnappauf and I want to pass along our sincere thanks to every command at NAS Jacksonville that has assisted HSM-70 in our preparation to join the Bush Carrier Strike Group. Squadrons attached to CVW-8 include: VFA-15 Valions, VFA87 Golden Warriors, VFA-31 Tomcatters, VFA-213 Black Lions, VAW-124 Bear Aces, VAQ-134 Garudas, VRC-40 Rawhides, HSC-9 Tridents and HSM-70 Spartans. SPARTANSFrom Page 1 MH-60R SeahawkThe MH-60R Seahawk is the most capable anti-submarine warfare (ASW) and anti-surface warfare (ASuW) helicopter in the world. Equipped with advanced mission systems and sensors, the MH-60R detects and prosecutes submarines in littoral and open ocean scenarios. Working alone or jointly with other MH-60R or MH-60S aircraft, these helicopter platforms form unique squadrons designed to protect todays carrier strike groups. During deployment, the HSM-70 Spartans will work with the HSC-9 Tridents who fly the MH-60S Seahawk primarily for search-and-rescue, MEDEVAC, utility and vertical replenishment mission. Photos by Clark PierceAT2 Nester Talcott tops off a shipping carton filled with "cranial" headgear and safety vests. AE3 Steven Virden and AM3 Daniela Dale tie down a ladder ontop of a carton of MH-60R maintenance tools. Spartans in the HSM-70 Ordnance Division prepare to secure four wood crates containing GAU-21 crewserved .50-caliber machine guns. HSM-70 Executive Officer Cmdr. Jeremy Vaughn con gratulates AM3 Justin Banks for his involvement with the paint scheme of Spartan No. 700 the squadron's "show bird." Plane captains in the Spartans' line shack secure cruise boxes onto pallets Feb. 7 for shipment to Norfolk, Va. The cargo will be loaded on board the aircraft carrier George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). (From left) AM1 Robert Orzescu, AM2 Matthew Ellison, AM2 Eric Clairday and (not shown) AM3 Justin Banks were the design-and-paint crew of the squadron's MH-60R "show bird." It took four coat ings of paint, topped by a clear coat, to achieve the distinctive appearance. (From left) AT3 Samuel Agustin and AT1 Andrew Parker check a hand-held ROVER (Remote Operational Video Enhanced Receiver) in the cockpit of an MH-60R helicopter assigned to the Spartans of HSM-70. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014 7

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Brusoe remarked, This award is largely due to the outstanding performance of our 104 firefighters, para medics and emergency medical technicians (EMTs). He noted, In 2013, we augmented the NSB Kings Bay Fire Department as they manned up for advanced submarine emergency response saving the Navy almost $1 million in personnel costs. We also sup ported major music concerts and other events at NS Mayport, in addition to training for shipboard emer gencies. We provide service not only to the two naval bases, but also to the Pinecastle Range Complex, and Outlying Landing Field Whitehouse. The department also converted its ambulance ser vice to advanced life support (ALS) transport; main tained memorandums of understanding with local counties to provide mutual aid response; hosted spe cialized hazardous materials and technical rescue teams at training events; provided CPR/automated external defibrillator (AED) training for base secu rity and Navy Exchange personnel; and assisted home ported ships at NS Mayport with annual fire hose test ing. First Coast Navy F&ES Firefighter/EMT Justin Uhrmacher said, Our leadership is dedicated to training. We expect a lot from each other and perform as expected. Theres a lot of fire and rescue expertise here and we demonstrated that in 2013 with a num ber of successful ALS runs, confined-space and highangle rescues. Elizabeth Lynch is a First Coast Navy F&ES firefight er/EMT who said the CNRSE Fire Department of the Year award was indicative of the goal-oriented leader ship at NAS Jax and NS Mayport. Our paramedics are all certified for ALS, which allows us to transport victims to hospitals off base when needed. First Coast Navy F&ES Firefighter Joey Fields said, This department is always moving up when it comes to building proficiency and teamwork. As we build our careers, we also train up to expand our capabilities. Brusoe added, We also have a superb fire preven tion program at NAS Jax and NS Mayport. They do an outstanding job educating the public on fire safety through lectures and demonstrations. They are also responsible for inspecting every building on base for fire hazards. Firefighters at both bases also spend many hours training to increase their proficiencies in emergency situations. Some of this certified training includes advanced life support, hazardous materials, rappel ling, damage control and evacuation on board ships, and exercising with the mobile aircraft live fire train er. The core competencies of First Coast Navy F&ES are: First Coast Navy F&ES will represent CNRSE in the upcoming Commander, Navy Installations Command F&ES competition. Each region may submit nominations in 11 catego ries: Large, Medium and Small Fire Department of the Year; Fire Prevention Program of the Year; Fire Service Instructor of the Year; Heroism Award; Military and Civilian Firefighter; and Military and Civilian Fire Officer of the Year. The winners in those categories are the Navy nomi nees for the corresponding DoD F&ES Awards. The EMS Provider of the Year and Navy Fire Chief of the Year are Navy only awards. FIRE AWARDFrom Page 1 By MC1 Brianna DandridgeA Navy Recruiting District (NRD) Jacksonville recruiter received national recognition as the Navy Recruiting Command Diversity Officer Recruiter of the Year for 2013. LS1 Cesar Serna, was recognized Feb. 7 from among his peers for performing exemplary service in recruiting the next generation of Sailors. Born in South America and raised in Summit, N.J., Serna has been in the Navy for more than 12 years. According to Serna, the key to being a successful recruiter is to stay focused, motivated and flexible. As the diversity officer for Navy Operational Support Command Orlando, Serna recruits the best of the nations young men and women and ensures the prop er screening and processing of all applicants. Using my life story as an example of what you can do in the Navy has also helped me succeed in recruit ing, Serna said. He is humbled and thankful for receiving the award. As recruiters continue to fill positions in the fleet, it is important to reach diverse communities and resourc es to find qualified men and women to join the Navy. I love the fact that the Navy offers unique oppor tunities to people that would never have had them available, said Serna. As a recruiter, you can see the immediate impact you can make in your community. Serna passes both mentorship and leadership down to the young men and women he puts into the Navy. Newly accepted candidates have a great many ques tions about the career path ahead of them. I use different resources available, like prior col legiates already in the fleet and recruiting officers to help them get a better sense of what they should expect, said Serna. According to him, the most challenging aspect of recruiting is to ensure quality men and women are entering the military. The Navy benefits from getting the best applicants and therefore more competitive Sailors. According to Chief of Naval Operations Jonathan Greenert, diversity within our force will be viewed as an integral part of the Navys effectiveness in warf ighting, operating forward and being ready. Being able to speak Spanish has allowed me to relate to minority groups and associations at the schools, said Serna. I find pride in our new genera tion looking to serve our nation for patriotic reasons vice monetary incentives. The dedication of recruiters provides both a fit and diverse force to military service. NRC consists of a command headquarters, two Navy Recruiting Regions and 26 Navy Recruiting Districts that serve more than 1,500 recruiting stations across the country. NRD Jacksonville Sailor named Recruiter of the YearPhoto by Morgan KehnertTop NGIS employee recognizedNavy Gateway Inns and Suites General Manager John Houdek (right) presents Judith Saflor, lead front desk associate with the Employee of the Year 2013 award on Feb. 3. Saflor's attention to detail and her "never quit" attitude ensured that all front desk associates were certified through the Commander, Navy Installations Command Certification program ahead of schedule while continuing to excel in her role as lead associ ate. Without hesitation, she effortlessly stepped into the position of front office manager while her supervisor was out for an extended absence. During that time, her leadership and supervisory skills kept the operation running smoothly. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014

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port of Military Saves Week at NAS Jacksonville Feb. 6. Military Saves Week runs from Feb. 24 through March 1 and is intended to encourage service members to make responsible financial decisions to build wealth and reduce debt. The proclamation officially recog nizes the week and calls on all service members throughout the Southeast Region to take action to improve their individual and household financial sit uations. Personal financial stability is an important issue for all of our Sailors, Williamson said. Its very difficult for Sailors and families who are experi encing financial difficulties to focus on the mission. Our goal with Military Saves Week is to encourage everyone to assess their financial situation and ask themselves what they can be doing to improve it. We have financial advi sors and resources available through the Fleet and Family Support Centers (FFSC) for those who could use a little help. Military Saves is a social marketing campaign to persuade, motivate and encourage military families to save money every month and to convince leaders to be aggressive in promoting automatic savings. It is a part of the Department of Defense (DoD) Financial Readiness Campaign and has been a partner with DoD since 2003. The campaign has been a success for more than ten years now, said Carol Lucius, Southeast Region work and family life coordinator. If a Sailor has a certain financial goal, whether its set ting up an emergency cash fund, get ting out of debt or saving for retirement, Military Saves can help them develop those goals and take action. The program focuses on helping service members achieve their finan cial goals by providing savings advice, financial tools and resources, and moti vation. According to Lucius, the pro gram has a tremendous impact on serv ice members because they routinely face extraordinary circumstances. Deployments and frequent moves can be big financial strains on military households and good financial plan ning for both events is essential for success, Lucius said. FFSC person al financial managers (PFM), who are accredited financial counselors, will sit down with a family and help them execute a comprehensive financial planning worksheet to illustrate their current financial situation and to help them plan for the future. Whether a family is in good financial shape or not, PFMs will work with them to improve their financial situation. The Military Saves campaign is not only targeted at service members, but at the entire family, because spouses and children also play a huge role in overall financial stability, Lucius said. The personal financial readiness of our service members and their fami lies directly supports mission readiness, and engaging our military spouses is important, as they play a vital role in maintaining financial discipline and stability within a military family, she said. Another important aspect of the campaign is helping kids develop finan cial skills. The Military Youth Saves program is specifically designed to encourage kids and teens to develop good savings habits at a young age. According to Williamson, raising awareness about Military Saves and promoting effective financial planning and decision making is the responsibil ity of all leaders throughout the region, not only during Military Saves Week, but year round. I think its important for leaders at all levels of the chain of command to spread awareness about the Military Saves program and the resources avail able to our Sailors, Williamson said. While we look to observe Military Saves Week later on this month, respon sible financial planning is a year-round effort and there is always somewhere to turn for Sailors in need of assist ance. I encourage leaders throughout the region to make sure that message is heard. Service members or dependents that would like more information about resources and services offered through Military Saves, or organizations who would like to find out how they can sup port the program, should contact their local FFSC. In addition, more informa tion is available at http://www.militar ysaves.org/. MILITARY SAVESFrom Page 1 Finance Makeover Re$ource Night ADDRESSING THE NEEDS OF MILITARY FAMILIES AND PLANTING THE SEEDS FOR A SECURE FUTURE FREE child care will be provided onsite. Space is limited and pre registration is required. To register for child care: Call (904) 542 4718 and ask for Christianne Provide childs name, contact information for sponsor, emergency contact information To ensure your spot register as soon as possible. All registrations for child care must be received by 3pm on February 20th. Sponsored by: Keys to Financial Success for Military Families C O M E J O I N U S FREE pizza and drinks FREE child care Guest Speakers Resources Tips for Financial Success W h e r e : Youth Activity Center 2069 Mustin Road NAS Jacksonville W h e n : Thursday, Feb 27, 2014 6pm 8pm F o r m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n o n t h i s g r e a t e v e n t p l e a s e c a l l R u f u s B u n d r i g e a t ( 9 0 4 ) 5 4 2 4 9 7 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014 9

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From staff Jesse LeRoy Brown was born in Hattiesburg, Miss. on Oct. 13, 1926. Educated in the pub lic schools of Hattiesburg, he attended Ohio State University College of Engineering, prior to enlisting in the U.S. Naval Reserve on July 8, 1946. Brown reported for active duty the following year at Glenview, Ill. His enlistment was terminated to accept appointment as Midshipman, U.S. Navy, and on Apr. 9, 1947, he reported to the Navy PreFlight School, Ottumwa, Iowa, for flight training. Ensign Brown received further flight training at NAS Pensacola, Fla. He was detached June 22, 1948 to NAS Jacksonville, Fla. for duty with Fighter Advanced Training Unit (VF-ATU) 2 flying the Grumman F6F Hellcat. Brown was designated a naval aviator (heavier-than-air) Oct. 21, 1948. Wearing his new wings of gold, Brown report ed to Fighter Squadron (VF) 32 on Jan. 4, 1949, where he flew the F4U-4 Corsair and sub sequently deployed with his squadron on USS Leyte (CV32). He took the oath of his com missioning at sea, adminis tered by Capt. W. I. Erdmann, commanding officer of the Leyte, in June 1949. Ensign Brown flew 20 missions while assigned to VF-32, with the Leyte having joined the 7th Fleet by then, in the combat operating area off the northeast coast of Korea. For this service, Brown earned the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps Air Medal. The citation reads: For meritorious achieve ment in aerial flight as pilot of a fighter plane in Fighter Squadron 32, attached to the USS Leyte, in action against enemy aggressor forces in Korea from Oct. 12. to Nov. 7, 1950. Completing 10 missions during this period, Ensign Brown participated in close-air support flights and carried out daring bombing and strafing attacks against enemy lines of communication, transporta tion facilities, military instilla tions and troop concentrations at Wonsan, Chongjin, Songjin and Sinanju. Leading his section in the face of hostile antiaircraft fire, he vigorously pressed home his attacks, thereby contribut ing materially to the success of his division in inflicting seri ous losses upon the enemy and in providing effective support for friendly ground forces. His courage, skilled airmanship and unswerving devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. Brown was also the first African-American Naval officer to loose his life in combat. On Dec. 4, 1950, while flying with Lt. j.g. Thomas Hudner Jr. in close-air support for Marines fighting near the Chosin Reservoir, Browns plane was hit by enemy gunfire and crashed. Hudner crash-landed his own plane nearby to help the injured pilot. Risking his own life to save Brown, who was trapped in the burning wreck age, Hudner packed snow bare handedly around the fuselage while under continuing enemy attack, but in vain. Ensign Brown was entitled to the Korean Service Medal. He was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart Medal and the Distinguished Flying Cross. His citation for the DFC reads: For heroism and extraor dinary achievement in aerial flight as a fighter pilot and section leader in VF-32, attached to the USS Leyte, in action against enemy aggressor forces in the Korean Area from Oct. 12 to Dec. 4, 1950. Participating in 20 air strikes during this period, Ensign Brown led his section in daring attacks on enemy military instilla tions, lines of communica tions, transportation facilities and troop concentrations at Chosin Reservoir, Ta-ku-shan, Manpojin, Lin-chiang, Sinuiju, Kesan, Wonsan, Chongjin, Songjin, Kilchu and Sinanju. Flying in support of units of the 1st Marine Division sur rounded by enemy in the vicin ity of the Chosin Reservoir, he pressed home numerous attacks on hostile troops mov ing to attack our forces, con tinuing his aggressive behav ior runs despite heavy opposi tion until his plane was fatally struck by enemy anti-aircraft fire. His exceptional courage, airmanship and devotion to duty in the face of great danger reflect this highest credit upon Ensign Brown and the United States Naval Service. He gal lantly gave his life for his coun try. The first U.S. Navy ship to be named in honor of a black Navy officer was named in honor of Brown. USS Jesse L. Brown (DE 1089), a Knox-class ocean escort ship, was launched March 18, 1972 at Avondale Shipyards in Westwego, La. She was designed to operate as an anti-submarine ship, a screening unit, or as a patrol or convoy ship. Upon commis sioning early in 1973, she was homeported at Newport, R.I., as a unit of Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla Two. Ensign Browns widow served as sponsor of the ship, and the principle address was given by Capt. Thomas Hudner Jr. In July 1975, she was reclassi fied as a frigate and designated FF-1089. Her career was spent with the Atlantic Fleet, and included several deployments to the Mediterranean Sea, the Persian Gulf and northern European waters. Jesse L. Brown was trans ferred to the Naval Reserve in January 1992, and was redesig nated FFT-1089. Jesse L. Brown was decom missioned in July 1994 and transferred to the Egyptian Navy, in which she served as Damietta (F-961). Remembering the Navys first black combat aviatorU.S. Navy photoEnsign Jesse Leroy Brown (third from left), becomes the first African-American to receive his aviator wings through the Naval Aviation Cadet Program during a graduation ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Oct. 23, 1948. During the Korean Conflict, his squadron (VF-32) operated from USS Leyte (CV-32), flying F4U-4 Corsair fighters in support of United Nations forces. On Dec. 4, 1950, while on a close-air support mission near the Chosin Reservoir, Brown's plane was hit by enemy anti-aircraft fire and crashed. Despite heroic efforts by other aviators, he could not be rescued and died in his aircraft. Brown was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for his combat service in the Korean Conflict.Photo by MC3 Mikelle SmithMedal of Honor recipient retired Capt. Thomas Hudner salutes as taps is played during the Centennial of Naval Aviation Wreath Laying Ceremony held Dec. 1, 2011 at the United States Navy Memorial in Washington D.C. Hudner received the medal of honor for his heroic efforts as he attempted to rescue Ensign Jesse Brown during the Korean War. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014 11

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XO reaches new heights in GEMD spot inspectionBy Clark PierceEditorNAS Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker visited the Ground Electronics Maintenance Division (GEMD) recently to perform quality assurance compliance for the tactical air navi gation (TACAN) system that military pilots use to determine bearing and distance to an airfield. Division LCPO Jose Luna explained, Many mainte nance procedures require maintenance and material management (3M) spot checks to ensure compliance with proper maintenance procedures. This is key to maintaining aviation safety at NAS Jacksonville. After reviewing the TACAN maintenance records, well drive Capt. Wanamaker to the TACAN tower near the middle of the airfield where he will review the 3M requirement cards and then perform a bottom-totop visual inspection, said Luna. Wanamaker said that he performs periodic 3M inspections at different departments throughout the base. Unlike the galley, the barracks or the air ter minal, todays inspection is challenging because it requires me to climb aloft about 70 feet with a GEMD maintainer. Wearing a safety harness is mandatory, so we should be safe and secure. He added, The Navys 3M program is very impor tant in maintaining readiness. Ill be performing a visual quality assurance check of a recent TACAN maintenance procedure. The NAS Jacksonville GEMD provides inspection, maintenance and repair of airfield navigation aids, radar, communications and ancillary electronic equipment, including runway lighting. GEMD also performs periodic testing, maintenance and repair of air traffic control navigational aids and VHF/UHF communications. NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker looks on as IC2 Jayson Bankhead performs a communications check inside the station's TACAN tower facility.Photos by Clark Pierce(From left) ETSN Cody Utsler, NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker and ET1 Nic Stersic unload climbing safety harnesses prior to going 70 feet aloft to the TACAN beacon. Their inspection com plete, NAS Jax Executive Officer Howard Wanamaker and IC2 Jayson Bankhead check safety harnesses before descending. IC2 Jayson Bankhead reviews documents of the most recent spot check for the tactical air navigation (TACAN) sys tem Jan. 31 with NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker. IC2 Jayson Bankhead leads the way up the NAS Jax TACAN tower as NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker awaits his turn. With their inspection complete, IC2 Jayson Bankhead and NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker carefully descend from the airfield TACAN tower. 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaokeFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per per son, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Jan. 18, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: Jan. 25, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Swim to Cuba Aquatic Program At the Indoor Pool Teams complete 30,000 laps and team members receive a t-shirt! Navy Run Training Program At the Fitness Source Running group meets every Tuesday at 4 p.m. Biggest Loser Challenge Eight-week program, teams of two Begins March 10 Aerobathon featuring TRX, spin, muscle max, boot camp, step, yoga, HIT and Zumba Feb. 15, 10 a.m. noon Fitness CenterI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Gatornationals March 1416 $30 $58 Disney Jr. Live $15 $29 Monster Jam $22 $42 Wild Adventures $30 $70 Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket $166 $194.50 Universal Orlando $114 $169.50 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Daytona 500 $62 $209 Drive 4COPD 300 $55 Budweiser Duels $55 Sprint Unlimited $30 $55 Rolex 24 $32 $65 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 The Artist Series Broadway in Jacksonville 2014 season, select shows Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2014 season, select shows Armed Forces Vacation Club www.afv club.com $349 $369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 Ripleys St. Augustine $4.25 $7.50 St. Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Wild Florida Airboats $17 $46.50 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off prop erty hotels located near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restrict ed to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Habitat for Humanity Volunteer Trip Feb. 15 at 8 a.m. Daytona 500 Trip Feb. 23 at 10 a.m. $40 per person Military Saves Week Feb. 2428 Take the pledge to save money!NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Daily Twilight Golf Special Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1 p.m. Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty Feb. 25 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests Feb. 13 & 27Mulberry Cove Marina Call 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you!Flying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person Photo by Morgan KehnertGolf expoSherman Turner tests out an Adams' Hybrid at the NAS Jax Golf Course Driving Range during the golf expo Feb. 7. Nine vendors were on hand to discuss new equipment and allow patrons to test out clubs. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014 13

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By Yan KennonNaval Hospital Jacksonville Senior WriterDid you know that Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles award -winning Wellness Center and Health Promotions offers individual and group classes that center on improving your health? Classes include tobacco cessation, weight management, health fitness and nutrition. The following classes are offered throughout the year: Choose My Plate (appointment or walk-in): Basic nutrition one-hour Health Fitness Assessment (appoint ment only): Body mass, exercise and basic nutrition two-day class (one individual session and one group ses sion) Healthy Heart (appointment or walk-in): Cholesterol management 90-minutes Sail A Weigh (appointment only): Healthy lifestyle/weight management six weeks (one hour per week) Ship Shape (appointment only): Weight management eight weeks (one hour per week) Tobacco Cessation (appointment or walk-in): Monday, 9 a.m.; Tuesday, 1 p.m.; Thursday, noon. For more information or to make an appointment, call 542-5292 or visit NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center locat ed at Building 867, adjacent to the NAS Jacksonville Fitness Source. By Yan KennonNH Jacksonville Senior WriterNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles primary care teams are now open lon ger to better serve patients and offer appointment times when they need them. Family Medicine (Green, Red, White and Yellow Teams), Internal Medicine (Blue Team) and Pediatrics (Purple Team) are now open Monday to Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Patients with a primary care man ager (PCM) at the hospital or branch health clinic are part of a Medical Home Porta collaborative team of caregiv ers (from doctors and nurses to case managers) led by the PCM. The team focuses on meeting all of the patients health care needspreventive, routine and urgent. To meet the PCMs on each of the commands 14 Medical Home Port teams, visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/navalhospi taljax Patients can reach their team by secure email, for non-urgent issues. Sign up for RelayHealth at www.relay health.com or on the commands web site by clicking on Medical Home Port. At the hospital, patients can call the appointment line at 542-4677 or 800529-4677, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Active duty patients at Branch Health Clinic Jacksonvilles Silver Team can call 546-7094/7095, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. After-hours nurse advice is available for patients at all sites at 542-4677 or 800-529-4677 on evenings, weekends and federal holidays.The run is free and open to all authorized points for their commands by participating. Sign up at NAS Jax Gym or the Fitness Source prior to the Feb. 7 deadline. The run is held on Perimeter Road at the end of Mustin Road, before the Antenna Farm at 11:30 a.m. Registration will also be held at the run site from 10:30-11:15 a.m. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. Call 542-2930 for rules and required paperwork. Play begins the week of Feb. 24. is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractor personnel ages 30 and older who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games are played on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 11:30 or designated representative attend will rules and required paperwork. active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors who work in a command at NAS Jacksonville. Games play in the evening. Commands whose Cup points along with rules and required paperwork. active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, DoD contractors, retirees, and dependents over 18. Games play in the or designated representative attend the along with rules and required paperwork. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Players earn participation points for their command or third. Register by Feb. 19. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractors assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Players earn participation points for their command or third. Register by Feb. 26. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. along with rules and required paperwork. Open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians and DoD contractors assigned to a command aboard NAS Jacksonville. along with rules and required paperwork. The tournament is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractor women assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants will earn participation points for their command or third. Sign up by March 21. The tournament is open to active duty, selective reservists, DoD civilians, and DoD contractor women assigned to a command at NAS Jacksonville. Participants will earn participation points for their command or third. Register by March 21. Open to active duty, retirees, dependents over 18, selective reservists, DoD civilians and contractors. The tournament starts at 5 p.m. at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts on the corner of Allegheny Road and Birmingham Road. Call 542-2930 to sign up by April 25. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil Standings As of Feb. 7 HSM-72 2 0 NOSC 2 0 Vet Clinic 2 0 VP-26 2 0 VR-58 2 0 VR-62 1 1 CRS-10 0 1 FACSFAC 0 1 ASD Jax 0 2 FRCSE 62A/690 0 2 NavHosp IMC 0 2 VP-62 0 2 CNATTU Blue 1 0 CV-TSC Ashore 1 0 FRCSE 1 0 Navy Band 1 0 NCTS 1 0 VP-45 1 0 CNATTU Gold 0 1 PSD Jax 0 1 SERCC 0 1 VP-10 0 1 VP-30 0 1 VR-58 0 1 VP-10 3 0 VP-30 3 1 NAVHOSP 2 1 FRCSE 2 2 VP-26 2 2 FLCJ 1 2 NAVFAC 1 3 NCTS 0 3 FRCSE 600 3 1 FRCSE 700 3 1 NAVHOSP 3 1 VP-10 3 1 NAVHOSP Galley 2 2 VR-58 2 2 NAS Jax 1 1 TPU/PCF 1 2 VP-45 1 2 VP-26 1 3 NCTS 1 3 FACSFAC 0 3 File photoGreat American Spit OutHM3 James Freeman (left) explains to HM1 Jack Green some of the negative impacts smokeless tobacco can have on the mouth at the Great American Spit Out display at Naval Hospital Jacksonville in February 2013. The annual Great American Spit Out occurs in February as a means to raise awareness of the dangers associated with smokeless tobacco. Hospital clinics open longer hoursNaval Hospital Jacksonville invites you to get fit in 2014 NAS Jax Sports 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014 From StaffAngela Glass, assistant natural resources manager at NAS Jacksonville, participated in the Water Education Festival Feb.1 at the Museum of Science and History (MOSH) that was attended by more than 1,800 persons. Our Enviroscape model was used to show how pollutants from everyday activities affects the St. Johns River including methods to clean up oil and other toxic spills from the water, said Glass. Another demonstration showed how homeowners may increase the flow of nutrients into the river by over-fer tilizing which can lead to toxic algal blooms. When a bloom decomposes, it reduces oxygen levels in the river and may detrimentally affect other forms of marine life. The festival was sponsored the City of Jacksonvilles Environmental Protection Board. Displays and resourc es included: access to MOSH exhibits; marine wildlife touch tank; animal encounters with MOSH resident ani mals; kids games and crafts; and boat tours on the St. Johns River. By Jim GaramoneAmerican Forces Press ServiceOn the E-ring of the Pentagon hangs a picture of the Mercury 7 NASAs first group of astronauts. All were military test pilots: Marine Corps Maj. John Glenn, Navy Cmdr. Alan Shepherd, Air Force Maj. Gus Grissom, Air Force Maj. Gordon Cooper, Navy Cmdr. Wally Schirra, Navy Cmdr. Scott Carpenter and Air Force Maj. Deke Slayton. The military tie remains strong in the astronaut corps today, as NASAs new class of astronauts has six serv ing military officers. The group visited the Pentagon last week and met with Navy Adm. James Winnefeld Jr., the vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Air Force Lt. Col. Tyler Hague, Navy Lt. Cmdr. Josh Cassada, Navy Lt. Cmdr. Victor Glover, Marine Corps Maj. Nicole Mann, Army Maj. Anne McClain and Army Lt. Col. (Dr.) Andrew Morgan are the military members of the class. Drs. Jessica Meir and Christina Hammock are the civilians. The military astronauts like just about anyone else in the services today bring the experience of operating in Iraq. Hague worked to detect or jam improvised explosive devices. McClain flew helicopters in and around Kirkuk and Tal Afar. Morgan was a flight doctor who deployed with the 3rd Special Forces Group to Iraq. Until the inclusion of this class, the United States had fewer than 50 active astronauts. They serve in a variety of jobs, including at Mission Control in Houston or as liaisons with commercial space vendors. Others live and work with the Russian space agency. Those astronauts train in Star City outside Moscow, and at the launch facilities at Baikonur. All of the new astronauts are learning Russian, a development that probably would surprise the Mercury astronauts, who were selected at the height of the Cold War. It was a tough process to be selected. More than 6,100 applications went to NASA in 2011. For some, it wasnt the first experience. Hague, for example, first applied to be an astronaut in 2003. It boils down to two rounds of inter views, and the interviews consist of a lot of medical screening, Hague said. Theres not a lot of time away from ser vice during the selection process. Hague said he almost forgot he had submitted an application when he was notified he had been selected. His pack et had to go through the Air Force and NASA. His civilian colleagues had it a bit easier. Hammock, one of the civilians, said she simply filled out a resume on the USAJobs website and submitted it. The astronauts have begun their two years of training before their first flight into space. There are only a few slots for U.S. astronauts per year aboard the International Space Station. Some could be involved in development and testing of new spacecraft. And one could be landing on Mars someday. You never know where a gov ernment job can take you. Red Lancers bid farewell to ChisholmBy Lt. Charles SandfordVP-10 Public AffairsAVCM Clay Chisholm retired from the U.S. Navy Jan. 10, in a ceremo ny that capped a career that spanned 30 years, 10 deployments, and eight commands. Upon graduating from high school in Albuquerque, N.M., Chisholm worked various construction jobs until deciding to enlist in the Navy in 1984. He report ed to Naval Training Command in Great Lakes, Ill. embarking on a journey that would be more fulfilling than he could have ever imag ined. After completing A school and a fleet replacement squadron as an aviation electricians mate (AE), he reported to VAW-112 where he completed the USS Kitty Hawks around the world final cruise. Photos courtesy of NAS Jax Environmental DepartmentOn a table-top display, NAS Jax Assistant Natural Resources Manager Angela Glass (left) demonstrates how pollution affects people, animals and plants along the St. Jonhs River.Base supports water education festival(Left) Angela Glass, assistant natural resources manager at NAS Jax, shows youths and parents at MOSH on Feb.1 how pollutants from everyday activities can harm the St. Johns River.Photos by MC3 Brian FloodHS-11 helps replenish An SH-60F Seahawk helicopter assigned to the "Dragonslayers" of HS-11 lifts a pallet of supplies from the Military Sealift Command fleet replenish ment oiler USNS Kanawha (T-AO 196) and delivers it to the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) during a Jan. 30 vertical replenishment. Theodore Roosevelt is underway conducting training in preparation for a future deployment. Forklift drivers aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) wait for an SH-60F Seahawk helicopter assigned to the Dragonslayers of Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 11 to drop off a palate of supplies during a Jan. 30 vertical replenishment. Theodore Roosevelt is underway in the Atlantic conducting training. Photo by MCSA Matthew YoungAn SH-60H Seahawk helicopter assigned to the "Dragonslayers" of HS-11, flies over the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) on Jan. 30 during a vertical replenishment-at-sea. Photo by MC2 Kristin M. SchusterVice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO) Adm. Mark Ferguson receives a signed 8-ball from three visiting astronauts from NASA's 2013 astronaut candidate class at the Pentagon.New astronaut class visits PentagonPhotos courtesy of VP-10VP-10's AVCM Clay Chisholm is accompanied by his wife, Eileen, as he is piped ashore for the last time at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 117. AVCM Clay Chisholm hugs his daughter, Amanda Smith, as his son, Joe, looks on after he presented them with certificates of appreciation and flowers.See VP-10 RETIREMENT, Page 17

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014 17 In 1990, he joined the Wallbangers of VAW-117, deploying twice in support of Operation Desert Storm and Desert Shield. After a two-year tour, he depart ed VAW-117 as a first class petty officer and Sailor of the Year who returned to Albuquerque for an unforgettable recruiting tour in his home town. Rejoining the world of naval aviation, Chief Petty Officer Chisholm reported to VS-32 and got his first taste of run ning the show as maintenance control chief a position he would not relin quish for the remainder of his storied career. He then reported to VAW-120 in Norfolk, Va. During a detachment to NAS Key West, he was promoted to senior chief petty officer. In 2002, he returned to NAS Jacksonville, checking in with the VS-22 Checkmates. After another successful tour, Chisholm reported to Naval Personnel Command (NPC) in Millington, Tenn., where he assumed the position of placement coordinator for the P-3C community. While at NPC, he achieved the rank of master chief petty officer and was promoted to detailer in charge of all maintenance master chiefs across the entire Navy. In 2012, he reported to his final com mand, the Red Lancers of VP-10. As the squadrons MMCPO, he made two deployments, supervising the care and maintenance of more than 60 aircraft. Under his guidance the VP-10 main tenance team completed more than 20,000 man hours of labor. Chisholm led the Red Lancers main tainers with commitment and determi nation, upholding the the squadrons tradition of maintenance excellence. In what would be his final Aviation Maintenance Inspection, he led the Red Lancers to the highest score across the MPRA community within the pre vious 18 months receiving a Bravo Zulu from Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group. VP-10 Command Master Chief (CMDCM) Teri Zehnacker summed it up best during his retirement ceremony. Today the Navy and the Red Lancers bid farewell to an awesome main tenance master chief who is a leader, mentor, friend and Shipmate. We are thankful for his service to our country and our Navy. He will be missed by all those with whom he served. VP-10 RETIREMENTFrom Page 16 From Secretary of the Navy Public AffairsTraveling to both Brisbane and the Australian capital of Canberra, Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus met with U.S. and Australian government and military officials to reinforce the alliance between the two countries. The United States and Australia have an historic and extensive relationship, one that has been an anchor of peace and stability in the Asia-Pacific region, said Mabus. From exercises like RIMPAC and Talisman Saber to per sonnel exchanges at sea and ashore, our countries oper ate together cooperatively and seamlessly to enhance global and regional security, while building on shared experiences and strengthening our partner ship. In Brisbane, he met with the Australian Armys First Division leadership, the com mand responsible for the Joint Deployable Force Headquarters that oversees large-scale amphibious operations and training activities. While in Canberra, Mabus met with Australian Minister of Defense David Johnston, Secretary for Defense Dennis Richardson, Chief of Defense Force Gen. David Hurley, and Chief of Navy Vice Adm. Ray Griggs, along with members for their staffs where they dis cussed regional relationships, fleet operations and shipbuild ing, and energy initiatives. In addition to meeting with officials, Mabus participated in a wreath-laying ceremony at the Royal Australian Naval Memorial, Canberra, that hon ors sailors who have served in defense of their country. Mabus visit represents a con tinuation of the Department of the Navys focus on building partnerships designed to help distribute the burden of secur ing the global maritime domain based on alliances, shared val ues and mutual trust. From Navy Region Southeast Public AffairsGiving back to the commu nity is nothing new to Sailors. What volunteers often discover, however, is that they receive as much as they give. Sailors assigned to Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) found this to be true when they volunteered their time for a service project at the Ronald McDonald House in Jacksonville on Feb. 5. During the project, partici pants helped replace light bulbs and clean light covers on three floors of the facility, which pro vides lodging and support ser vices for critically ill, chroni cally ill and seriously injured children and their families. Volunteer efforts like this are very important to us, said Fay Weiss, Ronald McDonald House Charities of Jacksonville outreach coordinator. Were a 30-bedroom house with a small staff, so we rely heavily on the community and volunteer groups that come in to assist with meals, maintenance or housekeeping. Our volunteers are essential to serving our mission. According to MC1(SW) Greg Johnson, CNRSE volunteer coordinator, the project was an opportunity for Sailors to build camaraderie while having a positive effect on the local com munity. I think its important for the Navy to maintain a strong presence in the community because we have the peo ple and resources to have an impact, Johnson said. When you visit a place like this, it puts into perspective how much you take for granted. The families and children here are probably going through a tougher time than most of us could imagine and this house is here to make that time a little less stressful. Hopefully our efforts contrib ute to that goal. The house is located about a block away from Wolfson Childrens Hospital and Nemours Childrens Clinic, where many of the children receive treatment. While guests are asked to give a $10-pernight donation for the duration of their stay, no family is turned away if they cannot make the payment. Since opening in 1988, the house has served more than 32,000 families. In addition to providing lodging and reduced travel expenses for families, it also facilitates an emotionallysupportive environment where families can connect with oth ers who may be going through similar situations, Weiss said. I think spending the day out here and helping out with what we can is the very least we can do, said RPSN(SW) Abraham Dukuly, a volunteer. For us, it is a small contribu tion, but it still means a lot to the staff here. Its absolutely a rewarding experience, consid ering the mission of the Ronald McDonald House. The house operates solely on donations from the local com munity and volunteer projects and has shared a particularly special relationship with the local military, Weiss said. We are so grateful to our military volunteers, Weiss said. They are so dedicated to whatever it is they are asked to do, whether its gardening and raking leaves in the courtyard or cleaning indoors. According to Weiss, those efforts are appreciated not only by the houses staff, but by the families who stay there as well. What is extraordinary about military volunteers is their effect on the families, Weiss said. A lot of families realize they are enlisted, and for ser vice members to take the time to do this, it demonstrates to them that there are armies of people out there who care about what they are going through. One of the volunteers under stood firsthand why families who stay at the house appreci ate volunteer efforts. QMC(SW) William Chase has stayed at the house twice once in 1999 when his first son was born pre mature and again in 2001, when his second son was born pre mature. Without the Ronald McDonald House, we would have had to pay for months of hotel bills, Chase said. Not to mention, they provide trans portation services and a vari ety of other things at the house, such as arts and craft nights for the kids and all kinds of other activities. Its important because it takes away some of the stress surrounding the situ ation and lets you just concen trate on your child. Thats why I feel like I want to give back to the charity. I try to volunteer every chance I get. Ronald McDonald House Charities was founded in 1974. The first house opened in Philadelphia and was funded by McDonalds restaurant pro ceeds donated by local owners. Today, there are 309 houses in more than 50 countries world wide. MC2 Amanda CabasosNAS Jax staff writerFor individuals in search of great deals and inexpensive items, the Not New Shop is available for service members, retired military and spous es, located at the NAS Jax Main Gate, Building 13. The thrift shop is operated by members of the Navy Wives Clubs of America, No. 86, a non-profit organi zation comprised mainly of wives of enlisted Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard Personnel. The shop accepts donated items such as military uniforms, civilian clothes, baby necessities, household goods, toys and other various knick knacks. We are here to serve our service members, said Chris McCloskey, one of the chairmen of the thrift shop. All of our uniforms and other items are donated to us by generous people. We resell them to our military members and families as low cost. CS2(SW) Samuel McKever, of Naval Hospital Jacksonville said, I am here today to look for a pair of pants for my dress blue uniform. Ive been here a few times and every time I come, I always find what I am looking for. I would rec ommend the thrift shop to anyone. The thrift shop is open every Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tax forms are available for those interested in donating items. According to McCloskey, many ser vice members are unaware of the base thrift shop. We would like to spread the word to let service members know we are here, said McCloskey. We know some service members cant afford uniforms and this is a good way find the items they might need. I know that when my husband was in the service, the prices were high back then. We want service members to feel good and leave here with some money still in their pockets. Retired Navy Seabee Edward Ross said, This is my first time here and I am actually glad I stopped by because the thrift shop has a lot of things to offer. According to McCloskey, there is a thrift shop on or near almost all the military installations and she advises service members to check their base every time they relocate. For more information, please call 5421582. Mabus concludes Australia visitPhoto by MC1 Arif PataniSecretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus reviews Royal Australian Navy personnel during a visit to Australian defense headquarters in the countrys capital. Mabus is in the region to meet with Sailors and Marines, and civilian and military officials, as part of a multi-nation visit to the U.S. Pacific, European, and Central Command areas of responsibility.Photo by Clark PierceOne of the Royal Australian Navy's 725 Squadron MH-60R Seahawk helicopters prepares to lift off from the seawall of NAS Jacksonville, Fla. When training is complete, RAN will operate 24 Romeos seven for its training squadron (725) and 17 for its operational squadron (816) that will deploy on board RAN sur face combatants. NAS Jax plays a partFrom Staff CNRSE Sailors volunteer to brighten Jacksonville Ronald McDonald HousePhoto by MC1 Greg JohnsonRP2(SW) Abraham Dukuly removes a light cover while replacing light bulbs during a Commander, Navy Region Southeast volunteer effort at the Ronald McDonald House in Jacksonville. Base thrift store available for service membersPhotos by MC2 Amanda CabasosChris McCloskey of the Not New Shop, manages transactions for CS2(SW) Samuel McKever of Naval Hospital Jacksonville on Feb. 4. Naval Flight Officer Lt. j.g. Levi Blackwell of VP-45, checks out some uniforms in search of a flight suit at the Not New Shop.

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 13, 2014