Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
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Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note:
Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
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Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID:
UF00028307:02076


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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2014 VR-58 COC MPRF SIBLINGS JEOP AR DY! Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Adm. Harry Harris Jr., Pacific Fleet commander, saw first hand the advanced capabilities of the P-8A Poseidon on a Jan. 24 flight with the War Eagles of VP-16, home-based at NAS Jacksonville. The P-8A flew an eight-hour maritime surveillance mis sion over the East China Sea, highlighting the full range of the Poseidons game-changing intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) capabili ties. This is a super aircraft. Within just three months of arriving for its first-ever deployment, its already a huge leap forward in capability for the Pacific Fleet, said Harris. The software upgrades that were put in place last fall have paid off in providing an imme diate and effective advantage in Anti-Submaine Warfare, ISR and sensor integration. In my opinion, the P-8A is exceeding its key performance parame ters by a wide margin. This is exactly what we need to fight tonight. Send more my way! VP-45 Poseidon transition right on targetIn a prelude to their upcoming P-8A Safe for Flight (SFF) inspection, the VP-45 Pelicans successfully completed their Conventional Weapons Training Proficiency Inspection (CWTPI) Jan. 30 at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 511. Inspectors from Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) -11 Weapons School judged the proficiency of both avia tion electronics technicians (AT) and aviation ordnancemen (AO) through the process of wire-checking, uploading and download ing ordnance, such as torpedoes and chaff, on the P-8A aircraft. VP-45 Commanding Officer Cmdr. John Brabazon was impressed. According to the out-brief, our people in work center 230 well exceeded expectations. Their pride and professionalism really helped knock this inspection out of the park, he said. Brabazon added that CWTPI is the first inspection in the leadup to SFF, scheduled for the week of Feb. 24. Upon attaining SFF, we can begin flight operations in support of CPRW-11 objectives, that may include Exercise BALTOPS in northern Europe, and Exercise RIMPAC in the waters surround ing Hawaii. The Pelicans will fly the only P-8A asset in these exer cises designed to enhance interoperability between the U.S. Navy and our allies. VP-45 Executive Officer Cmdr. T.J. Grady said, Our P-8A transi Pacific Fleet commander takes close look at P-8 advanced capabilities Carrying on for fallen shipmateThe Mad Foxes of VP-5 visited Ramona Elementary School in Jacksonville Jan. 30 to continue their presence in the community and to honor their fallen shipmate, AT2(AW) Thomas Moore, who tragically lost his life last September. VP-5 hosted the first AT2(AW) Thomas Moore Memorial Baseball Clinic, fulfilling Moores longtime dream of teaching base ball to children who might not normally be exposed to the sport. Moores father and childhood coach, Dwight Moore, drove to Jacksonville from Durham, N.C., to see his sons dream come to fruition. Thomas always wanted to coach baseball, even more so after he had [his son] Zachary, said Moore. He always wanted to give back to kids in the community. He was not only a dedicated Sailor and father, but also an extremely talented baseball player. Moore started playing baseball at the age of four and pitched his first no-hitter at the age of 12. He continued to pitch through junior college. Upon joining the Navy, he tried out for and was selected to play on the All Department of Defense (DoD) team, where he traveled to North and South America playing baseball on behalf of the United States military. During his time in South America, his vision was born. After playing baseball, the All DoD

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Feb. 6 1862 Union gunboat squadron cap tures Fort Henry on the Tennessee River. 1922 World powers sign the Washington Naval Treaty providing for limitation of naval armament. The treaty limited any new carrier to 27,000 tons. 1973 In accordance with the agree ment at the Paris Peace Talks, Navy Task Force 78 begins Operation End Sweep, the mine clearance of North Vietnamese waters of mines laid in 1972. Feb. 7 1800 USS Essex becomes first U.S. Navy vessel to cross the Equator. 1815 The Board of Naval Commissioners, a group of senior offi cers, is established to oversee the oper ation and maintenance of the Navy, under the direction of the Secretary of the Navy. 1950 In a demonstration of carrier long-range attack capabilities, a P2V-3C Neptune, with Cmdr. Thomas Robinson in command, took off from USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVA 42) near Jacksonville, Fla., and flew for almost 26 hours and 5,060 miles. Feb. 8 1862 Joint amphibious force cap tures Roanoke Island, key to Albemarle Sound in N.C. 1890 USS Omaha sailors and marines assist Hodogary, Japan in sub duing large fire. Feb. 9 1799 USS Constellation (Capt. Truxtun) captures French lInsurgente. 1943 Organized Japanese resistance on Guadalcanal ends. Feb. 10 1862 Union gunboats destroy Confederate ships at Elizabeth City, N.C. 1900 Appointment of first naval gov ernor of Guam, Commodore Seaton Schroder. 1960 USS Sargo (SSN-583) surfaces at North Pole. Feb. 11 1862 SecNav directs formation of organization to evaluate new inven tions and technical development which eventually led to National Academy of Science. 1943 The Vought F4U Corsair fight er is flown on its first combat mission when 12 planes of VMF-124 (based on Guadalcanal) escorted a PB2Y flying boat to pick up downed pilots. 1971 U.S. and U.S.S.R. sign a treaty prohibiting the deployment of nuclear weapons on the ocean floor. Feb. 12 1945 USS Batfish (SS-310) sinks sec ond Japanese submarine in three days. 1947 First launching of a guided missile (Loon) from the deck of a sub marine, USS Cusk (SS-348), near Point Mugu, Calif. If you have three children, you know that the young est one often gets robbed. His scrapbook is half as thick as the others, and by the time hes old enough to care, the family has already done all the cool vaca tions and sightseeing trips. Oh, alright, so the middle child probably gets gypped, too. Or, at least, thats the way it might appear, because you middles never really speak up about it. You guys are quiet like that. My middle son, Owen, rarely complains, even though he could often make a good case. Hes shared a room with a brother since literally the day we brought him home for the hospital. I didnt feel sorry for him because many siblings share a room. I had planned for it to be that way until the kids went to col lege. Owens first bed his crib was next to big-broth er Fords toddler bed. Ford was two at the time. He had just been evicted from the crib when I went into labor early with Owen, and we were worried that he might try to crawl back in, or, worse, put blankets and pil lows in there with Owen. So Owens crib had a mesh, pop-up tent around it. He looked like he was sleeping on a safari. In the morning, we had to unzip the tent and get him out. The whole thing was rather ridicu lous, but the setup kept curious brothers safely out of the area. And if we had had a cat, it would have kept it out of the crib, too. Eventually Owen moved into a toddler bedright next to Fords. In all of our first four homes (thanks to all those Navy moves), Ford and Owen were always roommates. Late at night, while I was rocking baby Lindell in the other room, I could hear Ford reading books aloud to Owen. Sometimes, I would yell for them to, turn off the lights and go to bed already! Until that time Owen yelled back, But hes almost done reading me the Bible, Mommy. Oh, well . carry on, then. When Ford started third grade, he got a hankering to have his own room. This seemed to bother Owen at first. And, honestly, I wasnt going to allow Ford to move because I had always said that brothers sharing a room isnt such a bad thing. I mean, there are worse things in life, certainly. Except, by then, Lindell wasnt a baby anymore, and I worried that he felt left out. While Ford and Owen giggled in their room, Lindell was alone in his. So I let Ford move into a different room, and for about 12 (daytime) hours, Owen had a room to him self. I wish I could say the process was as easy as it seems, but the whole thing was a lot like a divorce. Emotions ran high, and there were plenty of belong ings to divvy up. Ford started to lock up high-value items in his new room because he knew Owen might try to retrieve them. Owen stared gloomily at the blank walls where Fords pictures used to hang. He made an argument that at least half of those pictures were his. Right? But by bedtime, we had already moved Lindell into Fords old spot. Now half of Owens room was filled with Scooby Doo, toy trains, stuffed animals and pic tures books. Still, he didnt complain. Through the ensuing years, Owen would periodical ly point out that Lindell snores and talks in his sleep. Owen had trouble falling asleep because of this. Also, as he matured, he was tired of having half the room belong to someone still in kindergarten. This fall, Owen finally complained. I want my own room, he said. Ive never had anything to myself since the day I was born. I was rather unsympathetic. Remember, there are worse things than sharing a room with a younger brother. The pleading continued. And then one day, Lindell said, Ill move out, Owen, and you can have your own room. I was so surprised and touched by Lindells selfless ness, I allowed the move to happen. We converted an unused room upstairs into Lindells new bedroom. Everyone had their own space, and Owen nearly burst with the possibilities of what to do with his very own room. A few weeks later, as I lay in my bed across the hall from Lindell, I heard what sounded like a chainsaw cutting wood. It was Lindell snoring. Then I heard talking. And more snoring. He snored (very loudly) all night. I thought, is this what Owen was talking about all those years? Is this what he slept through? And he never complained? And thats when I knew: Someday, when Owen is in college, his experiences sharing a room with Ford and Lindell are going to make him the most tolerant room mate ever. That and also because hes a middle child. Middle child gets his own room NAS Jacksonville announces an informational meeting to review the U. S. Navy proposal to establish a small defined search and rescue (SAR) training area in the St. Johns River off shore of NAS Jacksonville, that would limit public access in order to support con gressional mandated search and rescue training. Establishment of SAR training area would prevent anchoring of objects, such as crab traps, or unmanned vessels in the training area to help trainees avoid inju ry and prevent equipment damage. All fishermen, boaters and the general public are invited to attend the meeting Feb. 19, from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the South Mandarin Library, 12125 San Jose Boulevard, Jacksonville 32223. For further information about this public meeting send an email to stephen.biemiller@navy.mil. Public comments will be accepted until March 31, at NAVFAC_SE_SAR_PROJ@navy.mil or via regular mail at NAVFACSE SAR Training Area, NEPA Program Manager (EV21), P.O. Box 30, Jacksonville, Fla. 322120030.SAR information meeting set for Feb. 19

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VR-58 held a change of command ceremony Jan. 25 at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 1000 where Cmdr. Anthony Gutierrez assumed command from Cmdr. Richard Shettler. Capt. Mark Bailey, commander, Fleet Logistics Support Wing, served as guest speaker for the event while AEC Raymond Battle provided the invocation and benediction. Framed by one of the squadrons C-40A Clipper air craft, friends, family and squadron members listened as Bailey recognized Shettlers achievements not ing his accomplishments and unique leadership style spanning more than 30 years of service to the nation. [Shettler] has brought to this squadron levels of success that are absolutely unprecedented, said Bailey, who also noted that Shettlers success could not have been achieved without the sacrifices and support of his family, from his parents to his wife and children. Quoting Pulitzer Prize winning author Walt Whitman, Bailey said, The final test of a leader is that he leaves behind him in other men the conviction and the will to carry on. As I look at the men and women of VR-58 and witness their unparalleled dedication to their critical mission, it is clear to me that skipper Shettler has passed the final test as a leader with fly ing colors. Reserving his speech for the retirement ceremony following the change of command, Shettler thanked his family, friends and crew who served with him and then read his orders. Gutierrez assumed command of VR-58 following the reading of his orders and took to the podium to address the audience, as well as his new crew. I am going to make three promises to the men and women of VR-58, said Gutierrez. I will do my best to provide you the tools and work environment to oper ate safely and effectively every day. I am going to do my best to provide you with the potential and experi ence to manage the future of your careers. And lastly, I promise that all of you will have fun here. I am excited to assume command and I have big shoes to fill because Commander Shettler was an out standing leader, said Gutierrez after having the com mand pin attached to his uniform by his wife, Kathy. Im here to serve the troops and carry on the tradition of VR-58. Born in Dorchester, Mass., Gutierrez graduated from Bridgewater State College in 1991 with a bach elors degree in aviation science. He graduated from Aviation Officer Candidate School in 1995 and accu mulated more than 3,500 mishap-free flight hours in naval aircraft. In his civilian career, he is a first officer on a Boeing 777 with FedEx Express. Gutierrezs awards include the Air Medal, earned while flying more than 22 combat missions during Operation Noble Anvil, the Navy Commendation Medal, two Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medals, three NATO medals as well as various unit, campaign and service medals. In February 2012, he reported to VR-58 and served as executive officer since October 2012. When Shettler passed through side boys, the change of command ceremony transitioned to a dual retire ment ceremony for Shettler and Capt. John Donovan. Donovan, who served more than 30 years, was des ignated a naval flight surgeon in 1979. He logged more than 900 hours of flight time in 16 different naval air craft. Donovan retired alongside Shettler to conclude the days ceremonies. VR-58 Sunseekers hold change of command A CFC participant provided as a public service.Do not accept defeat. Fight deadly childhood diseases. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014 tion began in July 2013 as we followed the footsteps of VP-16 and VP-5. Until now, weve flown with our great train ing partners at VP-30. But when we reach our SFF milestone, well be oper ating under our own recognizance. VP-45 Command Master Chief (CMDCM) Tom Ayers said,SFF inspec tors will look at our P-8A Maintenance program, with a deep focus on mainte nance control and quality assurance. Our Sailors have really embraced the Poseidon and broken training thresh olds to attain qualifications at a rapid pace. From SFF, we move right into our 12-month Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle. The men and women of VP-45 are ecstatic to be part of this history making transition to the P-8A Poseidon. Its the fourth maritime patrol airframe the Pelicans have transitioned to since 1942, including the P5M Marlin, the P2V Neptune and the P-3 Orion, stated Brabazon. Up to this point, our Sailors have exceeded their training objectives but now theyre absolutely hungry to return to an operational status. So, let the IDRC begin. AE2 Ryan Fisher likes working on the new platform. Theres a lot less wire chasing trou bleshooting on the Poseidon. Its much more automated and user friendly for maintainers. If we run into an unusual problem, we can consult with a VP-30 or Boeing training representative to find a solution. Our work center is ready to work at our normal operating capacity. Itll be great when our second Poseidon arrives in April. AD2 Catherine Larkin is a plane cap tain (PC) in the VP-45 line shack. Being a PC requires a general base of knowledge about the entire aircraft and the maintainers who work on it. We take care of the squadrons P-8A sup port equipment, check fuel for contami nation, perform daily, turnaround and pre-flight inspections. PCs also provide move crews, in addition to the launch and recovery of the aircraft. AO2 Jamaal Davis led one of the two load teams in the CWTPI. These are young Sailors who per formed in a stellar manner. We loaded MK46 torpedoes and our ALE-47 chaffflare countermeasures system with zero discrepancies and no hits. VP-45 VP-45 by the numbers(as of Jan. 30) Pelican aircrew professionals: NATOPS qualifications earned by 19 pilots, 21 naval flight officers, 14 acoustic warfare operators, and 9 electronic warfare operators. Total training events executed: 2,157 (497 flight events, 1,660 simula tor events) Pelican maintenance professionals: 95 Qualified Proficient Apprentice 67 Qualified Proficient Journeyman 33 Collateral Duty Inspectors Two Collateral Duty Quality Assurance Representatives Eight Quality Assurance Representatives Seven Plane Captains

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014 5

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Cmdr. Gregory Guidry will relieve Cmdr. James Tran as the 10th officer in charge of Fleet Support Unit Five (FSU5) during a change of charge ceremony Feb. 6. Capt. Sean Liedman, commander, Patrol Reconnaissance Wing Eleven (CPRW-11), will preside over the ceremony. Guidry hails from Reserve, La. and enlisted in the Navy in 1987. He served on board USS Lexington (AVT-16) before attending the Naval Academy Preparatory School. He later graduated from the United States Naval Academy with a Bachelor of Science in Engineering and was commis sioned in 1995. Guidry was designated a naval aviator in 1997. After initial training in the P-3C he completed tours with VP-5 where he flew armed com bat missions in support of the Bosnian conflict. He then served as a Fleet Replacement Squadron instructor with VP-30; and cat apult and arresting gear officer on board USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74). He also completed a depart ment head tour at VP-10, fol lowed by staff duty as CPRW11s operations officer and chief staff officer. Guidry will lead the P-3C Orions Littoral Surveillance Radar System transition to the new P-8A Poseidon. Tran grew up in Northglen, Colo. and graduated the United States Naval Academy in 1994 with a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry and earned a Masters of Arts in National Security and Strategic Studies from the Naval War College in 2005. Tran was designated a naval flight officer in 1995 and fol lowing initial training reported to VP-9, followed by a tour as a Fleet Replacement Squadron instructor duty with VP-30 and catapult and arresting gear officer on board USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70). He then completed his department head tour with VP-8. His staff tours include CPRW-11 as the new tech nologies officer and with 838 Expeditionary Advisory Group Afghanistan as director of operations. Tran has led FSU-5 since June 2010 and will now serve at the Navy Research Laboratory, Washington, DC. IA Luncheon set for Feb 20NAS Jacksonville and the Northeast Florida Navy League Councils will host the NAS Jacksonville Individual Augmentee (IA) Recognition Luncheon Feb. 20 at 11 a.m. at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center. All NAS Jacksonville and tenant command Sailors who have returned from an IA assignment since May 1, 2013 will be recognized during the event. The guest speaker will be Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ 4th Fleet. There is no cost for the IA Sailor or Marine and their spouse. The cost for other military and civil ian guests is $10. Tickets may be purchased at the Fleet and Family Support Center, Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. -3 p.m. The deadline to purchase tickets is Feb. 13. Child care will be provided at the Child Development Center for children of IAs and spouses in atten dance. Families should call 542-9075, 30 days in advance to secure their drop-in space. To RSVP, contact your command CIAC or Bobby Johns at bobby.johns.ctr@navy.mil For more information, call 542-5637. Tax services availableThe VITA Self Service will be avail able to active duty service members, retirees and dependents, Reservists (active 30 days or pre-demobilization) and entitled former spouses from Feb. 4 through April 15. The service is for those whose adjusted gross income doesnt exceed $57,000. Those who qualify under the Military One Source will be able file their taxes for free using the H&R Block software. Volunteer assistance will be onsite; however volunteers are not permitted to prepare taxes. Those needing additional assistance outside the scope of the volunteers may be redirected to a nearby tax cen ter. The tax center is located at NAS Jacksonville, Building 4, Room 108 (Ranger Street). The center is open Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Tuesday and Thursday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. For questions or concerns, please contact LN1 Clinton Washington at 542-5974 or e-mail Clinton.washing ton@navy.mil. FSU-5 holds change of charge 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014

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The Navy joins our nation in celebrating the vibrant history and culture of African-American and Black Sailors during African-American/Black History Month throughout the month of February, as announced by NAVADMIN 016/14 released Jan. 27. Established in 1926 as Negro History Week, President Gerald R. Ford expanded the celebration in 1976 to include the entire month of February. This year, Navy commands are encouraged to celebrate and reflect on the theme Civil Rights in America. African-American Sailors have a legacy of honorable service that permeates our naval history through every major armed conflict since the Revolutionary War. During the Civil War, African-American Sailors fought on every kind of Union warship, accounting for 10 to 24 percent of each ships crew, and included eight Medal of Honor recipients. During World War II, the Golden Thirteen were an example of African-Americans breaking new ground in the Navy and in American society. In February 1944, 12 prior-enlisted black servicemen were com missioned as ensigns and a 13th was made a warrant officer. They were the first group of black servicemen to complete officer training in the Navy and led the way for future African-Americans. These 13 officers not only made a contribution to the Navy during World War II, but to society as well. By the end of the war, 64 African-Americans had become officers in the Navy. Striving for equality at home and blazing a trail for future African-American Sailors, Wesley A. Brown became the first black graduate of the United States Naval Academy in 1949, joining the Navys Civil Engineer Corps and retiring at the rank of lieutenant commander. He passed away May 22, 2012 after a dis tinguished career both in the Navy and in the civilian workforce. Edna Young was the first black woman to enlist in the regular Navy and later the first black woman to achieve the rank of chief petty officer. Young joined the Navy after the passage of the Womens Armed Services Integration Act July 7, 1948. In December 1996, Adm. Paul Reason became the first black naval officer to wear four stars and assumed command of the Atlantic Fleet, comprising nearly 200 warships, 1,400 aircraft, and 122,000 service men and women based at 18 major shore facilities. Vice Adm. Michelle Howard is recognized for many first accomplishments, including the recognition as the first female United States Naval Academy gradu ate to be promoted to the rank of admiral, the first black female to command a combatant ship, and the first black female promoted to two-star and three-star admiral. She has also been confirmed by the Senate to serve as Vice Chief of Naval Operations, the services No. 2 uniformed officer. She will be the first black and first woman to hold the job and the first female fourstar admiral. These outstanding examples of African-American Sailors are just a handful of those marking history with firsts and distinguishing the Navy as a force for free dom and equality. African-Americans continue to serve with distinc tion, now comprising more than 17 percent of our active duty Navy total force end-strength. Sailors and their commands are encouraged to use this month to celebrate and recognize the exceptional and distinc tive contributions and the unique histories and cul tures that our African-American shipmates bring to our Navy. More information on the many milestones achieved by black Sailors and the history of the AfricanAmerican Navy experience can be found at the Naval History and Heritage Command at http://www.his tory.navy.mil/special%20highlights/africanAmerican/ African-hist.htm. A full-color brochure on the history of African-Americans in the United States Navy is also available for download through the Naval History and Heritage Command link. Navy celebrates 2014 African-American/Black History Month JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014 7

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Led by VP-16 Commanding Officer, Cmdr. William Pennington Jr., the aircrew demonstrated why the P-8A is critical to the Navys rebalance to the Pacific. Admiral Harris visit high lights the significance of the P-8As role in the rebalance to the Pacific. The War Eagles were proud to showcase not only the capability of this lead ing-edge aircraft, but more so, the enthusiasm of our aircrew and maintenance profession als. Together, they are helping to set the foundation for how the maritime patrol and recon naissance force will operate going forward in this strategic region, said Pennington. The P-8A brings the latest avionics and onboard systems to the maritime patrol and ISR mission making it the most advanced anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare aircraft in the world. The P-8A features a techno logically agile open architec ture that enables the integra tion of modern and capable sensors, a robust communica tions suite, anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare weapons and acoustic/non-acoustic sen sors. It was a great honor having Adm. Harris visit our squad ron. Our Sailors have been working extremely hard the last two months, answering the demands of a high opera tional tempo, said Lt. Cmdr. Matthew Griffin, P-8A tactical coordinator. They have truly embodied the VP-16 motto, Anytime, Anywhere, Any task...Nothing But Excellence. In terms of mission effective ness and reliability, the P-8A represents a leap forward for the United States maritime patrol and reconnaissance community. The P-8A is a long-range air craft capable of broad-area, maritime and littoral anti-sub marine and anti-surface war fare, and ISR operations. The aircraft is a militarized Boeing Next-Generation 737 derivative. The aircraft has a maximum speed of 490 knots, a ceiling of 41,000 feet, and provides a range of more than 1,200 nautical miles with four hours on station. The P-8A is capable of deliv ering a number of weapons, including MK-54 torpedoes and Harpoon missiles. The multipurpose P-8A offers the joint, combined or naval operational command er a potent weapons platform with a rapid response time for worldwide employment. The P-8A is part of the Navys long-range plan to rotate newer and more capable aircraft to 7th Fleet to ensure the Navy is best postured to honor its secu rity commitments to the IndoAsia-Pacific and contribute to regional security and stability. Overall, as part of the rebal ance, military forces will reach a 60/40 split to the Indo-AsiaPacific by 2020. VP-16 Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel announced Jan. 30 Navy Vice Adm. Michael Rogers as President Obamas nominee to become commander of U.S. Cyber Command. In addition, the secretary announced that he designated Vice Adm. Rogers to serve as director of the National Security Agency, and chief of the Central Security Service. Rogers currently serves as the U.S. Fleet Cyber Command commander. If confirmed by the U.S. Senate, he will replace Gen. Keith Alexander, who has served as the NSA director since 2005, and the Cyber Command com mander since 2010. Additionally, the department is announcing that Richard Ledgett has been selected to serve as NSA deputy director. In his new role as the senior civilian at NSA, Ledgett acts as the agencys chief operating officer. He replaces J. Chris Inglis, who retired from the position in January. A Navy officer poised to become the services first woman and the militarys first African-American woman to achieve four-star rank was a guest of First Lady Michelle Obama Jan. 28 as President Barack Obama delivered his State of the Union address. Vice Adm. Michelle Howard, currently the deputy chief of naval operations for operations, plans and strategy, was nominated by the president and confirmed by the Senate in December to receive her fourth star and assignment as the vice chief of naval operations. Howards initial sea tours were aboard USS Hunley and USS Lexington. While serving on board Lexington, she received the secretary of the Navy/Navy League Captain Winifred Collins award in May 1987. This award is given to one woman officer a year for out standing leadership. She took command of USS Rushmore on March 12, 1999, becoming the first African-American woman to command a U.S. Navy ship. In 2010, she was the maritime task force commander for the Baltic Operations exercise under U.S. 6th Fleet. Her shore assignments have included service on the Joint Staff and in the office of the chief naval operations, duty as senior military assistant to the secretary of the Navy, and service as deputy commander of U.S. Fleet Forces Command. Howard is a 1978 graduate of Gateway High School in Aurora, Colo. She graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1982 and from the Armys Command and General Staff College in 1998, with a masters in degree in military arts and sciences. Vice Adm. Rogers nominated as Cyber Command commander/NSA directorFirst Lady invites Navy officer to State of Union address 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014

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NC1(SW) Vladimir Arias-Martinez and IT2(SW) Keston Adharsingh were named Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Senior and Junior Sailor of the First Quarter 2014, respec tively, Jan. 21. As a Navy counselor at Navy Region Southeast, Arias-Martinez assisted fel low Sailors with 13 C-WAYPoint appli cations and assisted in the coordination of a fleet engagement team visit with Navy Personnel Command that pro vided information to 800 sailors. He also conducted 10 career development boards and four reenlistments during the quarter that resulted in 100 per cent retention rate. As a command fit ness leader, Arias-Martinez led fitness enhancement sessions that contributed to the commands 100 percent Physical Fitness Assessment (PFA) pass rate. In addition, Arias-Martinez is pres ident of the First Class Petty Officers Association and the Multicultural Heritage Committee. His off base activities include volunteering with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northeast Florida and organizing food drives for the Mandarin Food Bank. NC1 Arias-Martinez is an outstand ing first class petty officer who hit the deck running since checking onboard, said NCC (AW/SW) Jacqueline Gonzalez. I wouldnt be surprised if we see his name in the CPO Selection Board Results NAVADMIN this year. According to Arias-Martinez, he could never have accomplished so much without the help of others within the command. I am honored to be representing CNRSE as the Sailor of the Quarter, said Arias-Martinez. We have an out standing chain of command who does nothing but support and take care of its Sailors. I couldnt be more happy. Adharsingh is assigned to the Regional Operations Center as a watch specialist. He quickly qualified in his current position in order to sustain mis sion readiness to include two drill exer cises that ensured all installations were 100 percent ready. He also serves as the Regional Operations Centers budget officer and saved the department hun dreds of dollars during his time in the position. Additionally, he enhanced situational awareness for region pro gram directors and special assistants by organizing more than10 briefings and teleconferences. An active member of the community, Adharsingh volunteered locally with Feeding the Homeless and Habitat for Humanity Jacksonville. He is also pur suing a bachelors degree in computer information technology at Excelsior College. IT2 Adharsingh always maintains an impeccable military appearance, said QMC(SW) Dexter Collins, Adharsinghs supervisor. Honesty and integrity are not just words they are at the forefront of everything he does. His professional ism and work performance clearly rep resent a Junior Sailor of the Quarter. Adharsingh said its a great honor to accept the award, however it was the support from people around him that contributed to his success. Im honored to be nominated and selected as Junior Sailor of the Quarter, and Im proud to represent the oper ations department and Commander, Navy Region Southeast, said Adharsingh. Individual selection criteria for the awards were based upon exemplary performance of tasks, contributions that enhanced organization accom plishment of command objectives, mis sion, teamwork or public image, and ones professional attitude toward self and others. CNRSE announces Senior, Junior Sailor of the First Quarter 2014 Navy joins NASA in Day of RemembranceFormer, current and future Navy astro nauts joined NASA employees and family members during a Day of Remembrance Jan. 31, at Arlington National Cemetery to honor fallen astronauts. Today, the NASA family joins the nation in pausing to remember the con tributions of those who lost their lives try ing to take our nation farther into space, said retired Marine Maj. Gen. Charles Bolden, the NASA Administrator. They were our friends, family and colleagues, and they were American heroes who exemplified our nations pioneering spirit and dared to risk their lives revealing the unknown. Our lives are better and our nation is stronger for their sacrifice. The ceremony took place during the week of the anniversaries of three fatal accidents: The Apollo 1 fire, space shuttle Challenger (STS-51L) explosion and space shuttle Columbia (STS-107) accident. Five Sailors died in the line of duty during these accidents: Lt. Cmdr. Roger Chaffee, Capt. Michael Smith, Cmdr. William McCool, Capt. David Brown and Capt. Laurel Clark. The best way to honor their memo ries is to keep pushing the boundaries of space exploration so that we can bring new knowledge and new benefits to our nation and our world, said Bolden. That is what our astronauts on the International Space Station are doing at this very moment. The Navy has been deeply involved in the U.S. space program since the begin ning, said Capt. Kathryn Hire, an active duty Navy officer and former NASA astro naut. From the first U.S. astronaut to fly in space, Alan Shepard in 1961, to Chris Ferguson, the commander of the 135th Space Shuttle mission in 2011, Navy astronauts contributed to many great achievements in space exploration. he Navy continues to add to NASAs space programs by employing seven active duty astronauts and enrolling two officers in the 2013 Astronaut Class. Lt. Cmdr. Josh Cassada, from White Bear Lake, Minn., and Lt. Cmdr. Victor Glover, from Pomona, Calif., are two of the eight total members of the class training with NASA to be our nations future space explorers and researchers. All members of the class attended the ceremony and listened attentively to the remarks given for their fallen predecessors. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014 9

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Navy brothers share last flight Lt. Conor ODonnell flew his last oper ational flight on a P-3C Orion with NAS Jacksonvilles VP-26 Tridents Jan. 24 alongside his younger brother, Lt.j.g. Rory ODonnell with the VP-10 Red Lancers. Conor, a patrol plane commander, graduated from the University of Florida in 2008 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Aerospace Engineering and was desig nated a naval aviator in 2010. He checked in to VP-26 in May of 2011 after complet ing initial training in the P-3C at VP-30. Rory, a patrol plane copilot, graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 2011 and recently checked into VP-10. I was honored to fly with Conor on his last P-3C flight. Its such a blessing to have two older brothers and role models to guide me along my career. Aviation has brought us closer and I hope we get to fly together again, he said. Conor added, It was great to fly with my brother, Rory on my last flight at VP-26 but it would have been even better if Brian had been able to join us as well. We are very grateful to both commands for giving us this opportunity. Conor and Rory are two of the four brothers that make up the ODonnell family, which is native of New Smyrna Beach, Fla. Their brother, Lt. Brian ODonnell, also a patrol plane commander, is cur rently deployed with the VP-8 Fighting Tigers to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. Their youngest brother, Nolan, is a senior at the University of South Florida, and hopes to follow in their footsteps and aviation success at some time in the near future. Aviation is a family trade for the ODonnell family as their father, Terry, a former Navy lieutenant, flew the C-1 Trader for four years during the Vietnam War. After his time of service in the Navy, he flew for Delta Airlines for more than 35 years. Conor will be checking out of VP-26 in February and moving to Corpus Christi, Texas where he will become a T-6 Texan primary flight instructor for the VT-27 Boomers. Meanwhile, Rory will pursue further qualifications in the P-3C and is slated to transition to the P-8A Poseidon next year. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014 11

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On Jan. 24, a group of homeschoolers were invited to explore the Black Point Interpretive Center at NAS Jacksonville. The event began with a brief introduction by the Assistant Natural Resources Manager Angela Glass, followed by a presentation by Christine Bauer, the facil itys Natural Resources Manager. Bauer spoke with the children about the local wildlife found on base, what their role is in pro tecting the animals, and various other educa tional topics like native plants and animals in our area, and the difference between predatory ani mals and their prey. Throughout the pro gram, the children were engaged in both answer ing and asking questions. After the presentation, the children were given paper and ceramic tiles to paint something from nature that could be found in the room. Casey Hogan, one of the mothers at the event said, Its really excit ing that NAS Jax is cre ating events for the Homeschool program because it is wonderful to get the families together. To find out about upcoming events, check out NAS Jacksonville MWR on Facebook or contact the Installation School Liaison Officer, Dawn Mills at 7782236 or by emailing dawn.m.mills@navy.mil Homeschoolers visit interpretive center Ribbons & Roses monthly meeting Feb. 11 Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles Ribbons & Roses, a breast cancer support group, meets Feb. 11 at 7 p.m. The meeting will be held in the hospitals General Surgery Clinic, on the second floor of the east annex. Naturopathic Doctor Todd Robinson will be the guest speaker. Robinson has supported clients both during and after treatment for breast cancer. He serves as Secretary of the Board for the Florida Naturopathic Physicians Association and operates Wellness Working Group at Jacksonville Beach. Naturopathic doctors have expertise in botanical medicine, clinical nutrition, homeopathy, physical medicine and lifestyle counseling. The group meets on the second Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. For more information, call 542-7857. 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014

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Who is Lt. Michelle DeGrothy?Imagine taking an online knowledge test just for fun, and then qualifying to fly out to Los Angeles, meet one of the most recognizable names in television and winning $27,900. For Lt. Michelle DeGrothy, a helicopter pilot with HSM-70, this unlikely scenario became a reality. After seeing promotions for Military Week on Jeopardy!, DeGrothy thought it would be fun to see if she had what it takes to be a contest on the long-run ning show. You dont get any immediate results back from the online test that tell you how well you did, so I had no idea what to expect, she said. A few days later, DeGrothy received an email invit ing her to audition in Tampa. The audition required her to take a written test, and participate in a mock Jeopardy! game with three other qualifiers. She also gave a personal interview and filled out several ques tionnaires. Its a long process and you never receive any feed back in regards to how youre doing or whether you are going to make the cut or not, said Degrothy. In fact, it wasnt until a few months after the audi tion that she received a call back asking her to be on the show. The date she was scheduled to appear fell too close to her squadrons deployment so DeGrothy had no choice but to decline the invitation and believe her chances of appearing on the show were over. Fortunately, she was contacted again by the show several weeks later and asked to appear in November. A lot of people ask what Alex Trebek is like. Hes a little intimidating and very smart. In fact, I think he knows most of the answers without having to look at them. Degrothys appearance on Jeopardy! aired mid-Jan uary and after winning three episodes she pocketed $27,900. Even though she is a Navy helicopter pilot, DeGrothy plans on putting her winnings toward the purchase of a private airplane. Overall, DeGrothy enjoyed a great experience, I was really nervous, but I had a lot of fun. I wasnt expecting to do well at all, but Im really glad I went through with it. Did you know that Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles award-winning Wellness Center and Health Promotions offers individual and group classes that center on improving your health? Classes include tobacco cessation, weight management, health fitness and nutrition. The following classes are offered throughout the year: Choose My Plate (appointment or walk-in): Basic nutritionone-hour Health Fitness Assessment (appointment only): Body mass, exercise and basic nutritiontwo-day class (one individual session and one group session) Healthy Heart (appointment or walk-in): Cholesterol management90-minutes Sail A Weigh (appointment only): Healthy lifestyle/ weight management six weeks (one hour per week) Ship Shape (appointment only): Weight manage menteight weeks (one hour per week) Tobacco Cessation (appointment or walk-in): Monday, 9 a.m.; Tuesday, 1 p.m.; Thursday, noon. For more information or to make an appointment, call 542-5292 or visit NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center located at Building 867, adjacent to the NAS Jacksonville Fitness Source. Naval Hospital Jacksonville invites you to get fit in 2014 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014 13

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaoke DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Jan. 18, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: Jan. 25, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Swim to Cuba Aquatic Program Begins Feb. 3 at the Indoor Pool Teams complete 30,000 laps and team members receive a t-shirt! Navy Run Training Program Begins Feb. 4 at the fitness center Running group meets every Tuesday at 4 p.m. Biggest Loser Challenge Eight-week program, teams of two Begins March 10 Aerobathon featuring TRX, spin, muscle max, boot camp, step, yoga, HIT and Zumba Feb. 15, 10 a.m. noon Fitness CenterI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Gatornationals March 1416 $30 $58 Disney Jr. Live $15 $29 Monster Jam $22 $42 Wild Adventures $30 $70 Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket $166 $194.50 Universal Orlando $114 $169.50 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Daytona 500 $62 $209 Drive 4COPD 300 $55 Budweiser Duels $55 Sprint Unlimited $30 $55 Rolex 24 $32 $65 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 The Artist Series Broadway in Jacksonville 2014 season, select shows Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2014 season, select shows Armed Forces Vacation Club www.afvclub.com $349 $369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 Ripleys St. Augustine $4.25 $7.50 St. Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Wild Florida Airboats $17 $46.50 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels located near attrac tions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restrict ed to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Habitat for Humanity Volunteer Trip Feb. 15 at 8 a.m. Daytona 500 Trip Feb. 23 at 10 a.m. $40 per person Military Saves Week Feb. 24 28 Take the pledge to save money! NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Daily Twilight Golf Special Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1 p.m. Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty Feb. 11 & 25 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests Feb. 13 & 27Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you!Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil OPERATIO N: I DENTIFICATIO NCancer is one of our children's biggest enemies; but if identied early, a child's chances of survival are greatly enhanced.Parents, please be aware of these warning signs: Call 800-822-6344 or visit stjude.org to learn more.A CFC Participant provided as a public service. 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014

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Team visited local orphanages and schools teaching children how to play baseball. After his days on the mound as a formidable southpaw came to an end, he focused his efforts to coaching children in local baseball leagues and in his own neighborhood. He always had a heart for others, said his father. Thomas always portrayed a father-like role from early on in life. His mindset was to always pay it forward. Although the rain and the freezing temperatures forced the Mad Foxes and the children indoors, they did not cancel the event. Rather, they set up coaching stations for the par ticipating students inside the cafeteria and auditorium. Out of the approximate 450 stu dents enrolled in the school, 76 children registered to attend in the after-school event. The children were taught the fundamentals of base running, hitting, pitching, catching, fielding ground and fly base balls, and basic physical condi tioning. The Mad Foxes prom ised the principal, LaShawn Russ, they would return March 14 and conduct the clinic out side on the baseball diamond. We are so very proud the Mad Foxes carried on petty officer Moores vision of service before self. These Sailors are everyday heroes who are mak ing a real and lasting impact on these children not only today, but every day they volunteer in the community, said VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Matt Pottenburgh, It was won derful for us to share the day with Dwight Moore. The chil dren got to hear about Thomas and the positive impact base ball had on his life. When the event came to a close and all of the children participated in each station, everyone gathered for a spe cial presentation of donated baseball equipment. VP-5 presented bats, gloves, hel mets and baseballs to Ramona Elementary School. This ensured the children could exercise their newly acquired baseball skills during physical education class and recess. Volunteerism is extreme ly important to the men and women of VP-5. The squadron has been averaging 75 hours of volunteerism each month since returning from deployment. They adopted Ramona Elementary last spring and have been very active in indi vidual classrooms, tutoring math and reading and even assisting in vision screening throughout the school year. As January was National Volunteer Month, Pottenburgh challenged the squadron to double their volunteer efforts. The baseball clinic was the finale of their volunteer efforts in January. I am so very proud to report the Mad Foxes volunteered 467 man-hours in January, said IS1 Cedrick Green, the VP-5 volunteer coordinator. We blew right past our skippers goal of 150 hours! The Mad Foxes are five months into their InterDeployment Readiness Cycle and remain on track for a suc cessful P-8A Poseidon deploy ment to the 7th Fleet area of responsibility. VP-5 Hospital clinics open longer hoursNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles primary care teams are now open longer to better serve patients and offer appointment times when they need them. Family Medicine (Green, Red, White and Yellow Teams), Internal Medicine (Blue Team) and Pediatrics (Purple Team) are now open Monday to Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Patients with a primary care manager (PCM) at the hospital or branch health clinic are part of a Medical Home Port a collab orative team of caregivers (from doctors and nurses to case managers) led by the PCM. The team focuses on meeting all of the patients health care needs preventive, routine and urgent. To meet the PCMs on each of the com mands 14 Medical Home Port teams, visit the command website at www.med.navy. mil/sites/navalhospitaljax Patients can reach their team by secure email, for non-urgent issues. Sign up for RelayHealth at www.relayhealth.com or on the commands website by clicking on Medical Home Port. At the hospital, patients can call the appointment line at 542-4677 or 800-5294677, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Active duty patients at Branch Health Clinic Jacksonvilles Silver Team can call 546-7094/7095, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. After-hours nurse advice is available for patients at all sites at 542-4677 or 800-5294677 on evenings, weekends and federal holi days. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014 From autonomy to information dominance: ONR forums beginOn the heels of a vibrant meeting between some of the nations top minds in autonomy and unmanned systems, officials at the Office of Naval Research (ONR) announced Jan. 23 they will host a similar gathering of experts on the subject of information dominance and C4I (command, control, communica tions, computers and intelligence) later this year. The events, called Focus Area Forums, are an initiative of Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder, the chief of naval research. The goal: bring together experts and find new and low-cost ways to support Navy and Marine Corps pri orities-and advance disruptive technol ogies for our Sailors and Marines. The lifeblood of scientific research is generating new ideas and sharing information, said Klunder. Bringing together multiple experts for a day allows us to really dive into the heart of various topics, to advance new ideas and technologies, and address chal lenges. Nearly 200 participants came to the Jan. 15 forum from across government, military services, academia, think tanks and industry to learn, share ideas, meet with ONR program officers and engage directly with senior naval lead ers. [See video highlights of the event here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =hAwDIOe4aHc&feature=youtu.be] This was ONRs first Focus Area Forum, and officials say the topic of autonomy is well-timed as the future force will increasingly rely on a hybrid of manned and unmanned capabilitiesand as potential adversaries advance and build inexpensive threats. Unmanned systems and autonomy are force multipliers, said Klunder. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert has noted the impor tance to the Navy and Marine Corps of staying on the cutting edge of autonomy and unmanned systems. In his Sailing Directions, Greenert notes: The reach and effectiveness of ships and aircraft will be greatly expanded through... unmanned systems, and adds that unmanned systems in the air and water will employ greater autonomy in future operations. Participants expressed strong support for the importance of the forum. One of the keys to advancing the field of autonomy is creating new col laborations across different disciplines that can bring important new ideas and methods to the research, said Dr. Marc Steinberg, the Science of Autonomy pro gram officer at ONR. Norah Ayanian, a computer scientist researching multi-robot coordination and human interaction at the University of Southern California, said: I think this forum has been great-I am having a lot of really good conversations with people. Having just started, I am look ing for collaborators, so I found a lot of people that have complimentary inter ests. Information dominance and C4I, the topics of the next forum, logically follow autonomy, experts say, since the pri mary mission of many unmanned sys tems is intelligence gathering. The Navy and Marine Corps are greatly interested in information dominance, as technol ogy has advanced in quantum leaps in recent years and potential adversar ies have invested heavily in advanced technologies designed to challenge U.S. advantages in the information domain. Innovative, forward-leaning C4ISR [command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance] systems will be required for future autonomous net worked sensors above, on and below the seas, Klunder said. When we combine this with our emphasis on electromagnetic maneuver warfare, we believe we are positioning our Sailors and Marines to best address future threats. ONR efforts in this field include work in computer network operations, tac tical communication networks, com mand and control capabilities and more. Officials say they hope to hold that Focus Area Forum by early summer. The annual Retiree Seminar will be held Feb. 15 at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center aboard NAS Jacksonville. The seminar will consist of various presentations and exhibits throughout the day to allow maximum exposure to represen tatives who can address retired pay issues, healthcare concerns, veterans ben efits, long term care and assis tance, and those issues for retirees approaching or at Social Security and Medicare/ TRICARE for Life age. This years seminar is focused on the grey area for Reservists reaching retired pay age, all U.S. Armed Forces retirees and SBP annuitants. The keynote speaker is retired Vice Adm. John Cotton, former chief of Navy Reserve and commander, Naval Reserve Force. He also served as the assistant dep uty, Chief of Naval Operations Warfare Requirements and Programs. He is a naval aviator with more 15,000 hours as a Navy and commercial pilot and has held command leadership positions of an FA-18 squadron, NAS Keflavik, Iceland, and the Pentagon Navy Command Center. For the past five years, he has been a corpo rate senior vice presi dent at DRS Technologies. Currently, Cotton serves as a defense and secu rity consul tant, is on the Secretary of Defense Reserve Forces pol icy board, is a Senior Fellow at the Joint Forces Staff College, and is the chairman of the board of trustees of the Navy/Marines/ Coast Guard Residence Foundation. To pre-register for the seminar call 542-5711 or e-mail at JAXS_NAS_RAO@ Navy.Mil Registration will also be taken at the door.Annual Retiree Seminar set for Feb. 15 The Clay County Veterans Service Office is now located on the second floor of the Clay County Administration Building at 477 Houston Street, Green Cove Springs, Fla. The former Veterans Service office location at 1565 CR 315 has been closed. The office is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The Clay County Veterans Service Office is staffed with a full time vet erans service officer and a part-time veterans program assistant who are both available and eager to assist veter ans and/or family members with filing claims and other related needs. Part of Clay Countys heritage is the countys strong ties to the military dat ing back to the early 1800s. Today, there are more than 24,000 veterans who call Clay County home. These veterans rep resent service to our nation from World War II through the current conflicts as well as decades of service during peace time. To make an appointment, please call (904) 269-6326.Clay County Veterans Services Office helps

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2014 VR-58 COC MPRF SIBLINGS JEOPARDY! Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Adm. Harry Harris Jr., Pacific Fleet commander, saw first hand the advanced capabilities of the P-8A Poseidon on a Jan. 24 flight with the War Eagles of VP-16, home-based at NAS Jacksonville. The P-8A flew an eight-hour maritime surveillance mis sion over the East China Sea, highlighting the full range of the Poseidons game-changing intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) capabili ties. This is a super aircraft. Within just three months of arriving for its first-ever deployment, its already a huge leap forward in capability for the Pacific Fleet, said Harris. The software upgrades that were put in place last fall have paid off in providing an immediate and effective advantage in Anti-Submaine Warfare, ISR and sensor integration. In my opinion, the P-8A is exceeding its key performance parame ters by a wide margin. This is exactly what we need to fight tonight. Send more my way! VP-45 Poseidon transition right on targetIn a prelude to their upcoming P-8A Safe for Flight (SFF) inspection, the VP-45 Pelicans successfully completed their Conventional Weapons Training Proficiency Inspection (CWTPI) Jan. 30 at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 511. Inspectors from Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) -11 Weapons School judged the proficiency of both aviation electronics technicians (AT) and aviation ordnancemen (AO) through the process of wire-checking, uploading and downloading ordnance, such as torpedoes and chaff, on the P-8A aircraft. VP-45 Commanding Officer Cmdr. John Brabazon was impressed. According to the out-brief, our people in work center 230 well exceeded expectations. Their pride and professionalism really helped knock this inspection out of the park, he said. Brabazon added that CWTPI is the first inspection in the leadup to SFF, scheduled for the week of Feb. 24. Upon attaining SFF, we can begin flight operations in support of CPRW-11 objectives, that may include Exercise BALTOPS in northern Europe, and Exercise RIMPAC in the waters surround ing Hawaii. The Pelicans will fly the only P-8A asset in these exercises designed to enhance interoperability between the U.S. Navy and our allies. VP-45 Executive Officer Cmdr. T.J. Grady said, Our P-8A transiPacific Fleet commander takes close look at P-8 advanced capabilities Carrying on for fallen shipmateThe Mad Foxes of VP-5 visited Ramona Elementary School in Jacksonville Jan. 30 to continue their presence in the community and to honor their fallen shipmate, AT2(AW) Thomas Moore, who tragically lost his life last September. VP-5 hosted the first AT2(AW) Thomas Moore Memorial Baseball Clinic, fulfilling Moores longtime dream of teaching base ball to children who might not normally be exposed to the sport. Moores father and childhood coach, Dwight Moore, drove to Jacksonville from Durham, N.C., to see his sons dream come to fruition. Thomas always wanted to coach baseball, even more so after he had [his son] Zachary, said Moore. He always wanted to give back to kids in the community. He was not only a dedicated Sailor and father, but also an extremely talented baseball player. Moore started playing baseball at the age of four and pitched his first no-hitter at the age of 12. He continued to pitch through junior college. Upon joining the Navy, he tried out for and was selected to play on the All Department of Defense (DoD) team, where he traveled to North and South America playing baseball on behalf of the United States military. During his time in South America, his vision was born. After playing baseball, the All DoD

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Feb. 6 1862 Union gunboat squadron cap tures Fort Henry on the Tennessee River. 1922 World powers sign the Washington Naval Treaty providing for limitation of naval armament. The treaty limited any new carrier to 27,000 tons. 1973 In accordance with the agreement at the Paris Peace Talks, Navy Task Force 78 begins Operation End Sweep, the mine clearance of North Vietnamese waters of mines laid in 1972. Feb. 7 1800 USS Essex becomes first U.S. Navy vessel to cross the Equator. 1815 The Board of Naval Commissioners, a group of senior offi cers, is established to oversee the operation and maintenance of the Navy, under the direction of the Secretary of the Navy. 1950 In a demonstration of carrier long-range attack capabilities, a P2V-3C Neptune, with Cmdr. Thomas Robinson in command, took off from USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVA 42) near Jacksonville, Fla., and flew for almost 26 hours and 5,060 miles. Feb. 8 1862 Joint amphibious force cap tures Roanoke Island, key to Albemarle Sound in N.C. 1890 USS Omaha sailors and marines assist Hodogary, Japan in subduing large fire. Feb. 9 1799 USS Constellation (Capt. Truxtun) captures French lInsurgente. 1943 Organized Japanese resistance on Guadalcanal ends. Feb. 10 1862 Union gunboats destroy Confederate ships at Elizabeth City, N.C. 1900 Appointment of first naval governor of Guam, Commodore Seaton Schroder. 1960 USS Sargo (SSN-583) surfaces at North Pole. Feb. 11 1862 SecNav directs formation of organization to evaluate new inven tions and technical development which eventually led to National Academy of Science. 1943 The Vought F4U Corsair fighter is flown on its first combat mission when 12 planes of VMF-124 (based on Guadalcanal) escorted a PB2Y flying boat to pick up downed pilots. 1971 U.S. and U.S.S.R. sign a treaty prohibiting the deployment of nuclear weapons on the ocean floor. Feb. 12 1945 USS Batfish (SS-310) sinks second Japanese submarine in three days. 1947 First launching of a guided missile (Loon) from the deck of a sub marine, USS Cusk (SS-348), near Point Mugu, Calif. If you have three children, you know that the youngest one often gets robbed. His scrapbook is half as thick as the others, and by the time hes old enough to care, the family has already done all the cool vacations and sightseeing trips. Oh, alright, so the middle child probably gets gypped, too. Or, at least, thats the way it might appear, because you middles never really speak up about it. You guys are quiet like that. My middle son, Owen, rarely complains, even though he could often make a good case. Hes shared a room with a brother since literally the day we brought him home for the hospital. I didnt feel sorry for him because many siblings share a room. I had planned for it to be that way until the kids went to college. Owens first bed his crib was next to big-brother Fords toddler bed. Ford was two at the time. He had just been evicted from the crib when I went into labor early with Owen, and we were worried that he might try to crawl back in, or, worse, put blankets and pil lows in there with Owen. So Owens crib had a mesh, pop-up tent around it. He looked like he was sleeping on a safari. In the morning, we had to unzip the tent and get him out. The whole thing was rather ridicu lous, but the setup kept curious brothers safely out of the area. And if we had had a cat, it would have kept it out of the crib, too. Eventually Owen moved into a toddler bedright next to Fords. In all of our first four homes (thanks to all those Navy moves), Ford and Owen were always roommates. Late at night, while I was rocking baby Lindell in the other room, I could hear Ford reading books aloud to Owen. Sometimes, I would yell for them to, turn off the lights and go to bed already! Until that time Owen yelled back, But hes almost done reading me the Bible, Mommy. Oh, well . carry on, then. When Ford started third grade, he got a hankering to have his own room. This seemed to bother Owen at first. And, honestly, I wasnt going to allow Ford to move because I had always said that brothers sharing a room isnt such a bad thing. I mean, there are worse things in life, certainly. Except, by then, Lindell wasnt a baby anymore, and I worried that he felt left out. While Ford and Owen giggled in their room, Lindell was alone in his. So I let Ford move into a different room, and for about 12 (daytime) hours, Owen had a room to himself. I wish I could say the process was as easy as it seems, but the whole thing was a lot like a divorce. Emotions ran high, and there were plenty of belongings to divvy up. Ford started to lock up high-value items in his new room because he knew Owen might try to retrieve them. Owen stared gloomily at the blank walls where Fords pictures used to hang. He made an argument that at least half of those pictures were his. Right? But by bedtime, we had already moved Lindell into Fords old spot. Now half of Owens room was filled with Scooby Doo, toy trains, stuffed animals and pictures books. Still, he didnt complain. Through the ensuing years, Owen would periodically point out that Lindell snores and talks in his sleep. Owen had trouble falling asleep because of this. Also, as he matured, he was tired of having half the room belong to someone still in kindergarten. This fall, Owen finally complained. I want my own room, he said. Ive never had anything to myself since the day I was born. I was rather unsympathetic. Remember, there are worse things than sharing a room with a younger brother. The pleading continued. And then one day, Lindell said, Ill move out, Owen, and you can have your own room. I was so surprised and touched by Lindells selflessness, I allowed the move to happen. We converted an unused room upstairs into Lindells new bedroom. Everyone had their own space, and Owen nearly burst with the possibilities of what to do with his very own room. A few weeks later, as I lay in my bed across the hall from Lindell, I heard what sounded like a chainsaw cutting wood. It was Lindell snoring. Then I heard talking. And more snoring. He snored (very loudly) all night. I thought, is this what Owen was talking about all those years? Is this what he slept through? And he never complained? And thats when I knew: Someday, when Owen is in college, his experiences sharing a room with Ford and Lindell are going to make him the most tolerant roommate ever. That and also because hes a middle child. Middle child gets his own room NAS Jacksonville announces an informational meeting to review the U. S. Navy proposal to establish a small defined search and rescue (SAR) training area in the St. Johns River off shore of NAS Jacksonville, that would limit public access in order to support congressional mandated search and rescue training. Establishment of SAR training area would prevent anchoring of objects, such as crab traps, or unmanned vessels in the training area to help trainees avoid injury and prevent equipment damage. All fishermen, boaters and the general public are invited to attend the meeting Feb. 19, from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the South Mandarin Library, 12125 San Jose Boulevard, Jacksonville 32223. For further information about this public meeting send an email to stephen.biemiller@navy.mil. Public comments will be accepted until March 31, at NAVFAC_SE_SAR_PROJ@navy.mil or via regular mail at NAVFACSE SAR Training Area, NEPA Program Manager (EV21), P.O. Box 30, Jacksonville, Fla. 322120030.SAR information meeting set for Feb. 19

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VR-58 held a change of command ceremony Jan. 25 at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 1000 where Cmdr. Anthony Gutierrez assumed command from Cmdr. Richard Shettler. Capt. Mark Bailey, commander, Fleet Logistics Support Wing, served as guest speaker for the event while AEC Raymond Battle provided the invocation and benediction. Framed by one of the squadrons C-40A Clipper aircraft, friends, family and squadron members listened as Bailey recognized Shettlers achievements not ing his accomplishments and unique leadership style spanning more than 30 years of service to the nation. [Shettler] has brought to this squadron levels of success that are absolutely unprecedented, said Bailey, who also noted that Shettlers success could not have been achieved without the sacrifices and support of his family, from his parents to his wife and children. Quoting Pulitzer Prize winning author Walt Whitman, Bailey said, The final test of a leader is that he leaves behind him in other men the conviction and the will to carry on. As I look at the men and women of VR-58 and witness their unparalleled dedication to their critical mission, it is clear to me that skipper Shettler has passed the final test as a leader with fly ing colors. Reserving his speech for the retirement ceremony following the change of command, Shettler thanked his family, friends and crew who served with him and then read his orders. Gutierrez assumed command of VR-58 following the reading of his orders and took to the podium to address the audience, as well as his new crew. I am going to make three promises to the men and women of VR-58, said Gutierrez. I will do my best to provide you the tools and work environment to oper ate safely and effectively every day. I am going to do my best to provide you with the potential and experience to manage the future of your careers. And lastly, I promise that all of you will have fun here. I am excited to assume command and I have big shoes to fill because Commander Shettler was an outstanding leader, said Gutierrez after having the command pin attached to his uniform by his wife, Kathy. Im here to serve the troops and carry on the tradition of VR-58. Born in Dorchester, Mass., Gutierrez graduated from Bridgewater State College in 1991 with a bach elors degree in aviation science. He graduated from Aviation Officer Candidate School in 1995 and accu mulated more than 3,500 mishap-free flight hours in naval aircraft. In his civilian career, he is a first officer on a Boeing 777 with FedEx Express. Gutierrezs awards include the Air Medal, earned while flying more than 22 combat missions during Operation Noble Anvil, the Navy Commendation Medal, two Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medals, three NATO medals as well as various unit, campaign and service medals. In February 2012, he reported to VR-58 and served as executive officer since October 2012. When Shettler passed through side boys, the change of command ceremony transitioned to a dual retire ment ceremony for Shettler and Capt. John Donovan. Donovan, who served more than 30 years, was designated a naval flight surgeon in 1979. He logged more than 900 hours of flight time in 16 different naval aircraft. Donovan retired alongside Shettler to conclude the days ceremonies. VR-58 Sunseekers hold change of command A CFC participant provided as a public service.Do not accept defeat. Fight deadly childhood diseases. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014 tion began in July 2013 as we followed the footsteps of VP-16 and VP-5. Until now, weve flown with our great train ing partners at VP-30. But when we reach our SFF milestone, well be operating under our own recognizance. VP-45 Command Master Chief (CMDCM) Tom Ayers said,SFF inspec tors will look at our P-8A Maintenance program, with a deep focus on maintenance control and quality assurance. Our Sailors have really embraced the Poseidon and broken training thresh olds to attain qualifications at a rapid pace. From SFF, we move right into our 12-month Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle. The men and women of VP-45 are ecstatic to be part of this history making transition to the P-8A Poseidon. Its the fourth maritime patrol airframe the Pelicans have transitioned to since 1942, including the P5M Marlin, the P2V Neptune and the P-3 Orion, stated Brabazon. Up to this point, our Sailors have exceeded their training objectives but now theyre absolutely hungry to return to an operational status. So, let the IDRC begin. AE2 Ryan Fisher likes working on the new platform. Theres a lot less wire chasing troubleshooting on the Poseidon. Its much more automated and user friendly for maintainers. If we run into an unusual problem, we can consult with a VP-30 or Boeing training representative to find a solution. Our work center is ready to work at our normal operating capacity. Itll be great when our second Poseidon arrives in April. AD2 Catherine Larkin is a plane captain (PC) in the VP-45 line shack. Being a PC requires a general base of knowledge about the entire aircraft and the maintainers who work on it. We take care of the squadrons P-8A sup port equipment, check fuel for contamination, perform daily, turnaround and pre-flight inspections. PCs also provide move crews, in addition to the launch and recovery of the aircraft. AO2 Jamaal Davis led one of the two load teams in the CWTPI. These are young Sailors who per formed in a stellar manner. We loaded MK46 torpedoes and our ALE-47 chaffflare countermeasures system with zero discrepancies and no hits. VP-45 VP-45 by the numbers(as of Jan. 30) Pelican aircrew professionals: NATOPS qualifications earned by 19 pilots, 21 naval flight officers, 14 acoustic warfare operators, and 9 electronic warfare operators. Total training events executed: 2,157 (497 flight events, 1,660 simulator events) Pelican maintenance professionals: 95 Qualified Proficient Apprentice 67 Qualified Proficient Journeyman 33 Collateral Duty Inspectors Two Collateral Duty Quality Assurance Representatives Eight Quality Assurance Representatives Seven Plane Captains

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014 5

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Cmdr. Gregory Guidry will relieve Cmdr. James Tran as the 10th officer in charge of Fleet Support Unit Five (FSU5) during a change of charge ceremony Feb. 6. Capt. Sean Liedman, commander, Patrol Reconnaissance Wing Eleven (CPRW-11), will preside over the ceremony. Guidry hails from Reserve, La. and enlisted in the Navy in 1987. He served on board USS Lexington (AVT-16) before attending the Naval Academy Preparatory School. He later graduated from the United States Naval Academy with a Bachelor of Science in Engineering and was commissioned in 1995. Guidry was designated a naval aviator in 1997. After initial training in the P-3C he completed tours with VP-5 where he flew armed com bat missions in support of the Bosnian conflict. He then served as a Fleet Replacement Squadron instructor with VP-30; and catapult and arresting gear officer on board USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74). He also completed a department head tour at VP-10, fol lowed by staff duty as CPRW11s operations officer and chief staff officer. Guidry will lead the P-3C Orions Littoral Surveillance Radar System transition to the new P-8A Poseidon. Tran grew up in Northglen, Colo. and graduated the United States Naval Academy in 1994 with a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry and earned a Masters of Arts in National Security and Strategic Studies from the Naval War College in 2005. Tran was designated a naval flight officer in 1995 and fol lowing initial training reported to VP-9, followed by a tour as a Fleet Replacement Squadron instructor duty with VP-30 and catapult and arresting gear officer on board USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70). He then completed his department head tour with VP-8. His staff tours include CPRW-11 as the new tech nologies officer and with 838 Expeditionary Advisory Group Afghanistan as director of operations. Tran has led FSU-5 since June 2010 and will now serve at the Navy Research Laboratory, Washington, DC. IA Luncheon set for Feb 20NAS Jacksonville and the Northeast Florida Navy League Councils will host the NAS Jacksonville Individual Augmentee (IA) Recognition Luncheon Feb. 20 at 11 a.m. at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center. All NAS Jacksonville and tenant command Sailors who have returned from an IA assignment since May 1, 2013 will be recognized during the event. The guest speaker will be Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ 4th Fleet. There is no cost for the IA Sailor or Marine and their spouse. The cost for other military and civilian guests is $10. Tickets may be purchased at the Fleet and Family Support Center, Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. -3 p.m. The deadline to purchase tickets is Feb. 13. Child care will be provided at the Child Development Center for children of IAs and spouses in atten dance. Families should call 542-9075, 30 days in advance to secure their drop-in space. To RSVP, contact your command CIAC or Bobby Johns at bobby.johns.ctr@navy.mil For more information, call 542-5637. Tax services availableThe VITA Self Service will be avail able to active duty service members, retirees and dependents, Reservists (active 30 days or pre-demobilization) and entitled former spouses from Feb. 4 through April 15. The service is for those whose adjusted gross income doesnt exceed $57,000. Those who qualify under the Military One Source will be able file their taxes for free using the H&R Block software. Volunteer assistance will be onsite; however volunteers are not permitted to prepare taxes. Those needing additional assistance outside the scope of the volunteers may be redirected to a nearby tax center. The tax center is located at NAS Jacksonville, Building 4, Room 108 (Ranger Street). The center is open Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Tuesday and Thursday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. For questions or concerns, please contact LN1 Clinton Washington at 542-5974 or e-mail Clinton.washing ton@navy.mil. FSU-5 holds change of charge 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014

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The Navy joins our nation in celebrating the vibrant history and culture of African-American and Black Sailors during African-American/Black History Month throughout the month of February, as announced by NAVADMIN 016/14 released Jan. 27. Established in 1926 as Negro History Week, President Gerald R. Ford expanded the celebration in 1976 to include the entire month of February. This year, Navy commands are encouraged to celebrate and reflect on the theme Civil Rights in America. African-American Sailors have a legacy of honorable service that permeates our naval history through every major armed conflict since the Revolutionary War. During the Civil War, African-American Sailors fought on every kind of Union warship, accounting for 10 to 24 percent of each ships crew, and included eight Medal of Honor recipients. During World War II, the Golden Thirteen were an example of African-Americans breaking new ground in the Navy and in American society. In February 1944, 12 prior-enlisted black servicemen were com missioned as ensigns and a 13th was made a warrant officer. They were the first group of black servicemen to complete officer training in the Navy and led the way for future African-Americans. These 13 officers not only made a contribution to the Navy during World War II, but to society as well. By the end of the war, 64 African-Americans had become officers in the Navy. Striving for equality at home and blazing a trail for future African-American Sailors, Wesley A. Brown became the first black graduate of the United States Naval Academy in 1949, joining the Navys Civil Engineer Corps and retiring at the rank of lieutenant commander. He passed away May 22, 2012 after a distinguished career both in the Navy and in the civilian workforce. Edna Young was the first black woman to enlist in the regular Navy and later the first black woman to achieve the rank of chief petty officer. Young joined the Navy after the passage of the Womens Armed Services Integration Act July 7, 1948. In December 1996, Adm. Paul Reason became the first black naval officer to wear four stars and assumed command of the Atlantic Fleet, comprising nearly 200 warships, 1,400 aircraft, and 122,000 service men and women based at 18 major shore facilities. Vice Adm. Michelle Howard is recognized for many first accomplishments, including the recognition as the first female United States Naval Academy gradu ate to be promoted to the rank of admiral, the first black female to command a combatant ship, and the first black female promoted to two-star and three-star admiral. She has also been confirmed by the Senate to serve as Vice Chief of Naval Operations, the services No. 2 uniformed officer. She will be the first black and first woman to hold the job and the first female fourstar admiral. These outstanding examples of African-American Sailors are just a handful of those marking history with firsts and distinguishing the Navy as a force for free dom and equality. African-Americans continue to serve with distinc tion, now comprising more than 17 percent of our active duty Navy total force end-strength. Sailors and their commands are encouraged to use this month to celebrate and recognize the exceptional and distinc tive contributions and the unique histories and cul tures that our African-American shipmates bring to our Navy. More information on the many milestones achieved by black Sailors and the history of the AfricanAmerican Navy experience can be found at the Naval History and Heritage Command at http://www.his tory.navy.mil/special%20highlights/africanAmerican/ African-hist.htm. A full-color brochure on the history of African-Americans in the United States Navy is also available for download through the Naval History and Heritage Command link. Navy celebrates 2014 African-American/Black History Month JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014 7

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Led by VP-16 Commanding Officer, Cmdr. William Pennington Jr., the aircrew demonstrated why the P-8A is critical to the Navys rebalance to the Pacific. Admiral Harris visit high lights the significance of the P-8As role in the rebalance to the Pacific. The War Eagles were proud to showcase not only the capability of this leading-edge aircraft, but more so, the enthusiasm of our aircrew and maintenance profession als. Together, they are helping to set the foundation for how the maritime patrol and reconnaissance force will operate going forward in this strategic region, said Pennington. The P-8A brings the latest avionics and onboard systems to the maritime patrol and ISR mission making it the most advanced anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare aircraft in the world. The P-8A features a techno logically agile open architec ture that enables the integra tion of modern and capable sensors, a robust communica tions suite, anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare weapons and acoustic/non-acoustic sensors. It was a great honor having Adm. Harris visit our squad ron. Our Sailors have been working extremely hard the last two months, answering the demands of a high opera tional tempo, said Lt. Cmdr. Matthew Griffin, P-8A tactical coordinator. They have truly embodied the VP-16 motto, Anytime, Anywhere, Any task...Nothing But Excellence. In terms of mission effectiveness and reliability, the P-8A represents a leap forward for the United States maritime patrol and reconnaissance community. The P-8A is a long-range air craft capable of broad-area, maritime and littoral anti-submarine and anti-surface war fare, and ISR operations. The aircraft is a militarized Boeing Next-Generation 737 derivative. The aircraft has a maximum speed of 490 knots, a ceiling of 41,000 feet, and provides a range of more than 1,200 nautical miles with four hours on station. The P-8A is capable of delivering a number of weapons, including MK-54 torpedoes and Harpoon missiles. The multipurpose P-8A offers the joint, combined or naval operational command er a potent weapons platform with a rapid response time for worldwide employment. The P-8A is part of the Navys long-range plan to rotate newer and more capable aircraft to 7th Fleet to ensure the Navy is best postured to honor its security commitments to the IndoAsia-Pacific and contribute to regional security and stability. Overall, as part of the rebal ance, military forces will reach a 60/40 split to the Indo-AsiaPacific by 2020. VP-16 Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel announced Jan. 30 Navy Vice Adm. Michael Rogers as President Obamas nominee to become commander of U.S. Cyber Command. In addition, the secretary announced that he designated Vice Adm. Rogers to serve as director of the National Security Agency, and chief of the Central Security Service. Rogers currently serves as the U.S. Fleet Cyber Command commander. If confirmed by the U.S. Senate, he will replace Gen. Keith Alexander, who has served as the NSA director since 2005, and the Cyber Command com mander since 2010. Additionally, the department is announcing that Richard Ledgett has been selected to serve as NSA deputy director. In his new role as the senior civilian at NSA, Ledgett acts as the agencys chief operating officer. He replaces J. Chris Inglis, who retired from the position in January. A Navy officer poised to become the services first woman and the militarys first African-American woman to achieve four-star rank was a guest of First Lady Michelle Obama Jan. 28 as President Barack Obama delivered his State of the Union address. Vice Adm. Michelle Howard, currently the deputy chief of naval operations for operations, plans and strategy, was nominated by the president and confirmed by the Senate in December to receive her fourth star and assignment as the vice chief of naval operations. Howards initial sea tours were aboard USS Hunley and USS Lexington. While serving on board Lexington, she received the secretary of the Navy/Navy League Captain Winifred Collins award in May 1987. This award is given to one woman officer a year for out standing leadership. She took command of USS Rushmore on March 12, 1999, becoming the first African-American woman to command a U.S. Navy ship. In 2010, she was the maritime task force commander for the Baltic Operations exercise under U.S. 6th Fleet. Her shore assignments have included service on the Joint Staff and in the office of the chief naval operations, duty as senior military assistant to the secretary of the Navy, and service as deputy commander of U.S. Fleet Forces Command. Howard is a 1978 graduate of Gateway High School in Aurora, Colo. She graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1982 and from the Armys Command and General Staff College in 1998, with a masters in degree in military arts and sciences. Vice Adm. Rogers nominated as Cyber Command commander/NSA directorFirst Lady invites Navy officer to State of Union address 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014

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NC1(SW) Vladimir Arias-Martinez and IT2(SW) Keston Adharsingh were named Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Senior and Junior Sailor of the First Quarter 2014, respectively, Jan. 21. As a Navy counselor at Navy Region Southeast, Arias-Martinez assisted fellow Sailors with 13 C-WAYPoint appli cations and assisted in the coordination of a fleet engagement team visit with Navy Personnel Command that pro vided information to 800 sailors. He also conducted 10 career development boards and four reenlistments during the quarter that resulted in 100 per cent retention rate. As a command fit ness leader, Arias-Martinez led fitness enhancement sessions that contributed to the commands 100 percent Physical Fitness Assessment (PFA) pass rate. In addition, Arias-Martinez is pres ident of the First Class Petty Officers Association and the Multicultural Heritage Committee. His off base activities include volunteering with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northeast Florida and organizing food drives for the Mandarin Food Bank. NC1 Arias-Martinez is an outstand ing first class petty officer who hit the deck running since checking onboard, said NCC (AW/SW) Jacqueline Gonzalez. I wouldnt be surprised if we see his name in the CPO Selection Board Results NAVADMIN this year. According to Arias-Martinez, he could never have accomplished so much without the help of others within the command. I am honored to be representing CNRSE as the Sailor of the Quarter, said Arias-Martinez. We have an out standing chain of command who does nothing but support and take care of its Sailors. I couldnt be more happy. Adharsingh is assigned to the Regional Operations Center as a watch specialist. He quickly qualified in his current position in order to sustain mission readiness to include two drill exercises that ensured all installations were 100 percent ready. He also serves as the Regional Operations Centers budget officer and saved the department hundreds of dollars during his time in the position. Additionally, he enhanced situational awareness for region pro gram directors and special assistants by organizing more than10 briefings and teleconferences. An active member of the community, Adharsingh volunteered locally with Feeding the Homeless and Habitat for Humanity Jacksonville. He is also pursuing a bachelors degree in computer information technology at Excelsior College. IT2 Adharsingh always maintains an impeccable military appearance, said QMC(SW) Dexter Collins, Adharsinghs supervisor. Honesty and integrity are not just words they are at the forefront of everything he does. His professional ism and work performance clearly rep resent a Junior Sailor of the Quarter. Adharsingh said its a great honor to accept the award, however it was the support from people around him that contributed to his success. Im honored to be nominated and selected as Junior Sailor of the Quarter, and Im proud to represent the oper ations department and Commander, Navy Region Southeast, said Adharsingh. Individual selection criteria for the awards were based upon exemplary performance of tasks, contributions that enhanced organization accom plishment of command objectives, mission, teamwork or public image, and ones professional attitude toward self and others. CNRSE announces Senior, Junior Sailor of the First Quarter 2014 Navy joins NASA in Day of RemembranceFormer, current and future Navy astronauts joined NASA employees and family members during a Day of Remembrance Jan. 31, at Arlington National Cemetery to honor fallen astronauts. Today, the NASA family joins the nation in pausing to remember the con tributions of those who lost their lives trying to take our nation farther into space, said retired Marine Maj. Gen. Charles Bolden, the NASA Administrator. They were our friends, family and colleagues, and they were American heroes who exemplified our nations pioneering spirit and dared to risk their lives revealing the unknown. Our lives are better and our nation is stronger for their sacrifice. The ceremony took place during the week of the anniversaries of three fatal accidents: The Apollo 1 fire, space shuttle Challenger (STS-51L) explosion and space shuttle Columbia (STS-107) accident. Five Sailors died in the line of duty during these accidents: Lt. Cmdr. Roger Chaffee, Capt. Michael Smith, Cmdr. William McCool, Capt. David Brown and Capt. Laurel Clark. The best way to honor their memo ries is to keep pushing the boundaries of space exploration so that we can bring new knowledge and new benefits to our nation and our world, said Bolden. That is what our astronauts on the International Space Station are doing at this very moment. The Navy has been deeply involved in the U.S. space program since the begin ning, said Capt. Kathryn Hire, an active duty Navy officer and former NASA astro naut. From the first U.S. astronaut to fly in space, Alan Shepard in 1961, to Chris Ferguson, the commander of the 135th Space Shuttle mission in 2011, Navy astronauts contributed to many great achievements in space exploration. he Navy continues to add to NASAs space programs by employing seven active duty astronauts and enrolling two officers in the 2013 Astronaut Class. Lt. Cmdr. Josh Cassada, from White Bear Lake, Minn., and Lt. Cmdr. Victor Glover, from Pomona, Calif., are two of the eight total members of the class training with NASA to be our nations future space explorers and researchers. All members of the class attended the ceremony and listened attentively to the remarks given for their fallen predecessors. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014 9

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Navy brothers share last flight Lt. Conor ODonnell flew his last operational flight on a P-3C Orion with NAS Jacksonvilles VP-26 Tridents Jan. 24 alongside his younger brother, Lt.j.g. Rory ODonnell with the VP-10 Red Lancers. Conor, a patrol plane commander, graduated from the University of Florida in 2008 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Aerospace Engineering and was designated a naval aviator in 2010. He checked in to VP-26 in May of 2011 after completing initial training in the P-3C at VP-30. Rory, a patrol plane copilot, graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 2011 and recently checked into VP-10. I was honored to fly with Conor on his last P-3C flight. Its such a blessing to have two older brothers and role models to guide me along my career. Aviation has brought us closer and I hope we get to fly together again, he said. Conor added, It was great to fly with my brother, Rory on my last flight at VP-26 but it would have been even better if Brian had been able to join us as well. We are very grateful to both commands for giving us this opportunity. Conor and Rory are two of the four brothers that make up the ODonnell family, which is native of New Smyrna Beach, Fla. Their brother, Lt. Brian ODonnell, also a patrol plane commander, is cur rently deployed with the VP-8 Fighting Tigers to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. Their youngest brother, Nolan, is a senior at the University of South Florida, and hopes to follow in their footsteps and aviation success at some time in the near future. Aviation is a family trade for the ODonnell family as their father, Terry, a former Navy lieutenant, flew the C-1 Trader for four years during the Vietnam War. After his time of service in the Navy, he flew for Delta Airlines for more than 35 years. Conor will be checking out of VP-26 in February and moving to Corpus Christi, Texas where he will become a T-6 Texan primary flight instructor for the VT-27 Boomers. Meanwhile, Rory will pursue further qualifications in the P-3C and is slated to transition to the P-8A Poseidon next year. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014 11

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On Jan. 24, a group of homeschoolers were invited to explore the Black Point Interpretive Center at NAS Jacksonville. The event began with a brief introduction by the Assistant Natural Resources Manager Angela Glass, followed by a presentation by Christine Bauer, the facilitys Natural Resources Manager. Bauer spoke with the children about the local wildlife found on base, what their role is in pro tecting the animals, and various other educa tional topics like native plants and animals in our area, and the difference between predatory ani mals and their prey. Throughout the pro gram, the children were engaged in both answer ing and asking questions. After the presentation, the children were given paper and ceramic tiles to paint something from nature that could be found in the room. Casey Hogan, one of the mothers at the event said, Its really excit ing that NAS Jax is cre ating events for the Homeschool program because it is wonderful to get the families together. To find out about upcoming events, check out NAS Jacksonville MWR on Facebook or contact the Installation School Liaison Officer, Dawn Mills at 7782236 or by emailing dawn.m.mills@navy.mil Homeschoolers visit interpretive center Ribbons & Roses monthly meeting Feb. 11 Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles Ribbons & Roses, a breast cancer support group, meets Feb. 11 at 7 p.m. The meeting will be held in the hospitals General Surgery Clinic, on the second floor of the east annex. Naturopathic Doctor Todd Robinson will be the guest speaker. Robinson has supported clients both during and after treatment for breast cancer. He serves as Secretary of the Board for the Florida Naturopathic Physicians Association and operates Wellness Working Group at Jacksonville Beach. Naturopathic doctors have expertise in botanical medicine, clinical nutrition, homeopathy, physical medicine and lifestyle counseling. The group meets on the second Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m. For more information, call 542-7857. 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014

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Who is Lt. Michelle DeGrothy?Imagine taking an online knowledge test just for fun, and then qualifying to fly out to Los Angeles, meet one of the most recognizable names in television and winning $27,900. For Lt. Michelle DeGrothy, a helicopter pilot with HSM-70, this unlikely scenario became a reality. After seeing promotions for Military Week on Jeopardy!, DeGrothy thought it would be fun to see if she had what it takes to be a contest on the long-running show. You dont get any immediate results back from the online test that tell you how well you did, so I had no idea what to expect, she said. A few days later, DeGrothy received an email invit ing her to audition in Tampa. The audition required her to take a written test, and participate in a mock Jeopardy! game with three other qualifiers. She also gave a personal interview and filled out several questionnaires. Its a long process and you never receive any feedback in regards to how youre doing or whether you are going to make the cut or not, said Degrothy. In fact, it wasnt until a few months after the audition that she received a call back asking her to be on the show. The date she was scheduled to appear fell too close to her squadrons deployment so DeGrothy had no choice but to decline the invitation and believe her chances of appearing on the show were over. Fortunately, she was contacted again by the show several weeks later and asked to appear in November. A lot of people ask what Alex Trebek is like. Hes a little intimidating and very smart. In fact, I think he knows most of the answers without having to look at them. Degrothys appearance on Jeopardy! aired mid-January and after winning three episodes she pocketed $27,900. Even though she is a Navy helicopter pilot, DeGrothy plans on putting her winnings toward the purchase of a private airplane. Overall, DeGrothy enjoyed a great experience, I was really nervous, but I had a lot of fun. I wasnt expecting to do well at all, but Im really glad I went through with it. Did you know that Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles award-winning Wellness Center and Health Promotions offers individual and group classes that center on improving your health? Classes include tobacco cessation, weight management, health fitness and nutrition. The following classes are offered throughout the year: Choose My Plate (appointment or walk-in): Basic nutritionone-hour Health Fitness Assessment (appointment only): Body mass, exercise and basic nutritiontwo-day class (one individual session and one group session) Healthy Heart (appointment or walk-in): Cholesterol management90-minutes Sail A Weigh (appointment only): Healthy lifestyle/ weight management six weeks (one hour per week) Ship Shape (appointment only): Weight manage menteight weeks (one hour per week) Tobacco Cessation (appointment or walk-in): Monday, 9 a.m.; Tuesday, 1 p.m.; Thursday, noon. For more information or to make an appointment, call 542-5292 or visit NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center located at Building 867, adjacent to the NAS Jacksonville Fitness Source. Naval Hospital Jacksonville invites you to get fit in 2014 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014 13

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaoke DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Jan. 18, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: Jan. 25, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Swim to Cuba Aquatic Program Begins Feb. 3 at the Indoor Pool Teams complete 30,000 laps and team members receive a t-shirt! Navy Run Training Program Begins Feb. 4 at the fitness center Running group meets every Tuesday at 4 p.m. Biggest Loser Challenge Eight-week program, teams of two Begins March 10 Aerobathon featuring TRX, spin, muscle max, boot camp, step, yoga, HIT and Zumba Feb. 15, 10 a.m. noon Fitness CenterI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Gatornationals March 1416 $30 $58 Disney Jr. Live $15 $29 Monster Jam $22 $42 Wild Adventures $30 $70 Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket $166 $194.50 Universal Orlando $114 $169.50 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Daytona 500 $62 $209 Drive 4COPD 300 $55 Budweiser Duels $55 Sprint Unlimited $30 $55 Rolex 24 $32 $65 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 The Artist Series Broadway in Jacksonville 2014 season, select shows Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2014 season, select shows Armed Forces Vacation Club www.afvclub.com $349 $369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 Ripleys St. Augustine $4.25 $7.50 St. Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Wild Florida Airboats $17 $46.50 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels located near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Habitat for Humanity Volunteer Trip Feb. 15 at 8 a.m. Daytona 500 Trip Feb. 23 at 10 a.m. $40 per person Military Saves Week Feb. 24 28 Take the pledge to save money! NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Daily Twilight Golf Special Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1 p.m. Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty Feb. 11 & 25 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests Feb. 13 & 27Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you!Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil OPERATIO N: I DENTIFICATIONCancer is one of our children's biggest enemies; but if identied early, a child's chances of survival are greatly enhanced.Parents, please be aware of these warning signs: Call 800-822-6344 or visit stjude.org to learn more.A CFC Participant provided as a public service. 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014

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Team visited local orphanages and schools teaching children how to play baseball. After his days on the mound as a formidable southpaw came to an end, he focused his efforts to coaching children in local baseball leagues and in his own neighborhood. He always had a heart for others, said his father. Thomas always portrayed a father-like role from early on in life. His mindset was to always pay it forward. Although the rain and the freezing temperatures forced the Mad Foxes and the children indoors, they did not cancel the event. Rather, they set up coaching stations for the par ticipating students inside the cafeteria and auditorium. Out of the approximate 450 stu dents enrolled in the school, 76 children registered to attend in the after-school event. The children were taught the fundamentals of base running, hitting, pitching, catching, fielding ground and fly base balls, and basic physical conditioning. The Mad Foxes promised the principal, LaShawn Russ, they would return March 14 and conduct the clinic out side on the baseball diamond. We are so very proud the Mad Foxes carried on petty officer Moores vision of service before self. These Sailors are everyday heroes who are making a real and lasting impact on these children not only today, but every day they volunteer in the community, said VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Matt Pottenburgh, It was wonderful for us to share the day with Dwight Moore. The chil dren got to hear about Thomas and the positive impact base ball had on his life. When the event came to a close and all of the children participated in each station, everyone gathered for a spe cial presentation of donated baseball equipment. VP-5 presented bats, gloves, hel mets and baseballs to Ramona Elementary School. This ensured the children could exercise their newly acquired baseball skills during physical education class and recess. Volunteerism is extreme ly important to the men and women of VP-5. The squadron has been averaging 75 hours of volunteerism each month since returning from deployment. They adopted Ramona Elementary last spring and have been very active in indi vidual classrooms, tutoring math and reading and even assisting in vision screening throughout the school year. As January was National Volunteer Month, Pottenburgh challenged the squadron to double their volunteer efforts. The baseball clinic was the finale of their volunteer efforts in January. I am so very proud to report the Mad Foxes volunteered 467 man-hours in January, said IS1 Cedrick Green, the VP-5 volunteer coordinator. We blew right past our skippers goal of 150 hours! The Mad Foxes are five months into their InterDeployment Readiness Cycle and remain on track for a successful P-8A Poseidon deploy ment to the 7th Fleet area of responsibility. VP-5 Hospital clinics open longer hoursNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles primary care teams are now open longer to better serve patients and offer appointment times when they need them. Family Medicine (Green, Red, White and Yellow Teams), Internal Medicine (Blue Team) and Pediatrics (Purple Team) are now open Monday to Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Patients with a primary care manager (PCM) at the hospital or branch health clinic are part of a Medical Home Port a collaborative team of caregivers (from doctors and nurses to case managers) led by the PCM. The team focuses on meeting all of the patients health care needs preventive, routine and urgent. To meet the PCMs on each of the com mands 14 Medical Home Port teams, visit the command website at www.med.navy. mil/sites/navalhospitaljax Patients can reach their team by secure email, for non-urgent issues. Sign up for RelayHealth at www.relayhealth.com or on the commands website by clicking on Medical Home Port. At the hospital, patients can call the appointment line at 542-4677 or 800-5294677, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Active duty patients at Branch Health Clinic Jacksonvilles Silver Team can call 546-7094/7095, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. After-hours nurse advice is available for patients at all sites at 542-4677 or 800-5294677 on evenings, weekends and federal holidays. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 6, 2014 From autonomy to information dominance: ONR forums beginOn the heels of a vibrant meeting between some of the nations top minds in autonomy and unmanned systems, officials at the Office of Naval Research (ONR) announced Jan. 23 they will host a similar gathering of experts on the subject of information dominance and C4I (command, control, communica tions, computers and intelligence) later this year. The events, called Focus Area Forums, are an initiative of Rear Adm. Matthew Klunder, the chief of naval research. The goal: bring together experts and find new and low-cost ways to support Navy and Marine Corps priorities-and advance disruptive technologies for our Sailors and Marines. The lifeblood of scientific research is generating new ideas and sharing information, said Klunder. Bringing together multiple experts for a day allows us to really dive into the heart of various topics, to advance new ideas and technologies, and address chal lenges. Nearly 200 participants came to the Jan. 15 forum from across government, military services, academia, think tanks and industry to learn, share ideas, meet with ONR program officers and engage directly with senior naval lead ers. [See video highlights of the event here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =hAwDIOe4aHc&feature=youtu.be] This was ONRs first Focus Area Forum, and officials say the topic of autonomy is well-timed as the future force will increasingly rely on a hybrid of manned and unmanned capabilitiesand as potential adversaries advance and build inexpensive threats. Unmanned systems and autonomy are force multipliers, said Klunder. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert has noted the importance to the Navy and Marine Corps of staying on the cutting edge of autonomy and unmanned systems. In his Sailing Directions, Greenert notes: The reach and effectiveness of ships and aircraft will be greatly expanded through... unmanned systems, and adds that unmanned systems in the air and water will employ greater autonomy in future operations. Participants expressed strong support for the importance of the forum. One of the keys to advancing the field of autonomy is creating new col laborations across different disciplines that can bring important new ideas and methods to the research, said Dr. Marc Steinberg, the Science of Autonomy program officer at ONR. Norah Ayanian, a computer scientist researching multi-robot coordination and human interaction at the University of Southern California, said: I think this forum has been great-I am having a lot of really good conversations with people. Having just started, I am look ing for collaborators, so I found a lot of people that have complimentary inter ests. Information dominance and C4I, the topics of the next forum, logically follow autonomy, experts say, since the pri mary mission of many unmanned systems is intelligence gathering. The Navy and Marine Corps are greatly interested in information dominance, as technology has advanced in quantum leaps in recent years and potential adversar ies have invested heavily in advanced technologies designed to challenge U.S. advantages in the information domain. Innovative, forward-leaning C4ISR [command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance] systems will be required for future autonomous net worked sensors above, on and below the seas, Klunder said. When we combine this with our emphasis on electromagnetic maneuver warfare, we believe we are positioning our Sailors and Marines to best address future threats. ONR efforts in this field include work in computer network operations, tac tical communication networks, com mand and control capabilities and more. Officials say they hope to hold that Focus Area Forum by early summer. The annual Retiree Seminar will be held Feb. 15 at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center aboard NAS Jacksonville. The seminar will consist of various presentations and exhibits throughout the day to allow maximum exposure to represen tatives who can address retired pay issues, healthcare concerns, veterans ben efits, long term care and assis tance, and those issues for retirees approaching or at Social Security and Medicare/ TRICARE for Life age. This years seminar is focused on the grey area for Reservists reaching retired pay age, all U.S. Armed Forces retirees and SBP annuitants. The keynote speaker is retired Vice Adm. John Cotton, former chief of Navy Reserve and commander, Naval Reserve Force. He also served as the assistant dep uty, Chief of Naval Operations Warfare Requirements and Programs. He is a naval aviator with more 15,000 hours as a Navy and commercial pilot and has held command leadership positions of an FA-18 squadron, NAS Keflavik, Iceland, and the Pentagon Navy Command Center. For the past five years, he has been a corpo rate senior vice presi dent at DRS Technologies. Currently, Cotton serves as a defense and secu rity consul tant, is on the Secretary of Defense Reserve Forces pol icy board, is a Senior Fellow at the Joint Forces Staff College, and is the chairman of the board of trustees of the Navy/Marines/ Coast Guard Residence Foundation. To pre-register for the seminar call 542-5711 or e-mail at JAXS_NAS_RAO@ Navy.Mil Registration will also be taken at the door.Annual Retiree Seminar set for Feb. 15 The Clay County Veterans Service Office is now located on the second floor of the Clay County Administration Building at 477 Houston Street, Green Cove Springs, Fla. The former Veterans Service office location at 1565 CR 315 has been closed. The office is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The Clay County Veterans Service Office is staffed with a full time vet erans service officer and a part-time veterans program assistant who are both available and eager to assist veterans and/or family members with filing claims and other related needs. Part of Clay Countys heritage is the countys strong ties to the military dat ing back to the early 1800s. Today, there are more than 24,000 veterans who call Clay County home. These veterans represent service to our nation from World War II through the current conflicts as well as decades of service during peacetime. To make an appointment, please call (904) 269-6326.Clay County Veterans Services Office helps

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