Jax air news

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Material Information

Title:
Jax air news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note:
Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID:
UF00028307:02075


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014 SAPR MUSIC MAKERS RETI R EES MEET Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Focusing on what unites Aussies and Yanks in the Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing community, officers and Sailors from both navies gath ered Jan. 24 at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 1122 to commemo rate the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) 725 Squadron In Service Date (ISD) milestone. Historically, Australia has enjoyed a close relationship with America since World War II in the Pacific. Through innu merable campaigns, a mutual friendship developed between allies that continues today, said Head of Australian Defense Staff (Washington) Rear Adm. Steve Gilmore. Now, as America rebalanc es its naval assets around the globe, this close relationship will continue to be critical and what were accomplishing here in Jacksonville with the MH-60R program is an important part of that relationship. Achievement of the ISD fol lowed a comprehensive range of activities undertaken over the past 14 months by the joint RAN and the U.S. Navy Foreign Military Sales team to deliver 24 MH-60R Seahawk helicopters by 2016. Since the formal accep tance of its first two MH-60R Seahawks in December 2013, RAN 725 Squadron conducted its acceptance program aboard NAS Jacksonville to ensure the aircraft were ready to com mence service with everything well ahead of schedule. Gilmore added, The Royal Australian Navy is in a period of regeneration and our new Romeo helicopters will deploy with guided-missile destroy ers supported by the evolution ary Aegis combat system. Their capabilities in both anti-subma rine and anti-surface warfare create a very lethal combina tion. Whilst the RAN men and women serving in Jacksonville return home by the end of this year, the professional relation ships and friendships that were formed create a legacy that will last for the next 20 years of Romeo operations, he said. Australia is proud to be the first U.S. ally to purchase and operate the same version MH-60R that is flown by USN squadrons. We appreciate your welcoming us into your rotary Sailors of the Quarter honored at luncheonNAS Jacksonville recognized 81 top Sailors from the base and tenant commands for the first quarter dur ing the Sailor of the Quarter (SOQ) luncheon at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center Jan. 23. The operational tempo of todays Navy is insanely hectic. Today, we have 323,000 active duty members and 62,000 Selected Reservists currently deployed to every area of responsibility in the world. Our objec tive is to protect power and deter war to sustain the American way of life. We continue to operate forward despite budget constraints capitalizing on our most valuable asset our people, said NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd. He continued, But its nice today to be able to carve out a little time to remember our forward deployed squadrons VP-8, VP-16 and HSM-74 and to recognize our Sailors for their contributions, service and sacrifices. Members of the Navy Band Southeast Brass Quintet performed the national anthem and NAS Jacksonville Two members of the U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, The Blue Angels, visited NAS Jacksonville to meet with members of the stations air show committee on Jan. 21. Blue Angels Pilot/Narrator Lt. Ryan Chamberlain and Blue Angels Event Coordinator Lt. Cmdr. Michael Cheng landed the No. 7 jet in front of the NAS Jax Air Operations Tower where they were greeted by NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander, NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker and Air Show Director Cmdr. Mark McManus. After a quick media interview with local news affiliates, Chamberlain and Cheng met with key personnel organiz ing the 2014 NAS Jax Air Show which will be held aboard the station Oct. 25-26 to discuss preseason details. The air show alternates each year between NAS Jax and the City of Jacksonville (held at Jax Beach). But due to the cancellation of the event aboard the station last year as a result of the government sequestration, city and base officials decided NAS Jax would host the air show in 2014. Undersander says he is excited to be hosting the event this year. It was a big disappointment having to cancel the air show last year, however, we are grate ful to the City of Jacksonville for work ing with us to host this event and are very pleased to get the Blues back, said Undersander. NAS Jax has always had a great rela tionship with the community. We like to show the American public the Navys aviation prowess. This is a great oppor tunity for us to open up the base and let them see what the Navy and the mili tary are all about. During the meeting, Chamberlain gave a brief overview on the Blue Angels explaining that the group originat ed at NAS Jacksonville in 1946 under the director of former Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Chester Nimitz. The team for formed in an effort to boost Navy morale, maintain a public inter est in naval aviation and demonstrate naval air power. We are the oldest U.S. military avia tion demonstration team in the world, said Chamberlain. Our mission is to showcase the pride Royal Australian Navy celebrates In Service Date Blue Angels visit NAS Jax to discuss upcoming air show

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 30, 2014 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Jan. 30 1862 Launching of USS Monitor, the first turreted warship. Monitor was also the first ironclad warship commissioned by the U.S. Navy during the American Civil War. 1968 Tet Offensive begins in Vietnam. Jan. 31 1944 American amphibious landing on Kwajalein, Marshall Islands. 1961 Lt. Cmdr. Samuel Lee Gravely Jr. becomes first African-American to command a combat ship, USS Falgout. 1981 Era of Enlisted Naval Aviators ends as last pilot retires. Feb. 1 1941 U.S. Fleet reorganized, reviving Atlantic and Pacific Fleets. 1942 USS Enterprise and USS Yorktown make first World War II air strike against Japanese Marshall Islands. 1955 Operation Deep Freeze, a multinational research task force to Antarctica consisting of seven ships and 1,800 men, was begun in two stages. The first was to build an airfield at McMurdo Station. Feb. 2 1800 USS Constellation (Capt. Thomas Truxtun) defeats la Vengeance. 1862 USS Hartford (Capt. David G. Farragut) departs Hampton Roads for Mississippi River cam paign against Confederate forces. Feb. 3 1801 Senate approves peace treaty with France ending undeclared naval war that began in 1798. 1917 U.S. severs diplomatic relations with Germany. Feb. 4 1779 John Paul Jones takes command of Bonhomme Richard. 1959 Keel laying of USS Enterprise (CVN 65), first nuclear powered aircraft carrier, in Newport News, Va. Feb. 5 1854 Dedication of first chapel built on Navy prop erty in Annapolis, Md. 1941 Navy Chief Nurse Marion Olds and Nurse Leona Jackson arrive on Guam. 1971 Moon walk by Capt. Alan Shepherd Jr., commander of Apollo 14 and Cmdr. Edgar Mitchell, lunar module pilot. During the nine-day mission, 94 lbs. of lunar material was collected. Shepard also became the first person to hit a golf ball on the moon. Recovery was by helicopters from USS New Orleans (LPH-11). Two weeks ago, I shared with you three of my favor ite, non-trending stories of 2013. One of them included an elderly woman in a retirement home who had a surprise for me in her apartment: a wall full of paint ings her husband had created many of them of his wife throughout his life. Readers loved this story and wanted more details. So my husband and I went back to visit Dot last week and hear about life with her late, artist husband, Milton. Milt, as Dot calls him, always had an artistic streak. He had an eye for seeing beauty in ordinary things, and he had the hands for shaping those ordinary things into something spectacular. But Milt didnt take up painting until he was a pris oner of war in World War II. After graduating from the University of Maine, Milt joined the Army infantry and was sent overseas. He was captured by the Germans in North Africa and then held in Poland, on the Russian border, for 27 months. Back in the states, he first was listed as MIA, then later as a POW. Dot didnt know Milt yet. She was a young woman living in Georgia, helping with the USO and other sup port efforts for the troops. The Germans didnt care much about Milts pris oner camp. They mostly left the prisoners alone. This was bad in some respects (food was scarce) but good in others. People who sided with the United States often snuck things into the prison for the inmates. One time, they brought oil paints and canvas. A fellow prisoner from Chicago had taught oil paint ing before and started a quasi-college inside the camp walls. There, Milt completed his first painting. Its a still life of a pair of sandals next to an open Bible. When the Germans were eventually overrun and released the prisoners two years later, they simply opened the gates, according to Dot, and left Milt and his fellow POWs to find their way back to France. Milt rolled up his oil-and-canvas painting and car ried it all the way to France on a broomstick strapped to his back. After the war, Dot met Milt at an officers club in Georgia. They were married in 1946 and made their home in Maine, where Milt worked at a bank and painted in his free time. One of my favorite paintings in Dots room was painted at Dots mothers home in Georgia. In it, a young Dot stands in a long, elegant gown. Behind her is a mirror. In the reflection of the mirror, you can see Milt, standing in his suit, smiling back at her. Even now, it gives me chills to think of it. Milt has been gone for many years now. He died shortly after their 50th wedding anniversary. But each day, Dot sits in front of that glorious painting, some thing that surely took time and effort to create and clearly shows his love for her. I guess I need to take up painting, Dustin said. But it doesnt have to be a painting. The story of Dot and Milt is a story about things that last, tangible reminders of love that remain even after someone is gone. How many of my generation even have actual print ed photographs of our children? I know most of mine are stored on my computer, or worse, on my iPhone. Everything is so fleeting and easy today. We snap a picture with our phone, save it, and then transfer it to our computer. When I look at Milts paintings of his wife, what is immediately apparent to me is the care that went into each one. It wasnt a snap-save-transfer process. But Dustins right we cant all be artists. (Although, Id love to see his attempt.) Many of us, however, do have some craft wood working, knitting, sewing, writing, photography that leaves behind a little bit of ourselves in each finished piece. On a very basic level, we can even write handwritten notes instead of e-mails for the messages that really matter. In a world that moves a mile-aminute, we can slow down and create something for someone we love. Dot said it was difficult moving from her home to the retirement apartment, mostly because she had to make tough decisions about what to keep and what to leave behind. Obviously, Milts paintings came with her. And its clear as to why. Those pieces of art speak to Dot and to anyone else who visits her room. They tell the story of a man many of us never got to meet and of a love many of us aspire to have.Treasured art a gift through time

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NAS Jacksonville announces an informational meeting to review the U. S. Navy proposal to establish a small defined search and rescue (SAR) training area in the St. Johns River off shore of NAS Jacksonville, that would limit public access in order to support con gressional mandated search and rescue training. Establishment of SAR training area would prevent anchoring of objects, such as crab traps, or unmanned vessels in the training area to help trainees avoid inju ry and prevent equipment damage. All fishermen, boaters and the general public are invited to attend the meeting Feb. 19, from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the South Mandarin Library, 12125 San Jose Boulevard, Jacksonville 32223. For further information about this public meeting send an e-mail to stephen.biemiller@navy.mil. Public comments will be accepted until March 31, at NAVFACSESARPROJ@navy.mil or via regular mail at NAVFACSE SAR Training Area, NEPA Program Manager (EV21), P.O. Box 30, Jacksonville, Fla. 322120030. NAS Jacksonville and the Northeast Florida Navy League Councils will host the NAS Jacksonville Individual Augmentee (IA) Recognition Luncheon Feb. 20 at 11 a.m. at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center. All NAS Jacksonville and tenant command Sailors who have returned from an IA assignment since May 1, 2013 will be recognized during the event. The guest speaker will be Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ 4th Fleet. There is no cost for the IA Sailor or Marine and their spouse. The cost for other military and civilian guests is $10. Tickets may be purchased at the Fleet and Family Support Center, Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. The deadline to purchase tickets is Feb. 13. Child care will be provided at the Child Development Center for children of IAs and spouses in attendance. Families should call 542-9075, 30 days in advance to secure their drop-in space. To RSVP, contact your command CIAC or Bobby Johns at bobby.johns.ctr@navy.mil For more information, call 542-5637. Tax services available in Building No. 4The VITA Self Service will be available to active duty service members, retirees and dependents, Reservists (active 30 days or pre-demobilization) and entitled former spouses from Feb. 4 through April 15. The ser vice is for those whose adjusted gross income doesnt exceed $57,000. Those who qualify under the Military One Source will be able file their taxes for free using the H&R Block software. Volunteer assistance will be onsite; however vol unteers are not permitted to prepare taxes. Those needing additional assistance outside the scope of the volunteers may be redirected to a nearby tax center. The tax center is located at NAS Jacksonville, Building 4, Room 108 (Ranger Street). The center is open Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Tuesday and Thursday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. For questions or concerns, please contact LN1 Clinton Washington at 542-5974 or e-mail Clinton. washington@navy.mil.Search and Rescue information meeting set for Feb. 19Individual Augmentee Recognition Luncheon is Feb. 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 30, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 30, 2014 Established in 1995, Navy Band Southeast is one of 13 official U.S. Navy Bands. The command consists of 35 versatile musicians dedicated to the highest levels of musical performance. The ceremonial band or any of its various ensembles pro vide a wide variety of music for any occasion including mili tary ceremonies, parades, pub lic concerts, musical outreach to local schools and more. They also play a crucial role in Navy recruitment. Lt. Cmdr. Mark Corbliss, director of Navy Band Southeast since 2012, says the level of musical talent with in the band is ridiculously good despite the challenges of sequestration in 2013. We gave up 10 billets last year as part of 220 musician billets that were closed across the fleet. We were also restrict ed to playing venues that were no further than 50 miles from NAS Jacksonville. As a result, weve really expanded our outreach to our surrounding counties in Northeast Florida. He said the Music for Recruiting program has been restored, so Navy bands may perform concerts, patriotic ceremonies and parades for the general public and school concerts in support of Navy recruiting. This allows Navy Band Southeast to do more with local school systems and pub lic libraries. When youre plan ning a program for school pop ulations, their only interest is rock n roll. So our popular music ensemble not only entertains, but creates a positive environ ment for Navy recruiters who may accompany us to a high school, explained Corbliss. At other high school appear ances, we spend time working with their music programs to teach clinics and master class es, as well as perform joint con certs, he added. Corbliss is cautiously opti mistic about the bands 2014 program. Its first come, first served and the summer months are already being booked. This fall, well be performing downtown at the Times Union Center for the Performing Arts. Of course, Memorial Day, 4th of July and Veterans Day are busy times but we believe its always better to be performing than practic ing. The ceremonial band and brass quintet are our bread and butter, representing the bulk of our gigs. A popular new small-group ensemble is the Saxophone Quartet that plays different musical styles rang ing from classic concert fare to popular music and jazz, said Corbliss. MU1 Dexter Jones said, So far, audiences have real ly embraced the 20th century sounds of our saxophone quar tet. Ive been a Navy musician for 16 years and this quartet is a most rewarding way to pres ent a variety of musical styles jazz, marches, gospel and con temporary. Booking Navy Band Southeast Submit your request early. Although the band cannot confirm support until 90 days prior to military events and 60 days prior to civilian events, they accept requests up to 12 months prior to the event. You may submit your request by phone (542-8060), e-mail (nbse.ops@navy.mil) or online (https://www.cnic.navy.mil/ regions/cnrse/about/navy_ bands/navy_band_southeast. html). Military music makers: Navy Band Southeast

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As VP-5 continues its busy schedule operating and main taining the P8-A Poseidon, the squadron is highlighting one outstanding Mad Fox each week. This weeks Mad Fox of the Week is LS2(AW) Juniel Daniel. Daniel was born in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands and currently resides in the Jacksonville area with his fami ly. Daniel joined the Navy upon entering basic training in 2009. After basic training, he com pleted Logistic Specialist A school in Meridian, Miss. in September 2009. He reported to VP-5 Sept. 28, 2009. During his time at the squadron, he has deployed to Sigonella, Italy in 2009 and Kadena, Japan in 2012. As a logistics specialist, Daniel is in charge of provid ing and budgeting all supplies within the command. He is tasked with maintain ing supplies from pens and paper to expensive parts on the aircraft. He is the operation target budget manager within the VP-5 Supply Division. He makes sure the squadron has the appropriate funding for daily operations to allot for flight hours, fuel, and mainte nance parts. His collateral duties include sponsor coordinator, masterat-arms, and morale, welfare and recreation representative. The most challenging part of my job is making sure we are ahead of the schedule to make sure the squadron has everything we need because we cannot fly without supply, explained Daniel. I enjoy coming to work each day because of those in my division. From the day I checked in, they were welcom ing and taught me how to do my job properly and with pro fessionalism. This has motivat ed me each day to pass this on to those who have come after me. Daniels goals are to make chief petty officer and to retire from the Navy as a master chief. Away from the squadron he enjoys spending time with his family and traveling outside the area. VP-5 is currently in the interdeployment readiness cycle aboard NAS Jacksonville. Sailors and civilians attended a volunteer interview training workshop at the NAS Jax NavyMarine Corps Relief Society on Jan. 23 to embrace Americas veterans with questions about their service, as well as retrieve important artifacts and records from their time serving in the military. The course is for those interested in being part of the Veterans History Project (VHP). In 2000, U.S. Congress created VHP as part of the American Folk Life Center at the Library of Congress, one of the worlds most respected research and cultural institutions. There are now 17 people ready to interview veterans in the local commu nity. In todays seminar we are providing an overview with what the Library of Congress desires, said Military Engagement Manager Richard Neal of HandsOn Jacksonville. There are certain forms that need to be filled out and a cer tain process that has to be fol lowed. So that when the pack age is sent to the Library of Congress, it is a complete pack age that will not be rejected. The program objectives are to utilize volunteers to conduct interviews and collect video and audio records from veterans for the Library of Congress. Individuals are welcome and encouraged to participate as a volunteer for VHP as a way to help preserve military history. I am here today to volun teer as an interviewer, said AO2(AW) Linwood Wilson. I am interested in hearing veterans stories and learning what they went through during wars and how it was to serve back then. The project collects first hand accounts of U.S. veterans from World War II, Korean War, Vietnam War, Persian Gulf War and the Afghanistan and Iraq conflicts. I want to volunteer, because my husband is a veteran, my parents were veterans and my grandfather was a veteran. I really like meeting people and want to hear their stories regarding their military ser vice, said Ellen Miceli. Neals workshop touched on topics such as interviewing techniques, form requirements and the options of utilizing cam eras and voice recorders. The VHP, mandated by Congress in 2000, is a way to capture either video format, audio format, or a 20-page memo of their service stories to be archived in the Library of Congress, said Neal. The most important thing from my perspective is that these stories will be accessible Mad Fox of the week: LS2(AW) Juniel DanielVHP is safeguarding our U.S. military history 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 30, 2014

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and professionalism of the Navy and Marine Corps and inspire a culture of excellence and service to country by conducting flight demonstrations and community outreach. This is the core of where we are today. Chamberlain and Cheng also discussed safety measures, community outreach events, show specifications and requirements, public relations and the timeline of events. The Blue Angels visit each air show site prior to the show to ensure we are all on the same page and understand their support requirements, said McManus. The air show is a huge event for NAS Jacksonville. In 2011, we had nearly 250,000 people attend. People love to see the Blue Angels fly so for them not to be here last year was dis appointing. We are working hard to coordinate this event and plan to give the public another great show, he added. BLUE ANGELS VP-8 Sailors volunteer at a Bahrain Elementary SchoolSailors assigned to the Fighting Tigers of VP-8, participated in a community relations (COMREL) project at the RIA-Institute in Bahrain. During the COMREL, Sailors read books, played games and colored pictures with the children, putting smiles on all the childrens faces! Theres nothing better than dedicating your time to another person, and the children absolutely love it when service members visit, said Student Director Christine Gordon. We really hope to continue this partnership because service members bring pride, professionalism, and know how to behave around the children, plus the children always enjoy the visits. With the mission statement of Education for All, the RIAInstitute caters to the needs of mainstream learners, as well as students with physical and intel lectual disabilitiesthat require special educational programs. This is the most fun Ive had on a COMREL in quite a while said PR3 Adetolani Adeosun. I definitely plan to volunteer here again because I had a great time and all of the children seemed to have had a great time as well. For more information on VP-8, visit our Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/pages/PatrolSquadron-EIGHT-VP-8/335177721864?ref=hl. The Victims Legal Counsel (VLC) Program is fully operational at NAS Jacksonville. The Navy is implementing the VLC Program to provide a military attorney free of charge to eligible victims of sexual assault. VLCs can assist eligible victims with a decision to make a restricted or an unre stricted report of sexual assault; advocate on their behalf to investigators, com manders, and prosecutors; participate in interviews with other lawyers or investigators; and, provide other legal advice and assistance connected to the sexual assault. It is never too early or too late for an eligible victim to seek the assistance of a VLC. All communications between eli gible victims and VLCs are confidential. Navy judge advocate attorneys assigned to VLC Program units at NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport, NAS Pensacola, NCBC Gulfport, and Joint Base San Antonio provide these legal ser vices to eligible victims of sexual assault throughout Navy Region Southeast. We have clients throughout Navy Region Southeast and are actively pro moting and protecting their rights and interests as crime victims. On a daily basis, VLC attorneys are making sure our clients understand the legal process, make informed legal decisions, and are treated with respect and dignity, said VLC Attorney (Lt.) Nick Smith, who is located in the NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center. Active duty Sailors, adult dependents, and certain reservists are eligible for the program. Victims of sexual assault are encouraged to contact the local sexual assault response coordinator or assigned victim advocate to set up a meeting with Smith. For more information, call 542-5430 or email nicholas.f.smith@navy.mil. New Victims Legal Counsel Program begins 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 30, 2014

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wing community at NAS Jacksonville and NS Mayport. Indeed, you are now a part of RAN history. Thank you. RAN 725 Squadron Commanding Officer Cmdr. David Frost said the term ISD best translates as, we are ready! He added that the ISD event is also the squadrons way of saying thank you to all the commands and individuals that have contributed to the success of the acquisition project. In particular, he mentioned HSM-40 at NS Mayport and the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jax for developing and implementing the training systems. Frost told reporters that RAN has flown an early version of the anti-submarine warfare Seahawk for more than 24 years, So even though we understand the Seahawk platform the MH-60R vari ant is a whole new ballgame. The Romeo integrates many mission systems, sen sors and weapons that are new to us, including the anti-surface warfare capa bility. Except for a kangaroo on the tail, well be operating the Seahawk thats identical to the USN squadrons in the helicopter maritime strike wing. When this acquisition is complete, RAN will operate 24 Romeos seven for our train ing squadron (725) and 17 for our opera tional squadron (816) that will deploy at sea on board RAN surface combatants. Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet, told the audience, The Royal Australian Navy and the U.S. Navy are kinsmen of the sea. They are our brethren. Our relationship is the strongest it has ever been. Our two navies have fought beside each other in numerous conflicts andtoday we cel ebrate another important collaboration the induction of the MH-60R here at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. This proj ect represents the continuing evolution in our partnership and I am excited to say it can only lead to continued coop eration in the future. By training with our counterparts, like the Royal Australian Navy, the U.S. and our partner nations learn from each other, sharing the best practices and proving collective reliability for address ing common challenges, Harris contin ued. In a larger sense, these opportuni ties for exchange of ideas not only allow us the chance to learn best practices and challenges, but also allows us to unite around the common goals of securing our waters and providing for peace in our regions. Frost also expressed his appreciation for the families of 725 Squadron officers and Sailors who moved from the coast of New South Wales to the shores of the St. Johns River in Jacksonville. To our families, thank you for sup porting us and working to be part of this great community, he said. Frost concluded, The USN uses the term shipmates whilst the RAN, in true Aussie fashion, abbreviates it to mates. For us, this is a very strong word bring ing with it a commitment that you will always be there for each other, will watch each others back, and share a bond that will stand the test of time. You never for get your mates, you remember when you met them and you look forward to when you meet them again. I am very proud to call our USN hosts . mates. RAN JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 30, 2014 9

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Aussie media check out RAN 725 RomeosA reporter and cameraman from the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC), called on Royal Australian Navy (RAN) 725 Squadron at NAS Jacksonville Jan. 23 24 to learn about the capabilities of their new American-built MH-60R helicopters. Public Affairs Officer Lt. Mark Flowerdew said the ABC news team was at NAS Jacksonville to interview aircrew and maintainers about their transition to the new Romeo version of the Seahawk anti-submarine warfare helicopter. Theyll see that this foreign military sales and train ing program is working well for both services. The Australian Defense Force has very done well since deciding to work in tandem with the U.S. Navy, said Flowerdew. The squadron invited the ABC crew to fly on a training mission this morning to gain some first hand experience with the Romeo. Correspondent Ben Knight and Cameraman Dan Sweetapple traveled from ABCs Washington D.C. bureau to spend two days reporting from NAS Jacksonville. These helicopters are enormously fascinating. Its always great to get airborne and watch the crew put the aircraft through its paces, said Knight. Our flight crew was eager to tell us all about the surface and antisubmarine capabilities of the Romeo. He said the flight took them up the St. Johns River to Mayport Naval Station, then along the Atlantic coast to Ponte Vedra Beach, and inland to Outlying Landing Field Whitehouse before returning to NAS Jacksonville. Compared to their previous S-70B Seahawk helicop ter, the MH-60R represents a quantum leap in sensor technology and weaponry. In the months ahead, they look forward to deploying to the U.S. Navys undersea training range in the Bahamas, said Knight. ABC is Australias public broadcasting network producing international, national and local television, radio and online services. CSADD bowling eventNAS Jax Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) along with NAS Freedom Lanes, will host a bowling event Jan. 31 from 3-5 p.m. This event is open to all hands, however, the NAS Jax CSADD is challenging tenant command CSADD chapters in the event. The highest scoring team of four or more will win a prize. For more info, contact MAC Henderson at 5428513 or AC3 Ray at 542-2517. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 30, 2014 11

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 30, 2014 13 Chaplain (Lt.) Andrew Hayler delivered the invocation. The events guest speaker was VP-30 Senior Sailor of the Quarter AWO1 Gerald Boyson. When I first joined the Navy and went to boot camp and A School, I absolutely hated it, said Boyson. But then I saw how the leaders believed in me and my ability to become a leader. You have to start as a follower first. You have to be able to take an order and fulfill it. You have to take what you have learned and apply it. These are the traits that make a good leader, Boyson continued. But what about those Blue Jackets who show how to lead from the bottom up? We continue to learn from our junior Sailors. Leadership starts at the top and ends at the bottom but leadership also runs from the bottom up. Following lunch, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander thanked the Sailors and their spouses. I would like to extend my personal con gratulations to all of you who have been selected as outstanding Sailors for this quarter, said Undersander. As is tradition in the Navy, when you are recognized for excellence, you are rewarded by having more responsibility put upon you. Much of that responsibility will involve more opportunities for leader ship. Undersander went on to quote Gen. Douglas MacArthur, A true leader has the confidence to stand alone, the courage to make tough decisions, and the compassion to listen to the needs of others. He does not set out to be a leader, but becomes one by the equality of his actions and the integrity of his intent. There are two points I would like you take away from this. These three charac teristics are all required to be a balanced leader. Too much or too little of any one of these will throw you off balance. And often times, the compassion aspect gets left behind. Dont let it happen to you, he continued. Be a leader by you actions, not just words. And know in your heart that you are taking the right actions. Without action and integrity there is no leadership, said Undersander. Again, congratulations to you and your family members. As we all know, it is a team effort on the home front that makes us successful. Undersander then presented each SOQ an award envelope with a $25 gift card from VyStar Credit Union. I think this is a great idea holding this luncheon to recognize us for all the hard work we do each day. And, its nice for the junior Sailors to be honored it really makes an impact, said VP-62 Junior Sailor of the Quarter AWV2(NAC/AW) William Schmier. This is really nice to bring everyone together and let the different commands know who is being recognized outside of the squadron. It gives junior Sailors some thing to strive for, added VP-45 Senior Sailor of the Quarter AT1(AW) Tiffani Travis. Sponsors included USAA, First Command, University of Phoenix and Columbia College who picked up the cost of the buffet luncheon for the SOQs and their family members.Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or ser vices. SOQto people such as loved ones, educators, teachers, etc, said Neal. They can go in to the library and do research and find out stories about our service men and women. Unfortunately, we dont have any more World War I veter ans. But anyone from World War II up through Operation Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom their unique sto ries will be accessible to the general public. Our job with HandsOn Jacksonville is to engage our local active duty, veter ans, spouses and families into volunteer opportunities. This is a great opportunity for our local community, that is comprised of more than 75,000 veterans, to have their voices heard and their stories told, concluded Neal. For more information on how to become a VHP volun teer, register with HandsOn Jacksonville to attend a vol unteer interviewer training workshop, at 332-6767 or Richard@handsonjackson ville.org. Club Beyond is a chapel based, com munity focused, ecumenical program for middle and high school kids of service members. It is a partnership between Young Life, Youth for Christ and Life Teen and is part of the NAS Jax Command Religious Program. For more information contact Alex Perez at aperez@clubbeyond.org or (904) 588-2456. The following is the schedule of events: *Calendar is subject to change. Check & Like our FB page at: https:// www.facebook.com/clubbeyondnasjax.New Club Beyond offers programs for teens at base chapel VHP The decline in research and development brought on by budget cuts is contributing to the erosion of the U.S. militarys technological superiority at an alarm ing rate, the undersecretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics said Jan. 17. Technological superiority is not assured, Frank Kendall told a conference sponsored by the Center for a New American Society. The United States came out of the Cold War, and demonstrated in the first Persian Gulf War, a very significant superiority in military technology and the application of those technologies. And weve sort of had an assumption [during] the last 20-plus years that that (American] technological supe riority would be a fact of life in the world. The Defense Department has a big part of sustain ing the levels of [research and development] invest ment that I think we need, Kendall added. Despite the relief provided by a trillion dollar plus spending bill approved by Congress for 2014, Kendall said the department still faces heavy budget cuts. Were still taking substantial cuts, and [2015] is much worse than 14 is, he said. And then we dont know what will happen to us after that. So with budgets heading in that direction, he con tinued, and all the uncertainty were dealing with, the Department of Defense has a very difficult plan ning problem. Theres always a tendency to hang onto force struc ture in order to do to the things we need to do in the world, he said. But if we do hang onto that force structure, the consequence of that is R&D has to be cut, in order to pay salaries and readiness. And thats what youre seeing even with the appro priations bill the Senate just passed, Kendall said. And it gets much worse as we go further out. Eventually, if we know where the [budget] is going, we can get our force structure down to where we can get in balance between those different accounts that I mentioned, he said. The undersecretary laid out three points support ing his concern for the erosion of U.S. technological superiority. [Research and development] is not a variable cost. Theres a tendency in the Defense Department, when we cut budgets, to kind of cut everything. But what drives R&D is the rate of modernization that we desire, Kendall continued. [It] is really not dependent on the size of the force structure. Kendalls second point is time is not a recoverable asset. R&D really buys that time in something of a race for technological superiority, he said. I can buy back readiness, I can increase force struc ture, but I dont have any way to buy back the time it takes me to get a new product, Kendall said. That timeline in the acquisitions business is rela tively long, Kendall said, noting how often he gets remarks about the length of an acquisitions process which hasnt changed much over the years. Essentially, Kendall said, it takes about two years before the department can get a budget to spend seri ous money on an idea. Then we have two or three years to four years of risk reduction where we develop the technology to where were confident we can put it into a product, he said. Then we have five or six years of development of making the product ready for production. Combine that with the few years of buying enough numbers to make a difference militarily, Kendall said, and the timeline easily becomes 10 or 15 years. So for that reason as well, Im concerned, he said. Im trying to do a lot of things now to hedge against these [challenges] and make people aware of these things and do more about them.Kendall: Military technological superiority not assured

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NFL Jacksonville Jaguars defensive end Ryan Davis could barely walk down the aisle as fans crowded around to greet him during his scheduled visit to the NAS Jax Commissary Jan. 24. Davis was all smiles as he posed for photographs, autographed footballs and even signed one dedicated fans box of crackers and coffee can at her request. Im here to salute our service men and women, to interact with NFL fans, and have fun, said Davis. This was his first time visiting NAS Jax and he said he felt honored by the warm welcome he received. NAS Jax Commissary Store Director Larry Bentley said, My patrons, employees and contractors enjoyed Ryan Davis visit to the commissary. This certainly brought excitement to the store and from the looks of things, Ryan enjoyed coming to support our military families. Jaguar prowls the Commissary 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 30, 2014

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 30, 2014 Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles Ribbons & Roses, a breast cancer sup port group, meets on Tuesday Feb. 11 at 7 p.m. The meeting will be held in the hospitals General Surgery Clinic, on the second floor of the east annex. Naturopathic Dr. Todd Robinson will be the guest speaker. Robinson has supported clients both during and after treatment for breast cancer. He serves as secretary of the board for the Florida Naturopathic Physicians Association and operates Wellness Working Group at Jacksonville Beach. Naturopathic doctors have expertise in botanical medicine, clinical nutri tion, homeopathy, physical medicine and lifestyle counseling. Ribbons & Roses support group meets monthly at NH Jacksonville General Surgery Clinic on the second Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m.September through June. All are welcome are welcome to attend. For more information on Ribbons & Roses support group, call 542-7857.Ribbons & Roses holds monthly meeting Feb. 11 DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live enter tainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaoke DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Super Bowl Party Feb. 2, 5 p.m., $10 per person Door prizes, buffet and beverage specials Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Jan. 18, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: Jan. 25, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Swim to Cuba Aquatic Program Begins Feb. 3 at the Indoor Pool Teams complete 30,000 laps and team members receive a T-shirt! Navy Run Training Program Begins Feb. 4 at the fitness center Running group meets every Tuesday at 4 p.m. Biggest Loser Challenge Eight-week program, teams of two Begins March 10 Aerobathon featuring TRX, spin, muscle max, boot camp, step, yoga, HIT and Zumba Feb. 15, 10 a.m. noon Fitness CenterI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Gatornationals March 1416 $30 $58 Disney Jr. Live $15 $29 Monster Jam $22 $42 Wild Adventures $30 $70 Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket $166 $194.50 Universal Orlando $114 $169.50 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Daytona 500 $62 $209 Drive 4COPD 300 $55 Budweiser Duels $55 Sprint Unlimited $30 $55 Rolex 24 $32 $65 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 The Artist Series Broadway in Jacksonville 2014 season, select shows Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2014 season, select shows Armed Forces Vacation Club www.afvclub.com $349 $369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 Ripleys St. Augustine $4.25 $7.50 St. Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Wild Florida Airboats $17 $46.50 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels located near attrac tions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restrict ed to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Paintball Trip GTF in Yulee Feb. 1 at 9 a.m. Deweys Super Bowl Party Feb. 2, $10 per person Includes buffet Habitat for Humanity Volunteer Trip Feb. 15 at 8 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Daily Twilight Golf Special Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you!Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil The annual Retiree Seminar will be held Feb. 15 at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center aboard NAS Jacksonville. The seminar will consist of various presentations and exhibits throughout the day to allow maximum exposure to representatives who can address retired pay issues, healthcare con cerns, veterans benefits, long term care and assistance, and those issues for retirees approaching or at Social Security and Medicare/TRICARE for Life age. This years seminar is focused on the grey area for Reservists reaching retired pay age, all U.S. Armed Forces retirees and SBP annuitants. The keynote speaker is retired Vice Adm. John Cotton, former chief of Navy Reserve and commander, Naval Reserve Force. He also served as the assistant dep uty, Chief of Naval Operations Warfare Requirements and Programs. He is a naval aviator with more 15,000 hours as a Navy and commer cial pilot and has held command lead ership positions of an FA-18 squad ron, NAS Keflavik, Iceland, and the Pentagon Navy Command Center. For the past five years, he has been a corporate senior vice president at DRS Technologies. Currently, Cotton serves as a defense and security consultant, is on the Secretary of Defense Reserve Forces policy board, is a Senior Fellow at the Joint Forces Staff College, and is the chairman of the board of trust ees of the Navy/Marines/Coast Guard Residence Foundation. To pre-register for the seminar call 542-5711 or e-mail at JAXS_NAS_ RAO@Navy.Mil Registration will also be taken at the door. Annual Retiree Seminar set for Feb. 15

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 30, 2014 17 Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles primary care teams are now open lon ger to better serve patients and offer appointment times when they need them. Family Medicine (Green, Red, White and Yellow Teams), Internal Medicine (Blue Team) and Pediatrics (Purple Team) are now open Monday to Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Patients with a primary care man ager (PCM) at the hospital or branch health clinic are part of a Medical Home Porta collaborative team of caregiv ers (from doctors and nurses to case managers) led by the PCM. The team focuses on meeting all of the patients health care needspreventive, routine and urgent. To meet the PCMs on each of the commands 14 Medical Home Port teams, visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/navalhospi taljax Patients can reach their team by secure email, for non-urgent issues. Sign up for RelayHealth at www.relay health.com or on the commands web site by clicking on Medical Home Port. At the hospital, patients can call the appointment line at 542-4677 or 800529-4677, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Active duty patients at Branch Health Clinic Jacksonvilles Silver Team can call 546-7094/7095, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. After-hours nurse advice is available for patients at all sites at 542-4677 or 800-529-4677 on evenings, weekends and federal holidays. Sailors assigned to Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) participated in a student enrichment day and provided one-on-one tutor ing with students at Mattie V. Rutherford (MVR) Alternative Middle School in Jacksonville on Jan. 16. During the volunteer effort, Sailors tutored sixth, seventh and eighth-grade students in math and reading, and helped faculty members supervise a basketball game. It was the latest in a series of events conducted under an official partnership between CNRSE and MVR. The partnership benefits our students because they can build relationships with adults who are successful and are making good choices, said Sadie Milliner-Smith, the schools principal. Our goal is to create a safe environment that is condu cive for learning. Many of our students come here with a lot of challenges, and we provide personal, social and academic strategies that students can use to address those challenges. The one-on-one tutoring the Sailors provide to the stu dents affords them an opportu nity to connect with an adult in a different way than they might be able to with their teachers. As an alternative school, MVR currently enrolls 96 stu dents who have made poor educational and social deci sions many of which have been involved in disciplinary incidents at school, at home or in the community. Students are assigned to the school for a minimum of 45 days with the goal of helping them develop positive strate gies to resolve conflicts while providing a challenging aca demic setting. Those who accomplish these goals return to their primary school. As principal, Milliner-Smith said she is committed to creat ing and maintaining an order ly, trusting and caring environ ment to assist students as they develop into productive and responsible citizens. According to QMC(SW) Joseph Ziro, lead coordinator for the CNRSE-MVR partner ship, the school offers a unique opportunity for Sailors to have a significant impact on com munity youth. I think we can really make a difference here because it is an opportunity to be a positive role model for some good kids that may have made some bad decisions, Ziro said. Having been here and inter acted with many of them, I can tell you that their potential is unlimited. Our goal is to try to help them realize that potential through some positive guid ance and mentorship. Tandra Wade, who teaches eighth-grade geometry, algebra and pre-algebra, agreed with Ziro. I think the students can recognize the honor in the fact that these service members are taking time out of their busy day to be here, Wade said. Working with them can help them understand what it means to be accountable and will also instill the message that they too can be success ful if they make the right deci sions. One student was very appre ciative for the opportunity to receive one-on-one tutoring. Tavian Randall, a student in Wades eighth-grade geometry class, said he looks forward to similar events in the future. It really helped me to under stand math, Tavian said. He truly explained how to do the work and answered all of my questions. I would like to see them come back every other week. NC1(SW) Vladimir AriasMartinez, who tutored Tavian during the visit, said the expe rience was mutually reward ing. Its a really gratifying expe rience to have the opportuni ty to come out and help these kids grow from an educational standpoint, Arias said. I support these kinds of vol unteer outings whenever I can because, as members of the military, we have a chance to positively influence the com munity. As a Sailor, thats an opportunity that I dont think we should shy away from. The Association of Naval Aviations Jacksonville Bald Eagle Squadron, held its monthly luncheon at the NAS Jax Officers Club Jan. 21. The group was honored to host retired Army Sgt. 1st Class Norbie Lara and retired Army Staff Sgt. Erick Millette of the Wounded Warrior Projects Warriors Speak program as their guest speakers. In 2004, Laras vehicle was struck by a rocket pro pelled grenade while on combat patrol in Baquban, Iraq with the 293rd Military Police Company 3rd Infantry Division. Lara shared his story with others so they may gain a per sonal perspective of what happens in combat and to makethe story real. Miller, who was hit by impro vised explosive devices while serving in Balad, Iraq with 3rd Battalion 29th Field Artillery, now suffers from traumatic brain injury, a left knee injury, as well as a spinal injury. Miller joined the Warriors Speak program to help others understand what the combat to civilian life transition looks like. He found the opportunity to share his story and be a voice to the invisible wounds of war to be therapeutic. Retired Capt. Pat Wylly, commanding officer of the Bald Eagle Squadron, said he felt honored and privileged to have these brave men share their stories. The Bald Eagle Squadron is always eager to hear from those who have served and give support upon their return. The ANA is very active in the NAS Jax commu nity by fronting many ben eficial projects, including the refurbishment of the historic aircraft in Heritage Park and providing 40 scholarships for children to the National Flight Academy. Recently, a beloved member of the Bald Eagle Squadron, retired Adm. Joe Coleman, passed away. The associations Chief of Staff, Ben Willingham, who spoke the eulogy at Colemans funeral, was his close friend for 60 years and reminisced, He was a great leader who will be missed ter ribly. He has gone upstairs to take command and we will all soon be receiving invitations to his change of command cer emony. He is in a better place. CNRSE Sailors connect with local middle school students Association of Naval Aviation Jax meets with Wounded Warriors Naval Hospital Jacksonville clinics offer longer hours Tax services availableThe VITA Self Service will be avail able to active duty service members, retirees and dependents, Reservists (active 30 days or pre-demobilization) and entitled former spouses from Feb. 4 through April 15. The service is for those whose adjusted gross income doesnt exceed $57,000. Those who qualify under the Military One Source will be able file their taxes for free using the H&R Block software. Volunteer assistance will be onsite; however volunteers are not permitted to prepare taxes. Those needing addi tional assistance outside the scope of the volunteers may be redirected to a nearby tax center. The tax center is located at NAS Jacksonville, Building 4, Room 108 (Ranger Street). The center is open Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Tuesday and Thursday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. For questions or concerns, please contact LN1 Clinton Washington at 5425974 or email Clinton.washington@ navy.mil.

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, 2014 SAPR MUSIC MAKERS RETI REES MEET Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Focusing on what unites Aussies and Yanks in the Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing community, officers and Sailors from both navies gath ered Jan. 24 at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 1122 to commemo rate the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) 725 Squadron In Service Date (ISD) milestone. Historically, Australia has enjoyed a close relationship with America since World War II in the Pacific. Through innu merable campaigns, a mutual friendship developed between allies that continues today, said Head of Australian Defense Staff (Washington) Rear Adm. Steve Gilmore. Now, as America rebalanc es its naval assets around the globe, this close relationship will continue to be critical and what were accomplishing here in Jacksonville with the MH-60R program is an important part of that relationship. Achievement of the ISD fol lowed a comprehensive range of activities undertaken over the past 14 months by the joint RAN and the U.S. Navy Foreign Military Sales team to deliver 24 MH-60R Seahawk helicopters by 2016. Since the formal acceptance of its first two MH-60R Seahawks in December 2013, RAN 725 Squadron conducted its acceptance program aboard NAS Jacksonville to ensure the aircraft were ready to com mence service with everything well ahead of schedule. Gilmore added, The Royal Australian Navy is in a period of regeneration and our new Romeo helicopters will deploy with guided-missile destroy ers supported by the evolution ary Aegis combat system. Their capabilities in both anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare create a very lethal combina tion. Whilst the RAN men and women serving in Jacksonville return home by the end of this year, the professional relation ships and friendships that were formed create a legacy that will last for the next 20 years of Romeo operations, he said. Australia is proud to be the first U.S. ally to purchase and operate the same version MH-60R that is flown by USN squadrons. We appreciate your welcoming us into your rotary Sailors of the Quarter honored at luncheonNAS Jacksonville recognized 81 top Sailors from the base and tenant commands for the first quarter during the Sailor of the Quarter (SOQ) luncheon at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center Jan. 23. The operational tempo of todays Navy is insanely hectic. Today, we have 323,000 active duty members and 62,000 Selected Reservists currently deployed to every area of responsibility in the world. Our objec tive is to protect power and deter war to sustain the American way of life. We continue to operate forward despite budget constraints capitalizing on our most valuable asset our people, said NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd. He continued, But its nice today to be able to carve out a little time to remember our forward deployed squadrons VP-8, VP-16 and HSM-74 and to recognize our Sailors for their contributions, service and sacrifices. Members of the Navy Band Southeast Brass Quintet performed the national anthem and NAS Jacksonville Two members of the U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, The Blue Angels, visited NAS Jacksonville to meet with members of the stations air show committee on Jan. 21. Blue Angels Pilot/Narrator Lt. Ryan Chamberlain and Blue Angels Event Coordinator Lt. Cmdr. Michael Cheng landed the No. 7 jet in front of the NAS Jax Air Operations Tower where they were greeted by NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander, NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker and Air Show Director Cmdr. Mark McManus. After a quick media interview with local news affiliates, Chamberlain and Cheng met with key personnel organizing the 2014 NAS Jax Air Show which will be held aboard the station Oct. 25-26 to discuss preseason details. The air show alternates each year between NAS Jax and the City of Jacksonville (held at Jax Beach). But due to the cancellation of the event aboard the station last year as a result of the government sequestration, city and base officials decided NAS Jax would host the air show in 2014. Undersander says he is excited to be hosting the event this year. It was a big disappointment having to cancel the air show last year, however, we are grate ful to the City of Jacksonville for work ing with us to host this event and are very pleased to get the Blues back, said Undersander. NAS Jax has always had a great relationship with the community. We like to show the American public the Navys aviation prowess. This is a great opportunity for us to open up the base and let them see what the Navy and the mili tary are all about. During the meeting, Chamberlain gave a brief overview on the Blue Angels explaining that the group originat ed at NAS Jacksonville in 1946 under the director of former Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Chester Nimitz. The team for formed in an effort to boost Navy morale, maintain a public inter est in naval aviation and demonstrate naval air power. We are the oldest U.S. military aviation demonstration team in the world, said Chamberlain. Our mission is to showcase the pride Royal Australian Navy celebrates In Service Date Blue Angels visit NAS Jax to discuss upcoming air show

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 30, 2014 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Jan. 30 1862 Launching of USS Monitor, the first turreted warship. Monitor was also the first ironclad warship commissioned by the U.S. Navy during the American Civil War. 1968 Tet Offensive begins in Vietnam. Jan. 31 1944 American amphibious landing on Kwajalein, Marshall Islands. 1961 Lt. Cmdr. Samuel Lee Gravely Jr. becomes first African-American to command a combat ship, USS Falgout. 1981 Era of Enlisted Naval Aviators ends as last pilot retires. Feb. 1 1941 U.S. Fleet reorganized, reviving Atlantic and Pacific Fleets. 1942 USS Enterprise and USS Yorktown make first World War II air strike against Japanese Marshall Islands. 1955 Operation Deep Freeze, a multinational research task force to Antarctica consisting of seven ships and 1,800 men, was begun in two stages. The first was to build an airfield at McMurdo Station. Feb. 2 1800 USS Constellation (Capt. Thomas Truxtun) defeats la Vengeance. 1862 USS Hartford (Capt. David G. Farragut) departs Hampton Roads for Mississippi River cam paign against Confederate forces. Feb. 3 1801 Senate approves peace treaty with France ending undeclared naval war that began in 1798. 1917 U.S. severs diplomatic relations with Germany. Feb. 4 1779 John Paul Jones takes command of Bonhomme Richard. 1959 Keel laying of USS Enterprise (CVN 65), first nuclear powered aircraft carrier, in Newport News, Va. Feb. 5 1854 Dedication of first chapel built on Navy property in Annapolis, Md. 1941 Navy Chief Nurse Marion Olds and Nurse Leona Jackson arrive on Guam. 1971 Moon walk by Capt. Alan Shepherd Jr., commander of Apollo 14 and Cmdr. Edgar Mitchell, lunar module pilot. During the nine-day mission, 94 lbs. of lunar material was collected. Shepard also became the first person to hit a golf ball on the moon. Recovery was by helicopters from USS New Orleans (LPH-11). Two weeks ago, I shared with you three of my favorite, non-trending stories of 2013. One of them included an elderly woman in a retirement home who had a surprise for me in her apartment: a wall full of paintings her husband had created many of them of his wife throughout his life. Readers loved this story and wanted more details. So my husband and I went back to visit Dot last week and hear about life with her late, artist husband, Milton. Milt, as Dot calls him, always had an artistic streak. He had an eye for seeing beauty in ordinary things, and he had the hands for shaping those ordinary things into something spectacular. But Milt didnt take up painting until he was a prisoner of war in World War II. After graduating from the University of Maine, Milt joined the Army infantry and was sent overseas. He was captured by the Germans in North Africa and then held in Poland, on the Russian border, for 27 months. Back in the states, he first was listed as MIA, then later as a POW. Dot didnt know Milt yet. She was a young woman living in Georgia, helping with the USO and other support efforts for the troops. The Germans didnt care much about Milts pris oner camp. They mostly left the prisoners alone. This was bad in some respects (food was scarce) but good in others. People who sided with the United States often snuck things into the prison for the inmates. One time, they brought oil paints and canvas. A fellow prisoner from Chicago had taught oil painting before and started a quasi-college inside the camp walls. There, Milt completed his first painting. Its a still life of a pair of sandals next to an open Bible. When the Germans were eventually overrun and released the prisoners two years later, they simply opened the gates, according to Dot, and left Milt and his fellow POWs to find their way back to France. Milt rolled up his oil-and-canvas painting and carried it all the way to France on a broomstick strapped to his back. After the war, Dot met Milt at an officers club in Georgia. They were married in 1946 and made their home in Maine, where Milt worked at a bank and painted in his free time. One of my favorite paintings in Dots room was painted at Dots mothers home in Georgia. In it, a young Dot stands in a long, elegant gown. Behind her is a mirror. In the reflection of the mirror, you can see Milt, standing in his suit, smiling back at her. Even now, it gives me chills to think of it. Milt has been gone for many years now. He died shortly after their 50th wedding anniversary. But each day, Dot sits in front of that glorious painting, some thing that surely took time and effort to create and clearly shows his love for her. I guess I need to take up painting, Dustin said. But it doesnt have to be a painting. The story of Dot and Milt is a story about things that last, tangible reminders of love that remain even after someone is gone. How many of my generation even have actual printed photographs of our children? I know most of mine are stored on my computer, or worse, on my iPhone. Everything is so fleeting and easy today. We snap a picture with our phone, save it, and then transfer it to our computer. When I look at Milts paintings of his wife, what is immediately apparent to me is the care that went into each one. It wasnt a snap-save-transfer process. But Dustins right we cant all be artists. (Although, Id love to see his attempt.) Many of us, however, do have some craft wood working, knitting, sewing, writing, photography that leaves behind a little bit of ourselves in each finished piece. On a very basic level, we can even write handwritten notes instead of e-mails for the messages that really matter. In a world that moves a mile-aminute, we can slow down and create something for someone we love. Dot said it was difficult moving from her home to the retirement apartment, mostly because she had to make tough decisions about what to keep and what to leave behind. Obviously, Milts paintings came with her. And its clear as to why. Those pieces of art speak to Dot and to anyone else who visits her room. They tell the story of a man many of us never got to meet and of a love many of us aspire to have.Treasured art a gift through time

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NAS Jacksonville announces an informational meeting to review the U. S. Navy proposal to establish a small defined search and rescue (SAR) training area in the St. Johns River off shore of NAS Jacksonville, that would limit public access in order to support congressional mandated search and rescue training. Establishment of SAR training area would prevent anchoring of objects, such as crab traps, or unmanned vessels in the training area to help trainees avoid injury and prevent equipment damage. All fishermen, boaters and the general public are invited to attend the meeting Feb. 19, from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the South Mandarin Library, 12125 San Jose Boulevard, Jacksonville 32223. For further information about this public meeting send an e-mail to stephen.biemiller@navy.mil. Public comments will be accepted until March 31, at NAVFACSESARPROJ@navy.mil or via regular mail at NAVFACSE SAR Training Area, NEPA Program Manager (EV21), P.O. Box 30, Jacksonville, Fla. 322120030. NAS Jacksonville and the Northeast Florida Navy League Councils will host the NAS Jacksonville Individual Augmentee (IA) Recognition Luncheon Feb. 20 at 11 a.m. at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center. All NAS Jacksonville and tenant command Sailors who have returned from an IA assignment since May 1, 2013 will be recognized during the event. The guest speaker will be Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ 4th Fleet. There is no cost for the IA Sailor or Marine and their spouse. The cost for other military and civilian guests is $10. Tickets may be purchased at the Fleet and Family Support Center, Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. The deadline to purchase tickets is Feb. 13. Child care will be provided at the Child Development Center for children of IAs and spouses in attendance. Families should call 542-9075, 30 days in advance to secure their drop-in space. To RSVP, contact your command CIAC or Bobby Johns at bobby.johns.ctr@navy.mil For more information, call 542-5637. Tax services available in Building No. 4The VITA Self Service will be available to active duty service members, retirees and dependents, Reservists (active 30 days or pre-demobilization) and entitled former spouses from Feb. 4 through April 15. The service is for those whose adjusted gross income doesnt exceed $57,000. Those who qualify under the Military One Source will be able file their taxes for free using the H&R Block software. Volunteer assistance will be onsite; however vol unteers are not permitted to prepare taxes. Those needing additional assistance outside the scope of the volunteers may be redirected to a nearby tax center. The tax center is located at NAS Jacksonville, Building 4, Room 108 (Ranger Street). The center is open Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Tuesday and Thursday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. For questions or concerns, please contact LN1 Clinton Washington at 542-5974 or e-mail Clinton. washington@navy.mil.Search and Rescue information meeting set for Feb. 19Individual Augmentee Recognition Luncheon is Feb. 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 30, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 30, 2014 Established in 1995, Navy Band Southeast is one of 13 official U.S. Navy Bands. The command consists of 35 versatile musicians dedicated to the highest levels of musical performance. The ceremonial band or any of its various ensembles pro vide a wide variety of music for any occasion including mili tary ceremonies, parades, public concerts, musical outreach to local schools and more. They also play a crucial role in Navy recruitment. Lt. Cmdr. Mark Corbliss, director of Navy Band Southeast since 2012, says the level of musical talent with in the band is ridiculously good despite the challenges of sequestration in 2013. We gave up 10 billets last year as part of 220 musician billets that were closed across the fleet. We were also restricted to playing venues that were no further than 50 miles from NAS Jacksonville. As a result, weve really expanded our outreach to our surrounding counties in Northeast Florida. He said the Music for Recruiting program has been restored, so Navy bands may perform concerts, patriotic ceremonies and parades for the general public and school concerts in support of Navy recruiting. This allows Navy Band Southeast to do more with local school systems and pub lic libraries. When youre planning a program for school populations, their only interest is rock n roll. So our popular music ensemble not only entertains, but creates a positive environ ment for Navy recruiters who may accompany us to a high school, explained Corbliss. At other high school appearances, we spend time working with their music programs to teach clinics and master class es, as well as perform joint concerts, he added. Corbliss is cautiously opti mistic about the bands 2014 program. Its first come, first served and the summer months are already being booked. This fall, well be performing downtown at the Times Union Center for the Performing Arts. Of course, Memorial Day, 4th of July and Veterans Day are busy times but we believe its always better to be performing than practicing. The ceremonial band and brass quintet are our bread and butter, representing the bulk of our gigs. A popular new small-group ensemble is the Saxophone Quartet that plays different musical styles ranging from classic concert fare to popular music and jazz, said Corbliss. MU1 Dexter Jones said, So far, audiences have real ly embraced the 20th century sounds of our saxophone quartet. Ive been a Navy musician for 16 years and this quartet is a most rewarding way to pres ent a variety of musical styles jazz, marches, gospel and contemporary. Booking Navy Band Southeast Submit your request early. Although the band cannot confirm support until 90 days prior to military events and 60 days prior to civilian events, they accept requests up to 12 months prior to the event. You may submit your request by phone (542-8060), e-mail (nbse.ops@navy.mil) or online (https://www.cnic.navy.mil/ regions/cnrse/about/navy_ bands/navy_band_southeast. html). Military music makers: Navy Band Southeast

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As VP-5 continues its busy schedule operating and main taining the P8-A Poseidon, the squadron is highlighting one outstanding Mad Fox each week. This weeks Mad Fox of the Week is LS2(AW) Juniel Daniel. Daniel was born in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands and currently resides in the Jacksonville area with his family. Daniel joined the Navy upon entering basic training in 2009. After basic training, he completed Logistic Specialist A school in Meridian, Miss. in September 2009. He reported to VP-5 Sept. 28, 2009. During his time at the squadron, he has deployed to Sigonella, Italy in 2009 and Kadena, Japan in 2012. As a logistics specialist, Daniel is in charge of provid ing and budgeting all supplies within the command. He is tasked with maintain ing supplies from pens and paper to expensive parts on the aircraft. He is the operation target budget manager within the VP-5 Supply Division. He makes sure the squadron has the appropriate funding for daily operations to allot for flight hours, fuel, and mainte nance parts. His collateral duties include sponsor coordinator, masterat-arms, and morale, welfare and recreation representative. The most challenging part of my job is making sure we are ahead of the schedule to make sure the squadron has everything we need because we cannot fly without supply, explained Daniel. I enjoy coming to work each day because of those in my division. From the day I checked in, they were welcoming and taught me how to do my job properly and with pro fessionalism. This has motivated me each day to pass this on to those who have come after me. Daniels goals are to make chief petty officer and to retire from the Navy as a master chief. Away from the squadron he enjoys spending time with his family and traveling outside the area. VP-5 is currently in the interdeployment readiness cycle aboard NAS Jacksonville. Sailors and civilians attended a volunteer interview training workshop at the NAS Jax NavyMarine Corps Relief Society on Jan. 23 to embrace Americas veterans with questions about their service, as well as retrieve important artifacts and records from their time serving in the military. The course is for those interested in being part of the Veterans History Project (VHP). In 2000, U.S. Congress created VHP as part of the American Folk Life Center at the Library of Congress, one of the worlds most respected research and cultural institutions. There are now 17 people ready to interview veterans in the local commu nity. In todays seminar we are providing an overview with what the Library of Congress desires, said Military Engagement Manager Richard Neal of HandsOn Jacksonville. There are certain forms that need to be filled out and a cer tain process that has to be fol lowed. So that when the pack age is sent to the Library of Congress, it is a complete pack age that will not be rejected. The program objectives are to utilize volunteers to conduct interviews and collect video and audio records from veterans for the Library of Congress. Individuals are welcome and encouraged to participate as a volunteer for VHP as a way to help preserve military history. I am here today to volun teer as an interviewer, said AO2(AW) Linwood Wilson. I am interested in hearing veterans stories and learning what they went through during wars and how it was to serve back then. The project collects first hand accounts of U.S. veterans from World War II, Korean War, Vietnam War, Persian Gulf War and the Afghanistan and Iraq conflicts. I want to volunteer, because my husband is a veteran, my parents were veterans and my grandfather was a veteran. I really like meeting people and want to hear their stories regarding their military ser vice, said Ellen Miceli. Neals workshop touched on topics such as interviewing techniques, form requirements and the options of utilizing cameras and voice recorders. The VHP, mandated by Congress in 2000, is a way to capture either video format, audio format, or a 20-page memo of their service stories to be archived in the Library of Congress, said Neal. The most important thing from my perspective is that these stories will be accessible Mad Fox of the week: LS2(AW) Juniel DanielVHP is safeguarding our U.S. military history 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 30, 2014

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and professionalism of the Navy and Marine Corps and inspire a culture of excellence and service to country by conducting flight demonstrations and community outreach. This is the core of where we are today. Chamberlain and Cheng also discussed safety measures, community outreach events, show specifications and requirements, public relations and the timeline of events. The Blue Angels visit each air show site prior to the show to ensure we are all on the same page and understand their support requirements, said McManus. The air show is a huge event for NAS Jacksonville. In 2011, we had nearly 250,000 people attend. People love to see the Blue Angels fly so for them not to be here last year was dis appointing. We are working hard to coordinate this event and plan to give the public another great show, he added. BLUE ANGELS VP-8 Sailors volunteer at a Bahrain Elementary SchoolSailors assigned to the Fighting Tigers of VP-8, participated in a community relations (COMREL) project at the RIA-Institute in Bahrain. During the COMREL, Sailors read books, played games and colored pictures with the children, putting smiles on all the childrens faces! Theres nothing better than dedicating your time to another person, and the children absolutely love it when service members visit, said Student Director Christine Gordon. We really hope to continue this partnership because service members bring pride, professionalism, and know how to behave around the children, plus the children always enjoy the visits. With the mission statement of Education for All, the RIAInstitute caters to the needs of mainstream learners, as well as students with physical and intellectual disabilitiesthat require special educational programs. This is the most fun Ive had on a COMREL in quite a while said PR3 Adetolani Adeosun. I definitely plan to volunteer here again because I had a great time and all of the children seemed to have had a great time as well. For more information on VP-8, visit our Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/pages/PatrolSquadron-EIGHT-VP-8/335177721864?ref=hl. The Victims Legal Counsel (VLC) Program is fully operational at NAS Jacksonville. The Navy is implementing the VLC Program to provide a military attorney free of charge to eligible victims of sexual assault. VLCs can assist eligible victims with a decision to make a restricted or an unrestricted report of sexual assault; advocate on their behalf to investigators, com manders, and prosecutors; participate in interviews with other lawyers or investigators; and, provide other legal advice and assistance connected to the sexual assault. It is never too early or too late for an eligible victim to seek the assistance of a VLC. All communications between eli gible victims and VLCs are confidential. Navy judge advocate attorneys assigned to VLC Program units at NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport, NAS Pensacola, NCBC Gulfport, and Joint Base San Antonio provide these legal services to eligible victims of sexual assault throughout Navy Region Southeast. We have clients throughout Navy Region Southeast and are actively pro moting and protecting their rights and interests as crime victims. On a daily basis, VLC attorneys are making sure our clients understand the legal process, make informed legal decisions, and are treated with respect and dignity, said VLC Attorney (Lt.) Nick Smith, who is located in the NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center. Active duty Sailors, adult dependents, and certain reservists are eligible for the program. Victims of sexual assault are encouraged to contact the local sexual assault response coordinator or assigned victim advocate to set up a meeting with Smith. For more information, call 542-5430 or email nicholas.f.smith@navy.mil. New Victims Legal Counsel Program begins 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 30, 2014

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wing community at NAS Jacksonville and NS Mayport. Indeed, you are now a part of RAN history. Thank you. RAN 725 Squadron Commanding Officer Cmdr. David Frost said the term ISD best translates as, we are ready! He added that the ISD event is also the squadrons way of saying thank you to all the commands and individuals that have contributed to the success of the acquisition project. In particular, he mentioned HSM-40 at NS Mayport and the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jax for developing and implementing the training systems. Frost told reporters that RAN has flown an early version of the anti-submarine warfare Seahawk for more than 24 years, So even though we understand the Seahawk platform the MH-60R vari ant is a whole new ballgame. The Romeo integrates many mission systems, sen sors and weapons that are new to us, including the anti-surface warfare capa bility. Except for a kangaroo on the tail, well be operating the Seahawk thats identical to the USN squadrons in the helicopter maritime strike wing. When this acquisition is complete, RAN will operate 24 Romeos seven for our training squadron (725) and 17 for our operational squadron (816) that will deploy at sea on board RAN surface combatants. Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet, told the audience, The Royal Australian Navy and the U.S. Navy are kinsmen of the sea. They are our brethren. Our relationship is the strongest it has ever been. Our two navies have fought beside each other in numerous conflicts andtoday we cel ebrate another important collaboration the induction of the MH-60R here at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. This proj ect represents the continuing evolution in our partnership and I am excited to say it can only lead to continued coop eration in the future. By training with our counterparts, like the Royal Australian Navy, the U.S. and our partner nations learn from each other, sharing the best practices and proving collective reliability for addressing common challenges, Harris contin ued. In a larger sense, these opportunities for exchange of ideas not only allow us the chance to learn best practices and challenges, but also allows us to unite around the common goals of securing our waters and providing for peace in our regions. Frost also expressed his appreciation for the families of 725 Squadron officers and Sailors who moved from the coast of New South Wales to the shores of the St. Johns River in Jacksonville. To our families, thank you for sup porting us and working to be part of this great community, he said. Frost concluded, The USN uses the term shipmates whilst the RAN, in true Aussie fashion, abbreviates it to mates. For us, this is a very strong word bringing with it a commitment that you will always be there for each other, will watch each others back, and share a bond that will stand the test of time. You never forget your mates, you remember when you met them and you look forward to when you meet them again. I am very proud to call our USN hosts . mates. RAN JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 30, 2014 9

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Aussie media check out RAN 725 RomeosA reporter and cameraman from the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC), called on Royal Australian Navy (RAN) 725 Squadron at NAS Jacksonville Jan. 23 24 to learn about the capabilities of their new American-built MH-60R helicopters. Public Affairs Officer Lt. Mark Flowerdew said the ABC news team was at NAS Jacksonville to interview aircrew and maintainers about their transition to the new Romeo version of the Seahawk anti-submarine warfare helicopter. Theyll see that this foreign military sales and training program is working well for both services. The Australian Defense Force has very done well since deciding to work in tandem with the U.S. Navy, said Flowerdew. The squadron invited the ABC crew to fly on a training mission this morning to gain some first hand experience with the Romeo. Correspondent Ben Knight and Cameraman Dan Sweetapple traveled from ABCs Washington D.C. bureau to spend two days reporting from NAS Jacksonville. These helicopters are enormously fascinating. Its always great to get airborne and watch the crew put the aircraft through its paces, said Knight. Our flight crew was eager to tell us all about the surface and antisubmarine capabilities of the Romeo. He said the flight took them up the St. Johns River to Mayport Naval Station, then along the Atlantic coast to Ponte Vedra Beach, and inland to Outlying Landing Field Whitehouse before returning to NAS Jacksonville. Compared to their previous S-70B Seahawk helicopter, the MH-60R represents a quantum leap in sensor technology and weaponry. In the months ahead, they look forward to deploying to the U.S. Navys undersea training range in the Bahamas, said Knight. ABC is Australias public broadcasting network producing international, national and local television, radio and online services. CSADD bowling eventNAS Jax Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) along with NAS Freedom Lanes, will host a bowling event Jan. 31 from 3-5 p.m. This event is open to all hands, however, the NAS Jax CSADD is challenging tenant command CSADD chapters in the event. The highest scoring team of four or more will win a prize. For more info, contact MAC Henderson at 5428513 or AC3 Ray at 542-2517. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 30, 2014 11

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 30, 2014 13 Chaplain (Lt.) Andrew Hayler delivered the invocation. The events guest speaker was VP-30 Senior Sailor of the Quarter AWO1 Gerald Boyson. When I first joined the Navy and went to boot camp and A School, I absolutely hated it, said Boyson. But then I saw how the leaders believed in me and my ability to become a leader. You have to start as a follower first. You have to be able to take an order and fulfill it. You have to take what you have learned and apply it. These are the traits that make a good leader, Boyson continued. But what about those Blue Jackets who show how to lead from the bottom up? We continue to learn from our junior Sailors. Leadership starts at the top and ends at the bottom but leadership also runs from the bottom up. Following lunch, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander thanked the Sailors and their spouses. I would like to extend my personal congratulations to all of you who have been selected as outstanding Sailors for this quarter, said Undersander. As is tradition in the Navy, when you are recognized for excellence, you are rewarded by having more responsibility put upon you. Much of that responsibility will involve more opportunities for leadership. Undersander went on to quote Gen. Douglas MacArthur, A true leader has the confidence to stand alone, the courage to make tough decisions, and the compassion to listen to the needs of others. He does not set out to be a leader, but becomes one by the equality of his actions and the integrity of his intent. There are two points I would like you take away from this. These three charac teristics are all required to be a balanced leader. Too much or too little of any one of these will throw you off balance. And often times, the compassion aspect gets left behind. Dont let it happen to you, he continued. Be a leader by you actions, not just words. And know in your heart that you are taking the right actions. Without action and integrity there is no leadership, said Undersander. Again, congratulations to you and your family members. As we all know, it is a team effort on the home front that makes us successful. Undersander then presented each SOQ an award envelope with a $25 gift card from VyStar Credit Union. I think this is a great idea holding this luncheon to recognize us for all the hard work we do each day. And, its nice for the junior Sailors to be honored it really makes an impact, said VP-62 Junior Sailor of the Quarter AWV2(NAC/AW) William Schmier. This is really nice to bring everyone together and let the different commands know who is being recognized outside of the squadron. It gives junior Sailors something to strive for, added VP-45 Senior Sailor of the Quarter AT1(AW) Tiffani Travis. Sponsors included USAA, First Command, University of Phoenix and Columbia College who picked up the cost of the buffet luncheon for the SOQs and their family members.Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or ser vices. SOQto people such as loved ones, educators, teachers, etc, said Neal. They can go in to the library and do research and find out stories about our service men and women. Unfortunately, we dont have any more World War I veter ans. But anyone from World War II up through Operation Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom their unique sto ries will be accessible to the general public. Our job with HandsOn Jacksonville is to engage our local active duty, veter ans, spouses and families into volunteer opportunities. This is a great opportunity for our local community, that is comprised of more than 75,000 veterans, to have their voices heard and their stories told, concluded Neal. For more information on how to become a VHP volunteer, register with HandsOn Jacksonville to attend a vol unteer interviewer training workshop, at 332-6767 or Richard@handsonjackson ville.org. Club Beyond is a chapel based, com munity focused, ecumenical program for middle and high school kids of service members. It is a partnership between Young Life, Youth for Christ and Life Teen and is part of the NAS Jax Command Religious Program. For more information contact Alex Perez at aperez@clubbeyond.org or (904) 588-2456. The following is the schedule of events: *Calendar is subject to change. Check & Like our FB page at: https:// www.facebook.com/clubbeyondnasjax.New Club Beyond offers programs for teens at base chapel VHP The decline in research and development brought on by budget cuts is contributing to the erosion of the U.S. militarys technological superiority at an alarming rate, the undersecretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics said Jan. 17. Technological superiority is not assured, Frank Kendall told a conference sponsored by the Center for a New American Society. The United States came out of the Cold War, and demonstrated in the first Persian Gulf War, a very significant superiority in military technology and the application of those technologies. And weve sort of had an assumption [during] the last 20-plus years that that (American] technological superiority would be a fact of life in the world. The Defense Department has a big part of sustaining the levels of [research and development] investment that I think we need, Kendall added. Despite the relief provided by a trillion dollar plus spending bill approved by Congress for 2014, Kendall said the department still faces heavy budget cuts. Were still taking substantial cuts, and [2015] is much worse than 14 is, he said. And then we dont know what will happen to us after that. So with budgets heading in that direction, he continued, and all the uncertainty were dealing with, the Department of Defense has a very difficult planning problem. Theres always a tendency to hang onto force structure in order to do to the things we need to do in the world, he said. But if we do hang onto that force structure, the consequence of that is R&D has to be cut, in order to pay salaries and readiness. And thats what youre seeing even with the appropriations bill the Senate just passed, Kendall said. And it gets much worse as we go further out. Eventually, if we know where the [budget] is going, we can get our force structure down to where we can get in balance between those different accounts that I mentioned, he said. The undersecretary laid out three points support ing his concern for the erosion of U.S. technological superiority. [Research and development] is not a variable cost. Theres a tendency in the Defense Department, when we cut budgets, to kind of cut everything. But what drives R&D is the rate of modernization that we desire, Kendall continued. [It] is really not dependent on the size of the force structure. Kendalls second point is time is not a recoverable asset. R&D really buys that time in something of a race for technological superiority, he said. I can buy back readiness, I can increase force structure, but I dont have any way to buy back the time it takes me to get a new product, Kendall said. That timeline in the acquisitions business is rela tively long, Kendall said, noting how often he gets remarks about the length of an acquisitions process which hasnt changed much over the years. Essentially, Kendall said, it takes about two years before the department can get a budget to spend serious money on an idea. Then we have two or three years to four years of risk reduction where we develop the technology to where were confident we can put it into a product, he said. Then we have five or six years of development of making the product ready for production. Combine that with the few years of buying enough numbers to make a difference militarily, Kendall said, and the timeline easily becomes 10 or 15 years. So for that reason as well, Im concerned, he said. Im trying to do a lot of things now to hedge against these [challenges] and make people aware of these things and do more about them.Kendall: Military technological superiority not assured

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NFL Jacksonville Jaguars defensive end Ryan Davis could barely walk down the aisle as fans crowded around to greet him during his scheduled visit to the NAS Jax Commissary Jan. 24. Davis was all smiles as he posed for photographs, autographed footballs and even signed one dedicated fans box of crackers and coffee can at her request. Im here to salute our service men and women, to interact with NFL fans, and have fun, said Davis. This was his first time visiting NAS Jax and he said he felt honored by the warm welcome he received. NAS Jax Commissary Store Director Larry Bentley said, My patrons, employees and contractors enjoyed Ryan Davis visit to the commissary. This certainly brought excitement to the store and from the looks of things, Ryan enjoyed coming to support our military families. Jaguar prowls the Commissary 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 30, 2014

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 30, 2014 Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles Ribbons & Roses, a breast cancer sup port group, meets on Tuesday Feb. 11 at 7 p.m. The meeting will be held in the hospitals General Surgery Clinic, on the second floor of the east annex. Naturopathic Dr. Todd Robinson will be the guest speaker. Robinson has supported clients both during and after treatment for breast cancer. He serves as secretary of the board for the Florida Naturopathic Physicians Association and operates Wellness Working Group at Jacksonville Beach. Naturopathic doctors have expertise in botanical medicine, clinical nutri tion, homeopathy, physical medicine and lifestyle counseling. Ribbons & Roses support group meets monthly at NH Jacksonville General Surgery Clinic on the second Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m.September through June. All are welcome are welcome to attend. For more information on Ribbons & Roses support group, call 542-7857.Ribbons & Roses holds monthly meeting Feb. 11 DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live entertainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaoke DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Super Bowl Party Feb. 2, 5 p.m., $10 per person Door prizes, buffet and beverage specials Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Jan. 18, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: Jan. 25, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Swim to Cuba Aquatic Program Begins Feb. 3 at the Indoor Pool Teams complete 30,000 laps and team members receive a T-shirt! Navy Run Training Program Begins Feb. 4 at the fitness center Running group meets every Tuesday at 4 p.m. Biggest Loser Challenge Eight-week program, teams of two Begins March 10 Aerobathon featuring TRX, spin, muscle max, boot camp, step, yoga, HIT and Zumba Feb. 15, 10 a.m. noon Fitness CenterI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Gatornationals March 1416 $30 $58 Disney Jr. Live $15 $29 Monster Jam $22 $42 Wild Adventures $30 $70 Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket $166 $194.50 Universal Orlando $114 $169.50 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Daytona 500 $62 $209 Drive 4COPD 300 $55 Budweiser Duels $55 Sprint Unlimited $30 $55 Rolex 24 $32 $65 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 The Artist Series Broadway in Jacksonville 2014 season, select shows Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2014 season, select shows Armed Forces Vacation Club www.afvclub.com $349 $369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 Ripleys St. Augustine $4.25 $7.50 St. Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Wild Florida Airboats $17 $46.50 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels located near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Paintball Trip GTF in Yulee Feb. 1 at 9 a.m. Deweys Super Bowl Party Feb. 2, $10 per person Includes buffet Habitat for Humanity Volunteer Trip Feb. 15 at 8 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Daily Twilight Golf Special Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you!Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil The annual Retiree Seminar will be held Feb. 15 at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center aboard NAS Jacksonville. The seminar will consist of various presentations and exhibits throughout the day to allow maximum exposure to representatives who can address retired pay issues, healthcare con cerns, veterans benefits, long term care and assistance, and those issues for retirees approaching or at Social Security and Medicare/TRICARE for Life age. This years seminar is focused on the grey area for Reservists reaching retired pay age, all U.S. Armed Forces retirees and SBP annuitants. The keynote speaker is retired Vice Adm. John Cotton, former chief of Navy Reserve and commander, Naval Reserve Force. He also served as the assistant dep uty, Chief of Naval Operations Warfare Requirements and Programs. He is a naval aviator with more 15,000 hours as a Navy and commer cial pilot and has held command leadership positions of an FA-18 squad ron, NAS Keflavik, Iceland, and the Pentagon Navy Command Center. For the past five years, he has been a corporate senior vice president at DRS Technologies. Currently, Cotton serves as a defense and security consultant, is on the Secretary of Defense Reserve Forces policy board, is a Senior Fellow at the Joint Forces Staff College, and is the chairman of the board of trust ees of the Navy/Marines/Coast Guard Residence Foundation. To pre-register for the seminar call 542-5711 or e-mail at JAXS_NAS_ RAO@Navy.Mil Registration will also be taken at the door. Annual Retiree Seminar set for Feb. 15

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 30, 2014 17 Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles primary care teams are now open lon ger to better serve patients and offer appointment times when they need them. Family Medicine (Green, Red, White and Yellow Teams), Internal Medicine (Blue Team) and Pediatrics (Purple Team) are now open Monday to Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Patients with a primary care man ager (PCM) at the hospital or branch health clinic are part of a Medical Home Porta collaborative team of caregiv ers (from doctors and nurses to case managers) led by the PCM. The team focuses on meeting all of the patients health care needspreventive, routine and urgent. To meet the PCMs on each of the commands 14 Medical Home Port teams, visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/navalhospi taljax Patients can reach their team by secure email, for non-urgent issues. Sign up for RelayHealth at www.relay health.com or on the commands web site by clicking on Medical Home Port. At the hospital, patients can call the appointment line at 542-4677 or 800529-4677, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Active duty patients at Branch Health Clinic Jacksonvilles Silver Team can call 546-7094/7095, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. After-hours nurse advice is available for patients at all sites at 542-4677 or 800-529-4677 on evenings, weekends and federal holidays. Sailors assigned to Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) participated in a student enrichment day and provided one-on-one tutor ing with students at Mattie V. Rutherford (MVR) Alternative Middle School in Jacksonville on Jan. 16. During the volunteer effort, Sailors tutored sixth, seventh and eighth-grade students in math and reading, and helped faculty members supervise a basketball game. It was the latest in a series of events conducted under an official partnership between CNRSE and MVR. The partnership benefits our students because they can build relationships with adults who are successful and are making good choices, said Sadie Milliner-Smith, the schools principal. Our goal is to create a safe environment that is condu cive for learning. Many of our students come here with a lot of challenges, and we provide personal, social and academic strategies that students can use to address those challenges. The one-on-one tutoring the Sailors provide to the stu dents affords them an opportunity to connect with an adult in a different way than they might be able to with their teachers. As an alternative school, MVR currently enrolls 96 stu dents who have made poor educational and social deci sions many of which have been involved in disciplinary incidents at school, at home or in the community. Students are assigned to the school for a minimum of 45 days with the goal of helping them develop positive strate gies to resolve conflicts while providing a challenging aca demic setting. Those who accomplish these goals return to their primary school. As principal, Milliner-Smith said she is committed to creating and maintaining an orderly, trusting and caring environment to assist students as they develop into productive and responsible citizens. According to QMC(SW) Joseph Ziro, lead coordinator for the CNRSE-MVR partner ship, the school offers a unique opportunity for Sailors to have a significant impact on com munity youth. I think we can really make a difference here because it is an opportunity to be a positive role model for some good kids that may have made some bad decisions, Ziro said. Having been here and interacted with many of them, I can tell you that their potential is unlimited. Our goal is to try to help them realize that potential through some positive guid ance and mentorship. Tandra Wade, who teaches eighth-grade geometry, algebra and pre-algebra, agreed with Ziro. I think the students can recognize the honor in the fact that these service members are taking time out of their busy day to be here, Wade said. Working with them can help them understand what it means to be accountable and will also instill the message that they too can be success ful if they make the right deci sions. One student was very appre ciative for the opportunity to receive one-on-one tutoring. Tavian Randall, a student in Wades eighth-grade geometry class, said he looks forward to similar events in the future. It really helped me to understand math, Tavian said. He truly explained how to do the work and answered all of my questions. I would like to see them come back every other week. NC1(SW) Vladimir AriasMartinez, who tutored Tavian during the visit, said the expe rience was mutually reward ing. Its a really gratifying expe rience to have the opportuni ty to come out and help these kids grow from an educational standpoint, Arias said. I support these kinds of volunteer outings whenever I can because, as members of the military, we have a chance to positively influence the com munity. As a Sailor, thats an opportunity that I dont think we should shy away from. The Association of Naval Aviations Jacksonville Bald Eagle Squadron, held its monthly luncheon at the NAS Jax Officers Club Jan. 21. The group was honored to host retired Army Sgt. 1st Class Norbie Lara and retired Army Staff Sgt. Erick Millette of the Wounded Warrior Projects Warriors Speak program as their guest speakers. In 2004, Laras vehicle was struck by a rocket pro pelled grenade while on combat patrol in Baquban, Iraq with the 293rd Military Police Company 3rd Infantry Division. Lara shared his story with others so they may gain a personal perspective of what happens in combat and to makethe story real. Miller, who was hit by improvised explosive devices while serving in Balad, Iraq with 3rd Battalion 29th Field Artillery, now suffers from traumatic brain injury, a left knee injury, as well as a spinal injury. Miller joined the Warriors Speak program to help others understand what the combat to civilian life transition looks like. He found the opportunity to share his story and be a voice to the invisible wounds of war to be therapeutic. Retired Capt. Pat Wylly, commanding officer of the Bald Eagle Squadron, said he felt honored and privileged to have these brave men share their stories. The Bald Eagle Squadron is always eager to hear from those who have served and give support upon their return. The ANA is very active in the NAS Jax commu nity by fronting many ben eficial projects, including the refurbishment of the historic aircraft in Heritage Park and providing 40 scholarships for children to the National Flight Academy. Recently, a beloved member of the Bald Eagle Squadron, retired Adm. Joe Coleman, passed away. The associations Chief of Staff, Ben Willingham, who spoke the eulogy at Colemans funeral, was his close friend for 60 years and reminisced, He was a great leader who will be missed ter ribly. He has gone upstairs to take command and we will all soon be receiving invitations to his change of command ceremony. He is in a better place. CNRSE Sailors connect with local middle school students Association of Naval Aviation Jax meets with Wounded Warriors Naval Hospital Jacksonville clinics offer longer hours Tax services availableThe VITA Self Service will be avail able to active duty service members, retirees and dependents, Reservists (active 30 days or pre-demobilization) and entitled former spouses from Feb. 4 through April 15. The service is for those whose adjusted gross income doesnt exceed $57,000. Those who qualify under the Military One Source will be able file their taxes for free using the H&R Block software. Volunteer assistance will be onsite; however volunteers are not permitted to prepare taxes. Those needing addi tional assistance outside the scope of the volunteers may be redirected to a nearby tax center. The tax center is located at NAS Jacksonville, Building 4, Room 108 (Ranger Street). The center is open Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Tuesday and Thursday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. For questions or concerns, please contact LN1 Clinton Washington at 5425974 or email Clinton.washington@ navy.mil.

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 30, 2014