Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

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Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
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Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID:
UF00028307:02074


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 2014 HOSPITAL SURVEY POWER PLANTS SCHOLARSHIPS Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The VP-45 Pelicans con tinue to excel as they transition to the Navys new maritime patrol asset, the P-8A Poseidon aircraft. VP-45s Quality Assurance (QA) Department has led the charge in becoming the Navys third operational P-8A squadron as the VP-45 received its first aircraft on Jan. 13. As the primary department overseeing safe and correct maintenance practices, QA paved the way in preparing the squadron for its upcoming safe for flight inspection. The mission of the QA Department is to ensure that maintainers complete repairs and maintenance not only correctly and expeditiously, but safely as well. QA representatives pro vide the supervision and final checks on aircraft mainte nance to confirm the P-8A is safe for flight. Its our job as QA to make sure that maintenance work is completed safely and up to code, said QA Officer Lt. Jordan Young. For us, quality and safety are everything. We not only make sure that maintenance is getting the job done safely, but that the work is done correctly so that the aircrew can be confident in the plane when out completing their missions. Magnifying the excitement of the approaching transition completion was news that the Pelicans had accepted delivery of their first P-8A Poseidon, aircraft side number 434. For the past month, Pelican maintainers have worked on aircraft 434 under the squad rons QA department, as well as with guidance from VP-30. Its exciting. We have really taken ownership of 434 and Im pleased to see what the future holds for this plane as a part of VP-45, said AM2 Jonathan Harrod. Following the aircraft acceptance, QA will continue to lead the Pelican maintenance team as they prepare for their safe for flight evaluation next month. Members of the National Weather Service (NWS) Jacksonville office presented NAS Jacksonvilles Commanding Officer Roy Undersander and Emergency Management Officer Ray Edmond with the NWS StormReady designation on Jan. 14. The designation is presented to communities and military installations deemed, prepared to save lives during severe weather through notification, educa tion, and training processes. North Floridians live in an area prone to thun derstorms, floods, occasional tornadoes and tropical weather; as well as intense summer heat, wild fires and other destructive weather impacts. Ray Edmond and his team continually work to ensure that the NAS Jacksonville community is prepared for any type of destructive weather. The National Weather Service has recognized and certified our processes with their StormReady certification program. Congratulations! said Scott Cordero, meteorologist in charge, NWS Jacksonville. The NAS Jax Emergency Management Office earned the StormReady designation by meeting specific cri teria proving the station is prepared for weather-related incidents. These include: having a local 24-hour warning point and an emergency operations center; having mul tiple ways of receiving NWS warnings; being able to monitor local weather/river conditions; having mul tiple ways of alerting the installation community; promoting public readiness through community semi nars and presentations; having a formal destructive weather plan and trained spotters; conducting peri odic drills/ exercises and interaction with the NWS Jacksonville office. Some past weather-related incidents occurring within the NAS Jax vicinity included a significant downburst over the St. Johns River in May 1997 where 107-mph destructive winds plowed southward down the St. Johns River racing toward the station. The event caused damage to the stations hangars but there were no personnel injuries. Another weather event in June 2009 saw a waterspout form near the station on the St. Johns River. One hurricane and several tropical storms have also caused major damage to the installation. These are just a couple of significant weather events that impacted the base, and serve as a remindPelicans QA Department safely leads transition to first P-8A NAS Jax earns StormReady certification Sailors, family and friends gathered for a memorial service at HardageGiddens Funeral Home in Jacksonville Jan. 19 to honor retired Rear Adm. Joseph Joe Lustrat Coleman, 91, who passed away at St. Vincents Medical Center Jan. 14. About 150 people attended the cer emony, including family members, former shipmates and Jacksonville community leaders. Admiral Coleman really set the standard when it comes to dedica tion to serving both your country and your community, said Rear Adm. Rick Williamson, commander, Navy Region Southeast. His commitment to our Navy was nothing short of heroic, having spent a combat tour in World War II and three more in Vietnam. After his military career, he went on to have a tremen dous impact here in the Jacksonville community. He will be missed not only by his family, but by everyone who knew him. Coleman was born Sept. 10, 1922 in Atlanta. He entered the Naval Aviation Cadet program in 1942 and earned his wings of gold and commission as an ensign in 1943. Throughout his naval career, Coleman logged 3,200 flight hours and performed 550 fixed-wing landings at sea. In combat, he served Navy renders honors for heroic aviator Rear Adm. Joseph Coleman

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014 January 23 1960 Bathyscaph Trieste descends to deepest part of the ocean, the Marianas Trench. 1968 USS Pueblo seized by North Korean forces in Sea of Japan. Jan. 24 1942 Battle of Makassar Strait, destroyer attack on Japanese convoy in first surface action in the Pacific during World War II 1991 Helos from USS Leftwich and USS Nicholas recapture first Kuwaiti territory from Iraqis. Jan. 25 1963 First Seabee Technical Assistance Team arrives in Vietnam 1968 Operation Windsong I in Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Jan. 26 1911 First hydro-aeroplane flight is witnessed by naval aviator 1913 The remains of John Paul Jones is laid in its final resting place in the of Naval Academy Chapel in Annapolis, Md. 1949 USS Norton Sound, first guid ed-missile ship, launches Navys first guided missile, the Loon. 1960 USS John S. McCain rescues the entire 41-man crew of the sinking Japanese freighter, Shinwa Maru, in the East China Sea. Jan. 27 1942 USS Gudgeon is first US sub to sink enemy submarine (Japanese I-173) in action. 1945 Commissioning of USS Higbee (DD-806), first U.S. Navy ship named after woman member of U.S. Navy. 1967 Fire in Command Module at Cape Kennedy during simulation countdown. Lunar Module Pilot Lt. Cmdr. Roger Chaffee and two other crew members died. 1973 Paris Peace Accords signed, ending U.S. participation in the Vietnam War. Jan. 28 1778 Second New Providence Expedition raised the flag with thirteen stripes over Fort Nassau. 1960 Navy demonstrates value of moon communication relay, used in fleet broadcasts. 1962 USS Cook (APD-130) res cues 25 survivors from after section of Panamanian tanker, SS Stanvac Sumatra, which broke in two in the South China Sea 1986 Space shuttle Challenger explodes killing Cmdr. Michael Smith and six other astronauts Jan. 29 1914 U.S. Marines land in Haiti to protect U.S. consulate. 1943 Beginning of two-day battle of Rennell Island, enabling U.S. transports to reach Guadalcanal. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Astronaut Buzz Aldrin. Former Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Terry Bradshaw. Actor Marlon Brando. Comedian Jim Carrey. Princess Diana. Charles Dickens. Tolstoy. Billy Joel. And, President Abraham Lincoln. Especially President Lincoln. These are just some notable people who have battled depression. For most of my life, I counted myself as one of them not for being notable, but for suffering from depression. After a serious case of post-partum depression when my first son was born 13 years ago, I started taking medication for the disease. And it is a disease. Over the last decade, however, I was doing extremely well. Last year, I decided maybe I didnt identify with the likes of the list above and it was time to stop taking medicine. I mean, Im not having anymore babies, so postpartum depression is no longer a concern. And I hadnt had a major episode in 13 years. So, against the advice of my doctor, and despite my husband telling me he would actually pay me to keep taking the medicine, I started tapering my dose in early 2013. Through that spring and summer, I felt great. See, I dont need the medicine, I told my hus band. In the back of my mind, however, I was cautiously aware that a true recurrence of the disease doesnt reveal itself until a patient has been off medication for about six months. And in my eagerness to be normal again, I completely overlooked signs in September roughly six months after I altered my own dose that I was not doing well. And then everything went out of control in December. I explain the feelings of depression to my hus band, who has never experienced a true depression, like this: Its a creeping feeling, a heaviness that is there when you first open your eyes in the morning and wonder how youll get yourself out of bed. Shopping for Christmas presents is an effort, holiday music an annoyance. Deadlines, bills, cleaning even cutting my own toenails seem like enormous obstacles. But mostly, I feel hol lowed out, like a shell of a person. It doesnt matter what triggers the depression. The triggers are different for everyone. But any one who has been through it knows that the abyss quickly feels like it will swallow you whole. During one of my first depressive episodes when I was younger, I clung to stories of Lincoln and his depression. They helped me understand, or at least accept, something that has always puzzled me about myself: most of my friends know me as an outgoing person. I make a living out of telling stories and writing books that are sometimes humorous. How could someone like me suffer from depression? In a 2005 Atlantic article titled Lincolns Great Depression by Joshua Shenk, Lincolns colleague Henry Whitney is noted as once having said, No element of Mr. Lincolns character was so marked, obvious and ingrained as his mysterious and profound melancholy. William Herndon, Lincolns law partner, said, His melancholy dripped from him as he walked. My husband might say the same of me at times. And yet, most of us learned about a very different Lincoln in school the jovial Lincoln who was known for telling funny stories, and a quick wit, and loved to visit with people in the White House. My husband might also say this about me. It is this juxtaposition of deep sadness, creativity, and an intense drive to connect with others on a personal level that has always seemed like an ill-fitting puzzle for people who suffer from depression. And its part of what made me in 2013 erroneously decide I dont need medicine. Depression isnt me, I told myself. It was just something I went through once. Its not who I am. Except it doesnt work that way. Diabetics often need medicine for the rest of their lives. So do people with heart disease. Likewise, depression is usually a lifelong disease, and often it is in fact part of who we are. In December, I knew things were bad, but I held out hope that I could be one of those regular people who dont need anti-depressants, people who can go for a jog and feel better. What finally changed my mind was when I was crying in my room and my youngest son slipped a note under the door that read, Its worse when you are sad. The next day, I took my medicine, and today, thankfully, Im starting to get better . for them. After all, if I had diabetes, Id take medicine to be healthy for my children. There are days when I feel like a failure for being stuck with this. There are days when I curse the pill bottle. But there also are days when I look at that list of notable people again, and I realize, its not a bad group of which to be part. Quite the opposite. As Shenk said of Lincoln in the Atlantic article, Whatever greatness Lincoln achieved can not be explained as a triumph over personal suffering . Lincoln didnt do great work because he solved the problem of his melancholy; the problem of his melancholy was all the more fuel for the fire of his great work.Lincolns lessons on depression

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Naval Hospital Jacksonville to undergo inspectionsNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville its hospital and five branch health clinics will undergo a Bureau of Medicine and Surgery Medical Inspector General (MEDIG) inspection Jan. 24-30 and The Joint Commission (TJC) inspection Jan. 27-30 to assess its quality of health care and efficiency of administrative procedures. The scheduled inspections, which are consis tently passed every three years by the hospital and branch health clinics, were last completed in 2011. TJC conducts periodic surveys of hospitals nationwide to evaluate the organizations compli ance with nationally established Joint Commission standards. The standards deal with organization quality, safety of care issues and the safety of the environ ment in which care is provided. The MEDIG inspection is designed to assess the efficiency, effectiveness, readiness and capabili ties of the hospital and branch health clinics in accordance with Bureau of Medicine and Surgery guidelines. Surveys will be used to evaluate NH Jacksonville during these inspections. Valuable feedback, through a brief web-based beneficiary survey, will allow NH Jacksonville to better serve customer and patient needs, and identify potential concerns. Available through Friday, Jan. 24, the survey can be accessed at https://apps.max.gov/survey/index. php?sid=69926&lang=en, and only takes a few minutes. No personal identifiers are included in this survey and all responses will remain anonymous. Patient input is valuable. This survey is open to any NH Jacksonville JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014 FRCSE 400 Division Sailors keep P-3C power plants ready for issueThe P-3C Orion has been the Navys frontline, landbased maritime patrol aircraft since 1969. To ensure the P-3C platform remains a viable warfighter until the P-8A Poseidon achieves full operational capability, aviation machinists mates at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) aboard NAS Jacksonville do whatever it takes to keep squadrons supplied with quality, refurbished T56-14 turboprop engines. Most of our maintainers are ADs who have every thing to do with engines and propellers for the P-3C Orion aircraft, explained AFCM Rodney Feliciano, the divisions leading chief petty officer. Were all about the Rolls-Royce T56-14 turboprop engine that powers the P-3C Orion. When a squadron sends us an ailing engine, we tear it apart, determine what needs to be fixed and build it back up. The same goes for propellers we take them completely down to parade rest and bring them back to fully RFI (ready for issue). The 400 Division is located on Yorktown Ave. between VP-30 and the aviation fuel farm. ADC Sean Riley, who is in charge of production control, explained that the division also operates an engine test cell facility located across the runway from the NAS Jax Air Operations Tower. Its not unusual for our Level II maintainers to go out on the flight line and troubleshoot a T56 with squadron (Level I) maintainers in order to identify engine or propeller discrepancies. Other times, well tow an engine to our test cell for an induction run that checks all of the systems performance param eters to identify components that must be repaired or replaced, said Riley. Feliciano added, The reduction gear box (RGB) on the front of the engine is a component that frequently needs replacement. In certain cases, we can perform over-the-wing RGB replacements in the squadrons hangars that are more efficient and cost-effective than pulling the entire engine off the wing and bringing it to our shop for repair. Division Officer Lt. Shawn Collins said the impact of the P-8A transition has already affected manning levels. Since 2012, weve gone from 120 to 88 Sailors. The sundowning of Orion has begun, yet we still sup port 15 tenant commands and five AORs. Thats why we expect a lot from our mechs especially now as demand for our engines has not slacked off. That means 10 to 12 hours a day, five to six days a week when the workload dictates. We send quality assets to wherever the P-3 engine manager at Pax River needs them Atlantic, Pacific, Middle East or Mediterranean. Our goal is to never allow our fleet operators to go waiting for lack of an engine or propeller, said Collins. He added, Despite their many hours on the shop floor and at the test cell, our Sailors still find time to study and advance their careers. Our advancement rate is about 90 percent. As the P-3 workload dimin ishes under sundown, our mechs will cross-train for other naval aviation platforms including the Hawkeye, Greyhound, Hercules, Seahawk and Hornet.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014 5

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A spiritual fitness brief, hosted by NAS Jax Command Chaplain (Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore, was held at the base chapel as part of a training to aid and equip NAS Jax Sailors with the tools needed for a higher level of mission readiness. The brief is a local training session that is readily available for all tenant commands aboard NAS Jax. This is not a religious pro gram. We see spirituality as a sense of connection, a transcendence-something you are con nected to beyond yourself, said Skidmore. I think that it gives you purpose, meaning and direction in life. For each per son its different. According to Skidmore, the Joint Chiefs of Staff Total Force Fitness Instruction 3405.01 is comprised of eight categories, which include social, physical, environmental, medical and dental, spiritual, nutritional, psychological and behavioral. Brief details were derived from this instruction and developed by Skidmore and former NAS Jax Chaplain (Lt.) Paul Rodgers. We talk about honor, courage and commitment in the Navy. And that is something that the Navy can dictate. But to get to that level, is something that we all bring from our dif ferent backgrounds. For exam ple, we have different religions, philosophies, family traditions, beliefs and worldviews all of these things we bring into the Navy when we join, said Skidmore. We all come together and the Navy doesnt dictate how we get to honor, courage and commit ment, but they expect us to live by these core values. This pro gram helps provide an under standing and foundation to live by and apply to our daily lives, careers and friends and family, he continued. Spirituality is defined as, that which allows a person to experience transcendent mean ing and purpose in life. Spirituality is the foundation of individual character, behav iors, core values and ethics, said Skidmore. One of the categories in the instruction is spiritual and we are elaborating on this from a chaplains perspective and implying the reasons why these are important from a spiritual spectrum, Skidmore added. Three goals that we have are to help develop resiliency under stress, living with integrity and mission readiness. I believe this brief helped me understand that my morals are an influence of my upbringing and I learned how I can apply my core values to work and the people around me, said OS2(SW) Earl Trammell of NAS Jax. The program motivated me to be a better person, and to realize the importance when a shipmate is going through a troubling time, that we should reach out to them and care for them. I feel that this type of train ing is necessary in our Navy today, said AME3 Ruby Gill, of NAS Jax. We all know deep down that we need to keep our spiritual lives intact in order to be good Sailors, but putting it on paper and making it an instruction helps us keep the information in the forefront of our minds on a daily basis. We are hoping this program will help us remember and reflect on what gives us direc tion and purpose in life, said Skidmore. I think it is an ongoing pro cess to strengthen who we are and strengthen our character. There is a real need to strengthen the spiritual aspects of our lives. NAS Jacksonville and the Northeast Florida Navy League Councils will host the NAS Jacksonville Individual Augmentee (IA) Recognition Luncheon Feb. 20 at 11 a.m. at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center. All NAS Jacksonville and tenant com mand Sailors who have returned from an IA assignment since May 1, 2013 will be recognized during the event. The guest speaker will be Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ 4th Fleet. There is no cost for the IA Sailor or Marine and their spouse. The cost for other military and civilian guests is $10. Tickets may be purchased at the Fleet and Family Support Center, MondayFriday from 8 a.m. -3 p.m. The dead line to purchase tickets is Feb. 13. Child care will be provided at the Child Development Center for children of IAs and spouses in attendance. Families should call 542-9075, 30 days in advance to secure their drop-in space. To RSVP, contact your command CIAC or Bobby Johns at bobby.johns.ctr@navy. mil For more information, call 542-5637. Drive-up window still openNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles Satellite Pharmacy, located near the Navy Exchange (building 950), will close its lobby Jan. 2225 to facilitate pharmacy automation upgrades. The Satellite Pharmacys drive-up window will remain open during its regular scheduled times, Monday Friday, 8 a.m. 6 p.m. and Saturday, 8 a.m. 3 p.m. N ext-day drop off prescriptions will continue to be accepted. NH Jacksonvilles Outpatient Pharmacy in the hospital is not affected and will remain open during its normal hours of Monday Friday, 7:30 a.m. 6 p.m. and Saturday, 8 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Patients needing same-day pre scription fills will be directed to NH Jacksonville Outpatient Pharmacy. For more information, call 542-7405. Staying fit through spirituality IA Luncheon set for Feb. 20Satellite Pharmacy lobby closing for improvements 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014

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Mary Francis Chergi of the NAS Jax Legal Department and Vick Smith of the Air Operations Department were recently selected as the 2013 NAS Jax Senior and Junior Civilians of the Year. Chergi, began working for the base legal office as a legal secretary in 1989. I was a paralegal for the U.S. Attorneys Office, but I wanted to work at NAS Jacksonville so I took a pay cut and came on as a legal secretary. As the years went on, I eventu ally became a paralegal here, she explained. Ive had a lot of onthe-job training. When I came here, I knew nothing about the mili tary. My husband, who is a retired master chief, helped me learn about military instructions. There is basically an instruction for every thing so once I realized that I could research and find the information I needed, it all clicked, said Chergi, who is responsible for research ing legal procedures and guidelines; ethics; han dling claims related the station such as personal injuries or property damage; investigations; law suits; working with base security, Naval Criminal Investigative Service and victims; solicitations on base and contracting issues for the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department. My job is to take care of the installation. This office works for the com manding officer (CO), protects him and the station, she said. She was selected as the 2013 NAS Jax Senior Civilian of the Year for: managing two $1.5 million personal injury claims against NAS Jax saving the station $3 million. She also recouped $26,938 in claims for Public Works and handled the dises tablishment of the Navy Yacht Club. Chergi also completed six appeals, 13 debarments, two Freedom of Information requests, two foreclosure packages for housing, eight gift requests, nine memorandums of understanding, 11 MWR con tracts and two subpoe nas. I was so overwhelmed to learn I was chosen because I work with such wonderful people. I love NAS Jax and am honored to work with such a great team, said Chergi. In the future, Chergi plans to retire in the near future so she can spend more time with her fam ily and travel. I will have 29 years working for the government next month and will go to 30 and see what happens. I love my job but want to retire happy and healthy, she said laughing. I want to thank the skipper, executive officer and all my prior COs and XOs. There are so many people that have touched my life and I love work ing with all the young military members that come and go in our office. It keeps me young! said Chergi. In her free time, Chergi spends time with her husband, children and grandchildren. She also enjoys walking, doing pilates, working in her garden, home decorating and shopping. A native of Gahanna, Ohio, Smith has worked as an arresting gear technician with Air Operations for the past four years. He was selected as the 2013 NAS Jax Junior Civilian of the Year for: not only working as a technician but filling the role of arresting gear supervisor. Since arriving here, Smith has revived a neglected arresting gear program to the high est standards as proved by an inspection by the Naval Safety Center in 2013 who praised his efforts. His commitment has ensured the airfield is 100 percent mission ready to support tenant and transient fleet air craft. Smith says he is hum bled being selected for this prestigious honor. I have a great sense of gratitude and humility win ning this award. The six outstanding Navy Sailors who work with me daily, share in this accomplishment. I also appreciate the exceptional leader ship and support from Cmdr. Mark McManus, Lt. Cmdr. Jay Haddock and Doug Chaney. Smiths responsibili ties include performing daily inspections, main tenance and maintaining all records for the sta tions eight emergency arresting gear systems on the flight lines. He joined the NAS Jax team after completing a tour on Diego Garcia and retiring from the Navy as a chief petty officer. According to Smith, he is thrilled to be working on the NAS Jax flight line. I love having a job that has the potential to prevent the loss of life and save multi-million dollar aircraft. After all these years, I still get an adrenalin rush watching a 45,000-pound aircraft going 150 knots and come to a complete stop in less than 900 feet after engaging the emergency arresting gear, said Smith. As for the future, Smith plans to continue work ing at NAS Jax. Unless I happen to win the lot tery, he said jokingly. When hes not hard at work, Smith enjoys spending time with his family, deep sea fish ing, flying radio control model aircraft. NAS Jax recognizes top civilian employees JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014 7

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8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014 er of why this facility, which at any given time hosts about 20,000 lives, needs a plan in place to help prepare its population for weather hazards to minimize the loss of life and property, said Cordero. To ensure public safety, NAS Jax has taken many measures to ensure prompt notification of NWS watches/warnings to the base community includ ing base wide distribution via blast email, text mes sages, and phone calls through the bases Wide Area Alert Notification (WAAN) system known as ATHOC. Frequently visited locations on base including hous ing, the commissary, Navy Exchange and barracks also have weather radios to provide early notification. NAS Jax also utilizes an interactive web-based program called C4I that highlights incidents and hazards impacting the installation as an information-sharing piece with higher echelons. The station also houses the Regional Operations Center (ROC), a unique emergency response facility that serves as a regional hub for bases in the southeast region. The ROC gathers and disseminates informa tion and coordinates with outside agencies as needed. According to Edmond, becoming a Storm Ready installation aligns NAS Jax with the outside com munity. We are kind of our own eco-system here but destructive weather doesnt recognize our fence line. We work in conjunction with Duval County Emergency Management so that when they are con ducting preparedness measures, we are as well, he said. We have been working hard to become des ignated for the past year. There are some processes that we execute differently as a military installation as compared to outside agencies. We had to alien the processes to be effective for both entities. We have also solidified our relationship with the National Weather Service so now we get even more notifications to follow not only our military track, but also the civilian track for weather issues, Edmond continued. So when we are making destructive weather preventive or response decisions, we are receiving information from multiple sources and several different perspectives. This allows for better, more effective decision making in preparation for, or response to destructive weather events. The StormReady Program started in 1999 in Tulsa, Okla. to help arm communities with the communication and safety skills needed to save lives and property before and during a weather event. As of this month, there are 2,170 StormReady sites in 49 states and Puerto Rico. The designation remains in effect for three years at which time NAS Jax will be reevaluated and recertified for another three years. While no community is storm proof, being StormReady offers another means to be prepared to help communities save lives. WEATHER patients whether care is received at the hospital or a branch health clinic. If individuals have concerns about patient care and/or safety at NH Jacksonville, contact Patient Relations ( nhjaxcustomerservice@med.navy.mil ). Hospital: (904) 542-9175/9413 BHC Albany: (229) 639-7886/7834/7874 BHC Jacksonville: (904) 546-7096 BHC Key West: (305) 293-3924 BHC Kings Bay: (912) 573-4458 BHC Mayport: (904) 270-4446/4303 For more information on TJC, call ( 630) 7925000. To speak with a member of the MEDIG team, call (301) 319-3803, or e-mail at InspectionTeam. MEDIG@med.navy.mil Concerns may be submitted anonymously, however providing names and contact information makes it possible for TJC staff to follow-up if more information is needed, and to inform individuals of actions being taken in response to any concerns. SURVEYaboard USS Swannee (CVE 27) during World War II and served as commanding officer of USS Mispillion (AO 105) and USS Ranger (CVA 61) during the Vietnam War. Coleman retired in 1995 after 32 years of service. In civilian life, Coleman was an active mem ber of the Jacksonville community. He served as chairman of the Jacksonville Electric Authority and board member of the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce, the Navy League of Jacksonville and Commodores League of Jacksonville. Additionally, he was a founder and former president of the Fleet Landing Retirement Community and a national trustee of the Association of Naval Aviation. Admiral Coleman was an exemplary Sailor and someone you always wanted to spend time with, said Bill Dudley, national vice president of the Navy League of the United States. He inspired all Sailors and carried on the tradition of the Navy and brought it to the Navy League, as well. He really epitomized what anyone wearing the uni form would want to emulate and he was a friend to everybody. All of his shipmates will greatly miss him. Coleman maintained a close relationship with the Navy during retirement. In addition to his association with the Navy League, he also rou tinely attended change of command ceremonies, retirement ceremonies, air shows and other official events throughout the tri-base region. He may have officially retired from the Navy, but he never really left it, said Denice Gonzalez, Navy Region Southeast protocol officer. Even in retirement, his heart was with the Navy, from mentoring and engaging with senior leadership right down to grooming young Sailors. During the ceremony, family and friends recounted memories of Coleman, who was honored with a three-gun volley and a missing man formation aerial salute. Williamson then presented the ensign from the casket to Colemans wife, Margaret. All of our warmest condolences go out to Margaret and the rest of the Coleman family, Williamson said. Joseph touched so many people and there are many of us here today with heavy hearts, but Im sure none so much as his family. I personally appreciate the sacrifices they have made through the years and want them to know that there are a lot of people, not just here in the region, but throughout the Navy, that feel the same. Coleman was laid to rest at Jacksonville National Cemetery Jan. 20. He is survived by Margaret, his children Carol Lee Jackson, Sherrie Lynn Millichap and Joseph Lustrat Coleman Jr., as well as seven grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. COLEMAN Did you know that Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles award -winning Wellness Center and Health Promotions offers individual and group classes that center on improving your health? Classes include tobacco cessation, weight management, health fitness and nutrition. The following classes are offered throughout the year: walk-in): Basic nutritionone-hour ment only): Body mass, exercise and basic nutritiontwo-day class (one individual session and one group session) in): Cholesterol management90-min utes Healthy lifestyle/weight management six weeks (one hour per week) Weight managementeight weeks (one hour per week) or walk-in): Monday, 9 a.m.; Tuesday, 1 p.m.; Thursday, noon. For more information or to make an appointment, call 542-5292 or visit NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center located at Building 867, adjacent to the NAS Jacksonville Fitness Source.Naval Hospital Jacksonville invites you to get fit in 2014 Navy officials said Sailors and Marines who used their Navy Cash/Marine Cash cards at any U.S. Target stores between Nov. 27 and Dec. 15, 2013, are not liable for any transactions that occur as a result of the unauthorized access to card data reported by Target Corporation in December. Navy Cash/Marine Cash cardholders affected by the breach are protected by the card networks and Regulation E [http://www.cfpb.gov/], which sets rules, liabilities, and procedures for electronic funds transfers and establishes customer protections associated with using electronic funds transfers. We partner with the U.S. Department of the Treasury and its financial agent to manage the Navy Cash/Marine Cash program, said Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP) Commander Rear Adm. Jonathan Yuen. Data reports show 58 cardholders used their Navy Cash/Marine Cash cards at Target stores during the affected period. These accounts have been flagged and are being monitored for unusual activity. Disbursing officers on ships with members impacted by the breach are being notified to issue new cards to affected cardholders. Navy Cash/Marine Cash combines a chip-based electronic purse (stored-value function) with a tradi tional magnetic strip (debit card and ATM function). The electronic purse replaces currency aboard ships. The magnetic strip and branded debit features afford users access to funds in their Navy Cash/Marine Cash accounts worldwide via Automated Teller Machines (ATMs) and point-of-sale (POS) devices at merchants who accept debit cards. Cashless ATMs aboard ship provide 24-hour-a-day, seven-day-a-week access to Navy Cash/Marine Cash accounts. The cashless ATMs also provide off-line access to accounts at financial institutions ashore and the ability to move money electronically to and from Navy Cash/Marine Cash accounts and those financial institution accounts. We are deeply concerned about the inconvenience the data breach may have caused our Sailors and Marines, Yuen added. We take this matter very seriously and are doing all we can to ensure our Sailors and Marines privacy and information is protected now and in the future. For questions regarding specific transactions, Sailors may contact: Navy Cash/Marine Cash Transaction Services Unit Tel: (866) 362-8922 Fax: (888) 344-3796 e-mail: Navy Cash@ezpaymt.comNavy Cash/Marine Cash cardholders are protected from Target data breach NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville contribut ed to Joint Enabling Capabilities Command (JECC) Mission Readiness Exercise (MRX) held from Dec. 9-13. The JECC MRX brings members from multiple commands and dif ferent branches of service togeth er to validate the capabilities and expertise of the on-coming Ready JECC Package (RJP) a three-month alert posture fully prepared to support missions across multiple joint operations. The most recent MRX provided training focused on enhancing the JECCs readiness to support humanitarian assistance/disaster relief (HA/DR) operations in sup port of the joint task force com mander. Lt. Ian Brenner, a NAVSUP operational logistics intern with 4th fleet played a vital role in the planning, execution, and coordina tion of logistics of the MRX, while leveraging NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonvilles capabilities to support the logistics requirements of HA/DR operations as simulated joint and allied forces respond to a major catastrophe. The coordination of logistics is essential to the success of every operation, and the JECC MRX provided a realistic planning process in which NAVSUP can execute to meet the logistics requirements of the HA/DR operation, said Brenner. At the conclusion of the MRX, Brenner briefed Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris on the logistics planning portion of the HA/DR operation. The MRX validated the RJPs ability to adapt to joint operational requirements and strengthen ties with likely mission partners. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, one of eight Fleet Logistics Centers under NAVSUP Global Logistics Support, provides operation al logistics, business and sup port services to the fleet, shore, and industrial commands of the Navy, Coast Guard, Military Sealift Command, and other joint allied forces. Services include contract ing, regional transportation, fuel, material management, household goods movement support, postal and consolidated mail, warehous ing, global logistics and husband ing, hazardous material manage ment, and integrated logistics support. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville contributes to JECC MRX

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NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander welcomed World War II veteran Clyde Reedy Jan. 15 at Heritage Park. Reedy, 92, served in the Navy from 1942-1946 as a PBY-SA pilot. This is a dangerous aircraft, said Reedy. The PBY Catalina was not easy to fly. You worked all the time and it was not one of those aircraft you could switch on the autopilot and sit back. Reedy shared his naval experiences during the war with Undersander. We got shot at a few times and we shot back, but other than that, it was just another day at the office. According to Reedy, he only needed a two-year degree at the time to qualify for the pilot program. He remembered, I became a pilot because I did not want to be a deck Sailor or a private in the Army. What I found interesting about Reedy was his reminisc ing of the PBY Catalina patrol plane and how it functions and how he flew from NAS Jax working off the seawall, said Undersander. It was interest ing learning about the training pipeline that he went through. Although there are some name changes, the philosophies and principles for naval aviator training has not changed much since the 1940s to today. The most unique thing about Reedy that I could really associate with is that he oper ated in a time before heli copters and so, many of the missions he flew in the PBY are what I would call combat search and rescue today, said Undersander. We talked about what he did during his time of service and how we partake in similar missions like that with helicopters. Following the meet and greet at Heritage Park, Undersander escorted Reedy and his friends, Bill and Rick Hosking, to Mulligans Restaurant for lunch. Undersander concluded, It is always my honor to meet with veterans because it always amazes me what they went through in that era and how they look at it like it was noth ing just something they had to do. The Clay County Veterans Service Office is now located on the second floor of the Clay County Administration Building at 477 Houston Street, Green Cove Springs, Fla. The former Veterans Service office location at 1565 CR 315 has been closed. The office is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The Clay County Veterans Service Office is staffed with a full time vet erans service officer and a part-time veterans program assistant who are both available and eager to assist veterans and/or family members with filing claims and other related needs. Part of Clay Countys heritage is the countys strong ties to the military dat ing back to the early 1800s. Today there are more than 24,000 veterans who call Clay County home. These veterans rep resent service to our nation from World War II through the current conflicts as well as decades of service during peacetime. To make an appointment, please call (904) 269-6326. Skipper welcomes World War II PBY pilotClay County Veterans Services Office helps veterans JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014 9

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The United States Naval Academys 2014 Summer Seminar Program invites a select group of young men and women to attend the Naval Academy Summer Seminar (NASS). This fast-paced, six-day experience is designed to introduce the Naval Academy to rising high school seniors. At the core of the NASS is the aca demic program involving 90-minute workshops designed to promote prob lem-solving skills using critical think ing, optimization, innovation, creativ ity, and team work. Students choose eight workshops from a wide range of subjects to include: Information Technology, Naval Architecture, Mechanical Engineering, Ocean Engineering, Aerospace Flight Testing, Systems Engineering, Microcomputer Design, Ethics and Character Development, Oceanography, Mathematics, History, Meteorology, Literature, Chemistry, Political Science, Language Studies, Martial Arts, and Economics. Students participate in project-based modules applying hands-on, realworld approaches to solving design and analysis problems utilizing the Naval Academys world-class laboratory facilities. These facilities provide a unique learning environment outside the traditional classroom. The NASS teaches prospective appli cants about the life of midshipmen at the Naval Academy, where academics, athletics, and professional training are key elements in developing our nations leaders. Students live in the dormitory, eat in the dining hall and participate in aca demic and leadership workshops. They also participate in daily physical training including group runs and conditioning exercises. Seamanship and navigation classes culminate in a cruise aboard a Navy Yard Patrol Craft. The program helps educate, motivate and prepare selected students who are considering application for appoint ment to the Naval Academy. If you think that you may be interested in pursuing an appointment to the Naval Academy and serving your country as an officer, you should seriously consider attending the Naval Academys 2014 Summer Seminar. The session dates are May 31-June 5, June 7-12 and June 14-19. Application are available at www. usna.edu/admissions/nass. Naval Academy Summer Seminar Program seeks student applicants JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014 11

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live entertainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaoke DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Super Bowl Party Feb. 2, 5 p.m., $10 per person Door prizes, buffet and beverage specials Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Jan. 18, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: Jan. 25, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Navy Run Training Program Begins Feb. 4 at the fitness center Running group meets every Tuesday at 4 p.m. Biggest Loser Challenge 8 week program, teams of 2 Begins March 10 Aerobathon featuring TRX, spin, muscle max, boot camp, step, yoga, HIT and Zumba Feb. 15, 10 a.m. noon Fitness CenterI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Gatornationals March 1416 $30 $58 Yahala Country Bakery Trip Jan. 25 $25 per person Disney Jr. Live $15 $29 Monster Jam $22 $42 Wild Adventures $30 $70 Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket $166 $194.50 Universal Orlando $114 $169.50 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Daytona 500 $62 $209 Drive 4COPD 300 $55 Budweiser Duels $55 Sprint Unlimited $30 $55 Rolex 24 $32 $65 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 The Artist Series Broadway in Jacksonville 2014 season, select shows Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2014 season, select shows Armed Forces Vacation Club www. afvclub.com $349 $369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 Ripleys St. Augustine $4.25 $7.50 St. Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Wild Florida Airboats $17 $46.50 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels located near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Grill & Chill at the Liberty Center Jan. 23, 6 p.m. Free hamburgers and hotdogs St. Augustine Night of Lights Trip Jan. 25, 6 p.m. Free Deweys Super Bowl Party Feb. 2, $10 per person Includes buffetNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Daily Twilight Golf Special Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you!Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person For more information about any of the sports articles, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil Visit the MWR website at www.cnic.navy.mil or www.facebook.com nasjaxmwr. Public education is supported by local (primarily property tax revenues), state, and federal funding. Most school districts rely heavily on these resources to support educational programming classroom instruction, extracurricular activities, faculty training, transpor tation, administrative services and so much more. Our current economic conditions have placed most families, businesses, and governmental agencies in the difficult position of having to operate under severe budgetary constraints. Tighter budgets have placed peo ple and organizations in the position of having to scale down and, in some cases, eliminate services all together. School districts are no exception. Like most states, Florida has suffered the loss of tax and federal revenues. As a result, Gov. Rick Scott and state legislators have looked for ways to maintain state programs and services while monitoring an ever-shrinking budget. The Duval County School System has had to bear its share of these budget ary woes. Education leaders in the 16 states who are members of the Southern Regional Education Board, includ ing Florida and Georgia, are working on various ways to deal with the eco nomic challenges but its not easy! The federal government recognizes that districts like Duval County face added economic pressure because real property (land) in this area has been purchased for use by the military. This means that the county government is positioned to lose property tax revenue which it might otherwise have earned if the federal government had not acquired the property. Compensation for this loss, known as Impact Aid, is paid for federal property which is used to support military installations, low-income housing, Indian lands, and for children whose parents Support federal funding of local schools Turn in Federal Assistance Program form JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014 13

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14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014 Applications for the 2014 Scholarships for Military Children Program are now available at commissaries worldwide or at http://www.militaryscholar.org Applications must be turned in to a commissary by close of business Feb. 28, 2014. Packages must be hand-delivered or shipped via U.S. Postal Service or other delivery methods, not emailed or faxed. This years award amount has risen to $2,000, and the program awards at least one scholarship at each commissary with qualified applicants. An applicant must be a dependent, unmarried child, younger than 23, if enrolled as a full-time stu dent at a college or university, of a service member on active duty, Reserve or Guard member, retiree or survivor of a military member who died while on active duty, or survivor of a retiree. Applicants should ensure that they and their sponsor are enrolled in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System database and have a military ID card. The applicant must attend or plan to attend an accredited college or university, full time, in the fall of 2014 or be enrolled in studies designed to transfer to a four-year program. Fisher House Foundation, a nonprofit organiza tion that helps service members and their families, administers the program. Scholarship Managers, a national, nonprofit, scholarship management services organization, manages and awards the scholarships. Commissary partners and the general public donate money to the program; every dollar donated goes directly to funding the scholarships. Since inception of the program in 2001, more than $11.3 million in scholarships have been awarded to 7,412 military dependents from more than 71,000 applicants.For more information, call 856-616-9311 or email militaryscholar@scholarshipmanagers.com. Science fair judges neededThe Rotary Clubs of Clay County are sponsor ing the Junior and Senior High School Science Fair Feb. 11 at the Clay County Fairgrounds on S.R. 16, Green Cove Springs. More than 480 area students are expected to compete in this scholastic event. Each project must be judge by a minimum of three judges. A minimum of 125 judges must be recruited in or to make this years event a resounding success.To volunteer or for more information, contact Lillian Bell, science fair coordinator at 654-8149. NWCA offers scholarships The Scholarship Foundation of Navy Wives Clubs of America (NWCA) annually gives 30 scholarships to eligi ble students for $1,000 or $1,500 to help with col lege tuition, room and board, books and other fees. To be eligible, an applicant must be a dependent (natural born, legally adopted or stepchild) of an active duty, retired or deceased enlisted mem ber of the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps or Coast Guard. The applicant must have a valid dependent ID card, show need for financial assistance, have at least a 2.5 grade point average and be a high school graduate or equivalent prior to applying. Upperclassmen may all apply for financial assis tance. The deadline for applications is May 31. Applications may be downloaded from the NWCA web site at www. navywivesclubsofameri ca.org FFSC offers life skills workshopsThe NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to ser vice members and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2014: p.m.), Feb. 5 (8 a.m.-12:30 p.m.) May 12-15 (5:30-10 p.m.), Aug. 18-19 (8 a.m.-4 p.m.), Aug. 20 (8 a.m.12:30 p.m.), Nov. 17-20 (5:30-10 p.m.). Separation Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) Feb. 3-7, Feb. 24-28, March 10-14, March 24-28, April 7-11, May 5-9, May 19-23, June 9-13, June 23-27, July 7-11, July 21-25, Aug. 11-15, Aug. 25-29, Sept. Retirement Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) Feb. 10-14, March 17-21, April 14-18, May 12-16, June 27-31, Nov. 17-21, Dec. 8-12. noon) Feb. 21, April 1, May 2, June 30, June 30, (8-9:30 a.m.) April 2, May 28, July 1, Sept. 3, Nov. 12. noon) April 2, May 28, July 1, Sept. 3, Nov. 12. p.m.) Feb. 18-19, April 29-30, Aug. 5-6, Nov. 24-25. a.m.-4 p.m.) July 31. March 6, May 8, July 10, Sept. 11, Nov. 13. March 10, April 14, May 12, June 9, July 14, Aug. 11, a.m.) Feb. 11, March 11, April 8, May 13, June 10, a.m.-noon) Jan. 28, May 20, 27, Sept. 23, 30. Jan. 27, Feb. 24, March 31, April 28, May 19, June 15. (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.), March 27 May 1 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.), May 27 July 8 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.-no workshop June 3), July 29 Sept. 9 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.-no workshop Aug. 19), March 19, May 6, July 15, Sept. 9, Nov. 18. 21, 28; March 4, 11, 18, 25; May 6, 13, 20, 27; July 1, 8, 15, 22; Sept. 9, 16, 23, 30; Nov. 4, 12, 18, 25. 18, 25; April 1, 8, 15, 22; June 3, 10, 17, 24; Aug. 5, 12, 11 a.m.) Every Wednesday June 3, Sept. 16, Dec. 2. Feb. 11, 25; March 11, 25; April 1, 15, 29; May 13, 27; 7, 21; Nov. 4, 18; Dec. 2, 16. July 17, Sept. 4, Nov. 5. Dec. 4.To register for any of the above workshops, please call 542-5745. Scholarships for military children available

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014 15 Generational changes important to air dominanceU.S. airpower strategy is based on having air domi nance in any conflict. Air dominance means marrying the best pilots in the world with the best aircraft, and tying them together with the best tactics. The current plan to field variants of a fifth-generation aircraft is one arm of that strategy. Just the idea of a fifth-gen eration aircraft is a relatively new concept. It really only cropped up when the U.S. Air Force called for what became the F-22 Raptor. As the Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps develop the Joint Strike Fighter the F-35 Lightning II there is more discussion of fifth-gener ation capabilities. The idea of generations of aircraft really came around with the F-22, said Lt. Col. Brian Stahl, an airpower strat egist with the Air Force. As we looked at past aircraft, the main thing we were looking at were generational changes and improvement in capabilities. So as you looked at the first jet aircraft like the P-80 and into the F-86 move into the F-4 with air-to-air missiles and into the fourth generation aircraft you have better avionics, increased maneuverability, specialized mission sets. As you move into the F-22, it is a linear progres sion of all these things. But what are the previous generations of jet aircraft that have maintained aerial domi nance since Korea? The first generation of jet aircraft began in World War II. The German Messerschmitt 262 was the first jet aircraft that saw widespread combat in the war. American and British designers were concurrently working on jets, but none saw combat. The P-80 Shooting Star was the most successful American jet. It was a trailblazer for the U.S. Army Air Force. The straight-wing aircraft first flew in 1943, and was built by the Lockheed Skunk Works in 143 days. The aircraft first flew with a British engine. It did not see combat during World War II, but was a workhorse in the early days of the Korean War. The Air Force and the Navy flew what became known as F-80 aircraft into the 1970s. The T-33 training aircraft was a variant of the F-80 and served in that role into the 1980s. The Bell P-59 Airacomet and Republic F-84 Thunderjet are also considered first-genera tion aircraft. In Korea, the F-80 was clearly outclassed by the MiG-15. This swept-wing aircraft produced by the Soviet Union flew at least 100 mph faster than the F-80. Enter the North American F-86 Sabre. This sweptwing fighter bridged the gap between first-generation fight ers and the second generation. The F-86 more than held its own against the MiG-15. The aircraft cruised at more than 600 mph. In a dive, it could break the sound barrier. The F-86 gave United Nations forc es in Korea air superiority not air dominance over the bat tlefield. North Korea launched a night air attack against U.S. forces on April 15, 1951, killing two soldiers. They were the last American ground casualties from an aerial attack. Designers of second-gen eration aircraft took lessons learned in Korea and incorpo rated them into the aircraft of the so-called Century series of aircraft. This generation roughly runs from the mid1950s to 1965. Technological advances made this era a hothouse of aviation growth. Designers built aircraft with swept wings, delta wings and arearuled fuselages. Engine break throughs enabled secondgeneration fighters to sustain supersonic speeds in level flight. Advances in radar, missile technology and changes in tactics defined this generation of aircraft. The thinking at the time was that dogfighting was a thing of the past. Designers built aircraft that would climb quickly, fly fast and, using only missiles, shoot down intercontinental bombers. The first aircraft of the Century series was the F-100 Super Sabre. The jet, also built by North American, was an outgrowth of the F-86. It was capable of sustained supersonic flight. Introduced in 1954, the F-100 started as an airsuperiority fighter and segued into a close-air support plat form in Vietnam. Other air craft of the Century series are the McDonnell F-101 Voodoo, the Convair F-102 Delta Dagger, the Lockheed F-104 Starfighter, the Republic F-105 Thunderchief and the Convair F-106 Delta Dart. The McDonnell-Douglas F-4 Phantom II is the finest U.S. example of the third genera tion of fighters. Developed for the Navy and Marine Corps, the aircraft was also adopted by the Air Force in 1963. The Phantom is a two-seat, twinengine, all-weather, long-range supersonic jet interceptor fighter/fighter-bomber. The manyhyphenated designation means the aircraft was one of the most capable in the inventory. It is still serving in air forces around the world. Fourth-generation air craft are the workhorses of American air power today. The F-15 Eagle and F-16 Fighting Falcon are the Air Force fourthgen aircraft. The Navys F/A-18 Super Hornet is a fourth-generation aircraft. The now retired F-14 Tomcat is also considered a fourth-gen aircraft. All these jets were designed in the mid to late 1970s and took the lessons learned from the Vietnam War. The empha sis was again on maneuverability. Dogfighting, stealth and radar avoidance came to the fore. The aircraft were continually updated with new target ing pods, new radar and new materials. The classic exam ple of this is the F/A-18 Super Hornet that while based on a 1970s airframe, is one of the most capable aircraft in the world. Currently, the United States has the only fifth-generation fighters. Russia and China are working to catch up. The Lockheed-Martin F-22 Raptor is operational and capable of worldwide deploy ment. Lockheed-Martin also designed the F-35 Lightning II and that will be used by the Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps and allied nations. The aircraft are the most advanced in the world and their capabilities are being kept purposely vague. They incorporate the latest in stealth technology, the latest avionics, communications, sensors and weaponry. These are all fused together giving pilots improved situational awareness, while reducing the workload. Stahl says the biggest change from fourth-gen to fifth-gen is stealth. Fifth-generation fight ers use the latest stealth tech nology. Another difference is the way information is gathered, processed and used. Stahl flew F-16s and F-22s. In the fourthgen aircraft, the pilot is a sys tem operator, he said. An F-16 or F-15 pilot is con stantly working the radar or working the targeting pod; all of these different sensors that require input from the pilot, he said. In the F-22, all that is inte grated and you have a synthesis of the data, he continued. Where the pilot was the operator before, now the jet is doing the integration and operation of the sensors. The pilot can now spend less time oper ating the systems, and more time actually processing the data. In other words, the pilot becomes more a tactician, instead of just trying to ensure the right information out of the systems on board. Each generation of aircraft costs more. The F-80 cost about $110,000 a copy. The F-86 ran about $220,000. An F-100 Super Sabre ran about $700,000, while the F-4C Phantom was about $2.5 million. An F-15 Eagle ran about $30 million a copy. The F-22 Raptor costs about $133 million, with the F-35A coming in around the same range.

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014 The Veterans Oral History Project was created by the United States Congress in 2000. This project of the Library of Congress and American Folklife Center collects, preserves and makes accessible the personal accounts of American war veterans so that future generations may hear directly from veterans and better understand the realities of war. The objective of this program is col lecting first-hand video and/or audio accounts of U.S. Veterans on behalf of the Library of Congress. Volunteers are used to conduct interviews for the Library of Congress. The project collects first-hand accounts of U.S. veterans from the fol lowing wars: U.S. citizen civilians who were actively as war industry workers, USO workers, flight instructors, medical volunteers, able stories. To volunteer to help with this proj ect, please register with HandsOn Jacksonville and attend a volunteer interviewer training workshop conducted by Dr. Annette Fromm with the Library of Congress/American Folklore Society in the NAS Jacksonville Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society conference room ate left just prior to entering the NAS Jacksonville Main Gate. To register, please send an email with your full name, e-mail address, phone number and session attending, to Richard@handsonjacksonville.org. Baseball and Softball Divisions: Everybody playsRegistration for all levels of the Little League Baseball and Softball is now underway at the NOL Clubhouse on Allegheny Rd. at NAS Roosevelt Blvd. Or register online at www.noljax. org For more info, email noljax@ gmail.com Baseball Divisions Boys and Girls Softball Divisions Girls Challenger Division boys and girls with physical/mental chal NOL is open to active and reserve military families, plus, residents of Avondale, Ortega, Lakeshore, Venetia, Ortega Hills, Riverside, Farms, Confederate Point and Collins Road. Volunteer interviewers needed for oral history projectLittle League registration now underway

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014 17 The National Defense Authorization Act passed last month requires sweep ing changes to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ), particularly in cases of rape and sexual assault. These are the most changes to the Manual for Courts-Martial that weve seen since a full committee studied it decades ago, said Lt. Col. John Kiel Jr., the policy branch chief at the Armys Criminal Law Division in the Office of the Judge Advocate General. Key provisions of the UCMJ that were rewritten under the NDAA for Fiscal Year 2014 signed Dec. 26, 2013, by President Barack Obama are Articles 32, 60, 120 and 125. Article 32 The law now requires the services to have judge advocates serve as Article 32 investigating officers. Previously, the Army was the only service in which judge advocates routinely did not serve as Article 32 investigating officers. Article 32 hearings roughly equiva lent to grand jury proceedings in the civilian judicial system are held to determine if theres enough evidence to warrant a general court-martial the most serious type of court-martial used for felony-level offenses such as rape and murder. Congress decided that the services needed to have trained lawyers judge advocates consider the evidence, since in their view, trained lawyers often are in the best position to make determinations to go forward with general courts-martial, Kiel said. Judge advocates didnt always serve as Article 32 investigating officers in the Army largely because we try four times the number of cases of any of the other services, he explained an issue of not having enough judge advocates for the high volume of cases. Army officials asked Congress to consider its resourcing issue, he said, so the legislators wrote an exception, stating that where practicable, you will have a judge advocate conduct the Article 32 investigation. Kiel explained what where practicable means, citing a number of circumstances where it could apply. Many courts-martial were conducted over the years in Iraq and Afghanistan where soldiers were deployed and some of those involved war crimes, he said. In these cases, the Army found it sometimes was best to have line officers be the Article 32 investigating officers, because they could best put themselves in the shoes of the accused. Those line officers understood what its like to make decisions in the heat of battle better than a lawyer without those experiences, Kiel said. They added a level of judgment that some times judge advocates could not. Another example, he said, might be travel fraud. In the case of complex [temporary duty] fraud, for instance, you might want to have a finance officer as the IO, Kiel said. Besides subject-matter experts being in the best position to be Article 32 investigating officers, he said, there simply might not be enough judge advocates in the area of the installation. For example, U.S. Army Forces Command would have enough judge advocates to do Article 32 hearings, Kiel said, but if a number of hearings came up at once at U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command installations a smaller major command they might come up short. That might jeopardize the right of an accused to a speedy trial if the clock runs out, he noted. And, if a judge advocate is flown in from another installa tion, travel costs would be incurred. Those are very real situations that could impact the ability to get it done expeditiously and cost effectively, Kiel said. Other attorneys on an installation cannot always be tapped for Article 32 investigating officer work, he said. On larger installations, we have operational law attorneys that potentially could cover down on some of these areas, but we dont have a lot of those, he added. On other installations, Kiel said, administrative law attorneys might have conflicts of interest if theyve previously rendered some kind of legal review on a case. And, our administrative law attor neys are always busy reviewing vari ous sorts of investigations and helping the command deal with such things as ethics and family readiness issues, he continued. Then we have our criminal law advocates, trial counsels and defense counsels, Kiel added. Theyre all conflicted out from being IOs, because theyre actually tasked with presenting evidence during the [Article 32 hearing] as theyre acting as counsel to the gov ernment or to the accused. The fiscal 2014 National Defense Authorization Act gives the services one year to phase in this change to Article 32, stipulating that where practicable, judge advocates conduct the investiga tions. This one-year time period provides needed time for the staff judge advo cates to figure out if they have enough judge advocates to fill the requirement to cover down on all the Article 32 hearings and determine which installations are struggling to meet the require ments, Kiel said. Another impact to courts-martial practice is the new requirement for a special victims counsel to provide support and advice to the alleged victim, Kiel said. For example, the special victims counsel must inform the victim of any upcoming hearings pretrial confinement, parole board, clemency and so on and inform the victim that he or she can choose to attend any of those. The victim also will be notified in advance of trial dates and be informed of any delays. Furthermore, Kiel said, the special victims counsels may represent the alleged victims during trial, ensuring their rights are not violated, as under the Rape Shield Rule, for example. The Rape Shield Rule, or Military Rule of Evidence 412, prevents admission of evidence concerning sexual predisposition and behavior of an alleged victim of sexual assault. Kiel provided an aside regarding the Rape Shield Law and how a high-vis ibility case a few months ago involv ing football players at the U.S. Naval Academy influenced changes to Article 32 by Congress. In that case, the defense counsel had the victim on the stand for three days of questioning about the alleged victims motivations, medical history, apparel, and so on during the Article 32 hearing, he related. The cross-examination was perceived by the public and Congress to be dis graceful and degrading, and potentially violating the federal Rape Shield Rule. With passage of the fiscal 2014 National Defense Authorization Act, alleged rape and sexual assault victims are no longer subject to that kind of interrogation at the Article 32 hearing, he said. Before the new law, alleged victims of sexual assault were ordered to show up at Article 32 hearings and frequently were asked to testify during those hearings as well. Congress thought that wasnt fair, since civilian victims of sexual assault didnt have to show up or testify, Kiel said. Now, any victim of a crime who suffers pecuniary, emotional or physical harm and is named in one of the charges as a victim does not have to testify at the hearing, he added. Article 60 Like Article 32 changes, modifica tions to Article 60 are to be phased in over the course of 12 months. Article 60 involves pretrial agreements and actions by the convening authority in modifying or setting aside findings of a case or reducing sentencing. A convening authority could do that in the past, and some did, though rarely. Changes to Article 60 were influ enced last year by a case involving Air Force Lt. Col. James Wilkerson, a former inspector general convicted of aggra vated sexual assault, Kiel said. The convening authority, Air Force Lt. Gen. Craig Franklin, overturned the findings of guilt. That got Congress stirred up, Kiel said. In the new law, legislators said the convening authority can no longer adjust any findings of guilt for felony offenses where the sentence is lon ger than six months or contains a dis charge. They cannot change findings for any sex crime, irrespective of sen tencing time. One way a commander still can modify a sentence is, if the trial counsel comes forward and says, This particu lar accused was very helpful in securing evidence or cooperating with the gov ernment in prosecuting someone who was accused of committing an offense under the UCMJ. That is a trigger for the convening authority to be able to modify a sen tence, Kiel said. The other way a convening authority can modify a sentence, even involving rape and sexual assault, is if a pretrial agreement is in place, he said, meaning that the case could close, but the pre trial agreement would still take effect. Congress realized that Article 60 was still needed to continue the option for pretrial agreements, Kiel said. Had Article 60 been done away with alto gether, he added, that would have likely meant all courts-martial would have gone to full contest, and that would have bottlenecked the entire process. Voiding Article 60 also would have meant that all alleged victims of sexual assault likely would have to testify. Sometimes, victims supported the pretrial agreement, supported the potential sentence and supported the fact that they didnt have to testify when it was in their best individual interest, Kiel said. Other changes to courts-martial practice were made. Prior to the new law, the convening authority could consider the military character of the accused in consider ing how to dispose of a case, Kiel said. Congress decided that should have no bearing on whether or not the accused has committed a sexual assault or other type of felony. Also, he said, previous to new law, sometimes the [staff judge advocate] would say, Take the case to a gener al court-martial, and the convening authority would disagree and say, Im not going forward. Now, he said, if the convening authority disagrees, the case has to go to the secretary of the service concerned, [who] would have to decide whether to go forward or not. In the case of an alleged rape or sexual assault in which the staff judge advocate and the convening author ity decide not to go forward because of a lack of evidence or for any other reason, that case has to go up to the next-highest general court-martial convening authority for an independent review, Kiel said. So if the case occurred at the divi sion level in the Army, for example, and a decision were made at that level not to go forward, then the division would need to take the victims statements, its own statements for declining the case, and forward them and the entire investigative file to the next level up in this case, the corps. At the corps level, the staff judge advocate and the corps command er would then review the file, look at the evidence and make a determina tion whether or not to go forward, Kiel explained. If its decided to move forward the case would be referred at the corps level instead of sending it back down to the division, he added. This, he explained, avoids unlawful command influence on the cases outcome. Articles 120 and 125 UCMJ Articles 120 and 125 now have mandatory minimum punishments: dishonorable discharge for enlisted service members and dismissal for officers, Kiel said. Article 120 deals with rape and sexual assault upon adults or chil dren and other sex crimes, and Article 125 deals with forcible sodomy. In addition, the accused now must appear before a general court-martial with no opportunity to be tried at a summary or special court-martial, Kiel said. A summary court-martial is for rela tively minor misconduct, and a special court-martial is for an intermediatelevel offense. Furthermore, Congress highly encouraged the services not to dispose of sexual assault cases with adverse administrative action or an Article 15, which involves non-judicial punish ment usually reserved for minor disci plinary offenses, Kiel said. Rather, Kiel said, Congress desires those cases to be tried at a general court-martial and has mandated that all sexual assault and rape cases be tried only by general court-martial. Prior to the fiscal 2014 National Defense Authorization Act, there was a five-year statute of limitations on r ape and sexual assault on adults and children under Article 120 cases. Now, theres no statute of limitations, he said. Congress repealed the offense of consensual sodomy under Article 125 in keeping with previous Supreme Court precedent, Kiel said, and also barred anyone who has been convicted of rape, sexual assault, incest or forcible sodomy under state or federal law from enlisting or being commissioned into military service. Whats Ahead Congress could make even more changes that address sexual assaults in the military as early as this month, Kiel said. And later this year, changes to the Manual for Courts-Martial should be signed by the president after review by the services, the national security staff, the Defense Department and other agencies, he added. The updated manual would codify all the changes, although some already are in effect, he said.New law brings changes to Uniform Code of Military Justicework on or live on federal property. To be eligible to receive highly impacted federal funds, a school district must have at least 40 percent of its student population consid ered federally connected. In order to qualify for these funds, the local school dis trict must verify the numbers of students served by its local schools. Each year, at the same time, local schools send home an FAP card and ask parents to complete it based on whether they are active duty military and/or work or live on federal property. The following are some longstanding myths associated with the cards use. The schools are making money off of our children Not true! Administered by the U.S. Department of Education, the Impact Aid program is one of the oldest education pro grams, dating from 1950. Like most federal programs, it was fully funded in its early years. However, since about the mid1970s, the program has been under funded. This means that local school districts, while receiving some federal funding, are still not being fully compensated for the costs of the educational services they provide. They are collecting too much personal information one place. Not true! In fact, the information which parents provide on the FAP card is basic contact information and work-related infor mation. Parents are not asked questions about salary or fam ily income, nor are they asked to provide social security numbers or other important identi fying data. If I do not return the FAP card, my childs school will know that I am angry about Not true! Not completing the FAP card does not affect a district or schools decisions about policies or procedures. Withholding the FAP card only denies the local district the much needed funding required to maintain programs and ser vices. Its too much work to fill out all these forms again! Not true! Completing the FAP card will only take a moment. While it is true that every child in a family will receive an FAP card, parents will quickly real ize there are a few simple questions which can be answered in two maybe three minutes. What else is needed? A signa ture! The FAP cards have already gone home with Duval stu dents. Parents need to com plete a separate form for each child. And remember to dou ble check the form. Without accurate numbers, the schools could miss out on grant opportunities such as the one granted to Mayport Middle School. DoDEAs Promoting Student Achievement at Schools Impacted by Military Force Structure Changes Grant earned by Mayport Middle School has allowed the school to enhance student achieve ment in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, English language arts, and reading. A large portion of the grant has ensured integration of technology into the cur riculum. Teachers have had opportunities to strengthen their content knowledge and instructional skills through professional development tar geted to the new curriculum. To qualify, a school must have a significant military student population to meet the eligibility requirement. Specifically, elementary schools must have a military student population of least 25 percent and secondary schools must have a military student population of at least 15 per cent. So before Duval Schools can submit a grant application to DoDEA, they must determine if these schools meet the eligibility criteria. Please complete your FAP card. If you have misplaced it, please call the school for a replacement. Schools will begin returning cards to the district office in late November. The deadline for returning the cards has been extended to Jan. 29. Dawn Mills is the NAS Jacksonville school liaison officer. If you have questions about an educational issue impacting your child, email dawn.m.mills@navy.mil or call 778-2236/486-8221. IMPACT AID

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 2014 HOSPITAL SURVEY POWER PLANTS SCHOLARSHIPS Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The VP-45 Pelicans con tinue to excel as they transition to the Navys new maritime patrol asset, the P-8A Poseidon aircraft. VP-45s Quality Assurance (QA) Department has led the charge in becoming the Navys third operational P-8A squadron as the VP-45 received its first aircraft on Jan. 13. As the primary department overseeing safe and correct maintenance practices, QA paved the way in preparing the squadron for its upcoming safe for flight inspection. The mission of the QA Department is to ensure that maintainers complete repairs and maintenance not only cor rectly and expeditiously, but safely as well. QA representatives pro vide the supervision and final checks on aircraft mainte nance to confirm the P-8A is safe for flight. Its our job as QA to make sure that maintenance work is completed safely and up to code, said QA Officer Lt. Jordan Young. For us, quality and safety are everything. We not only make sure that maintenance is getting the job done safely, but that the work is done correctly so that the aircrew can be con fident in the plane when out completing their missions. Magnifying the excitement of the approaching transition completion was news that the Pelicans had accepted delivery of their first P-8A Poseidon, air craft side number 434. For the past month, Pelican maintainers have worked on aircraft 434 under the squad rons QA department, as well as with guidance from VP-30. Its exciting. We have really taken ownership of 434 and Im pleased to see what the future holds for this plane as a part of VP-45, said AM2 Jonathan Harrod. Following the aircraft accep tance, QA will continue to lead the Pelican maintenance team as they prepare for their safe for flight evaluation next month. Members of the National Weather Service (NWS) Jacksonville office presented NAS Jacksonvilles Commanding Officer Roy Undersander and Emergency Management Officer Ray Edmond with the NWS StormReady designation on Jan. 14. The designation is presented to communities and military installations deemed, prepared to save lives during severe weather through notification, educa tion, and training processes. North Floridians live in an area prone to thun derstorms, floods, occasional tornadoes and tropical weather; as well as intense summer heat, wild fires and other destructive weather impacts. Ray Edmond and his team continually work to ensure that the NAS Jacksonville community is prepared for any type of destructive weather. The National Weather Service has recognized and certified our processes with their StormReady certification program. Congratulations! said Scott Cordero, meteorologist in charge, NWS Jacksonville. The NAS Jax Emergency Management Office earned the StormReady designation by meeting specific cri teria proving the station is prepared for weather-relat ed incidents. These include: having a local 24-hour warning point and an emergency operations center; having mul tiple ways of receiving NWS warnings; being able to monitor local weather/river conditions; having mul tiple ways of alerting the installation community; pro moting public readiness through community semi nars and presentations; having a formal destructive weather plan and trained spotters; conducting peri odic drills/ exercises and interaction with the NWS Jacksonville office. Some past weather-related incidents occurring within the NAS Jax vicinity included a significant downburst over the St. Johns River in May 1997 where 107-mph destructive winds plowed southward down the St. Johns River racing toward the station. The event caused damage to the stations hangars but there were no personnel injuries. Another weather event in June 2009 saw a waterspout form near the sta tion on the St. Johns River. One hurricane and several tropical storms have also caused major damage to the installation. These are just a couple of significant weather events that impacted the base, and serve as a remind Pelicans QA Department safely leads transition to first P-8A NAS Jax earns StormReady certification Sailors, family and friends gathered for a memorial service at HardageGiddens Funeral Home in Jacksonville Jan. 19 to honor retired Rear Adm. Joseph Joe Lustrat Coleman, 91, who passed away at St. Vincents Medical Center Jan. 14. About 150 people attended the cer emony, including family members, for mer shipmates and Jacksonville com munity leaders. Admiral Coleman really set the standard when it comes to dedica tion to serving both your country and your community, said Rear Adm. Rick Williamson, commander, Navy Region Southeast. His commitment to our Navy was nothing short of heroic, having spent a combat tour in World War II and three more in Vietnam. After his military career, he went on to have a tremen dous impact here in the Jacksonville community. He will be missed not only by his family, but by everyone who knew him. Coleman was born Sept. 10, 1922 in Atlanta. He entered the Naval Aviation Cadet program in 1942 and earned his wings of gold and commission as an ensign in 1943. Throughout his naval career, Coleman logged 3,200 flight hours and performed 550 fixed-wing landings at sea. In combat, he served Navy renders honors for heroic aviator Rear Adm. Joseph Coleman

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014 January 23 1960 Bathyscaph Trieste descends to deepest part of the ocean, the Marianas Trench. 1968 USS Pueblo seized by North Korean forces in Sea of Japan. Jan. 24 1942 Battle of Makassar Strait, destroyer attack on Japanese convoy in first surface action in the Pacific during World War II 1991 Helos from USS Leftwich and USS Nicholas recapture first Kuwaiti territory from Iraqis. Jan. 25 1963 First Seabee Technical Assistance Team arrives in Vietnam 1968 Operation Windsong I in Mekong Delta, Vietnam. Jan. 26 1911 First hydro-aeroplane flight is witnessed by naval aviator 1913 The remains of John Paul Jones is laid in its final resting place in the of Naval Academy Chapel in Annapolis, Md. 1949 USS Norton Sound, first guid ed-missile ship, launches Navys first guided missile, the Loon. 1960 USS John S. McCain rescues the entire 41-man crew of the sinking Japanese freighter, Shinwa Maru, in the East China Sea. Jan. 27 1942 USS Gudgeon is first US sub to sink enemy submarine (Japanese I-173) in action. 1945 Commissioning of USS Higbee (DD-806), first U.S. Navy ship named after woman member of U.S. Navy. 1967 Fire in Command Module at Cape Kennedy during simulation countdown. Lunar Module Pilot Lt. Cmdr. Roger Chaffee and two other crew members died. 1973 Paris Peace Accords signed, ending U.S. participation in the Vietnam War. Jan. 28 1778 Second New Providence Expedition raised the flag with thirteen stripes over Fort Nassau. 1960 Navy demonstrates value of moon communication relay, used in fleet broadcasts. 1962 USS Cook (APD-130) res cues 25 survivors from after section of Panamanian tanker, SS Stanvac Sumatra, which broke in two in the South China Sea 1986 Space shuttle Challenger explodes killing Cmdr. Michael Smith and six other astronauts Jan. 29 1914 U.S. Marines land in Haiti to protect U.S. consulate. 1943 Beginning of two-day battle of Rennell Island, enabling U.S. transports to reach Guadalcanal. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Astronaut Buzz Aldrin. Former Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Terry Bradshaw. Actor Marlon Brando. Comedian Jim Carrey. Princess Diana. Charles Dickens. Tolstoy. Billy Joel. And, President Abraham Lincoln. Especially President Lincoln. These are just some notable people who have battled depression. For most of my life, I counted myself as one of them not for being notable, but for suffering from depression. After a serious case of post-partum depression when my first son was born 13 years ago, I started taking medication for the disease. And it is a dis ease. Over the last decade, however, I was doing extremely well. Last year, I decided maybe I didnt identify with the likes of the list above and it was time to stop taking medicine. I mean, Im not having anymore babies, so postpartum depression is no longer a concern. And I hadnt had a major episode in 13 years. So, against the advice of my doctor, and despite my husband telling me he would actually pay me to keep taking the medicine, I started tapering my dose in early 2013. Through that spring and summer, I felt great. See, I dont need the medicine, I told my hus band. In the back of my mind, however, I was cautiously aware that a true recurrence of the dis ease doesnt reveal itself until a patient has been off medication for about six months. And in my eagerness to be normal again, I completely overlooked signs in September roughly six months after I altered my own dose that I was not doing well. And then everything went out of control in December. I explain the feelings of depression to my hus band, who has never experienced a true depres sion, like this: Its a creeping feeling, a heaviness that is there when you first open your eyes in the morning and wonder how youll get yourself out of bed. Shopping for Christmas presents is an effort, holiday music an annoyance. Deadlines, bills, cleaning even cutting my own toenails seem like enormous obstacles. But mostly, I feel hol lowed out, like a shell of a person. It doesnt matter what triggers the depression. The triggers are different for everyone. But any one who has been through it knows that the abyss quickly feels like it will swallow you whole. During one of my first depressive episodes when I was younger, I clung to stories of Lincoln and his depression. They helped me understand, or at least accept, something that has always puzzled me about myself: most of my friends know me as an outgoing person. I make a living out of telling stories and writing books that are sometimes humorous. How could someone like me suffer from depression? In a 2005 Atlantic article titled Lincolns Great Depression by Joshua Shenk, Lincolns colleague Henry Whitney is noted as once having said, No element of Mr. Lincolns character was so marked, obvious and ingrained as his mysterious and profound melancholy. William Herndon, Lincolns law partner, said, His melancholy dripped from him as he walked. My husband might say the same of me at times. And yet, most of us learned about a very differ ent Lincoln in school the jovial Lincoln who was known for telling funny stories, and a quick wit, and loved to visit with people in the White House. My husband might also say this about me. It is this juxtaposition of deep sadness, creativ ity, and an intense drive to connect with others on a personal level that has always seemed like an ill-fitting puzzle for people who suffer from depression. And its part of what made me in 2013 errone ously decide I dont need medicine. Depression isnt me, I told myself. It was just something I went through once. Its not who I am. Except it doesnt work that way. Diabetics often need medicine for the rest of their lives. So do people with heart disease. Likewise, depression is usually a lifelong disease, and often it is in fact part of who we are. In December, I knew things were bad, but I held out hope that I could be one of those regular people who dont need anti-depressants, people who can go for a jog and feel better. What finally changed my mind was when I was crying in my room and my youngest son slipped a note under the door that read, Its worse when you are sad. The next day, I took my medicine, and today, thankfully, Im starting to get better . for them. After all, if I had diabetes, Id take medicine to be healthy for my children. There are days when I feel like a failure for being stuck with this. There are days when I curse the pill bottle. But there also are days when I look at that list of notable people again, and I realize, its not a bad group of which to be part. Quite the opposite. As Shenk said of Lincoln in the Atlantic arti cle, Whatever greatness Lincoln achieved can not be explained as a triumph over personal suf fering . Lincoln didnt do great work because he solved the problem of his melancholy; the problem of his melancholy was all the more fuel for the fire of his great work.Lincolns lessons on depression

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Naval Hospital Jacksonville to undergo inspectionsNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville its hospital and five branch health clinics will undergo a Bureau of Medicine and Surgery Medical Inspector General (MEDIG) inspection Jan. 24-30 and The Joint Commission (TJC) inspection Jan. 27-30 to assess its quality of health care and efficiency of administrative procedures. The scheduled inspections, which are consis tently passed every three years by the hospital and branch health clinics, were last completed in 2011. TJC conducts periodic surveys of hospitals nationwide to evaluate the organizations compli ance with nationally established Joint Commission standards. The standards deal with organization quality, safety of care issues and the safety of the environ ment in which care is provided. The MEDIG inspection is designed to assess the efficiency, effectiveness, readiness and capabili ties of the hospital and branch health clinics in accordance with Bureau of Medicine and Surgery guidelines. Surveys will be used to evaluate NH Jacksonville during these inspections. Valuable feedback, through a brief web-based beneficiary survey, will allow NH Jacksonville to better serve customer and patient needs, and identify potential concerns. Available through Friday, Jan. 24, the survey can be accessed at https://apps.max.gov/survey/index. php?sid=69926&lang=en and only takes a few min utes. No personal identifiers are included in this survey and all responses will remain anonymous. Patient input is valuable. This survey is open to any NH Jacksonville JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014 FRCSE 400 Division Sailors keep P-3C power plants ready for issueThe P-3C Orion has been the Navys frontline, landbased maritime patrol aircraft since 1969. To ensure the P-3C platform remains a viable warfighter until the P-8A Poseidon achieves full operational capability, aviation machinists mates at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) aboard NAS Jacksonville do what ever it takes to keep squadrons supplied with quality, refurbished T56-14 turboprop engines. Most of our maintainers are ADs who have every thing to do with engines and propellers for the P-3C Orion aircraft, explained AFCM Rodney Feliciano, the divisions leading chief petty officer. Were all about the Rolls-Royce T56-14 turboprop engine that powers the P-3C Orion. When a squadron sends us an ailing engine, we tear it apart, determine what needs to be fixed and build it back up. The same goes for pro pellers we take them completely down to parade rest and bring them back to fully RFI (ready for issue). The 400 Division is located on Yorktown Ave. between VP-30 and the aviation fuel farm. ADC Sean Riley, who is in charge of production control, explained that the division also operates an engine test cell facility located across the runway from the NAS Jax Air Operations Tower. Its not unusual for our Level II maintainers to go out on the flight line and troubleshoot a T56 with squadron (Level I) maintainers in order to identify engine or propeller discrepancies. Other times, well tow an engine to our test cell for an induction run that checks all of the systems performance param eters to identify components that must be repaired or replaced, said Riley. Feliciano added, The reduction gear box (RGB) on the front of the engine is a component that frequently needs replacement. In certain cases, we can perform over-the-wing RGB replacements in the squadrons hangars that are more efficient and cost-effective than pulling the entire engine off the wing and bringing it to our shop for repair. Division Officer Lt. Shawn Collins said the impact of the P-8A transition has already affected manning levels. Since 2012, weve gone from 120 to 88 Sailors. The sundowning of Orion has begun, yet we still sup port 15 tenant commands and five AORs. Thats why we expect a lot from our mechs especially now as demand for our engines has not slacked off. That means 10 to 12 hours a day, five to six days a week when the workload dictates. We send quality assets to wherever the P-3 engine manager at Pax River needs them Atlantic, Pacific, Middle East or Mediterranean. Our goal is to never allow our fleet operators to go waiting for lack of an engine or propel ler, said Collins. He added, Despite their many hours on the shop floor and at the test cell, our Sailors still find time to study and advance their careers. Our advancement rate is about 90 percent. As the P-3 workload dimin ishes under sundown, our mechs will cross-train for other naval aviation platforms including the Hawkeye, Greyhound, Hercules, Seahawk and Hornet.

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A spiritual fitness brief, hosted by NAS Jax Command Chaplain (Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore, was held at the base chapel as part of a training to aid and equip NAS Jax Sailors with the tools needed for a high er level of mission readiness. The brief is a local training session that is readily available for all tenant commands aboard NAS Jax. This is not a religious pro gram. We see spirituality as a sense of connection, a transcen dence-something you are con nected to beyond yourself, said Skidmore. I think that it gives you purpose, meaning and direction in life. For each per son its different. According to Skidmore, the Joint Chiefs of Staff Total Force Fitness Instruction 3405.01 is comprised of eight categories, which include social, physical, environmental, medical and dental, spiritual, nutritional, psychological and behavioral. Brief details were derived from this instruction and devel oped by Skidmore and former NAS Jax Chaplain (Lt.) Paul Rodgers. We talk about honor, cour age and commitment in the Navy. And that is something that the Navy can dictate. But to get to that level, is something that we all bring from our dif ferent backgrounds. For exam ple, we have different religions, philosophies, family traditions, beliefs and worldviews all of these things we bring into the Navy when we join, said Skidmore. We all come together and the Navy doesnt dictate how we get to honor, courage and commit ment, but they expect us to live by these core values. This pro gram helps provide an under standing and foundation to live by and apply to our daily lives, careers and friends and family, he continued. Spirituality is defined as, that which allows a person to experience transcendent mean ing and purpose in life. Spirituality is the foundation of individual character, behav iors, core values and ethics, said Skidmore. One of the categories in the instruction is spiritual and we are elaborating on this from a chaplains perspective and implying the reasons why these are important from a spiritual spectrum, Skidmore added. Three goals that we have are to help develop resiliency under stress, living with integrity and mission readiness. I believe this brief helped me understand that my morals are an influence of my upbringing and I learned how I can apply my core values to work and the people around me, said OS2(SW) Earl Trammell of NAS Jax. The program motivated me to be a better person, and to realize the importance when a shipmate is going through a troubling time, that we should reach out to them and care for them. I feel that this type of train ing is necessary in our Navy today, said AME3 Ruby Gill, of NAS Jax. We all know deep down that we need to keep our spiritual lives intact in order to be good Sailors, but putting it on paper and making it an instruction helps us keep the information in the forefront of our minds on a daily basis. We are hoping this program will help us remember and reflect on what gives us direc tion and purpose in life, said Skidmore. I think it is an ongoing pro cess to strengthen who we are and strengthen our character. There is a real need to strength en the spiritual aspects of our lives. NAS Jacksonville and the Northeast Florida Navy League Councils will host the NAS Jacksonville Individual Augmentee (IA) Recognition Luncheon Feb. 20 at 11 a.m. at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center. All NAS Jacksonville and tenant com mand Sailors who have returned from an IA assignment since May 1, 2013 will be recognized during the event. The guest speaker will be Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ 4th Fleet. There is no cost for the IA Sailor or Marine and their spouse. The cost for other military and civilian guests is $10. Tickets may be purchased at the Fleet and Family Support Center, MondayFriday from 8 a.m. -3 p.m. The dead line to purchase tickets is Feb. 13. Child care will be provided at the Child Development Center for children of IAs and spouses in attendance. Families should call 542-9075, 30 days in advance to secure their drop-in space. To RSVP, contact your command CIAC or Bobby Johns at bobby.johns.ctr@navy. mil For more information, call 542-5637. Drive-up window still openNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles Satellite Pharmacy, located near the Navy Exchange (building 950), will close its lobby Jan. 2225 to facilitate pharmacy automation upgrades. The Satellite Pharmacys drive-up window will remain open during its regular scheduled times, Monday Friday, 8 a.m. 6 p.m. and Saturday, 8 a.m. 3 p.m. N ext-day drop off prescriptions will continue to be accepted. NH Jacksonvilles Outpatient Pharmacy in the hospital is not affect ed and will remain open during its normal hours of Monday Friday, 7:30 a.m. 6 p.m. and Saturday, 8 a.m. 3:30 p.m. Patients needing same-day pre scription fills will be directed to NH Jacksonville Outpatient Pharmacy. For more information, call 542-7405. Staying fit through spirituality IA Luncheon set for Feb. 20Satellite Pharmacy lobby closing for improvements 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014

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Mary Francis Chergi of the NAS Jax Legal Department and Vick Smith of the Air Operations Department were recently selected as the 2013 NAS Jax Senior and Junior Civilians of the Year. Chergi, began working for the base legal office as a legal secretary in 1989. I was a paralegal for the U.S. Attorneys Office, but I wanted to work at NAS Jacksonville so I took a pay cut and came on as a legal secretary. As the years went on, I eventu ally became a paralegal here, she explained. Ive had a lot of onthe-job training. When I came here, I knew nothing about the mili tary. My husband, who is a retired master chief, helped me learn about military instructions. There is basically an instruction for every thing so once I realized that I could research and find the information I needed, it all clicked, said Chergi, who is responsible for research ing legal procedures and guidelines; ethics; han dling claims related the station such as personal injuries or property dam age; investigations; law suits; working with base security, Naval Criminal Investigative Service and victims; solicitations on base and contracting issues for the Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department. My job is to take care of the installation. This office works for the com manding officer (CO), protects him and the sta tion, she said. She was selected as the 2013 NAS Jax Senior Civilian of the Year for: managing two $1.5 mil lion personal injury claims against NAS Jax saving the station $3 million. She also recouped $26,938 in claims for Public Works and handled the dises tablishment of the Navy Yacht Club. Chergi also completed six appeals, 13 debarments, two Freedom of Information requests, two foreclosure packages for housing, eight gift requests, nine memorandums of under standing, 11 MWR con tracts and two subpoe nas. I was so overwhelmed to learn I was chosen because I work with such wonderful people. I love NAS Jax and am honored to work with such a great team, said Chergi. In the future, Chergi plans to retire in the near future so she can spend more time with her fam ily and travel. I will have 29 years working for the government next month and will go to 30 and see what happens. I love my job but want to retire happy and healthy, she said laughing. I want to thank the skipper, executive officer and all my prior COs and XOs. There are so many people that have touched my life and I love work ing with all the young military members that come and go in our office. It keeps me young! said Chergi. In her free time, Chergi spends time with her husband, children and grandchildren. She also enjoys walking, doing pilates, working in her garden, home decorating and shopping. A native of Gahanna, Ohio, Smith has worked as an arresting gear technician with Air Operations for the past four years. He was select ed as the 2013 NAS Jax Junior Civilian of the Year for: not only working as a technician but filling the role of arresting gear supervisor. Since arriving here, Smith has revived a neglected arresting gear program to the high est standards as proved by an inspection by the Naval Safety Center in 2013 who praised his efforts. His commitment has ensured the airfield is 100 percent mission ready to support tenant and transient fleet air craft. Smith says he is hum bled being selected for this prestigious honor. I have a great sense of grat itude and humility win ning this award. The six outstanding Navy Sailors who work with me daily, share in this accomplish ment. I also appreciate the exceptional leader ship and support from Cmdr. Mark McManus, Lt. Cmdr. Jay Haddock and Doug Chaney. Smiths responsibili ties include performing daily inspections, main tenance and maintaining all records for the sta tions eight emergency arresting gear systems on the flight lines. He joined the NAS Jax team after completing a tour on Diego Garcia and retiring from the Navy as a chief petty officer. According to Smith, he is thrilled to be working on the NAS Jax flight line. I love having a job that has the potential to prevent the loss of life and save multi-million dollar aircraft. After all these years, I still get an adrenalin rush watching a 45,000-pound aircraft going 150 knots and come to a complete stop in less than 900 feet after engag ing the emergency arrest ing gear, said Smith. As for the future, Smith plans to continue work ing at NAS Jax. Unless I happen to win the lot tery, he said jokingly. When hes not hard at work, Smith enjoys spending time with his family, deep sea fish ing, flying radio control model aircraft. NAS Jax recognizes top civilian employees JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014 7

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8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014 er of why this facility, which at any given time hosts about 20,000 lives, needs a plan in place to help pre pare its population for weather hazards to minimize the loss of life and property, said Cordero. To ensure public safety, NAS Jax has taken many measures to ensure prompt notification of NWS watches/warnings to the base community includ ing base wide distribution via blast email, text mes sages, and phone calls through the bases Wide Area Alert Notification (WAAN) system known as ATHOC. Frequently visited locations on base including hous ing, the commissary, Navy Exchange and barracks also have weather radios to provide early notification. NAS Jax also utilizes an interactive web-based pro gram called C4I that highlights incidents and hazards impacting the installation as an information-sharing piece with higher echelons. The station also houses the Regional Operations Center (ROC), a unique emergency response facility that serves as a regional hub for bases in the southeast region. The ROC gathers and disseminates informa tion and coordinates with outside agencies as needed. According to Edmond, becoming a Storm Ready installation aligns NAS Jax with the outside com munity. We are kind of our own eco-system here but destructive weather doesnt recognize our fence line. We work in conjunction with Duval County Emergency Management so that when they are con ducting preparedness measures, we are as well, he said. We have been working hard to become des ignated for the past year. There are some processes that we execute differently as a military installation as compared to outside agencies. We had to alien the processes to be effective for both entities. We have also solidified our relationship with the National Weather Service so now we get even more notifications to follow not only our military track, but also the civilian track for weather issues, Edmond continued. So when we are making destructive weather preventive or response decisions, we are receiving information from multiple sources and sev eral different perspectives. This allows for better, more effective decision making in preparation for, or response to destructive weather events. The StormReady Program started in 1999 in Tulsa, Okla. to help arm communities with the communica tion and safety skills needed to save lives and property before and during a weather event. As of this month, there are 2,170 StormReady sites in 49 states and Puerto Rico. The designation remains in effect for three years at which time NAS Jax will be reevaluated and recertified for another three years. While no community is storm proof, being StormReady offers another means to be prepared to help communities save lives. WEATHER patients whether care is received at the hospital or a branch health clinic. If individuals have concerns about patient care and/or safety at NH Jacksonville, contact Patient Relations ( nhjaxcustomerservice@med.navy.mil ). Hospital: (904) 542-9175/9413 BHC Albany: (229) 639-7886/7834/7874 BHC Jacksonville: (904) 546-7096 BHC Key West: (305) 293-3924 BHC Kings Bay: (912) 573-4458 BHC Mayport: (904) 270-4446/4303 For more information on TJC, call ( 630) 7925000. To speak with a member of the MEDIG team, call (301) 319-3803, or e-mail at InspectionTeam. MEDIG@med.navy.mil Concerns may be submitted anonymously, how ever providing names and contact information makes it possible for TJC staff to follow-up if more information is needed, and to inform individuals of actions being taken in response to any concerns. SURVEYaboard USS Swannee (CVE 27) during World War II and served as commanding officer of USS Mispillion (AO 105) and USS Ranger (CVA 61) dur ing the Vietnam War. Coleman retired in 1995 after 32 years of service. In civilian life, Coleman was an active mem ber of the Jacksonville community. He served as chairman of the Jacksonville Electric Authority and board member of the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce, the Navy League of Jacksonville and Commodores League of Jacksonville. Additionally, he was a founder and former president of the Fleet Landing Retirement Community and a national trustee of the Association of Naval Aviation. Admiral Coleman was an exemplary Sailor and someone you always wanted to spend time with, said Bill Dudley, national vice president of the Navy League of the United States. He inspired all Sailors and carried on the tradition of the Navy and brought it to the Navy League, as well. He really epitomized what anyone wearing the uni form would want to emulate and he was a friend to everybody. All of his shipmates will greatly miss him. Coleman maintained a close relationship with the Navy during retirement. In addition to his association with the Navy League, he also rou tinely attended change of command ceremonies, retirement ceremonies, air shows and other official events throughout the tri-base region. He may have officially retired from the Navy, but he never really left it, said Denice Gonzalez, Navy Region Southeast protocol officer. Even in retire ment, his heart was with the Navy, from mentoring and engaging with senior leadership right down to grooming young Sailors. During the ceremony, family and friends recounted memories of Coleman, who was honored with a three-gun volley and a missing man forma tion aerial salute. Williamson then presented the ensign from the casket to Colemans wife, Margaret. All of our warmest condolences go out to Margaret and the rest of the Coleman family, Williamson said. Joseph touched so many people and there are many of us here today with heavy hearts, but Im sure none so much as his family. I personally appreciate the sacrifices they have made through the years and want them to know that there are a lot of people, not just here in the region, but throughout the Navy, that feel the same. Coleman was laid to rest at Jacksonville National Cemetery Jan. 20. He is survived by Margaret, his children Carol Lee Jackson, Sherrie Lynn Millichap and Joseph Lustrat Coleman Jr., as well as seven grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. COLEMAN Did you know that Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles award -winning Wellness Center and Health Promotions offers individual and group classes that center on improving your health? Classes include tobacco cessation, weight management, health fitness and nutrition. The following classes are offered throughout the year: walk-in): Basic nutritionone-hour ment only): Body mass, exercise and basic nutritiontwo-day class (one indi vidual session and one group session) in): Cholesterol management90-min utes Healthy lifestyle/weight management six weeks (one hour per week) Weight managementeight weeks (one hour per week) or walk-in): Monday, 9 a.m.; Tuesday, 1 p.m.; Thursday, noon. For more information or to make an appointment, call 542-5292 or visit NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center located at Building 867, adjacent to the NAS Jacksonville Fitness Source.Naval Hospital Jacksonville invites you to get fit in 2014 Navy officials said Sailors and Marines who used their Navy Cash/Marine Cash cards at any U.S. Target stores between Nov. 27 and Dec. 15, 2013, are not liable for any transactions that occur as a result of the unauthorized access to card data reported by Target Corporation in December. Navy Cash/Marine Cash cardholders affected by the breach are protected by the card networks and Regulation E [http://www.cfpb.gov/], which sets rules, liabilities, and procedures for electronic funds trans fers and establishes customer protections associated with using electronic funds transfers. We partner with the U.S. Department of the Treasury and its financial agent to manage the Navy Cash/Marine Cash program, said Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP) Commander Rear Adm. Jonathan Yuen. Data reports show 58 cardholders used their Navy Cash/Marine Cash cards at Target stores during the affected period. These accounts have been flagged and are being monitored for unusual activity. Disbursing officers on ships with members impact ed by the breach are being notified to issue new cards to affected cardholders. Navy Cash/Marine Cash combines a chip-based electronic purse (stored-value function) with a tradi tional magnetic strip (debit card and ATM function). The electronic purse replaces currency aboard ships. The magnetic strip and branded debit features afford users access to funds in their Navy Cash/Marine Cash accounts worldwide via Automated Teller Machines (ATMs) and point-of-sale (POS) devices at merchants who accept debit cards. Cashless ATMs aboard ship provide 24-hour-a-day, seven-day-a-week access to Navy Cash/Marine Cash accounts. The cashless ATMs also provide off-line access to accounts at financial institutions ashore and the abil ity to move money electronically to and from Navy Cash/Marine Cash accounts and those financial insti tution accounts. We are deeply concerned about the inconvenience the data breach may have caused our Sailors and Marines, Yuen added. We take this matter very seriously and are doing all we can to ensure our Sailors and Marines privacy and information is protected now and in the future. For questions regarding specific transactions, Sailors may contact: Navy Cash/Marine Cash Transaction Services Unit Tel: (866) 362-8922 Fax: (888) 344-3796 e-mail: Navy Cash@ezpaymt.comNavy Cash/Marine Cash cardholders are protected from Target data breach NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville contribut ed to Joint Enabling Capabilities Command (JECC) Mission Readiness Exercise (MRX) held from Dec. 9-13. The JECC MRX brings members from multiple commands and dif ferent branches of service togeth er to validate the capabilities and expertise of the on-coming Ready JECC Package (RJP) a three-month alert posture fully prepared to sup port missions across multiple joint operations. The most recent MRX provided training focused on enhancing the JECCs readiness to support humanitarian assistance/disaster relief (HA/DR) operations in sup port of the joint task force com mander. Lt. Ian Brenner, a NAVSUP oper ational logistics intern with 4th fleet played a vital role in the plan ning, execution, and coordina tion of logistics of the MRX, while leveraging NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonvilles capabilities to support the logistics requirements of HA/DR operations as simulated joint and allied forces respond to a major catastrophe. The coordination of logistics is essential to the success of every operation, and the JECC MRX pro vided a realistic planning process in which NAVSUP can execute to meet the logistics requirements of the HA/DR operation, said Brenner. At the conclusion of the MRX, Brenner briefed Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris on the logistics planning portion of the HA/DR operation. The MRX validated the RJPs ability to adapt to joint operational requirements and strengthen ties with likely mission partners. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, one of eight Fleet Logistics Centers under NAVSUP Global Logistics Support, provides operation al logistics, business and sup port services to the fleet, shore, and industrial commands of the Navy, Coast Guard, Military Sealift Command, and other joint allied forces. Services include contract ing, regional transportation, fuel, material management, household goods movement support, postal and consolidated mail, warehous ing, global logistics and husband ing, hazardous material manage ment, and integrated logistics sup port. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville contributes to JECC MRX

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NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander welcomed World War II veteran Clyde Reedy Jan. 15 at Heritage Park. Reedy, 92, served in the Navy from 1942-1946 as a PBY-SA pilot. This is a dangerous air craft, said Reedy. The PBY Catalina was not easy to fly. You worked all the time and it was not one of those aircraft you could switch on the autopi lot and sit back. Reedy shared his naval expe riences during the war with Undersander. We got shot at a few times and we shot back, but other than that, it was just another day at the office. According to Reedy, he only needed a two-year degree at the time to qualify for the pilot program. He remembered, I became a pilot because I did not want to be a deck Sailor or a private in the Army. What I found interesting about Reedy was his reminisc ing of the PBY Catalina patrol plane and how it functions and how he flew from NAS Jax working off the seawall, said Undersander. It was interest ing learning about the training pipeline that he went through. Although there are some name changes, the philosophies and principles for naval aviator training has not changed much since the 1940s to today. The most unique thing about Reedy that I could really associate with is that he oper ated in a time before heli copters and so, many of the missions he flew in the PBY are what I would call combat search and rescue today, said Undersander. We talked about what he did during his time of service and how we partake in similar missions like that with helicopters. Following the meet and greet at Heritage Park, Undersander escorted Reedy and his friends, Bill and Rick Hosking, to Mulligans Restaurant for lunch. Undersander concluded, It is always my honor to meet with veterans because it always amazes me what they went through in that era and how they look at it like it was noth ing just something they had to do. The Clay County Veterans Service Office is now located on the second floor of the Clay County Administration Building at 477 Houston Street, Green Cove Springs, Fla. The former Veterans Service office location at 1565 CR 315 has been closed. The office is open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The Clay County Veterans Service Office is staffed with a full time vet erans service officer and a part-time veterans program assistant who are both available and eager to assist veter ans and/or family members with filing claims and other related needs. Part of Clay Countys heritage is the countys strong ties to the military dat ing back to the early 1800s. Today there are more than 24,000 veterans who call Clay County home. These veterans rep resent service to our nation from World War II through the current conflicts as well as decades of service during peace time. To make an appointment, please call (904) 269-6326. Skipper welcomes World War II PBY pilotClay County Veterans Services Office helps veterans JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014 9

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The United States Naval Academys 2014 Summer Seminar Program invites a select group of young men and women to attend the Naval Academy Summer Seminar (NASS). This fast-paced, six-day experience is designed to introduce the Naval Academy to rising high school seniors. At the core of the NASS is the aca demic program involving 90-minute workshops designed to promote prob lem-solving skills using critical think ing, optimization, innovation, creativ ity, and team work. Students choose eight workshops from a wide range of subjects to include: Information Technology, Naval Architecture, Mechanical Engineering, Ocean Engineering, Aerospace Flight Testing, Systems Engineering, Microcomputer Design, Ethics and Character Development, Oceanography, Mathematics, History, Meteorology, Literature, Chemistry, Political Science, Language Studies, Martial Arts, and Economics. Students participate in project-based modules applying hands-on, realworld approaches to solving design and analysis problems utilizing the Naval Academys world-class laboratory facili ties. These facilities provide a unique learning environment outside the tradi tional classroom. The NASS teaches prospective appli cants about the life of midshipmen at the Naval Academy, where academics, athletics, and professional training are key elements in developing our nations leaders. Students live in the dormitory, eat in the dining hall and participate in aca demic and leadership workshops. They also participate in daily physical training including group runs and con ditioning exercises. Seamanship and navigation classes culminate in a cruise aboard a Navy Yard Patrol Craft. The program helps educate, motivate and prepare selected students who are considering application for appoint ment to the Naval Academy. If you think that you may be interest ed in pursuing an appointment to the Naval Academy and serving your coun try as an officer, you should seriously consider attending the Naval Academys 2014 Summer Seminar. The session dates are May 31-June 5, June 7-12 and June 14-19. Application are available at www. usna.edu/admissions/nass. Naval Academy Summer Seminar Program seeks student applicants JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014 11

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live enter tainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaoke DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Super Bowl Party Feb. 2, 5 p.m., $10 per person Door prizes, buffet and beverage spe cials Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Jan. 18, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: Jan. 25, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Navy Run Training Program Begins Feb. 4 at the fitness center Running group meets every Tuesday at 4 p.m. Biggest Loser Challenge 8 week program, teams of 2 Begins March 10 Aerobathon featuring TRX, spin, muscle max, boot camp, step, yoga, HIT and Zumba Feb. 15, 10 a.m. noon Fitness CenterI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Gatornationals March 1416 $30 $58 Yahala Country Bakery Trip Jan. 25 $25 per person Disney Jr. Live $15 $29 Monster Jam $22 $42 Wild Adventures $30 $70 Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket $166 $194.50 Universal Orlando $114 $169.50 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Daytona 500 $62 $209 Drive 4COPD 300 $55 Budweiser Duels $55 Sprint Unlimited $30 $55 Rolex 24 $32 $65 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 The Artist Series Broadway in Jacksonville 2014 season, select shows Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2014 season, select shows Armed Forces Vacation Club www. afvclub.com $349 $369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 Ripleys St. Augustine $4.25 $7.50 St. Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Wild Florida Airboats $17 $46.50 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels located near attrac tions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Grill & Chill at the Liberty Center Jan. 23, 6 p.m. Free hamburgers and hotdogs St. Augustine Night of Lights Trip Jan. 25, 6 p.m. Free Deweys Super Bowl Party Feb. 2, $10 per person Includes buffetNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Daily Twilight Golf Special Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you!Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person For more information about any of the sports articles, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil Visit the MWR website at www.cnic.navy.mil or www.facebook.com nasjaxmwr. Public education is supported by local (primarily property tax revenues), state, and federal funding. Most school dis tricts rely heavily on these resources to support educational programming classroom instruction, extracurricular activities, faculty training, transpor tation, administrative services and so much more. Our current economic conditions have placed most families, businesses, and governmental agencies in the diffi cult position of having to operate under severe budgetary constraints. Tighter budgets have placed peo ple and organizations in the position of having to scale down and, in some cases, eliminate services all together. School districts are no exception. Like most states, Florida has suffered the loss of tax and federal revenues. As a result, Gov. Rick Scott and state legis lators have looked for ways to maintain state programs and services while mon itoring an ever-shrinking budget. The Duval County School System has had to bear its share of these budget ary woes. Education leaders in the 16 states who are members of the Southern Regional Education Board, includ ing Florida and Georgia, are working on various ways to deal with the eco nomic challenges but its not easy! The federal government recognizes that districts like Duval County face added economic pressure because real property (land) in this area has been purchased for use by the military. This means that the county government is positioned to lose property tax revenue which it might otherwise have earned if the federal government had not acquired the property. Compensation for this loss, known as Impact Aid, is paid for federal property which is used to support military instal lations, low-income housing, Indian lands, and for children whose parents Support federal funding of local schools Turn in Federal Assistance Program form JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014 13

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14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014 Applications for the 2014 Scholarships for Military Children Program are now available at commissaries worldwide or at http://www.militaryscholar.org Applications must be turned in to a commissary by close of business Feb. 28, 2014. Packages must be hand-delivered or shipped via U.S. Postal Service or other delivery methods, not emailed or faxed. This years award amount has risen to $2,000, and the program awards at least one scholarship at each commissary with qualified applicants. An applicant must be a dependent, unmarried child, younger than 23, if enrolled as a full-time stu dent at a college or university, of a service member on active duty, Reserve or Guard member, retiree or sur vivor of a military member who died while on active duty, or survivor of a retiree. Applicants should ensure that they and their spon sor are enrolled in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System database and have a military ID card. The applicant must attend or plan to attend an accredited college or university, full time, in the fall of 2014 or be enrolled in studies designed to transfer to a four-year program. Fisher House Foundation, a nonprofit organiza tion that helps service members and their families, administers the program. Scholarship Managers, a national, nonprofit, scholarship management services organization, manages and awards the scholarships. Commissary partners and the general public donate money to the program; every dollar donated goes directly to funding the scholarships. Since inception of the program in 2001, more than $11.3 million in scholarships have been awarded to 7,412 military dependents from more than 71,000 applicants.For more information, call 856-616-9311 or email mili taryscholar@scholarshipmanagers.com. Science fair judges neededThe Rotary Clubs of Clay County are sponsor ing the Junior and Senior High School Science Fair Feb. 11 at the Clay County Fairgrounds on S.R. 16, Green Cove Springs. More than 480 area students are expected to compete in this scholastic event. Each project must be judge by a minimum of three judges. A minimum of 125 judges must be recruited in or to make this years event a resounding success.To volunteer or for more information, contact Lillian Bell, science fair coordinator at 654-8149. NWCA offers scholarships The Scholarship Foundation of Navy Wives Clubs of America (NWCA) annually gives 30 scholarships to eligi ble students for $1,000 or $1,500 to help with col lege tuition, room and board, books and other fees. To be eligible, an appli cant must be a dependent (natural born, legally adopted or stepchild) of an active duty, retired or deceased enlisted mem ber of the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps or Coast Guard. The applicant must have a valid dependent ID card, show need for financial assistance, have at least a 2.5 grade point average and be a high school graduate or equiv alent prior to applying. Upperclassmen may all apply for financial assis tance. The deadline for applications is May 31. Applications may be downloaded from the NWCA web site at www. navywivesclubsofameri ca.org FFSC offers life skills workshopsThe NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to ser vice members and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon regis tration. The following is the schedule for 2014: p.m.), Feb. 5 (8 a.m.-12:30 p.m.) May 12-15 (5:30-10 p.m.), Aug. 18-19 (8 a.m.-4 p.m.), Aug. 20 (8 a.m.12:30 p.m.), Nov. 17-20 (5:30-10 p.m.). Separation Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) Feb. 3-7, Feb. 24-28, March 10-14, March 24-28, April 7-11, May 5-9, May 19-23, June 9-13, June 23-27, July 7-11, July 21-25, Aug. 11-15, Aug. 25-29, Sept. Retirement Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) Feb. 10-14, March 17-21, April 14-18, May 12-16, June 27-31, Nov. 17-21, Dec. 8-12. noon) Feb. 21, April 1, May 2, June 30, June 30, (8-9:30 a.m.) April 2, May 28, July 1, Sept. 3, Nov. 12. noon) April 2, May 28, July 1, Sept. 3, Nov. 12. p.m.) Feb. 18-19, April 29-30, Aug. 5-6, Nov. 24-25. a.m.-4 p.m.) July 31. March 6, May 8, July 10, Sept. 11, Nov. 13. March 10, April 14, May 12, June 9, July 14, Aug. 11, a.m.) Feb. 11, March 11, April 8, May 13, June 10, a.m.-noon) Jan. 28, May 20, 27, Sept. 23, 30. Jan. 27, Feb. 24, March 31, April 28, May 19, June 15. (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.), March 27 May 1 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.), May 27 July 8 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.-no workshop June 3), July 29 Sept. 9 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.-no workshop Aug. 19), March 19, May 6, July 15, Sept. 9, Nov. 18. 21, 28; March 4, 11, 18, 25; May 6, 13, 20, 27; July 1, 8, 15, 22; Sept. 9, 16, 23, 30; Nov. 4, 12, 18, 25. 18, 25; April 1, 8, 15, 22; June 3, 10, 17, 24; Aug. 5, 12, 11 a.m.) Every Wednesday June 3, Sept. 16, Dec. 2. Feb. 11, 25; March 11, 25; April 1, 15, 29; May 13, 27; 7, 21; Nov. 4, 18; Dec. 2, 16. July 17, Sept. 4, Nov. 5. Dec. 4.To register for any of the above workshops, please call 542-5745. Scholarships for military children available

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014 15 Generational changes important to air dominanceU.S. airpower strategy is based on having air domi nance in any conflict. Air dom inance means marrying the best pilots in the world with the best aircraft, and tying them together with the best tactics. The current plan to field variants of a fifth-generation aircraft is one arm of that strat egy. Just the idea of a fifth-gen eration aircraft is a relatively new concept. It really only cropped up when the U.S. Air Force called for what became the F-22 Raptor. As the Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps develop the Joint Strike Fighter the F-35 Lightning II there is more discussion of fifth-gener ation capabilities. The idea of generations of aircraft really came around with the F-22, said Lt. Col. Brian Stahl, an airpower strat egist with the Air Force. As we looked at past aircraft, the main thing we were looking at were generational changes and improvement in capabilities. So as you looked at the first jet aircraft like the P-80 and into the F-86 move into the F-4 with air-to-air missiles and into the fourth generation aircraft you have better avionics, increased maneuverability, specialized mission sets. As you move into the F-22, it is a linear progres sion of all these things. But what are the previous generations of jet aircraft that have maintained aerial domi nance since Korea? The first generation of jet aircraft began in World War II. The German Messerschmitt 262 was the first jet aircraft that saw widespread combat in the war. American and British designers were concurrently working on jets, but none saw combat. The P-80 Shooting Star was the most successful American jet. It was a trailblazer for the U.S. Army Air Force. The straight-wing aircraft first flew in 1943, and was built by the Lockheed Skunk Works in 143 days. The aircraft first flew with a British engine. It did not see combat during World War II, but was a workhorse in the early days of the Korean War. The Air Force and the Navy flew what became known as F-80 aircraft into the 1970s. The T-33 training aircraft was a variant of the F-80 and served in that role into the 1980s. The Bell P-59 Airacomet and Republic F-84 Thunderjet are also considered first-genera tion aircraft. In Korea, the F-80 was clearly outclassed by the MiG-15. This swept-wing aircraft produced by the Soviet Union flew at least 100 mph faster than the F-80. Enter the North American F-86 Sabre. This sweptwing fighter bridged the gap between first-generation fight ers and the second generation. The F-86 more than held its own against the MiG-15. The aircraft cruised at more than 600 mph. In a dive, it could break the sound barrier. The F-86 gave United Nations forc es in Korea air superiority not air dominance over the bat tlefield. North Korea launched a night air attack against U.S. forces on April 15, 1951, killing two soldiers. They were the last American ground casualties from an aerial attack. Designers of second-gen eration aircraft took lessons learned in Korea and incorpo rated them into the aircraft of the so-called Century series of aircraft. This generation roughly runs from the mid1950s to 1965. Technological advances made this era a hothouse of aviation growth. Designers built aircraft with swept wings, delta wings and arearuled fuselages. Engine break throughs enabled secondgeneration fighters to sustain supersonic speeds in level flight. Advances in radar, missile technology and changes in tac tics defined this generation of aircraft. The thinking at the time was that dogfighting was a thing of the past. Designers built aircraft that would climb quickly, fly fast and, using only missiles, shoot down intercon tinental bombers. The first aircraft of the Century series was the F-100 Super Sabre. The jet, also built by North American, was an outgrowth of the F-86. It was capable of sustained superson ic flight. Introduced in 1954, the F-100 started as an airsuperiority fighter and segued into a close-air support plat form in Vietnam. Other air craft of the Century series are the McDonnell F-101 Voodoo, the Convair F-102 Delta Dagger, the Lockheed F-104 Starfighter, the Republic F-105 Thunderchief and the Convair F-106 Delta Dart. The McDonnell-Douglas F-4 Phantom II is the finest U.S. example of the third genera tion of fighters. Developed for the Navy and Marine Corps, the aircraft was also adopted by the Air Force in 1963. The Phantom is a two-seat, twinengine, all-weather, long-range supersonic jet interceptor fight er/fighter-bomber. The manyhyphenated designation means the aircraft was one of the most capable in the inventory. It is still serving in air forces around the world. Fourth-generation air craft are the workhorses of American air power today. The F-15 Eagle and F-16 Fighting Falcon are the Air Force fourthgen aircraft. The Navys F/A-18 Super Hornet is a fourth-gener ation aircraft. The now retired F-14 Tomcat is also considered a fourth-gen aircraft. All these jets were designed in the mid to late 1970s and took the lessons learned from the Vietnam War. The empha sis was again on maneuverabil ity. Dogfighting, stealth and radar avoidance came to the fore. The aircraft were continu ally updated with new target ing pods, new radar and new materials. The classic exam ple of this is the F/A-18 Super Hornet that while based on a 1970s airframe, is one of the most capable aircraft in the world. Currently, the United States has the only fifth-generation fighters. Russia and China are working to catch up. The Lockheed-Martin F-22 Raptor is operational and capable of worldwide deploy ment. Lockheed-Martin also designed the F-35 Lightning II and that will be used by the Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps and allied nations. The aircraft are the most advanced in the world and their capabilities are being kept purposely vague. They incorporate the latest in stealth technology, the latest avionics, communications, sensors and weaponry. These are all fused together giving pilots improved situational awareness, while reducing the workload. Stahl says the biggest change from fourth-gen to fifth-gen is stealth. Fifth-generation fight ers use the latest stealth tech nology. Another difference is the way information is gathered, processed and used. Stahl flew F-16s and F-22s. In the fourthgen aircraft, the pilot is a sys tem operator, he said. An F-16 or F-15 pilot is con stantly working the radar or working the targeting pod; all of these different sensors that require input from the pilot, he said. In the F-22, all that is inte grated and you have a synthe sis of the data, he continued. Where the pilot was the operator before, now the jet is doing the integration and oper ation of the sensors. The pilot can now spend less time oper ating the systems, and more time actually processing the data. In other words, the pilot becomes more a tactician, instead of just trying to ensure the right information out of the systems on board. Each generation of aircraft costs more. The F-80 cost about $110,000 a copy. The F-86 ran about $220,000. An F-100 Super Sabre ran about $700,000, while the F-4C Phantom was about $2.5 million. An F-15 Eagle ran about $30 million a copy. The F-22 Raptor costs about $133 million, with the F-35A coming in around the same range.

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014 The Veterans Oral History Project was created by the United States Congress in 2000. This project of the Library of Congress and American Folklife Center collects, preserves and makes accessible the personal accounts of American war veterans so that future generations may hear directly from veterans and better understand the realities of war. The objective of this program is col lecting first-hand video and/or audio accounts of U.S. Veterans on behalf of the Library of Congress. Volunteers are used to conduct interviews for the Library of Congress. The project collects first-hand accounts of U.S. veterans from the fol lowing wars: U.S. citizen civilians who were actively as war industry workers, USO workers, flight instructors, medical volunteers, able stories. To volunteer to help with this proj ect, please register with HandsOn Jacksonville and attend a volunteer inter viewer training workshop conducted by Dr. Annette Fromm with the Library of Congress/American Folklore Society in the NAS Jacksonville Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society conference room ate left just prior to entering the NAS Jacksonville Main Gate. To register, please send an email with your full name, e-mail address, phone number and session attending, to Richard@handsonjacksonville.org. Baseball and Softball Divisions: Everybody playsRegistration for all levels of the Little League Baseball and Softball is now underway at the NOL Clubhouse on Allegheny Rd. at NAS Roosevelt Blvd. Or register online at www.noljax. org For more info, email noljax@ gmail.com Baseball Divisions Boys and Girls Softball Divisions Girls Challenger Division boys and girls with physical/mental chal NOL is open to active and reserve military families, plus, residents of Avondale, Ortega, Lakeshore, Venetia, Ortega Hills, Riverside, Farms, Confederate Point and Collins Road. Volunteer interviewers needed for oral history projectLittle League registration now underway

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014 17 The National Defense Authorization Act passed last month requires sweep ing changes to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ), particularly in cases of rape and sexual assault. These are the most changes to the Manual for Courts-Martial that weve seen since a full committee studied it decades ago, said Lt. Col. John Kiel Jr., the policy branch chief at the Armys Criminal Law Division in the Office of the Judge Advocate General. Key provisions of the UCMJ that were rewritten under the NDAA for Fiscal Year 2014 signed Dec. 26, 2013, by President Barack Obama are Articles 32, 60, 120 and 125. Article 32 The law now requires the services to have judge advocates serve as Article 32 investigating officers. Previously, the Army was the only service in which judge advocates routinely did not serve as Article 32 investigating officers. Article 32 hearings roughly equiva lent to grand jury proceedings in the civilian judicial system are held to determine if theres enough evidence to warrant a general court-martial the most serious type of court-martial used for felony-level offenses such as rape and murder. Congress decided that the services needed to have trained lawyers judge advocates consider the evidence, since in their view, trained lawyers often are in the best position to make determinations to go forward with gen eral courts-martial, Kiel said. Judge advocates didnt always serve as Article 32 investigating officers in the Army largely because we try four times the number of cases of any of the other services, he explained an issue of not having enough judge advocates for the high volume of cases. Army officials asked Congress to con sider its resourcing issue, he said, so the legislators wrote an exception, stating that where practicable, you will have a judge advocate conduct the Article 32 investigation. Kiel explained what where practica ble means, citing a number of circum stances where it could apply. Many courts-martial were conducted over the years in Iraq and Afghanistan where soldiers were deployed and some of those involved war crimes, he said. In these cases, the Army found it some times was best to have line officers be the Article 32 investigating officers, because they could best put themselves in the shoes of the accused. Those line officers understood what its like to make decisions in the heat of battle better than a lawyer without those experiences, Kiel said. They added a level of judgment that some times judge advocates could not. Another example, he said, might be travel fraud. In the case of complex [temporary duty] fraud, for instance, you might want to have a finance officer as the IO, Kiel said. Besides subject-matter experts being in the best position to be Article 32 investigating officers, he said, there simply might not be enough judge advo cates in the area of the installation. For example, U.S. Army Forces Command would have enough judge advocates to do Article 32 hearings, Kiel said, but if a number of hearings came up at once at U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command installations a smaller major command they might come up short. That might jeopardize the right of an accused to a speedy trial if the clock runs out, he noted. And, if a judge advo cate is flown in from another installa tion, travel costs would be incurred. Those are very real situations that could impact the ability to get it done expeditiously and cost effectively, Kiel said. Other attorneys on an installation cannot always be tapped for Article 32 investigating officer work, he said. On larger installations, we have operation al law attorneys that potentially could cover down on some of these areas, but we dont have a lot of those, he added. On other installations, Kiel said, administrative law attorneys might have conflicts of interest if theyve pre viously rendered some kind of legal review on a case. And, our administrative law attor neys are always busy reviewing vari ous sorts of investigations and helping the command deal with such things as ethics and family readiness issues, he continued. Then we have our criminal law advocates, trial counsels and defense counsels, Kiel added. Theyre all con flicted out from being IOs, because theyre actually tasked with presenting evidence during the [Article 32 hearing] as theyre acting as counsel to the gov ernment or to the accused. The fiscal 2014 National Defense Authorization Act gives the services one year to phase in this change to Article 32, stipulating that where practicable, judge advocates conduct the investiga tions. This one-year time period provides needed time for the staff judge advo cates to figure out if they have enough judge advocates to fill the requirement to cover down on all the Article 32 hear ings and determine which installations are struggling to meet the require ments, Kiel said. Another impact to courts-martial practice is the new requirement for a special victims counsel to provide sup port and advice to the alleged victim, Kiel said. For example, the special vic tims counsel must inform the victim of any upcoming hearings pretrial confinement, parole board, clemency and so on and inform the victim that he or she can choose to attend any of those. The victim also will be notified in advance of trial dates and be informed of any delays. Furthermore, Kiel said, the special victims counsels may represent the alleged victims during trial, ensuring their rights are not violated, as under the Rape Shield Rule, for example. The Rape Shield Rule, or Military Rule of Evidence 412, prevents admission of evidence concerning sexual predisposi tion and behavior of an alleged victim of sexual assault. Kiel provided an aside regarding the Rape Shield Law and how a high-vis ibility case a few months ago involv ing football players at the U.S. Naval Academy influenced changes to Article 32 by Congress. In that case, the defense counsel had the victim on the stand for three days of questioning about the alleged victims motivations, medical history, apparel, and so on during the Article 32 hearing, he related. The cross-examination was perceived by the public and Congress to be dis graceful and degrading, and potentially violating the federal Rape Shield Rule. With passage of the fiscal 2014 National Defense Authorization Act, alleged rape and sexual assault victims are no longer subject to that kind of interrogation at the Article 32 hearing, he said. Before the new law, alleged victims of sexual assault were ordered to show up at Article 32 hearings and frequently were asked to testify during those hear ings as well. Congress thought that wasnt fair, since civilian victims of sexual assault didnt have to show up or testify, Kiel said. Now, any victim of a crime who suf fers pecuniary, emotional or physical harm and is named in one of the charg es as a victim does not have to testify at the hearing, he added. Article 60 Like Article 32 changes, modifica tions to Article 60 are to be phased in over the course of 12 months. Article 60 involves pretrial agreements and actions by the convening authority in modifying or setting aside findings of a case or reducing sentencing. A conven ing authority could do that in the past, and some did, though rarely. Changes to Article 60 were influ enced last year by a case involving Air Force Lt. Col. James Wilkerson, a former inspector general convicted of aggra vated sexual assault, Kiel said. The convening authority, Air Force Lt. Gen. Craig Franklin, overturned the findings of guilt. That got Congress stirred up, Kiel said. In the new law, legislators said the convening authority can no longer adjust any findings of guilt for felony offenses where the sentence is lon ger than six months or contains a dis charge. They cannot change findings for any sex crime, irrespective of sen tencing time. One way a commander still can mod ify a sentence is, if the trial counsel comes forward and says, This particu lar accused was very helpful in securing evidence or cooperating with the gov ernment in prosecuting someone who was accused of committing an offense under the UCMJ. That is a trigger for the convening authority to be able to modify a sen tence, Kiel said. The other way a convening authority can modify a sentence, even involving rape and sexual assault, is if a pretrial agreement is in place, he said, meaning that the case could close, but the pre trial agreement would still take effect. Congress realized that Article 60 was still needed to continue the option for pretrial agreements, Kiel said. Had Article 60 been done away with alto gether, he added, that would have like ly meant all courts-martial would have gone to full contest, and that would have bottlenecked the entire process. Voiding Article 60 also would have meant that all alleged victims of sexual assault likely would have to testify. Sometimes, victims supported the pretrial agreement, supported the potential sentence and supported the fact that they didnt have to testify when it was in their best individual interest, Kiel said. Other changes to courts-martial practice were made. Prior to the new law, the convening authority could consider the military character of the accused in consider ing how to dispose of a case, Kiel said. Congress decided that should have no bearing on whether or not the accused has committed a sexual assault or other type of felony. Also, he said, previous to new law, sometimes the [staff judge advocate] would say, Take the case to a gener al court-martial, and the convening authority would disagree and say, Im not going forward. Now, he said, if the convening authority disagrees, the case has to go to the secretary of the service concerned, [who] would have to decide whether to go forward or not. In the case of an alleged rape or sexual assault in which the staff judge advocate and the convening author ity decide not to go forward because of a lack of evidence or for any other reason, that case has to go up to the next-highest general court-martial con vening authority for an independent review, Kiel said. So if the case occurred at the divi sion level in the Army, for example, and a decision were made at that level not to go forward, then the division would need to take the victims statements, its own statements for declining the case, and forward them and the entire inves tigative file to the next level up in this case, the corps. At the corps level, the staff judge advocate and the corps command er would then review the file, look at the evidence and make a determina tion whether or not to go forward, Kiel explained. If its decided to move forward the case would be referred at the corps level instead of sending it back down to the division, he added. This, he explained, avoids unlawful command influence on the cases outcome. Articles 120 and 125 UCMJ Articles 120 and 125 now have mandatory minimum punishments: dishonorable discharge for enlisted ser vice members and dismissal for officers, Kiel said. Article 120 deals with rape and sexual assault upon adults or chil dren and other sex crimes, and Article 125 deals with forcible sodomy. In addi tion, the accused now must appear before a general court-martial with no opportunity to be tried at a summary or special court-martial, Kiel said. A summary court-martial is for rela tively minor misconduct, and a special court-martial is for an intermediatelevel offense. Furthermore, Congress highly encouraged the services not to dispose of sexual assault cases with adverse administrative action or an Article 15, which involves non-judicial punish ment usually reserved for minor disci plinary offenses, Kiel said. Rather, Kiel said, Congress desires those cases to be tried at a general court-martial and has mandated that all sexual assault and rape cases be tried only by general court-martial. Prior to the fiscal 2014 National Defense Authorization Act, there was a five-year statute of limitations on rape and sexual assault on adults and children under Article 120 cases. Now, theres no statute of limitations, he said. Congress repealed the offense of con sensual sodomy under Article 125 in keeping with previous Supreme Court precedent, Kiel said, and also barred anyone who has been convicted of rape, sexual assault, incest or forcible sodomy under state or federal law from enlisting or being commissioned into military service. Whats Ahead Congress could make even more changes that address sexual assaults in the military as early as this month, Kiel said. And later this year, changes to the Manual for Courts-Martial should be signed by the president after review by the services, the national security staff, the Defense Department and other agencies, he added. The updated manual would codify all the changes, although some already are in effect, he said.New law brings changes to Uniform Code of Military Justicework on or live on federal prop erty. To be eligible to receive highly impacted federal funds, a school district must have at least 40 percent of its student population consid ered federally connected. In order to qualify for these funds, the local school dis trict must verify the numbers of students served by its local schools. Each year, at the same time, local schools send home an FAP card and ask parents to complete it based on whether they are active duty military and/or work or live on federal property. The following are some longstanding myths associated with the cards use. The schools are making money off of our children Not true! Administered by the U.S. Department of Education, the Impact Aid program is one of the oldest education pro grams, dating from 1950. Like most federal programs, it was fully funded in its early years. However, since about the mid1970s, the program has been under funded. This means that local school districts, while receiving some federal funding, are still not being fully compensated for the costs of the educational services they provide. They are collecting too much personal information one place. Not true! In fact, the information which parents provide on the FAP card is basic contact infor mation and work-related infor mation. Parents are not asked questions about salary or fam ily income, nor are they asked to provide social security num bers or other important identi fying data. If I do not return the FAP card, my childs school will know that I am angry about Not true! Not completing the FAP card does not affect a district or schools decisions about policies or procedures. Withholding the FAP card only denies the local district the much needed funding required to maintain programs and ser vices. Its too much work to fill out all these forms again! Not true! Completing the FAP card will only take a moment. While it is true that every child in a family will receive an FAP card, parents will quickly real ize there are a few simple ques tions which can be answered in two maybe three minutes. What else is needed? A signa ture! The FAP cards have already gone home with Duval stu dents. Parents need to com plete a separate form for each child. And remember to dou ble check the form. Without accurate numbers, the schools could miss out on grant opportunities such as the one granted to Mayport Middle School. DoDEAs Promoting Student Achievement at Schools Impacted by Military Force Structure Changes Grant earned by Mayport Middle School has allowed the school to enhance student achieve ment in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, English language arts, and reading. A large portion of the grant has ensured integration of technology into the cur riculum. Teachers have had opportunities to strengthen their content knowledge and instructional skills through professional development tar geted to the new curriculum. To qualify, a school must have a significant military student population to meet the eligibility requirement. Specifically, elementary schools must have a military student population of least 25 percent and secondary schools must have a military student population of at least 15 per cent. So before Duval Schools can submit a grant application to DoDEA, they must determine if these schools meet the eligibil ity criteria. Please complete your FAP card. If you have misplaced it, please call the school for a replacement. Schools will begin returning cards to the district office in late November. The deadline for returning the cards has been extended to Jan. 29. Dawn Mills is the NAS Jacksonville school liaison officer. If you have questions about an educational issue impacting your child, email dawn.m.mills@navy.mil or call 778-2236/486-8221. IMPACT AID

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 23, 2014