Jax air news

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Material Information

Title:
Jax air news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note:
Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID:
UF00028307:02073


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014 NEW NFOS NEX FINAL FLIGHT Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Vice Adm. Robert Thomas, commander, 7th Fleet, flew over Japan with Patrol Squadron (VP) 16 in the Navys newest maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft, the P-8A Poseidon, Jan. 9 and praised the crew for their mis sion skills and hard work. The War Eagles of VP 16 are making their inaugural deploy ment with six P-8As in support of 7th Fleet maritime domain awareness efforts in the IndoAsia-Pacific. According to Thomas, the P-8A deployment brings increased capability to 7th Fleets Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force. I am extremely impressed with VP-16 and the P-8A Poseidons performance dur ing their inaugural deployment to Seventh Fleet, Thomas said. Across every mission set, from anti-submarine warfare to maritime intelligence, sur veillance and reconnaissance (ISR), P-8A capability repre sents a significant improve ment over the P-3C, providing the opportunity to detect, track and report on more targets than ever before. This contin ues to be validated throughout the course of the aircrafts time here. I had the opportunity to fly with the squadron and wit nessed their capabilities first hand . this aircraft is a game changer. The P-8A is the most advanced long-range anti-sub marine and anti-surface war fare aircraft in the world. A true multi-mission aircraft, it also provides superior maritime ISR capability. Built on the proven Boeing 737 airframe, the tran sition to P-8A brings with it enhanced safety and reduced maintenance. The P-8A is sig nificantly quieter than the P-3C, requires less mainte nance, and provides more onstation time. The P-8A remains fully interoperable with the Japan Maritime Self Defense Forces P-3C force. The new P-8A Poseidon is part of the Navys commit ment to the Pacific rebalanced, bringing latest technology to 7th Fleet to ensure the U.S. is best postured to honor its secu rity commitments to regional security and stability. CPRW-11 to hold change of commandCapt. Sean Liedman will relieve Capt. Eric Wiese as the 53rd commodore of Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven (CPRW-11) during a change of command ceremony Jan. 16. Liedman, a native of Kimball, Minn., graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1991 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Systems Engineering. He received a Master of Arts degree in National Security and Strategic Studies from the Naval War College in 2002, and served as a Federal Executive Fellow at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard University in 2010-11. Liedman was designated a naval flight officer in 1993. After initial train ing in the P-3C Orion, his first fleet assignment was with the Pelicans of VP-45, where he completed three over seas deployments and was selected as the CPRW-11 NFO of the Year in 1996. Subsequent flying tours include Fleet Replacement Squadron instructor duty with the Pros Nest of VP-30; a department head tour with the Old Buzzards of VPU-1, and as the 61st commanding officer of the Fighting Tigers of VP-8. Staff tours include duty as the aide/ flag lieutenant to Commander, Carrier Group One; deputy executive assistant to the director, Air Warfare Division on the Chief of Naval Operations staff; executive assistant to the deputy com mander, U.S. Central Command; and P-3C/P-8A aircraft requirements offi cer in the Air Warfare Division on the Chief of Naval Operations staff. Liedman will continue CPRW-11s transition from the P-3C Orion to the P-8A Poseidon. A wounded warrior from NAS Jacksonville competed in his first adaptive athletics competition at the Wounded Warrior Pacific Invitational Jan. 8 in Honolulu. AWFAN Brett Parks, attached to VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville, threw standing shot put and discus during the joint-service event for seriously wounded, ill and injured service mem bers. In addition to field sports, he is participating in multiple swimming events. This event has opened me up to a world that I didnt know before, said Parks. We all have goals, but theres only so far you can go on your own when it comes to fitness and rehabili tation. This really raises the bar on my goals; when I go home, I have a pur pose and new goals to strive for. Parks was wounded Oct. 17, 2012 in his hometown of Jacksonville, when he came to the aid of a man being robbed at gunpoint. Parks a husband and father with a second child on the way was wait ing to conduct a training session at his gym when he heard a man scream and decided to intervene. Two gunshots were fired at Parks; the first shot hit his abdomen, the second shot missed him. U.S. 7th Fleet commander praises P-8A performance Local Wounded Warrior shares message of hope in Hawaii

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 16, 2014 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Jan. 16 1930 USS Lexington (CV-2) provides power to Tacoma, Wash. after floods knocked out city power plants. 1991 Operation Desert Storm, the liberation of Kuwait from Iraq, begins. Jan. 17 1832Sloop-of-war USS Peacock makes contact with Vietnamese court officials 1900 The U.S., represented by Cmdr. Taussig in the steel-hulled gunboat USS Bennington, takes formal possession of Wake Island in the Pacific. 1942 To protect the advance of Task Force 8 for its strike against the Marshall and Gilbert Islands, planes of Patrol Squadron 23 fly daily searches of the waters between their base at Canton Island and Suva in the Fijis. 1955 USS Nautilus (SSN-571), the first nuclear-pow ered submarine, casts off lines at and sends message underway on nuclear power. Jan. 18 1911 First aircraft landing on board a ship, armored cruiser USS Pennsylvania (CA-4), by aviator Eugene Ely. 1968 Operation Coronado X begins in Mekong Delta, Vietnam 1977 The Trident (C-4) missile development flight test program commenced when C4X-1 was launched from a flight pad at Cape Canaveral. 1991 USS Nicholas attacks and captures Iraqi oil platforms. Jan. 19 1840 Lt. Charles Wilkes is first American to dis cover Antarctic coast. Jan. 20 1783 Hostilities cease between Great Britain and the United States. 1903 Theodore Roosevelt issues executive order placing the Midway Islands under jurisdiction of the Navy Department. 1914 School for naval air training opens in Pensacola, Fla. 1948 Establishment of U.S. Persian Gulf Area Command (later changed to Middle East Force in August 1948). Jan. 21 1954 Launching of Nautilus (SSN-571), the first nuclear submarine, at Groton, Conn. 1961 USS George Washington (SSBN-598) com pletes first operational voyage of fleet ballistic missile submarine, operating submerged 66 days. Jan. 22 1800 Capt. Thomas Tingey ordered to duty as first superintendent of the Washington Navy Yard 1944 Operation Shingle, the allied landing at Anzio, Italy. On New Years Eve, a round-up of 2013 trending stories and people includ ing Miley Cyrus, Paula Deen and Phil Robertson got me thinking and dis couraged. There are so many wonderful, quiet stories in communities across the coun try that never trend. The search terms dont auto-fill on Google. The people behind the stories are hardly household names. And yet, these stories are certain ly more fascinating than Miley Cyrus and her twerking. Three of these quiet stories that I witnessed this past year are below. First, in October, our family met and had dinner with David Cote, a major in the Marine Corps and the 2011 Military Times Marine of the Year. A go-getter since he started his own paper route in Bangor, Maine, at the age of eight, Cote later became an Eagle Scout in high school. Now, the young major is embark ing on his biggest and most important feat yet: The Summit Project. The Summit Project is a living memo rial to honor every service member from the state of Maine who lost their life in service to our country since 9/11. Families of the service members select a rock from a special location camp, backyard, a nearby path that reminds them of their loved one. Cote meets with the families, hears their stories, then he engraves each of the rocks with the service members initials and birth and death years. On Memorial Day 2014, Cote and a group of hikers will carry the rocks up Mt. Katahdin in Millinocket, Maine. We will honor the fallen by challeng ing the living, Cote told us. (Some of the rocks weigh close to 20 pounds.) Cote remembers the stories, the names and the circumstances behind every rock. He has the service members aspi rations, interests and heroism engraved, in a way, on his own heart. In a world full of celebrities, Cote told us that his definition of success is not guided by pop culture or material things. Its guided by living a life of service. Next, in November, our family met Katie and Alex Hall, grown siblings who are legally blind. Katie has a very narrow field of vision, but Alex is almost com pletely blind. He can only see light and some movement. The thought of living without sight might cause some to believe they would give up. Certainly, before we met Katie and Alex, the boys and I couldnt imagine not being able to see. But Alex and Katie marveled us with their fearlessness and determination to live as fully as someone who has 20/20 vision. Alex even used to ride a bike, yes, while blind! He shovels snow and bakes pies, with only his sense of touch, smell and hearing to guide him. Today, Katie is going to school to study nutrition, and Alex works to help others with visual impairments master Braille and technology. But perhaps the quietest, most unex pected story I encountered in 2013 hap pened in late November, when I had din ner at a local retirement home. I shared a table with a 101-year old man who delighted me with a centurys worth of tidbits and trivia. Later, after dinner, a woman asked me to come see her room. I knew I needed to get home to my boys, and I was in a rush, but I told her Id pop in for a minute. Inside this womans room were dozens of paintings lining the walls. The paint ings were of a younger woman with a face I recognized in the older woman beside me. The portraits were painted by her late husband and they were elegant. Without even knowing her husband, and barely knowing the woman herself, the love and history between them was clear ly visible in the carefully displayed pic tures. The man even painted one of the pictures while he was a prisoner in World War II. I was in awe. Outside, the world flew by. Cars honked. People rushed home and grum bled about the traffic. But there, tucked away inside that retirement home was a tiny one-bedroom apartment filled with a couples and part of the worlds history. My hope for 2014 is that our culture will begin to value stories like these above the latest, trending celebrities and their pub lic faux pas. These stories arent flashy. You wont find them on Google. But if everyone could come across people like Major Cote and the Halls, or stories like the elderly woman with a room full of painted memories, as eas ily as they come across the definition of twerking I believe our world would be a better place. The quiet stories of 2013 The Veterans Oral History Project was created by the United States Congress in 2000. This project of the Library of Congress and American Folklife Center collects, preserves and makes accessible the personal accounts of American war veterans so that future generations may hear directly from veterans and better understand the realities of war. The objective of this program is collecting first-hand video and/or audio accounts of U.S. Veterans on behalf of the Library of Congress. Volunteers are used to conduct inter views for the Library of Congress. The project collects first-hand accounts of U.S. veterans from the following wars: Korean War (1950-55) Persian Gulf War (1990-1995) (2001-present) U.S. citizen civilians who were actively involved in supporting war efforts (such as war industry work ers, USO workers, flight instructors, medical volunteers, etc.) are also invited to share their valuable sto ries. To volunteer to help with this proj ect, please register with HandsOn Jacksonville and attend a volunteer interviewer training workshop con ducted by Dr. Annette Fromm with the Library of Congress/American Folklore Society Jan. 23 from 9 a.m. to noon or 1-4 p.m. in the NAS Jacksonville Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society conference room in Building 13 located to the immedi ate left just prior to entering the NAS Jacksonville Main Gate. To register, please send an e-mail with your full name, email address, phone number and session attend ing, to Richard@handsonjackson ville.org.Volunteer interviewers needed for oral history project For service members, veter ans, and their dependents, there are many scholarship opportuni ties available from a wide-variety of organizations. If you have met your tuition assistance cap for the year, or are looking for additional fund ing sources for your education, these scholarship programs may provide you and your family with many options to pursue higher education and professional development. The Navy College Office has 10 copies of a book published specif ically for veteran, active duty, and dependent scholarships. There are more than 8,500 military, active duty, veteran, and dependent schol arships in variety of programs. These guides are available at the Navy College Office and may be checkedout for two weeks at a time. Additionally, Navy Knowledge Online (NKO) maintains a database of over 1.7 million scholarships that are worth a total of 8 million dollars. Below are the directions for com pleting a search for scholarships on NKO. Some are just for aviators, Seabees, those assigned to heli copter units, or residents of certain states. They fall under several different categories, which will allow Sailors, veterans and dependents to search different categories in able to locate programs best suited for their needs. Log-into NKO: Click on Learning tab at top of page Scroll down a little and Click on orange Petersons Lifelong Learning block Click on Scholarship tab under the caption that says Educational Searches Click on Undergraduate Scholarship Search Enter different key words, such as military, dependent, Sailor, Navy, aviation, helicopter, a state name, the name of a college major, or certain organizations to which you may belong.A quick guide to scholarship opportunities

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VP-30 wings Navys newest naval flight officersOn Dec. 13, VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Curtis Phillips and Cmdr. David Whitehead, aviation officer community manager awarded naval flight officer (NFO) wings to the following 13 officers: Ensigns John Bernier, William Buehn, Nicholas Carver, Margo Cortijo, Allen Cutman, Louis Gao, Bryan Hamby, Derek Kalbfleisch, Anthony Montes, Shane Polzin, Brenna Williams and CWO2 Jeff Muenchrath. The recipients completed the undergraduate mari time flight officer syllabus at VP-30, earning their cov eted wings of gold. These newly winged aviators will now enroll in the CAT I Fleet Replacement Squadron syllabus at VP-30. Upon completion of the CAT I syllabus, they will report to operational maritime patrol and reconnais sance squadrons to begin their initial sea tours in either Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, Whidbey Island, Wash. or Jacksonville. The NFO training pipeline begins with aviation pre flight introduction (API) instruction in Pensacola, Fla. where all aviation officers undergo a classroom syl labus and are taught the basics of naval aviation which includes aerodynamics, meteorology and principles of navigation. After completing API, all student NFOs report for primary training at VT-10, co-located at NAS Pensacola. While assigned to VT-10, they transition from a classroom learning environment to initial airborne flight training in the T-6A Texan II. Upon completion of primary flight training at NAS Pensacola, officers who are selected for the P-3, EP-3 or P-8 training pipe line report to VP-30 for specific aircraft training. NAS Jacksonville announces an informational meeting to review the U. S. Navy proposal to establish a small defined search and rescue training (SAR) area in the St. Johns River offshore of NAS Jacksonville, that would limit public access in order to support congres sional mandated search and rescue training. Establishment of the search and rescue training area would prevent anchoring of objects, such as crab traps, or unmanned vessels in the training area to help trainees avoid injury and prevent equipment damage. All fishermen, boaters and the general public are invited and encouraged to attend the meeting. What: Informational Meeting When: Feb. 19 Time: 5:30-7:30 p.m. Where: South Mandarin Library, 12125 San Jose Boulevard, Jacksonville, FL 32223. For further information about this public meeting send an email to stephen.biemiller@navy.mil. Public comments will be accepted until March 31, 2014 at NAVFAC_SE_SAR_PROJ@navy.mil or via reg ular mail at NAVFACSE SAR Training Area, NEPA Program Manager (EV21), P.O. Box 30, Jacksonville, FL 32212-0030.SAR information meeting announced Jaguar player to visit commissaryJacksonville Jaguars Defensive Back Ryan Davis will visit the NAS Jax Commissary Jan. 24 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. to meet military members and their families. Davis will be available for autographs and photos with commissary patrons. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 16, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 16, 2014 Navy Exchange associates cater to customersSince its inception in 1946, the Navy Exchange Service Commands (NEXCOM) goal has been to make every patron a customer for life. To accomplish that, we work hard everyday to become your first choice for shopping, said Marsha Brooks, Navy Exchange (NEX) general manager at NAS Jacksonville. Our mission has always been to provide NEX customers with quality goods and services at a savings as well as contribute to Navy quality of life programs. She said that military members, retirees and their families save an average of 23 percent on all the prod ucts they purchase, not including sales tax. In addition, our pricing strategy ensures that you get the best brands at the best buys. The NEX carries merchandise in all price ranges, so we have a range of products and services to fit everyones budget, added Brooks. When shoppers think about the NEX, most recall the centrally located main exchange that includes depart ments such as the uniform shop, barber/beauty shop, dry cleaning, cosmetics, electronics, jewelry, floral shop and personalized services. However, the NEX also encompasses the Food Court, Home and Garden Center, Car Care Center, Navy Lodge, Enterprise Rental Services, NExpress, as well as the mini-mart and coffee kiosk at Naval Hospital Jacksonville. The Navy Exchange Service Command announc es the NEX customer satisfaction index (CSI) each January and according to Brooks, the NAS Jax NEX was rated as one of the best worldwide. The Navy Exchange Enterprise achieved an overall score of 85, which when compared to industry stan dards is extremely high. Im very proud to announce that the customer satisfaction index score for the Jacksonville complex is an 87, our highest ever, pro claimed Brooks. NEX associates will use this survey information to continue to better serve its customers. While Im extremely proud of the Jacksonville Associate Team for delivering premier customer ser vice to our military patrons as reflected in our overall score, we will be receiving more specific information in the next few weeks on key metrics that will identify areas for improvement, Brooks stated. We utilize the customer feedback specific to our location to create an action plan to focus on elements that we can address at the local level with our associate team. The information obtained through the CSI and online shopping surveys indicate the importance NEX facilities are to patrons.The placement of the minimarts offer convenience, while the specialization of products and services at the Home and Garden Center, Car Care Center and Navy Lodge offer our patrons quality goods and services with one stop shopping on base. The Food Court, McDonalds, Subway, GNC and Enterprise Car Rental are just a few of the public private ventures included in the NEX portfolio and are important services available to our patrons, said Brooks. Within the next year, patrons will see many new ser vices and initiatives promoted at the NAS Jax NEX to better serve the customers. We are excited about 2014!The NEX commitment to improving business processes and creating a culture of premier customer service will continue to be top pri orities.Our complex is part of the worldwide deploy ment of a new point of sale system, that will streamline the patron checkout process at the registers.We are scheduled for roll out to begin here and at NS Mayport in April, explained Brooks. The NEX is also supporting the Secretary of the Navys 21st Century Sailor and Marine Initiative by creating the A Better You campaign that expanded healthy food alternatives, vitamins and supplements and offers more athletic equipment, clothing and foot wear to promote fitness and a healthier lifestyle. According to Brooks, her team strives to keep cus tomers happy so they continue to shop on base. One challenge our patrons have communicated through the CSI survey is to become more competi tively priced in a few key departments and to have new items that are available in the marketplace.Our buying and merchandising teams have worked closely with our vendor partners to have the right merchan dise, at the right price and at the right time, said Brooks. We offer a wide array of brand names at great prices in virtually every department. On Jan. 1, the NEX introduced the New Lower Price program.Hundreds of highly recognized items have been reduced throughout the store.Look for this program to contin ue to add even more items that families use every day. In addition, your Navy Exchange will match prices of any local competitor on the exact same item should you find a lower advertised price, she added. One of the most important benefits of shopping at the Navy Exchange is that a significant portion of the profit goes directly to support Morale, Welfare and Recreation programs. When you shop here, you help support Navy quality of life programs. Since 1946, NEXCOM has contributed more than $2.2 billion to Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation programs, concluded Brooks.Hours of Operation Main NEX store: Monday Saturday, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., Sunday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Laundry/dry cleaning: Monday Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Car Care Center: MondaySaturday, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., Sunday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 16, 2014 5 General Manager Bldg. 987 ......................... 777-7211 Admin .......................................... 777-7200 Barber Shop Bldg. 987 ............................. 777-7228 Beauty Salon Bldg. 987 ............................ 777-7228 Beverage Mart Bldg. 987 ........................... 777-7286 Camera Department Bldg. 987 ...................... 777-7289 Car Care Center Bldg. 429 .................... 777-7142/46/47 Car Rental Bldg. 1000 ............................. 772-7007 Childrens Department ............................. 777-7298 Convenience Store Bldg. 987 ....................... 777-7286 Cosmetics Bldg. 987 ............................... 777-7291 Customer Service Bldg. 987 ........................ 777-7286 Flower Shop Bldg. 987 ............................. 777-7225 Food Court Bldg. 987 ............................... 771-7458 Furniture Store Bldg. 987 ........................... 777-6605 Garden Center Bldg. 429 ........................... 777-7293 Hospital Retail Store ............................... 542-7821 Jewelry/Cosmetic Department Bldg. 987 .......... 777-4041/7042 Ladies Department Bldg. 987 ....................... 777-7055 Laundry/Dry Cleaning Bldg. 987 ..................... 777-7229 Mens Wear Dept Bldg. 987 ......................... 777-7296 Navy Lodge Bldg. 802 ............................. 772-6000 Reservations ............................... 1-800-NAVY-INN Optical Shop Bldg. 987 ............................ 777-7232 NEXPRESS Bldg. 931 ............................... 777-7294 Personalized Services Bldg. 987 ..................... 777-7222 Service Station Bldg. 987 .................. 777-7142/7146/7147 Shoe Department Bldg. 987 ......................... 777-7287 Electronics Bldg. 987 .............................. 777-7289 Special Orders Bldg. 987 ............................ 777-7281 Sporting Goods Bldg. 987 .......................... 777-7286 Tailor Shop Bldg. 987 .............................. 777-7009 Toy Department Bldg. 987 .......................... 777-7286 Uniform Shop Bldg. 987 ............................ 777-7295Get in touch with NEX Photos by AE2 Samantha Jones and MC2 Amanda Cabasos

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VP-30 Sailors from the Avionics Technician and Aviation Electrician Shops have came together to help people in need during holiday sea son by volunteering at the Clara White Mission to feed hundreds of individuals on numerous occasions from October to December. Donating more than 55 man-hours of work, Sailors served meals, bussed tables, mopped floors and repaired broken bicycles. ATC(AW/SW) Charles Chadwick is pleased at the proactive approach his junior Sailors are taking towards serv ing the community. I believe that every Sailor needs to be involved in their community; it makes for a well-round ed individual. It gives us an opportu nity to realize how good we have it, said Chadwick. Located in downtown Jacksonville, the Clara White Mission provides hot, nutritious meals seven days a week. In addition to meals, they also provide housing and job-training programs to individuals 18 years of age and older with special priority given to veterans. The Clara White Mission takes pride in being the only veterans drop-in day center in Jacksonville, providing sup portive services to homeless veterans in need. Our mission statement is to restore those in need to meaningful, dignified lives in the community, said Merle Wright, Clara White Mission vol unteer coordinator. Wright knows what it means to serve. Before dedicating her life to serving the community as Clara White Missions volunteer coordinator, she served in the United States Marine Corps. Wright is extremely thankful for the time VP-30 has spent volunteering. We could not do what we do without the help of our volunteers. It means a lot to them [the veterans in their program] that other veterans are helping them and that other military personnel are there for them, she stated. Chadwick feels that helping veterans is an important aspect of being a good Sailor and that it gives the Sailors a more in depth sense of purpose. Military ser vice has a lot to do with heritage and tra ditions. You always honor the past and helping veterans is one way to do that, said Chadwick. The Clara White Mission desperately depends on members of the community to volunteer their time and talents to help achieve their humanitarian goals. In addition to helping those in need, young Sailors gain an appreciation of their own life and an understanding of the hardships that some members of society face. Before volunteering at the Clara White Mission, AN Nicole Agee wasnt fully aware of the homeless situation in Jacksonville. There were more people there than I expected to see; it was sad see ing how many people were so bad off. It broadened my horizons. You think of it [homelessness], but it never affects you because youre not in their situation, said Agee. AT3 Class Dena Bivens felt she gained a new perspective about what it means to be homeless and what kinds of people are homeless. Bivens stated, I saw several families there with very small children, maybe 3 or 4 years old, with a single parent. It made me realize that there are families that need help too. For AN Zachary Howland one volun teering moment especially stands out in his mind. A guy came up to me and asked me where he could find shoes for his kid; it hit home right then, said Howland. He feels that volunteering is a way of becoming a part of humanity. He con tinued, I wish that I could say that Ive done more, but I havent. By using your hands, head and heart, you can allevi ate a little bit of the suffering that takes place. Howland plans to continue volunteer ing wherever he can. For more information on the Clara White Mission and volunteering oppor tunities, call (904) 354-4162 or visit www.clarawhitemission.org. St. Johns River blue crab trap closure starts on Jan. 16 Recreational and commercial blue crab traps in all waters of the St. Johns River system must be removed from the water before Jan. 16, the first day of a 10-day trap clo sure. This closure will give groups authorized by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) the opportunity to identify and retrieve lost and abandoned blue crab traps from the water. The closure includes all waters of the St. Johns River system, its asso ciated lakes and tributaries from west of the St. Johns Rivers inter section with the Intercoastal Canal through and including Lake Hellen Blazes in Brevard County. Traps can be placed back in the water in this area starting Jan. 26, though closures may be reduced in duration if it is determined that the number of lost and abandoned traps in the region will take less time to remove. Until the trap sea son reopens, blue crabs may be harvested with other gear, such as dip nets and fold-up traps. Blue crab harvesters may also use stan dard blue crab traps during the closure if the traps are attached to a dock or other private property. Lost and abandoned blue crab traps are a problem in the blue crab fishery because they can con tinue to trap crabs and fish when left in the water. They can also be unsightly in the marine environ ment, damage sensitive habitats and pose navigational hazards to boaters on the water. The closure is one of three regional, 10-day blue crab trap closures that occur in 2014 on the Atlantic coast of Florida. There are six regional closures total: three in odd-numbered years on the west coast and three in even-numbered years on the east coast. VP-30 Sailors find new ways to give back NAS Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Tina Vaughn held the first Coffee with the SARC network session with unit Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Program victim advocates Jan. 7 at the Fleet and Family Support Center. During the session, victim advocates met with the victims legal counsel, Lt. Nicholas Smith who provides legal advice and advocacy for eligible victims of sexual assault as request ed by victims. The Victims Legal Counsel helps victims understand the inves tigation and military justice pro cess, advocate their legal rights and interests and, when appro priate, appear in court on their behalf. Victims may speak with the Victims Legal Counsel prior to selecting a reporting option for sexual assault. Victim advocates were also introduced to civilian SAPR Victim Advocate LaTresa Henderson, who serves as an addi tional resource for sexual assault victims. Henderson provides advo cacy and support throughout a sex ual assault case and offers training as requested by commands. The event gave SAPR victim Network session held for SAPR victim advocates 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 16, 2014

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Commander, Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (HST CSG) visit ed French aircraft carrier FS Charles de Gaulle while the ship was operating with USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Dec. 30. Rear Adm. Kevin Sweeney visited the aircraft carrier to meet Task Force 473 commander French navy Rear Adm. Eric Chaperon, and to gain additional insight on the operations of USS Charles de Gaulle. Our two aircraft carriers and asso ciated ships are operating together now here in the Gulf of Oman, said Sweeney. Being able to conduct strike group operations side-by-side will ultimately help improve regional maritime secu rity and stability and also strengthen trust and confidence with our partners in the region. While on board, Sweeney met with Chaperon, visited with French staff, and learned more about the capabili ties of the embarked Rafale and Super Etendard jet fighters including how they operate, launch and recover. It was certainly an eye opening experience to see how one of our closest allies employs a carrier strike group and how we can build a more effective part nership, said Sweeney. The aim of the mission is far beyond conducting a couple of exercises; it is about developing the ability of the two CSG to realize integrated operations should the need arise, said Chaperon. This is a huge challenge but all the conditions are met to overcome it. In addition to its flagship Charles de Gaulle, Task Force 473 is comprised of the destroyers FS Forbin (D 620) and Jean de Vienne (D 643), and replenish ment oiler FS Meuse (A 607). HST CSG is comprised of its flagship, aircraft carrier Harry S. Truman, the guided-missile destroyers USS Mason (DDG 87) and USS Bulkeley (DDG 84), the guided-missile cruisers USS Gettysburg (CG 64) and USS San Jacinto (CG 56) and the embarked Carrier Air Wing 3 which includes Strike Fighter Squadrons (VFA) 32 Swordsmen, VFA-37 Ragin Bulls, and VFA-105 Gunslingers, Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 312 Checkerboards, Airborne Early Warning Squadron 126 Seahawks, Electronic Attack Squadron 130 Zappers, Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 7 Dusty Dogs, and Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 74 Swamp Foxes. HST CSG is forward-deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility where it is conducting maritime securi ty operations, supporting theater secu rity cooperation efforts and supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. HST Carrier Strike Group commander visits French carrier JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 16, 2014 7

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Wiese has commanded CPRW-11 since June 29, 2012 and has successfully led CPRW-11 squadrons in the execu tion of more than 6,000 hours of mis hap-free flying supporting eight major fleet exercises and readiness evalua tions by U.S. Fleet Forces Command. Most notably, squadrons under his command have successfully deployed six times in support of all geographic combatant commanders. CPRW-11 forces participated in a vari ety of multi-national exercises and real world events. His leadership was instrumental to the transition of three maritime patrol and reconnaissance squadrons from the P-3C to the P-8A and future Broad Area Maritime Surveillance Unmanned Arial System, critical to the future suc cess maritime patrol and reconnais sance aviation. Additionally, Wiese has volunteered countless hours to mili tary initiatives and outreach programs within the local community, solidifying the Navys relationship with local and national leaders. Wieses next assignment will be will be at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. CPRW-11The bullet shredded his kidney, severely damaged one-third of his colon and severed a major artery, disrupting blood flow to his right leg. His lower right leg was amputated, and Parks spent four months recovering from his wounds and learning how to use a pros thetic limb. The night it happened, my wife gave me a coupon and told me to remember to pick up milk, Parks recalls. When I was running out the door I said, Bye baby; I love you. I didnt come home for four months. Parks is enrolled in Navy Wounded Warrior (NWW) Safe Harbor, the Navy and Coast Guards wounded warrior support program. Many NWW enrollees, like Parks, were not wounded in combat; the pro gram also supports service members who are diagnosed with a serious ill ness or have been injured in shipboard, liberty or training accidents. All enrollees in NWW are encour aged to make adaptive athletics, which has many proven benefits, part of their recovery and rehabilitation efforts. NWW connects wounded war riors to adaptive athletic opportunities throughout the country. The Wounded Warrior Pacific Trials are jointly hosted by NWW and Navy Region Hawaii. At the Wounded Warrior Pacific Invitational this week, wounded war riors are going head-to-head in a variety of sports, including as cycling; seated volleyball; swimming; track and field; and wheelchair basketball. Every ath lete will receive a participation medal lion at the conclusion of the event. This is event is one of many lead ing up to the Warrior Games, which will take place this fall, said NWW Cross-functional Division Lead Marty Martinez. Brett has demonstrated tons of potential on the playing field, but, more importantly, he has a great atti tude. Its a lot of fun to compete along side him. In addition to his athletic ambitions, Parks also has written a book about his experiences. Its working title is Training for Life, and Parks has been reaching out to various publishers. Before I was wounded, I was the strongest I ever have been, said Parks. My training before the incident physi cally, spiritually and emotionally pre pared me for the challenge I would face. My doctors told me that I might not have survived if I hadnt been in such good shape. It is true of anything in life: You need to be prepared, set a goal, never quit and find spiritual strength. With those four things, you can beat almost any thing, he added. Parks also has established an orga nization called Second Shot Ministry, which enables him to share his faith and journey to recovery. He serves as a motivational speaker at local schools, churches and companies. The organi zations name has multiple meanings; literally, it refers to the second shot that missed him, and figuratively, it symbol izes his second chance at life. I am on Earth for a reason, and its to spread a message of hope, said Parks. PARKS Twenty-seven Sailors from VP-8 assigned to Cooperative Security Location in Comalapa, El Salvador completed much-needed repairs Jan. 4 to an orphanage in San Salvador. The Sailors from VP-8, also known as the Fighting Tigers, paint ed four rooms at the Love and Hope Orphanage, which 21 children call home. They also installed lighting in a courtyard, showed a movie, and played tag and other games with the children. It was a great opportunity to help improve the living conditions of the children and spend some quality time with them, said Lt. j.g. Jeremy Cooper, a naval flight officer with VP-8. Being able to see the excitement and joy on the childrens faces has been one of the most rewarding experiences of this deployment. The Love and Hope childrens home cares for orphaned, abused, abandoned and neglected children. Many of the children have been saved from emo tional and physical neglect and many more will be saved in the future due to The Love and Hope Orphanage. We were really excited to be able to get out and do something good for the community, said AWO2 Alana Rondon. Being able to interact with the children was a lot of fun as well as gratifying. The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 are cur rently deployed to the 4th and 5th Fleet areas of responsibility, assisting in counter-drug efforts and providing humanitarian assistance. VP-8 volunteers at Love and Hope Childrens Home advocates the opportuni ty to meet with the SARC, receive updates and ask questions about the SAPR Program. For more information on the SAPR program, visit www.sapr.mil To become a unit SAPR vic tim advocate, please con tact Vaughn at 542-4717 or tina.c.vaughn@navy.mil The Victims Legal Counsel may be reached at 542-5430 or nicholas.f.smith@navy.mil For SAPR training, call the NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center at 542-5745. Victims of sexu al assault may contact the SAFE Helpline at 1-877995-5247.Prepare now for tax season, DoD official advises With the arrival of tax season, service members should begin gathering documentation to file their 2013 taxes, the director of the Pentagons office of family policy and children and youth said Jan. 9. In an interview with American Forces Press Service and the Pentagon Channel, Barbara Thompson suggest ed visiting the Military OneSource website for tax filing resources, and to learn what will be necessary to file, such as W2 forms, Social Security numbers and receipts for deductions such as child care, education, medical expenses and donations, among other write-offs. And tax preparers at Military OneSource will do short-form tax filing free of charge for service members and their families, Thompson said. Relocations and deployments have tax implications, Thompson noted. For example, deployed service mem bers can receive an extension to file taxes after the normal April 15 filing date, she said. Its very helpful to have someone who is experienced to help you through the cumbersome issue of taxes and tax returns, she added. The tax preparers at Military OneSource are up to date on changes in tax laws, and can answer militaryspecific questions, Thompson said. Installations also offer volunteer income tax assis tance to service members and their families, while certain banks and credit unions provide education and training on tax preparation, Thompson said. She advised that service members organize their taxes by starting a file beginning each Jan. 1 for the following years tax papers, such as receipts and other write-offs. You dont want to wait until the last minute, she said. Service members and families who prepare long-form taxes with deductions such as mortgages and rental properties might want to consider hiring a tax expert to file for them, Thompson said. Its best to get advice to make sure you have everything covered, she added. People who do their own taxes need to stay on top of current tax information, Thompson said. Sometimes tax laws change, so you have to be really smart about doing your own taxes, she added. States tax laws often vary, too, she said, and because of relocations, some service members have to file local taxes in more than one state. Thats where [tax consultants] can really be of great value to make sure you know what the requirements are for states, Thompson said. Filing federal and state tax returns usually results in either a tax refund or money owed back to the government. Expecting to receive a tax refund, but instead finding out that money is owed can be a shock, Thompson said. Looking at W2s to determine how much money in taxes is being withheld is a good indica tor of whether or not one will owe money, she suggested. Service members who receive a tax refund face important decisions on what to do with the money, Thompson said. Do you use it to buy down debt, or put it in a savings account? she asked, advising people to not blow their tax refunds in a spending frenzy of unnecessary pur chases. A tax refund also can be deposited into a retirement savings account, she added. Its important to think about what youre going to do with that money, she advised, and how you can best utilize it for your finan cial well-being. Meeting with a financial planner to learn the lay of the land, and what tax deductions might apply to a ser vice members finances is a good idea, Thompson said. Its really important to be savvy about that. SAPR 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 16, 2014

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Registration for all levels of the Navy Ortega Lakeshore (NOL) Little League Baseball and Softball is now underway at the NOL Clubhouse on Allegheny Rd. at NAS Jax or at Lillians Restaurant, 5393 Roosevelt Blvd. Register in person Jan. 18, 25 or Feb. 1, from 10 a.m. to noon. Or register online at www.noljax.org For more info, email noljax@gmail.com Baseball Divisions Boys and Girls Softball Divisions Girls Challenger Division NOL is open to active and reserve military families, plus, residents of Little League registration now underway Capt. Eric Wiese, commodore last operational flight aboard NAS Jacksonville. highlights of his last week in he assumed on June 29, 2012. Wieses last flight with the career in maritime patrol avia tion full circle, since he started his aviation career as a junior Some of the recent highlights of his tour include transitioning the first three patrol squadrons to initial operational capacity. During the approximate trained for missions in both maritime domain awareness and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance off the eastern coast of Florida. Lt. Connor ODonnell, patrol plane commander of the flight, described the experience as, Lt. Daniel Baker, patrol plane pilot, added, Having the opportunity to fly with Capt. Wiese on his last flight was an honor and a privilege. He has been extremely supportive of As aircraft 289 taxied back to Hangar 1000 at NAS Jacksonville, it was showered by two fire trucks as a signal of farewell to the commodore. Wiese was greeted by his wife and two sons, each waiting to spray him with a bottle of champagne as a large group of Wiese and his family will be moving to Washington, D.C., where he will be taking on a Sean Liedman is succeed change of command ceremony Commodore makes final operational flight Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles Exchange will close its lobby Jan. 2225 to facilitate pharmacy automation upgrades. up window will remain open during scriptions will continue to be accepted. NH Jacksonvilles Outpatient and will remain open during its normal scription fills should go to Outpatient Satellite Pharmacy lobby closing for improvements JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 16, 2014 9

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The Career Management System Interactive Detailing (CMS-ID) application phase is scheduled to remain open through 5 a.m. Central time, Jan. 21 for active duty and Full-Time Support Sailors in their orders-negotiation window, officials said. Enlisted Sailors use CMS-ID to review and apply for permanent change-of-station (PCS) orders online. Sailors may access the website at https://www.cmsid.navy.mil or from the CMS/ID link at www.npc.navy. mil. Eligible Sailors may review advertised billets in CMS-ID during the application phase and apply for up to five jobs, either directly using CMS-ID, through a com mand career counselor (CCC), or through direct interaction with the detailer, who can make an application on the Sailors behalf. CMS-ID features a Sailor Preference section under the Sailor Info Tab where Sailors may rank duty preferences by type, command, location, platform and com munity, as well as indicate which special programs and schools they would like and leave comments for the detailer. Detailers will always attempt to fill bil lets using a Sailors desired selections first; however, Fleet readiness require ments are the guiding factor in filling bil lets. Detailers must also follow sea-shore flow guidelines outlined in NAVADMIN 361/12, so unless a Sailor requests Sea Duty Incentive Pay or the Voluntary Sea Duty Program to take consecutive sea duty orders, a Sailor up for shore duty should not be involuntarily assigned another sea tour. It may mean a Sailor hoping for shore duty in Hawaii or Washington may receive shore duty someplace else, where the need is greater. A single set of sea billets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command, and a single set of shore billets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command and the Bureau of Naval Personnel are advertised each application cycle in CMS-ID as the Navy seeks to fill gaps at sea and place Sailors with the right experience levels and skill sets into highpriority Fleet billets. Some factors a detailer weighs when matching Sailors to jobs include the Sailors desires, qualifications, training availability, career progression, command preference and cost to the Navy. Detailers will not assign Sailors to adver tised jobs until after the close of the CMSID application phase, during the detailer selection phase. Sailors may log into CMSID anytime after the detailer selection phase to see if they have been selected for orders. Commands also have the ability to rank and add comments to applications for jobs at their command. This process can occur throughout the Sailor Application Phase, and there is a brief period after Sailor appli cations are shut off before Detailers com mence selections when commands alone are allowed access to apply comments and ranking to each application for their com mand. Command input is another factor that Detailers use when making their selec tions. Sailors can learn more about CMS-ID from their CCC or access CMS-ID by select ing the CMS-ID link on the NPC website at www.npc.navy.mil.January application phase opens for Sailors seeking orders JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 16, 2014 13

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Lighter than its bulky pre decessor, the Navys rede signed Aircrew Endurance (AE) Survival Vest recently attained initial operational capabil ity (IOC), a key milestone in the development of the lifesaving equipment, the Navy announced Dec. 18. The upgraded AE survival vest provides improved ballis tic-protection, superior load distribution and a new univer sal color for deployment in a wider variety of terrain, Navy officials said, adding that the improvements will decrease the physical burden on rotarywing aircrew during extended missions. IOC status, a pivotal gauge in the military procurement pro cess, is achieved when a sys tem or product can meet the operational capabilities for users before proceeding to full operational capability (FOC). With IOC reached Nov. 27, the AE vest is scheduled to achieve FOC during the first quarter of 2016. The Aircrew Systems Program Office [PMA-202] is focused on identifying solu tions to improve performance and safety for the human ele ment of the weapons system, said Capt. Nora Burghardt, program manager for PMA202, which is aligned under the Naval Air Systems Command based at NAS Patuxent River, Md. Under the Aircrew Endurance program, the Navy will field a family of products all focused on reducing physi cal fatigue and stress during longer missions now being con ducted by Navy and Marine Corps aircrew. The new AE system resolves deficiencies existing in lega cy aircrew survival vests and fields upgraded armor protection. Two configurations of the new AE system are being deployed, one for mobile air crew and another for those air crew who remain seated dur ing flight. The AE mobile air crew vest weighs 29.6 pounds and the AE seated version 19.5 pounds about 7 pounds light er than legacy AIRSAVE sur vival vests. Worn over the flight suit, the vest provides protection from shrapnel and bullets. The mobile crewman configuration provides an 80-inch tether con nection to the aircraft allowing crewmembers to move freely about the cabin as they carry out normal duties. It prevents ejection from the aircraft in a crash and incorporates a quickdisconnection release from the aircraft during an emergency egress. As a survival item, the vest provides locations to carry emergency signaling devices, radios, medical kit, emergency underwater breathing devices and an inflatable life preserver. In a rescue situation, the vest provides a harness used for hoisting the aircrew into a res cue helicopter. PMA-202 manages all sys tems that directly support the aircrew, troops and passengers in the performance of their missions. The program office supports more than 780 prod ucts common to many naval aircraft platforms and aircrew, including ejection seats, flight deck cranials, flight deck and aircrew clothing, as well as chemical, biological and nucle ar protective equipment. Did you know that Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles award-winning Wellness Center and Health Promotions offers individual and group classes that center on improv ing your health? Classes include tobacco cessation, weight management, health fitness and nutrition. The following classes are offered throughout the year: Choose My Plate (appoint ment or walk-in): Basic nutri tionone-hour Health Fitness Assessment (appointment only): Body mass, exercise and basic nutrition two-day class (one individual session and one group session) Healthy Heart (appointment or walk-in): Cholesterol man agement90-minutes Sail A Weigh (appointment only): Healthy lifestyle/weight management six weeks (one hour per week) ShipShape (appointment only): Weight management eight weeks (one hour per week) Tobacco Cessation (appoint ment or walk-in): Monday, 9 a.m.; Tuesday, 1 p.m.; Thursday, noon.For more information or to make an appointment, call (904) 542-5292 or visit NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center located at Building 867, adjacent to the NAS Jacksonville fitness center. Navys redesigned aircrew endurance survival vest reaches key milestone Naval Hospital Jacksonville invites you to get fit in 2014 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 16, 2014

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live enter tainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaoke DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Super Bowl Party Feb. 2, 5 p.m., $10 per person Door prizes, buffet and beverage spe cials Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Jan. 18, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: Jan. 25, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Powerlifting Competition Feb. 8, 7 a.m. at the Fitness Center $10 registration feeI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Gatornationals March 1416 $30 $58 Yahala Country Bakery Trip Jan. 25 $25 per person Disney Jr. Live $15 $29 Monster Jam $22 $42 Wild Adventures $30 $70 Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket $166 $194.50 Universal Orlando $114 $169.50 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Daytona 500 $62 $209 Drive 4COPD 300 $55 Budweiser Duels $55 Sprint Unlimited $30 $55 Rolex 24 $32 $65 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 The Artist Series Broadway in Jacksonville 2014 season, select shows Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2014 season, select shows Armed Forces Vacation Club www. afvclub.com $349 $369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 Ripleys St. Augustine $4.25 $7.50 St. Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Wild Florida Airboats $17 $46.50 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels located near attrac tions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restrict ed to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus Jan. 18, 6 p.m. $5 per person Grill & Chill at the Liberty Center Jan. 23, 6 p.m. Free hamburgers and hotdogs St. Augustine Night of Lights Trip Jan. 25, 6 p.m. Free NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Daily Twilight Golf Special Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1 p.m. Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty Jan. 18 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests Jan. 16 & 30Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you!Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person Applications for the 2014 Scholarships for Military Children Program are now available at commissaries worldwide or at http://www.militaryscholar.org Applications must be turned in to a commissary by close of business Feb. 28, 2014. Packages must be hand-deliv ered or shipped via U.S. Postal Service or other delivery methods, not emailed or faxed. This years award amount has risen to $2,000, and the program awards at least one scholarship at each commissary with qualified applicants. An applicant must be a dependent, unmarried child, younger than 23, if enrolled as a full-time student at a col lege or university, of a service member on active duty, Reserve or Guard mem ber, retiree or survivor of a military member who died while on active duty, or survivor of a retiree. Applicants should ensure that they and their sponsor are enrolled in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System database and have a military ID card. The applicant must attend or plan to attend an accredit ed college or university, full time, in the fall of 2014 or be enrolled in studies designed to transfer to a four-year pro gram. Fisher House Foundation, a nonprofit organization that helps service mem bers and their families, administers the program. Scholarship Managers, a national, nonprofit, scholarship man agement services organization, man ages and awards the scholarships. Commissary partners and the general public donate money to the program; every dollar donated goes directly to funding the scholarships. Since inception of the program in 2001, more than $11.3 million in schol arships have been awarded to 7,412 mil itary dependents from more than 71,000 applicants.For more information, call 856-616-9311 or e-mail militaryscholar@scholarship managers.com.Scholarships for military children available For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil. Parent Academy announced by Duval County Public Schools Duval County Public Schools (DCPS) recently launched the Parent Academy to promote parental involvement and enhance student achievement. Parent Academy classes are offered in schools, libraries, community centers, government offices and faith-based institutions. The Parent Academys focus is on three primary tracks: Student Achievement workshops and activities provide parents and caregiv ers with tools to promote students aca demic achievement and navigate the school system. Parenting & Advocacy workshops and activities provide tools to more effectively enhance parenting, advo cacy and leadership skills. Personal & Individual Growth work shops and activities provide tools for supporting the personal and profes sional growth of parents and caregivers. The DCPS Department of Community & Family Engagement is designed to develop strong, innovative and collab orative partnerships. Key stakeholders engaged by this office include parent and fam ily organizations, educators, non profits, businesses, faith-based enti ties, government agencies, institutes of higher education and civic groups. For more information, call 390-2960 or email cfeinfo@duvalschools.org. 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 16, 2014

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 16, 2014 17 To mitigate potential risk to the public during live bomb ing exercises at the Pinecastle Range Complex south of Palatka, Fla., a team from Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jacksonville (FACSFACJAX), U.S. Fleet Forces Command and the U.S. Forest Service relocated a portion of the Farles Prairie Florida Hiking to a safer loca tion within the Ocala National Forest. For almost 50 years, the Farles Prairie Florida Hiking trail has been located near the weapons safety danger zone of the Navys Pinecastle Range Complex. This vital bombing range in the Ocala National Forest is a fenced area of 5,760 acres, with the eastern edge of the range located about two miles west of State Road 19 and the Ocala national and state camp grounds, as well as one-half mile west of the Farles Lake campground. After months of plan ning between FACSFACJAX, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, and the U.S. Forest Service Regional Headquarters, work began to relocate a portion of the trail to a more secure loca tion in the Ocala National Forest, with a focus on mini mizing environmental and wildlife impact. Moving the trail has miti gated a potential risk to the public during bombing exer cises. More than three miles of new hiking trails were cut and mulched. Overhead branches were trimmed and fallen debris removed. In addition, the new primary pathway was sprayed with herbicide to prevent regrowth. Tactical aircraft from the Navy, Air Force and Marines conduct training in the special use airspace above the Ocala National Forest before turning their focus to employ air-toground weapons in a 450-acre portion of the range specifi cally designed for live weapons impact. The Navy has used the area for target practice under a spe cial use permit from the U.S. Forest Service. In October 1966, Florida Trail Association founder Jim Kern and a handful of hardy hikers painted the trails first blaze at Clearwater Lake. With more than 73 miles of unbro ken wilderness hiking through sand hills, prairies, pine flat woods, and the beautiful Big Scrub Recreation Area this is a prime destination for back packers who want to spend a week on the Florida Trail. Visitors can take an 8.5-mile hike around Farles Prairie and through the heart of the scrub forest, showcasing rolling hills topped with sand pine forest of varying ages and views out across Farles Prairie and Farles Lake. While it hosts the Navys only live weapons impact range on the east coast, the Ocala National Forest is best known for its more than 600 natu ral lakes and ponds. Between the river boundaries of this forest lie central highlands, coastal lowlands, swamps, springs and hundreds of lakes and ponds. Near the Juniper Prairie Wilderness and Juniper Springs is The Yearling Trail, one of the locations where The Yearling was filmed in 1946. The Ocala National Forest receives more visitors annually than any other national forest in the Sunshine State. The for ests porous sands and largely undeveloped character provide an important recharge area for the Floridan aquifer. Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles physical readiness a best practiceNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville revitalized its physical readiness program (PRP) to better improve the health and lifestyles of its sailors and strengthen command readiness. While the previous version of the commands PRP com plied fully with Navy physical readiness standards, about a year ago NH Jacksonville found problemsmainly admin istrativethat if not corrected could become detrimental to the command and its approximately 1,600 assigned Sailors. A full-time PRP staff, consisting of a program manager, an officer command fitness leader (CFL), an enlisted CFL and select directorate and branch health clinic CFLs was appointed to provide long-term continuity and program consistency across its six facilities (a hospital and five branch health clinics), while centralizing all physical fit ness components within the command. Ultimately the key to the success of any command program is the unwavering support and program owner ship of the commanding officer, said Capt. Gayle Shaffer, NH Jacksonville commanding officer. Our appointed PRP staff has been the driving force behind our program success this past year. The staffs adoption of a culture of encouragement and coaching, vice instruction only, was instrumental in active duty buy-in of the program and its overall success. The staff developed corrective actions and established goals to correct discovered problems and identify program non-compliance, actions which were embraced by leader ship. NH Jacksonville reverted solely to the Navys governing OPNAV Instruction, along with applicable BUMED and Navy Medicine East (NME) instructions, which eliminated confusion previously created by local physical readiness instructions. Changes in the commands Fitness Enhancement Program (FEP)for sailors unable to obtain passing scores or in danger of failing a Physical Fitness Assessment (PFA)were made and tailored to address individual sailor needs and abilities, whether related to specific physical limitations or body composition. This proactive approach has resulted in a 62 percent FEP success rate for the com mand. Administrative datato include PFA scores, associated page 13 distribution and failure notificationsis now pref erably logged the same day assessments are administered, allowing sailors access to personal scores and CFLs the opportunity to evaluate command performance and pre pare necessary paperwork for those requiring re-testing or FEP enrollment, an evolution that took more than a month in the past. Individual record accuracy and upkeep is now moni tored by each CFL (officer and enlisted) and the program manager, with all parties conducting cross-checks on each other to ensure compliance and accuracy. In addition to current cycle records, NH Jacksonville now retains past records a minimum of five yearspaper and electronic versions, which ensures that sailors who have transferred from the command still have the ability to recover records if needed. Routine internal and external audits ensure program compliance to NME, BUMED and Navy-wide require ments. Within its first year (two PFA cycles) of implementation, NH Jacksonvilles PRP has achieved a 97.5 percent pass rate, with a 45 percent decrease in failures. As a result, NH Jacksonvilles PRP was recently recognized as a best prac tice by NME inspector general. Caring for our nations heroes and their families is our business here at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, said Shaffer. In order to do so, we ourselves must be physically ready for that challenge at all times. Change of watch at base yacht clubMembers and special guests of the Navy Jax Yacht Club met Jan. 11 at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center for the 2014 Change of Watch, where newly elected officers took their oaths. The slate of 2014 officers includes: Commodore Annette Paul; Vice Commodore Robert Sharkey; Rear Commodore Brian Paul and Secretary/ Treasurer Frank Houghton. Special guests in attendance were NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander and his wife, Pam, as well as representatives from St. Augustine Yacht Club, Epping Forest Yacht Club and North Florida Cruising Club. Navy Jax Yacht Club promotes boating instruc tion and safety from the naval air stations Mulberry Cove Marina. We meet the first Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center, said new commodore, Annette Paul. Our goals for the year ahead are to help revive the intramural sailing program, to provide more information about boating safety in our commu nity, and encourage more people to take advantage of our sailing classes. We also work to enhance awareness of the bases Mulberry Cove Marina on the St. Johns River and the programs they offer, said Sharkey. The club hosts several sailing regattas on the river with neighboring yacht clubs. There are raftups and social functions as well. For more information about sailing and the yacht clubs many activities for active duty and retirees, call 779-0805 or be our guest at our next monthly meeting, said Paul. FACSFACJAX adds more safety to hiking trail in Ocala National Forest Another great source for students pursuing col lege is the American Legion website http://pdf. needalift.org/ This publication walks you through helpful steps for students. The possibilities are endless. However, each scholarship may require a different application, resume, or letters of recommendation and most have deadlines that are rapidly approaching. Finally, below is a small sampling of the many organizations offering education financial scholar ships and assistance. The National Association of Institutions for Military Education Services. http:naimes.org Council of College and Military Educators Joe King Scholarship Award. http://www.ccmeonline. org Florida Advisory Council on Military Education Scholarship Award. http://fla-acme.org Columbia College, (904-778-9769) http://www. ccis.edu/offices/financialaid/scholarshipfinder First Command Educational Foundation Scholarships (877-872-8289) https://www.fcef. com/scholarships/ Navy Marine Corps Relief Society. http://www. nmcrs.org/pages/education-loans-and-scholar ships MyCaa. Spouses of service members E-1 to E-5, W-1 to W-2, 0-1 to 0-2, $2,000 a year for a maximum of two years http://www.militaryonesource.mil Click on spouse education and career opportuni ties. Click on my caa. Thomas Edison State College (Active, reserve, guard, spouses, veterans, wounded warriors). http://www.tesc.edu/military/scholarship.cfm Univ. of Maryland University College. http:// greatcollegesuccess.com/collegescholarship2. html?finaldeadline American Military University Book Vouchers. http://www.amu.apus.edu/tuition-and-finance/ other-financial/assistance/scholarships.htm Wings Over America. http://wingsoveramerica. us/ Naval Helicopter Association. http://nhaschol arshipfund.org Florida High School Bright Futures (You must apply before you graduate high school). http:// www.floridastudentfinancialaid.org/SSFAD/ home/uamain.htm. SCHOLARSHIPS

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 16, 2014 NEW NFOS NEX FINAL FLIGHT Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Vice Adm. Robert Thomas, commander, 7th Fleet, flew over Japan with Patrol Squadron (VP) 16 in the Navys newest maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft, the P-8A Poseidon, Jan. 9 and praised the crew for their mission skills and hard work. The War Eagles of VP 16 are making their inaugural deployment with six P-8As in support of 7th Fleet maritime domain awareness efforts in the IndoAsia-Pacific. According to Thomas, the P-8A deployment brings increased capability to 7th Fleets Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force. I am extremely impressed with VP-16 and the P-8A Poseidons performance dur ing their inaugural deployment to Seventh Fleet, Thomas said. Across every mission set, from anti-submarine warfare to maritime intelligence, sur veillance and reconnaissance (ISR), P-8A capability repre sents a significant improve ment over the P-3C, providing the opportunity to detect, track and report on more targets than ever before. This contin ues to be validated throughout the course of the aircrafts time here. I had the opportunity to fly with the squadron and wit nessed their capabilities first hand . this aircraft is a game changer. The P-8A is the most advanced long-range anti-sub marine and anti-surface war fare aircraft in the world. A true multi-mission aircraft, it also provides superior maritime ISR capability. Built on the proven Boeing 737 airframe, the tran sition to P-8A brings with it enhanced safety and reduced maintenance. The P-8A is sig nificantly quieter than the P-3C, requires less mainte nance, and provides more onstation time. The P-8A remains fully interoperable with the Japan Maritime Self Defense Forces P-3C force. The new P-8A Poseidon is part of the Navys commit ment to the Pacific rebalanced, bringing latest technology to 7th Fleet to ensure the U.S. is best postured to honor its security commitments to regional security and stability. CPRW-11 to hold change of commandCapt. Sean Liedman will relieve Capt. Eric Wiese as the 53rd commodore of Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven (CPRW-11) during a change of command ceremony Jan. 16. Liedman, a native of Kimball, Minn., graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1991 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Systems Engineering. He received a Master of Arts degree in National Security and Strategic Studies from the Naval War College in 2002, and served as a Federal Executive Fellow at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard University in 2010-11. Liedman was designated a naval flight officer in 1993. After initial training in the P-3C Orion, his first fleet assignment was with the Pelicans of VP-45, where he completed three overseas deployments and was selected as the CPRW-11 NFO of the Year in 1996. Subsequent flying tours include Fleet Replacement Squadron instructor duty with the Pros Nest of VP-30; a department head tour with the Old Buzzards of VPU-1, and as the 61st commanding officer of the Fighting Tigers of VP-8. Staff tours include duty as the aide/ flag lieutenant to Commander, Carrier Group One; deputy executive assistant to the director, Air Warfare Division on the Chief of Naval Operations staff; executive assistant to the deputy commander, U.S. Central Command; and P-3C/P-8A aircraft requirements offi cer in the Air Warfare Division on the Chief of Naval Operations staff. Liedman will continue CPRW-11s transition from the P-3C Orion to the P-8A Poseidon. A wounded warrior from NAS Jacksonville competed in his first adaptive athletics competition at the Wounded Warrior Pacific Invitational Jan. 8 in Honolulu. AWFAN Brett Parks, attached to VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville, threw standing shot put and discus during the joint-service event for seriously wounded, ill and injured service members. In addition to field sports, he is participating in multiple swimming events. This event has opened me up to a world that I didnt know before, said Parks. We all have goals, but theres only so far you can go on your own when it comes to fitness and rehabili tation. This really raises the bar on my goals; when I go home, I have a pur pose and new goals to strive for. Parks was wounded Oct. 17, 2012 in his hometown of Jacksonville, when he came to the aid of a man being robbed at gunpoint. Parks a husband and father with a second child on the way was wait ing to conduct a training session at his gym when he heard a man scream and decided to intervene. Two gunshots were fired at Parks; the first shot hit his abdomen, the second shot missed him. U.S. 7th Fleet commander praises P-8A performance Local Wounded Warrior shares message of hope in Hawaii

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 16, 2014 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Jan. 16 1930 USS Lexington (CV-2) provides power to Tacoma, Wash. after floods knocked out city power plants. 1991 Operation Desert Storm, the liberation of Kuwait from Iraq, begins. Jan. 17 1832Sloop-of-war USS Peacock makes contact with Vietnamese court officials 1900 The U.S., represented by Cmdr. Taussig in the steel-hulled gunboat USS Bennington, takes formal possession of Wake Island in the Pacific. 1942 To protect the advance of Task Force 8 for its strike against the Marshall and Gilbert Islands, planes of Patrol Squadron 23 fly daily searches of the waters between their base at Canton Island and Suva in the Fijis. 1955 USS Nautilus (SSN-571), the first nuclear-powered submarine, casts off lines at and sends message underway on nuclear power. Jan. 18 1911 First aircraft landing on board a ship, armored cruiser USS Pennsylvania (CA-4), by aviator Eugene Ely. 1968 Operation Coronado X begins in Mekong Delta, Vietnam 1977 The Trident (C-4) missile development flight test program commenced when C4X-1 was launched from a flight pad at Cape Canaveral. 1991 USS Nicholas attacks and captures Iraqi oil platforms. Jan. 19 1840 Lt. Charles Wilkes is first American to dis cover Antarctic coast. Jan. 20 1783 Hostilities cease between Great Britain and the United States. 1903 Theodore Roosevelt issues executive order placing the Midway Islands under jurisdiction of the Navy Department. 1914 School for naval air training opens in Pensacola, Fla. 1948 Establishment of U.S. Persian Gulf Area Command (later changed to Middle East Force in August 1948). Jan. 21 1954 Launching of Nautilus (SSN-571), the first nuclear submarine, at Groton, Conn. 1961 USS George Washington (SSBN-598) completes first operational voyage of fleet ballistic missile submarine, operating submerged 66 days. Jan. 22 1800 Capt. Thomas Tingey ordered to duty as first superintendent of the Washington Navy Yard 1944 Operation Shingle, the allied landing at Anzio, Italy. On New Years Eve, a round-up of 2013 trending stories and people includ ing Miley Cyrus, Paula Deen and Phil Robertson got me thinking and dis couraged. There are so many wonderful, quiet stories in communities across the country that never trend. The search terms dont auto-fill on Google. The people behind the stories are hardly household names. And yet, these stories are certainly more fascinating than Miley Cyrus and her twerking. Three of these quiet stories that I witnessed this past year are below. First, in October, our family met and had dinner with David Cote, a major in the Marine Corps and the 2011 Military Times Marine of the Year. A go-getter since he started his own paper route in Bangor, Maine, at the age of eight, Cote later became an Eagle Scout in high school. Now, the young major is embarking on his biggest and most important feat yet: The Summit Project. The Summit Project is a living memorial to honor every service member from the state of Maine who lost their life in service to our country since 9/11. Families of the service members select a rock from a special location camp, backyard, a nearby path that reminds them of their loved one. Cote meets with the families, hears their stories, then he engraves each of the rocks with the service members initials and birth and death years. On Memorial Day 2014, Cote and a group of hikers will carry the rocks up Mt. Katahdin in Millinocket, Maine. We will honor the fallen by challenging the living, Cote told us. (Some of the rocks weigh close to 20 pounds.) Cote remembers the stories, the names and the circumstances behind every rock. He has the service members aspirations, interests and heroism engraved, in a way, on his own heart. In a world full of celebrities, Cote told us that his definition of success is not guided by pop culture or material things. Its guided by living a life of service. Next, in November, our family met Katie and Alex Hall, grown siblings who are legally blind. Katie has a very narrow field of vision, but Alex is almost com pletely blind. He can only see light and some movement. The thought of living without sight might cause some to believe they would give up. Certainly, before we met Katie and Alex, the boys and I couldnt imagine not being able to see. But Alex and Katie marveled us with their fearlessness and determination to live as fully as someone who has 20/20 vision. Alex even used to ride a bike, yes, while blind! He shovels snow and bakes pies, with only his sense of touch, smell and hearing to guide him. Today, Katie is going to school to study nutrition, and Alex works to help others with visual impairments master Braille and technology. But perhaps the quietest, most unex pected story I encountered in 2013 hap pened in late November, when I had dinner at a local retirement home. I shared a table with a 101-year old man who delighted me with a centurys worth of tidbits and trivia. Later, after dinner, a woman asked me to come see her room. I knew I needed to get home to my boys, and I was in a rush, but I told her Id pop in for a minute. Inside this womans room were dozens of paintings lining the walls. The paint ings were of a younger woman with a face I recognized in the older woman beside me. The portraits were painted by her late husband and they were elegant. Without even knowing her husband, and barely knowing the woman herself, the love and history between them was clearly visible in the carefully displayed pic tures. The man even painted one of the pictures while he was a prisoner in World War II. I was in awe. Outside, the world flew by. Cars honked. People rushed home and grumbled about the traffic. But there, tucked away inside that retirement home was a tiny one-bedroom apartment filled with a couples and part of the worlds history. My hope for 2014 is that our culture will begin to value stories like these above the latest, trending celebrities and their public faux pas. These stories arent flashy. You wont find them on Google. But if everyone could come across people like Major Cote and the Halls, or stories like the elderly woman with a room full of painted memories, as eas ily as they come across the definition of twerking I believe our world would be a better place. The quiet stories of 2013 The Veterans Oral History Project was created by the United States Congress in 2000. This project of the Library of Congress and American Folklife Center collects, preserves and makes accessible the personal accounts of American war veterans so that future generations may hear directly from veterans and better understand the realities of war. The objective of this program is collecting first-hand video and/or audio accounts of U.S. Veterans on behalf of the Library of Congress. Volunteers are used to conduct interviews for the Library of Congress. The project collects first-hand accounts of U.S. veterans from the following wars: Korean War (1950-55) Persian Gulf War (1990-1995) (2001-present) U.S. citizen civilians who were actively involved in supporting war efforts (such as war industry work ers, USO workers, flight instructors, medical volunteers, etc.) are also invited to share their valuable sto ries. To volunteer to help with this project, please register with HandsOn Jacksonville and attend a volunteer interviewer training workshop con ducted by Dr. Annette Fromm with the Library of Congress/American Folklore Society Jan. 23 from 9 a.m. to noon or 1-4 p.m. in the NAS Jacksonville Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society conference room in Building 13 located to the immedi ate left just prior to entering the NAS Jacksonville Main Gate. To register, please send an e-mail with your full name, email address, phone number and session attend ing, to Richard@handsonjackson ville.org.Volunteer interviewers needed for oral history project For service members, veter ans, and their dependents, there are many scholarship opportuni ties available from a wide-variety of organizations. If you have met your tuition assistance cap for the year, or are looking for additional fund ing sources for your education, these scholarship programs may provide you and your family with many options to pursue higher education and professional development. The Navy College Office has 10 copies of a book published specif ically for veteran, active duty, and dependent scholarships. There are more than 8,500 military, active duty, veteran, and dependent scholarships in variety of programs. These guides are available at the Navy College Office and may be checkedout for two weeks at a time. Additionally, Navy Knowledge Online (NKO) maintains a database of over 1.7 million scholarships that are worth a total of 8 million dollars. Below are the directions for com pleting a search for scholarships on NKO. Some are just for aviators, Seabees, those assigned to heli copter units, or residents of certain states. They fall under several different categories, which will allow Sailors, veterans and dependents to search different categories in able to locate programs best suited for their needs. Log-into NKO: Click on Learning tab at top of page Scroll down a little and Click on orange Petersons Lifelong Learning block Click on Scholarship tab under the caption that says Educational Searches Click on Undergraduate Scholarship Search Enter different key words, such as military, dependent, Sailor, Navy, aviation, helicopter, a state name, the name of a college major, or certain organizations to which you may belong.A quick guide to scholarship opportunities

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VP-30 wings Navys newest naval flight officersOn Dec. 13, VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Curtis Phillips and Cmdr. David Whitehead, aviation officer community manager awarded naval flight officer (NFO) wings to the following 13 officers: Ensigns John Bernier, William Buehn, Nicholas Carver, Margo Cortijo, Allen Cutman, Louis Gao, Bryan Hamby, Derek Kalbfleisch, Anthony Montes, Shane Polzin, Brenna Williams and CWO2 Jeff Muenchrath. The recipients completed the undergraduate maritime flight officer syllabus at VP-30, earning their coveted wings of gold. These newly winged aviators will now enroll in the CAT I Fleet Replacement Squadron syllabus at VP-30. Upon completion of the CAT I syllabus, they will report to operational maritime patrol and reconnais sance squadrons to begin their initial sea tours in either Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, Whidbey Island, Wash. or Jacksonville. The NFO training pipeline begins with aviation preflight introduction (API) instruction in Pensacola, Fla. where all aviation officers undergo a classroom syl labus and are taught the basics of naval aviation which includes aerodynamics, meteorology and principles of navigation. After completing API, all student NFOs report for primary training at VT-10, co-located at NAS Pensacola. While assigned to VT-10, they transition from a classroom learning environment to initial airborne flight training in the T-6A Texan II. Upon completion of primary flight training at NAS Pensacola, officers who are selected for the P-3, EP-3 or P-8 training pipeline report to VP-30 for specific aircraft training. NAS Jacksonville announces an informational meeting to review the U. S. Navy proposal to establish a small defined search and rescue training (SAR) area in the St. Johns River offshore of NAS Jacksonville, that would limit public access in order to support congressional mandated search and rescue training. Establishment of the search and rescue training area would prevent anchoring of objects, such as crab traps, or unmanned vessels in the training area to help trainees avoid injury and prevent equipment damage. All fishermen, boaters and the general public are invited and encouraged to attend the meeting. What: Informational Meeting When: Feb. 19 Time: 5:30-7:30 p.m. Where: South Mandarin Library, 12125 San Jose Boulevard, Jacksonville, FL 32223. For further information about this public meeting send an email to stephen.biemiller@navy.mil. Public comments will be accepted until March 31, 2014 at NAVFAC_SE_SAR_PROJ@navy.mil or via regular mail at NAVFACSE SAR Training Area, NEPA Program Manager (EV21), P.O. Box 30, Jacksonville, FL 32212-0030.SAR information meeting announced Jaguar player to visit commissaryJacksonville Jaguars Defensive Back Ryan Davis will visit the NAS Jax Commissary Jan. 24 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. to meet military members and their families. Davis will be available for autographs and photos with commissary patrons. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 16, 2014 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 16, 2014 Navy Exchange associates cater to customersSince its inception in 1946, the Navy Exchange Service Commands (NEXCOM) goal has been to make every patron a customer for life. To accomplish that, we work hard everyday to become your first choice for shopping, said Marsha Brooks, Navy Exchange (NEX) general manager at NAS Jacksonville. Our mission has always been to provide NEX customers with quality goods and services at a savings as well as contribute to Navy quality of life programs. She said that military members, retirees and their families save an average of 23 percent on all the products they purchase, not including sales tax. In addition, our pricing strategy ensures that you get the best brands at the best buys. The NEX carries merchandise in all price ranges, so we have a range of products and services to fit everyones budget, added Brooks. When shoppers think about the NEX, most recall the centrally located main exchange that includes departments such as the uniform shop, barber/beauty shop, dry cleaning, cosmetics, electronics, jewelry, floral shop and personalized services. However, the NEX also encompasses the Food Court, Home and Garden Center, Car Care Center, Navy Lodge, Enterprise Rental Services, NExpress, as well as the mini-mart and coffee kiosk at Naval Hospital Jacksonville. The Navy Exchange Service Command announc es the NEX customer satisfaction index (CSI) each January and according to Brooks, the NAS Jax NEX was rated as one of the best worldwide. The Navy Exchange Enterprise achieved an overall score of 85, which when compared to industry stan dards is extremely high. Im very proud to announce that the customer satisfaction index score for the Jacksonville complex is an 87, our highest ever, pro claimed Brooks. NEX associates will use this survey information to continue to better serve its customers. While Im extremely proud of the Jacksonville Associate Team for delivering premier customer ser vice to our military patrons as reflected in our overall score, we will be receiving more specific information in the next few weeks on key metrics that will identify areas for improvement, Brooks stated. We utilize the customer feedback specific to our location to create an action plan to focus on elements that we can address at the local level with our associate team. The information obtained through the CSI and online shopping surveys indicate the importance NEX facilities are to patrons.The placement of the minimarts offer convenience, while the specialization of products and services at the Home and Garden Center, Car Care Center and Navy Lodge offer our patrons quality goods and services with one stop shopping on base. The Food Court, McDonalds, Subway, GNC and Enterprise Car Rental are just a few of the public private ventures included in the NEX portfolio and are important services available to our patrons, said Brooks. Within the next year, patrons will see many new ser vices and initiatives promoted at the NAS Jax NEX to better serve the customers. We are excited about 2014!The NEX commitment to improving business processes and creating a culture of premier customer service will continue to be top pri orities.Our complex is part of the worldwide deploy ment of a new point of sale system, that will streamline the patron checkout process at the registers.We are scheduled for roll out to begin here and at NS Mayport in April, explained Brooks. The NEX is also supporting the Secretary of the Navys 21st Century Sailor and Marine Initiative by creating the A Better You campaign that expanded healthy food alternatives, vitamins and supplements and offers more athletic equipment, clothing and footwear to promote fitness and a healthier lifestyle. According to Brooks, her team strives to keep cus tomers happy so they continue to shop on base. One challenge our patrons have communicated through the CSI survey is to become more competi tively priced in a few key departments and to have new items that are available in the marketplace.Our buying and merchandising teams have worked closely with our vendor partners to have the right merchan dise, at the right price and at the right time, said Brooks. We offer a wide array of brand names at great prices in virtually every department. On Jan. 1, the NEX introduced the New Lower Price program.Hundreds of highly recognized items have been reduced throughout the store.Look for this program to continue to add even more items that families use every day. In addition, your Navy Exchange will match prices of any local competitor on the exact same item should you find a lower advertised price, she added. One of the most important benefits of shopping at the Navy Exchange is that a significant portion of the profit goes directly to support Morale, Welfare and Recreation programs. When you shop here, you help support Navy quality of life programs. Since 1946, NEXCOM has contributed more than $2.2 billion to Navy Morale, Welfare and Recreation programs, concluded Brooks.Hours of Operation Main NEX store: Monday Saturday, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., Sunday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Laundry/dry cleaning: Monday Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Car Care Center: MondaySaturday, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., Sunday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 16, 2014 5 General Manager Bldg. 987 ......................... 777-7211 Admin .......................................... 777-7200 Barber Shop Bldg. 987 ............................. 777-7228 Beauty Salon Bldg. 987 ............................ 777-7228 Beverage Mart Bldg. 987 ........................... 777-7286 Camera Department Bldg. 987 ...................... 777-7289 Car Care Center Bldg. 429 .................... 777-7142/46/47 Car Rental Bldg. 1000 ............................. 772-7007 Childrens Department ............................. 777-7298 Convenience Store Bldg. 987 ....................... 777-7286 Cosmetics Bldg. 987 ............................... 777-7291 Customer Service Bldg. 987 ........................ 777-7286 Flower Shop Bldg. 987 ............................. 777-7225 Food Court Bldg. 987 ............................... 771-7458 Furniture Store Bldg. 987 ........................... 777-6605 Garden Center Bldg. 429 ........................... 777-7293 Hospital Retail Store ............................... 542-7821 Jewelry/Cosmetic Department Bldg. 987 .......... 777-4041/7042 Ladies Department Bldg. 987 ....................... 777-7055 Laundry/Dry Cleaning Bldg. 987 ..................... 777-7229 Mens Wear Dept Bldg. 987 ......................... 777-7296 Navy Lodge Bldg. 802 ............................. 772-6000 Reservations ............................... 1-800-NAVY-INN Optical Shop Bldg. 987 ............................ 777-7232 NEXPRESS Bldg. 931 ............................... 777-7294 Personalized Services Bldg. 987 ..................... 777-7222 Service Station Bldg. 987 .................. 777-7142/7146/7147 Shoe Department Bldg. 987 ......................... 777-7287 Electronics Bldg. 987 .............................. 777-7289 Special Orders Bldg. 987 ............................ 777-7281 Sporting Goods Bldg. 987 .......................... 777-7286 Tailor Shop Bldg. 987 .............................. 777-7009 Toy Department Bldg. 987 .......................... 777-7286 Uniform Shop Bldg. 987 ............................ 777-7295Get in touch with NEX Photos by AE2 Samantha Jones and MC2 Amanda Cabasos

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VP-30 Sailors from the Avionics Technician and Aviation Electrician Shops have came together to help people in need during holiday sea son by volunteering at the Clara White Mission to feed hundreds of individuals on numerous occasions from October to December. Donating more than 55 man-hours of work, Sailors served meals, bussed tables, mopped floors and repaired broken bicycles. ATC(AW/SW) Charles Chadwick is pleased at the proactive approach his junior Sailors are taking towards serv ing the community. I believe that every Sailor needs to be involved in their community; it makes for a well-round ed individual. It gives us an opportu nity to realize how good we have it, said Chadwick. Located in downtown Jacksonville, the Clara White Mission provides hot, nutritious meals seven days a week. In addition to meals, they also provide housing and job-training programs to individuals 18 years of age and older with special priority given to veterans. The Clara White Mission takes pride in being the only veterans drop-in day center in Jacksonville, providing sup portive services to homeless veterans in need. Our mission statement is to restore those in need to meaningful, dignified lives in the community, said Merle Wright, Clara White Mission volunteer coordinator. Wright knows what it means to serve. Before dedicating her life to serving the community as Clara White Missions volunteer coordinator, she served in the United States Marine Corps. Wright is extremely thankful for the time VP-30 has spent volunteering. We could not do what we do without the help of our volunteers. It means a lot to them [the veterans in their program] that other veterans are helping them and that other military personnel are there for them, she stated. Chadwick feels that helping veterans is an important aspect of being a good Sailor and that it gives the Sailors a more in depth sense of purpose. Military service has a lot to do with heritage and traditions. You always honor the past and helping veterans is one way to do that, said Chadwick. The Clara White Mission desperately depends on members of the community to volunteer their time and talents to help achieve their humanitarian goals. In addition to helping those in need, young Sailors gain an appreciation of their own life and an understanding of the hardships that some members of society face. Before volunteering at the Clara White Mission, AN Nicole Agee wasnt fully aware of the homeless situation in Jacksonville. There were more people there than I expected to see; it was sad see ing how many people were so bad off. It broadened my horizons. You think of it [homelessness], but it never affects you because youre not in their situation, said Agee. AT3 Class Dena Bivens felt she gained a new perspective about what it means to be homeless and what kinds of people are homeless. Bivens stated, I saw several families there with very small children, maybe 3 or 4 years old, with a single parent. It made me realize that there are families that need help too. For AN Zachary Howland one volun teering moment especially stands out in his mind. A guy came up to me and asked me where he could find shoes for his kid; it hit home right then, said Howland. He feels that volunteering is a way of becoming a part of humanity. He con tinued, I wish that I could say that Ive done more, but I havent. By using your hands, head and heart, you can allevi ate a little bit of the suffering that takes place. Howland plans to continue volunteering wherever he can. For more information on the Clara White Mission and volunteering oppor tunities, call (904) 354-4162 or visit www.clarawhitemission.org. St. Johns River blue crab trap closure starts on Jan. 16 Recreational and commercial blue crab traps in all waters of the St. Johns River system must be removed from the water before Jan. 16, the first day of a 10-day trap closure. This closure will give groups authorized by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) the opportunity to identify and retrieve lost and abandoned blue crab traps from the water. The closure includes all waters of the St. Johns River system, its associated lakes and tributaries from west of the St. Johns Rivers intersection with the Intercoastal Canal through and including Lake Hellen Blazes in Brevard County. Traps can be placed back in the water in this area starting Jan. 26, though closures may be reduced in duration if it is determined that the number of lost and abandoned traps in the region will take less time to remove. Until the trap season reopens, blue crabs may be harvested with other gear, such as dip nets and fold-up traps. Blue crab harvesters may also use standard blue crab traps during the closure if the traps are attached to a dock or other private property. Lost and abandoned blue crab traps are a problem in the blue crab fishery because they can continue to trap crabs and fish when left in the water. They can also be unsightly in the marine environ ment, damage sensitive habitats and pose navigational hazards to boaters on the water. The closure is one of three regional, 10-day blue crab trap closures that occur in 2014 on the Atlantic coast of Florida. There are six regional closures total: three in odd-numbered years on the west coast and three in even-numbered years on the east coast. VP-30 Sailors find new ways to give back NAS Jacksonville Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) Tina Vaughn held the first Coffee with the SARC network session with unit Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) Program victim advocates Jan. 7 at the Fleet and Family Support Center. During the session, victim advocates met with the victims legal counsel, Lt. Nicholas Smith who provides legal advice and advocacy for eligible victims of sexual assault as request ed by victims. The Victims Legal Counsel helps victims understand the inves tigation and military justice pro cess, advocate their legal rights and interests and, when appro priate, appear in court on their behalf. Victims may speak with the Victims Legal Counsel prior to selecting a reporting option for sexual assault. Victim advocates were also introduced to civilian SAPR Victim Advocate LaTresa Henderson, who serves as an additional resource for sexual assault victims. Henderson provides advo cacy and support throughout a sexual assault case and offers training as requested by commands. The event gave SAPR victim Network session held for SAPR victim advocates 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 16, 2014

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Commander, Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (HST CSG) visit ed French aircraft carrier FS Charles de Gaulle while the ship was operating with USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Dec. 30. Rear Adm. Kevin Sweeney visited the aircraft carrier to meet Task Force 473 commander French navy Rear Adm. Eric Chaperon, and to gain additional insight on the operations of USS Charles de Gaulle. Our two aircraft carriers and associated ships are operating together now here in the Gulf of Oman, said Sweeney. Being able to conduct strike group operations side-by-side will ultimately help improve regional maritime secu rity and stability and also strengthen trust and confidence with our partners in the region. While on board, Sweeney met with Chaperon, visited with French staff, and learned more about the capabili ties of the embarked Rafale and Super Etendard jet fighters including how they operate, launch and recover. It was certainly an eye opening experience to see how one of our closest allies employs a carrier strike group and how we can build a more effective partnership, said Sweeney. The aim of the mission is far beyond conducting a couple of exercises; it is about developing the ability of the two CSG to realize integrated operations should the need arise, said Chaperon. This is a huge challenge but all the conditions are met to overcome it. In addition to its flagship Charles de Gaulle, Task Force 473 is comprised of the destroyers FS Forbin (D 620) and Jean de Vienne (D 643), and replenish ment oiler FS Meuse (A 607). HST CSG is comprised of its flagship, aircraft carrier Harry S. Truman, the guided-missile destroyers USS Mason (DDG 87) and USS Bulkeley (DDG 84), the guided-missile cruisers USS Gettysburg (CG 64) and USS San Jacinto (CG 56) and the embarked Carrier Air Wing 3 which includes Strike Fighter Squadrons (VFA) 32 Swordsmen, VFA-37 Ragin Bulls, and VFA-105 Gunslingers, Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 312 Checkerboards, Airborne Early Warning Squadron 126 Seahawks, Electronic Attack Squadron 130 Zappers, Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 7 Dusty Dogs, and Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 74 Swamp Foxes. HST CSG is forward-deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility where it is conducting maritime security operations, supporting theater security cooperation efforts and supporting Operation Enduring Freedom. HST Carrier Strike Group commander visits French carrier JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 16, 2014 7

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Wiese has commanded CPRW-11 since June 29, 2012 and has successfully led CPRW-11 squadrons in the execu tion of more than 6,000 hours of mis hap-free flying supporting eight major fleet exercises and readiness evalua tions by U.S. Fleet Forces Command. Most notably, squadrons under his command have successfully deployed six times in support of all geographic combatant commanders. CPRW-11 forces participated in a variety of multi-national exercises and real world events. His leadership was instrumental to the transition of three maritime patrol and reconnaissance squadrons from the P-3C to the P-8A and future Broad Area Maritime Surveillance Unmanned Arial System, critical to the future suc cess maritime patrol and reconnais sance aviation. Additionally, Wiese has volunteered countless hours to mili tary initiatives and outreach programs within the local community, solidifying the Navys relationship with local and national leaders. Wieses next assignment will be will be at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C. CPRW-11The bullet shredded his kidney, severely damaged one-third of his colon and severed a major artery, disrupting blood flow to his right leg. His lower right leg was amputated, and Parks spent four months recovering from his wounds and learning how to use a prosthetic limb. The night it happened, my wife gave me a coupon and told me to remember to pick up milk, Parks recalls. When I was running out the door I said, Bye baby; I love you. I didnt come home for four months. Parks is enrolled in Navy Wounded Warrior (NWW) Safe Harbor, the Navy and Coast Guards wounded warrior support program. Many NWW enrollees, like Parks, were not wounded in combat; the pro gram also supports service members who are diagnosed with a serious ill ness or have been injured in shipboard, liberty or training accidents. All enrollees in NWW are encour aged to make adaptive athletics, which has many proven benefits, part of their recovery and rehabilitation efforts. NWW connects wounded war riors to adaptive athletic opportunities throughout the country. The Wounded Warrior Pacific Trials are jointly hosted by NWW and Navy Region Hawaii. At the Wounded Warrior Pacific Invitational this week, wounded war riors are going head-to-head in a variety of sports, including as cycling; seated volleyball; swimming; track and field; and wheelchair basketball. Every ath lete will receive a participation medallion at the conclusion of the event. This is event is one of many lead ing up to the Warrior Games, which will take place this fall, said NWW Cross-functional Division Lead Marty Martinez. Brett has demonstrated tons of potential on the playing field, but, more importantly, he has a great atti tude. Its a lot of fun to compete alongside him. In addition to his athletic ambitions, Parks also has written a book about his experiences. Its working title is Training for Life, and Parks has been reaching out to various publishers. Before I was wounded, I was the strongest I ever have been, said Parks. My training before the incident physi cally, spiritually and emotionally pre pared me for the challenge I would face. My doctors told me that I might not have survived if I hadnt been in such good shape. It is true of anything in life: You need to be prepared, set a goal, never quit and find spiritual strength. With those four things, you can beat almost any thing, he added. Parks also has established an orga nization called Second Shot Ministry, which enables him to share his faith and journey to recovery. He serves as a motivational speaker at local schools, churches and companies. The organi zations name has multiple meanings; literally, it refers to the second shot that missed him, and figuratively, it symbolizes his second chance at life. I am on Earth for a reason, and its to spread a message of hope, said Parks. PARKS Twenty-seven Sailors from VP-8 assigned to Cooperative Security Location in Comalapa, El Salvador completed much-needed repairs Jan. 4 to an orphanage in San Salvador. The Sailors from VP-8, also known as the Fighting Tigers, paint ed four rooms at the Love and Hope Orphanage, which 21 children call home. They also installed lighting in a courtyard, showed a movie, and played tag and other games with the children. It was a great opportunity to help improve the living conditions of the children and spend some quality time with them, said Lt. j.g. Jeremy Cooper, a naval flight officer with VP-8. Being able to see the excitement and joy on the childrens faces has been one of the most rewarding experiences of this deployment. The Love and Hope childrens home cares for orphaned, abused, abandoned and neglected children. Many of the children have been saved from emo tional and physical neglect and many more will be saved in the future due to The Love and Hope Orphanage. We were really excited to be able to get out and do something good for the community, said AWO2 Alana Rondon. Being able to interact with the children was a lot of fun as well as gratifying. The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 are currently deployed to the 4th and 5th Fleet areas of responsibility, assisting in counter-drug efforts and providing humanitarian assistance. VP-8 volunteers at Love and Hope Childrens Home advocates the opportuni ty to meet with the SARC, receive updates and ask questions about the SAPR Program. For more information on the SAPR program, visit www.sapr.mil To become a unit SAPR vic tim advocate, please con tact Vaughn at 542-4717 or tina.c.vaughn@navy.mil The Victims Legal Counsel may be reached at 542-5430 or nicholas.f.smith@navy.mil For SAPR training, call the NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center at 542-5745. Victims of sexu al assault may contact the SAFE Helpline at 1-877995-5247.Prepare now for tax season, DoD official advises With the arrival of tax season, service members should begin gathering documentation to file their 2013 taxes, the director of the Pentagons office of family policy and children and youth said Jan. 9. In an interview with American Forces Press Service and the Pentagon Channel, Barbara Thompson suggested visiting the Military OneSource website for tax filing resources, and to learn what will be necessary to file, such as W2 forms, Social Security numbers and receipts for deductions such as child care, education, medical expenses and donations, among other write-offs. And tax preparers at Military OneSource will do short-form tax filing free of charge for service members and their families, Thompson said. Relocations and deployments have tax implications, Thompson noted. For example, deployed service members can receive an extension to file taxes after the normal April 15 filing date, she said. Its very helpful to have someone who is experienced to help you through the cumbersome issue of taxes and tax returns, she added. The tax preparers at Military OneSource are up to date on changes in tax laws, and can answer militaryspecific questions, Thompson said. Installations also offer volunteer income tax assis tance to service members and their families, while certain banks and credit unions provide education and training on tax preparation, Thompson said. She advised that service members organize their taxes by starting a file beginning each Jan. 1 for the following years tax papers, such as receipts and other write-offs. You dont want to wait until the last minute, she said. Service members and families who prepare long-form taxes with deductions such as mortgages and rental properties might want to consider hiring a tax expert to file for them, Thompson said. Its best to get advice to make sure you have everything covered, she added. People who do their own taxes need to stay on top of current tax information, Thompson said. Sometimes tax laws change, so you have to be really smart about doing your own taxes, she added. States tax laws often vary, too, she said, and because of relocations, some service members have to file local taxes in more than one state. Thats where [tax consultants] can really be of great value to make sure you know what the requirements are for states, Thompson said. Filing federal and state tax returns usually results in either a tax refund or money owed back to the government. Expecting to receive a tax refund, but instead finding out that money is owed can be a shock, Thompson said. Looking at W2s to determine how much money in taxes is being withheld is a good indicator of whether or not one will owe money, she suggested. Service members who receive a tax refund face important decisions on what to do with the money, Thompson said. Do you use it to buy down debt, or put it in a savings account? she asked, advising people to not blow their tax refunds in a spending frenzy of unnecessary pur chases. A tax refund also can be deposited into a retirement savings account, she added. Its important to think about what youre going to do with that money, she advised, and how you can best utilize it for your financial well-being. Meeting with a financial planner to learn the lay of the land, and what tax deductions might apply to a service members finances is a good idea, Thompson said. Its really important to be savvy about that. SAPR 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 16, 2014

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Registration for all levels of the Navy Ortega Lakeshore (NOL) Little League Baseball and Softball is now underway at the NOL Clubhouse on Allegheny Rd. at NAS Jax or at Lillians Restaurant, 5393 Roosevelt Blvd. Register in person Jan. 18, 25 or Feb. 1, from 10 a.m. to noon. Or register online at www.noljax.org For more info, email noljax@gmail.com Baseball Divisions Boys and Girls Softball Divisions Girls Challenger Division NOL is open to active and reserve military families, plus, residents of Little League registration now underway Capt. Eric Wiese, commodore last operational flight aboard NAS Jacksonville. highlights of his last week in he assumed on June 29, 2012. Wieses last flight with the career in maritime patrol avia tion full circle, since he started his aviation career as a junior Some of the recent highlights of his tour include transitioning the first three patrol squadrons to initial operational capacity. During the approximate trained for missions in both maritime domain awareness and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance off the eastern coast of Florida. Lt. Connor ODonnell, patrol plane commander of the flight, described the experience as, Lt. Daniel Baker, patrol plane pilot, added, Having the opportunity to fly with Capt. Wiese on his last flight was an honor and a privilege. He has been extremely supportive of As aircraft 289 taxied back to Hangar 1000 at NAS Jacksonville, it was showered by two fire trucks as a signal of farewell to the commodore. Wiese was greeted by his wife and two sons, each waiting to spray him with a bottle of champagne as a large group of Wiese and his family will be moving to Washington, D.C., where he will be taking on a Sean Liedman is succeed change of command ceremony Commodore makes final operational flight Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles Exchange will close its lobby Jan. 2225 to facilitate pharmacy automation upgrades. up window will remain open during scriptions will continue to be accepted. NH Jacksonvilles Outpatient and will remain open during its normal scription fills should go to Outpatient Satellite Pharmacy lobby closing for improvements JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 16, 2014 9

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The Career Management System Interactive Detailing (CMS-ID) application phase is scheduled to remain open through 5 a.m. Central time, Jan. 21 for active duty and Full-Time Support Sailors in their orders-negotiation window, officials said. Enlisted Sailors use CMS-ID to review and apply for permanent change-of-station (PCS) orders online. Sailors may access the website at https://www.cmsid.navy.mil or from the CMS/ID link at www.npc.navy. mil. Eligible Sailors may review advertised billets in CMS-ID during the application phase and apply for up to five jobs, either directly using CMS-ID, through a com mand career counselor (CCC), or through direct interaction with the detailer, who can make an application on the Sailors behalf. CMS-ID features a Sailor Preference section under the Sailor Info Tab where Sailors may rank duty preferences by type, command, location, platform and com munity, as well as indicate which special programs and schools they would like and leave comments for the detailer. Detailers will always attempt to fill bil lets using a Sailors desired selections first; however, Fleet readiness require ments are the guiding factor in filling bil lets. Detailers must also follow sea-shore flow guidelines outlined in NAVADMIN 361/12, so unless a Sailor requests Sea Duty Incentive Pay or the Voluntary Sea Duty Program to take consecutive sea duty orders, a Sailor up for shore duty should not be involuntarily assigned another sea tour. It may mean a Sailor hoping for shore duty in Hawaii or Washington may receive shore duty someplace else, where the need is greater. A single set of sea billets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command, and a single set of shore billets, prioritized by U.S. Fleet Forces Command and the Bureau of Naval Personnel are advertised each application cycle in CMS-ID as the Navy seeks to fill gaps at sea and place Sailors with the right experience levels and skill sets into highpriority Fleet billets. Some factors a detailer weighs when matching Sailors to jobs include the Sailors desires, qualifications, training availability, career progression, command preference and cost to the Navy. Detailers will not assign Sailors to advertised jobs until after the close of the CMSID application phase, during the detailer selection phase. Sailors may log into CMSID anytime after the detailer selection phase to see if they have been selected for orders. Commands also have the ability to rank and add comments to applications for jobs at their command. This process can occur throughout the Sailor Application Phase, and there is a brief period after Sailor applications are shut off before Detailers com mence selections when commands alone are allowed access to apply comments and ranking to each application for their com mand. Command input is another factor that Detailers use when making their selections. Sailors can learn more about CMS-ID from their CCC or access CMS-ID by selecting the CMS-ID link on the NPC website at www.npc.navy.mil.January application phase opens for Sailors seeking orders JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 16, 2014 13

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Lighter than its bulky pre decessor, the Navys rede signed Aircrew Endurance (AE) Survival Vest recently attained initial operational capabil ity (IOC), a key milestone in the development of the lifesaving equipment, the Navy announced Dec. 18. The upgraded AE survival vest provides improved ballis tic-protection, superior load distribution and a new univer sal color for deployment in a wider variety of terrain, Navy officials said, adding that the improvements will decrease the physical burden on rotarywing aircrew during extended missions. IOC status, a pivotal gauge in the military procurement pro cess, is achieved when a sys tem or product can meet the operational capabilities for users before proceeding to full operational capability (FOC). With IOC reached Nov. 27, the AE vest is scheduled to achieve FOC during the first quarter of 2016. The Aircrew Systems Program Office [PMA-202] is focused on identifying solu tions to improve performance and safety for the human ele ment of the weapons system, said Capt. Nora Burghardt, program manager for PMA202, which is aligned under the Naval Air Systems Command based at NAS Patuxent River, Md. Under the Aircrew Endurance program, the Navy will field a family of products all focused on reducing physi cal fatigue and stress during longer missions now being con ducted by Navy and Marine Corps aircrew. The new AE system resolves deficiencies existing in lega cy aircrew survival vests and fields upgraded armor protection. Two configurations of the new AE system are being deployed, one for mobile air crew and another for those aircrew who remain seated dur ing flight. The AE mobile air crew vest weighs 29.6 pounds and the AE seated version 19.5 pounds about 7 pounds lighter than legacy AIRSAVE sur vival vests. Worn over the flight suit, the vest provides protection from shrapnel and bullets. The mobile crewman configuration provides an 80-inch tether connection to the aircraft allowing crewmembers to move freely about the cabin as they carry out normal duties. It prevents ejection from the aircraft in a crash and incorporates a quickdisconnection release from the aircraft during an emergency egress. As a survival item, the vest provides locations to carry emergency signaling devices, radios, medical kit, emergency underwater breathing devices and an inflatable life preserver. In a rescue situation, the vest provides a harness used for hoisting the aircrew into a rescue helicopter. PMA-202 manages all sys tems that directly support the aircrew, troops and passengers in the performance of their missions. The program office supports more than 780 prod ucts common to many naval aircraft platforms and aircrew, including ejection seats, flight deck cranials, flight deck and aircrew clothing, as well as chemical, biological and nuclear protective equipment. Did you know that Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles award-winning Wellness Center and Health Promotions offers individual and group classes that center on improv ing your health? Classes include tobacco cessation, weight management, health fitness and nutrition. The following classes are offered throughout the year: Choose My Plate (appoint ment or walk-in): Basic nutri tionone-hour Health Fitness Assessment (appointment only): Body mass, exercise and basic nutrition two-day class (one individual session and one group session) Healthy Heart (appointment or walk-in): Cholesterol man agement90-minutes Sail A Weigh (appointment only): Healthy lifestyle/weight management six weeks (one hour per week) ShipShape (appointment only): Weight management eight weeks (one hour per week) Tobacco Cessation (appoint ment or walk-in): Monday, 9 a.m.; Tuesday, 1 p.m.; Thursday, noon.For more information or to make an appointment, call (904) 542-5292 or visit NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center located at Building 867, adjacent to the NAS Jacksonville fitness center. Navys redesigned aircrew endurance survival vest reaches key milestone Naval Hospital Jacksonville invites you to get fit in 2014 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 16, 2014

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., live entertainment, $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Family Night Third Friday of the month, 58 p.m., balloon artist and karaoke DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Super Bowl Party Feb. 2, 5 p.m., $10 per person Door prizes, buffet and beverage specials Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Jan. 18, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: Jan. 25, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Powerlifting Competition Feb. 8, 7 a.m. at the Fitness Center $10 registration feeI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Gatornationals March 1416 $30 $58 Yahala Country Bakery Trip Jan. 25 $25 per person Disney Jr. Live $15 $29 Monster Jam $22 $42 Wild Adventures $30 $70 Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket $166 $194.50 Universal Orlando $114 $169.50 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Daytona 500 $62 $209 Drive 4COPD 300 $55 Budweiser Duels $55 Sprint Unlimited $30 $55 Rolex 24 $32 $65 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 The Artist Series Broadway in Jacksonville 2014 season, select shows Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2014 season, select shows Armed Forces Vacation Club www. afvclub.com $349 $369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 Ripleys St. Augustine $4.25 $7.50 St. Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Wild Florida Airboats $17 $46.50 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels located near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus Jan. 18, 6 p.m. $5 per person Grill & Chill at the Liberty Center Jan. 23, 6 p.m. Free hamburgers and hotdogs St. Augustine Night of Lights Trip Jan. 25, 6 p.m. Free NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Daily Twilight Golf Special Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1 p.m. Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty Jan. 18 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests Jan. 16 & 30Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free kayak & canoe rental Every Thursday for active duty Free stand-up paddleboard lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *Weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding ASE certified mechanic onsiteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you!Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person Applications for the 2014 Scholarships for Military Children Program are now available at commissaries worldwide or at http://www.militaryscholar.org Applications must be turned in to a commissary by close of business Feb. 28, 2014. Packages must be hand-deliv ered or shipped via U.S. Postal Service or other delivery methods, not emailed or faxed. This years award amount has risen to $2,000, and the program awards at least one scholarship at each commissary with qualified applicants. An applicant must be a dependent, unmarried child, younger than 23, if enrolled as a full-time student at a col lege or university, of a service member on active duty, Reserve or Guard member, retiree or survivor of a military member who died while on active duty, or survivor of a retiree. Applicants should ensure that they and their sponsor are enrolled in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System database and have a military ID card. The applicant must attend or plan to attend an accredit ed college or university, full time, in the fall of 2014 or be enrolled in studies designed to transfer to a four-year program. Fisher House Foundation, a nonprofit organization that helps service mem bers and their families, administers the program. Scholarship Managers, a national, nonprofit, scholarship man agement services organization, man ages and awards the scholarships. Commissary partners and the general public donate money to the program; every dollar donated goes directly to funding the scholarships. Since inception of the program in 2001, more than $11.3 million in schol arships have been awarded to 7,412 military dependents from more than 71,000 applicants.For more information, call 856-616-9311 or e-mail militaryscholar@scholarship managers.com.Scholarships for military children available For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil. Parent Academy announced by Duval County Public Schools Duval County Public Schools (DCPS) recently launched the Parent Academy to promote parental involvement and enhance student achievement. Parent Academy classes are offered in schools, libraries, community centers, government offices and faith-based institutions. The Parent Academys focus is on three primary tracks: Student Achievement workshops and activities provide parents and caregiv ers with tools to promote students academic achievement and navigate the school system. Parenting & Advocacy workshops and activities provide tools to more effectively enhance parenting, advo cacy and leadership skills. Personal & Individual Growth work shops and activities provide tools for supporting the personal and profes sional growth of parents and caregivers. The DCPS Department of Community & Family Engagement is designed to develop strong, innovative and collab orative partnerships. Key stakeholders engaged by this office include parent and fam ily organizations, educators, non profits, businesses, faith-based enti ties, government agencies, institutes of higher education and civic groups. For more information, call 390-2960 or email cfeinfo@duvalschools.org. 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 16, 2014

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 16, 2014 17 To mitigate potential risk to the public during live bomb ing exercises at the Pinecastle Range Complex south of Palatka, Fla., a team from Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jacksonville (FACSFACJAX), U.S. Fleet Forces Command and the U.S. Forest Service relocated a portion of the Farles Prairie Florida Hiking to a safer loca tion within the Ocala National Forest. For almost 50 years, the Farles Prairie Florida Hiking trail has been located near the weapons safety danger zone of the Navys Pinecastle Range Complex. This vital bombing range in the Ocala National Forest is a fenced area of 5,760 acres, with the eastern edge of the range located about two miles west of State Road 19 and the Ocala national and state campgrounds, as well as one-half mile west of the Farles Lake campground. After months of plan ning between FACSFACJAX, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, and the U.S. Forest Service Regional Headquarters, work began to relocate a portion of the trail to a more secure location in the Ocala National Forest, with a focus on mini mizing environmental and wildlife impact. Moving the trail has miti gated a potential risk to the public during bombing exer cises. More than three miles of new hiking trails were cut and mulched. Overhead branches were trimmed and fallen debris removed. In addition, the new primary pathway was sprayed with herbicide to prevent regrowth. Tactical aircraft from the Navy, Air Force and Marines conduct training in the special use airspace above the Ocala National Forest before turning their focus to employ air-toground weapons in a 450-acre portion of the range specifi cally designed for live weapons impact. The Navy has used the area for target practice under a special use permit from the U.S. Forest Service. In October 1966, Florida Trail Association founder Jim Kern and a handful of hardy hikers painted the trails first blaze at Clearwater Lake. With more than 73 miles of unbro ken wilderness hiking through sand hills, prairies, pine flat woods, and the beautiful Big Scrub Recreation Area this is a prime destination for back packers who want to spend a week on the Florida Trail. Visitors can take an 8.5-mile hike around Farles Prairie and through the heart of the scrub forest, showcasing rolling hills topped with sand pine forest of varying ages and views out across Farles Prairie and Farles Lake. While it hosts the Navys only live weapons impact range on the east coast, the Ocala National Forest is best known for its more than 600 natu ral lakes and ponds. Between the river boundaries of this forest lie central highlands, coastal lowlands, swamps, springs and hundreds of lakes and ponds. Near the Juniper Prairie Wilderness and Juniper Springs is The Yearling Trail, one of the locations where The Yearling was filmed in 1946. The Ocala National Forest receives more visitors annually than any other national forest in the Sunshine State. The forests porous sands and largely undeveloped character provide an important recharge area for the Floridan aquifer. Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles physical readiness a best practiceNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville revitalized its physical readiness program (PRP) to better improve the health and lifestyles of its sailors and strengthen command readiness. While the previous version of the commands PRP complied fully with Navy physical readiness standards, about a year ago NH Jacksonville found problemsmainly admin istrativethat if not corrected could become detrimental to the command and its approximately 1,600 assigned Sailors. A full-time PRP staff, consisting of a program manager, an officer command fitness leader (CFL), an enlisted CFL and select directorate and branch health clinic CFLs was appointed to provide long-term continuity and program consistency across its six facilities (a hospital and five branch health clinics), while centralizing all physical fit ness components within the command. Ultimately the key to the success of any command program is the unwavering support and program owner ship of the commanding officer, said Capt. Gayle Shaffer, NH Jacksonville commanding officer. Our appointed PRP staff has been the driving force behind our program success this past year. The staffs adoption of a culture of encouragement and coaching, vice instruction only, was instrumental in active duty buy-in of the program and its overall success. The staff developed corrective actions and established goals to correct discovered problems and identify program non-compliance, actions which were embraced by leadership. NH Jacksonville reverted solely to the Navys governing OPNAV Instruction, along with applicable BUMED and Navy Medicine East (NME) instructions, which eliminated confusion previously created by local physical readiness instructions. Changes in the commands Fitness Enhancement Program (FEP)for sailors unable to obtain passing scores or in danger of failing a Physical Fitness Assessment (PFA)were made and tailored to address individual sailor needs and abilities, whether related to specific physical limitations or body composition. This proactive approach has resulted in a 62 percent FEP success rate for the command. Administrative datato include PFA scores, associated page 13 distribution and failure notificationsis now preferably logged the same day assessments are administered, allowing sailors access to personal scores and CFLs the opportunity to evaluate command performance and pre pare necessary paperwork for those requiring re-testing or FEP enrollment, an evolution that took more than a month in the past. Individual record accuracy and upkeep is now moni tored by each CFL (officer and enlisted) and the program manager, with all parties conducting cross-checks on each other to ensure compliance and accuracy. In addition to current cycle records, NH Jacksonville now retains past records a minimum of five yearspaper and electronic versions, which ensures that sailors who have transferred from the command still have the ability to recover records if needed. Routine internal and external audits ensure program compliance to NME, BUMED and Navy-wide require ments. Within its first year (two PFA cycles) of implementation, NH Jacksonvilles PRP has achieved a 97.5 percent pass rate, with a 45 percent decrease in failures. As a result, NH Jacksonvilles PRP was recently recognized as a best practice by NME inspector general. Caring for our nations heroes and their families is our business here at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, said Shaffer. In order to do so, we ourselves must be physically ready for that challenge at all times. Change of watch at base yacht clubMembers and special guests of the Navy Jax Yacht Club met Jan. 11 at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center for the 2014 Change of Watch, where newly elected officers took their oaths. The slate of 2014 officers includes: Commodore Annette Paul; Vice Commodore Robert Sharkey; Rear Commodore Brian Paul and Secretary/ Treasurer Frank Houghton. Special guests in attendance were NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander and his wife, Pam, as well as representatives from St. Augustine Yacht Club, Epping Forest Yacht Club and North Florida Cruising Club. Navy Jax Yacht Club promotes boating instruc tion and safety from the naval air stations Mulberry Cove Marina. We meet the first Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center, said new commodore, Annette Paul. Our goals for the year ahead are to help revive the intramural sailing program, to provide more information about boating safety in our commu nity, and encourage more people to take advantage of our sailing classes. We also work to enhance awareness of the bases Mulberry Cove Marina on the St. Johns River and the programs they offer, said Sharkey. The club hosts several sailing regattas on the river with neighboring yacht clubs. There are raftups and social functions as well. For more information about sailing and the yacht clubs many activities for active duty and retirees, call 779-0805 or be our guest at our next monthly meeting, said Paul. FACSFACJAX adds more safety to hiking trail in Ocala National Forest Another great source for students pursuing college is the American Legion website http://pdf. needalift.org/ This publication walks you through helpful steps for students. The possibilities are endless. However, each scholarship may require a different application, resume, or letters of recommendation and most have deadlines that are rapidly approaching. Finally, below is a small sampling of the many organizations offering education financial scholarships and assistance. The National Association of Institutions for Military Education Services. http:naimes.org Council of College and Military Educators Joe King Scholarship Award. http://www.ccmeonline. org Florida Advisory Council on Military Education Scholarship Award. http://fla-acme.org Columbia College, (904-778-9769) http://www. ccis.edu/offices/financialaid/scholarshipfinder First Command Educational Foundation Scholarships (877-872-8289) https://www.fcef. com/scholarships/ Navy Marine Corps Relief Society. http://www. nmcrs.org/pages/education-loans-and-scholar ships MyCaa. Spouses of service members E-1 to E-5, W-1 to W-2, 0-1 to 0-2, $2,000 a year for a maximum of two years http://www.militaryonesource.mil Click on spouse education and career opportunities. Click on my caa. Thomas Edison State College (Active, reserve, guard, spouses, veterans, wounded warriors). http://www.tesc.edu/military/scholarship.cfm Univ. of Maryland University College. http:// greatcollegesuccess.com/collegescholarship2. html?finaldeadline American Military University Book Vouchers. http://www.amu.apus.edu/tuition-and-finance/ other-financial/assistance/scholarships.htm Wings Over America. http://wingsoveramerica. us/ Naval Helicopter Association. http://nhaschol arshipfund.org Florida High School Bright Futures (You must apply before you graduate high school). http:// www.floridastudentfinancialaid.org/SSFAD/ home/uamain.htm. SCHOLARSHIPS

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