Jax air news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jax air news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note:
Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID:
UF00028307:02072


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 2014 HSM-74 COC VR-62 HOME BLUE STA R EVENT Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The top admiral and top enlisted man in the Navy recently released another installment of their Internet video series, Conversation with a Shipmate. MC2 Mike DiMestico interviewed Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Mike Stevens aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) on Dec. 19. The leaders were visit ing Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group that is currently supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility. With USS Gettysburg (CG 64) alongside the carrier, Greenert and Stevens answered ques tions that are hot topics among Sailors in the fleets. The three discussed a wide berth of issues: deployment lengths and budget cuts to uniform updates and advancement exam changes. DiMestico used CNOs recently released Position Report as a starting point for the interview, questioning what 2014 holds for the Navy. We heard you loud and clear when you said presence is our mandate, said DiMestico. What is the key in 2014 in maintaining that global pres ence? Greenert said the key will be to have rotational forces for ward from the east and west coasts; and then he went on to emphasize another important element, places. Greenert explained that non-rotational forces will play a much larger role in the future. In Rota, Spain there will be four destroyers by 2016. Singapore will have four litto ral combat ships operating forward. The Navy will also continue to develop forward deployed naval forces in Japan, as well as the Darwin option, where the Australian government will host marines to be forward deployed. Greenert said, These nonrotational places are really the key to getting the most out of forward deployed forces. The conversation pivoted to the effects of sequestration on The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 have officially relieved the Screaming Eagles of VP-1 as Commander Task Group (CTG) 57.2 and the Golden Swordsmen of VP-47 as CTG 47.1. VP-8s Commanding Officer Cmdr. Todd Libby said, VP-1 and VP-47 dis played great hospitality and professionalism while welcoming VP-8 to both 4th and 5th Fleet areas of responsibility. Our collective efforts resulted in a highly successful turnover which enabled the Fighting Tigers to continue the excellence of the Screaming Eagles and Golden Swordsmen. Since relieving VP-1 and VP-47, the Fighting Tigers have flown more than 539 flight hours in support of coordinated operations with U.S. Army, Marine Corps, Air Force, Coast Guard and the Customs and Border Patrol Agency. In addition to coordinated operations, VP-8 conducts anti-submarine warfare and maritime surveillance and recon naissance missions. VP-8 is excited and prepared for the challenges of a dual-site deployment. I am extremely proud of our Fighting Tigers and all theyve accomplished since assuming CTG 57.2 and CTG 47.1, said Cmdr. Derek Adametz, VP-8s executive officer. VP-8 participates in CSL Comalapas 10-year anniversaryThe Fighting Tigers of VP-8 recently participated in Cooperative Security Location (CSL) Comalapa, El Salvadors, 10-year anniversary celebration. The celebration featured aircraft static displays from VP-8, the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agency and the El Salvador Air Force. VP-8 Training Officer Lt. Cmdr. Jared Tharp said, The anniversary celebra tion provided a great opportunity for VP-8 Sailors to meet their El Salvador counterparts and to enjoy some local food and entertainment. CSL Comalapa provides critical logistics and infrastructure to support for ward deployed U.S. military units par ticipating in Joint Interagency Task Fighting Tigers deploy to 4th/5th Fleets CNO, MCPON tackle important issues

PAGE 2

2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Jan. 9 1861 Union steamer Star of the West fired on in Charleston Harbor 1918 Establishment of Naval Overseas Transportation Service to carry cargo during World War I 1945 Carrier aircraft begin two-day attack on Japanese forces in Luzon, Philippines. Jan. 10 1847 American naval forces occupy Los Angeles. 1917 Navy places first production order for aerial photographic equipment. 1934 VP-10F flies first non-stop formation flight from San Francisco to Pearl Harbor. Jan. 11 1863 CSS Alabama sinks USS Hatteras off Galveston, Texas. 1944 Aircraft from escort carrier USS Block Island (CVE-21) make first aircraft rocket attack on a German submarine in the Atlantic. 1956 Establishment of first Navy nuclear power school at Submarine Base, New London, Conn. Jan. 12 1813 Frigate USS Chesapeake captures British Volunteer 1848 Attack on sloop Lexington, San Blas, Mexico. 1953 Landings tested on board USS Antietam (CV36), the first angled deck aircraft carrier. Jan. 13 1964 USS Manley (DD-940) evacuates 54 American and 36 allied nationals after Zanzibar government is overthrown. Jan. 14 1813 Frigate USS Chesapeake captures British brig Hero 1863 Navy General Order 4, Emancipation Proclamation 1943 In the Navys first submarine re-supply mis sion, USS Gudgeon (SS-211) lands six guerrilla fighters with one ton of equipment and supplies on Negros Island, Panay. Jan. 15 1815 HMS Endymion, Tenedos and Pomone cap ture USS President 1865 In largest amphibious operation of war, Union forces capture Fort Fisher, Wilmington, North Carolina, by joint amphibious force. 1997 Navy physician Capt. Jerry Lineger joined the crew of the MIR space station after being launched on Atlantis during Space Shuttle Mission STS-81. Prior to the mission, he trained at the Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia for more than a year. I am skilled at purging things from cupboards, closets and basements. Its something I learned from my mom, who has never been afraid to set a dumpster below a second-story window and throw out armloads of junk. Mom doesnt even sort through the piles. No, she plays like its an extreme sport: How many pounds of junk can I throw out the window without letting go of something I need? Mom will even throw out the morning paper and your cereal if you dont read or eat it quick enough. Her Inbox is always empty. Always. Growing up with this, I developed a low tolerance for clutter. Those reality television shows about hoarders are not entertainment for me; they are a nightmare. Five years ago, my skills were put to the ultimate test when we moved from a 3,000 square-foot home in Florida to a 1,500 square-foot one in Maine. I literally had to throw out or give away half of our things. And it was liberating. Living with less felt right. Over time, however, the basement started to fill up again. The boys closets were stuffed. And one kitchen cabinet door wouldnt close unless the sauce pan handles inside were delicately lifted up at an angle and held there until the last second, when the door was latched shut. I have scars on my wrist from this maneuver. Last week, I couldnt take it anymore. It was time to clean, purge and reclaim space. Naturally, I begged my mom to come up from Virginia to help me with this. Together, we are a formida ble force. We can plow through piles like aggressively large lawnmowers that spit out grass clippings and chewed up leaves from the back. We dont rest until there are no more trash bags in the basement and the last load has been hauled off to the dump, recycling or Goodwill. But Mom couldnt come to help me. I had to face it alone. Oh, sure, I have three sons and a husband to pitch in, but none of them except maybe, Owen, 11 share my passion for emptying closets and drawers. In fact, everyone, except Owen, runs away when I bring out the industrial-size trash bags. If Mom is the ultimate organizer and Im her protege, my husband, Dustin, in particular, is her antithesis. Dustin is a rescuer of things and junk. Regular readers might remember a column several years ago when I tried to get rid of Dustins 4,000 (slight overstatement) coffee mugs at a garage sale. While neighbors and community members browsed our belongings strewn across the front lawn, Dustin followed close behind them and rescued all of his coffee mugs. Thats not for sale, he said. One by one, he took everything that belonged to him and put it back inside our house. Only, he didnt find places for these rescued objects. He just left them on the floor and the kitchen counter. You see, Dustin doesnt really want to use those things again. He just wants to have them. It is for this same reason that we own knives that supposedly can cut through tennis shoes. Said knives do not, however, cut through the aver age tomato, and yet Dustin wont let me throw them out. So, I did all my cleaning while Dustin was out of town. He would not see the boxes of coffee mugs and utensils leav ing our door. He could not rescue anything. My helper was Owen. Owen and I plowed through bins of old, broken toys and clothes that no one has worn. We purged the basement, the attic, the kitchen cabinets and everyones closet. We sorted through winter gear, board games, DVDs and CDs. (Are you tired yet?) And at the end of the week, while the boys were at school, I took a load of filled boxes and bags to Goodwill. Any good cleaner knows its impor tant to get rid of the donations before past owners notice. One time, when I was getting rid of a talking puppy from Lindells closet, it barked from the depths of a trash bag in the trunk of the car and Lindell heard it. Is that my puppy? Is it in the car? Why would my talking puppy be in the car? This time, I rode to Goodwill in silence. There only was the occasional programmed voices coming from the boys old Star Wars Millenium Falcon. A storm trooper hat made shooting sounds. A toy cash register dinged. I was getting rid of it all. But when I opened the car door at Goodwill, suddenly it occurred to me: my boys childhoods were in boxes and bags in the back of the van. Dustins mugs were at the bottom of a box. My heart broke a little. Tears came to my eyes. I felt pangs of sadness and guilt. Then I took a deep breath, steadied my hands, and threw everything out. Because, really, If I dont save us from hoarders, who will? The Department of Defense announced Dec. 31 the transfer of Yusef Abbas, Saidullah Khalik and Hajiakbar Abdul Ghuper from the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay to the government of Slovakia, according to a DoD news release. These three detainees are the last ethnic Uighur Chinese nationals to be transferred from the Guantanamo Bay detention facility, the release said. These detainees were subject to release from Guantanamo as a result of a court order issued Oct. 7, 2008, by the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, and are voluntarily resettling in Slovakia. As directed by the presidents Jan. 22, 2009, executive order, the interagency Guantanamo Review Task Force conducted a comprehensive review of these cases, the release said. As a result of that review, which examined a number of factors, including security issues, these indi viduals were designated for transfer by unanimous con sent among all six agencies on the task force, the release said. In accordance with statutory reporting requirements, the administration informed Congress of its intent to transfer these individuals, the release said. The United States is grateful to the government of Slovakia for this humanitarian gesture and its willing ness to support U.S. efforts to close the Guantanamo Bay detention facility, the release said. The United States coor dinated with the government of Slovakia to ensure the transfer took place in accordance with appropriate security and humane treatment measures, the release said. This transfer and resettlement constitutes a significant milestone in our effort to close the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel remains grateful to the Defense Departments Special Envoy Paul Lewis, and Department of State Special Envoy Cliff Sloan, for their and their respective teams many efforts that facilitated this successful transfer, the release said. Today, 155 detainees remain at Guantanamo Bay, according to the release. Life lesson: Clean while no one watches DoD announces transfer of 3 Guantanamo detainees Jaguars player to visit base commissaryJacksonville Jaguars Defensive Back Ryan Davis will visit the NAS Jax Commissary Jan. 24 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. to meet military members and their families. Davis will be available for autographs and photos with commissary patrons. Rendering honors during colorsReminder: Whenever the national anthem is played, all personnel aboard NAS Jacksonville, not in formation, are required to stand at attention and face the national ensign. In the event, the national ensign is not displayed, they shall face the source of the music. When covered, they shall come to attention and salute until the anthem ends. Those in formation, shall come to attention and the formation commander will render salute. Those driving a vehicle shall come to a complete stop and remain seated at attention. Morning colors are conducted every day at 8 a.m. and each evening at sunset.

PAGE 3

The Swamp Foxes of HSM74 held a change of command ceremony aboard the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), Dec. 21. Cmdr. Matt Boren relieved Cmdr. Jim Miller, who has commanded HSM-74 since Sept. 29, 2012. Its been a great experience, said Miller. Weve done great things tactically and professionally on this carrier. We won the Battle E award, among several oth ers. Were the only airborne anti-submarine warfare asset and we provide a lot of the recognized maritime picture for the strike group. Miller said he owes a lot of thanks to the Carrier Air Wing 3, Carrier Strike Group 10, and 1st Combined Destroyer Squadron. I would like to thank them for helping us integrate into a new environment, said Miller. We couldnt have come as far as we have without their support, assistance and teach ing. Cmdr. Matt Boren, who pre viously served as HSM-74s executive officer, took over as commanding officer. I feel very lucky that Im inheriting a squadron thats won the Battle E award, said Boren. Ive been with the squadron for the last 15 months, includ ing all the workups. Were halfway into deployment and I think everyone knows their battle rhythm and is comfort able with our day-to-day operations. Were deployed to the Arabian Gulf and I couldnt think of a better time to take command. I think the squad ron is set up to have continued success. Boren said he is committed to staying mission ready, but is looking forward to some welldeserved relaxation. I want to make sure were prepared for deployment. The business at hand is the first priority, said Boren. Weve worked hard for the last year and a half and our detachments are deployed to different areas. Im looking forward to reuniting with them for some well-deserved holiday parties and summer picnics. On Christmas Eve, the War Eagles of VP-16 took a moment from their operational deployment schedule and joined with the Grey Knights of VP-46 for a special holi day dinner. With the hangar decorated in festive cheer, Sailors set down their tools, left their shops, and sat down with one another for a tradi tional feast. The Chiefs Mess pro vided the meat for the dinner, spending the day baking, frying, and smoking hundreds of pounds of turkeys and ham. AFCM Ervin Byrd was out in spirit, tending his Orion smoker outside the hangar. I love get ting out and cooking for our Sailors. Theyve been working hard and deserve a break and a good meal. Its a privilege for me and one Ive been looking forward to for a long time, he said. AWO2 Joseph Montellese, an acous tic operator for the War Eagles, enjoyed the home-cooked meal, tell ing friends, it reminded me of my moms cook ing. Being so far away from home for Christmas is difficult; its hard to get in the holiday spirit. Seeing the effort people made to put together this event reminded me that, although I am far from relatives, I am surrounded by my own War Eagle family. VP-16 Commanding Officer Cmdr. William Pennington, Jr. com mented on the success of the event. Im glad we were able to give our Sailors a respite from the rigors of deployment, even if just for an eve ning. Tonight was a night that allowed many of our squadron members to reflect on the importance of family, friends, and the many blessings we have received throughout the past year. We close out this holiday season and end the year with many lessons learned and new hopes and goals for the future. 2013 was a great year with many firsts for the Poseidon, the War Eagles and the maritime patrol and reconnais sance community as a whole. We are hoping to make 2014 an even greater one. Following the dinner, Sailors talked and joked amongst one another as Christmas music played through the hangar. As the evening wound to a close, rumors that Santa has learned of the War Eagles deployment spread through the han gar. When asked about these rumors, CMDCM Brian Porter stated, Ive been told that our friends with Operation Gratitude and St. Josephs Church in Jacksonville have been in constant communica tion with the North Pole, updating Saint Nick on the status of our deployed troops. I guess well find out tomorrow whether Santa and his helpers got the memo.HSM-74 holds change of command at sea War Eagles enjoy holiday banquet JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 3

PAGE 4

4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 VR-62 Nomads home from PACOMA detachment from the VR-62 Nomads returned to NAS Jacksonville from U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM) just in time for Christmas. While on detachment in PACOM the Nomads lifted a total of 535,805pounds of equipment and material over the 90-day period. The Nomads also flew 361.4 hours and landed at 18 unique airfields. VR-62 accomplished this detachment with one C-130T mission aircraft and an average of 22 personnel including flight crew. These crews were comprised of FTS (Full Time Support) and SELRES (Selected Reservists) personnel. Although this time of year is generally slow in PACOM, the VR-62 Nomads were on station and ready to airlift any and all materials that can fit into a C-130T Hercules, In addition to completing significant military support missions, we delivered 46 tons of material in support of Operation Damayan the Philippines typhoon relief mission, said AZCM Karen Quinn, the VR-62 operations master chief. In addition to supporting relief efforts, Nomadslifted cargo for Carrier Air Wing Five, VRC-30, Explosive Ordinance DisposalMobile Unit Five, HSC-25, and Underwater Construction Team Two. VR-62 Commanding Officer Tony Scarpino added, Our squadron is prepared to answer all calls in support of our Navy no matter if it is a disaster of epic proportions or regional instability, Nomads deliver! He said VR-62 is now preparing for a U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) detachment in the spring. Home based at NAS Jacksonville, VR-62 is one of five Navy Reserve C-130T squadrons serving the Navys high priority logistics needs around the globe.

PAGE 5

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 5 Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast announced Dec. 18 that Transportation Specialist Johnny Washington was selected as the U.S. Navys 2013 Robert V. Ronicks Fleet Manager of the Year. Washington was selected from a pool of well-qualified nominees Navy-wide. I am very humbled and appreciate receiving this award, said Washington. We have a great team at NAVFAC Southeast, our 15 public works departments and the core office in Jacksonville. The Robert V. Ronick Navy Fleet Manager of the Year Award was named after the Navy fleet manager in Yokosuka, Japan who died in 2003. This recognition is presented annually to Navy fleet man agers who embody the skills, professionalism, and can-do attitude required for excellence in fleet management. I am proud to recognize Mr. Washington for his work, said NAVFAC Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus when he presented the award during an all hands meeting. Winning a Navy wide award is a real accomplishment and he should be very proud, he added. Washington is the com mands primary contact for the development, implementation and maintenance of the regions base support vehicle and equipment emergency response plan, his implemen tation of plan response strate gies designed to address hur ricane preparedness and other emergency situations. Clearly, the level of importance inherent in these roles, not only to the mission, but also to service members and their families, speaks volumes about the trust Mr. Washington has earned among Navy lead ership, said Kiwus. Washington demonstrated that he is a natural leader with abilities to assemble teams, effectively communicate mis sion intent, establish priorities, develop plans, set goals and execute projects in a timely manner with the end result being a product of the highest quality according to the award citation. Working directly with the Commander Navy Region Southeast staff and the Lean Six Sigma team, Washington developed C-Pool and B-Pool inventory reduction and realignment strategies result ing in cost reduction and pro jected annual cost savings of $1.7 million to the command. Because of these actions, we will be providing the most fuel-efficient, cost effective vehicles and equipment, said Washington. His profound awareness, results-oriented performance and consistent focus on value to the customer and savings to the taxpayer, make him an invaluable member of the team, said Kiwus. Navys 2013 Fleet Manager of the Year from NAVFAC Southeast NAVFAC Southeast announces 2013 Employee of the Year awards Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast announced its 2013 Employee of the Year awards Dec. 18. Timothy Covey was named Supervisor of the Year and Gerald Jay Caddy was named Employee of the Year. I am proud to recognize these two outstanding pro fessionals for their work, said NAVFAC Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus when he presented each of them with a Meritorious Civilian Service Award. Covey, the financial man agement cost accounting director, was recognized as the Supervisor of the Year for his technical knowledge and leadership skills to overcome a vast array of extraordinary challenges faced throughout the year. He consistently supplied critical and necessary information to his staff for the startup of a new fiscal year, working through an administrative furlough, faced a complex end of year closeout and established the groundwork for the emer gency furlough period. Tim took it upon himself to improve processes in our cost accounting department sav ing the government countless man-hours of work and thou sands of dollars, said Kiwus. He continuously pulled reports providing senior lead ership vital information to ensure we maintained com pliance during the imposed sequestration, Kiwus contin ued. Covey contributes his suc cess to his staff. They are good people who want to do a good job and are willing to help each other, said Covey. I am fortunate to work with them. Caddy, an engineer with the Public Works Department Jacksonville Utilities Department, was recognized as the Employee of the Year and was recognized for his extraordi nary technical ability in the development and implementation of several innovative proj ects to protect the environment while reducing overall energy costs to the U.S. Navy. Jay has dedicated many years in developing and implementing several innovative projects to protect our environment while reducing energy costs to the government, said Kiwus. He was the driving force behind the recent expansion of the wastewater treatment plant reuse system to supply reclaimed water to the golf course irrigation system at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. This project not only elimi nated the discharge of 18,000 pounds of harmful nutrients per year into the St. Johns River, it also precluded the need to withdraw 37 million gallons of water per year from the Florida aquifer. The sec ond part of the project, which should be completed in 2014, will make the Jacksonville wastewater treatment plant the first zero discharge plant in the area. Caddy also researched the technology, developed the statement of work, gained reg ulatory approval, coordinated with the manufacturer and oversaw the implementation of a new sludge treatment system that will reduce energy con sumption by nearly one million kilowatt hours per year and save over $100,000 annually in energy and operating costs. Working these projects has been very fulfilling, said Caddy. When I first came here in 1994, I worked on getting the first phase of the reuse system designed, permitted and con structed for the Timuquana Country Club for golf course irrigation, but I always wanted to expand it to our station golf course. It took 20 years, but we did it. Through his hard work NAS Jacksonville has reduced its wastewater discharge to the river while providing a source of irrigation water to the golf course and eliminating the withdrawal of millions of gal lons of potable water from the Florida aquifer.

PAGE 6

6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 For more than 50 years, military personnel and gov ernment employees have sup ported their favorite causes through the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC). In recognition that many CFC events were put on hold or cancelled during the gov ernment shutdown, the act ing director of the Office of Personnel Management extended the CFC solicitation period from Dec. 15 until Jan. 15. Rear Adm. Rick Williamson, commander, Navy Region Southeast recently answered some questions about the sta tus of the CFC in the Southeast Region. years CFC campaign? Our goal is very simple. We want everyone to have the opportunity to contrib ute to charities of their choice through the CFC. For more than 50 years, the CFC has given us the opportunity to join together and help those in need, and to bring about dra matic change in the commu nities that need it most. The objective remains the same, yet this year has been different. While weve been faced with unprecedented budget chal lenges, our commitment to public service and our community is still there. Many people say, when times are hard, expect to have a bad campaign. During my 28 years in the Navy, I have found this to be untrue. Each year weve always had good campaigns. I see no reason to expect that the trend will be reversed. I think its a great thing that the campaign has been extended for another month, and with it, I expect that our campaign will be successful. tant to you? There are a lot of charities that participate in CFC. If you want to contribute to medical research or disaster relief or programs for the homeless you can do so through CFC. Ive always been drawn towards charities supporting education because my parents always put a high value on a quality education. Thats the beauty of CFC the choices are in your hands. You can des ignate the type of charity you want to support, choose how much and how you want to pay. And through CFC, you are giving back to your community. government employees who havent yet had the chance to give, what should they do? I hope by now everyone has been approached by their CFC key person. The key person has the catalogs of charities who participate in CFC and the forms youll need to designate your contribution. Your key person can even help you fill out the paperwork. Not only do you have the flex ibility to decide to which char ity you give, you can also make one lump-sum payment or set up a payroll deduction. And dont forget, your donation is tax deductible. So if youve not heard from your key person, ask your supervisor who it is. And do is soon, as the cam paign ends on Jan.15. The smallest donation can go a long way towards improv ing the lives of many. I hope that each of you will lend your valued support to this worth while annual campaign. Together we can continue the success of CFC. President Barack Obama signed House Resolution 3304 Dec. 26, which provides pay and bonuses for U.S. service members, enhances coun terterrorism efforts overseas, builds security capacities of key U.S. partner-nations, expands efforts to prevent sexual assault and strengthens protections for victims. Here is the text of the presi dents statement on the signing of the bill: Today I have signed into law H.R. 3304, the National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year 2014. I have signed this annual defense authorization legislation because it will provide pay and bonuses for our service members, enhance counterterrorism initiatives abroad, build the security capacity of key partners, and expand efforts to prevent sexual assault and strengthen pro tections for victims. Since taking office, I have repeatedly called upon the Congress to work with my administration to close the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The continued operation of the facility weakens our national security by draining resourc es, damaging our relation ships with key allies and part ners, and emboldening violent extremists. For the past several years, the Congress has enacted unwarranted and burden some restrictions that have impeded my ability to transfer detainees from Guantanamo. Earlier this year, I again called upon the Congress to lift these restrictions and, in this bill, the Congress has taken a positive step in that direction. Section 1035 of this Act gives the administration additional flexibility to transfer detainees abroad by easing rigid restric tions that have hindered negotiations with foreign countries and interfered with executive branch determinations about how and where to transfer detainees. Section 1035 does not, however, eliminate all of the unwarranted limitations on foreign transfers and, in cer tain circumstances, would violate constitutional separation of powers principles. The executive branch must have the flexibility, among other things, to act swiftly in conducting negotiations with foreign countries regarding the circum stances of detainee transfers. Of course, even in the absence of any statutory restrictions, my administration would transfer a detainee only if the threat the detainee may pose can be sufficiently mitigated and only when consistent with our humane treatment policy. Section 1035 nevertheless rep resents an improvement over current law and is a welcome step toward closing the facility. In contrast, sections 1033 and 1034 continue unwise funding restrictions that cur tail options available to the executive branch. Section 1033 renews the bar against using appropriated funds to con struct or modify any facility in the United States, its terri tories, or possessions to house any Guantanamo detainee in the custody or under the control of the Department of Defense unless authorized by the Congress. Section 1034 renews the bar against using appropriated funds to trans fer Guantanamo detainees into the United States for any purpose. I oppose these provisions, as I have in years past, and will continue to work with the Congress to remove these restrictions. The executive branch must have the authority to determine when and where to prosecute Guantanamo detainees, based on the facts and circumstances of each case and our national secu rity interests. For decades, Republican and Democratic administrations have success fully prosecuted hundreds of terrorists in federal court. Those prosecutions are a legitimate, effective, and powerful tool in our efforts to protect the nation. Removing that tool from the executive branch does not serve our national secu rity interests. Moreover, sec tion 1034 would, under certain circumstances, violate consti tutional separation of powers principles. The detention facility at Guantanamo continues to impose significant costs on the American people. I am encouraged that this act provides the executive greater flexibility to transfer Guantanamo detain ees abroad, and look forward to working with the Congress to take the additional steps needed to close the facility. In the event that the restrictions on the transfer of Guantanamo detainees in sections 1034 and 1035 operate in a manner that violates constitutional separa tion of powers principles, my administration will implement them in a manner that avoids the constitutional conflict. The 2014 basic allowance for housing rates for service members released today rep resent an average increase of 5 percent, or up to $75 to $80 per month, the Defense Departments Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH) program manager said. The new rates will took effect Jan. 1 at a cost of about $20 billion for the Defense Department program, which will affect nearly 1 million ser vice members, Cheryl Anne Woehr said. The allowance differs by pay grade, location and whether or not service mem bers have dependents. How each service member is impacted is local, Woehr said, explaining that BAH rates are based on the costs of housing for civilians with comparable incomes in 306 areas in the country with significant mili tary populations. The program focuses strictly on the rental market and cer tain types of housing, such as rental prices for townhouses, apartments and single-family homes, Woehr said. BAH rate adjustments, she said, are based on three factors: data gathered from property managers for existing vacan cies in each area, the costs of utilities based on data from the American Community Survey, and renters insurance costs, based on data collected from insurance carriers in each state. BAH rates are routinely reviewed and are adjusted each year to account for fluc tuations in rent, utilities and renters insurance in a given location, said Navy Lt. Cmdr. Nate Christensen, a Pentagon spokesman. BAH is designed to assist service members assigned to permanent duty stations within the United States with acquir ing housing comparable to civilians in the same income range at that location, he added. The largest BAH area increase for 2014 will be in Mobile, Ala., at an average of 14.9 percent, which translates into about $1,500 for BAH per month for service members with dependents, compared to $1,305 per month for 2013. Increases in Honolulu County, Hawaii, and Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., follow at 14.7 per cent and 14.5 percent, respectively. The areas with the larg est BAH decreases are Sacramento, Calif., where a 7.7 percent BAH reduction trans lates into $1,998 monthly for service members with depen dents, compared to $2,132 in 2013 Yuma, Ariz., sees a 6.1 percent decrease in 2014, and BAH rates will drop by 5.9 percent at Altus Air Force Base, Okla. The BAH rate decreases will apply only to service members who are newly reporting to those locations. Service members already assigned to an area where BAH decreases in 2014 are grandfathered by the programs individual rate pro tection, and their rate will not go down. In areas where BAH is increasing, service mem bers who already live there will receive the new rate. We do want to make sure were fair to the service mem bers regardless of where in the country theyre stationed, Woehr said. A BAH primer on the Defense Travel Management Office website lays out the data col lection process and has a table that links housing types to pay grades, she added. Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) Aviation team members across the United States spread some holiday spirit by participating in annual angel trees and toy drives that help families that are unable to provide gifts to their children during the holiday season. DLA Aviation employees at Oklahoma City, Warner Robins, Ga., and Jacksonville, Fla., helped their local communities despite having their budgets shortened earlier this year with government furloughs and shutdowns. The employees at DLA Aviation at Jacksonville kicked off their 2013 holi day season Nov.22 with a potluck luncheon and Toys for Tots toy drive. Daniel Ortiz, a staff sergeant with the U.S. Marine Corps took delivery of the first donations from Sustainment Specialist Noel Magsakay, Equipment Specialist Terri Wood and the rest of the DLA Aviation Jacksonville team. We have been supporting the Salvation Army for several years, said Acquisition Logistics Specialist April Walls, DLA Aviation at Warner Robins. I am not sure how many years DLA has been involved with the Salvation Army Angel Tree, but this is my third year participating and second year working as a lead. Last year I was able to get a tour of the warehouse where all the gifts are stored and arranged. It gave me a greater understanding of how important the support we give is to the community, Walls said. Walls said they adopted 18 children this year, but several offices at Warner Robins participated as groups. I am not sure how many individual contributors there were within each group, she said. Additionally, DLA Aviation at Oklahoma City had a 90 percent employee participation rate in its Angel Tree Program according to Director, Procurement Operations Frances Evans. Our social committee donates 50 percent of the funds for our Christmas party to the kids and purchases gifts, Evans said. She added that the social commit tee does this in addition to those gifts employees have already purchased. Evans said she asked her employees if they wanted to help find a charity for Christmas because, we are so blessed to have our jobs and we should reach out to our community and help. On the same token, Walls said, I feel like every child should have a Merry Christmas. Giving makes you feel real ly good. With everything in the world, we can all get wrapped up in our own lives and forget about those that may not have as much. If our contributions help a family in need have a beautiful Christmas then we have accomplished the true mean ing of the season, Walls said. Combined Federal Campaign extended to Jan. 15Obama-signed bill provides military pay, bonusesOfficials announce 2014 military housing allowance ratesDLA Aviation forward sites spread cheer with toy drives ducks.org 800-45-DUCKS JOIN TODAY! Continental Conservation: You Make it HappenA CFC participant provided as a public service

PAGE 7

Blue Star Families brought the joy of reading to military children by donat ing nearly 400 new books through the organizations Books on Bases pro gram at the NAS Jacksonville Child Development Center (CDC) Dec. 17. Blue Star Families Chapter Director Kate Pennington said, Our goal today is to promote reading and educate military families on the importance of lit eracy and to inform military families of the multiple programs we offer in the area for both children and spouses. We are sending bran new books home to families to encourage them to read allowed at home. The books were donated by Disney Corporation. During the event, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander, his wife, Pam, along with NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamakers wife, Teri, and NAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM) (AW/SW) Bradley Shepherd read vari ous books to preschoolers before giv ing each of the children a book to take home. Shepherd said, It was pleasure and a wonderful opportunity to read books to children at the Child Development Center. I recommend this heart-warming experience to anyone. This is the least I can do to support the children of military parents during the holiday season. Blue Star Families, a nonprofit orga nization that was created by military families in April 2009, is a program that consist of military families support ing one another through the various challenges of military life, regardless of rank, branch of service or physical location. Several of the programs the organization offers include, books on bases, Blue I think the Blue Star Families is a wonderful program. The books that are donated to children are outstanding. They have a wide-variety of hard cov ered quality books, she added. Literature is real import for children. It is important for them to be exposed to reading when they are young. We think it is great this program comes to the CDC and reads to our children. The kids love having different people come into their classroom, said NAS Jax Youth Program Manager Mary Grenier. Blue Star Families program promotes reading for military children JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 7

PAGE 8

8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 Cooperative Security Location (CSL) Comalapa, El Salvador commemorated its 10-year anniversary by hosting a general public visit Dec. 14. CSL Comalapa began operations in late 2000 although it was not until Nov. 13, 2003 that an official site location was determined and con struction started. CSL Comalapa pro vides critical logistics, infrastructure, and oper ational support to for ward deployed U.S. and partner aviation assets that participate in Joint Interagency Task ForceSouth assigned coun ter-narcotic/illicit traf ficking operations and Naval Forces Southern Command-directed humanitarian efforts. CSL Comalapa has played a vitally important part in protecting the southern approaches to the U.S. and its interests for more than10 years. Guests and citizens of the local El Salvadoran community were treat ed to static displays of aircraft, including the P-3C Orion mari time patrol aircraft, U.S. Customs and Border Protection MQ-9, a Guardian Unmanned Aerial System, El Salvadorian Air Force A-37 Dragonfly and others. Additionally, there was a mix of American and El Salvadorian foods and refreshments that also symbolized the deep and very important rela tionship that CSL continues to maintain with the local community. CSL Commanding Officer Cmdr. Odin Klug, talked about the impor tance of having a forward operating air field in El Salvador. Over 2,600 missions flown with targets of all shapes and sizes inter dicted, seizing or disrupting tens of thousands of metric tons of contra band narcotics equating to a street value in the billions of dollars, said Klug. The anniversary cer emony was concluded by a cake cutting with U.S. Ambassador to El Salvador Mari Carmen Aponte, U.S. Deputy Chief of Mission to El Salvador Michael Barkin, and Klug.The guests also witnessed the final reen listment of MAC David Shisk, who will transfer to his final command next summer. Klug shared a message from Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander, U.S. Naval Southern Command/Commander U.S. 4th Fleet, who said, The success of our mis sion requires you to be ready, skilled, and dedi cated. And for a decade, CSL Comalapa has been ready, skilled and dedi cated. Well done to all the brave men and women who have and continue to serve aboard CSL Comalapa! CSL Comalapa is under the operational control of U.S. Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet employ maritime forces in coop erative maritime security operations in order to maintain access enhance interoperability and build enduring partner ships that foster region al security in the U.S. Southern Command area of responsibility. Force South (JIATF-S). JIATF-S sup ports counter-illicit trafficking oper ations, as well as humanitarian, and search and rescue missions. The VP-8 Fighting Tigers are current ly deployed to El Salvador supporting JIATF-S and U.S. Southern Command. deployment lengths. After these next three carrier deployments that will take us through 2014 to 2015 well probably migrate to about eight months for our carriers for OPTEMPO length, said Greenert. Amphibious ready groups will be about seven and a half months, and submarines about six-month deploy ment lengths, he added. Well be stabilized in a few years, Greenert said. But it will take those few years to get through this of impact of sequestration. MCPON spoke on how increas ing deployment lengths have affected Sailors and their families. Our Sailors and their families never cease to amaze us, said Stevens, citing Sailors perseverance through increas ing deployment lengths. We cannot fool ourselves, this has taken a toll and it will continue to take a toll, this is why we need to take a look at how long and how hard our Sailors are being deployed, said Stevens. Later in the interview Greenert dis cussed compensation and how the Navy will deal with budget issues in the coming years. He measures quality of ser vice in two parts quality of life and quality of work. Quality of life being pay and benefits and quality of work being whether Sailors have adequate training and the parts they need. Sailors say that where the Navy needs some improvement is in the quality of work, Greenert said. The Navy has got to do better in: having right kind of leadership in place; getting rid of gaps at sea; having spare parts and training; and having a more predictable schedule. He went on to explain that those needs must be bal anced with what the Navy spends on compensation. We have to balance how we pay our people with what we need to operate, Greenert said. MESSAGE CSL Comalapa celebrates 10-year anniversary VP-8

PAGE 9

The Defense Depart-ment has expanded its zero tolerance for the use of illicit drugs to include syn thetic marijuana, also known as spice, the director of DoDs drug testing and program policy said Dec. 13. In an interview with American Forces Press Service and the Pentagon Channel, Army Lt. Col. Tom Martin said that in addition to the broad range of drugs for which the military already randomly tests service members, synthetic marijuana will also be included. The message were getting out now is that when you participate in our random urinalysis program, synthetic marijuana products or synthetic marijuana will now be tested along with our other drugs, he said. Its been known in the general population, both in the medical community and various media reports, that synthetic marijuana drug use is a serious health concern. Martin noted that while the military typically has a much lower level of drug use than in society at large, synthetic marijuana still poses a significant risk to both the safety and readiness of our force. Prior to synthetic marijuana being banned, he said, the department went out and did a random study looking at a sampling of military urine speci mens from all the different services to see if synthetic marijuana was being used by our members. At that time, the positive rate, or the number of service members who tested positive, was about 2.5 percent. To put that in perspective, he said, in 2012 the overall positive rate for all the drugs tested for in the urinalysis program was 0.9 percent. In 2012, synthetic marijuana products were banned through legislation, Martin said. So we went back and did a similar study, and what we found is that the actual numbers went down. However, he added, a high number of service members are using synthetic marijuana. In addition to testing for synthetic marijuana, Martin said, the military also randomly tests all ser vice members for marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines and other drugs in the amphetamine class, including methamphetamines and the drug known as ecstasy. The test also looks for codeine and morphine, oxy codone, oxymorphone, hydrocodone, hydromor phone, Vicodin, and different diazepines, such as Valium and Xanax. Martin said even deployed troops are subject to random drug testing. They are still mandated to be tested under the militarys random urinalysis pro gram; however, the frequency is determined by the operational tempo, he said. If a random drug testing detects the presence of illegal drugs, Martin said, troops are subject to punish ment under military law guidelines. Any service member who tests positive for either an illicit drug or misuse of a prescription drug falls under any actions deemed appropriate under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, as well actions that are appropriate as deemed by their commander, he said. With the addition of synthetic marijuana to an already stringent drug testing policy, Martin reiter ated the departments commitment to zero tolerance for the abuse of illicit drugs. All service members participating in our urinaly sis program will be tested for cannabinoids, he said. And if they do test positive, they will be dealt with according to the Uniform Code of Military Justice. The Center for Personal and Professional Development (CPPD) is temporarily expanding the availability of tuition assistance (TA) for Sailors. CPPDs Virtual Education Center (VEC) will start authorizing commandapproved TA requests for classes that have a start date in the second quarter of FY-14, which ends March 31, accord ing to Capt. John Newcomer, CPPDs commanding officer. We strongly believe that Sailors who take the initiative to develop personally and professionally through Navy vol untary education programs are better equipped with strong analytical skills and the ability to make informed decisions that benefit their command and the Navy, he said. TA requests for the FY-14 second quarter will be approved in the order they are received on a first come, first served basis for as long as TA funds are available, said Newcomer. TA requests will be authorized up to a total expen diture cap of approximately $23 million for the second quarter. The second quarter of each fiscal year historically has the highest demand for TA funding, said Newcomer. He emphasized that Sailors are responsible to know the status of the TA request before they begin any class. Sailors must ensure their TA requests are command approved, in the WebTA system, and authorized by the VEC before their class start date. If any of these three criteria arent met, Sailors should contact the VEC or servicing Navy College Office regarding the status of their TA request before their class begins. The VEC is open from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. (ET) Monday through Friday. Sailors can reach the VEC by phone at 1-877838-1659 or 757-492-4684, or DSN at 492-4684. The VEC e-mail address is VEC@navy.mil TA is the Navys educational finan cial assistance program available to both Navy officer and enlisted active duty personnel and Navy reservists on continuous active duty. It funds tuition costs for courses taken in an off-duty status at a college, universi ty or vocational/technical institution, whose regional or national accredita tion is recognized by the Department of Education and has a signed Department of Defense Memorandum of Understanding. CPPD is responsible for providing a wide range of personal and profes sional development courses and mate rials, including general military train ing, Navy instructor training, alcohol and drug awareness program training, suicide and sexual assault prevention, bystander intervention, and personal responsibility classes. CPPD also administers the Navys voluntary education program provid ing Sailors with the opportunities to earn college degrees. CPPD also man ages the U.S. Military Apprenticeship Program, which offers Sailors the opportunity to earn civilian apprenticeship certifications. For more information, visit: https:// www.netc.navy.mil/centers/cppd/ DoD adds synthetic marijuana to random drug testingTuition Assistance temporarily expanded As VP-5 continues its busy schedule operat ing and maintaining the P8-A Poseidon, the squadron is highlighting one outstanding Mad Fox each week. This weeks spotlight shines on AWO2(NAC/AW) Nathan Smith. Smith was born in Scottsbluff, Neb. and currently resides in Jacksonville with his wife, Kimberly. His mother, Lt. Col. Debra Smith works as a chief nurse in the United States Air Force. His grandfather served in the Army during the Korean War. He joined the Navy in 2008. After basic train ing, he attended Navy Aircrewman School and A school in Pensacola, Fla. After graduation, he was assigned to VP-30 to learn the P3-C Orion aircraft. Upon comple tion of his syllabus in VP-30, he was assigned to the VP-5 Mad Foxes. He has deployed to NAS Sigonella, Italy; Djibouti, Africa and Kadena Air Base, Japan and com pleted the transition to the P8-A Poseidon fol lowing his last deploy ment. As an electron ic warfare opera tor (EWO) aboard the P8-A Poseidon, Smith is tasked with manag ing, maintaining, and employing the elec tronic weapon systems aboard the aircraft. This includes the radar, IFFI, EO/IR, and ESM systems. He employs all of these systems to maintain a surface plot for the aircrew and ensure safety of flight. Smith is the EWO training track manager and is currently in charge of 10 upgraders. On Nov. 20, he became an EWO P8-A instructor and was previously an instructor on the P3-C Orion. The most rewarding part of my job is seeing everyone in the squad ron benefit from the training they are provided and seeing the junior operators get qualified, explained Smith. In that same light mak ing sure that the correct VP-5 Mad Fox of the Week JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 9

PAGE 10

10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014

PAGE 11

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 11

PAGE 12

Ask the doc: Concerned about cholesterol? Question: Im 25 years old. When should I be concerned about my cholesterol? Answer: Taking care of your cholesterol now will dramatically decrease your risk of developing heart disease and stroke later on and which is why we recommend screen ing at your age. Having high cholester ol can, and usually will, lead to heart disease and stroke if left untreated. If you have high cholesterol early in life, the choles terol can build-up in the arteries of your heart, brain and other organs. This build-up over time can lead to blockages causing heart attacks and stroke. Ask the Doc is writ ten by Naval Hospital Jacksonville providers from its hospital and five branch health clinics in Florida and Georgia. This column was written by Lt. Cmdr. John Steely, a Family Medicine physician from Naval Branch Health Clinic Key West. If you have a question for a physi cian, dentist, pharmacist or optometrist that youd like to see published, please send it to jaxpublicaffairs@ med.navy.mil 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014

PAGE 13

President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on Jan.1, 1863, as the nation approached its third year of bloody civil war. The proclama tion declared, that all persons held as slaves within the rebellious states are, and henceforward shall be free. According to the National Archives, although the Emancipation Proclamation did not end slavery in the nation, it cap tured the hearts and imagination of mil lions of Americans and fundamentally transformed the character of the war. Moreover, the Proclamation announced the accep tance of black men into the Union Army and Navy enabling the liberated to become liberators. By the end of the war, almost 200,000 black soldiers and sailors had fought for the Union and freedom. Emancipation Proclamation U.S. Navy General Order No. 4 of 14 January 1863 _________________ The following Proclamation of the President is published for the information and government of the officers and others of the Naval Service. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy ________________ BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. A PROCLAMATION. _________________ WHEREAS, on the twenty-second day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, a Proclamation was issued by the President of the United States, containing, among other things, the following, to wit: That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever, free; and the Executive government of the United States, including the military and naval authority thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of any such persons, and will do no act or acts to repress such persons, or any of them, in any efforts they may make for their actual freedom. That the Executive will, on the first day of January aforesaid, by proclamation, designate the States and parts of States, if any, in which the people thereof, respectively, shall then be in rebellion against the United States; and the fact that any State, or the people thereof, shall on that day be in good faith represented in the Congress of the United States, by members chosen thereto at elections wherein a majority of the qualified voters of such States shall have participated, shall, in the absence of strong countervailing testimony, be deemed conclusive evidence that such State, and the people thereof, are not then in rebellion against the United States. Now, therefore, I, ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States, by virtue of the power in me vested as Commander-in-chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, in time of actual armed rebellion against the authority and government of the United States, and as a fit and necessary war measure for suppressing said rebellion, do, on this first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and in accordance with my purpose so to do, publicly proclaimed for the full period of one hundred days from the day first above mentioned, order and designate as the States and parts of States wherein the people thereof, respectively, are this day in rebellion against the United States, the following, to wit: Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, (except the parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemines, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James, Ascension, Assumption, Terre Bonne, Lafourche, St. Mary, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the city of New Orleans,) Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia, (except the forty-eight counties designated as West Virginia, and also the counties of Berkeley, Accomac, Northampton, Elizabeth City, York, Princess Ann, and Norfolk, including the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth,) and which excepted parts are for the present left precisely as if this Proclamation were not issued. And by virtue of the power and for the purpose aforesaid, I do order and declare that all persons held as slaves within said designated States and parts of States are and henceforward shall be free; and that the Executive government of the United States, including the military and naval authorities thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of said persons. And I hereby enjoin upon the people so declared to be free to abstain from all violence, unless in necessary self-defense; and I recommend to them that, in all cases when allowed, they labor faithfully for reasonable wages. And I further declare and make known that such persons, of suitable condition, will be received into the armed service of the United States to garrison forts, positions, stations, and other places, and to man vessels of all sorts in said service. And upon this act, sincerely believed to be an act of justice warranted by the Constitution upon military necessity, I invoke the considerate judgement of mankind and the gracious favor of Almighty God. In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. Done at the city of Washington this first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the eighty-seventh. _________________ ABRAHAM LINCOLN _________________ By the President: William H. Seward, Secretary of State 151 years ago: U.S. Navy General Order No. 4 While the Navy already has one of the strongest counter-fraud efforts in the government, Navy Secretary Ray Mabus announced Dec. 20 new measures to assure contracting integrity and to prevent fraud. Mabus, who briefed the Pentagon press corps, spoke amid a criminal investigation focused on Glenn Defense Marine Asia (GDMA). The U.S. Department of Justice is prosecuting the case, which alleges the company overcharged the U.S. Navy for husbanding services throughout Asia. Husbanding is the services ships receive in port and covers everything from removing sewage to providing transportation to resupply. Some Naval officers have been arrested for their involvement in the scheme and Mabus expects more announce ments as a result of the case. Mabus is proud of the work Navy personnel did in uncovering the plot. The Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS), along with the Defense Criminal Investigative Service, and the Defense Contract Audit Agency are doing incredibly impressive work to ferret out the alleged fraud and corruption carried out by GDMA and, yes, allega tions against naval personnel, as well, Mabus said. The investigation has been under way since May 2010. Information gathered during this investigation was eventually turned over to government prosecutors and led to the recent charges filed in federal court, Mabus said. This included charges filed against an NCIS agent. Throughout the investigation, Mabus repeatedly instructed NCIS agents to take the investigation wherever it led. This is a very serious case, and it is a serious issue, he said. The secretary has spoken with all threeand four-star admirals about the investigation and the changes he is making. The conduct and the behavior alleged to have occurred in connection with this case is absolutely incompat ible with the standards we require from our Navy officers and civilians, Mabus said. If, as a result of this investigation, criminal prosecutors decide not to pursue criminal charges, but instead refer cases to the Navy for disposition, Im announcing that those cases will be reviewed and resolved through a con solidated disposition authority. This authority will be a four-star admiral who will ensure that if alle gations are substantiated, individuals will be held appropriately accountable, Mabus said. Since 2009, Navy has suspended 252 contractors and debarred 400, the secretary said. Still, he said, the service must do more. Mabus is taking steps following receipt of a report reviewing acquisition strategies for husbanding and similar contracts worldwide. Experts are examining the husband ing contractor process from end-to-end and will recommend changes to correct deficiencies in those procedures and to provide maximum effective oversight of the process. When that task is finished, the Navy will issue a revised acquisition strategy that will be used on all husbanding contracts globally. The Navy will further standard ize requirements, further standardize contract vehicles, further standardize administration and increase oversight of husbanding contracts and contrac tors, Mabus said. The Navy will increase the use of firm fixed-price line items and minimize the use and improve the oversight of unpriced line items. The service also will remove pay functions to husbanding service pro viders from ships and provide better guidance on requirements and more contracting support ship COs going overseas, he said. The Navy will also incorporate stan dardized requisition processes fleet wide, and the service auditor general will conduct a special audit of husbanding and port services contracts. That report is due in June 2014.Mabus tightens Navys counter-fraud measures JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 13

PAGE 14

14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus announced Dec. 22 plans to evaluate and redesign ele ments of the female service dress uniform for both officers and enlisted beginning no later than May 2014. SECNAV approved a propos al by Chief of Naval Personnel Vice Adm. Bill Moran to redesign the Service Dress Blue (SDB) uniform worn by female Sailors E1-E6 and to redesign the female combination cover for E7 and above. These changes ensure greater uniformity in our ser vice and ceremonial dress, but more importantly, they send a clear signal that we are one in dress, one in standard and one in team. As you look out across a group of Sailors, you ought to see, not female and male Sailors, but Sailors, said Mabus. I asked the Chief of Naval Personnel to present me a plan that balanced the importance for uniformity with cost and functionality and he did just that. Its now over to his team to do the necessary testing and get these uniforms rolled out to the Fleet as soon practical. The new E1-E6 service dress blue female uniform blends uniformity and tradition. The jumper and Dixie cup, tailored for female form and functionality, will match the recently redesigned (but not yet issued) male jumper -closely resembling the iconic image of the Lone Sailor. Following completion of a fit evaluation on the female jumper style uniform and dixie cup, there will be a combined fleet introduction of the new female uniform and the previously approved male redesigned SDB uniform. The female combination cover for E-7 and above will be redesigned to more closely resemble the male version, but will fit a womans head in size and proportion. It was clear in the feedback from the recent test that simply issuing a male cover to females did not result in satisfactory fit or appearance. Similarly, lessons learned from the fit evaluation will be used to inform the design of the female cover. New uniform items will be evaluated for fit, comfort and durability. Fleet introduction will begin following approval of the final design and completion of the manufacturing process. The final timeline and costs of the new items will be determined following the wear test. We are moving out with our plan to test these new uniforms items this spring, said Moran. After a thorough testing, elements of these uniforms will begin to be introduced. Feedback from a May 2013 uniform survey was instru mental in the development of these changes. More than 1,000 female offi cers and enlisted participated in the internal study which looked at level of satisfaction when wearing the male combination cover, Dixie Cup and the winter jumper style uniform. Loud and clear we heard their feedback-dont simply put us in mens uniforms, said Moran. We are taking the needed time to develop and test uni forms that more closely resemble their male shipmates, but are designed to fit female Sailors. Uniform officials say that further changes to female uni forms are likely, as the uniform board reviews and deliberates additional ways to improve uniformity and functionality.For more information on uni forms and uniform policy, visit the Navy Uniform Matters web site at http://www.public.navy. mil/bupers-npc/support/uni forms/pages/default2.aspx. The Defense Department announced Jan. 3 changes in imminent danger pay (IDP) that will go into effect June 1, DoD spokesman Army Col. Steven Warren told reporters at a Pentagon news conference. This is a process that began [in 2011], he said, and included in-depth threat assessment from the combatant commands. It was made in coor dination with the Joint Staff, combatant commands and military services. Warren noted this policy change was not a budget-driven decision, but part of a rou tine recertification that hap pens every couple of years -its an ongoing process. According to a DoD news release announcing the recer tification, the combatant com mands conducted in-depth threat assessments for coun tries within their areas of responsibility. Following the review, the release stated, it was deter mined that the imminent threat of physical harm to U.S. military personnel due to civil insurrection, civil war, terror ism or wartime conditions is significantly reduced in many countries, resulting in the discontinuation of imminent danger pay in those areas. Periodic recertification of IDP, according to the news release, ensures that imminent danger designations match the actual conditions of des ignated countries so that the department can provide fair entitlements and benefits. The last recertification was com pleted in 2007. The DoD news release noted the following areas would no longer be designated as imminent danger areas: Timor, Haiti, Liberia, Oman, Rwanda, Tajikistan, United Arab Emirates, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan. space above Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Serbia and Montenegro. the Arabian Sea, Gulf of Aden, Gulf of Oman, and the Red Sea. space above the Persian Gulf. Of specific note, Warren said, imminent danger pay will remain in effect for the following: Iraq, Afghanistan, Lebanon, Jordan, Pakistan, Syria, Yemen and Egypt. Although 2013 statistics are not currently available, Warren noted that in the year prior, 194,189 personnel received IDP. Approximately 50,000 fewer will be receiving imminent danger pay, he said. In [2012], we spent approximately $500 million on imminent danger pay. This will result in a reduc tion of approximately $100 million. The benefit provides troops in IDP areas about $7.50 per day up to the maximum monthly rate of $225, Warren said. Uniform changes for female sailors to promote uniformity, fit, functionality Pentagon announces changes to imminent danger pay

PAGE 15

DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Family Night third Friday of the month, 8 p.m., balloon artist and karaoke DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Super Bowl Party Feb. 2 at 5 p.m., $10 per person Door prizes, buffet and beverage specialsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4 10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for Active Duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Jan. 18, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: Jan. 25, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Powerlifting Competition Feb. 8, 7 a.m. at the Fitness Center $10 registration feeI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: St. Augustine Holiday Lights $8.75 adult & $3 child Ringling Brothers Barnum & Bailey Circus $15 Disney Jr. Live $15 $29 Monster Jam $22 $42 Globetrotters $18 Wild Adventures $30 $70 Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL $166 $194.50 Universal Orlando $114 $169.50 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Daytona 500 $62 $209 Drive 4COPD 300 $55 Budweiser Duels $55 Sprint Unlimited $30 $55 Rolex 24 $32 $65 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 The Artist Series Broadway in Jacksonville 2014 season, select shows $51 $65 Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2014 season, select shows $11 $70 Armed Forces Vacation Club www. afvclub.com $349 $369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St. Augustine $4.25 $7.50 St. Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Wild Florida Airboats $17 $46.50 Florida Ecosafaris $25 $119 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels located near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Jacksonville Giants Game Jan. 11 at 6 p.m Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus Jan. 18 at 6 p.m. $5 per person Grill & Chill at the Liberty Center Jan. 23 at 6 p.m. Free hamburgers and hotdogs NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Daily Twilight Golf Special Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1 p.m. Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty Jan. 14 & 18 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests Jan. 16 & 30Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you!Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 15

PAGE 16

16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 FFSC offers life skills workshopsThe NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregistration is required at 5425745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2014: 3-4 (8 a.m.-4 p.m.), Feb. 5 (8 a.m.-12:30 p.m.) May 12-15 (5:30-10 p.m.), Aug. 18-19 (8 a.m.-4 p.m.), Aug. 20 (8 a.m.12:30 p.m.), Nov. 17-20 (5:30-10 p.m.). (TAP) Separation Workshop (7:30 a.m.4:15 p.m.) Feb. 3-7, Feb. 24-28, March 10-14, March 24-28, April 7-11, May 5-9, May 19-23, June 9-13, June 23-27, July 7-11, July 21-25, Aug. 11-15, Aug. 25-29, 1-5. (TAP) Retirement Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) Jan. 13-17, Feb. 10-14, March 17-21, April 14-18, May 12-16, June 16-20, July 14-18, Aug. 18-22, Sept. (8:30 a.m.-noon) Jan. 21, Feb. 21, April 1, May 2, June 30, June 30, July 29, Aug. Workshop (8-9:30 a.m.) Jan. 22, April 2, May 28, July 1, Sept. 3, Nov. 12. (9:40 a.m.-noon) Jan. 22, April 2, May 28, July 1, Sept. 3, Nov. 12. (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Feb. 18-19, April 29-30, Aug. 5-6, Nov. 24-25. Training (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) July 31. Management Workshop (1-4 p.m.) Jan. p.m.) Jan. 16, Feb. 13, April 3, May 1, 4 p.m.) Jan 9, March 6, May 8, July 10, Sept. 11, Nov. 13. 11 (10-11:30 a.m.), April 7 (1-2:30 p.m.), p.m.) Jan. 13, Feb. 10, March 10, April 14, May (9-10:30 a.m.) Jan. 14, Feb. 11, March 11, April 8, May 13, June 10, July 8, Aug. Extended Stress Management Workshop (8 a.m.-noon) Jan. 21, 28, May 20, 27, Sept. 23, 30. a.m.-noon) Jan. 27, Feb. 24, March 31, April 28, May 19, June 30, July 28, Aug. Personal Anger Control Group Jan. 23-Feb. 27 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.), March 27 May 1 (Thursdays 11 a.m.1 p.m.), May 27 July 8 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.-no workshop June 3), July 29 Sept. 9 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.-no workshop 11 a.m.-1 p.m.). Individual Communication (11 a.m.1 p.m.) -Jan 14, March 19, May 6, July 15, Sept. 9, Nov. 18. p.m.) Jan. 14, 21, 28; March 4, 11, 18, 25; May 6, 13, 20, 27; July 1, 8, 15, 22; Sept. 9, 16, 23, 30; Nov. 4, 12, 18, 25. Active Parenting of Teens (1-4 p.m.) Feb. 4, 11, 18, 25; April 1, 8, 15, 22; June 21, 28. Power 2 Change Womens Support Group (9:30-11 a.m.) Every Wednesday Expectant Families (9 a.m.-3 p.m.) Tiny Tots Play Group (10 a.m.-noon) Jan. 14, 28; Feb. 11, 25; March 11, 25; April 1, 15, 29; May 13, 27; June 10, 24; Exceptional Family Member p.m.-3 p.m.) March 13, May. 15, July 17, Sept. 4, Nov. 5. p.m.-3 p.m.) Feb. 6, April 10, June 12, To register for any of the above work shops, please call 542-5745. delivered its 100th F-35 Lightning II joint strike fighter to the Air Force, the services leaders marked the milestone and outlined the aircrafts value. The F-35 will be delivered to Luke serve as the first training aircraft for pilots of the fifth-generation fighter. Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Welsh III called the event a big deal for the Air Force during a recent Pentagon news conference. Welsh discussed the services need for the Lightning II, a need that became even more acute, he said, after total buy of F-22 Raptor fighters. The F-22 was to provide theaterwide air superiority, the general said. umbrella, F-35s must pick up the slack. You must have the F-35 to augment the F-22 to do the air superiority fight at the beginning of a high-end conflict in order to survive against the fifthgeneration threats we believe will be in the world at that point in time, he said. Even with upgrades, Welsh said, current air superiority fighters -F-15 Eagles and F-16 Fighting Falcons -cannot survive against a fifth-generation threat. added. I am certainly not willing to go to my secretary or the secretary of defense or to the chairman [of the Joint Chiefs of Staff] and say, I would rec ommend that we keep our old equip ment and update it, and just accept more losses and count on the incred ible ability of our aviators to win the fight anyway. The joint strike fighter program is the most expensive in American mili tary history. The Air Force will fly the F-35A variant, the Navy will fly the F-35C, and the Marine Corps will capability for the Air Force is set for The program has had growing pains. Costs have risen, and the flyaway cost for the Air Force version is around $150 million per aircraft. aircraft is rising and production costs are dropping, Welsh said. Since 2011, the program has met milestones con sistently, the general said. We have allies buying into the program and committing to purchasing aircraft, which will keep being more and more of a financial benefit for us over time. Welsh said now is not the time to cut the joint strike fighter program. I dont believe this is a good time to talk about truncating the buy cap ping it at some number, he said. I think that will put the program at risk of financially costing us even more. If wacky winter weather has played havoc with your electric and water bills, you can reduce future costs by making your home more energy and water efficient. The Jacksonville Public Library (JPL), JEA and the Green Team Project Yourself and training work shops at the following library locations in 2014: Jan. 11 Library Feb. 8 10:30 a.m. Southeast Regional Library March 8 10:30 a.m. Regency April 12, 10:30 a.m. Mandarin May 17, 10:30 a.m. Webb Wesconnett Regional Library June 14, The kit tools come in backpacks made from recycled billboard vinyl made locally in Jacksonville. Initially developed several years ago by JEA, the backpack still includes the great energy efficiency measuring tools to help you conserve energy, identify problem areas in your home, and tips backpacks also include new water use evaluation tools to find water leaks and estimate your water costs, discover if your faucets and appliances are water efficient, and determine if your outdoor irrigation system is watering effectively. The Green Team Project is offering one-hour workshops and demonstra tions on the proper use of the kits for those interested. For the past several years, weve helped people identify ways to make their homes more energy efficient. Were very excited to be able to expand the backpacks to include water effi ciency measurement tools and conserGreen Team Project Program coordi nator. We hope homeowners will take advantage of these training workshops that are free and open to the public. The kits will be available for check out with a JPL library card at each of able for checkout at any library loca tion throughout the year. In 2013, the backpacks were borrowed more than 2,000 times, and won a Green Initiative Council North Florida for making a significant impact on sustainability in North Florida. Pre-registration for the workshops is required. Attendance at each work shop is limited to 20 individuals on a first-come, first-served basis.For more information and to register, visit www.greenteamproject.org Chiefs of Staff Army Gen. Martin E. make substantial improvements to the militarys sexual assault preven tion and response, including related improvements to the military justice system. back to him with a full-scale review of The presidents statement reads as follows: Earlier this year I directed Secretary Hagel, Chairman Dempsey and our entire defense leadership team to step up their game exponentially in pre venting and responding to the serious crime of sexual assault in our military. As Commander in Chief, Ive made it clear that these crimes have no place in the greatest military on earth. Since then, our armed forces have moved ahead with a broad range of initia tives, including reforms to the military justice system, improving and expand ing prevention programs, and enhanc ing support for victims. I commend the Pentagon leadership for their hard work on this critical issue of vital importance to our nation. Yet, so long as our women and men in uniform face the insider threat of sexual assault, we have an urgent obligation to do more to support victims and hold perpetrators accountable for their crimes, as appropriate under the military justice system. Members of Congress, especially Senators Gillibrand and McCaskill, have rightly called attention to the urgency of eradicat ing this scourge from our armed forces. As a result, there were a broad range of reforms proposed in this years National Defense Authorization Act. The White House and the Department of Defense and other relevant agencies in my Administration will continue to work with Congress to address this corrosive problem, which is a violation of the values our armed forces stand for, destroys trust among our troops, and undermines our readiness. Today, I instructed Secretary Hagel and Chairman Dempsey to contin ue their efforts to make substantial improvements with respect to sex ual assault prevention and response, including to the military justice system. I have also directed that they report back to me, with a full-scale review of their progress, by Dec.1, 2014. If I do not see the kind of progress I expect, then we will consider additional reforms that may be required to eliminate this crime from our military ranks and protect our brave service members who stand guard for us every day at home and around the world.Obama directs review of sexual assault prevention progressReduce utility bills with home energy and water evaluation kits Air Force leader outlines Joint Strike Fighters value

PAGE 17

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 17

PAGE 18

18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 8 is training and preparing off the coast of Southern California for NASAs unmanned Exploration Flight Test-One (EFT-1) for the Orion spacecraft, scheduled for early next year. Orion will travel 3,600 miles above the Earths surface, more than 15 times farther than the International Space Station, and will ultimately re-enter the atmosphere at a speed of more than 20,000 miles per hour, enduring temperatures up to 4,000 degrees Fahrenheit. HSC-8 will embark NASA engineers on two MH-60S Knighthawks to film and monitor the re-entry and recovery of Orion using state of the art debris tracking software and video equipment. Aside from documenting the initial test phase of this event, NASA will use data gathered from the mission to evalu ate parachute deployments and debris patterns to refine Orions design prior to the manned launch. HSC-8s aircraft will launch from San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS San Diego (LPD 22) and assist the crews that will recover the craft into the ships well-deck. Cmdr. Derrick Kingsley, HSC-8 commanding officer, said his squadron is honored to be involved in the beginning stages of the next major phase of space exploration and proud to showcase the multi-mission capabilities of the MH-60S Seahawk helicopter. The Eightballers of HSC-8 operate within U.S. 3rd Fleet area of responsibility; their missions include vertical lift, search and rescue, logistics, anti-surface warfare, special operations forces support, and combat search and rescue. Joint, interagency and international relationships strengthen 3rd Fleets ability to respond to crises and protect maritime interests of the U.S. and its allies. All four active services met or exceeded their numerical accession goals for the first month of fiscal year 2014, which began Oct. 1, Defense Department officials announced. Here are the services num bers for October: percent of its goal of 4,120; percent of its goal of 2,155; sions, 100 percent of its goal of 2,252; and The Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps exhibited strong retention numbers for the first month of fiscal 2014, officials said. Four of the six reserve com ponents met or exceeded their accession goals for the first month of the fiscal year: accessions, 118 percent of its goal of 3,828; sions, 96 percent of its goal of 2,203; sions, 100 percent of its goal of 313; accessions, 100 percent of its goal of 801; accessions, 100 percent of its goal of 681; and sions, 93 percent of its goal of All reserve components met their attrition goals, or were within the percentage vari ance allowed by the Defense Department, officials said, noting that attrition data lags behind accession data. Current trends are expected to continue, they added. NASA, Navy team up for capsule recovery Recruiting for all services starts fiscal year on track training is presented is always challenging. Smiths current goal is to make first class petty officer. His longterm goals are to make chief petty officer or become an offi cer through Officer Candidate School. He earned his associates degree at Columbia College and plans to attend Arizona State University and pursue a bach elors degree in history. Outside of the squadron, Smith enjoys working around the house and on cars. VP-5

PAGE 19

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 19

PAGE 20

20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014



PAGE 1

THURSDAY, JANUARY 9, 2014 HSM-74 COC VR-62 HOME BLUE STA R EV ENT Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The top admiral and top enlisted man in the Navy recently released another installment of their Internet video series, Conversation with a Shipmate. MC2 Mike DiMestico interviewed Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) Mike Stevens aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) on Dec. 19. The leaders were visit ing Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group that is currently supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility. With USS Gettysburg (CG 64) alongside the carrier, Greenert and Stevens answered ques tions that are hot topics among Sailors in the fleets. The three discussed a wide berth of issues: deployment lengths and budget cuts to uniform updates and advance ment exam changes. DiMestico used CNOs recently released Position Report as a starting point for the interview, questioning what 2014 holds for the Navy. We heard you loud and clear when you said presence is our mandate, said DiMestico. What is the key in 2014 in maintaining that global pres ence? Greenert said the key will be to have rotational forces for ward from the east and west coasts; and then he went on to emphasize another important element, places. Greenert explained that non-rotational forces will play a much larger role in the future. In Rota, Spain there will be four destroyers by 2016. Singapore will have four litto ral combat ships operating for ward. The Navy will also continue to develop forward deployed naval forces in Japan, as well as the Darwin option, where the Australian government will host marines to be forward deployed. Greenert said, These nonrotational places are really the key to getting the most out of forward deployed forces. The conversation pivoted to the effects of sequestration on The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 have officially relieved the Screaming Eagles of VP-1 as Commander Task Group (CTG) 57.2 and the Golden Swordsmen of VP-47 as CTG 47.1. VP-8s Commanding Officer Cmdr. Todd Libby said, VP-1 and VP-47 dis played great hospitality and profession alism while welcoming VP-8 to both 4th and 5th Fleet areas of responsibility. Our collective efforts resulted in a high ly successful turnover which enabled the Fighting Tigers to continue the excellence of the Screaming Eagles and Golden Swordsmen. Since relieving VP-1 and VP-47, the Fighting Tigers have flown more than 539 flight hours in support of coordinat ed operations with U.S. Army, Marine Corps, Air Force, Coast Guard and the Customs and Border Patrol Agency. In addition to coordinated operations, VP-8 conducts anti-submarine warfare and maritime surveillance and recon naissance missions. VP-8 is excited and prepared for the challenges of a dual-site deployment. I am extremely proud of our Fighting Tigers and all theyve accomplished since assuming CTG 57.2 and CTG 47.1, said Cmdr. Derek Adametz, VP-8s exec utive officer. VP-8 participates in CSL Comalapas 10-year anniversaryThe Fighting Tigers of VP-8 recently participated in Cooperative Security Location (CSL) Comalapa, El Salvadors, 10-year anniversary celebration. The celebration featured aircraft static displays from VP-8, the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agency and the El Salvador Air Force. VP-8 Training Officer Lt. Cmdr. Jared Tharp said, The anniversary celebra tion provided a great opportunity for VP-8 Sailors to meet their El Salvador counterparts and to enjoy some local food and entertainment. CSL Comalapa provides critical logis tics and infrastructure to support for ward deployed U.S. military units par ticipating in Joint Interagency Task Fighting Tigers deploy to 4th/5th Fleets CNO, MCPON tackle important issues

PAGE 2

2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Jan. 9 1861 Union steamer Star of the West fired on in Charleston Harbor 1918 Establishment of Naval Overseas Transportation Service to carry cargo during World War I 1945 Carrier aircraft begin two-day attack on Japanese forces in Luzon, Philippines. Jan. 10 1847 American naval forces occupy Los Angeles. 1917 Navy places first production order for aerial photographic equipment. 1934 VP-10F flies first non-stop formation flight from San Francisco to Pearl Harbor. Jan. 11 1863 CSS Alabama sinks USS Hatteras off Galveston, Texas. 1944 Aircraft from escort carrier USS Block Island (CVE-21) make first aircraft rocket attack on a German submarine in the Atlantic. 1956 Establishment of first Navy nuclear power school at Submarine Base, New London, Conn. Jan. 12 1813 Frigate USS Chesapeake captures British Volunteer 1848 Attack on sloop Lexington, San Blas, Mexico. 1953 Landings tested on board USS Antietam (CV36), the first angled deck aircraft carrier. Jan. 13 1964 USS Manley (DD-940) evacuates 54 American and 36 allied nationals after Zanzibar government is overthrown. Jan. 14 1813 Frigate USS Chesapeake captures British brig Hero 1863 Navy General Order 4, Emancipation Proclamation 1943 In the Navys first submarine re-supply mis sion, USS Gudgeon (SS-211) lands six guerrilla fighters with one ton of equipment and supplies on Negros Island, Panay. Jan. 15 1815 HMS Endymion, Tenedos and Pomone cap ture USS President 1865 In largest amphibious operation of war, Union forces capture Fort Fisher, Wilmington, North Carolina, by joint amphibious force. 1997 Navy physician Capt. Jerry Lineger joined the crew of the MIR space station after being launched on Atlantis during Space Shuttle Mission STS-81. Prior to the mission, he trained at the Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia for more than a year. I am skilled at purging things from cupboards, closets and basements. Its something I learned from my mom, who has never been afraid to set a dumpster below a second-story window and throw out armloads of junk. Mom doesnt even sort through the piles. No, she plays like its an extreme sport: How many pounds of junk can I throw out the window without letting go of some thing I need? Mom will even throw out the morning paper and your cereal if you dont read or eat it quick enough. Her Inbox is always empty. Always. Growing up with this, I developed a low tolerance for clutter. Those reality television shows about hoarders are not entertainment for me; they are a night mare. Five years ago, my skills were put to the ultimate test when we moved from a 3,000 square-foot home in Florida to a 1,500 square-foot one in Maine. I literal ly had to throw out or give away half of our things. And it was liberating. Living with less felt right. Over time, however, the basement started to fill up again. The boys closets were stuffed. And one kitchen cabinet door wouldnt close unless the sauce pan handles inside were delicately lift ed up at an angle and held there until the last second, when the door was latched shut. I have scars on my wrist from this maneuver. Last week, I couldnt take it anymore. It was time to clean, purge and reclaim space. Naturally, I begged my mom to come up from Virginia to help me with this. Together, we are a formida ble force. We can plow through piles like aggressively large lawnmowers that spit out grass clippings and chewed up leaves from the back. We dont rest until there are no more trash bags in the basement and the last load has been hauled off to the dump, recycling or Goodwill. But Mom couldnt come to help me. I had to face it alone. Oh, sure, I have three sons and a husband to pitch in, but none of them except maybe, Owen, 11 share my passion for emp tying closets and drawers. In fact, everyone, except Owen, runs away when I bring out the industrial-size trash bags. If Mom is the ultimate orga nizer and Im her protege, my husband, Dustin, in particular, is her antithesis. Dustin is a rescuer of things and junk. Regular readers might remember a column several years ago when I tried to get rid of Dustins 4,000 (slight over statement) coffee mugs at a garage sale. While neighbors and community mem bers browsed our belongings strewn across the front lawn, Dustin followed close behind them and rescued all of his coffee mugs. Thats not for sale, he said. One by one, he took everything that belonged to him and put it back inside our house. Only, he didnt find places for these res cued objects. He just left them on the floor and the kitchen counter. You see, Dustin doesnt really want to use those things again. He just wants to have them. It is for this same reason that we own knives that supposedly can cut through tennis shoes. Said knives do not, however, cut through the aver age tomato, and yet Dustin wont let me throw them out. So, I did all my cleaning while Dustin was out of town. He would not see the boxes of coffee mugs and utensils leav ing our door. He could not rescue any thing. My helper was Owen. Owen and I plowed through bins of old, broken toys and clothes that no one has worn. We purged the basement, the attic, the kitchen cabinets and everyones closet. We sorted through winter gear, board games, DVDs and CDs. (Are you tired yet?) And at the end of the week, while the boys were at school, I took a load of filled boxes and bags to Goodwill. Any good cleaner knows its impor tant to get rid of the donations before past owners notice. One time, when I was getting rid of a talking puppy from Lindells closet, it barked from the depths of a trash bag in the trunk of the car and Lindell heard it. Is that my puppy? Is it in the car? Why would my talking puppy be in the car? This time, I rode to Goodwill in silence. There only was the occasional programmed voices coming from the boys old Star Wars Millenium Falcon. A storm trooper hat made shooting sounds. A toy cash register dinged. I was getting rid of it all. But when I opened the car door at Goodwill, suddenly it occurred to me: my boys childhoods were in boxes and bags in the back of the van. Dustins mugs were at the bottom of a box. My heart broke a little. Tears came to my eyes. I felt pangs of sadness and guilt. Then I took a deep breath, steadied my hands, and threw everything out. Because, really, If I dont save us from hoarders, who will? The Department of Defense announced Dec. 31 the transfer of Yusef Abbas, Saidullah Khalik and Hajiakbar Abdul Ghuper from the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay to the government of Slovakia, according to a DoD news release. These three detainees are the last ethnic Uighur Chinese nationals to be transferred from the Guantanamo Bay detention facility, the release said. These detainees were subject to release from Guantanamo as a result of a court order issued Oct. 7, 2008, by the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, and are voluntarily resettling in Slovakia. As directed by the presidents Jan. 22, 2009, executive order, the interagency Guantanamo Review Task Force conducted a comprehensive review of these cases, the release said. As a result of that review, which examined a number of factors, including security issues, these indi viduals were designated for transfer by unanimous con sent among all six agencies on the task force, the release said. In accordance with statutory reporting requirements, the administration informed Congress of its intent to transfer these individuals, the release said. The United States is grateful to the government of Slovakia for this humanitarian gesture and its willing ness to support U.S. efforts to close the Guantanamo Bay detention facility, the release said. The United States coor dinated with the government of Slovakia to ensure the transfer took place in accordance with appropriate secu rity and humane treatment measures, the release said. This transfer and resettlement constitutes a significant milestone in our effort to close the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel remains grateful to the Defense Departments Special Envoy Paul Lewis, and Department of State Special Envoy Cliff Sloan, for their and their respective teams many efforts that facilitated this successful transfer, the release said. Today, 155 detainees remain at Guantanamo Bay, according to the release. Life lesson: Clean while no one watches DoD announces transfer of 3 Guantanamo detainees Jaguars player to visit base commissaryJacksonville Jaguars Defensive Back Ryan Davis will visit the NAS Jax Commissary Jan. 24 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. to meet military members and their families. Davis will be available for autographs and photos with commissary patrons. Rendering honors during colorsReminder: Whenever the national anthem is played, all personnel aboard NAS Jacksonville, not in formation, are required to stand at attention and face the national ensign. In the event, the national ensign is not displayed, they shall face the source of the music. When covered, they shall come to atten tion and salute until the anthem ends. Those in for mation, shall come to attention and the formation commander will render salute. Those driving a vehicle shall come to a complete stop and remain seated at attention. Morning colors are conducted every day at 8 a.m. and each evening at sunset.

PAGE 3

The Swamp Foxes of HSM74 held a change of command ceremony aboard the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), Dec. 21. Cmdr. Matt Boren relieved Cmdr. Jim Miller, who has commanded HSM-74 since Sept. 29, 2012. Its been a great experience, said Miller. Weve done great things tac tically and professionally on this carrier. We won the Battle E award, among several oth ers. Were the only airborne anti-submarine warfare asset and we provide a lot of the rec ognized maritime picture for the strike group. Miller said he owes a lot of thanks to the Carrier Air Wing 3, Carrier Strike Group 10, and 1st Combined Destroyer Squadron. I would like to thank them for helping us integrate into a new environment, said Miller. We couldnt have come as far as we have without their support, assistance and teach ing. Cmdr. Matt Boren, who pre viously served as HSM-74s executive officer, took over as commanding officer. I feel very lucky that Im inheriting a squadron thats won the Battle E award, said Boren. Ive been with the squadron for the last 15 months, includ ing all the workups. Were halfway into deployment and I think everyone knows their battle rhythm and is comfort able with our day-to-day oper ations. Were deployed to the Arabian Gulf and I couldnt think of a better time to take command. I think the squad ron is set up to have continued success. Boren said he is committed to staying mission ready, but is looking forward to some welldeserved relaxation. I want to make sure were prepared for deployment. The business at hand is the first pri ority, said Boren. Weve worked hard for the last year and a half and our detachments are deployed to different areas. Im looking for ward to reuniting with them for some well-deserved holiday parties and summer picnics. On Christmas Eve, the War Eagles of VP-16 took a moment from their operational deployment schedule and joined with the Grey Knights of VP-46 for a special holi day dinner. With the han gar decorated in festive cheer, Sailors set down their tools, left their shops, and sat down with one another for a tradi tional feast. The Chiefs Mess pro vided the meat for the dinner, spending the day baking, frying, and smoking hundreds of pounds of turkeys and ham. AFCM Ervin Byrd was out in spirit, tending his Orion smoker outside the hangar. I love get ting out and cooking for our Sailors. Theyve been working hard and deserve a break and a good meal. Its a privilege for me and one Ive been looking forward to for a long time, he said. AWO2 Joseph Montellese, an acous tic operator for the War Eagles, enjoyed the home-cooked meal, tell ing friends, it reminded me of my moms cook ing. Being so far away from home for Christmas is difficult; its hard to get in the holiday spirit. Seeing the effort people made to put together this event reminded me that, although I am far from relatives, I am surround ed by my own War Eagle family. VP-16 Commanding Officer Cmdr. William Pennington, Jr. com mented on the success of the event. Im glad we were able to give our Sailors a respite from the rigors of deployment, even if just for an eve ning. Tonight was a night that allowed many of our squadron members to reflect on the importance of family, friends, and the many blessings we have received throughout the past year. We close out this holiday season and end the year with many lessons learned and new hopes and goals for the future. 2013 was a great year with many firsts for the Poseidon, the War Eagles and the maritime patrol and reconnais sance community as a whole. We are hoping to make 2014 an even great er one. Following the dinner, Sailors talked and joked amongst one another as Christmas music played through the hangar. As the evening wound to a close, rumors that Santa has learned of the War Eagles deployment spread through the han gar. When asked about these rumors, CMDCM Brian Porter stated, Ive been told that our friends with Operation Gratitude and St. Josephs Church in Jacksonville have been in constant communica tion with the North Pole, updating Saint Nick on the status of our deployed troops. I guess well find out tomorrow whether Santa and his helpers got the memo.HSM-74 holds change of command at sea War Eagles enjoy holiday banquet JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 3

PAGE 4

4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 VR-62 Nomads home from PACOMA detachment from the VR-62 Nomads returned to NAS Jacksonville from U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM) just in time for Christmas. While on detachment in PACOM the Nomads lifted a total of 535,805pounds of equipment and material over the 90-day period. The Nomads also flew 361.4 hours and landed at 18 unique airfields. VR-62 accomplished this detachment with one C-130T mission aircraft and an average of 22 personnel including flight crew. These crews were comprised of FTS (Full Time Support) and SELRES (Selected Reservists) personnel. Although this time of year is generally slow in PACOM, the VR-62 Nomads were on station and ready to airlift any and all mate rials that can fit into a C-130T Hercules, In addition to completing significant military support missions, we delivered 46 tons of material in support of Operation Damayan the Philippines typhoon relief mission, said AZCM Karen Quinn, the VR-62 operations master chief. In addition to supporting relief efforts, Nomadslifted cargo for Carrier Air Wing Five, VRC-30, Explosive Ordinance DisposalMobile Unit Five, HSC-25, and Underwater Construction Team Two. VR-62 Commanding Officer Tony Scarpino added, Our squadron is prepared to answer all calls in support of our Navy no matter if it is a disaster of epic proportions or regional instability, Nomads deliver! He said VR-62 is now preparing for a U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) detachment in the spring. Home based at NAS Jacksonville, VR-62 is one of five Navy Reserve C-130T squadrons serving the Navys high priority logistics needs around the globe.

PAGE 5

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 5 Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast announced Dec. 18 that Transportation Specialist Johnny Washington was selected as the U.S. Navys 2013 Robert V. Ronicks Fleet Manager of the Year. Washington was selected from a pool of well-qualified nominees Navy-wide. I am very humbled and appreciate receiving this award, said Washington. We have a great team at NAVFAC Southeast, our 15 public works departments and the core office in Jacksonville. The Robert V. Ronick Navy Fleet Manager of the Year Award was named after the Navy fleet manager in Yokosuka, Japan who died in 2003. This recognition is presented annually to Navy fleet man agers who embody the skills, professionalism, and can-do attitude required for excellence in fleet management. I am proud to recognize Mr. Washington for his work, said NAVFAC Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus when he presented the award during an all hands meeting. Winning a Navy wide award is a real accomplishment and he should be very proud, he added. Washington is the com mands primary contact for the development, implementa tion and maintenance of the regions base support vehicle and equipment emergency response plan, his implemen tation of plan response strate gies designed to address hur ricane preparedness and other emergency situations. Clearly, the level of impor tance inherent in these roles, not only to the mission, but also to service members and their families, speaks volumes about the trust Mr. Washington has earned among Navy lead ership, said Kiwus. Washington demonstrated that he is a natural leader with abilities to assemble teams, effectively communicate mis sion intent, establish priorities, develop plans, set goals and execute projects in a timely manner with the end result being a product of the highest quality according to the award citation. Working directly with the Commander Navy Region Southeast staff and the Lean Six Sigma team, Washington developed C-Pool and B-Pool inventory reduction and realignment strategies result ing in cost reduction and pro jected annual cost savings of $1.7 million to the command. Because of these actions, we will be providing the most fuel-efficient, cost effective vehicles and equipment, said Washington. His profound awareness, results-oriented performance and consistent focus on value to the customer and savings to the taxpayer, make him an invaluable member of the team, said Kiwus. Navys 2013 Fleet Manager of the Year from NAVFAC Southeast NAVFAC Southeast announces 2013 Employee of the Year awards Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast announced its 2013 Employee of the Year awards Dec. 18. Timothy Covey was named Supervisor of the Year and Gerald Jay Caddy was named Employee of the Year. I am proud to recognize these two outstanding pro fessionals for their work, said NAVFAC Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus when he presented each of them with a Meritorious Civilian Service Award. Covey, the financial man agement cost accounting director, was recognized as the Supervisor of the Year for his technical knowledge and leadership skills to overcome a vast array of extraordinary challenges faced throughout the year. He consistently supplied critical and necessary informa tion to his staff for the startup of a new fiscal year, working through an administrative fur lough, faced a complex end of year closeout and established the groundwork for the emer gency furlough period. Tim took it upon himself to improve processes in our cost accounting department sav ing the government countless man-hours of work and thou sands of dollars, said Kiwus. He continuously pulled reports providing senior lead ership vital information to ensure we maintained com pliance during the imposed sequestration, Kiwus contin ued. Covey contributes his suc cess to his staff. They are good people who want to do a good job and are willing to help each other, said Covey. I am fortu nate to work with them. Caddy, an engineer with the Public Works Department Jacksonville Utilities Department, was recognized as the Employee of the Year and was recognized for his extraordi nary technical ability in the development and implementa tion of several innovative proj ects to protect the environment while reducing overall energy costs to the U.S. Navy. Jay has dedicated many years in developing and imple menting several innovative projects to protect our environ ment while reducing energy costs to the government, said Kiwus. He was the driving force behind the recent expansion of the wastewater treatment plant reuse system to supply reclaimed water to the golf course irrigation system at Naval Air Station Jacksonville. This project not only elimi nated the discharge of 18,000 pounds of harmful nutrients per year into the St. Johns River, it also precluded the need to withdraw 37 million gallons of water per year from the Florida aquifer. The sec ond part of the project, which should be completed in 2014, will make the Jacksonville wastewater treatment plant the first zero discharge plant in the area. Caddy also researched the technology, developed the statement of work, gained reg ulatory approval, coordinated with the manufacturer and oversaw the implementation of a new sludge treatment system that will reduce energy con sumption by nearly one million kilowatt hours per year and save over $100,000 annually in energy and operating costs. Working these projects has been very fulfilling, said Caddy. When I first came here in 1994, I worked on getting the first phase of the reuse system designed, permitted and con structed for the Timuquana Country Club for golf course irrigation, but I always wanted to expand it to our station golf course. It took 20 years, but we did it. Through his hard work NAS Jacksonville has reduced its wastewater discharge to the river while providing a source of irrigation water to the golf course and eliminating the withdrawal of millions of gal lons of potable water from the Florida aquifer.

PAGE 6

6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 For more than 50 years, military personnel and gov ernment employees have sup ported their favorite causes through the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC). In recognition that many CFC events were put on hold or cancelled during the gov ernment shutdown, the act ing director of the Office of Personnel Management extended the CFC solicitation period from Dec. 15 until Jan. 15. Rear Adm. Rick Williamson, commander, Navy Region Southeast recently answered some questions about the sta tus of the CFC in the Southeast Region. years CFC campaign? Our goal is very simple. We want everyone to have the opportunity to contrib ute to charities of their choice through the CFC. For more than 50 years, the CFC has given us the opportunity to join together and help those in need, and to bring about dra matic change in the commu nities that need it most. The objective remains the same, yet this year has been different. While weve been faced with unprecedented budget chal lenges, our commitment to public service and our commu nity is still there. Many people say, when times are hard, expect to have a bad campaign. During my 28 years in the Navy, I have found this to be untrue. Each year weve always had good campaigns. I see no reason to expect that the trend will be reversed. I think its a great thing that the campaign has been extend ed for another month, and with it, I expect that our campaign will be successful. tant to you? There are a lot of charities that participate in CFC. If you want to contribute to medical research or disaster relief or programs for the homeless you can do so through CFC. Ive always been drawn towards charities supporting education because my parents always put a high value on a quality education. Thats the beauty of CFC the choices are in your hands. You can des ignate the type of charity you want to support, choose how much and how you want to pay. And through CFC, you are giv ing back to your community. government employees who havent yet had the chance to give, what should they do? I hope by now everyone has been approached by their CFC key person. The key person has the catalogs of charities who participate in CFC and the forms youll need to designate your contribution. Your key person can even help you fill out the paperwork. Not only do you have the flex ibility to decide to which char ity you give, you can also make one lump-sum payment or set up a payroll deduction. And dont forget, your donation is tax deductible. So if youve not heard from your key person, ask your supervisor who it is. And do is soon, as the cam paign ends on Jan.15. The smallest donation can go a long way towards improv ing the lives of many. I hope that each of you will lend your valued support to this worth while annual campaign. Together we can continue the success of CFC. President Barack Obama signed House Resolution 3304 Dec. 26, which provides pay and bonuses for U.S. service members, enhances coun terterrorism efforts overseas, builds security capacities of key U.S. partner-nations, expands efforts to prevent sex ual assault and strengthens protections for victims. Here is the text of the presi dents statement on the signing of the bill: Today I have signed into law H.R. 3304, the National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year 2014. I have signed this annual defense authoriza tion legislation because it will provide pay and bonuses for our service members, enhance counterterrorism initiatives abroad, build the security capacity of key partners, and expand efforts to prevent sexu al assault and strengthen pro tections for victims. Since taking office, I have repeatedly called upon the Congress to work with my administration to close the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The continued operation of the facility weakens our national security by draining resourc es, damaging our relation ships with key allies and part ners, and emboldening violent extremists. For the past several years, the Congress has enacted unwarranted and burden some restrictions that have impeded my ability to transfer detainees from Guantanamo. Earlier this year, I again called upon the Congress to lift these restrictions and, in this bill, the Congress has taken a positive step in that direction. Section 1035 of this Act gives the administration additional flexibility to transfer detainees abroad by easing rigid restric tions that have hindered nego tiations with foreign countries and interfered with executive branch determinations about how and where to transfer detainees. Section 1035 does not, however, eliminate all of the unwarranted limitations on foreign transfers and, in cer tain circumstances, would vio late constitutional separation of powers principles. The exec utive branch must have the flexibility, among other things, to act swiftly in conducting negotiations with foreign coun tries regarding the circum stances of detainee transfers. Of course, even in the absence of any statutory restrictions, my administration would transfer a detainee only if the threat the detainee may pose can be sufficiently mitigated and only when consistent with our humane treatment policy. Section 1035 nevertheless rep resents an improvement over current law and is a welcome step toward closing the facility. In contrast, sections 1033 and 1034 continue unwise funding restrictions that cur tail options available to the executive branch. Section 1033 renews the bar against using appropriated funds to con struct or modify any facility in the United States, its terri tories, or possessions to house any Guantanamo detainee in the custody or under the control of the Department of Defense unless authorized by the Congress. Section 1034 renews the bar against using appropriated funds to trans fer Guantanamo detainees into the United States for any purpose. I oppose these provi sions, as I have in years past, and will continue to work with the Congress to remove these restrictions. The executive branch must have the authority to determine when and where to prosecute Guantanamo detainees, based on the facts and circumstances of each case and our national secu rity interests. For decades, Republican and Democratic administrations have success fully prosecuted hundreds of terrorists in federal court. Those prosecutions are a legiti mate, effective, and powerful tool in our efforts to protect the nation. Removing that tool from the executive branch does not serve our national secu rity interests. Moreover, sec tion 1034 would, under certain circumstances, violate consti tutional separation of powers principles. The detention facility at Guantanamo continues to impose significant costs on the American people. I am encour aged that this act provides the executive greater flexibility to transfer Guantanamo detain ees abroad, and look forward to working with the Congress to take the additional steps needed to close the facility. In the event that the restrictions on the transfer of Guantanamo detainees in sections 1034 and 1035 operate in a manner that violates constitutional separa tion of powers principles, my administration will implement them in a manner that avoids the constitutional conflict. The 2014 basic allowance for housing rates for service members released today rep resent an average increase of 5 percent, or up to $75 to $80 per month, the Defense Departments Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH) program manager said. The new rates will took effect Jan. 1 at a cost of about $20 billion for the Defense Department program, which will affect nearly 1 million ser vice members, Cheryl Anne Woehr said. The allowance dif fers by pay grade, location and whether or not service mem bers have dependents. How each service member is impacted is local, Woehr said, explaining that BAH rates are based on the costs of housing for civilians with comparable incomes in 306 areas in the country with significant mili tary populations. The program focuses strictly on the rental market and cer tain types of housing, such as rental prices for townhouses, apartments and single-family homes, Woehr said. BAH rate adjustments, she said, are based on three factors: data gathered from property managers for existing vacan cies in each area, the costs of utilities based on data from the American Community Survey, and renters insurance costs, based on data collected from insurance carriers in each state. BAH rates are routinely reviewed and are adjusted each year to account for fluc tuations in rent, utilities and renters insurance in a given location, said Navy Lt. Cmdr. Nate Christensen, a Pentagon spokesman. BAH is designed to assist service members assigned to permanent duty stations within the United States with acquir ing housing comparable to civilians in the same income range at that location, he added. The largest BAH area increase for 2014 will be in Mobile, Ala., at an average of 14.9 percent, which translates into about $1,500 for BAH per month for service members with dependents, compared to $1,305 per month for 2013. Increases in Honolulu County, Hawaii, and Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn., follow at 14.7 per cent and 14.5 percent, respectively. The areas with the larg est BAH decreases are Sacramento, Calif., where a 7.7 percent BAH reduction trans lates into $1,998 monthly for service members with depen dents, compared to $2,132 in 2013 Yuma, Ariz., sees a 6.1 per cent decrease in 2014, and BAH rates will drop by 5.9 percent at Altus Air Force Base, Okla. The BAH rate decreases will apply only to service members who are newly reporting to those locations. Service members already assigned to an area where BAH decreases in 2014 are grandfathered by the programs individual rate pro tection, and their rate will not go down. In areas where BAH is increasing, service mem bers who already live there will receive the new rate. We do want to make sure were fair to the service mem bers regardless of where in the country theyre stationed, Woehr said. A BAH primer on the Defense Travel Management Office website lays out the data col lection process and has a table that links housing types to pay grades, she added. Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) Aviation team members across the United States spread some holiday spirit by participating in annual angel trees and toy drives that help families that are unable to provide gifts to their chil dren during the holiday season. DLA Aviation employees at Oklahoma City, Warner Robins, Ga., and Jacksonville, Fla., helped their local communities despite having their bud gets shortened earlier this year with government furloughs and shutdowns. The employees at DLA Aviation at Jacksonville kicked off their 2013 holi day season Nov.22 with a potluck luncheon and Toys for Tots toy drive. Daniel Ortiz, a staff sergeant with the U.S. Marine Corps took delivery of the first donations from Sustainment Specialist Noel Magsakay, Equipment Specialist Terri Wood and the rest of the DLA Aviation Jacksonville team. We have been supporting the Salvation Army for several years, said Acquisition Logistics Specialist April Walls, DLA Aviation at Warner Robins. I am not sure how many years DLA has been involved with the Salvation Army Angel Tree, but this is my third year participating and second year working as a lead. Last year I was able to get a tour of the warehouse where all the gifts are stored and arranged. It gave me a great er understanding of how important the support we give is to the community, Walls said. Walls said they adopted 18 children this year, but several offices at Warner Robins participated as groups. I am not sure how many individual contributors there were within each group, she said. Additionally, DLA Aviation at Oklahoma City had a 90 percent employee participation rate in its Angel Tree Program according to Director, Procurement Operations Frances Evans. Our social committee donates 50 percent of the funds for our Christmas party to the kids and purchases gifts, Evans said. She added that the social commit tee does this in addition to those gifts employees have already purchased. Evans said she asked her employees if they wanted to help find a charity for Christmas because, we are so blessed to have our jobs and we should reach out to our community and help. On the same token, Walls said, I feel like every child should have a Merry Christmas. Giving makes you feel real ly good. With everything in the world, we can all get wrapped up in our own lives and forget about those that may not have as much. If our contributions help a family in need have a beautiful Christmas then we have accomplished the true mean ing of the season, Walls said. Combined Federal Campaign extended to Jan. 15Obama-signed bill provides military pay, bonusesOfficials announce 2014 military housing allowance ratesDLA Aviation forward sites spread cheer with toy drives ducks.org 800-45-DUCKS JOIN TODAY! Continental Conservation: You Make it HappenA CFC participant provided as a public service

PAGE 7

Blue Star Families brought the joy of reading to military children by donat ing nearly 400 new books through the organizations Books on Bases pro gram at the NAS Jacksonville Child Development Center (CDC) Dec. 17. Blue Star Families Chapter Director Kate Pennington said, Our goal today is to promote reading and educate mili tary families on the importance of lit eracy and to inform military families of the multiple programs we offer in the area for both children and spouses. We are sending bran new books home to families to encourage them to read allowed at home. The books were donated by Disney Corporation. During the event, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander, his wife, Pam, along with NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamakers wife, Teri, and NAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM) (AW/SW) Bradley Shepherd read vari ous books to preschoolers before giv ing each of the children a book to take home. Shepherd said, It was pleasure and a wonderful opportunity to read books to children at the Child Development Center. I recommend this heart-warm ing experience to anyone. This is the least I can do to support the children of military parents during the holiday season. Blue Star Families, a nonprofit orga nization that was created by military families in April 2009, is a program that consist of military families support ing one another through the various challenges of military life, regardless of rank, branch of service or physical loca tion. Several of the programs the organiza tion offers include, books on bases, Blue I think the Blue Star Families is a wonderful program. The books that are donated to children are outstanding. They have a wide-variety of hard cov ered quality books, she added. Literature is real import for children. It is important for them to be exposed to reading when they are young. We think it is great this program comes to the CDC and reads to our children. The kids love having different people come into their classroom, said NAS Jax Youth Program Manager Mary Grenier. Blue Star Families program promotes reading for military children JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 7

PAGE 8

8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 Cooperative Security Location (CSL) Comalapa, El Salvador commemorated its 10-year anniversary by hosting a general public visit Dec. 14. CSL Comalapa began operations in late 2000 although it was not until Nov. 13, 2003 that an official site location was determined and con struction started. CSL Comalapa pro vides critical logistics, infrastructure, and oper ational support to for ward deployed U.S. and partner aviation assets that participate in Joint Interagency Task ForceSouth assigned coun ter-narcotic/illicit traf ficking operations and Naval Forces Southern Command-directed humanitarian efforts. CSL Comalapa has played a vitally important part in protecting the southern approaches to the U.S. and its interests for more than10 years. Guests and citizens of the local El Salvadoran community were treat ed to static displays of aircraft, including the P-3C Orion mari time patrol aircraft, U.S. Customs and Border Protection MQ-9, a Guardian Unmanned Aerial System, El Salvadorian Air Force A-37 Dragonfly and oth ers. Additionally, there was a mix of American and El Salvadorian foods and refreshments that also symbolized the deep and very important rela tionship that CSL contin ues to maintain with the local community. CSL Commanding Officer Cmdr. Odin Klug, talked about the impor tance of having a forward operating air field in El Salvador. Over 2,600 missions flown with targets of all shapes and sizes inter dicted, seizing or disrupt ing tens of thousands of metric tons of contra band narcotics equating to a street value in the billions of dollars, said Klug. The anniversary cer emony was concluded by a cake cutting with U.S. Ambassador to El Salvador Mari Carmen Aponte, U.S. Deputy Chief of Mission to El Salvador Michael Barkin, and Klug.The guests also witnessed the final reen listment of MAC David Shisk, who will transfer to his final command next summer. Klug shared a message from Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander, U.S. Naval Southern Command/Commander U.S. 4th Fleet, who said, The success of our mis sion requires you to be ready, skilled, and dedi cated. And for a decade, CSL Comalapa has been ready, skilled and dedi cated. Well done to all the brave men and women who have and continue to serve aboard CSL Comalapa! CSL Comalapa is under the operational control of U.S. Forces Southern Command/U.S. 4th Fleet. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet employ maritime forces in coop erative maritime security operations in order to maintain access enhance interoperability and build enduring partner ships that foster region al security in the U.S. Southern Command area of responsibility. Force South (JIATF-S). JIATF-S sup ports counter-illicit trafficking oper ations, as well as humanitarian, and search and rescue missions. The VP-8 Fighting Tigers are current ly deployed to El Salvador supporting JIATF-S and U.S. Southern Command. deployment lengths. After these next three carrier deploy ments that will take us through 2014 to 2015 well probably migrate to about eight months for our carriers for OPTEMPO length, said Greenert. Amphibious ready groups will be about seven and a half months, and submarines about six-month deploy ment lengths, he added. Well be stabilized in a few years, Greenert said. But it will take those few years to get through this of impact of sequestration. MCPON spoke on how increas ing deployment lengths have affected Sailors and their families. Our Sailors and their families never cease to amaze us, said Stevens, citing Sailors perseverance through increas ing deployment lengths. We cannot fool ourselves, this has taken a toll and it will continue to take a toll, this is why we need to take a look at how long and how hard our Sailors are being deployed, said Stevens. Later in the interview Greenert dis cussed compensation and how the Navy will deal with budget issues in the com ing years. He measures quality of ser vice in two parts quality of life and quality of work. Quality of life being pay and benefits and quality of work being whether Sailors have adequate training and the parts they need. Sailors say that where the Navy needs some improvement is in the qual ity of work, Greenert said. The Navy has got to do better in: hav ing right kind of leadership in place; getting rid of gaps at sea; having spare parts and training; and having a more predictable schedule. He went on to explain that those needs must be bal anced with what the Navy spends on compensation. We have to balance how we pay our people with what we need to operate, Greenert said. MESSAGE CSL Comalapa celebrates 10-year anniversary VP-8

PAGE 9

The Defense Depart-ment has expanded its zero tolerance for the use of illicit drugs to include syn thetic marijuana, also known as spice, the director of DoDs drug testing and program policy said Dec. 13. In an interview with American Forces Press Service and the Pentagon Channel, Army Lt. Col. Tom Martin said that in addition to the broad range of drugs for which the military already randomly tests service members, synthetic marijuana will also be included. The message were getting out now is that when you participate in our random urinalysis program, synthetic marijuana products or synthetic marijuana will now be tested along with our other drugs, he said. Its been known in the general population, both in the medical community and various media reports, that synthetic marijuana drug use is a serious health concern. Martin noted that while the military typically has a much lower level of drug use than in society at large, synthetic marijuana still poses a significant risk to both the safety and readiness of our force. Prior to synthetic marijuana being banned, he said, the department went out and did a random study looking at a sampling of military urine speci mens from all the different services to see if synthetic marijuana was being used by our members. At that time, the positive rate, or the number of service mem bers who tested positive, was about 2.5 percent. To put that in perspective, he said, in 2012 the over all positive rate for all the drugs tested for in the uri nalysis program was 0.9 percent. In 2012, synthetic marijuana products were banned through legislation, Martin said. So we went back and did a similar study, and what we found is that the actual numbers went down. However, he added, a high number of service members are using synthetic marijuana. In addition to testing for synthetic marijuana, Martin said, the military also randomly tests all ser vice members for marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines and other drugs in the amphetamine class, including methamphetamines and the drug known as ecstasy. The test also looks for codeine and morphine, oxy codone, oxymorphone, hydrocodone, hydromor phone, Vicodin, and different diazepines, such as Valium and Xanax. Martin said even deployed troops are subject to random drug testing. They are still mandated to be tested under the militarys random urinalysis pro gram; however, the frequency is determined by the operational tempo, he said. If a random drug testing detects the presence of ille gal drugs, Martin said, troops are subject to punish ment under military law guidelines. Any service member who tests positive for either an illicit drug or misuse of a prescription drug falls under any actions deemed appropriate under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, as well actions that are appropriate as deemed by their commander, he said. With the addition of synthetic marijuana to an already stringent drug testing policy, Martin reiter ated the departments commitment to zero tolerance for the abuse of illicit drugs. All service members participating in our urinaly sis program will be tested for cannabinoids, he said. And if they do test positive, they will be dealt with according to the Uniform Code of Military Justice. The Center for Personal and Professional Development (CPPD) is temporarily expanding the availability of tuition assistance (TA) for Sailors. CPPDs Virtual Education Center (VEC) will start authorizing commandapproved TA requests for classes that have a start date in the second quarter of FY-14, which ends March 31, accord ing to Capt. John Newcomer, CPPDs commanding officer. We strongly believe that Sailors who take the initiative to develop personally and professionally through Navy vol untary education programs are better equipped with strong analytical skills and the ability to make informed deci sions that benefit their command and the Navy, he said. TA requests for the FY-14 second quarter will be approved in the order they are received on a first come, first served basis for as long as TA funds are available, said Newcomer. TA requests will be authorized up to a total expen diture cap of approximately $23 million for the second quarter. The second quarter of each fiscal year historically has the highest demand for TA funding, said Newcomer. He emphasized that Sailors are responsible to know the status of the TA request before they begin any class. Sailors must ensure their TA requests are command approved, in the WebTA system, and authorized by the VEC before their class start date. If any of these three criteria arent met, Sailors should contact the VEC or servicing Navy College Office regarding the sta tus of their TA request before their class begins. The VEC is open from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. (ET) Monday through Friday. Sailors can reach the VEC by phone at 1-877838-1659 or 757-492-4684, or DSN at 492-4684. The VEC e-mail address is VEC@navy.mil TA is the Navys educational finan cial assistance program available to both Navy officer and enlisted active duty personnel and Navy reservists on continuous active duty. It funds tuition costs for courses taken in an off-duty status at a college, universi ty or vocational/technical institution, whose regional or national accredita tion is recognized by the Department of Education and has a signed Department of Defense Memorandum of Understanding. CPPD is responsible for providing a wide range of personal and profes sional development courses and mate rials, including general military train ing, Navy instructor training, alcohol and drug awareness program training, suicide and sexual assault prevention, bystander intervention, and personal responsibility classes. CPPD also administers the Navys voluntary education program provid ing Sailors with the opportunities to earn college degrees. CPPD also man ages the U.S. Military Apprenticeship Program, which offers Sailors the opportunity to earn civilian apprentice ship certifications. For more information, visit: https:// www.netc.navy.mil/centers/cppd/ DoD adds synthetic marijuana to random drug testingTuition Assistance temporarily expanded As VP-5 continues its busy schedule operat ing and maintaining the P8-A Poseidon, the squadron is highlighting one outstanding Mad Fox each week. This weeks spotlight shines on AWO2(NAC/AW) Nathan Smith. Smith was born in Scottsbluff, Neb. and currently resides in Jacksonville with his wife, Kimberly. His mother, Lt. Col. Debra Smith works as a chief nurse in the United States Air Force. His grandfather served in the Army during the Korean War. He joined the Navy in 2008. After basic train ing, he attended Navy Aircrewman School and A school in Pensacola, Fla. After graduation, he was assigned to VP-30 to learn the P3-C Orion aircraft. Upon comple tion of his syllabus in VP-30, he was assigned to the VP-5 Mad Foxes. He has deployed to NAS Sigonella, Italy; Djibouti, Africa and Kadena Air Base, Japan and com pleted the transition to the P8-A Poseidon fol lowing his last deploy ment. As an electron ic warfare opera tor (EWO) aboard the P8-A Poseidon, Smith is tasked with manag ing, maintaining, and employing the elec tronic weapon systems aboard the aircraft. This includes the radar, IFFI, EO/IR, and ESM systems. He employs all of these systems to maintain a surface plot for the aircrew and ensure safety of flight. Smith is the EWO train ing track manager and is currently in charge of 10 upgraders. On Nov. 20, he became an EWO P8-A instructor and was previously an instructor on the P3-C Orion. The most rewarding part of my job is seeing everyone in the squad ron benefit from the training they are provid ed and seeing the junior operators get qualified, explained Smith. In that same light mak ing sure that the correct VP-5 Mad Fox of the Week JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 9

PAGE 10

10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014

PAGE 11

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 11

PAGE 12

Ask the doc: Concerned about cholesterol? Question: Im 25 years old. When should I be concerned about my cho lesterol? Answer: Taking care of your cholesterol now will dramatically decrease your risk of developing heart disease and stroke later on and which is why we recommend screen ing at your age. Having high cholester ol can, and usually will, lead to heart disease and stroke if left untreated. If you have high cholesterol early in life, the choles terol can build-up in the arteries of your heart, brain and other organs. This build-up over time can lead to blockages causing heart attacks and stroke. Ask the Doc is writ ten by Naval Hospital Jacksonville providers from its hospital and five branch health clinics in Florida and Georgia. This column was written by Lt. Cmdr. John Steely, a Family Medicine physician from Naval Branch Health Clinic Key West. If you have a question for a physi cian, dentist, pharmacist or optometrist that youd like to see published, please send it to jaxpublicaffairs@ med.navy.mil 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014

PAGE 13

President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on Jan.1, 1863, as the nation approached its third year of bloody civil war. The proclama tion declared, that all persons held as slaves within the rebellious states are, and henceforward shall be free. According to the National Archives, although the Emancipation Proclamation did not end slavery in the nation, it cap tured the hearts and imagination of mil lions of Americans and fundamentally transformed the character of the war. Moreover, the Proclamation announced the accep tance of black men into the Union Army and Navy enabling the liberated to become liberators. By the end of the war, almost 200,000 black soldiers and sailors had fought for the Union and freedom. Emancipation Proclamation U.S. Navy General Order No. 4 of 14 January 1863 _________________ The following Proclamation of the President is published for the information and government of the officers and others of the Naval Service. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy ________________ BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. A PROCLAMATION. _________________ WHEREAS, on the twenty-second day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, a Proclamation was issued by the President of the United States, containing, among other things, the following, to wit: That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever, free; and the Executive government of the United States, including the military and naval authority thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of any such persons, and will do no act or acts to repress such persons, or any of them, in any efforts they may make for their actual freedom. That the Executive will, on the first day of January aforesaid, by proclamation, designate the States and parts of States, if any, in which the people thereof, respectively, shall then be in rebellion against the United States; and the fact that any State, or the people thereof, shall on that day be in good faith represented in the Congress of the United States, by members chosen thereto at elections wherein a majority of the qualified voters of such States shall have participated, shall, in the absence of strong countervailing testimony, be deemed conclusive evidence that such State, and the people thereof, are not then in rebellion against the United States. Now, therefore, I, ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States, by virtue of the power in me vested as Commander-in-chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, in time of actual armed rebellion against the authority and government of the United States, and as a fit and necessary war measure for suppressing said rebellion, do, on this first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and in accor dance with my purpose so to do, publicly proclaimed for the full period of one hundred days from the day first above mentioned, order and designate as the States and parts of States wherein the people thereof, respectively, are this day in rebellion against the United States, the following, to wit: Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, (except the parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemines, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James, Ascension, Assumption, Terre Bonne, Lafourche, St. Mary, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the city of New Orleans,) Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia, (except the forty-eight counties designated as West Virginia, and also the counties of Berkeley, Accomac, Northampton, Elizabeth City, York, Princess Ann, and Norfolk, including the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth,) and which excepted parts are for the present left pre cisely as if this Proclamation were not issued. And by virtue of the power and for the purpose aforesaid, I do order and declare that all persons held as slaves within said designated States and parts of States are and henceforward shall be free; and that the Executive government of the United States, including the military and naval authorities there of, will recognize and maintain the freedom of said persons. And I hereby enjoin upon the people so declared to be free to abstain from all violence, unless in necessary self-defense; and I recommend to them that, in all cases when allowed, they labor faithfully for reasonable wages. And I further declare and make known that such persons, of suitable condition, will be received into the armed service of the United States to garri son forts, positions, stations, and other places, and to man vessels of all sorts in said service. And upon this act, sincerely believed to be an act of justice warranted by the Constitution upon military necessity, I invoke the considerate judgement of mankind and the gracious favor of Almighty God. In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. Done at the city of Washington this first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the eighty-seventh. _________________ ABRAHAM LINCOLN _________________ By the President: William H. Seward, Secretary of State 151 years ago: U.S. Navy General Order No. 4 While the Navy already has one of the strongest counter-fraud efforts in the government, Navy Secretary Ray Mabus announced Dec. 20 new measures to assure contracting integrity and to pre vent fraud. Mabus, who briefed the Pentagon press corps, spoke amid a criminal investigation focused on Glenn Defense Marine Asia (GDMA). The U.S. Department of Justice is prosecuting the case, which alleges the company overcharged the U.S. Navy for husbanding services throughout Asia. Husbanding is the services ships receive in port and covers everything from removing sewage to providing transportation to resupply. Some Naval officers have been arrest ed for their involvement in the scheme and Mabus expects more announce ments as a result of the case. Mabus is proud of the work Navy per sonnel did in uncovering the plot. The Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS), along with the Defense Criminal Investigative Service, and the Defense Contract Audit Agency are doing incredibly impressive work to fer ret out the alleged fraud and corruption carried out by GDMA and, yes, allega tions against naval personnel, as well, Mabus said. The investigation has been under way since May 2010. Information gathered during this investigation was eventually turned over to government prosecutors and led to the recent charges filed in federal court, Mabus said. This included charges filed against an NCIS agent. Throughout the investigation, Mabus repeatedly instructed NCIS agents to take the investigation wherever it led. This is a very serious case, and it is a serious issue, he said. The secretary has spoken with all threeand four-star admirals about the investigation and the changes he is making. The conduct and the behavior alleged to have occurred in connection with this case is absolutely incompat ible with the standards we require from our Navy officers and civilians, Mabus said. If, as a result of this investigation, criminal prosecutors decide not to pur sue criminal charges, but instead refer cases to the Navy for disposition, Im announcing that those cases will be reviewed and resolved through a con solidated disposition authority. This authority will be a four-star admiral who will ensure that if alle gations are substantiated, individuals will be held appropriately accountable, Mabus said. Since 2009, Navy has suspended 252 contractors and debarred 400, the secretary said. Still, he said, the service must do more. Mabus is taking steps following receipt of a report reviewing acquisition strategies for husbanding and similar contracts worldwide. Experts are examining the husband ing contractor process from end-to-end and will recommend changes to correct deficiencies in those procedures and to provide maximum effective oversight of the process. When that task is finished, the Navy will issue a revised acquisition strategy that will be used on all husbanding con tracts globally. The Navy will further standard ize requirements, further standardize contract vehicles, further standardize administration and increase oversight of husbanding contracts and contrac tors, Mabus said. The Navy will increase the use of firm fixed-price line items and minimize the use and improve the oversight of unpriced line items. The service also will remove pay functions to husbanding service pro viders from ships and provide better guidance on requirements and more contracting support ship COs going overseas, he said. The Navy will also incorporate stan dardized requisition processes fleet wide, and the service auditor general will conduct a special audit of husband ing and port services contracts. That report is due in June 2014.Mabus tightens Navys counter-fraud measures JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 13

PAGE 14

14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus announced Dec. 22 plans to evaluate and redesign ele ments of the female service dress uniform for both officers and enlisted beginning no later than May 2014. SECNAV approved a propos al by Chief of Naval Personnel Vice Adm. Bill Moran to rede sign the Service Dress Blue (SDB) uniform worn by female Sailors E1-E6 and to redesign the female combination cover for E7 and above. These changes ensure greater uniformity in our ser vice and ceremonial dress, but more importantly, they send a clear signal that we are one in dress, one in standard and one in team. As you look out across a group of Sailors, you ought to see, not female and male Sailors, but Sailors, said Mabus. I asked the Chief of Naval Personnel to present me a plan that balanced the importance for uniformity with cost and functionality and he did just that. Its now over to his team to do the necessary testing and get these uniforms rolled out to the Fleet as soon practical. The new E1-E6 service dress blue female uniform blends uniformity and tradition. The jumper and Dixie cup, tailored for female form and functionality, will match the recently redesigned (but not yet issued) male jumper -close ly resembling the iconic image of the Lone Sailor. Following completion of a fit evaluation on the female jump er style uniform and dixie cup, there will be a combined fleet introduction of the new female uniform and the previously approved male redesigned SDB uniform. The female combination cover for E-7 and above will be redesigned to more closely resemble the male version, but will fit a womans head in size and proportion. It was clear in the feedback from the recent test that simply issuing a male cover to females did not result in satisfactory fit or appearance. Similarly, lessons learned from the fit evaluation will be used to inform the design of the female cover. New uniform items will be evaluated for fit, comfort and durability. Fleet introduction will begin following approval of the final design and completion of the manufacturing process. The final timeline and costs of the new items will be deter mined following the wear test. We are moving out with our plan to test these new uniforms items this spring, said Moran. After a thorough testing, ele ments of these uniforms will begin to be introduced. Feedback from a May 2013 uniform survey was instru mental in the development of these changes. More than 1,000 female offi cers and enlisted participated in the internal study which looked at level of satisfaction when wearing the male combi nation cover, Dixie Cup and the winter jumper style uniform. Loud and clear we heard their feedback-dont simply put us in mens uniforms, said Moran. We are taking the needed time to develop and test uni forms that more closely resem ble their male shipmates, but are designed to fit female Sailors. Uniform officials say that further changes to female uni forms are likely, as the uniform board reviews and deliberates additional ways to improve uniformity and functionality.For more information on uni forms and uniform policy, visit the Navy Uniform Matters web site at http://www.public.navy. mil/bupers-npc/support/uni forms/pages/default2.aspx. The Defense Department announced Jan. 3 changes in imminent danger pay (IDP) that will go into effect June 1, DoD spokesman Army Col. Steven Warren told reporters at a Pentagon news conference. This is a process that began [in 2011], he said, and includ ed in-depth threat assessment from the combatant commands. It was made in coor dination with the Joint Staff, combatant commands and military services. Warren noted this policy change was not a budget-driv en decision, but part of a rou tine recertification that hap pens every couple of years -its an ongoing process. According to a DoD news release announcing the recer tification, the combatant com mands conducted in-depth threat assessments for coun tries within their areas of responsibility. Following the review, the release stated, it was deter mined that the imminent threat of physical harm to U.S. military personnel due to civil insurrection, civil war, terror ism or wartime conditions is significantly reduced in many countries, resulting in the discontinuation of imminent danger pay in those areas. Periodic recertification of IDP, according to the news release, ensures that imminent danger designations match the actual conditions of des ignated countries so that the department can provide fair entitlements and benefits. The last recertification was com pleted in 2007. The DoD news release noted the following areas would no longer be designated as immi nent danger areas: Timor, Haiti, Liberia, Oman, Rwanda, Tajikistan, United Arab Emirates, Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan. space above Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Serbia and Montenegro. the Arabian Sea, Gulf of Aden, Gulf of Oman, and the Red Sea. space above the Persian Gulf. Of specific note, Warren said, imminent danger pay will remain in effect for the following: Iraq, Afghanistan, Lebanon, Jordan, Pakistan, Syria, Yemen and Egypt. Although 2013 statistics are not currently available, Warren noted that in the year prior, 194,189 personnel received IDP. Approximately 50,000 fewer will be receiving imminent danger pay, he said. In [2012], we spent approximately $500 million on imminent danger pay. This will result in a reduc tion of approximately $100 million. The benefit provides troops in IDP areas about $7.50 per day up to the maximum monthly rate of $225, Warren said. Uniform changes for female sailors to promote uniformity, fit, functionality Pentagon announces changes to imminent danger pay

PAGE 15

DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Family Night third Friday of the month, 8 p.m., balloon artist and kara oke DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Super Bowl Party Feb. 2 at 5 p.m., $10 per person Door prizes, buffet and beverage spe cialsFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4 10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for Active Duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes included. Sunday: Family Day $1.50 all day, per person, per game Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Jan. 18, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: Jan. 25, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Powerlifting Competition Feb. 8, 7 a.m. at the Fitness Center $10 registration feeI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: St. Augustine Holiday Lights $8.75 adult & $3 child Ringling Brothers Barnum & Bailey Circus $15 Disney Jr. Live $15 $29 Monster Jam $22 $42 Globetrotters $18 Wild Adventures $30 $70 Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL $166 $194.50 Universal Orlando $114 $169.50 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Daytona 500 $62 $209 Drive 4COPD 300 $55 Budweiser Duels $55 Sprint Unlimited $30 $55 Rolex 24 $32 $65 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 The Artist Series Broadway in Jacksonville 2014 season, select shows $51 $65 Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2014 season, select shows $11 $70 Armed Forces Vacation Club www. afvclub.com $349 $369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St. Augustine $4.25 $7.50 St. Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Wild Florida Airboats $17 $46.50 Florida Ecosafaris $25 $119 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels located near attrac tions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restrict ed to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Jacksonville Giants Game Jan. 11 at 6 p.m Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus Jan. 18 at 6 p.m. $5 per person Grill & Chill at the Liberty Center Jan. 23 at 6 p.m. Free hamburgers and hotdogs NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Daily Twilight Golf Special Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1 p.m. Military Appreciation Days Play 18-holes with cart for $18 Active duty Jan. 14 & 18 Retirees, DoD and sponsored guests Jan. 16 & 30Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. *weather dependentAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you!Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 15

PAGE 16

16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 FFSC offers life skills workshopsThe NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their fami lies. Preregistration is required at 5425745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The fol lowing is the schedule for 2014: 3-4 (8 a.m.-4 p.m.), Feb. 5 (8 a.m.-12:30 p.m.) May 12-15 (5:30-10 p.m.), Aug. 18-19 (8 a.m.-4 p.m.), Aug. 20 (8 a.m.12:30 p.m.), Nov. 17-20 (5:30-10 p.m.). (TAP) Separation Workshop (7:30 a.m.4:15 p.m.) Feb. 3-7, Feb. 24-28, March 10-14, March 24-28, April 7-11, May 5-9, May 19-23, June 9-13, June 23-27, July 7-11, July 21-25, Aug. 11-15, Aug. 25-29, 1-5. (TAP) Retirement Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) Jan. 13-17, Feb. 10-14, March 17-21, April 14-18, May 12-16, June 16-20, July 14-18, Aug. 18-22, Sept. (8:30 a.m.-noon) Jan. 21, Feb. 21, April 1, May 2, June 30, June 30, July 29, Aug. Workshop (8-9:30 a.m.) Jan. 22, April 2, May 28, July 1, Sept. 3, Nov. 12. (9:40 a.m.-noon) Jan. 22, April 2, May 28, July 1, Sept. 3, Nov. 12. (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Feb. 18-19, April 29-30, Aug. 5-6, Nov. 24-25. Training (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) July 31. Management Workshop (1-4 p.m.) Jan. p.m.) Jan. 16, Feb. 13, April 3, May 1, 4 p.m.) Jan 9, March 6, May 8, July 10, Sept. 11, Nov. 13. 11 (10-11:30 a.m.), April 7 (1-2:30 p.m.), p.m.) Jan. 13, Feb. 10, March 10, April 14, May (9-10:30 a.m.) Jan. 14, Feb. 11, March 11, April 8, May 13, June 10, July 8, Aug. Extended Stress Management Workshop (8 a.m.-noon) Jan. 21, 28, May 20, 27, Sept. 23, 30. a.m.-noon) Jan. 27, Feb. 24, March 31, April 28, May 19, June 30, July 28, Aug. Personal Anger Control Group Jan. 23-Feb. 27 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.), March 27 May 1 (Thursdays 11 a.m.1 p.m.), May 27 July 8 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.-no workshop June 3), July 29 Sept. 9 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.-no workshop 11 a.m.-1 p.m.). Individual Communication (11 a.m.1 p.m.) -Jan 14, March 19, May 6, July 15, Sept. 9, Nov. 18. p.m.) Jan. 14, 21, 28; March 4, 11, 18, 25; May 6, 13, 20, 27; July 1, 8, 15, 22; Sept. 9, 16, 23, 30; Nov. 4, 12, 18, 25. Active Parenting of Teens (1-4 p.m.) Feb. 4, 11, 18, 25; April 1, 8, 15, 22; June 21, 28. Power 2 Change Womens Support Group (9:30-11 a.m.) Every Wednesday Expectant Families (9 a.m.-3 p.m.) Tiny Tots Play Group (10 a.m.-noon) Jan. 14, 28; Feb. 11, 25; March 11, 25; April 1, 15, 29; May 13, 27; June 10, 24; Exceptional Family Member p.m.-3 p.m.) March 13, May. 15, July 17, Sept. 4, Nov. 5. p.m.-3 p.m.) Feb. 6, April 10, June 12, To register for any of the above work shops, please call 542-5745. delivered its 100th F-35 Lightning II joint strike fighter to the Air Force, the services leaders marked the milestone and outlined the aircrafts value. The F-35 will be delivered to Luke serve as the first training aircraft for pilots of the fifth-generation fighter. Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Welsh III called the event a big deal for the Air Force during a recent Pentagon news conference. Welsh discussed the services need for the Lightning II, a need that became even more acute, he said, after total buy of F-22 Raptor fighters. The F-22 was to provide theaterwide air superiority, the general said. umbrella, F-35s must pick up the slack. You must have the F-35 to augment the F-22 to do the air superiority fight at the beginning of a high-end conflict in order to survive against the fifthgeneration threats we believe will be in the world at that point in time, he said. Even with upgrades, Welsh said, current air superiority fighters -F-15 Eagles and F-16 Fighting Falcons -cannot survive against a fifth-genera tion threat. added. I am certainly not willing to go to my secretary or the secretary of defense or to the chairman [of the Joint Chiefs of Staff] and say, I would rec ommend that we keep our old equip ment and update it, and just accept more losses and count on the incred ible ability of our aviators to win the fight anyway. The joint strike fighter program is the most expensive in American mili tary history. The Air Force will fly the F-35A variant, the Navy will fly the F-35C, and the Marine Corps will capability for the Air Force is set for The program has had growing pains. Costs have risen, and the flyaway cost for the Air Force version is around $150 million per aircraft. aircraft is rising and production costs are dropping, Welsh said. Since 2011, the program has met milestones con sistently, the general said. We have allies buying into the program and committing to purchasing aircraft, which will keep being more and more of a financial benefit for us over time. Welsh said now is not the time to cut the joint strike fighter program. I dont believe this is a good time to talk about truncating the buy cap ping it at some number, he said. I think that will put the program at risk of financially costing us even more. If wacky winter weather has played havoc with your electric and water bills, you can reduce future costs by making your home more energy and water efficient. The Jacksonville Public Library (JPL), JEA and the Green Team Project Yourself and training work shops at the following library locations in 2014: Jan. 11 Library Feb. 8 10:30 a.m. Southeast Regional Library March 8 10:30 a.m. Regency April 12, 10:30 a.m. Mandarin May 17, 10:30 a.m. Webb Wesconnett Regional Library June 14, The kit tools come in backpacks made from recycled billboard vinyl made locally in Jacksonville. Initially developed several years ago by JEA, the backpack still includes the great energy efficiency measuring tools to help you conserve energy, identify problem areas in your home, and tips backpacks also include new water use evaluation tools to find water leaks and estimate your water costs, discov er if your faucets and appliances are water efficient, and determine if your outdoor irrigation system is watering effectively. The Green Team Project is offering one-hour workshops and demonstra tions on the proper use of the kits for those interested. For the past several years, weve helped people identify ways to make their homes more energy efficient. Were very excited to be able to expand the backpacks to include water effi ciency measurement tools and conser Green Team Project Program coordi nator. We hope homeowners will take advantage of these training workshops that are free and open to the public. The kits will be available for check out with a JPL library card at each of able for checkout at any library loca tion throughout the year. In 2013, the backpacks were borrowed more than 2,000 times, and won a Green Initiative Council North Florida for making a significant impact on sustainability in North Florida. Pre-registration for the workshops is required. Attendance at each work shop is limited to 20 individuals on a first-come, first-served basis.For more information and to register, visit www.greenteamproject.org Chiefs of Staff Army Gen. Martin E. make substantial improvements to the militarys sexual assault preven tion and response, including related improvements to the military justice system. back to him with a full-scale review of The presidents statement reads as follows: Earlier this year I directed Secretary Hagel, Chairman Dempsey and our entire defense leadership team to step up their game exponentially in pre venting and responding to the serious crime of sexual assault in our military. As Commander in Chief, Ive made it clear that these crimes have no place in the greatest military on earth. Since then, our armed forces have moved ahead with a broad range of initia tives, including reforms to the military justice system, improving and expand ing prevention programs, and enhanc ing support for victims. I commend the Pentagon leadership for their hard work on this critical issue of vital importance to our nation. Yet, so long as our women and men in uniform face the insider threat of sexual assault, we have an urgent obli gation to do more to support victims and hold perpetrators accountable for their crimes, as appropriate under the military justice system. Members of Congress, especially Senators Gillibrand and McCaskill, have rightly called attention to the urgency of eradicat ing this scourge from our armed forces. As a result, there were a broad range of reforms proposed in this years National Defense Authorization Act. The White House and the Department of Defense and other relevant agencies in my Administration will continue to work with Congress to address this cor rosive problem, which is a violation of the values our armed forces stand for, destroys trust among our troops, and undermines our readiness. Today, I instructed Secretary Hagel and Chairman Dempsey to contin ue their efforts to make substantial improvements with respect to sex ual assault prevention and response, including to the military justice system. I have also directed that they report back to me, with a full-scale review of their progress, by Dec.1, 2014. If I do not see the kind of progress I expect, then we will consider additional reforms that may be required to eliminate this crime from our military ranks and protect our brave service members who stand guard for us every day at home and around the world.Obama directs review of sexual assault prevention progressReduce utility bills with home energy and water evaluation kits Air Force leader outlines Joint Strike Fighters value

PAGE 17

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 17

PAGE 18

18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 8 is training and preparing off the coast of Southern California for NASAs unmanned Exploration Flight Test-One (EFT-1) for the Orion spacecraft, scheduled for early next year. Orion will travel 3,600 miles above the Earths surface, more than 15 times farther than the International Space Station, and will ultimately re-enter the atmosphere at a speed of more than 20,000 miles per hour, enduring temperatures up to 4,000 degrees Fahrenheit. HSC-8 will embark NASA engineers on two MH-60S Knighthawks to film and moni tor the re-entry and recovery of Orion using state of the art debris tracking software and video equipment. Aside from documenting the initial test phase of this event, NASA will use data gathered from the mission to evalu ate parachute deployments and debris patterns to refine Orions design prior to the manned launch. HSC-8s aircraft will launch from San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS San Diego (LPD 22) and assist the crews that will recover the craft into the ships well-deck. Cmdr. Derrick Kingsley, HSC-8 commanding officer, said his squadron is honored to be involved in the beginning stages of the next major phase of space exploration and proud to showcase the multi-mission capabilities of the MH-60S Seahawk helicopter. The Eightballers of HSC-8 operate within U.S. 3rd Fleet area of responsibility; their missions include vertical lift, search and rescue, logistics, anti-surface warfare, special operations forces support, and combat search and rescue. Joint, interagency and international relationships strengthen 3rd Fleets ability to respond to crises and protect maritime interests of the U.S. and its allies. All four active services met or exceeded their numerical acces sion goals for the first month of fiscal year 2014, which began Oct. 1, Defense Department offi cials announced. Here are the services num bers for October: percent of its goal of 4,120; percent of its goal of 2,155; sions, 100 percent of its goal of 2,252; and The Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps exhibited strong retention numbers for the first month of fiscal 2014, officials said. Four of the six reserve com ponents met or exceeded their accession goals for the first month of the fiscal year: accessions, 118 percent of its goal of 3,828; sions, 96 percent of its goal of 2,203; sions, 100 percent of its goal of 313; accessions, 100 percent of its goal of 801; accessions, 100 percent of its goal of 681; and sions, 93 percent of its goal of All reserve components met their attrition goals, or were within the percentage vari ance allowed by the Defense Department, officials said, noting that attrition data lags behind accession data. Current trends are expected to continue, they added. NASA, Navy team up for capsule recovery Recruiting for all services starts fiscal year on track training is presented is always challenging. Smiths current goal is to make first class petty officer. His longterm goals are to make chief petty officer or become an offi cer through Officer Candidate School. He earned his associates degree at Columbia College and plans to attend Arizona State University and pursue a bach elors degree in history. Outside of the squadron, Smith enjoys working around the house and on cars. VP-5

PAGE 19

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014 19

PAGE 20

20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, January 9, 2014