Jax air news

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Material Information

Title:
Jax air news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note:
Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID:
UF00028307:02071


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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2013 NEW LEADER HOLIDAY EVE NT PEARL HARBOR Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com NAS Jax earns environmental awardOn Dec. 5, Northeast Florida Regional Planning Council President Wendell Davis presented NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander with the 2013 Regional Award for Excellence in Environmental Stewardship in recog nition of the outstanding environmen tal partnerships the station had devel oped with elected officials, planning and environmental staffs and com munity. Davis stated that NAS Jacksonville was, strongly committed to greening its facilities, properties and operations through significant environmental, energy and conservation initiatives including educational outreach and environmental partnerships. When accepting the award, Undersander said that he was receiv ing the recognition on behalf of the 20,000 men and women at NAS Jacksonville who have incorporated environmental compliance into daily mission accomplishment. Margo Moehring, managing director of the councils policy and plan ning, added that the stations con sistently strong environmental partnerships with the city, state and Jacksonville were a model to follow. She said that NAS Jacksonvilles par ticipation in the councils recent year long study on the impact of sea level rising on the St Johns River and adja cent development was greatly appreci ated. Training for the worstActive shooter exercise heldAn active shooter training exer cise was conducted Dec. 3 at NAS Jacksonville Building 11, in conjunc tion with a table-top exercise at the NAS Jacksonville Emergency Operations Center. Maj. Jerry Syrek, training division officer for NAS Jacksonville Security Department, defined an active shooter as an individual who is engaged in kill ing or attempting to kill people inside a building or in an outside environment. In most cases, an active shooter uses Members of the VP-62 Broadarrows returned home to NAS Jacksonville last week concluding a six-month deploy ment to Kadena Airbase in Okinawa, Japan, with Commander, Task Group (CTG) 72.2 as part of the Navys first mobilization of a Reserve P-3C Orion squadron. Were very pleased with the out comes and what our crews and our teams have accomplished on these deployments, said Cmdr. Jon Townsend, VP-62 commanding officer. It proves reserve capabilities meet ing real-world operational require ments in support of our active-duty counterparts while they transition to the new P-8 Poseidon platform. Broadarrow air crew and mainte nance personnel joined the VP-26 Tridents with several detachments in the Western Pacific, conducting antisubmarine warfare including an exer cise out of Chennai, India culminat ing with a leading role in humanitar ian assistance and disaster relief in the wake of Typhoon Haiyans devastation in the Republic of the Philippines. The Broadarrows P-3C aircrews flew several missions over the hardest-hit areas since Nov. 11, assessing damage and providing intelligence to support coordination of relief efforts by U.S. and Philippine forces. Over 600 hours were flown, 73 over the Philippines alone. Imagery was collected and sent inflight to intelligence specialists who analyzed it and then provided it to Marines on the ground charged with helping to coordinate U.S. military and Philippine government relief efforts. The best part of the deployment was the disaster relief. We flew over these mountains and saw destruction and SOS painted on the ground, said Lt. Cmdr. Brett Frazier, a VP-62 pilot.Broadarrows return home from WESTPAC deployment The men and women of VP-26 are return ing to their home base of NAS Jacksonville after a dynamic, seven-month deployment. Operating primarily from Kadena Air Base on the island of Okinawa, Japan they supported Commander, Task Force 72 executing oper ations across the Pacific. The deployment was the first integrated active-reserve P-3C deployment to the 7th Fleet area of responsi bility. Augmented with reserve aircrews and aircraft from NAS Jacksonvilles VP-62 and NAS Whidbey Islands VP-69, the squadron formed two forward-deployed task groups, Commander, Task Group (CTG) 72.2 and 72.4. Through teamwork and dedication, the air crews, maintenance professionals and sup port personnel of CTGs 72.2 and 72.4 stood watch over the 7th Fleet area of responsibil ity (AOR) and are now returning home to the cheers of their loved ones. VP-26 flies the P-3C Orion, The U.S. Navys legacy maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft. While the P-3 is being replaced by the Boeing P-8 Poseidon it is still an effective weapons system, in high demand across the fleet. Traveling from Jacksonville, Fla. in May 2013, Team Trident undertook the signifi cant logistical feat of picking up and moving more than 350 personnel, aircraft, tools and equipment to the island of Okinawa, located approximately 600 miles south of the main islands of Japan. From Kadena Air Base the squadron conducted a wide variety of airborne antisubmarine and anti-surface warfare, intel ligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance, maritime domain awareness, search and res cue, and theater security cooperation mis sions. CTG 72.2 conducted regular detachments, comprised of aircrew and supporting main tenance personnel, to support partner and allied nations, build international partner ship and improve multinational interoper -VP-26 Tridents return to NAS Jacksonville

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Dec. 12 1862 Confederate torpedo (mine) sinks USS Cairo in Yazoo River. 1937 Japanese aircraft sink USS Panay in Yangtze River near Nanking, China. 1941 Naval Air Transport Service is established. 1951 First flight of helicopter with gas-turbine engine at Windsor Locks, Conn., demonstrates adapt ability of this engine to helicopters. 1972Capt. Eugene Cernan, commander of Apollo 17, walks on the Moon. Cmdr. Ronald Evans was the Command Module Pilot. The mission lasted 12 days, 13 hours and 52 minutes. Recovery by HC-1 helicopters from USS Ticonderoga (CVS-14). Dec. 13 1775 Continental Congress provides for the con struction of five ships of 32 guns, five ships of 28 guns, and three ships of 24 guns. 1941 Cmdr. William Sullivan designated the first Supervisor of Salvage with office in New York City. Dec. 14 1814 British squadron captures U.S. gunboats in Battle of Lake Borgne, La. 1944 Rank of Fleet Admiral, U.S. Navy (five-star admiral) is established. 1945 Captain Sue Dauser receives the first Distinguished Service Medal awarded to a nurse. 1965 Navy announces completion of 1,272 ft. radio tower at North West Cape, Australia, the highest manmade structure in the Southern Hemisphere at that time, as a link in fleet communications. Dec. 15 1943 Bureau of Naval Personnel Circular Letter on non-discrimination in Navy V-12 program. 1944 Congress appoints first three of four Fleet Admirals. 1965 Launch of Gemini 6 with Capt. Walter Schirra Jr. as Command Pilot. The mission included 16 orbits in 25 hours and 51 minutes. Recovery was by HS-11 heli copters from USS Wasp (CVS-18). Dec. 16 1821 Lt. Robert Stockton and Dr. Eli Ayers, a naval surgeon and member of American Colonizing Society, induce a local African king to sell territory for a colony which became the Republic of Liberia. 1907 Great White Fleet departs Hampton Roads, Va. to circumnavigate the world. 1922 USS Bainbridge (DD-246) rescues 482 persons from burning French transport Vinh-Long. 1941 USS Swordfish (SS-193) sinks Japanese cargo ship Atsutasan Maru. 1942 Pharmacists Mate First Class Harry Roby per forms an appendectomy on Torpedoman First Class W. R. Jones on board the submarine USS Grayback (SS208). It is the second appendectomy performed on board a submarine. 1998 In Operation Desert Fox, Navy cruise missiles attack Iraq. Dec. 17 1846 Ships under Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry capture Laguna de Terminos during Mexican War. 1941 Adm. Chester Nimitz named Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet, to relieve Adm. Husband Kimmel. Adm. William Pye becomes acting command er until Nimitzs arrival. Dec. 18 1902 Admiral of the Navy George Dewey receives orders to send his battleship to Trinidad and then to Venezuela to make sure that Great Britains and Germanys dispute with Venezuela was settled by peaceful arbitration, not force. 1944 Adm. Halseys 3rd Fleet encounters typhoon northeast of Samar. Destroyers USS Hull, USS Monaghan and USS Spence sink, while 21 other ships are damaged. 1965 River Patrol Force established in Vietnam. 1965 Helicopters from HS-11 on USS Wasp (CVS-18) pick up crew and capsule of Gemini 7, after picking up the crew and capsule of Gemini 6 two days earlier. 1967 Operation Preakness II begins in Mekong Delta. 1972 Mining and bombing of North Vietnam resumes with Linebacker II Operation. Long before the debate over the Affordable Care Act, the militarys own government-run healthcare system has been, for me, a mixed bag. On the one hand, my healthcare has always been free (if you can call paying with duty, deploy ments and, sometimes, life free). On the other hand, the military healthcare system has been confusing, inefficient and short on options. It is a complicated balance of entitle ment, subsidies and bureaucracy sentiments that have often been reflected in peoples reactions to my columns over the years. First, 14 years ago, during the only six weeks when I did not have a military identification card (between my college graduation and wedding), I broke my leg. I was technically uninsured, but the Navy hospital casted my leg anyway. Later, I wrote about how the military had taken care of its own. People were enraged. That cast wasnt free, they said The taxpayers paid for it. Its true. Since the day I was born, taxpayer money has cov ered my health insurance and medication. This has lead some people to believe they have input about my lifestyle. When people pay into something, they naturally want control over how their money is spent. Sarah broke her leg because she chose to wear high heels? We the taxpayers will have to cover that mistake. Sarahs overweight? We have to buy her blood pressure medicine. Sarah wants a third child? Yep, taxpayers will cover that, too. Ive always contended that my husbands service is our payment. For Dustins sacrifice to the country, taxpayer money covers our healthcare. Sounds perfect, right? Except, when the government spends other peoples money, they have to be careful. They have to make wise choices. And the benefi ciaries dont wield much power. The doctors Im allowed to see are limited, and getting a referral to a specialist is complicated. Usually, when the loca tion permits, Im restricted to the military hospital, where all the comparably-ranked doctors make the same pay and move every two to three years. Yes, there are many wonderful and talented doctors in military medicine, but without an element of financial competition, motivation to be the best doctor has to come from something else. Wait-times in lobbies and at the pharmacist are legendary. I once took an hour nap across three hard, plastic chairs wait ing for my antibiotics. When Lindell was an infant, the Navy hospital accidentally gave him the same series of shots twice on consecutive days. I was furious, but there was nothing I could do. I couldnt leave that practice and go to another one. I didnt have a choice. And complaining is pointless; no one loses their job or their customers. Then there was the time when Owen needed a tonsiland adenoidectomy. Technically it was elective surgery because it wasnt an emergency. But Owen was losing weight at 3 years old, he still wore a size 18-months pants and I was frantic. My options were to pay out-of-pocket on the outside (at a civilian hospital) or wait months to have the procedure done at the military hospital. Why months? Because of the hospitals backlog, and because the military has to review and approve these things. They have to be careful with taxpayer money. But military medicine is free and equally available to all who qualify. Or is it? The funny thing about making everyone equal is that people still find a way to give one group preferen tial treatment over another group. Many years ago, writing about military medicine, I said a system that requires users to be savvy in order to get the best treatment is a system that is broken. I was speaking to the fact that in the world of waiting for a referral, an appointment or a procedure, sometimes, the patient who works the system is seen faster. However, often the patient need not (and, of course, should not) manipulate anything. My dad retired as an admiral. Although we were raised to never use his position in any way (nope, not even when Dustin almost couldnt get leave for our wedding), after I married an ensign, I definitely noticed a change in treatment. When your ID card states you are the daughter of an admi ral, people notice. When your ID card states you are the wife of a new ensign, you take a nap while you wait for your antibiot ics. My concern, however, has always been for the spouses who are neither married to an ensign nor an admiral. My concern is for the enlisted families. What chance do they have in a free system that has been reduced to using rank as cur rency? People didnt like this either: There is manipulation of our taxpayer dollars? I thought all of it was free and equal? So, without getting overly political on either side, I am sin cere when I tell you that I have been intrigued by the countrys eagerness to be part of this government-run healthcare sys tem that I have come to both love and hate. Because the pros and cons of the Affordable Care Act seem strikingly familiar to the pros and cons of the military health care system. And if 38 years of being at the taxpayers and governments mercy has taught me anything it is this: nothing nothing is ever free. Base store closures for the holidaysThe NAS Jax Commissary will be open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Christmas Eve, Dec. 24. The store will be closed Christmas Day and reopen Dec. 26 for regular hours from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. The Commissary will be open normal hours (7 a.m. to 8 p.m.) on New Years Eve, Dec. 31 and will be closed New Years Day. The NAS Jax Navy Exchange (NEX) will be open Christmas Eve, Dec. 24 from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. The store will be closed Christmas Day. The NEX will be open New Years Eve, Dec. 31 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and New Years Day, Jan. 1 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Government-run (aka, military) healthcare has pros, cons

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Cmdr. Edgar Twining relieves Cmdr. Daryl Pierce as commanding officer for the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville during a change of command ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 117 Dec. 12. Capt. Katherine Erb, commanding offi cer, CNATT will preside. Twining, a native of Chemung, N.Y., graduated from Waverly High School in 1982 and enlisted in the Navy as an aviation structural mechanic. He completed three tours and multiple deploy ments as an enlisted Sailor, where he was designated as an enlisted aviation warfare specialist and master training specialist. In 1991, he was selected as the VA-75 Sailor of the Year and MATWING One Supervisor of the Year. The following year, he was promoted to chief petty officer. In May 1995, Twining received his commission through the Limited Duty Officer Program and has served as an assistant maintenance officer, quality assurance officer, maintenance officer, and maintenance material control offi cer. Twining reported for his current duty as executive officer of CNATTU Jax in July 2012. Directly following the change of com mand ceremony, Pierce is retiring from the Navy after serving more than 34 years for his country, at which his wife, retired Lt. Cmdr. Anita Pierce will be the guest speaker. Originally from Decatur, Ga., Pierce entered the Navy in 1979 as an avia tion structural mechanic (hydraulics). During his enlisted tours, he was select ed as Sailor of the Year, designated a master training specialist, promoted to chief petty officer, and earned a com mission through the Limited Duty Officer/Chief Warrant Officer Program. Pierce reported for duty as the executive officer, CNATTU Jacksonville in April 2011. While serving as commanding offi cer of CNATTU Jacksonville, he led 143 military and 40 civilian personnel in the training of 3,570 students through 1,199 classes of instruction. The Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville recently announced their selection for Senior and Junior Instructors of the Year. ADC(AW) Jeffrey Davis was selected as CNATTU Jacksonvilles 2013 Senior Instructor of the Year. Davis is currently assigned as Powerplant and Related Systems leading chief petty officer for Maintenance Training Unit 1011. He is qualified as a P-3 Orion T56-A-14 Engine O-Level and I-Level Maintenance instruc tor, and has provided 2,830 hours of classroom instruc tion to 33 students through six courses. His leadership and direct mentorship helped qual ify four new instructors. Davis was instrumen tal in the revision of the P-3 Powerplant and Related Systems (Career) Organizational Maintenance Course by updating and rewrit ing three new lessons which were critical to maintain cur rency and preparing techni cians to join the fleet. AS1(AW/SW) Daphne Guzman was selected as CNATTU Jacksonvilles 2013 Instructor of the Year. Guzman serves as Maintenance Training Unit 3032 leading petty officer and mechanical support equipment instructor. She has provided 960 hours of instruction to 46 Navy and Marine Corps students. Under her leadership, she supervised 30 staff members that maintained daily curricu lum development and upkeep of 28 support equipment main tenance courses that provided 11,176 hours of instruction to 371 students in 56 classes with a 100 percent graduation rate. AM2(AW/SW) Mark Hamilton was selected as CNATTU Jacksonvilles 2013 Junior Instructor of the Year. As lead H-60 Airframe and Related Systems instructor for Maintenance Training Unit 1005, he provided instruction to 88 Foreign National and U.S. Sailors through multiple cours es resulting in a 96.4 percent combined grade point average. Due to his technical exper tise and knowledge of H-60 airframe course curriculum, Hamilton was chosen to brief the Royal Australian Navy and the Royal Danish Navy on the airframes courseware content taught at CNATTU Jacksonville, strengthen ing relations between the two nations. As a master training specialist, he was responsible for the qualification of 10 new instructors and two master training specialists. Chapel holiday servicesThe following are the Christmas services at the NAS Jax Chapel: Christmas Eve (Dec. 24) Catholic Mass at 8 p.m. Christmas Eve (Dec. 24) Protestant Service at 7 p.m. Christmas Day (Dec. 25) Catholic Morning Mass at 10 a.m. For more information, call 542-3051/52. Twining to relieve Pierce as CNATTU Jax CO CNATTU JAX announces Instructors of the Year 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013

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The following NAS Jax Sailors were frocked during morning quarters on Dec. 6: AC2 Joseph Barry MA2 Larry Brown AT3 Linsay Bryars CS2 Gregory Burke ABE2 Jose Cruz MA1 Keith Danalewich AC1 Damien Davis ABH2 Joseph Demun AC1 Nicholas Done AWF3 Samantha Goulden AC3 Leanne Huynh AE2 Samantha Jones ABE2 Andrew Kimzey MM1 Corey Kruger ABH2 Alexsis LaBrake ABE3 Joshua Leinart ABH2 JaJuan Mangual MA3 Stephan Moore MA2 Glenn Patton ET1 Erik Paulsen CS2 John Phillips OS2 Samuel Polanco AT1 Christopher Robertson AC3 Stephen Simpson AM3 Nicholas Suszycki AC3 Christopher Tarvin EN3 Tysie Taylor CS1 Antonio Turner ABE1 William Ward The Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville announces their Sailors of the Year for 2013. AD1(AW) Zachary Brook was selected as CNATTU Jacksonvilles 2013 Sailor of the Year. Brook originates from Spokane, Wash. He currently serves as the lead ing petty officer and lead H-60 Power Plant Systems instructor at Maintenance Training Unit 1005 where he led and man aged the training of 581 allied military, U.S. Sailors and Marines; 56 of which he personally trained delivering more than 1,244 instruction hours while maintain ing a 95 percent grade point average (GPA). He also serves as the CNATTU Petty Officer Association president and coordinated 180 hours of instruction, in support of the Master Chief of the Navys CPO-365 program. His efforts helped support year round training for 65 first class petty officers. A dedicat ed mentor, his leadership led to seven instructors earning their master train ing specialist qualification. AT2(AW/SW) Marnicca Gomez was selected as CNATTU Jacksonvilles 2013 Junior Sailor of the Year. Gomez hails from Enterprise, Ala. Gomez consis tently displayed her expertise, profes sionalism and dedication as she pro vided 1,392 hours of instruction, while achieving a 100 percent graduation rate and a 97 per cent overall GPA. Hand selected to instruct at CNATTU North Island for 89 days, and for her efforts, Gomez was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal by the CNATTU North Island commanding officer. A key asset to the command, she carries out her duties as a sexual assault prevention and aware ness representative, CSAAD president, CPR instructor, public affairs photogra pher, and MWR secretary. Sgt. Eric Jude from Frazier Park, Calif., was selected as CNATTU Jackson-villes 2013 Marine of the Year. Jude managed 22 classes providing 496 hours of instruc tion to 106 Marines and two allied mili tary, all while lead ing 144 Marines through physical and tactical training at Maintenance Training Unit 3032. Jude also assumes duties as the uniform vic tim advocate for the detachment and SE PMS coordinator facilitating the com pletion of 107 scheduled and unsched uled maintenance actions on 63 pieces of support equipment. The MWR Liberty Program will be running free airport shuttles from Dec. 13 to Jan. 7 (with the exception of Christmas and New Year Day). Shuttles will be for departures and arrivals and is for E1-E6 single or unaccompanied military only. Sailors must sign up at the Liberty Center and bring a copy of their itinerary. All shuttles will depart from the barracks quarter deck. Pre-Registration is required. For more information, call 542-3491. CNATTU announces end of year staff awards NAS Sailors make rate Free airport shuttle available through MWR Liberty Operational Health Support Unit (OHSU) Jacksonville, the Reserve unit of Naval Hospital Jacksonville, held its change of command ceremony Dec. 8. In attendance were 200 guests from as far as San Diego and Ohio, as well as through out the southeastern United States. Capt. Lee Kiolbasa, a health care administrator whose prior position was as executive officer for OHSU San Diego, relievedCapt. Kenneth LaPolla, a general den tist from Ohio, who will transfer to a post-com mand staff position with OHSU Camp Lejuene. Capt. Gayle Shaffer, commanding offi cer of Naval Hospital Jacksonville, was the OHSU Jax holds change of command JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013 Dashing Through the Grove gets families in holiday spiritIt was an unusually warm December night as more than 1,000 active duty members, their families and friends came out to enjoy the NAS Jax Dashing Through the Grove event at Patriots Grove Dec. 6. Hundreds of children dashed through the park cre ating excitement in the air as they wait for Santa to arrive on the NAS Jax Fire Departments ladder truck. Once Santa arrived and made the rounds greeting the crowd, the children and their parents lined up to spend a few quality moments telling him what they would like for Christmas and to have their pictures taken. The families also enjoyed riding a small train around the grounds. We came last year and it was a great event for the kids. There are always plenty of activities and the kids can burn off their energy, said Laura Reichmann. While many stood in line to see Santa, others took turns sledding down an icy slide or having fun bom barding one another with snowballs. This was our first time at this event and it really exceeded our expectations. Lots to do for the kids in a safe environment and a great alternative from vis iting Santa at the mall, said AWO1 David Shaffery of Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven. Before the official program began, NAS Jax Chaplain (Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore gave a short blessing. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander thanked the guests for coming before beginning the countdown to light the base Christmas tree. Members from Navy Band Southeast and a DJ also provided some holiday music to entertain the crowd. MWR pro vided free hot chocolate and cookies. Additional activities included face painting, clowns, balloon artists, bounce houses and an assortment of inflatable games. We put this event on each year to kick off the holi day season and bring the NAS Jax community togeth er. We are excited to see such a tremendous response to this event as it continuous to grow. I am glad that so many people are making this NAS Jax tradition apart of their traditions, said Youth Activities Center Director Jason McKenzie. Special thanks go out to all the people behind the scenes including the NAS Jax Fire Department, Security Department, Chapel Center, Facilities Department, Navy Exchange, Commissary and MWR who help make this annual event such a huge success. The NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department coordinated the event, which was spon sored by VyStar Credit Union, University of Phoenix, Sprint, USA Discounters and USAA. Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any com pany, sponsor or its products or services.

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We then radioed back for the Marines to send an Osprey and res cue the people stranded below. Frazier, who in the civilian world is an agent flying P3s for the U.S. Customs and Border Protection agency, said he and his copilot on the relief mission had a combined 15,000 flight hours and 45 years of experience an asset in supple menting more junior active duty counterparts. In recent years, the Broadarrows have primarily flown counter-nar cotics missions in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico from bases in El Salvador. VP-62 is hoping to transition to the P-8A behind our active duty counterparts, but were content right now to focus on performing critical missions in the venerable P-3C Orion, said Townsend. The P-3C Orion has been in ser vice for 50-years in Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force. While mission gear has been updated over the years, the P-3 airframe itself is rapidly approaching the end of its service life. The new P-8A, a military vari ant of the Boeing 737, features improved airframe reliability, high-altitude surveillance and reconnaissance capability, openarchitecture mission systems, in-flight refueling capability and many other modern features. The squadron has completed Advanced Readiness Program, Operational Readiness Evaluation, Fleet NATOPS Evaluation Team inspection, Conventional Weapons Refresher Training, Conventional Weapons Technical Proficiency Inspection in support of it first iter ation of VP Reserve mobilization and deployment cycles. IT1(SW) Paul Voigt and YN2 Anthony Mitchell were honored as Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Senior and Junior Sailor of the Year 2013, respectively, during a ceremony at NAS Jacksonville, Nov. 27. As a battle watch specialist in the Regional Operations Center (ROC), Voigt supervised and trained a team of 17 Sailors from three different ratings. He ensured his team processed and disseminated more than 12,000 situ ational reports, 160 mutual aid reports, 100 voice reports for 16 installations throughout the region. Voigt was also led the execution of more than 60 regional task force exer cises, ensuring timely notification and thorough preparations for task force deployment during simulated nuclear incidents. In addition, Voigt is a command fit ness leader and a volunteer in the local community. He regularly volunteers at the Jacksonville Ronald McDonald house and the Cub Scouts of America Troop 0554. Petty Officer Voigt displays unparal leled leadership, said QMC(SW) Joseph Ziro, Voigts supervisor. He has the technical expertise of a seasoned chief petty officer and is also an engaged deckplate leader. Petty Officer Voigts contributions to the suc cess of day-to-day operations made the decision easy to nominate him for Sailor of the Year. Voigt attributed his success to his ROC co-workers and family. I would say the genuine work effort from my department and command has enabled me to be successful and fulfill everyday mission tasks, he said. We have a great operations team from top to bottom. I also have to thank my fam ily because without them I would not be where I am today. Mitchell serves as administration office assistant leading petty officer and the executive assistant to the regional command master chief (CMC), provid ing logistical support to the CMC dur ing his travels. He also processes all periodic and transfer evaluation and fit ness reports and coordinates executivelevel correspondence. Throughout the year, Mitchell processed 70 evaluations with no discrepancies, processed 500 documents for staff directorates and processed documents for four retire ments, three separations, 20 gains and 19 losses. According to YN(SW) John Felizpolanco, CNRSE Administrative Department leading petty officer, Mitchells contributions have been cru cial to the departments success. Hes an invaluable asset to our department, Felizpolanco said. Hes an absolute expert when it comes to customer service and taking care of the Sailors at this command. Hes also truly one of the most dependable Sailors Ive ever had work for me. I can task him with literally anything, and I know I can count on him to get the job done right and on time. Mitchell said he felt honored to receive such and award, but it was ulti mately the result of a team effort. Its always an honor to be selected for something like this because its a reminder that hard work does pay off, he said. I also realize, though, that this wouldnt be possible without the encouragement and support I get from every member of the department. My success relies heavily on those around me and I really dont think I could have accomplished this without them. According to Mitchell, the key to his success has been focus. You just have to come in and do your best every day, he said. The minute you lose focus and get relaxed, thats when you can start to make mistakes. Individual selection criteria for the awards was based upon exemplary per formance of tasks, contributions that enhanced organization accomplish ment of command objectives, mission, teamwork or public image, and ones professional attitude toward self and others. CNRSE honors 2013 Sailors of the Year VP-62 Rendering honors during colorsReminder: whenever the national anthem is played, all personnel aboard NAS Jacksonville, not in formation, are required to stand at attention and face the national ensign. In the event, the national ensign is not displayed, they shall face the source of the music. When covered, they shall come to atten tion and salute until the anthem ends. Those in for mation, shall come to attention and the formation commander will render salute. Those driving a vehicle shall come to a complete stop and remain seated at attention. Morning colors are conducted every morning at 8 a.m. Evening colors are at sunset. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013

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one or more firearms and displays no pattern or method for selection of their victims. In some cases, active shoot ers may also use improvised explosive devices to injure additional victims that become an impediment to police and emergency responders, said Syrek. Law enforcement responders must identify, close with, and neutralize the suspect in order to preserve life. NAS Jacksonville Training Officer Jim Butters said, Our primary objective was to run a safe exercise that would validate the pre-planned responses for security, fire and emergency services as well as Fleet and Family Support Center participation. John Tillman, NAS Jacksonville antiterrorism officer reported that the field exercise provided some excellent feed back for the stations security force. Because of the increase in real-world active shooter incidents, it is crucial that we conduct drills like this as we also focus on the changes to our man power structure and organizational makeup, sail Tillman. Syrek noted, Were always careful when firearms are involved in an exer cise. Officers responding during their shift must exchange their weapons at the incident command post for plas tic replicas, so there are no accidental shootings. The training went well. The more we train, the better we get. Any mistakes we make here are okay because they help deal with events in the real world. This exercise will be reviewed with the entire security department, said Syrek. Butters added, It is equally impor tant to continue our team-building strategies while increasing situation al awareness across the command. Overall, the exercise was a very good challenge and permitted all parties to exercise their training objectives. We never fail to develop some valuable les sons learned that will improve emer gency response procedures in the future. SHOOTER Our entire Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville staff across our hospital and five branch health clinics is working hard to become your medical center of choice, and we have great news regarding your primary care. For the first time in years, we are able to accept new patients. This means, its never been a better time to make NH Jacksonville your medical cen ter of choice. Staffing increases, facil ity improvements and Navy Medicines efforts to adapt, reshape and realign its state side naval hospitalslike oursis making this pos sible. Family members and retirees in the vicinity of NAS Jacksonville, NSB King Bay, Ga. and NS Mayport can now get a primary care manager (PCM) at our hospital or branch health clinics. When you enroll with a pri mary care manager at one of our facilities it means you are part of a Medical Home Port teamwhich places each of our enrolled patients in the center of a collaborative team of caregiversfrom doctors and nurses to case manag ers. Led by your primary care manager, your team focuses on your comprehensive health care needspreventive, urgent and routine. Plus, you have access to RelayHealth which provides 24/7 email access for non-urgent needs such as lab results, medication refills and appointments. This means you avoid extra trips for things you can take care of with secure email. Plus, it is easy to sign up, just go to www.med.navy. mil/sites/NavalHospitalJax and look for our Medical Home Port information. Our team approach improves access to care so you can get appointments when you need them, enhances your care experience, meets your urgent care needs, improves health outcomes by focusing on pre ventive care (which reduces hospitalizations and emergen cy room visits), and builds the relationship between you and your provider. And after hours, you have access to our Nurse Advice Line: (800) 529-4677 on evenings, weekends and holidays to triage your medi cal needs and direct you to the appropriate level of care. On top of this, we have some of the worlds leading healthcare experts in more than 30 specialty care areas, from orthopedics to undersea medicine. We have an awardwinning Family Medicine Residency Program, North Floridas only hospital cer tified Baby Friendly by the World Health Organization/ United Nations Childrens Fund, and maintain The Joint Commission Gold Seal of Approval for accreditation in healthcare quality and safety. In an effort to provide you with more convenient appointment times, we also plan to expand hours starting in early January. At our hos pital (family medicine, inter nal medicine and pediatrics) we plan to be open Monday through Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Fridays 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. BHC Kings Bay pri mary care is already open 10 hours on weekdays (7 a.m. to 5 p.m.). BHC Mayport (fam ily medicine and pediatrics) is already open Monday through Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Fridays, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; and Saturdays, 8 a.m. to noon. Not only do you gain access to top-notch care from some of the most gifted and edu cated medical professionals by choosing Navy Medicine, you join us in doing our part to improve value. Taxpayers like you and me essentially pay twice when Navy families receive care in the TRICARE network when that same care is available at our Navy facili ties: once for state-of-the-art Navy facilities and expert staff, and a second time for redun dant services in the network. For example, if Navy Medicine increased PCM enrollment across all facilities by just 15 percent, it would result in a $1 billion savings. Our TRICARE health bene fits advisors, patient relations staff and customer service rep resentatives are here to help you enroll at one of our facili ties. Those at or near NAS Jax can call 542-9175; NS Mayport call 270-4255; and at NSB Kings Bay call (912) 573-4458. Opportunities to enroll with primary care manager at Naval Hospital Jacksonville JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013 11

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USS Samuel B. Roberts hosts Pearl Harbor CeremonySailors, family and friends came together aboard USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) for a ceremony to commemorate the 72nd anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. Also in attendance was Charles Ellis, Duane Reyelts and Henry Griffin who served during that dread ful attack which lasted 90 minutes, taking the lives of more than 2,300 service members and wounding more than 1,200, immediately plunging the United States into World War II Dec 7, 1941. It feels wonderful just to be able to be here at this stage of my life, said Ellis. I am honored to represent those who lost their lives on that day at Pearl Harbor. This years historic commemoration, Sound the Alarm, examines how thousands of Americans answered the call to duty in the wake of the attack on Pearl Harbor. Today these men are commemorated and we will never forget their sacrifice, said Cmdr. Erica Hoffman, USS Samuel B. Roberts commanding officer. We can still hear the accounts of those in their own words who answered the call when the alarm was sounded. Reading their words, listening to their voices and seeing their faces will forever connect us to them. During the ceremony everyone in attendance, beginning with the Pearl Harbor survivors, was given the opportunity to lay a wreath or flowers over the side of the ship. It is an honor for us to be here to pay tribute to those who served before and laid the groundwork for all of us in uniform today, said NS Mayport Commanding Officer Capt. Wes McCall. It was a wonderful cer emony and we thank the Capt. Hoffmann and her crew for doing such a fan tastic job. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013 13

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The VP-45 Pelicans Wardroom and Chiefs Mess of recently took some time from their P-8A Poseidon transition to build camaraderie in a friendly compe tition. After completing their physical readi ness test, the officers and chiefs gath ered for some intense paintball action in Jacksonville. The event offered a fun team-build ing exercise to further develop personal and professional relationships between the squadron members. It was a great event, said Lt. j.g. Josh Stokes. Weve been working really hard with transition so it was good to get out and unwind a bit. The afternoon, which saw its share of playful banter and trash talking, was marked by the sharp crack of high-powered paintball guns and the cries of frustration from those whom were hit. Both sides fought tooth and nail for bragging rights throughout VP-45 spaces. At the end of the day, however, both sides agreed to a ceasefire since they could not determine a victor. Despite being adversaries on the paintball bat tlefield, the teams reunited for a bar beque sponsored by the chiefs mess. Youre out there trying to defeat each other, but you never lose sight of the fact that, in the end you are all on the same team, said Lt. j.g. Levi Blackwell. The paintball excursion enabled Pelican leaders the opportunity to forge deeper bonds. As they return to the business at hand of completing their transition to the P-8A Poseidon, the cemented relationships represent the hallmark of why VP-45 stands as one of the Navys premier maritime patrol squadrons. Sailors from CTG-72.2, deployed to Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan, recent ly returned from a week in Chennai, India, where they participated in Exercise Malabar 2013. The detachment, comprised of both active duty Sailors from VP-26 and reserve Sailors from VP-62, went to India to enhance interoperability between the U.S. and Indian maritime patrol and recon naissance communities. Malabar is a biennial naval training exercise that was held Nov. 5-11. U.S. participants included the USS McCampbell (DDG 85) and the Warlords of HSM-51. The Indian Navy was rep resented by the stealth frig ate INS Shivalik, guided mis sile destroyer INS Ranvijay, embarked Helix and Chetak helicopters, and a TU-142M maritime reconnaissance air craft. Sailors and airmen of both navies participated in training ashore and at-sea, beginning with conferences designed to allow profession al exchanges and facilitate increased cooperation and interoperability, followed by underway practical applica tion. Members of the CTG-72.2 crew also attended receptions aboard USS McCampbell and INS Shivalik, engaging in cul tural exchanges and develop ing personal relationships with the Indian Navy participants. Three anti-submarine war fare (ASW) events were flown by the U.S. P-3C crew in sup port of Malabar 2013. The first flight gave the P-3 and SH-60R crews an opportunity to prac tice nighttime coordinated operations in support of USS McCampbell. The next day the crew participated in an exer cise supporting INS Ranvijay, with an Indian KA-28 Helix helicopter and the MH-60R flying from USS McCampbell. During the third event, the aircrew safely conducted the first ASW plane-to-plane turn over with an Indian TU-142M Bear aircraft. The exercise advanced the maritime rela tionship between the two navies, encouraged construc tive synergies and demonstrat ed their ability to plan and exe cute multinational operations on-station. VP-26 Executive Officer Cmdr. Gregory Smith was the officer-in-charge of the P-3C detachment. He detailed the importance of the exchange, noting that international exer cises of this caliber are crucial to expanding our maritime partnerships and enhancing compatibility with those who share our security interests. I am extremely proud of the per formance of this fully integrat ed active-reserve detachment. The Navys new, most advanced maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft, the P-8A Poseidon, arrived in Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan for its inaugural deploy ment Dec. 1. The War Eagles of Patrol Squadron (VP) 16 deployed with six P-8A Poseidons in support of 7th Fleet maritime patrol and reconnaissance operations in the Indo-AsiaPacific region. The deployment marks a milestone in the transition of U.S. Navy Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Forces (MPRF). For the first time since the Navy received the P-3A Orion in 1962 a new aircraft will be operated by a deployed patrol squadron. The P-8A Poseidon is the most advanced, long-range anti-submarine and anti-sur face warfare aircraft in the VP-45 officers/chiefs compete in paintball VP-26 Tridents and VP-62 Broadarrows participate in Malabar 2013 First P-8A Poseidons report for duty 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013

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guest speaker and presiding officer for the ceremony. OHSU Jacksonville is the largest medical command within Navy Reserve Command Southeast, with more than 700 members in 18 detachments crossing four states and Puerto Rico.Its Sailors provide essential medical and dental readiness support for the more than 9,400 Sailors and Marines assigned to Naval Operational Support Commands in the southeast region. Kiolbasa comes to OHSU Jacksonville with a wealth of experience to include tours at Navy military treat ment facilities, operational commands with the Marines, mobilizations to Germany and Afghanistan, and several executive leadership positions. He attended the University of Nebraska in Lincoln, where he received a Bachelor of Science, and a Masters Degree in Business Administration. During LaPollas two-year command tenure, OHSU Jacksonville provided more than 220,000 hours of direct operational medical and dental care in the form of annual training to Navy active duty commands and missions throughout the world, including deploy ments of many members to Germany, Horn of Africa, Cuba, and Afghanistan. Under LaPollas leadership, every one of the com mands 18 detachments was awarded the Navy Surgeon Generals coveted Blue H Award for exceed ing industry standards for health and wellness initia tives. The command has also been recognized Navy wide for its development of an innovative exportable Trauma Nurse Training Course designed to deliver enhanced trauma care capabilities to the warfighter. In recognition of these efforts, LaPolla was award ed the Navy and Marine Corps Meritorious Service Medal by Shaffer during the ceremony. Navy Band Southeast and the Naval Hospital Honor Guard supported the change of command ceremony. OHSU world. A true multi-mission aircraft, it also provides superior maritime intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) capability. The Poseidon is built on the proven Boeing 737 airframe, the most commer cially operated aircraft in the world. The transition to the Poseidon brings with it enhanced safety and reduced maintenance. Based at NAS Jacksonville, VP-16 began the transi tion to become the first P-8A squadron 18 months ago, shortly after returning home from a six-month deploy ment to Kadena Air Base. The War Eagles achieved U.S. Navy safe for flight status in January 2013 and were certified ready for deployment in November 2013. I couldnt be more proud of what the War Eagles have been able to accomplish during the squadrons transition to the P-8A, said Cmdr. Bill Pennington, VP-16 commanding officer. We are well trained and well prepared for this deployment, and excited about the opportunity to demonstrate the Poseidons excep tional capabilities. The deployment of the P-8A Poseidons to Japan is part of a phased replacement of the propeller driven P-3C Orion now serving in U.S. 7th Fleet operating area. Deploying alongside VP-16 will be the VP-46 Grey Knights from Whidbey Island, Wash., who will operate the venerable Orion. In December, we will demonstrate the ability of the Poseidon to operate effectively alongside P-3C during high-tempo deployed operations, said Capt. Mike Parker, commander of Task Force 72. I also look forward to P-8A integrating seamlessly with our inter national partners and allies. Our interoperability will only get better with Poseidon, added Parker. VP-16 For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. Donations neededThe Greater Jacksonville Area USO is in need of food items/financial contributions to support the Holiday Food Basket program. Donations can be dropped off at the NAS Jax USO from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. or the NS Mayport USO from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. The USO is also accepting donations of new, unwrapped toys to support the Giving Tree at the Navy Exchange Courtyard which benefits military children. For more information, call 778-2821. ability. During the deployment Task Group 72.2 completed 29 detachments to 13 countries, including Australia, Brunei, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Micronesia, New Zealand, Palau, The Republic of the Philippines, the Republic of Korea, Singapore and Thailand,. The majority of the detachments involved scheduled multinational exer cises. Among these were SEASURVEX-2013 with the armed forces of Indonesia, a series of cooperation and readiness afloat training exercises with Brunei, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore and Thailand, Talisman Saber with the Australian Defense Force, AnnualEx in conjunction with the Japanese Self Defense Forces, Malabar-13 with naval forces from India, and numerous bilat eral exercises with Australia, Japan and the Republic of Korea. These multilateral efforts build ties between nations and allow for great er coordination and interoperability between forces. Other detachments were executed in support of operational requirements, such as Operation Big Eye which sup ports our partners attempts to curb illegal fishing within the territorial waters of Micronesia; search and res cue detachments to Guam; an historic detachment to New Zealand (the first by a U.S. Navy P-3C since 1984); and the humanitarian assistance detachment to the Philippines in response to Typhoon Haiyan last month. Typhoon Haiyan made landfall on Nov. 7, 2013, killing thousands and dev astating many islands along the nations eastern coast. The men and women of VP-26 and VP-62 were among the first on the scene to support the humanitar ian assistance/disaster relief mission after the government of the Philippines requested U.S. assistance. The P-3s played a vital role in damage assessment, providing a birds-eye view of the areas devastated by the typhoon so government officials could direct aid to those most in need. Aircrews performed reconnaissance of roadways and bridges, located per sonnel isolated from aid, and scouted the islands for suitable helicopter land ing sites to allow badly needed supplies to be delivered. The successful response to this crisis demonstrated both the value of main taining forward deployed naval forc es the level of integration achieved by the active and reserve maritime patrol forces who were ready to respond and executed flawlessly. In addition to VP-26, VP-62, and VP-69, aircrews from VP-1, stationed in Whidbey Island, Wash. also support ed CTG 72.2 and 72.4 throughout the deployment. Led, by VP-26 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mark Sohaney, the integrated team was tasked to meet all maritime patrol requirements across the Pacific Fleet AOR, while paving the way for the first operational deployment of the P-8A Poseidon. Sohaney and his team will turn over CTG 72.2 to NAS Jacksonvilles VP-16, the first P-8A squadron, later this month. Although Sohaney and Team Trident are returning home to NAS Jacksonville, they will remain ready to answer the call. The chance to lead these fine men and women in support of such an important mission is truly a once in a lifetime opportunity, said Sohaney. I could not be more proud of what they accomplished over the past seven months. With the last aircraft scheduled to arrive on home soil in mid-December, VP-26 Sailors will be re-uniting with their families just in time for Christmas. But Sohaney and the Tridents will soon be back at work training aircrews, repairing aircraft, and preparing for the squadrons next deployment. Their tireless dedication ensured a successful deployment and is a testa ment to the squadrons mantra that, Trident Pride runs Bone Deep. VP-26 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013

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With a month left before the start of tax season, service members should begin gathering documentation to file their 2013 taxes, the director of the Pentagons office of family policy and children and youth said Dec. 3. In a recent interview with American Forces Press Service and the Pentagon Channel, Barbara Thompson suggested visiting the Military OneSource Web site for tax filing resources and to learn what will be necessary to file, such as W2 forms, Social Security numbers and receipts for deductions such as child care, education, medical expenses and donations, among other write-offs. Tax preparers at Military OneSource will do short-form tax filing free of charge for service members and their families, Thompson said. Relocations and deployments have tax implications, Thompson noted. For example, deployed service mem bers can receive an extension to file taxes after the normal April 15 filing date, she said. Its very helpful to have someone who is experienced to help you through the cumbersome issue of taxes and tax returns, she added. The tax preparers at Military OneSource are up to date on changes in tax laws, and can answer militaryspecific questions, Thompson said. Installations also offer volunteer income tax assistance to service mem bers and their families, while certain banks and credit unions provide educa tion and training on tax preparation, Thompson said. She advised that ser vice members organize their taxes by starting a file beginning each Jan. 1 for the following years tax papers, such as receipts and other write-offs. You dont want to wait until the last minute, she said. Service members and families who prepare long-form taxes with deduc tions such as mortgages and rental properties might want to consider hiring a tax expert to file for them, Thompson said. Its best to get advice to make sure you have everything covered, she added. People who do their own taxes need to stay on top of current tax information, Thompson said. Sometimes tax laws change, so you have to be really smart about doing your own taxes, she added. States tax laws often vary, too, she said, and because of relocations, some ser vice members have to file local taxes in more than one state. Thats where [tax consultants] can really be of great value to make sure you know what the requirements are for states, Thompson said. Filing federal and state tax returns usually results in either a tax refund or money owed back to the government. Expecting to receive a tax refund, but instead finding out that money is owed can be a shock, Thompson said. Looking at W2s to determine how much money in taxes is being withheld is a good indi cator of whether or not one will owe money, she suggested. Service members who receive a tax refund face important decisions on what to do with the money, Thompson said. Do you use it to buy down debt, or put it in a savings account? she asked, advising people to not blow their tax refunds in a spending frenzy of unnec essary purchases. A tax refund also can be deposited into a retirement savings account, she added. Its important to think about what youre going to do with that money, she advised, and how you can best utilize it for your financial wellbeing. Meeting with a financial planner to learn the lay of the land, and what tax deductions might apply to a ser vice members finances is a good idea, Thompson said. Its really important to be savvy about that. Your base Navy College Office (NCO) offers paperbased American College Testing (ACT) and Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) college admissions testing at base education centers to active duty service members free of charge. According to Mareba Mack, educational special ist at the NAS Pensacola Navy College Office, when a current score is required for service or education programs, all eligible military members, including the Coast Guard, are authorized to take one free col lege admissions exam administered at their local base education center. A few of the service programs that require a cur rent SAT or ACT score are the Naval Academy and the Naval Academy Preparatory School Programs, Medical Enlisted Commissioning Program and the Seaman to Admiral-21 program, said Mack. Service members with hopes of pursuing a baccalaureate degree at a four-year institution are eligible for a free test whether or not they are using military education program benefits such as Tuition Assistance (TA) and/ or the GI Bill. Both the ACT and SAT are administered monthly by the educational center staff. In order to help prepare for the SAT and ACT, the NCO offers free materials to assist service members in achieving the scores they need. Mack suggests mem bers visit their local NCO to receive official test guide booklets that offer information about each exam, including practice tests. Additional information on the ACT and SAT is avail able at www.act.org/aap/pdf/Preparing-for-the-ACT. pdf and http://sat.collegeboard.org/SAT/public/pdf/ getting-ready-for-the-sat.pdf. Andrea Franklin, educational technician at the NCO Pensacola notes that the education centers also offer other tools that can be used to improve basic English and math skills. Other offerings available at no charge include the Online Academic Skills Course (OASC) and the College Placement Skills Training Course (CPST), said Franklin. For more information on the OASC and CPST, visit https://www.navycollege.navy.mil/dsp_oasc.aspx and https://www.navycollege.navy.mil/dsp_cpst.aspx. Prepare now for tax seasonInterested in college? Free admissions testing available for service members The NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) is offering Suicide Prevention Awareness Training for base and tenant commands this month. Should your command be in need of this training, select a date and time that is convenient for your command and call 542-2776 to reserve seating, said FFSC Education and Training Coordinator Wilhelmina Nash. Attending this one-hour class could help you save someones life. Thank you for your concern and support, she added. The following are the available train ing dates and times:Dec. 12 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 17 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 18 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 30 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 31 9 a.m. & 1 p.m.Suicide prevention awareness training JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013 17

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Childrens Holiday Bingo Dec. 20 Doors open at 5 p.m., games begin at 6 p.m. $10 per childFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Special Stars Bowling League for fami lies with special needs children. All ages welcome! Ramps available for the non-ambulatory as well as bumpers for beginners. Runs for 10 weeks at a cost of $7 per week, shoes are included. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for Active Duty 11 a.m 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Dec. 21, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: Dec. 28, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise* Strike in the New Year at NAS Freedom Lanes Dec. 31, 7 p.m. 1 a.m. $15 per personFitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Jingle Bell Jog 5K Dec. 13 at 11:30 a.m. Perimeter Rd. / Antenna Farm Powerlifting Competition Feb. 8, 2014 7 a.m. at the Fitness Center $10 registration feeI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Jacksonville Zoo Light $8.50 St. Augustine Holiday Lights $8.75 adult & $3 child Ringling Brothers Barnum & Bailey Circus $15 Disney Jr. Live $15 $29 Monster Jam $22 $42 Globetrotters $18 Gatorbowl $35 Russel Athletic Bowl $78 Capital One Bowl $98 Wild Adventures $30 $70 Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket Fla. $166 $194.50 Universal Orlando $114 $169.50 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Daytona 500 $62 $209 Drive 4COPD 300 $55 Budweiser Duels $55 Sprint Unlimited $30 $55 Rolex 24 $32 $65 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 The Artist Series Broadway in Jacksonville 2013 2014 season, select shows $51 $65 Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2013 2014 season, select shows $11 $70 Jaguar Tickets Section 147 $70 Armed Forces Vacation Club www.afvclub.com $349 $369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St. Augustine $4.25 $7.50 St. Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Wild Florida Airboats $17 $46.50 Florida Ecosafaris $25 $119 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels located near attrac tions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Ice Skating Trip Dec.14 at 6 p.m. The Avenues Mall Shuttle Dec. 17 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Dec. 17 for active duty Dec. 19 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Daily Twilight Golf Special Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1 p.m. Santa Sez Golf Scramble Dec. 20 at 10 a.m. $40 military, $50 civilian guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m.Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Movie Under the Stars featuring The Grinch Dec. 13, 6 p.m. Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013

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Schramm retires after 42 years Naval Hospital Jacksonville, why is volunteering important to you? A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013 19

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013 Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel ended his talk with troops at Manama, Bahrain Dec. 6 as he usually does offering to answer questions or listen to any advice they can offer. The service members and civilian mariners aboard the amphibious transport dock USS Ponce (LPD-15) Hagel spoke with today didnt offer advice, but they did ask about Iran, women in combat, and pay and benefits. The six-month interim agreement with Iran the State Department announced in November, Hagel said, is intended to allow space and time for negotiations on Irans nuclear program and other issues. Hagel said as secretary of defense and as a former sena tor, he believes the agreement represents an opportunity to probe in great detail the pos sibilities of getting to a higher ground . and see, in fact, if the Iranians are serious about following through on their pledge to halt pursuit of nucle ar weapons. During that six-month peri od, he added, We will keep the same kind of strong assets, [and we will conduct] the same exercises as usual. We understand, clearly, the dangers that Iran represents and has represented, he said. . . This is not an exercise based in folly. This is very clear-eyed, real engagement. Whether we can get to where we hope we can get to in six months, I dont know. Well see. Hagel offered a quick semi nar in response to a question on pay and benefits. With a continuing resolution controlling government spend ing through Jan. 15, no defense budget, and the likelihood of an additional $52 billion sequestration cut in defense funding next fiscal year, he said, Pentagon planners are challenged to map out the next five years. Always, you protect your people, he said. . This institution completely, abso lutely relies on you. The United States has a tre mendous advantage in cuttingedge technology, he said, but its useless without capable, committed people to use it. We are reviewing pay, com pensation, retirement . every aspect of our budget, Hagel said. The secretary assured the troops that he and other defense leaders begin every decision process . first focus ing on taking care of our peo ple. Hagels next questioner asked the secretarys opinion of women in combat. Given that three Marine women gradu ated from the Corps enlisted infantry training in November, a male Marine asked, Will we see full integration within the infantry battalions? And what is your personal opinion on this? Hagel termed the womens achievement tremendous, and said women Marines, soldiers, airmen and sailors should be given more opportu nities for jobs, promotions and command positions. The female troops he has spoken with dont want the standards lowered for them, the secretary said. And if women can and want to serve in any of . the combat areas and they can meet those stan dards, they should be allowed to serve. The services are evolving through the process of open ing combat arms to women, he said, and are on track with the effort. Im personally strongly sup portive of it, Hagel said. . .Im very proud of these women who are stepping for ward and who want to do more things, and are doing more things. The Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (HST CSG) passed the approximate midway point of its 2013-2014 deployment Dec. 6 in the Gulf of Oman. HST CSG deployed from Norfolk, Va., and Mayport, Fla., in late July and after transit ing the Atlantic Ocean and U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibil ity (AOR), entered the U.S. 5th Fleet AOR Aug. 18 to conduct maritime security operations, support theater security coop eration efforts and support Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF). HST CSG is currently the only continental U.S.-based carrier strike group forward deployed. I could not be more proud of the performance of our Sailors and Marines, said Rear Adm. Kevin Sweeney, commander, HST CSG. Their efforts in supporting coalition warfighters on the ground in Afghanistan and maritime operations through out the region have been the key to building trust and con fidence with our partner nations. HST CSG includes the air craft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), the guid ed-missile cruisers USS Gettysburg (CG 64) and USS San Jacinto (CG 57), the guid ed-missile destroyers USS Bulkeley (DDG 84) and USS Mason (DDG 87); Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3; and embarked Carrier Strike Group 10 and 1st Combined Destroyer Squadron staffs. Harry S. Truman, the strike groups flagship, has teamed up with CVW-3 to launch more than 7,000 sorties, amassing more than 19,700 flight hours, since departing for deploy ment. Nine days after enter ing the 5th Fleet AOR, an F/A18C Hornet, assigned to the Checkerboards of Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 312, piloted by Marine Lt. Col. Joseph Reedy, com manding officer of VMFA-312, launched from Truman in sup port of OEF Aug. 27. Since that time, CVW-3 squadrons have flown more than 8,900 hours and 1,500 sorties in support of OEF. Squadrons assigned to CVW-3 include the Seahawks of Airborne Early Warning Squadron 126, the Zappers of Electronic Attack Squadron 130, the Ragin Bulls of Strike Fighter Squadron 37, the Gunslingers of Strike Fighter Squadron 105, the Swordsmen of Strike Fighter Squadron 32, the Dusty Dogs of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 7 and the Swamp Foxes of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 74. Its inspiring to watch the young men and women of Truman and Carrier Air Wing 3 work so closely together, said Capt. Bob Roth, Trumans com manding officer. Its their hard work and tireless dedication to the mission that keep the jets launching, in the air, and sup porting the warfighters on the ground in Afghanistan. Capt. Sara Joyner, com mander, CVW-3, also spoke of the teamwork that makes HST CSGs support of OEF a success. Whether from the air wing or from Truman, every Sailor and Marine understands the importance of what were doing out here and how vital teamwork is to our success, she said. The ship and air wing team work side by side, every day for hours on end, in all sorts of conditions, to make sure we can get support to those who need it on the ground. Each ship in the strike group has made an impact on region al security and safety by pro viding assistance and medical support to fishermen and mer chants on multiple occasions, and by participating in theater security cooperation exercises. Other highlights of the deployment include port visits to Marseille, France; Manama, Bahrain; and Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates; a Thanksgiving Day visit by the Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Mike Stevens; and the advancement of approximately 350 Sailors. During the first 136 days of the deployment, Sailors and Marines consumed more than 15,175 gallons of milk, 52,718 lbs. of beef, 134,203 lbs. of chicken, 5,560 lbs. of hot dogs, 108,435 lbs. of fresh vegetables and 10,975 dozens of eggs. To date, Harry S. Truman completed 16 underway replenishments, during which more than 11.4 million gallons of JP-5 fuel was received, 9.5 million gallons of which was issued to aircraft for flight operations. Over the past four-and-ahalf months, this ship has done amazing things from support ing OEF, completing a physical readiness test while on a com bat deployment, had numerous Sailors advanced, Sailors get ting multiple warfare qualifica tions, and Sailors continuing their education, said Truman Sailor of the Year AO1 Ryan Smith. We still have a long road ahead of us with much more to accomplish before the end of deployment, but well ensure we remain vigilant and well keep meeting every chal lenge safely until we return safely to our loved ones. Hagel addresses Iran, pay, women in combat Truman Carrier Strike Group passes deployment midpoint The aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) launched and recovered E-2D Hawkeyes, from the Tiger Tails of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 125, for the first time, Dec. 3. With notable improvements and new features, the E-2D is a major advancement from the E-2C Hawkeye. The E-2D brings a signifi cant number of improvements to the older E-2C, said Cmdr. Paul Lanzilotta, commanding officer of VAW-125. The biggest thing is the sen sor and radar systems. They are much more advanced in the E-2D. The E-2D is also capable of seeing much farther and it is far more capable of detect ing targets on the surface and in the air. This helps ensure the carrier strike group is ade quately defended, even hun dreds of miles away. We can see it all. Other improvements include a fully integrated, all-glass tac tical cockpit, advanced identi fication friend-or-foe system, a new radar with both mechani cal and electronic scanning capabilities, electronic support measures enhancements, new mission computers and tactical workstations. Along with the many tech nological advances, the E-2D is also a much smoother flying aircraft now, said Lanzilotta. These aircraft are brand new. They still have that have that new-car smell. After hundreds of practice landings on shore, the launch and recovery of the E-2D onboard Theodore Roosevelt begins VAW-125s final transi tion process from the E-2C to the E-2D. USS Theodore Roosevelt welcomes new E-2D Hawkeye

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013 21 The Mayport community welcomed more than 350 new neighbors to Northeast Florida when USS New York (LPD 21) changed its homeport from Naval Station Norfolk to Naval Station Mayport Dec. 6. New York is one of three ships that make up the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) that the Navy is moving from Norfolk, Va., to Mayport, Fla. The other two ships USS Iwo Jima (LHD-7) and USS Fort McHenry (LSD-45) are slated to arrive as early as 2014. The three ships will bulk up the Navys fleet at Mayport, as the stations frigates are being retired. USS Underwood and the USS Klakring were decom missioned in March. According to U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, the move is a win-win situation for the Navy and the Mayport community. As Congress deals with very difficult budget decisions, this is promising news for national security and the First Coast, Crenshaw said in a statement. This first phase of the amphibious ready group move to Mayport underscores the Navys commitment to a strate gic dispersal of assets -a strat egy I have long advocated on Capitol Hill. New York is not the first Navy ship to hold that states name, but never before has the name had so much mean ing. The amphibious trans port dock was built with 7 1/2 tons of steel salvaged from the World Trade Center. According to New Yorks Commanding Officer Capt. Jon Kreitz, although leaving Hampton Roads, Va. was difficult, mari time strategy is the main job for the new ship. This is just the first of three ships relocating to Mayport in order to make sure the station remains that second strategic homeport for the fleet, he said. Were very excited to be a part of the Mayport family. Many Navy families had the daunting task of moving from Norfolk to Mayport in a short amount of time. According to OS2 Thomas Devore, it was tough moving suddenly, but the many activities offered on NS Mayport and the surround ing areas are worth the stress of moving to a new area. We were able to get base housing in only two days, he said. The help from the Fleet and Family Support Center was fantastic. It was a little hectic mov ing two small children, but we made it work, said Angela Devore. I am looking forward to the many beaches in the area. When the kids get a little older, we are definitely going to Disney World. The San Antonio-class LPD (USS New York) ships are used to transport and land Marines, their equipment and supplies. These ships support amphibi ous assault, special operations or expeditionary warfare mis sions and can serve as sec ondary aviation platforms for amphibious ready groups. Amphibious ships like New York provide the nation a cri sis response capability and demonstrate the Navy-Marine Corps team in action. The Navy is committed to strategic dis persal and at least two viable East Coast surface ship home ports as well as the preserva tion of the ship repair indus trial base in the Mayport area. According to Naval Station Mayport Commanding Officer Capt. Wesley McCall, the addi tion of up to 2,000 families to the area after all is said and done will be a boost for nation al defense and to the economy of Northeast Florida. I think were going to see some significant growth with USS Fort McHenry and USS Iwo Jima coming next year and the new littoral combat ships soon to follow, he said. You bring 2,000 new fami lies here; the benefits are going to be pretty substantial. The Sailors and their fami lies aboard New York are the ones who will benefit the most. Jacksonville and especially the Mayport area are huge military supporters. USS New York changes homeport to Mayport

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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2013 NEW LEADER HOLIDAY EVE NT PEARL HARBOR Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com NAS Jax earns environmental awardOn Dec. 5, Northeast Florida Regional Planning Council President Wendell Davis presented NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander with the 2013 Regional Award for Excellence in Environmental Stewardship in recognition of the outstanding environmental partnerships the station had developed with elected officials, planning and environmental staffs and com munity. Davis stated that NAS Jacksonville was, strongly committed to greening its facilities, properties and operations through significant environmental, energy and conservation initiatives including educational outreach and environmental partnerships. When accepting the award, Undersander said that he was receiving the recognition on behalf of the 20,000 men and women at NAS Jacksonville who have incorporated environmental compliance into daily mission accomplishment. Margo Moehring, managing director of the councils policy and plan ning, added that the stations con sistently strong environmental partnerships with the city, state and Jacksonville were a model to follow. She said that NAS Jacksonvilles par ticipation in the councils recent yearlong study on the impact of sea level rising on the St Johns River and adjacent development was greatly appreciated. Training for the worstActive shooter exercise heldAn active shooter training exer cise was conducted Dec. 3 at NAS Jacksonville Building 11, in conjunc tion with a table-top exercise at the NAS Jacksonville Emergency Operations Center. Maj. Jerry Syrek, training division officer for NAS Jacksonville Security Department, defined an active shooter as an individual who is engaged in killing or attempting to kill people inside a building or in an outside environment. In most cases, an active shooter uses Members of the VP-62 Broadarrows returned home to NAS Jacksonville last week concluding a six-month deploy ment to Kadena Airbase in Okinawa, Japan, with Commander, Task Group (CTG) 72.2 as part of the Navys first mobilization of a Reserve P-3C Orion squadron. Were very pleased with the out comes and what our crews and our teams have accomplished on these deployments, said Cmdr. Jon Townsend, VP-62 commanding officer. It proves reserve capabilities meet ing real-world operational require ments in support of our active-duty counterparts while they transition to the new P-8 Poseidon platform. Broadarrow air crew and mainte nance personnel joined the VP-26 Tridents with several detachments in the Western Pacific, conducting antisubmarine warfare including an exercise out of Chennai, India culminat ing with a leading role in humanitar ian assistance and disaster relief in the wake of Typhoon Haiyans devastation in the Republic of the Philippines. The Broadarrows P-3C aircrews flew several missions over the hardest-hit areas since Nov. 11, assessing damage and providing intelligence to support coordination of relief efforts by U.S. and Philippine forces. Over 600 hours were flown, 73 over the Philippines alone. Imagery was collected and sent inflight to intelligence specialists who analyzed it and then provided it to Marines on the ground charged with helping to coordinate U.S. military and Philippine government relief efforts. The best part of the deployment was the disaster relief. We flew over these mountains and saw destruction and SOS painted on the ground, said Lt. Cmdr. Brett Frazier, a VP-62 pilot.Broadarrows return home from WESTPAC deployment The men and women of VP-26 are return ing to their home base of NAS Jacksonville after a dynamic, seven-month deployment. Operating primarily from Kadena Air Base on the island of Okinawa, Japan they supported Commander, Task Force 72 executing oper ations across the Pacific. The deployment was the first integrated active-reserve P-3C deployment to the 7th Fleet area of responsibility. Augmented with reserve aircrews and aircraft from NAS Jacksonvilles VP-62 and NAS Whidbey Islands VP-69, the squadron formed two forward-deployed task groups, Commander, Task Group (CTG) 72.2 and 72.4. Through teamwork and dedication, the air crews, maintenance professionals and sup port personnel of CTGs 72.2 and 72.4 stood watch over the 7th Fleet area of responsibil ity (AOR) and are now returning home to the cheers of their loved ones. VP-26 flies the P-3C Orion, The U.S. Navys legacy maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft. While the P-3 is being replaced by the Boeing P-8 Poseidon it is still an effective weapons system, in high demand across the fleet. Traveling from Jacksonville, Fla. in May 2013, Team Trident undertook the signifi cant logistical feat of picking up and moving more than 350 personnel, aircraft, tools and equipment to the island of Okinawa, located approximately 600 miles south of the main islands of Japan. From Kadena Air Base the squadron conducted a wide variety of airborne antisubmarine and anti-surface warfare, intel ligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance, maritime domain awareness, search and rescue, and theater security cooperation mis sions. CTG 72.2 conducted regular detachments, comprised of aircrew and supporting main tenance personnel, to support partner and allied nations, build international partner ship and improve multinational interoper -VP-26 Tridents return to NAS Jacksonville

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Dec. 12 1862 Confederate torpedo (mine) sinks USS Cairo in Yazoo River. 1937 Japanese aircraft sink USS Panay in Yangtze River near Nanking, China. 1941 Naval Air Transport Service is established. 1951 First flight of helicopter with gas-turbine engine at Windsor Locks, Conn., demonstrates adapt ability of this engine to helicopters. 1972Capt. Eugene Cernan, commander of Apollo 17, walks on the Moon. Cmdr. Ronald Evans was the Command Module Pilot. The mission lasted 12 days, 13 hours and 52 minutes. Recovery by HC-1 helicopters from USS Ticonderoga (CVS-14). Dec. 13 1775 Continental Congress provides for the con struction of five ships of 32 guns, five ships of 28 guns, and three ships of 24 guns. 1941 Cmdr. William Sullivan designated the first Supervisor of Salvage with office in New York City. Dec. 14 1814 British squadron captures U.S. gunboats in Battle of Lake Borgne, La. 1944 Rank of Fleet Admiral, U.S. Navy (five-star admiral) is established. 1945 Captain Sue Dauser receives the first Distinguished Service Medal awarded to a nurse. 1965 Navy announces completion of 1,272 ft. radio tower at North West Cape, Australia, the highest manmade structure in the Southern Hemisphere at that time, as a link in fleet communications. Dec. 15 1943 Bureau of Naval Personnel Circular Letter on non-discrimination in Navy V-12 program. 1944 Congress appoints first three of four Fleet Admirals. 1965 Launch of Gemini 6 with Capt. Walter Schirra Jr. as Command Pilot. The mission included 16 orbits in 25 hours and 51 minutes. Recovery was by HS-11 heli copters from USS Wasp (CVS-18). Dec. 16 1821 Lt. Robert Stockton and Dr. Eli Ayers, a naval surgeon and member of American Colonizing Society, induce a local African king to sell territory for a colony which became the Republic of Liberia. 1907 Great White Fleet departs Hampton Roads, Va. to circumnavigate the world. 1922 USS Bainbridge (DD-246) rescues 482 persons from burning French transport Vinh-Long. 1941 USS Swordfish (SS-193) sinks Japanese cargo ship Atsutasan Maru. 1942 Pharmacists Mate First Class Harry Roby performs an appendectomy on Torpedoman First Class W. R. Jones on board the submarine USS Grayback (SS208). It is the second appendectomy performed on board a submarine. 1998 In Operation Desert Fox, Navy cruise missiles attack Iraq. Dec. 17 1846 Ships under Commodore Matthew Calbraith Perry capture Laguna de Terminos during Mexican War. 1941 Adm. Chester Nimitz named Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet, to relieve Adm. Husband Kimmel. Adm. William Pye becomes acting commander until Nimitzs arrival. Dec. 18 1902 Admiral of the Navy George Dewey receives orders to send his battleship to Trinidad and then to Venezuela to make sure that Great Britains and Germanys dispute with Venezuela was settled by peaceful arbitration, not force. 1944 Adm. Halseys 3rd Fleet encounters typhoon northeast of Samar. Destroyers USS Hull, USS Monaghan and USS Spence sink, while 21 other ships are damaged. 1965 River Patrol Force established in Vietnam. 1965 Helicopters from HS-11 on USS Wasp (CVS-18) pick up crew and capsule of Gemini 7, after picking up the crew and capsule of Gemini 6 two days earlier. 1967 Operation Preakness II begins in Mekong Delta. 1972 Mining and bombing of North Vietnam resumes with Linebacker II Operation. Long before the debate over the Affordable Care Act, the militarys own government-run healthcare system has been, for me, a mixed bag. On the one hand, my healthcare has always been free (if you can call paying with duty, deploy ments and, sometimes, life free). On the other hand, the military healthcare system has been confusing, inefficient and short on options. It is a complicated balance of entitle ment, subsidies and bureaucracy sentiments that have often been reflected in peoples reactions to my columns over the years. First, 14 years ago, during the only six weeks when I did not have a military identification card (between my college graduation and wedding), I broke my leg. I was technically uninsured, but the Navy hospital casted my leg anyway. Later, I wrote about how the military had taken care of its own. People were enraged. That cast wasnt free, they said The taxpayers paid for it. Its true. Since the day I was born, taxpayer money has covered my health insurance and medication. This has lead some people to believe they have input about my lifestyle. When people pay into something, they naturally want control over how their money is spent. Sarah broke her leg because she chose to wear high heels? We the taxpayers will have to cover that mistake. Sarahs overweight? We have to buy her blood pressure medicine. Sarah wants a third child? Yep, taxpayers will cover that, too. Ive always contended that my husbands service is our payment. For Dustins sacrifice to the country, taxpayer money covers our healthcare. Sounds perfect, right? Except, when the government spends other peoples money, they have to be careful. They have to make wise choices. And the beneficiaries dont wield much power. The doctors Im allowed to see are limited, and getting a referral to a specialist is complicated. Usually, when the location permits, Im restricted to the military hospital, where all the comparably-ranked doctors make the same pay and move every two to three years. Yes, there are many wonderful and talented doctors in military medicine, but without an element of financial competition, motivation to be the best doctor has to come from something else. Wait-times in lobbies and at the pharmacist are legendary. I once took an hour nap across three hard, plastic chairs waiting for my antibiotics. When Lindell was an infant, the Navy hospital accidentally gave him the same series of shots twice on consecutive days. I was furious, but there was nothing I could do. I couldnt leave that practice and go to another one. I didnt have a choice. And complaining is pointless; no one loses their job or their customers. Then there was the time when Owen needed a tonsiland adenoidectomy. Technically it was elective surgery because it wasnt an emergency. But Owen was losing weight at 3 years old, he still wore a size 18-months pants and I was frantic. My options were to pay out-of-pocket on the outside (at a civilian hospital) or wait months to have the procedure done at the military hospital. Why months? Because of the hospitals backlog, and because the military has to review and approve these things. They have to be careful with taxpayer money. But military medicine is free and equally available to all who qualify. Or is it? The funny thing about making everyone equal is that people still find a way to give one group preferential treatment over another group. Many years ago, writing about military medicine, I said a system that requires users to be savvy in order to get the best treatment is a system that is broken. I was speaking to the fact that in the world of waiting for a referral, an appointment or a procedure, sometimes, the patient who works the system is seen faster. However, often the patient need not (and, of course, should not) manipulate anything. My dad retired as an admiral. Although we were raised to never use his position in any way (nope, not even when Dustin almost couldnt get leave for our wedding), after I married an ensign, I definitely noticed a change in treatment. When your ID card states you are the daughter of an admiral, people notice. When your ID card states you are the wife of a new ensign, you take a nap while you wait for your antibiotics. My concern, however, has always been for the spouses who are neither married to an ensign nor an admiral. My concern is for the enlisted families. What chance do they have in a free system that has been reduced to using rank as cur rency? People didnt like this either: There is manipulation of our taxpayer dollars? I thought all of it was free and equal? So, without getting overly political on either side, I am sincere when I tell you that I have been intrigued by the countrys eagerness to be part of this government-run healthcare sys tem that I have come to both love and hate. Because the pros and cons of the Affordable Care Act seem strikingly familiar to the pros and cons of the military healthcare system. And if 38 years of being at the taxpayers and governments mercy has taught me anything it is this: nothing nothing is ever free. Base store closures for the holidaysThe NAS Jax Commissary will be open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Christmas Eve, Dec. 24. The store will be closed Christmas Day and reopen Dec. 26 for regular hours from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. The Commissary will be open normal hours (7 a.m. to 8 p.m.) on New Years Eve, Dec. 31 and will be closed New Years Day. The NAS Jax Navy Exchange (NEX) will be open Christmas Eve, Dec. 24 from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. The store will be closed Christmas Day. The NEX will be open New Years Eve, Dec. 31 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and New Years Day, Jan. 1 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Government-run (aka, military) healthcare has pros, cons

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Cmdr. Edgar Twining relieves Cmdr. Daryl Pierce as commanding officer for the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville during a change of command ceremony at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 117 Dec. 12. Capt. Katherine Erb, commanding officer, CNATT will preside. Twining, a native of Chemung, N.Y., graduated from Waverly High School in 1982 and enlisted in the Navy as an aviation structural mechanic. He completed three tours and multiple deployments as an enlisted Sailor, where he was designated as an enlisted aviation warfare specialist and master training specialist. In 1991, he was selected as the VA-75 Sailor of the Year and MATWING One Supervisor of the Year. The following year, he was promoted to chief petty officer. In May 1995, Twining received his commission through the Limited Duty Officer Program and has served as an assistant maintenance officer, quality assurance officer, maintenance officer, and maintenance material control offi cer. Twining reported for his current duty as executive officer of CNATTU Jax in July 2012. Directly following the change of command ceremony, Pierce is retiring from the Navy after serving more than 34 years for his country, at which his wife, retired Lt. Cmdr. Anita Pierce will be the guest speaker. Originally from Decatur, Ga., Pierce entered the Navy in 1979 as an avia tion structural mechanic (hydraulics). During his enlisted tours, he was selected as Sailor of the Year, designated a master training specialist, promoted to chief petty officer, and earned a com mission through the Limited Duty Officer/Chief Warrant Officer Program. Pierce reported for duty as the executive officer, CNATTU Jacksonville in April 2011. While serving as commanding offi cer of CNATTU Jacksonville, he led 143 military and 40 civilian personnel in the training of 3,570 students through 1,199 classes of instruction. The Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville recently announced their selection for Senior and Junior Instructors of the Year. ADC(AW) Jeffrey Davis was selected as CNATTU Jacksonvilles 2013 Senior Instructor of the Year. Davis is currently assigned as Powerplant and Related Systems leading chief petty officer for Maintenance Training Unit 1011. He is qualified as a P-3 Orion T56-A-14 Engine O-Level and I-Level Maintenance instruc tor, and has provided 2,830 hours of classroom instruc tion to 33 students through six courses. His leadership and direct mentorship helped qualify four new instructors. Davis was instrumen tal in the revision of the P-3 Powerplant and Related Systems (Career) Organizational Maintenance Course by updating and rewriting three new lessons which were critical to maintain cur rency and preparing techni cians to join the fleet. AS1(AW/SW) Daphne Guzman was selected as CNATTU Jacksonvilles 2013 Instructor of the Year. Guzman serves as Maintenance Training Unit 3032 leading petty officer and mechanical support equipment instructor. She has provided 960 hours of instruction to 46 Navy and Marine Corps students. Under her leadership, she supervised 30 staff members that maintained daily curriculum development and upkeep of 28 support equipment maintenance courses that provided 11,176 hours of instruction to 371 students in 56 classes with a 100 percent graduation rate. AM2(AW/SW) Mark Hamilton was selected as CNATTU Jacksonvilles 2013 Junior Instructor of the Year. As lead H-60 Airframe and Related Systems instructor for Maintenance Training Unit 1005, he provided instruction to 88 Foreign National and U.S. Sailors through multiple courses resulting in a 96.4 percent combined grade point average. Due to his technical exper tise and knowledge of H-60 airframe course curriculum, Hamilton was chosen to brief the Royal Australian Navy and the Royal Danish Navy on the airframes courseware content taught at CNATTU Jacksonville, strengthen ing relations between the two nations. As a master training specialist, he was responsible for the qualification of 10 new instructors and two master training specialists. Chapel holiday servicesThe following are the Christmas services at the NAS Jax Chapel: Christmas Eve (Dec. 24) Catholic Mass at 8 p.m. Christmas Eve (Dec. 24) Protestant Service at 7 p.m. Christmas Day (Dec. 25) Catholic Morning Mass at 10 a.m. For more information, call 542-3051/52. Twining to relieve Pierce as CNATTU Jax CO CNATTU JAX announces Instructors of the Year 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013

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The following NAS Jax Sailors were frocked during morning quarters on Dec. 6: AC2 Joseph Barry MA2 Larry Brown AT3 Linsay Bryars CS2 Gregory Burke ABE2 Jose Cruz MA1 Keith Danalewich AC1 Damien Davis ABH2 Joseph Demun AC1 Nicholas Done AWF3 Samantha Goulden AC3 Leanne Huynh AE2 Samantha Jones ABE2 Andrew Kimzey MM1 Corey Kruger ABH2 Alexsis LaBrake ABE3 Joshua Leinart ABH2 JaJuan Mangual MA3 Stephan Moore MA2 Glenn Patton ET1 Erik Paulsen CS2 John Phillips OS2 Samuel Polanco AT1 Christopher Robertson AC3 Stephen Simpson AM3 Nicholas Suszycki AC3 Christopher Tarvin EN3 Tysie Taylor CS1 Antonio Turner ABE1 William Ward The Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville announces their Sailors of the Year for 2013. AD1(AW) Zachary Brook was selected as CNATTU Jacksonvilles 2013 Sailor of the Year. Brook originates from Spokane, Wash. He currently serves as the lead ing petty officer and lead H-60 Power Plant Systems instructor at Maintenance Training Unit 1005 where he led and man aged the training of 581 allied military, U.S. Sailors and Marines; 56 of which he personally trained delivering more than 1,244 instruction hours while maintaining a 95 percent grade point average (GPA). He also serves as the CNATTU Petty Officer Association president and coordinated 180 hours of instruction, in support of the Master Chief of the Navys CPO-365 program. His efforts helped support year round training for 65 first class petty officers. A dedicat ed mentor, his leadership led to seven instructors earning their master train ing specialist qualification. AT2(AW/SW) Marnicca Gomez was selected as CNATTU Jacksonvilles 2013 Junior Sailor of the Year. Gomez hails from Enterprise, Ala. Gomez consis tently displayed her expertise, profes sionalism and dedication as she pro vided 1,392 hours of instruction, while achieving a 100 percent graduation rate and a 97 per cent overall GPA. Hand selected to instruct at CNATTU North Island for 89 days, and for her efforts, Gomez was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal by the CNATTU North Island commanding officer. A key asset to the command, she carries out her duties as a sexual assault prevention and aware ness representative, CSAAD president, CPR instructor, public affairs photographer, and MWR secretary. Sgt. Eric Jude from Frazier Park, Calif., was selected as CNATTU Jackson-villes 2013 Marine of the Year. Jude managed 22 classes providing 496 hours of instruc tion to 106 Marines and two allied mili tary, all while lead ing 144 Marines through physical and tactical training at Maintenance Training Unit 3032. Jude also assumes duties as the uniform victim advocate for the detachment and SE PMS coordinator facilitating the com pletion of 107 scheduled and unscheduled maintenance actions on 63 pieces of support equipment. The MWR Liberty Program will be running free airport shuttles from Dec. 13 to Jan. 7 (with the exception of Christmas and New Year Day). Shuttles will be for departures and arrivals and is for E1-E6 single or unaccompanied military only. Sailors must sign up at the Liberty Center and bring a copy of their itinerary. All shuttles will depart from the barracks quarter deck. Pre-Registration is required. For more information, call 542-3491. CNATTU announces end of year staff awards NAS Sailors make rate Free airport shuttle available through MWR Liberty Operational Health Support Unit (OHSU) Jacksonville, the Reserve unit of Naval Hospital Jacksonville, held its change of command ceremony Dec. 8. In attendance were 200 guests from as far as San Diego and Ohio, as well as through out the southeastern United States. Capt. Lee Kiolbasa, a health care administrator whose prior position was as executive officer for OHSU San Diego, relievedCapt. Kenneth LaPolla, a general den tist from Ohio, who will transfer to a post-com mand staff position with OHSU Camp Lejuene. Capt. Gayle Shaffer, commanding offi cer of Naval Hospital Jacksonville, was the OHSU Jax holds change of command JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013 Dashing Through the Grove gets families in holiday spiritIt was an unusually warm December night as more than 1,000 active duty members, their families and friends came out to enjoy the NAS Jax Dashing Through the Grove event at Patriots Grove Dec. 6. Hundreds of children dashed through the park creating excitement in the air as they wait for Santa to arrive on the NAS Jax Fire Departments ladder truck. Once Santa arrived and made the rounds greeting the crowd, the children and their parents lined up to spend a few quality moments telling him what they would like for Christmas and to have their pictures taken. The families also enjoyed riding a small train around the grounds. We came last year and it was a great event for the kids. There are always plenty of activities and the kids can burn off their energy, said Laura Reichmann. While many stood in line to see Santa, others took turns sledding down an icy slide or having fun bom barding one another with snowballs. This was our first time at this event and it really exceeded our expectations. Lots to do for the kids in a safe environment and a great alternative from vis iting Santa at the mall, said AWO1 David Shaffery of Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven. Before the official program began, NAS Jax Chaplain (Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore gave a short blessing. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander thanked the guests for coming before beginning the countdown to light the base Christmas tree. Members from Navy Band Southeast and a DJ also provided some holiday music to entertain the crowd. MWR provided free hot chocolate and cookies. Additional activities included face painting, clowns, balloon artists, bounce houses and an assortment of inflatable games. We put this event on each year to kick off the holiday season and bring the NAS Jax community together. We are excited to see such a tremendous response to this event as it continuous to grow. I am glad that so many people are making this NAS Jax tradition apart of their traditions, said Youth Activities Center Director Jason McKenzie. Special thanks go out to all the people behind the scenes including the NAS Jax Fire Department, Security Department, Chapel Center, Facilities Department, Navy Exchange, Commissary and MWR who help make this annual event such a huge success. The NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department coordinated the event, which was sponsored by VyStar Credit Union, University of Phoenix, Sprint, USA Discounters and USAA. Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services.

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We then radioed back for the Marines to send an Osprey and rescue the people stranded below. Frazier, who in the civilian world is an agent flying P3s for the U.S. Customs and Border Protection agency, said he and his copilot on the relief mission had a combined 15,000 flight hours and 45 years of experience an asset in supple menting more junior active duty counterparts. In recent years, the Broadarrows have primarily flown counter-nar cotics missions in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico from bases in El Salvador. VP-62 is hoping to transition to the P-8A behind our active duty counterparts, but were content right now to focus on performing critical missions in the venerable P-3C Orion, said Townsend. The P-3C Orion has been in service for 50-years in Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force. While mission gear has been updated over the years, the P-3 airframe itself is rapidly approaching the end of its service life. The new P-8A, a military vari ant of the Boeing 737, features improved airframe reliability, high-altitude surveillance and reconnaissance capability, openarchitecture mission systems, in-flight refueling capability and many other modern features. The squadron has completed Advanced Readiness Program, Operational Readiness Evaluation, Fleet NATOPS Evaluation Team inspection, Conventional Weapons Refresher Training, Conventional Weapons Technical Proficiency Inspection in support of it first iteration of VP Reserve mobilization and deployment cycles. IT1(SW) Paul Voigt and YN2 Anthony Mitchell were honored as Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Senior and Junior Sailor of the Year 2013, respectively, during a ceremony at NAS Jacksonville, Nov. 27. As a battle watch specialist in the Regional Operations Center (ROC), Voigt supervised and trained a team of 17 Sailors from three different ratings. He ensured his team processed and disseminated more than 12,000 situ ational reports, 160 mutual aid reports, 100 voice reports for 16 installations throughout the region. Voigt was also led the execution of more than 60 regional task force exer cises, ensuring timely notification and thorough preparations for task force deployment during simulated nuclear incidents. In addition, Voigt is a command fit ness leader and a volunteer in the local community. He regularly volunteers at the Jacksonville Ronald McDonald house and the Cub Scouts of America Troop 0554. Petty Officer Voigt displays unparalleled leadership, said QMC(SW) Joseph Ziro, Voigts supervisor. He has the technical expertise of a seasoned chief petty officer and is also an engaged deckplate leader. Petty Officer Voigts contributions to the success of day-to-day operations made the decision easy to nominate him for Sailor of the Year. Voigt attributed his success to his ROC co-workers and family. I would say the genuine work effort from my department and command has enabled me to be successful and fulfill everyday mission tasks, he said. We have a great operations team from top to bottom. I also have to thank my family because without them I would not be where I am today. Mitchell serves as administration office assistant leading petty officer and the executive assistant to the regional command master chief (CMC), provid ing logistical support to the CMC dur ing his travels. He also processes all periodic and transfer evaluation and fitness reports and coordinates executivelevel correspondence. Throughout the year, Mitchell processed 70 evaluations with no discrepancies, processed 500 documents for staff directorates and processed documents for four retire ments, three separations, 20 gains and 19 losses. According to YN(SW) John Felizpolanco, CNRSE Administrative Department leading petty officer, Mitchells contributions have been crucial to the departments success. Hes an invaluable asset to our department, Felizpolanco said. Hes an absolute expert when it comes to customer service and taking care of the Sailors at this command. Hes also truly one of the most dependable Sailors Ive ever had work for me. I can task him with literally anything, and I know I can count on him to get the job done right and on time. Mitchell said he felt honored to receive such and award, but it was ultimately the result of a team effort. Its always an honor to be selected for something like this because its a reminder that hard work does pay off, he said. I also realize, though, that this wouldnt be possible without the encouragement and support I get from every member of the department. My success relies heavily on those around me and I really dont think I could have accomplished this without them. According to Mitchell, the key to his success has been focus. You just have to come in and do your best every day, he said. The minute you lose focus and get relaxed, thats when you can start to make mistakes. Individual selection criteria for the awards was based upon exemplary performance of tasks, contributions that enhanced organization accomplish ment of command objectives, mission, teamwork or public image, and ones professional attitude toward self and others. CNRSE honors 2013 Sailors of the Year VP-62 Rendering honors during colorsReminder: whenever the national anthem is played, all personnel aboard NAS Jacksonville, not in formation, are required to stand at attention and face the national ensign. In the event, the national ensign is not displayed, they shall face the source of the music. When covered, they shall come to attention and salute until the anthem ends. Those in formation, shall come to attention and the formation commander will render salute. Those driving a vehicle shall come to a complete stop and remain seated at attention. Morning colors are conducted every morning at 8 a.m. Evening colors are at sunset. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013

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one or more firearms and displays no pattern or method for selection of their victims. In some cases, active shoot ers may also use improvised explosive devices to injure additional victims that become an impediment to police and emergency responders, said Syrek. Law enforcement responders must identify, close with, and neutralize the suspect in order to preserve life. NAS Jacksonville Training Officer Jim Butters said, Our primary objective was to run a safe exercise that would validate the pre-planned responses for security, fire and emergency services as well as Fleet and Family Support Center participation. John Tillman, NAS Jacksonville antiterrorism officer reported that the field exercise provided some excellent feed back for the stations security force. Because of the increase in real-world active shooter incidents, it is crucial that we conduct drills like this as we also focus on the changes to our man power structure and organizational makeup, sail Tillman. Syrek noted, Were always careful when firearms are involved in an exer cise. Officers responding during their shift must exchange their weapons at the incident command post for plas tic replicas, so there are no accidental shootings. The training went well. The more we train, the better we get. Any mistakes we make here are okay because they help deal with events in the real world. This exercise will be reviewed with the entire security department, said Syrek. Butters added, It is equally impor tant to continue our team-building strategies while increasing situation al awareness across the command. Overall, the exercise was a very good challenge and permitted all parties to exercise their training objectives. We never fail to develop some valuable lessons learned that will improve emer gency response procedures in the future. SHOOTER Our entire Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville staff across our hospital and five branch health clinics is working hard to become your medical center of choice, and we have great news regarding your primary care. For the first time in years, we are able to accept new patients. This means, its never been a better time to make NH Jacksonville your medical cen ter of choice. Staffing increases, facil ity improvements and Navy Medicines efforts to adapt, reshape and realign its state side naval hospitalslike oursis making this pos sible. Family members and retirees in the vicinity of NAS Jacksonville, NSB King Bay, Ga. and NS Mayport can now get a primary care manager (PCM) at our hospital or branch health clinics. When you enroll with a pri mary care manager at one of our facilities it means you are part of a Medical Home Port teamwhich places each of our enrolled patients in the center of a collaborative team of caregiversfrom doctors and nurses to case manag ers. Led by your primary care manager, your team focuses on your comprehensive health care needspreventive, urgent and routine. Plus, you have access to RelayHealth which provides 24/7 email access for non-urgent needs such as lab results, medication refills and appointments. This means you avoid extra trips for things you can take care of with secure email. Plus, it is easy to sign up, just go to www.med.navy. mil/sites/NavalHospitalJax and look for our Medical Home Port information. Our team approach improves access to care so you can get appointments when you need them, enhances your care experience, meets your urgent care needs, improves health outcomes by focusing on pre ventive care (which reduces hospitalizations and emergen cy room visits), and builds the relationship between you and your provider. And after hours, you have access to our Nurse Advice Line: (800) 529-4677 on evenings, weekends and holidays to triage your medi cal needs and direct you to the appropriate level of care. On top of this, we have some of the worlds leading healthcare experts in more than 30 specialty care areas, from orthopedics to undersea medicine. We have an awardwinning Family Medicine Residency Program, North Floridas only hospital cer tified Baby Friendly by the World Health Organization/ United Nations Childrens Fund, and maintain The Joint Commission Gold Seal of Approval for accreditation in healthcare quality and safety. In an effort to provide you with more convenient appointment times, we also plan to expand hours starting in early January. At our hos pital (family medicine, inter nal medicine and pediatrics) we plan to be open Monday through Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Fridays 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. BHC Kings Bay pri mary care is already open 10 hours on weekdays (7 a.m. to 5 p.m.). BHC Mayport (fam ily medicine and pediatrics) is already open Monday through Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Fridays, 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; and Saturdays, 8 a.m. to noon. Not only do you gain access to top-notch care from some of the most gifted and edu cated medical professionals by choosing Navy Medicine, you join us in doing our part to improve value. Taxpayers like you and me essentially pay twice when Navy families receive care in the TRICARE network when that same care is available at our Navy facili ties: once for state-of-the-art Navy facilities and expert staff, and a second time for redun dant services in the network. For example, if Navy Medicine increased PCM enrollment across all facilities by just 15 percent, it would result in a $1 billion savings. Our TRICARE health bene fits advisors, patient relations staff and customer service representatives are here to help you enroll at one of our facili ties. Those at or near NAS Jax can call 542-9175; NS Mayport call 270-4255; and at NSB Kings Bay call (912) 573-4458. Opportunities to enroll with primary care manager at Naval Hospital Jacksonville JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013 11

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USS Samuel B. Roberts hosts Pearl Harbor CeremonySailors, family and friends came together aboard USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) for a ceremony to commemorate the 72nd anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. Also in attendance was Charles Ellis, Duane Reyelts and Henry Griffin who served during that dread ful attack which lasted 90 minutes, taking the lives of more than 2,300 service members and wounding more than 1,200, immediately plunging the United States into World War II Dec 7, 1941. It feels wonderful just to be able to be here at this stage of my life, said Ellis. I am honored to represent those who lost their lives on that day at Pearl Harbor. This years historic commemoration, Sound the Alarm, examines how thousands of Americans answered the call to duty in the wake of the attack on Pearl Harbor. Today these men are commemorated and we will never forget their sacrifice, said Cmdr. Erica Hoffman, USS Samuel B. Roberts commanding officer. We can still hear the accounts of those in their own words who answered the call when the alarm was sounded. Reading their words, listening to their voices and seeing their faces will forever connect us to them. During the ceremony everyone in attendance, beginning with the Pearl Harbor survivors, was given the opportunity to lay a wreath or flowers over the side of the ship. It is an honor for us to be here to pay tribute to those who served before and laid the groundwork for all of us in uniform today, said NS Mayport Commanding Officer Capt. Wes McCall. It was a wonderful cer emony and we thank the Capt. Hoffmann and her crew for doing such a fan tastic job. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013 13

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The VP-45 Pelicans Wardroom and Chiefs Mess of recently took some time from their P-8A Poseidon transition to build camaraderie in a friendly competition. After completing their physical readiness test, the officers and chiefs gath ered for some intense paintball action in Jacksonville. The event offered a fun team-build ing exercise to further develop personal and professional relationships between the squadron members. It was a great event, said Lt. j.g. Josh Stokes. Weve been working really hard with transition so it was good to get out and unwind a bit. The afternoon, which saw its share of playful banter and trash talking, was marked by the sharp crack of high-powered paintball guns and the cries of frustration from those whom were hit. Both sides fought tooth and nail for bragging rights throughout VP-45 spaces. At the end of the day, however, both sides agreed to a ceasefire since they could not determine a victor. Despite being adversaries on the paintball battlefield, the teams reunited for a bar beque sponsored by the chiefs mess. Youre out there trying to defeat each other, but you never lose sight of the fact that, in the end you are all on the same team, said Lt. j.g. Levi Blackwell. The paintball excursion enabled Pelican leaders the opportunity to forge deeper bonds. As they return to the business at hand of completing their transition to the P-8A Poseidon, the cemented relationships represent the hallmark of why VP-45 stands as one of the Navys premier maritime patrol squadrons. Sailors from CTG-72.2, deployed to Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan, recent ly returned from a week in Chennai, India, where they participated in Exercise Malabar 2013. The detachment, comprised of both active duty Sailors from VP-26 and reserve Sailors from VP-62, went to India to enhance interoperability between the U.S. and Indian maritime patrol and recon naissance communities. Malabar is a biennial naval training exercise that was held Nov. 5-11. U.S. participants included the USS McCampbell (DDG 85) and the Warlords of HSM-51. The Indian Navy was rep resented by the stealth frig ate INS Shivalik, guided mis sile destroyer INS Ranvijay, embarked Helix and Chetak helicopters, and a TU-142M maritime reconnaissance air craft. Sailors and airmen of both navies participated in training ashore and at-sea, beginning with conferences designed to allow profession al exchanges and facilitate increased cooperation and interoperability, followed by underway practical applica tion. Members of the CTG-72.2 crew also attended receptions aboard USS McCampbell and INS Shivalik, engaging in cul tural exchanges and develop ing personal relationships with the Indian Navy participants. Three anti-submarine war fare (ASW) events were flown by the U.S. P-3C crew in support of Malabar 2013. The first flight gave the P-3 and SH-60R crews an opportunity to prac tice nighttime coordinated operations in support of USS McCampbell. The next day the crew participated in an exer cise supporting INS Ranvijay, with an Indian KA-28 Helix helicopter and the MH-60R flying from USS McCampbell. During the third event, the aircrew safely conducted the first ASW plane-to-plane turn over with an Indian TU-142M Bear aircraft. The exercise advanced the maritime rela tionship between the two navies, encouraged construc tive synergies and demonstrated their ability to plan and execute multinational operations on-station. VP-26 Executive Officer Cmdr. Gregory Smith was the officer-in-charge of the P-3C detachment. He detailed the importance of the exchange, noting that international exercises of this caliber are crucial to expanding our maritime partnerships and enhancing compatibility with those who share our security interests. I am extremely proud of the performance of this fully integrat ed active-reserve detachment. The Navys new, most advanced maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft, the P-8A Poseidon, arrived in Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan for its inaugural deployment Dec. 1. The War Eagles of Patrol Squadron (VP) 16 deployed with six P-8A Poseidons in support of 7th Fleet maritime patrol and reconnaissance operations in the Indo-AsiaPacific region. The deployment marks a milestone in the transition of U.S. Navy Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Forces (MPRF). For the first time since the Navy received the P-3A Orion in 1962 a new aircraft will be operated by a deployed patrol squadron. The P-8A Poseidon is the most advanced, long-range anti-submarine and anti-sur face warfare aircraft in the VP-45 officers/chiefs compete in paintball VP-26 Tridents and VP-62 Broadarrows participate in Malabar 2013 First P-8A Poseidons report for duty 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013

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guest speaker and presiding officer for the ceremony. OHSU Jacksonville is the largest medical command within Navy Reserve Command Southeast, with more than 700 members in 18 detachments crossing four states and Puerto Rico.Its Sailors provide essential medical and dental readiness support for the more than 9,400 Sailors and Marines assigned to Naval Operational Support Commands in the southeast region. Kiolbasa comes to OHSU Jacksonville with a wealth of experience to include tours at Navy military treat ment facilities, operational commands with the Marines, mobilizations to Germany and Afghanistan, and several executive leadership positions. He attended the University of Nebraska in Lincoln, where he received a Bachelor of Science, and a Masters Degree in Business Administration. During LaPollas two-year command tenure, OHSU Jacksonville provided more than 220,000 hours of direct operational medical and dental care in the form of annual training to Navy active duty commands and missions throughout the world, including deploy ments of many members to Germany, Horn of Africa, Cuba, and Afghanistan. Under LaPollas leadership, every one of the com mands 18 detachments was awarded the Navy Surgeon Generals coveted Blue H Award for exceeding industry standards for health and wellness initiatives. The command has also been recognized Navy wide for its development of an innovative exportable Trauma Nurse Training Course designed to deliver enhanced trauma care capabilities to the warfighter. In recognition of these efforts, LaPolla was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Meritorious Service Medal by Shaffer during the ceremony. Navy Band Southeast and the Naval Hospital Honor Guard supported the change of command ceremony. OHSU world. A true multi-mission aircraft, it also provides superior maritime intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) capability. The Poseidon is built on the proven Boeing 737 airframe, the most commercially operated aircraft in the world. The transition to the Poseidon brings with it enhanced safety and reduced maintenance. Based at NAS Jacksonville, VP-16 began the transition to become the first P-8A squadron 18 months ago, shortly after returning home from a six-month deployment to Kadena Air Base. The War Eagles achieved U.S. Navy safe for flight status in January 2013 and were certified ready for deployment in November 2013. I couldnt be more proud of what the War Eagles have been able to accomplish during the squadrons transition to the P-8A, said Cmdr. Bill Pennington, VP-16 commanding officer. We are well trained and well prepared for this deployment, and excited about the opportunity to demonstrate the Poseidons exceptional capabilities. The deployment of the P-8A Poseidons to Japan is part of a phased replacement of the propeller driven P-3C Orion now serving in U.S. 7th Fleet operating area. Deploying alongside VP-16 will be the VP-46 Grey Knights from Whidbey Island, Wash., who will operate the venerable Orion. In December, we will demonstrate the ability of the Poseidon to operate effectively alongside P-3C during high-tempo deployed operations, said Capt. Mike Parker, commander of Task Force 72. I also look forward to P-8A integrating seamlessly with our international partners and allies. Our interoperability will only get better with Poseidon, added Parker. VP-16 For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. Donations neededThe Greater Jacksonville Area USO is in need of food items/financial contributions to support the Holiday Food Basket program. Donations can be dropped off at the NAS Jax USO from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. or the NS Mayport USO from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. The USO is also accepting donations of new, unwrapped toys to support the Giving Tree at the Navy Exchange Courtyard which benefits military children. For more information, call 778-2821. ability. During the deployment Task Group 72.2 completed 29 detachments to 13 countries, including Australia, Brunei, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Micronesia, New Zealand, Palau, The Republic of the Philippines, the Republic of Korea, Singapore and Thailand,. The majority of the detachments involved scheduled multinational exercises. Among these were SEASURVEX-2013 with the armed forces of Indonesia, a series of cooperation and readiness afloat training exercises with Brunei, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore and Thailand, Talisman Saber with the Australian Defense Force, AnnualEx in conjunction with the Japanese Self Defense Forces, Malabar-13 with naval forces from India, and numerous bilateral exercises with Australia, Japan and the Republic of Korea. These multilateral efforts build ties between nations and allow for great er coordination and interoperability between forces. Other detachments were executed in support of operational requirements, such as Operation Big Eye which sup ports our partners attempts to curb illegal fishing within the territorial waters of Micronesia; search and res cue detachments to Guam; an historic detachment to New Zealand (the first by a U.S. Navy P-3C since 1984); and the humanitarian assistance detachment to the Philippines in response to Typhoon Haiyan last month. Typhoon Haiyan made landfall on Nov. 7, 2013, killing thousands and devastating many islands along the nations eastern coast. The men and women of VP-26 and VP-62 were among the first on the scene to support the humanitarian assistance/disaster relief mission after the government of the Philippines requested U.S. assistance. The P-3s played a vital role in damage assessment, providing a birds-eye view of the areas devastated by the typhoon so government officials could direct aid to those most in need. Aircrews performed reconnaissance of roadways and bridges, located per sonnel isolated from aid, and scouted the islands for suitable helicopter landing sites to allow badly needed supplies to be delivered. The successful response to this crisis demonstrated both the value of main taining forward deployed naval forc es the level of integration achieved by the active and reserve maritime patrol forces who were ready to respond and executed flawlessly. In addition to VP-26, VP-62, and VP-69, aircrews from VP-1, stationed in Whidbey Island, Wash. also support ed CTG 72.2 and 72.4 throughout the deployment. Led, by VP-26 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mark Sohaney, the integrated team was tasked to meet all maritime patrol requirements across the Pacific Fleet AOR, while paving the way for the first operational deployment of the P-8A Poseidon. Sohaney and his team will turn over CTG 72.2 to NAS Jacksonvilles VP-16, the first P-8A squadron, later this month. Although Sohaney and Team Trident are returning home to NAS Jacksonville, they will remain ready to answer the call. The chance to lead these fine men and women in support of such an important mission is truly a once in a lifetime opportunity, said Sohaney. I could not be more proud of what they accomplished over the past seven months. With the last aircraft scheduled to arrive on home soil in mid-December, VP-26 Sailors will be re-uniting with their families just in time for Christmas. But Sohaney and the Tridents will soon be back at work training aircrews, repairing aircraft, and preparing for the squadrons next deployment. Their tireless dedication ensured a successful deployment and is a testa ment to the squadrons mantra that, Trident Pride runs Bone Deep. VP-26 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013

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With a month left before the start of tax season, service members should begin gathering documentation to file their 2013 taxes, the director of the Pentagons office of family policy and children and youth said Dec. 3. In a recent interview with American Forces Press Service and the Pentagon Channel, Barbara Thompson suggested visiting the Military OneSource Web site for tax filing resources and to learn what will be necessary to file, such as W2 forms, Social Security numbers and receipts for deductions such as child care, education, medical expenses and donations, among other write-offs. Tax preparers at Military OneSource will do short-form tax filing free of charge for service members and their families, Thompson said. Relocations and deployments have tax implications, Thompson noted. For example, deployed service mem bers can receive an extension to file taxes after the normal April 15 filing date, she said. Its very helpful to have someone who is experienced to help you through the cumbersome issue of taxes and tax returns, she added. The tax preparers at Military OneSource are up to date on changes in tax laws, and can answer militaryspecific questions, Thompson said. Installations also offer volunteer income tax assistance to service mem bers and their families, while certain banks and credit unions provide education and training on tax preparation, Thompson said. She advised that ser vice members organize their taxes by starting a file beginning each Jan. 1 for the following years tax papers, such as receipts and other write-offs. You dont want to wait until the last minute, she said. Service members and families who prepare long-form taxes with deduc tions such as mortgages and rental properties might want to consider hiring a tax expert to file for them, Thompson said. Its best to get advice to make sure you have everything covered, she added. People who do their own taxes need to stay on top of current tax information, Thompson said. Sometimes tax laws change, so you have to be really smart about doing your own taxes, she added. States tax laws often vary, too, she said, and because of relocations, some ser vice members have to file local taxes in more than one state. Thats where [tax consultants] can really be of great value to make sure you know what the requirements are for states, Thompson said. Filing federal and state tax returns usually results in either a tax refund or money owed back to the government. Expecting to receive a tax refund, but instead finding out that money is owed can be a shock, Thompson said. Looking at W2s to determine how much money in taxes is being withheld is a good indicator of whether or not one will owe money, she suggested. Service members who receive a tax refund face important decisions on what to do with the money, Thompson said. Do you use it to buy down debt, or put it in a savings account? she asked, advising people to not blow their tax refunds in a spending frenzy of unnec essary purchases. A tax refund also can be deposited into a retirement savings account, she added. Its important to think about what youre going to do with that money, she advised, and how you can best utilize it for your financial wellbeing. Meeting with a financial planner to learn the lay of the land, and what tax deductions might apply to a ser vice members finances is a good idea, Thompson said. Its really important to be savvy about that. Your base Navy College Office (NCO) offers paperbased American College Testing (ACT) and Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) college admissions testing at base education centers to active duty service members free of charge. According to Mareba Mack, educational special ist at the NAS Pensacola Navy College Office, when a current score is required for service or education programs, all eligible military members, including the Coast Guard, are authorized to take one free col lege admissions exam administered at their local base education center. A few of the service programs that require a cur rent SAT or ACT score are the Naval Academy and the Naval Academy Preparatory School Programs, Medical Enlisted Commissioning Program and the Seaman to Admiral-21 program, said Mack. Service members with hopes of pursuing a baccalaureate degree at a four-year institution are eligible for a free test whether or not they are using military education program benefits such as Tuition Assistance (TA) and/ or the GI Bill. Both the ACT and SAT are administered monthly by the educational center staff. In order to help prepare for the SAT and ACT, the NCO offers free materials to assist service members in achieving the scores they need. Mack suggests mem bers visit their local NCO to receive official test guide booklets that offer information about each exam, including practice tests. Additional information on the ACT and SAT is available at www.act.org/aap/pdf/Preparing-for-the-ACT. pdf and http://sat.collegeboard.org/SAT/public/pdf/ getting-ready-for-the-sat.pdf. Andrea Franklin, educational technician at the NCO Pensacola notes that the education centers also offer other tools that can be used to improve basic English and math skills. Other offerings available at no charge include the Online Academic Skills Course (OASC) and the College Placement Skills Training Course (CPST), said Franklin. For more information on the OASC and CPST, visit https://www.navycollege.navy.mil/dsp_oasc.aspx and https://www.navycollege.navy.mil/dsp_cpst.aspx. Prepare now for tax seasonInterested in college? Free admissions testing available for service members The NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) is offering Suicide Prevention Awareness Training for base and tenant commands this month. Should your command be in need of this training, select a date and time that is convenient for your command and call 542-2776 to reserve seating, said FFSC Education and Training Coordinator Wilhelmina Nash. Attending this one-hour class could help you save someones life. Thank you for your concern and support, she added. The following are the available training dates and times:Dec. 12 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 17 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 18 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 30 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 31 9 a.m. & 1 p.m.Suicide prevention awareness training JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013 17

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Childrens Holiday Bingo Dec. 20 Doors open at 5 p.m., games begin at 6 p.m. $10 per childFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Special Stars Bowling League for families with special needs children. All ages welcome! Ramps available for the non-ambulatory as well as bumpers for beginners. Runs for 10 weeks at a cost of $7 per week, shoes are included. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for Active Duty 11 a.m 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Dec. 21, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person Scratch Sweeper: Dec. 28, 14 p.m. $30 entry fee *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise* Strike in the New Year at NAS Freedom Lanes Dec. 31, 7 p.m. 1 a.m. $15 per personFitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Jingle Bell Jog 5K Dec. 13 at 11:30 a.m. Perimeter Rd. / Antenna Farm Powerlifting Competition Feb. 8, 2014 7 a.m. at the Fitness Center $10 registration feeI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil ITT current ticket promotions include the following: Jacksonville Zoo Light $8.50 St. Augustine Holiday Lights $8.75 adult & $3 child Ringling Brothers Barnum & Bailey Circus $15 Disney Jr. Live $15 $29 Monster Jam $22 $42 Globetrotters $18 Gatorbowl $35 Russel Athletic Bowl $78 Capital One Bowl $98 Wild Adventures $30 $70 Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket Fla. $166 $194.50 Universal Orlando $114 $169.50 Orlando Magic $11 $491 Daytona 500 $62 $209 Drive 4COPD 300 $55 Budweiser Duels $55 Sprint Unlimited $30 $55 Rolex 24 $32 $65 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 The Artist Series Broadway in Jacksonville 2013 2014 season, select shows $51 $65 Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2013 2014 season, select shows $11 $70 Jaguar Tickets Section 147 $70 Armed Forces Vacation Club www.afvclub.com $349 $369 Amelia Island Museum of History $4 $10 MOSH $7 $12 Ripleys St. Augustine $4.25 $7.50 St. Augustine Alligator Farm $6.75 $13.50 Wild Florida Airboats $17 $46.50 Florida Ecosafaris $25 $119 Book Shades of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels located near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Ice Skating Trip Dec.14 at 6 p.m. The Avenues Mall Shuttle Dec. 17 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Dec. 17 for active duty Dec. 19 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Daily Twilight Golf Special Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1 p.m. Santa Sez Golf Scramble Dec. 20 at 10 a.m. $40 military, $50 civilian guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m.Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Movie Under the Stars featuring The Grinch Dec. 13, 6 p.m. Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013

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Schramm retires after 42 years Naval Hospital Jacksonville, why is volunteering important to you? A CFC participant. Provided as a public service. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013 19

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013 Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel ended his talk with troops at Manama, Bahrain Dec. 6 as he usually does offering to answer questions or listen to any advice they can offer. The service members and civilian mariners aboard the amphibious transport dock USS Ponce (LPD-15) Hagel spoke with today didnt offer advice, but they did ask about Iran, women in combat, and pay and benefits. The six-month interim agreement with Iran the State Department announced in November, Hagel said, is intended to allow space and time for negotiations on Irans nuclear program and other issues. Hagel said as secretary of defense and as a former sena tor, he believes the agreement represents an opportunity to probe in great detail the pos sibilities of getting to a higher ground . and see, in fact, if the Iranians are serious about following through on their pledge to halt pursuit of nuclear weapons. During that six-month peri od, he added, We will keep the same kind of strong assets, [and we will conduct] the same exercises as usual. We understand, clearly, the dangers that Iran represents and has represented, he said. . . This is not an exercise based in folly. This is very clear-eyed, real engagement. Whether we can get to where we hope we can get to in six months, I dont know. Well see. Hagel offered a quick semi nar in response to a question on pay and benefits. With a continuing resolution controlling government spending through Jan. 15, no defense budget, and the likelihood of an additional $52 billion sequestration cut in defense funding next fiscal year, he said, Pentagon planners are challenged to map out the next five years. Always, you protect your people, he said. . This institution completely, abso lutely relies on you. The United States has a tre mendous advantage in cuttingedge technology, he said, but its useless without capable, committed people to use it. We are reviewing pay, com pensation, retirement . every aspect of our budget, Hagel said. The secretary assured the troops that he and other defense leaders begin every decision process . first focusing on taking care of our peo ple. Hagels next questioner asked the secretarys opinion of women in combat. Given that three Marine women gradu ated from the Corps enlisted infantry training in November, a male Marine asked, Will we see full integration within the infantry battalions? And what is your personal opinion on this? Hagel termed the womens achievement tremendous, and said women Marines, soldiers, airmen and sailors should be given more opportunities for jobs, promotions and command positions. The female troops he has spoken with dont want the standards lowered for them, the secretary said. And if women can and want to serve in any of . the combat areas and they can meet those stan dards, they should be allowed to serve. The services are evolving through the process of open ing combat arms to women, he said, and are on track with the effort. Im personally strongly supportive of it, Hagel said. . .Im very proud of these women who are stepping for ward and who want to do more things, and are doing more things. The Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (HST CSG) passed the approximate midway point of its 2013-2014 deployment Dec. 6 in the Gulf of Oman. HST CSG deployed from Norfolk, Va., and Mayport, Fla., in late July and after transit ing the Atlantic Ocean and U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibil ity (AOR), entered the U.S. 5th Fleet AOR Aug. 18 to conduct maritime security operations, support theater security coop eration efforts and support Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF). HST CSG is currently the only continental U.S.-based carrier strike group forward deployed. I could not be more proud of the performance of our Sailors and Marines, said Rear Adm. Kevin Sweeney, commander, HST CSG. Their efforts in supporting coalition warfighters on the ground in Afghanistan and maritime operations through out the region have been the key to building trust and con fidence with our partner nations. HST CSG includes the air craft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), the guid ed-missile cruisers USS Gettysburg (CG 64) and USS San Jacinto (CG 57), the guid ed-missile destroyers USS Bulkeley (DDG 84) and USS Mason (DDG 87); Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3; and embarked Carrier Strike Group 10 and 1st Combined Destroyer Squadron staffs. Harry S. Truman, the strike groups flagship, has teamed up with CVW-3 to launch more than 7,000 sorties, amassing more than 19,700 flight hours, since departing for deploy ment. Nine days after enter ing the 5th Fleet AOR, an F/A18C Hornet, assigned to the Checkerboards of Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 312, piloted by Marine Lt. Col. Joseph Reedy, com manding officer of VMFA-312, launched from Truman in support of OEF Aug. 27. Since that time, CVW-3 squadrons have flown more than 8,900 hours and 1,500 sorties in support of OEF. Squadrons assigned to CVW-3 include the Seahawks of Airborne Early Warning Squadron 126, the Zappers of Electronic Attack Squadron 130, the Ragin Bulls of Strike Fighter Squadron 37, the Gunslingers of Strike Fighter Squadron 105, the Swordsmen of Strike Fighter Squadron 32, the Dusty Dogs of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 7 and the Swamp Foxes of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 74. Its inspiring to watch the young men and women of Truman and Carrier Air Wing 3 work so closely together, said Capt. Bob Roth, Trumans commanding officer. Its their hard work and tireless dedication to the mission that keep the jets launching, in the air, and sup porting the warfighters on the ground in Afghanistan. Capt. Sara Joyner, com mander, CVW-3, also spoke of the teamwork that makes HST CSGs support of OEF a success. Whether from the air wing or from Truman, every Sailor and Marine understands the importance of what were doing out here and how vital teamwork is to our success, she said. The ship and air wing team work side by side, every day for hours on end, in all sorts of conditions, to make sure we can get support to those who need it on the ground. Each ship in the strike group has made an impact on regional security and safety by pro viding assistance and medical support to fishermen and mer chants on multiple occasions, and by participating in theater security cooperation exercises. Other highlights of the deployment include port visits to Marseille, France; Manama, Bahrain; and Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates; a Thanksgiving Day visit by the Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Mike Stevens; and the advancement of approximately 350 Sailors. During the first 136 days of the deployment, Sailors and Marines consumed more than 15,175 gallons of milk, 52,718 lbs. of beef, 134,203 lbs. of chicken, 5,560 lbs. of hot dogs, 108,435 lbs. of fresh vegetables and 10,975 dozens of eggs. To date, Harry S. Truman completed 16 underway replenishments, during which more than 11.4 million gallons of JP-5 fuel was received, 9.5 million gallons of which was issued to aircraft for flight operations. Over the past four-and-ahalf months, this ship has done amazing things from support ing OEF, completing a physical readiness test while on a com bat deployment, had numerous Sailors advanced, Sailors get ting multiple warfare qualifica tions, and Sailors continuing their education, said Truman Sailor of the Year AO1 Ryan Smith. We still have a long road ahead of us with much more to accomplish before the end of deployment, but well ensure we remain vigilant and well keep meeting every chal lenge safely until we return safely to our loved ones. Hagel addresses Iran, pay, women in combat Truman Carrier Strike Group passes deployment midpoint The aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) launched and recovered E-2D Hawkeyes, from the Tiger Tails of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 125, for the first time, Dec. 3. With notable improvements and new features, the E-2D is a major advancement from the E-2C Hawkeye. The E-2D brings a signifi cant number of improvements to the older E-2C, said Cmdr. Paul Lanzilotta, commanding officer of VAW-125. The biggest thing is the sensor and radar systems. They are much more advanced in the E-2D. The E-2D is also capable of seeing much farther and it is far more capable of detect ing targets on the surface and in the air. This helps ensure the carrier strike group is adequately defended, even hun dreds of miles away. We can see it all. Other improvements include a fully integrated, all-glass tactical cockpit, advanced identi fication friend-or-foe system, a new radar with both mechanical and electronic scanning capabilities, electronic support measures enhancements, new mission computers and tactical workstations. Along with the many tech nological advances, the E-2D is also a much smoother flying aircraft now, said Lanzilotta. These aircraft are brand new. They still have that have that new-car smell. After hundreds of practice landings on shore, the launch and recovery of the E-2D onboard Theodore Roosevelt begins VAW-125s final transi tion process from the E-2C to the E-2D. USS Theodore Roosevelt welcomes new E-2D Hawkeye

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013 21 The Mayport community welcomed more than 350 new neighbors to Northeast Florida when USS New York (LPD 21) changed its homeport from Naval Station Norfolk to Naval Station Mayport Dec. 6. New York is one of three ships that make up the Iwo Jima Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) that the Navy is moving from Norfolk, Va., to Mayport, Fla. The other two ships USS Iwo Jima (LHD-7) and USS Fort McHenry (LSD-45) are slated to arrive as early as 2014. The three ships will bulk up the Navys fleet at Mayport, as the stations frigates are being retired. USS Underwood and the USS Klakring were decom missioned in March. According to U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, the move is a win-win situation for the Navy and the Mayport community. As Congress deals with very difficult budget decisions, this is promising news for national security and the First Coast, Crenshaw said in a statement. This first phase of the amphibious ready group move to Mayport underscores the Navys commitment to a strategic dispersal of assets -a strategy I have long advocated on Capitol Hill. New York is not the first Navy ship to hold that states name, but never before has the name had so much mean ing. The amphibious trans port dock was built with 7 1/2 tons of steel salvaged from the World Trade Center. According to New Yorks Commanding Officer Capt. Jon Kreitz, although leaving Hampton Roads, Va. was difficult, mari time strategy is the main job for the new ship. This is just the first of three ships relocating to Mayport in order to make sure the station remains that second strategic homeport for the fleet, he said. Were very excited to be a part of the Mayport family. Many Navy families had the daunting task of moving from Norfolk to Mayport in a short amount of time. According to OS2 Thomas Devore, it was tough moving suddenly, but the many activities offered on NS Mayport and the surrounding areas are worth the stress of moving to a new area. We were able to get base housing in only two days, he said. The help from the Fleet and Family Support Center was fantastic. It was a little hectic mov ing two small children, but we made it work, said Angela Devore. I am looking forward to the many beaches in the area. When the kids get a little older, we are definitely going to Disney World. The San Antonio-class LPD (USS New York) ships are used to transport and land Marines, their equipment and supplies. These ships support amphibi ous assault, special operations or expeditionary warfare mis sions and can serve as sec ondary aviation platforms for amphibious ready groups. Amphibious ships like New York provide the nation a cri sis response capability and demonstrate the Navy-Marine Corps team in action. The Navy is committed to strategic dis persal and at least two viable East Coast surface ship home ports as well as the preserva tion of the ship repair indus trial base in the Mayport area. According to Naval Station Mayport Commanding Officer Capt. Wesley McCall, the addition of up to 2,000 families to the area after all is said and done will be a boost for national defense and to the economy of Northeast Florida. I think were going to see some significant growth with USS Fort McHenry and USS Iwo Jima coming next year and the new littoral combat ships soon to follow, he said. You bring 2,000 new fami lies here; the benefits are going to be pretty substantial. The Sailors and their fami lies aboard New York are the ones who will benefit the most. Jacksonville and especially the Mayport area are huge military supporters. USS New York changes homeport to Mayport

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24 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, December 12, 2013