Jax air news

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Material Information

Title:
Jax air news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note:
Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID:
UF00028307:02069


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013 HSM COC NCIS NEX GIVING TREE Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 2 departed Norfolk Nov. 20 to begin Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) a series of training exercis es designed to certify that the carrier strike group is deployment-ready by testing its ability to react to real-world sce narios and perform as an inte gral unit. Commander, Strike Force T0raining Atlantic (CSFTL) is evaluating CSG2 on how well they perform during simu lated surface and sub-surface threats and ship movements such as transiting a strait in hostile waters. CSFTL will evaluate our ability to perform all the dif ferent mission sets, said Cmdr. Andrew Walton, the operations officer of USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). This includes everything from counter-pira cy to maritime interdiction operations and strike warfare. Throughout COMPTUEX, fictitious geopolitical scenarios are used to replicate real-world circumstances that could be encountered during deploy ment. We immerse ourselves in this synthetic world from the second we pull lines over and get underway, said Cmdr. Walton. This acts as a rep resentation of what well see throughout our deployment such as failed states, acts of piracy, and counter-terrorism operations. We expect that throughout the event, there will be airborne, surface and even sub-surface forces out there that will be testing us. CSG 2 combines George H.W. Bush, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8, and Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 22 during the exer cise. All ships and their crews and the embarked air wing will play active roles. Safety stand down at Deweys It was standing room only at Deweys All-Hands Club when hun dreds of Sailors and civilian employees from Commander, Navy Region Southeast and NAS Jacksonville attended the holiday safety stand down Nov. 20. Ron Williamson, NAS Jax safety officer, welcomed the gathering. You know why were here today to remind you to make smart decisions that will keep you and your family safe and sound over the holiday season, he said. After reciting some Navy Region Southeast accident statistics, Williamson introduced the guest speaker, stage hypnotist Bryan McDaniel. Thank you for inviting me here today. As a retired Marine Corps master sergeant, I have a special affinity for safety meetings on miliA two-helicopter detachment from the HSM74 Swamp Foxes returned to NAS Jacksonville Nov. 18, completing a 10-month independent deployment on board USS Gravely (DDG 107), an Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer. Officer in Charge Lt. Cmdr. John Nadder said the MH-60R Seahawk detachment consisted of six pilots, four aircrewmen and 16 maintainers. AEC Paul Champagne and AM1 Andrew Smith ran an outstanding shop. There wasnt any significant down time even when things got really busy. Our people kept all the maintenance straight and kept the aircraft running so well that mission readiness was never a concern, said Nadder. Gravely, which joined the fleet in 2010, was mentioned in August news reports when the ship was ordered to patrol the eastern Mediterranean Sea in response to rising rumors of an imminent U.S. military intervention in the Syrian civil war. The most memorable part of the deploy ment had to be the Syrian issue. Our destroyer was mentioned in the news quite a bit which The VP-8 Fighting Tigers depart NAS Jacksonville at the end of November for a dualsite, seven-month deployment to Bahrain and El Salvador. VP-8 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Todd Libby stated, through a focus on pride, people, and professionalism, all 350 Fighting Tigers are ready to deploy in what is scheduled to be our last P-3C Orion deployment prior to transitioning to the P-8 Poseidon. The squadrons mission will focus on maritime surveillance and reconnaissance. VP-8 will relieve the Screaming Eagles of VP-1 in Bahrain and the Golden Swordsmen of VP-47 in El Salvador. Cmdr. Derek Adametz, VP-8s executive officer commented,VP-8 Fighting Tigers continue to set the standard for maritime patrol avia tion. They are both ready and excited to deploy. Prior to deployment, VP-8s inter-deployment readiness cycle consisted of support ing carrier strike group exer cises, anti-submarine warfare training, individual and com mand qualifications and cer tifications. These included: operational readiness evalua tion, Fleet Naval Air Training and Operating Procedures Standardization evaluations, weapons inspections, overseas deployment training require ments, and Middle-East/ Central America cultural training. I am incredibly proud of all that the Fighting Tigers have accomplished during the past 12 months, from support ing the fleet to supporting the community. The men and women of VP-8 have made a positive difference said Libby. VP-8 Fighting Tigers begin dual-site deployment Bush strike group begins COMPTUEX Welcome home HSM-74 Det. 1

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Nov. 28 1775 Congress adopts first rules for regulation of the Navy of the United Colonies. 1941 USS Enterprise (CV6) sails from Pearl Harbor for Wake Island to ferry Marine Corps aircraft to island. 1942 Ensigns George Carlson and Mac Cason orga nize rescue parties to help rescue people from the fire at the Cocoanut Grove nightclub in Boston, Mass. They are cred ited for saving more lives than any other single agency. Nov. 29 1775 Capt. John Manley in schooner Lee captures British ordnance ship Nancy with large quantity of munitions. 1890 First Army-Navy football game (Navy won 24-0). 1929 Cmdr. Richard Byrd makes first flight over South Pole. 1944 USS Archerfish (SS311) sinks Japanese carrier Shinano, the worlds largest warship sunk by any subma rine during World War II. Nov. 30 1942 In Battle of Tassafaronga, th last major naval action in Solomon Islands, U.S. forces prevent Japanese attempt to reprovi sion the Japanese troops on Guadalcanal. Six U.S. ships were damaged in the action. Dec. 1 1842 Execution of three crewmembers of USS Somers for mutiny; Midshipman Philip Spencer, Boatswain Samuel Cromwell and Seaman Elisha Small. 1921 In first flight of a Navy airship filled with helium, Blimp C-7 piloted by Lt. Cmdr. Ralph Wood left Norfolk, Va. for Washington, D.C. 1959 Bureau of Ordnance (BUORD) merges with Bureau of Aeronautics (BUAER) to form the Bureau of Naval Weapons (BUWEPS). Dec. 2 1775 Congress orders first officers commissions printed. 1908 Rear Adm. William Cowles submits report, pre pared by Lt. George Sweet, recommending purchase of aircraft suitable for operating from naval ships on scouting and observation missions to Secretary of the Navy. 1941 First Naval Armed Guard detachment (seven men under a coxswain) of World War II reports to Liberty ship, SS Dunboyne. 1944 Two-day destroyer Battle of Ormoc Bay begins. 1965 USS Enterprise (CVAN-65) and USS Bainbridge (DLGN-25) become first nucle ar-powered task unit used in combat operations with launch of air strikes near Bien Hoa, Vietnam. Dec. 3 1775 Lt. John Paul Jones raises the Grand Union flag on USS Alfred. It was the First American flag raised over American naval vessel. 1940 President Franklin Roosevelt embarks on cruis er USS Tuscaloosa (CA-37) to inspect bases acquired from Great Britain under Destroyerfor Bases agreement. 1983 Two F-14 Tomcats fly ing over Lebanon were fired upon. Dec. 4 1918 President Woodrow Wilson sails in USS George Washington for Paris Peace Conference. 1943 Aircraft from USS Lexington (CV-16) and USS Independence (CVL-22) attack Kwajalein Atoll, sinking four Japanese ships and damag ing five others. Only three U.S. ships suffered damage. 1944 USS Flasher (SS249) sinks Japanese destroyer Kishinami and damages a merchant ship in South China Sea. Flasher is only U.S. submarine to sink more than 100,000 tons of enemy shipping in World War II. 1965 Launch of Gemini 7 piloted by Cmdr. James Lovell. This flight consisted of 206 orbits at an altitude of 327 km, lasting 13 days and 18 hours. Recovery by HS-11 helicopters from USS Wasp (CVS-18). 1983 Aircraft from USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) and USS Independence (CV-62) launch strike against anti-aircraft positions in Lebanon that fired on U.S. aircraft. Two U.S. Navy planes shot down. People sometimes wonder if I love or hate being a military dependent. Its a good question, and one Ive asked myself. Ive been known to write about things that drive me crazy about military life: deployments, fre quent moves, seabags full of clothes that are shipgrey and smell like JP-5 (jet fuel). Ive also been known to write about things I love about military life: most notably, the culture, unique experiences and relationships with other military families. If Facebook had a status update option for users feelings about the military, mine would be, Its complicated. To be fair, I dont know what its like for people who arent military dependents. Ive been one since the day I was born. In fact, there only have been six weeks, between my college graduation and wedding, when I didnt have a military identification card. During those six weeks, I broke my right leg. So thats what I think about not being in the military: I break things, and I dont have insurance. I often view the military as a parent. Ive gone through cyclical, childlike feelings about it, and while I can criticize and complain about Uncle Sam, my heart hurts when anyone else does (Hey, thats MY uncle youre talking about!). My dad was an F-14 pilot. His office was located on an aircraft carrier or above a hangar. Until I was about 13 years old, when I saw a documentary about aircraft carriers on television, I didnt realize this was unusual to those outside of the military. Going to see my dad on the ship was, from what I can tell, like a civilian child going to see her dad in an office building. The distinct odor of steel mixed with JP-5 is as familiar to me as the antiques smell of the house I grew up in. When I smell anything vaguely similar like the greasy handrails of old stairwells it stops me in my tracks. I remember going to see my dad on the aircraft carrier before ships were made to accommodate women. There werent any female restrooms. For some reason, that always made an impression on me. I sat on Dads small bed and usually complained of needing to use the bathroom (of course!) while I watched mom put his clothes away in metal drawers. If I gave Dad a picture to take on deployment, it had to be secured to his desk or wall so that it wouldnt slide. I didnt second-guess any of this. It was just the way it was. Then came what well call my teen years with the military. Only, I wasnt a teen. I was in my 20s and married to Dustin, another military pilot. By then, I could easily list all the ways in which the military was dumb. Not having female restrooms on the aircraft carrier? Dumb. Asking families for their top choice for a duty station and then sending them else where? Dumb. Using taxpayer dollars to move a family back and forth across the country when their top choice wouldnt have required transferring? Dumb, dumb, dumb. By this point, the military was something I couldnt wait to put behind me. It was wasteful, demanding, annoying, and so 1980s. If the mili tary were a person, Id scream that I hated it. Then Id cry, You dont care about me at all, do you? and slam my door. I begged Dustin to get out when his commitment was up. Thirteen years later, were still in the military and nearing Dustins 20-year mark. There will always be things I dont understand or like about the military (Detailers really are blindfolded when they throw darts at a map, arent they?), but, wow, the military somehow, magically even, became smarter and less annoying now that Im not in those teen years with it anymore. I watched my human parents go through a similar process: they were everything, then they got all weird, and then, when I turned 25, suddenly they were super smart again! Funny how those things happen, huh? Just the other day, as I drove past the airport, a Navy P-3 was about to takeoff. I actually pulled off the side of the road and watched from my car. I was surprised when I got a little teary. The aircraft seemed old, but it was familiar and looked like home to me. Its complicated. My feelings about the military, much like my feelings about my parents, cant be teased out. Theyre all mixed up in my childhood, who I am, and how I view the world. At times the military has disappointed me, infuriated me, and gotten in my way. But it has always been there. Always. So, as this is the week of giving thanks, it seems appropriate to take time to acknowledge the military for raising me, shaping me, and, ultimately, always providing for me and my family. Yes, I get mad, but dear military, when youre not looking, I smile and whisper, thank you. My feelings about Uncle Sam . its complicated Notice of upcoming NAS Jax power outageNAS Jacksonville Public Works Department periodi cally schedules power outages in order to safely per form required maintenance in the high voltage substa tion serving family housing and the Naval Hospital Jacksonville campus. The next scheduled power outage is Dec. 7, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Your understanding of the necessity for these power outages is sincerely appreciated because the required maintenance will greatly improve the reliability of the substation equipment and the installations overall electrical distribution system. Outages are scheduled in order to minimize the impact they will have on opera tions and the daily lives of our family housing residents. Single Navy mothers needed for research study If you are a single Navy mothers who have been on deployment and have completed an entire deployment cycle your participation is needed for a research study to determine what is the emotional re-adjustment of coming home and reentering post deployment life after being deployed. A doctoral psychology student at Capella University wishes to ask you a few questions about your experience on deployment. Your participation should take about one hour. You must have completed a deployment within the past 12 months and be at least 18 years old. All participants will receive a $10 Starbuck gift card. To learn more, contact Juanita Bruno-Jacob at (703) 618-9668 or email jbrunojacob2@capellaunivesity.edu. This research is conducted under the direction of Dr. Eleni Pinnow and has been reviewed and approved by the Capella University Institutional Review Board.

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Cmdr. George Austin assumed com mand of Helicopter Maritime Strike Weapons School Atlantic (HSMWSL) Nov. 22, relieving Cmdr. Raymond Marsh III during a change of com mand ceremony held at Naval Station Mayport. The HSM Weapons School serves as the Atlantic Fleets center of tactical excellence for training and evaluation of maritime strike combat helicopter aircrews. The command is responsi ble for ensuring that todays Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing, Atlantic squad rons and detachments deploy with the most comprehensive and up to date training available. Additionally, the Weapons School is charged with pro gressing and ensuring the future com bat success of all East Coast Helicopter Maritime Strike aircraft. During his 15-month tour as com manding officer, Marsh made immedi ate and enduring readiness improve ments for deploying combat aircrews. His direction and leadership pushed the Weapons Schools personnel to grow and excel professionally. He focused their talents and expertise to provide unprecedented levels of train ing and support for fleet operators. His next assignment will be as the Air Operations Officer onboard the USS Iwo Jima (LHD-7), home-ported in Norfolk, Va. A native of West Deptford, N.J., Austin enlisted in the Navy in January 1990 and served as a machinist mate (nuclear) until his selection to the United States Naval Academy. He graduated from the Naval Academy with a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering and received his commis sion in 1996. He also holds a Masters Degree in Aeronautical Engineering from the Naval Postgraduate School and a Developmental Test Pilot designation. He brings extensive fleet experi ence from flying tours on the East and West Coast, he has completed multiple Western Pacific and 5th Fleet deploy ments, MH-60R and MH-60S Seahawk Helicopter developmental testing and evaluation, as well as an Individual Augmentee tour with Task Force Raptor in Baghdad, Iraq supporting a Special Forces team. He also brings overseas staff experience from a tour at European Command Headquarters in Stuttgart, Germany. Helicopter Maritime Strike Weapons School, Atlantic holds change of command JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013

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Operational Health Support Unit (OHSU) Jacksonville, the Reserve Unit of Naval Hospital Jacksonville, will hold a Change of Command Ceremony Dec. 8 at 10 a.m. Capt. Lee Kiolbasa, a healthcare administrator who currently serves as the executive officer of OHSU San Diego, will assume command of the OHSU Jacksonville Unit from Capt. Kenneth LaPolla, a general dentist from Ohio, who will trans fer to OHSU Camp Lejuene. Capt. Gayle Shaffer, command ing officer of Naval Hospital Jacksonville, will be the guest speaker for the ceremony. Kiolbasa comes to OHSU Jacksonville with a wealth of experience within Navy Medicine to include tours at Navy military treatment facilities, operation al commands with the Marines, mobilizations to Germany and Afghanistan and several executive leadership positions.He attend ed the University of Nebraska in Lincoln, where he received a bachelor of science and a masters degree in business administration. During LaPollastwo-year com mand tenure, OHSU Jacksonville provided more than 220,000 hours of direct operational medical & dental care in the form of annual training to Navy active duty com mands and missions throughout the world, including deployments of many members to Landstuhl Regional Medical Centerand Afghanistan. Under LaPollas leadership, every one of the commands 18 detachments was awarded the Navy Surgeon Generals coveted The NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville (FLCJ) Detachment Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC) Mayport team recent ly conducted a continuous process improvement project focused on cap turing warehouse material storage capacity. The NAVSUP FLCJ team is a cross functional cadre of experts embedded at SERMC that directly supports the warfighter and the fleet by providing all aspects of integrated logistics ser vices to support mission related opera tions and functions for Naval Station Mayport-based Navy vessels, as well as numerous visiting ships. One of the major logistics services that the team provides is the receipt, inspection, and accommodation stor age of government furnished materi al, contractor furnished material, and sponsor owned material (SOM) at the detachments warehouse site before turnover to the alteration installa tion team, or to the waterfront opera tions maintenance team. Ultimately, the material stored in the sites ware house is transferred and used to accomplish repairs and moderniza tion for ships scheduled dry-docking selected Rrestricted availability, selected restricted availability, continuous maintenance availability, and emergent work performed during an unscheduled window of opportunity. With the recent changing of the patrol craft, USS Shamal (PC 13), USS Zepher (PC 8), and USS Tornado (PC14) homeports to NS Mayport, determining warehousing space availability became a primary focal point for the SERMC team. Furthermore, with future Navy plans including the homeport change for an Amphibious Ready Group (ARG), the USS New York (LPD 21) arriving in Dec., and the USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43) and the USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) in 2014, the team questioned whether or not there was adequate available space to accommodate additional material storage required to support the increase in ship repair and modification schedules. Geared to provide superior cus tomer support, the SERMC team pro actively enlisted the help of NAVSUP CPI Blackbelt, Ricky Toups, to jumpstart the CPI project designed to capture the current warehousing operational foot print. From the initial onset of the project, the team was faced with some dis tinctive challenges including resource restraints and an austere fiscal environment. To help alleviate resource chal lenges, the team developed a detailed plan of action which called for FLCJ personnel, SERMC resources, along with the assistance of Navy drilling reservists. Our team was able to make nec essary staffing adjustments required for the project, by bringing in Naval Reserve sailors to assist with con ducting some of the work-heavy tasks including a detailed wall to wall inventory, said FLCJ Detachment Site Director Lt. Cmdr. Paul Havens. With the help of the Navy reservists, the team was able to successfully con duct an in-depth analysis which established a baseline inventory, helped identify areas for process improvement as well as opportunities to reconcile discrepancies caused due to vary ing record keeping methodologies. Furthermore, as part of the projects Measure phase, the team was able to capture other critical statistics includ ing the current quantity and length of time that parts were being stored at the customers request. These results included the capturing of an average GFM stock turn rate of approximately 4.21 years, with SOM stock turn rates averaging approximately 1.33 years over the 24 month threshold. During the analyze phase of the project, final inventory numbers showed that of the 1,127 fixed storage locations; approxi mately 532 or 45 percent of the loca tions were empty, thus proving ware housing capacity to be adequate for any increased ship repair and modification workload. In order to enhance customer sup port and to help eliminate future inventory discrepancies and inconsistencies, the team was also able to successfully establish clear business rules for all receipted material. Furthermore, the team developed a Microsoft Access database tool that allows for increased material visibility, as well as quick and accurate identification of storage capacity. Both of the above solutions were identified during a brainstorming session of the process Improvement phase of the project. The database tool that the team developed has many benefits that can help influence customer decisions regarding disposition of material with above average stock turn rates, said Havens. Furthermore, to help expedite and plan for ship repairs, SERMC personnel including planners and managers were granted access to the database tool, which will also allow the reallocation of material not being used for future ship repairs, thus, leading to future cost avoidance due to being able to manage on-hand material. With regards to the success of the CPI project, Havens commented, The con duction of the wall to wall inventory and the creation of the Access database helped to provide increased visibility of end-use assets. It also allowed us to drive enhancements and efficiencies in our warehousing processes as well as the opportunity to further enhance our commitment to providing world class support to the fleet, while being the best possible stewards of NAVSEA owned parts, and taxpayer money. NAVSUP FLCJ captures warehouse efficiencies through CPI Project Operational Health Support Unit Jacksonville change of command JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013 Four Physical Security Specialists from the Navy Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) spent a week at NAS Jacksonville teaching secu rity personnel from both NAS Jacksonville and NSB Kings Bay the Active Shooter Response Course. From Nov. 18-22, Rick McNeely, Robert Harmon, Lt. David Highsmith, and Chief James Fuller taught the 40-hour course covering the four stages of response to an active shooter situation. After receiving classroom instruction, security person nel then practiced their new knowledge in order to improve their law enforcement skills. The ultimate evaluation was an active shooter simulation in an abandoned building on base using airsoft weapons and actors simulating bad guys, victims and innocent person nel. The first day consisted of classroom instruction in improvised explosives, the components of rapid response, apprehension, communication, and weapons fundamentals. The second day continued the classroom instruction of the first, with discussions of weapons handling and medi cal first aid specific to active shooter situations. Hands-on practice began this day as well, with students practicing the application of tourniquets on each other, as well as beginning outside group drills. These drills allow for instructors to teach basic skills in a group setting. Wednesday and Thursday the students began advanced practical drills, working through cones set up with police tape to simulate the hallways and rooms of an actual building while still allow ing for instructors to maintain awareness of the entire scenario. Airsoft weaponry replaced the fake rubber weapons of the previous day and adding additional realism. Each student wears the same gear they wear on the job, with the addition of a full face mask for safety while training with the airsoft weaponry. Friday was the final evalu ation, utilizing the old aban doned Gateway Inn and Suites building (Building 11) as the staging ground for a simu lated active shooter situation. Students had to utilize all their skills to deal with a hostile target, role-played by one of the instructors. Instructors based their por trayal on studies of active shooter incidents from the past 40 years in order to best present the type of situation security personnel may actually face in the future. Students not only participated as security forces, but also as actors in the scenario. The evaluation had to be repeated six times in order to allow all stu dents to practice each of the roles. Each scenario was different, however, to avoid those students who start the day playing the victims from hav ing an unfair advantage when it is their turn to practice being the response team. McNeely said, NCIS trav els to installations upon com mand request to perform the Active Shooter Response Course. Each class optimally consists of 12 to18 students to keep a quality instructorto-student ratio. Once a com mands security forces com plete the course, they become a Certified Reaction Force, and the command is responsible for maintaining the skills acquired through the Active Shooter Response Course. NCISshows security department the ropes during active shooter response course

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Our role during COMPTUEX will be similar to previous underways, said Lt. j.g. Jared Good, a pilot in Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 9. We will continue to provide support for antiterrorism force protection, and such things as vertical replenishment and man-overboard drills. The Spartans of NAS Jacksonvillebased Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 70 operate the MH-60R anti-submarine Seahawk heli copter from onboard the Bush and her accompanying ships. CSG 2 is conducting its final predeployment evaluation to ensure safe and effective coordination with the strike group to achieve mission readi ness and the ability to work alongside international allies in the execution of the Navys maritime strategy. COMPTUEXincluded HSM-74 detachment 1. It was a busy time, yet our Gravely/Swamp Foxes team performed in an outstand ing manner, said Nadder. We also took part in exercises with Egyptian, French and British armed forces. The largest part of our squadron, embarked on USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), passed Gravely on their way to 5th Fleet in August. HSM-74 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Jim Miller flew over from Truman and gave a bravo-zulu to Det 1, said Nadder. Over all, we accomplished our mission with a great team of men and women. I couldnt ask for anything more as the officer in charge. HSM-74 Blue H Award. The command has also been recognized Navy wide for its development of an innovative exportable Trauma Nurse Training Course that enhanced trauma care capabilities for Navy nurses throughout the enterprise to serve in Iraq, Afghanistan, Germany, and the Horn ofAfrica. Navy Band Southeast and the Naval Hospital Jacksonville Honor Guard will support the Change of Command Ceremony. OHSU Jacksonville is the largest medical command within Navy Reserve Command Southeast, with 775 mem bers in 18 detachments over four states and Puerto Rico. Its Sailors provide essential medical and dental readi ness support for the more than 9,400 sailors and Marines assigned to Naval Operational Support Commands in the southeast region. OHSU Navy Wounded Warrior call center connects with service members The Navy Wounded Warrior (NWW) Safe Harbor call center which connects people to the catalog of services provided by the Navys sole wounded warrior support program received more than 1,100 calls throughout its first year of operation. Established at the start of Fiscal Year 2013, the call center is based in Millington, Tenn. Representatives field telephone inquiries 24 hours a day, every day of the year. It is the first call center dedicated exclusively to the Navys wounded warrior program. The call center is a critical benefit for the wounded warriors enrolled in our program, and for service members with health concerns who may need to be enrolled, said NWW Deputy Director Merissa Larson. It ensures that, regardless of the date or time of their calls, and regardless of the sta tus of their cases, wounded warriors can connect to a trained professional whenever they need assistance. NWW is a Fleet and Family Readiness program that has assist ed nearly 2,500 wounded warriors nationwide. NWW provides a life time of non-medical care to seriously wounded, ill and injured Sailors and Coast Guardsmen, guiding them through recovery, rehabilitation and reintegration. The NWW call center can be reached at 855-NAVP WWP (6289997). Sailors and Coast Guardsmen may self-refer to NWW, or be referred by a family member, their command leadership or their medical team. In addition to fielding inbound calls, the call center began in March making hundreds of outbound calls to NWW enrollees. Representatives provided wounded warriors critical information about the Servicemembers Group Life Insurance Disability Extension, adaptive athletics opportunities and transition services. The call center uses sophisticated technology a voice-over, cloud-based Internet phone system to ensure there are no service interruptions, said Brad Nelson, director of revenue at Immersion Hospitality, the firm that manages the call center. As a result, the call center can do things more cost-effectively, faster and with total redundancy. The call center is staffed by three HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act)-certified pro fessionals, who use customized intake forms to capture the details of every call. Additionally, the call center staff will soon receive in-depth training on various NWW programs and services to better equip them to answer any type of inquiry they may receive. Call volume continues to increase every month, and the call centers capabilities are expanding. We hope to continue to spread the word about the call center and encourage people to use it whenever a need may surface, added Nelson. November marks Warrior Care Month its a time to honor the service and sacrifices of seriously wounded, ill 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013 9 A team of volunteers from Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility (FACSFAC) Jacksonville assisted with the 10th annual American Cancer Society Making Strides Against Breast Cancer walk, Oct. 25-26. The event is a non-competitive, three to five mile event that is held along the beautiful Jacksonville Landing on the St. Johns River waterfront to support the fight to end breast cancer. The FACSFAC Jacksonville team, organized by AC2 Persephone Dechario, assisted with the event setup, registration, water stations and clean up. There were 345 teams consisting of 2,585 participants that helped raise more than $174,000. The efforts by those who donated their time and money helped bring a lifetime of change to those fighting breast cancer, as well as their families. Every Making Strides Against Breast Cancer event is an incredible and inspiring opportunity to unite as a community to honor breast cancer survivors and raise awareness about what we can do to reduce our breast cancer risk. Dechario was impressed and hum bled by the turnout, stating, I am extremely proud to be a part of todays event and am in awe of the participa tion. This is a great opportunity to help others. The donations will help the American Cancer Society withbreast cancer research, information and services, and access to mammograms for women who need them. Since 1993, more than nine million participants across the country have raised more than $528 million to help fight breast cancer. AC2 Jekia Dowdell said, Everybody Ive met today knows someone who has been affected by this horrible disease. Participating in this cause is our way of supporting the fight. As VP-5 continues its busy schedule operating and main taining the P8-A Poseidon, the squadron shines a spotlight on one outstanding Mad Fox each week. This weeks superior Sailor is YN2 Robert Atutubo. Born in San Diego, Atutubo joined the Navy and entered boot camp in August 2009. He went on to Yeoman A school in Meridian, Miss. His first operational com mand was the 31st Seabee Readiness Group, where he worked from January 2010 to March 2012. He transferred to NSA Bahrain for a 12-month tour, after which he joined VP-5 at NAS Jacksonville. As a Yeoman, Atutobo is tasked with administrative support for the squadron. Specifically, he is in charge of disseminating and maintain ing command instructions, evaluations, and fellow Mad Foxes personnel records. He also makes the reserva tions for all DTS travel within the command and makes sure every Mad Foxes travel experience while on orders is efficient and uneventful. The most challenging part of my job is managing com mand budgets for travel and the intricacies of the paper work. I want everyones travels to run smoothly because just one error can cause delays, explained YN2 Atutobo. When a fellow Mad Fox gets back from TAD orders and comes to me and says how smoothly his travel went, it confirms why I make sure every detail is correct. Atutubos current goal is to make E6 and his long-term goals are to make Chief and provide at least 20 years of naval service to his country. He also plans to start work on his bachelors degree and plans to major in Homeland Security. When he is away from the squadron he enjoys hiking at Little Talbot Island and taking his dog to the park. VP-5 is currently in the interdeployment readiness cycle aboard NAS Jacksonville. VP-5 Mad Fox of the Week YN2 Robert AtutuboFACSFAC Jax Making Strides Against Breast Cancer

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tary bases like NAS Jacksonville. In 1998, while serving in Japan, my CO asked me to put together a safety stand down. I didnt really know how to go about it, so I asked him if I could do something with magic or hypnosis. His only reply was, Dont get me in trouble. So I did it and it could have been better but the troops seemed to like it. Then I came back to CONUS and the chain of command asked if Id like to do safety as my primary responsibility and I said, Sure. Now, as a full-time stage hypnotist and magician, McDaniel books about a dozen safety presentations at military bases each year. He said, According to feedback from the troops, they like it because its more entertaining than the standard PowerPoint presentation or a highway patrol officer reciting statistics about DUIs and traffic deaths. When McDaniel called for volunteers who wanted to be hypnotized, dozens stormed the stage in Deweys big hall. He picked 19 enthusiastic Sailors and civilians. Hypnosis is a trance state characterized by extreme suggestibility, relaxation and heightened imagination. Its not really like sleep because the subject is alert the whole time. Whether youre a skeptic or a believer, hypnosis is an interesting phenomenon. According to the American Psychological Association, hypnosis has been used for centuries and a growing body of scien tific research supports its benefits in treating a range of conditions, including pain, depression, anxiety and phobias. McDaniel also pointed out that stage hypnotism is interactive, too, because people get to see their friends on stage and they talk about each scenario. The most touching was when a Sailor is told that his careless driving has killed a shipmate. After dealing with the grief-filled scenar io, McDaniel removed the memory of the suggested accident from the Sailor with a touch to his forehead. After McDaniels performance, Williamson reminded the audience about Club 2000. It works like this: If you find yourself impaired in a bar, club, lounge, restaurant or private residence within Baker, Clay, Duval, Nassau or St. Johns counties call the NAS Jacksonville OOD office at 542-2338. You will be provided a taxi ride, paid for by the station, to your residence within the five-county area. If you are in an on-base club and over imbibe, the club bartender can contact the OOD no questions asked. Pick up a wallet-size NAS Jax Club 2000 card from MWR, carry it with you and do not hesitate to use it, said Williamson. He added, There always seem to be more accidents in the holiday season than during the rest of the year. So this safety stand down is a good reminder for every one to be more vigilant to safety measures, not only on the roads, but also at home. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander stressed the importance of planning and the use of operational risk management (ORM) in all facets of life especially when vacationing. Before you travel, have a plan, think it through and consider all the problems that could possibly happen. Think about what could go wrong ahead of time and avoid hazards. Also, be able to identify new hazards as your plan changes or when new situations pop up, said Undersander. Ours is the finest shore installation in the Navy and Im proud to serve with you. This Thanksgiving, Ill be grate ful for the wonderful team we have at NAS Jax. Enjoy this special season, be safe and come back to continue the outstanding work that you provide for our base and our country. SAFETY 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013

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The Seabees of Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 202, Detail Jacksonville, are always improving facilities at NAS Jacksonville and recently completed a high-profile project of a unique nature. On the site of the former Atlantic Fleet Air Photographic Laboratory now sits a new gazebo recently constructed with a $250k budget. This proj ect was unique for the Seabees of CBMU 202, says Operations Chief UTC (SCW) Duane Jerry, because Seabees are used to doing construction, but this time we had a little bit of everything. We had landscaping, which is something we dont normally do, and we had to do a lot of cosmetic construction, meaning pavers and brickwork, more than general contract ing. So it was kind of a differ ent project for us. This fine detail provided quality training for the Seabees, who normally provide expeditionary con struction and engineering support to the Navy, Marine Corps, joint, and other operational forces. In addition to the gazebo, Seabees at NAS Jax recently completed three head facilities at the marina, PRT site, and golf course, and are working on a fourth at the antennae farm. These facilities are constructed in an environmentally friendly way, with solar panels on the roofs to provide electricity and skylights for illumination. Once the antennae farm head facility is complete, planned construction for a con tractor laydown lot will begin in December of 2013, paving the way for future construction and improvements to NAS Jax. This lot will provide a location for contractors working on onsite to have a base of operations while completing their work. Plans call for 16 spots to be available for contractors, and the lot will be similar to an RV park says Chief Jerry. Projects like these allow Seabees to maintain and improve their construction skills. We have seven rates, and all those rates can take an open area, we can all come together, and build a full 250man tent camp with nothing else, says Chief Jerry. These projects ashore, however, allow the 50 Seabees of CBMU 202 to develop new construction skills as well maintain their current skills. In addition to support ing NAFAC and public works, Were also the disaster recov ery unit, so in the case of a hurricane or anything that hits this area, this whole region south east, we deploy units to sup port this base and Mayport explained Chief Jerry. We have everything for disaster recovery. The Seabees were found ed March 5th, 1942 and have served in all major U.S. con flicts since World War II. Projects at Naval Station Mayport were recognized by the American Concrete Institute, Florida First Coast Chapter Nov. 14 in Jacksonville at the chapters 2013 annual awards banquet. The awards recognized constructions with a Significant Concrete Structure. Two of the seven projects receiving an award were Navy structures aboard Naval Station (NS) Mayport the Wharf Charlie (C-1) Improvements project and the Mayport Fitness Center were recognized. A Significant Concrete Structure is a concrete structure in which concrete is used in a unique or innovative way and/or concrete is used because of its advantages over other materials with consideration to aesthetics, durability, cost and scheduling flexibility. Wharf Charlie is a general purpose berthing wharf originally constructed in 1952. The berth is one of two primary deep draft berths at Mayport. When con struction began the existing bulkhead was 57 years old and exhibited signs of severe corrosion and partial failure. The Wharf is considered a Significant Concrete Structure because precast/prestressed marine con crete products and specifically designed marine and flowable grout mixes were used to enhance the durability of the concrete structure. The contractor developed a new marine mix designed to enhance the structures durability, increase its propensity to protect it from the severe environment, and overall sustainability. The mix design exceeded the compressive strength require ments while retaining a high resistance to chorlide ion penetration and possible subsequent steel corrosion. Having the opportunity to work on a unique, durable and lasting mission-related construction effort is rare, said NS Mayport Public Works Department Construction Engineering Technician Joann Mason of the Wharf Charlie construction team. I am honored to be a part the NAVFAC Southeast Mayport team as a contributing member on this his torical first a double deck wharf development. A first for the U.S. Navy, she continued. The NS Mayport Fitness Center included a 100,000-square-foot addition and renovation project that required the design and construction of a onestory indoor pool addition. The gym centralizes all desired fitness programs in one facility on base. It has 18,000 plus square-feet of weight training and cardio area, a cycling studio, two championship-sized basketball courts, two racquet ball courts, three group exercise rooms, a family fit ness room, and the 10 lane 50-meter indoor pool. The renovated facility also includes locker rooms, offices, a child care area and a sauna. A significant amount of concrete was used con structing the 50-meter indoor pool and renovating the now 100,000-square-foot facility, said Mason. The fitness center will support Navy training requirements and offer multiple opportunities for selfdirected and group led physical fitness options. The centers facility spaces were designed to serve multiple purposes, and include systems that extend the buildings service life far beyond traditional projects. The ACI asks for nominations each year to showcase the best projects that display concrete structures that are unique and innovative. Seabees improve facilities, pave way for future work Regional projects recognized by American Concrete Institute $15 per person ($20 after Dec. 27). Pick up your tickets starting Dec. 1st. Tickets include glow in the dark bowling, shoe rental, DJ with Karaoke & a midnight toast. Full lanes may be reserved by purchasing 6 tickets. NAS Freedom Lanes reserves the right to put up to 6 people on a lane. Call (904) 542-3493 for questions.Strike in the New Year at NAS Freedom Lanes Tuesday, Dec. 31, 7 pm 1 am JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013 11

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Holiday Giving Tree helps military families Children from the NAS Jax Child Development Center cheered in the holiday season as they gathered at the Navy Exchange (NEX) kick off the annual Giving Tree program Nov. 21. This is the seventh year, the NEX and USO have sponsored the tree which helps military families who may have some financial challenges during the holiday season. The event began as NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander welcomed the children and officially lit the tree which is on display at the NEX Courtyard through the holiday season. The group of preschoolers were then tasked with singing Jingle Bells and We Wish you a Merry Christmas as loud as they could to see if a special guest might hear their merriment from afar. As the children and a small group of parents and teachers sang, Santa arrived to greet the children for photos and to hear their holiday wishes. We love sponsoring this program in conjunction with our USO. They pro vide us with wish list items needed by children from local commands whose families might be a little financially challenged during the holidays. It will ensure that some of our military chil dren will have a Christmas that they otherwise probably wouldnt have, said NEX General Manager Marsha Brooks. While shopping at the NEX, custom ers can pick an ornament from the tree. Each ornament contains a small list and sizes of children needing clothing arti cles or toys this holiday season. Once the items are purchased, they can be taken to Personalized Services inside the NEX for wrapping and distribution to the families registered at the USO. The gifts need to be returned by Dec. 15 so they can be delivered in time to bring joy to a childs Christmas. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast active duty military visited local classrooms Nov. 12 and 13 as part of the City of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor. Naval Station (NS) Mayport Public Works Officer Cmdr. Phillip Lavallee spoke to 40 fourth-graders at Arlington Heights Elementary Nov. 12. I spoke to the kids about the history of Veterans Day and what Veterans Day means to me, said Lavallee. I also explained to them the reasons why I joined the Navy and the impor tance of learning, listening and staying out of trouble if they wanted to consider a career in the Navy when they grew up. Lavallee said the children asked more questions than he had time to answer. Overall it was a great experience and I think the kids enjoyed the discussion, he said. SWCS Jose Torres, NAVFAC Southeast senior enlisted advisor, spoke to about 50 fifth-grade students Nov. 12 at Ortega Museum Magnet Elementary School just north of NAS Jacksonville. The Week of Valor is always a great opportunity to get out and talk with children about what we do in the mili tary, said Torres. I really am honored that schools take time out of their busy curriculum to spend some time with Seabees, Sailors, Marines, Airman and Soldiers. It is exciting to know that the children are very interested in what we do for our nation. The kids were very engaged, said Torres. I could tell they were anxious to ask questions. They made me smile and realize that this is why we enjoy making sacrifices for them to be able to be kids and to get a great education. On Nov. 3, NS Mayport Commodity Manager Lt. j.g. Stephen Baker spoke to 150 seventh-grade children at Mayport Middle School. I started my comments by speaking about my background and career thus far and my experience at the U.S. Naval Academy, said Baker. I then fielded a lengthy series of questions about life on submarines and at the Naval Academy and finished with a discussion about what we do at NAVFAC. Baker enjoyed talking to the children about Veterans Day and being thankful for what others do for our freedoms. It was a really good experience, said Baker. The citywide Week of Valor celebra tion saluted the sacrifice and service of military service men and women. The list of educational, patriotic, community and civic events that took place during the week also included a Military Appreciation Luncheon, a Salute to Veterans 5K run, the annu al Veterans Day Parade, a Veterans Housing Convention, and a Jacksonville Jaguars game dedicated to honoring the military. Jacksonvilles goal for hosting the series of events for active duty, reserv ists and veterans, is to showcase Jacksonville as the most military friendly city in the country. NAVFAC Southeast military support Week of Valor with school visits JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013 13

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Childrens Holiday Bingo December 20 Doors open at 5 p.m., games begin at 6 p.m. $10 per childFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Youth Bowling League: Every Sat., 10:30 am noon $17 annually or $8 per week. Includes shoes, awards will be given at the end of the season! Rising Stars Youth League: Every Sat., 10:30 am 12:30 pm. Pee Wee Division (6 years & under) 2 games, $6 per week. Juniors Division (7 years & older) 3 games, $8 per week. Special Stars Bowling League for families with special needs children. All ages welcome! Ramps available for the non-ambulatory as well as bumpers for beginners. Runs for 10 weeks at a cost of $7 per week, shoes are included. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4 6 pm. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4 10 pm. Thursdays: Free bowling for Active Duty 11 am 1 pm. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4 6 pm, Party Extreme $10, 8 pm midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Oct. 19, 1 4 pm. $20 per person, registration begins at noon. *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise* Strike in the New Year at NAS Freedom Lanes December 31, 7 p.m. 1 a.m. $15 per personFitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6 8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Jingle Bell Jog 5K December 13 at 11:30 a.m. Perimeter Rd. / Antenna Farm Powerlifting Competition Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014 7 a.m. at the Fitness Center $10 registration feeI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil Waves of Honor Special: Seaworld Orlando Adult $46.50, Child $42.25. Busch Gardens Tampa Adult $45, Child $40.50. Monster Jam: Club seating (includes pit pass) $42, regular seating (includes pit pass) $22. Jacksonville Jaguars: Section 147 Bud Zone, $70. Jags shuttle bus $12. Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2013 2014 Season: Tickets now available! MOSH: $7 $12. The Artist Series Broadway in Jax 2013 2014 Season: Tickets available now! Celtic Thunder: Nov. 10, 2013, 7 pm, $80. Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus: Jan. 17 & 18, 2014, $51. War Horse: Feb. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $68.50. Memphis: Mar. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $65. Million Dollar Quartet: Apr. 26, 2014, 8 pm, $65. The D* Word: Oct. 4 Oct. 25, 2014, $43.75 $46. Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27,2014) 4 day Hopper ticket$166 4 day 1 park per day and water park ticket-$166 4 day Hopper and Water park combo ticket$194 Gatorbowl $35 Capital One Bowl $98 Russell Athletic Bowl $78 Soul Food Festival Special $20 General Admission $32 Preferred $42 VIP $65 Ringling Brothers Barnum & Bailey Circus $15 Veterans Memorial Arena January 17, 2013 (7:30pm) January 18, 2013 (11:30am) January 18, 2014 (7:30pm) January 19, 2014 (1:00pm) January 19, 2014 (5:00pm) Legoland Free admission for active duty at park Tickets for family members available at ITT ITT is now selling $18 tickets for the Harlem Globetrotters! The show is February 28, 7 pm at Veterans Memorial Arena.The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Mall & Movie Trip Nov. 30 at noon Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater Ice Skating Trip December 14 at 6 p.m. The Avenues Mall Shuttle December 17 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Dec. 3 & 17 for active duty Dec. 5 & 19 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Daily Twilight Golf Special Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1 p.m. Santa Sez Golf Scramble December 20 at 10 a.m. $40 military, $50 civilian guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m.Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Dashing Through the Grove Dec. 6, 4 8 p.m. Free snow sledding, tree lighting, photos with Santa and more! Movie Under the Stars featuring The Grinch Dec. 13, 6 p.m. Patriots GroveFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013

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For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil. In November and December, NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) is offering Suicide Prevention Awareness Training for base and tenant commands. Should your command be in need of this training, select a date and time that is convenient for your command and call 542-2776 to reserve seating, said FFSC Education and Training Coordinator Wilhelmina Nash. Attending this one-hour class could help you save someones life. Thank you for your concern and support. Dec. 2 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 3 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 4 8 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 5 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 10 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 11 1 & 3 p.m. Dec. 12 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 17 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 18 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 30 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 31 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Suicide prevention awareness training available through FFSC Sailors from Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville volunteered at the New Life Hope Christian Church, during an extensive renovation and restructuring project Nov. 6. Getting out and volunteering shows the community a positive side to the Navy, said YN2 Marquita Greene. I make an effort to volunteer for these types of projects as often as I can. NRD Jacksonville Sailors were tasked with disposal of discarded scaffolding, carpet and other items used during the remodel. According to PS1 Anthony Sonola, volunteerism is very worthwhile and is an important part of building positive relationships between the Navy and the local community. It is important for Sailors to be seen in the communities that we live in, said Sonola. Helping is a gratifying experience. According to YN1Willie Sheppard it is important to give back. I have always made it a point to volunteer for community service my entire career, said Sheppard. Both members of the New Life Christian Church and Sailors will continue to volunteer time to the continuing renovation project which will take several additional weeks to complete Community service projects allow Sailors to support the Jacksonville and say thanks to the community. I volunteer to show a sense of pride, said IC1Will Adkinson. New Life Christian Fellowship is 99,000 square foot facility with a 2,900 seat sanctuary and family life center that includes a full-size activity gym, youth pavilion, preschool nursery and Sunday school and Bible study rooms. Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville announced the selection of PS1 Anthony Sonola as the 2013 Sailor of the Year (SOY) Nov. 9. Sonola serves as the command career counselor for NRD Jacksonville and oversees the training and careers of more than 100 Sailors throughout the district. He also serves as the coordi nator for United Services Military Apprenticeship Program (USMAP) and command indoctrination coordinator. It is humbling to be selected for SOY, said Sonola. I was competing against so many other outstanding Sailors. Sonola credits excellent command leadership for both his professional growth and nomination to the SOY competition against other highly qualified Sailors. I was called on by the command to take over the career counseling pro gram, said Sonola. When the call comes you do it. According to Command Master Chief LaDon Washington, Sonola has dis played leadership and continues to display the key skill sets of a successful Sailor and role model. Petty Officer Sonola has exhibited deck-plate leadership, professionalism, and effective communication throughout his duties, said Washington. Ive liked being a career counsel or and personnelman because both jobs let me help Sailors, said Sonola. Command career counselor has been challenging but I look at it as a new opportunity to excel. He provides consistent valuable insight. His foresight has assisted a number of our Sailors in making career enhancing choices, Washington said. Sonola holds a bachelors degree in Real Estate management from Federal Polytechnic, Ilaro Ogun State, Nigeria and a masters degree in business administration from the University of Phoenix. Other SOY finalists were HM1 Tadrus, Navy Officer Recruiting Station Savannah; and SH1 Pierre Jean-Louis, Navy Recruiting Station Mayport. NRD Jacksonville has the mission of recruiting the best men and women for Americas Navy to accomplish todays missions and meet tomorrows chal lenges. The command philosophy is to pro vide strong integrity-based leadership, spirited teamwork and a commitment to excellence. Former Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Elmo Zumwalt and former Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy John Whittet established the SOY program in 1972 to recognize an individual Sailor who best represents the dedicated Sailors at each command and the entire US Navy. Within 10 years, the Sailor of the Year program was expanded to include the shore establishment and Navy Reserve Sailors. NRD Jacksonville recruiters build community relationships Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville announces Sailor of the Year and injured service members. To learn more about NWW or Warrior Care Month, call 855-NAVP WWP (628-9997), visit the Web site at http://safeharbor.navylive.dodlive.mil or email navywoundedwarrior@navy. mil. NWW JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013 17

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Change is an invariable attribute of life in the Navy, with milestones that are often marked by custom and tradition. On Nov. 20, one such milestone occurred in the career transition of Cmdr. Joseph Moorhouse, commanding officer, VP-30 Squadron Augment Unit, when he concluded his last flight as a Navy pilot before his change of com mand Nov. 23. Customary wetting down, with the aid of fire department emergency response vehicles, is currently restrict ed due to ongoing budget constraints. Nevertheless, a glimpse of the tra dition was upheld by Moorhouses daughter, Gracen and son, Jonah who were each armed with water guns. Moorhouse reciprocated by rendering precious career mementoes to his children. Moorhouse carried the same national ensign in his helmet bag from the time of he was first winged in July 1996 to his last flight as a reminder of the rea son he was flying, service to country. He surrendered the flag to Jonah at the conclusion of his last naval flight. He also gave Gracen the flight suit flag patch that he had worn since his ninth flight in the Navy during flight school. Moorhouses previous flag patch was lost when his flight suit was cut off at the hospital after bailing out of a T-34 on the eighth flight. Moorhouses parents, Joe and Jane Moorhouse were also present at the event. Delighted to witness their sons career milestone achievement, they took pride in his resilience after sus taining serious injuries in the T-34 bail out Feb. 14, 1995. Challenges and setbacks did not override determination to serve his country as a naval pilot. Moorhouse has accrued more than 4,000 hours of flying time on T-34, T-44, TC-12, and P-3 platforms. Moorhouse also gave his chil dren his dog tags, that were issued in flight school and a required item for every naval flight. The symbolism he expressed to his children was giving them something that was with him every time he was away and missing them. Earlier in the final flight, Moorhouse had the opportunity to conduct a touch and go on the runway of NAS Pensacola, Fla. which is where his naval pilot career commenced nearly 20 years ago. His wife, Faith is currently tak ing a career break from the Case Management Department at UF Health as she prepares to deliver their third child, Ava in December. Meanwhile, Moorhouse is preparing for non-fly ing Navy duty as an instructor for the Senior Officer Leadership Course at the Center for Personal and Professional Development Southeast at Navy Operational Support Center Atlanta. Moorhouse conducts last flight Your commissary is the place for holiday savings The holidays are right around the corner, and special in-store promo tions make the commis sary the place to go to save on holiday grocer ies, said the Defense Commissary Agencys director of sales. Weve got some great promotions lined up for the holiday season, said Randy Chandler, DeCA sales director. Customers will find great savings and quality products for their holiday entertainment and meal needs, thanks to our industry partners. They might even sneak a peek at a jolly old man in a red suit! Chandler also reminds patrons that the holiday season is a perfect opportunity to consider giv ing the gift of groceries through Commissary Gift Cards. Our gift cards are a quick and easy way to spread holiday cheer to military service members and their family mem bers around the world, he said. Anyone can purchase them online through www.commis saries.com, or at a com missary for authorized shoppers to use. Managers specials and power buys provide big savings every day dur ing the holiday season in commissaries worldwide. Overseas stores may have substitute events for cer tain promotional pro grams, and customers should check their local commissary for details on dates and times for their promotions. FIGHT deadly childhood diseases.St. Jude Childrens Research Hospitalstjude.org A CFC participant provided as a public service. 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013 Members of Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeasts Employee Benefits Association (EBA) have come up with a new way to say thank you to its employees this Thanksgiving deliver ing handmade gifts to its workforce Nov. 21 at NAS Jacksonville. Times are tough with a continuing resolution and budget constraints, said NAVFAC Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus. Our employee morale team continues to find ways to build morale among our workforce and foster teamwork. Each year we look at ways to raise money to hold our annual holiday luncheon to keep the cost to a minimum for our employees, said Joanne Bailey, EBA president and NAVFAC Southeast plan ner. This week we are delivering a sweet treat. A turkey made out of a sucker, a fall leaf, and a chocolate kiss for its face. The EBA members are very passionate about what they do to help build morale among the work force. Every year the team comes up with new and more creative ideas. This fundraiser was a huge success. The team delivered 1,300 thank yous that say, A heartfelt thanks to you, for all that you do. We are thrilled to see how many employees really enjoy what we do, said Bailey. It is so exciting to see the look on someones face when we deliver a surprise to them. It really does put a smile on every ones face. NAVFAC Southeast employees work in five different buildings at NAS Jacksonville supporting Navy Region Southeast, along with others located on installations through out the southeast. This thank you came just in time for Thanksgiving, and well deserved to a team that has accomplished so much already this year, said Kiwus. As part of the Florida governments Cabinet Meeting Nov. 19 in Tallahassee, Fla., Gov. Rick Scott honored five edu cators certified through the Troops to Teachers Program with the Governors Shine Award for exemplary service to their country and contributions to Floridas students. Kim Stefansson, a Navy veteran and currently history teacher at Bellview Middle School was asked to address the cabinet meeting and represent the vet erans. Both the military and education career fields call for flexibility and those who are not easily deterred, said Stefansson. Both careers call for service 24/7 whether you are standing watch or spending your weekends grading papers, and both jobs ask our families to be supportive when we need extra time to do our jobs. The Governors Shine Award is pre sented to Floridians who have positively impacted children through education. It is an honor to thank these teachers who went from serving their country to serving Florida students in the class room, said Scott. A great education system is key to creating a highly-skilled workforce and driving our economy forward. These teachers have gone above and beyond the call of duty by preparing our stu dents today for the jobs of tomorrow and I thank for their continued service to Florida families. David Silverman, a veteran of both the Marine Corps and Florida Army National Guard, is now teaching adults at the Clay County Center for Adult & Community education in Orange Park. He said that like many of the jobs he held in the military, teaching adults is enjoyable. Teaching adults in many respects is easier than teaching kids they want to be here and really care about getting an education; they need to get their diploma or GED to get or keep a job, so they are definitely motivated with a positive attitude. William McAleer, Chief of the Troops to Teachers Program for the Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support in Pensacola, Fla. said that teaching is an outstanding fit for many veterans. Every service member was training their replacement while on active duty, said McAleer. They bring real-life experiences into the classroom and add perspective to subjects. Florida is one of the leaders in hiring veterans through the Troops to Teachers Program and in the past three years has helped 393 veterans obtain positions in Floridas schools. Its gratifying to see that Governor Scott is recognizing the service, hard work and contributions that veterans bring to education. The other Florida Troops to Teachers veterans honored with Shine Awards at the cabinet meeting were: Kenneth McAllister, Air Force veteran now teaching at Clay High School in Green Cove Springs; Jacqueline Williams, Navy veteran now teaching at A. Phillip Randolph High School Academies of Technology in Jacksonville; and Glenn Meyer, an Air Force veteran and 5th grade teacher at Navy Point Elementary in Pensacola. NAVFAC Southeast employees find creative ways to say thanks Gov. Rick Scott honors Troops to Teachers veterans in Tallahassee Commissary CEO shares sequestration consequences Offering a glimpse at what commissary and mili tary exchange services could become in light of smaller and unpredictable budgets, the Defense Commissary Agency director and CEO described to Congress yesterday the consequences sequestra tion and the government shutdown have already imposed. Customers packed commissaries Oct. 1, the first day of the government shutdown, Joseph Jeu told the House Armed Service Committees Military Personnel Subcommittee. Not knowing what was ahead, shoppers stocked up on food and supplies, racking up twice the typical days sales, at $30.5 million. That was our highest sale day ever, Jeu told the House panel. But as the furlough dragged on, its effects increasingly became evident. The department-wide hiring freeze had already put a dent in the customer service that been the pride of the Defense Commissary Agency. Because turnover tends to be high among the commissaries lower-grade employees, manning levels quickly dropped, Jeu explained. Two-thirds of all commissaries fell below the manning levels required to run the stores effectively. Even when DoD gave some relief and authorized personnel hiring, the results came slowly due to time lags in employee vetting. Exacerbating the situation, civilian furloughs forced most commissaries to close one day a week for six weeks. Customer complaints rose by over 50 percent and hit an all-time high during the furlough, Jeu reported. While our employees struggled to provide our goal of excellent customer service, they could not always overcome the challenges. Customers were often confronted with long checkout lines, closed registers and empty shelves, he said. Sometimes waits for checkouts dragged on for 20 to 30 minutes. Meanwhile, sales figures that had been on an upward trajectory dropped. Commissaries experi enced a sales loss totally over $99 million driven by sequestration closures in fiscal year 2013 and government shutdown closures in October of fiscal year 2014, Jeu reported. Distributors who supply the commissaries felt the impact, too, he said. They faced sporadic delays in offloading their deliveries, and orders were frequently held up or delayed. In some cases, the wrong products were shipped, damages werent processed in a timely manner, and orders were delayed due to closures that made scheduling a logistical nightmare. All this followed what Jue told the congressional panel had been an impressive year in fiscal 2012, before sequestration. Sales were up, topping the $6 billion level for the first time since 1992, he reported. The cost of delivering commissary services came in under budget. Customer satisfaction surveys that were indepen dently verified ranked commissaries above all but one commercial grocery chain. The commissary continues to be one of the most valued non-pay compensation benefits our mili tary members, past and present, and their families enjoy, Jeu said. Calling the commissary benefit an integral ele ment of the total compensation package, he said it saves patrons about 30 percent compared to com mercial supermarkets. That equates to about $1,500 a year for a single service member who consistently uses the commissary and as much as $4,500 for an average family of four, he said. This quality-of-life enhancement comes at a rate of $2 in patron savings for every taxpayer dollar invested, Jue reported. However, this two-for-one return on investment is insufficient to shield the commissary from scrutiny as it faces the same fiscal challenges as other government agencies, he lamented. Jue noted the Defense Commissary Agencys proven history of taking cost out of the system, and progress in reducing operating costs and overhead and introducing efficiencies and innovation. Warehouses and associated inventory has been eliminated, manpower has been reduced, account ing functions have been centralized and automated and headquarters and regional offices consolidated. Over the past 20 years, we have picked the longhanging fruit by seeking innovative initiatives to achieve operating efficiencies, and through good stewardship of taxpayer dollars, we made the commissary system significantly less costly to operate, Jeu said. With this history, any further reduction resulting from sequestration will diminish the commissary benefit, he continued. Even with commissaries to receive full funding in the proposed fiscal 2014 budget, Jeu warned that the impact of sequestration is likely to be considerable as the department establishes priorities and bal ances resources. Even with the budget uncertainty due to sequestration, as we move into this net era, the [Defense Commissary Agency] is excited about its ongoing initiatives to seek innovative and efficient methods of benefit delivery, he said. Jue testified yesterday with other senior defense officials who urged Congress to preserve military exchange and commissary services they call key to the morale and quality of life of service members and their families. Joining him in the House chamber were Rosemary Williams, deputy assistant secretary of defense for Military Community and Family Policy; retired Navy Rear Adm. Robert Bianchi, CEO of Navy Exchange Service Command; Thomas Shull, director and CEO of the Army and Air Force Exchange Service; William Dillon, director of the Marine Corps Semper Fit and Exchange Services; Thomas Gordy, presi dent of the Armed Forces Marketing Council; and Patrick Nixon, president of the American Logistics Association.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013 21 Over the static of crackling radios and phone lines, a lit tle-known group of dedicat ed Native American warriors joined the call to arms in both world wars with what would prove to be among the United States most powerful weapons: language. Known as Code Talkers, Native Americans learned early on the advantages of their tribal tongues, using indecipher able messages to confuse the enemy and bring combat vic tory to the United States. The code talker mission remained classified for decades after World War II. In observance of National Native American Heritage Month, the collabora tion between the Defense Departments Office of Diversity Management and Equal Opportunity and the Smithsonian Institution recently brought Native Words, Native Warriors to the Pentagon for a two-day exhibit. Developed by the Smithsonians National Museum of the American Indian and the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, the 15-panel display includes writing, images and videos depicting battlefield experiences and telling the remarkable story of a dozen tribes who offered their lan guage in support of the U.S. military. The displays really tell the personal contribution that each of the Code Talkers made with each other as a team, said Keevin Lewis, National Museum of the American Indian outreach coordinator. Navajo Code Talkers ... cre ated a code that was within the Navajo language -so even another Navajo speaker would not be able to determine what was being talked about, Lewis said. Others tribes, he said, also coded their languages, and others used original form, though typically most languages were not written. Lewis said the U.S. government surprisingly soon recognized many native lan guages, despite the fact that in reservation boarding schools, many Native American chil dren were instead encouraged to speak English. Its strange, but growing up as a child, I was forbidden to speak my native language at school, said Charles Chibitty, a Comanche Code Talker with the U.S. Army. Later, my country asked me to. My language helped win the war, and that makes me very proud very proud. According to the Smithsonians website, although the United States did not consid er American Indians citizens until as late as 1924, the mili tary first enlisted American Indians to relay messages in their native languages during World War I. The Navajo lan guage, among other Native American tongues, became formalized and recognized as a program which expanded dur ing World War II. Soldiers from the Comanche, Meskwaki, Sioux, Crow, Hopi and Cree nations, among oth ers, took part in the effort, said Lewis, adding that out of more than 500 tribes, each with dis tinct languages, about 200 to 250 dialects remain in use today. One display video depicts the Marines, who used Navajo language to create their code in 1942. As noted in the nar ration, the encoded messages proved to be a fast, accurate and indecipherable-to-the-ene my alternative, which suited the demands of the battlefield better than the painfully slow military devices that had been standard. The National Museum of the American Indian is one of 18 museums within the Smithsonian Institution and has affiliate locations at the Cultural Resources Center in Suitland, Md., the National Museum on the mall in Washington, D.C., and in the lower Manhattan region of New York. To have the Smithsonian recognize this accomplishment is remarkable, Lewis said. Native American code talkers who transmitted codes based on 33 tribal dialects during World Wars I and II so enemies could not decipher them were patriots with unique capabilities and willingness to give their talents and lives to the nation, the vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said today at a Congressional Gold Medal ceremony to honor them. Navy Adm. James Winnefeld Jr., joined in the U.S. Capitols Emancipation Hall by House and Senate leaders and other officials, recognized 216 code talkers and members of their families from those wars with the highest honor Congress can bestow. Winnefeld said, During Native American Heritage Month, I have the great privilege of representing the finest military in the world in recognizing hundreds of Native Americans who wore the cloth of our nation in the distinctive way we celebrate today, and in such a coura geous way, defending a country that did not always keep its word to their ances tors. Conceived in 1918, the code talker program eventually comprised more than 400 Native Americans who volunteered to defend the nation, the vice chairman said. The role of the code talkers during the two world wars was kept a secret until 1968, officials said. Throughout history, military leaders have sought the perfect code signals the enemy cannot break, no matter how able the intelligence team, the vice chairman said. It was our code talkers who created voice codes that defied decoding. Winnefeld said the codes were doubly clever by using words that were confusing to the enemy, such as crazy white man for Adolf Hitler and tortoise for tank. Our code talkers role in combat required intelligence, adaptability, grace under pressure, and bravery key attri butes handed down by their ancestors, the admiral said. Winnefeld said the code talkers endured some of the nations most dan gerous battles and served proudly dur ing critical combat operations, such as the Choctaws at the Meuse-Argonne, Comanches on Utah Beach on D-Day, Hopis in the Caroline Islands and the Cherokees at the Second Battle of the Somme. These men were integral mem bers of their teams -the 36th Infantry Division, the 4th Signals Company, the 81st Infantry Division, the 30th Infantry Division -learning Morse code and operating equipment to transmit mes sages quickly and accurately, he added. Contributing even more than battle skills, the code talkers also fundamen tally contributed to our military intelli gence communitys work in cryptology, Winnefeld said. The National Security Agency Museum highlights the code talkers of World War I and World War II as pioneers of this specialty, he added. The code talkers are a national resource, a wellspring of intelligence, innovation, hard work and resilience, the vice chairman said. We can best honor these great warriors among us not just with welldeserved and long overdue recognition, the vice chairman said, but also with our own efforts to continue leverag ing our nations diversity and to forever honor our veterans.Native American Code Talkers get Congressional Gold MedalWord Power: How Native American code talkers helped win wars

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013 HSM COC NCIS NEX GIV ING TR EE Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 2 departed Norfolk Nov. 20 to begin Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) a series of training exercis es designed to certify that the carrier strike group is deploy ment-ready by testing its abil ity to react to real-world sce narios and perform as an inte gral unit. Commander, Strike Force T0raining Atlantic (CSFTL) is evaluating CSG2 on how well they perform during simu lated surface and sub-surface threats and ship movements such as transiting a strait in hostile waters. CSFTL will evaluate our ability to perform all the dif ferent mission sets, said Cmdr. Andrew Walton, the operations officer of USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). This includes everything from counter-pira cy to maritime interdiction operations and strike warfare. Throughout COMPTUEX, fictitious geopolitical scenarios are used to replicate real-world circumstances that could be encountered during deploy ment. We immerse ourselves in this synthetic world from the second we pull lines over and get underway, said Cmdr. Walton. This acts as a rep resentation of what well see throughout our deployment such as failed states, acts of piracy, and counter-terrorism operations. We expect that throughout the event, there will be airborne, surface and even sub-surface forces out there that will be testing us. CSG 2 combines George H.W. Bush, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8, and Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 22 during the exer cise. All ships and their crews and the embarked air wing will play active roles. Safety stand down at Deweys It was standing room only at Deweys All-Hands Club when hun dreds of Sailors and civilian employees from Commander, Navy Region Southeast and NAS Jacksonville attended the holiday safety stand down Nov. 20. Ron Williamson, NAS Jax safety officer, welcomed the gathering. You know why were here today to remind you to make smart deci sions that will keep you and your family safe and sound over the holi day season, he said. After reciting some Navy Region Southeast accident statistics, Williamson introduced the guest speaker, stage hypnotist Bryan McDaniel. Thank you for inviting me here today. As a retired Marine Corps master sergeant, I have a special affinity for safety meetings on mili A two-helicopter detachment from the HSM74 Swamp Foxes returned to NAS Jacksonville Nov. 18, completing a 10-month independent deployment on board USS Gravely (DDG 107), an Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroy er. Officer in Charge Lt. Cmdr. John Nadder said the MH-60R Seahawk detachment consisted of six pilots, four aircrewmen and 16 maintainers. AEC Paul Champagne and AM1 Andrew Smith ran an outstanding shop. There wasnt any significant down time even when things got really busy. Our people kept all the maintenance straight and kept the aircraft running so well that mission readiness was never a con cern, said Nadder. Gravely, which joined the fleet in 2010, was mentioned in August news reports when the ship was ordered to patrol the eastern Mediterranean Sea in response to rising rumors of an imminent U.S. military intervention in the Syrian civil war. The most memorable part of the deploy ment had to be the Syrian issue. Our destroyer was mentioned in the news quite a bit which The VP-8 Fighting Tigers depart NAS Jacksonville at the end of November for a dualsite, seven-month deployment to Bahrain and El Salvador. VP-8 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Todd Libby stated, through a focus on pride, peo ple, and professionalism, all 350 Fighting Tigers are ready to deploy in what is scheduled to be our last P-3C Orion deploy ment prior to transitioning to the P-8 Poseidon. The squadrons mission will focus on maritime surveillance and reconnaissance. VP-8 will relieve the Screaming Eagles of VP-1 in Bahrain and the Golden Swordsmen of VP-47 in El Salvador. Cmdr. Derek Adametz, VP-8s executive officer commented,VP-8 Fighting Tigers continue to set the stan dard for maritime patrol avia tion. They are both ready and excited to deploy. Prior to deployment, VP-8s inter-deployment readiness cycle consisted of support ing carrier strike group exer cises, anti-submarine warfare training, individual and com mand qualifications and cer tifications. These included: operational readiness evalua tion, Fleet Naval Air Training and Operating Procedures Standardization evaluations, weapons inspections, overseas deployment training require ments, and Middle-East/ Central America cultural train ing. I am incredibly proud of all that the Fighting Tigers have accomplished during the past 12 months, from support ing the fleet to supporting the community. The men and women of VP-8 have made a positive difference said Libby. VP-8 Fighting Tigers begin dual-site deployment Bush strike group begins COMPTUEX Welcome home HSM-74 Det. 1

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Nov. 28 1775 Congress adopts first rules for regulation of the Navy of the United Colonies. 1941 USS Enterprise (CV6) sails from Pearl Harbor for Wake Island to ferry Marine Corps aircraft to island. 1942 Ensigns George Carlson and Mac Cason orga nize rescue parties to help res cue people from the fire at the Cocoanut Grove nightclub in Boston, Mass. They are cred ited for saving more lives than any other single agency. Nov. 29 1775 Capt. John Manley in schooner Lee captures British ordnance ship Nancy with large quantity of munitions. 1890 First Army-Navy foot ball game (Navy won 24-0). 1929 Cmdr. Richard Byrd makes first flight over South Pole. 1944 USS Archerfish (SS311) sinks Japanese carrier Shinano, the worlds largest warship sunk by any subma rine during World War II. Nov. 30 1942 In Battle of Tassafaronga, th last major naval action in Solomon Islands, U.S. forces prevent Japanese attempt to reprovi sion the Japanese troops on Guadalcanal. Six U.S. ships were damaged in the action. Dec. 1 1842 Execution of three crewmembers of USS Somers for mutiny; Midshipman Philip Spencer, Boatswain Samuel Cromwell and Seaman Elisha Small. 1921 In first flight of a Navy airship filled with helium, Blimp C-7 piloted by Lt. Cmdr. Ralph Wood left Norfolk, Va. for Washington, D.C. 1959 Bureau of Ordnance (BUORD) merges with Bureau of Aeronautics (BUAER) to form the Bureau of Naval Weapons (BUWEPS). Dec. 2 1775 Congress orders first officers commissions printed. 1908 Rear Adm. William Cowles submits report, pre pared by Lt. George Sweet, recommending purchase of aircraft suitable for operating from naval ships on scouting and observation missions to Secretary of the Navy. 1941 First Naval Armed Guard detachment (seven men under a coxswain) of World War II reports to Liberty ship, SS Dunboyne. 1944 Two-day destroyer Battle of Ormoc Bay begins. 1965 USS Enterprise (CVAN-65) and USS Bainbridge (DLGN-25) become first nucle ar-powered task unit used in combat operations with launch of air strikes near Bien Hoa, Vietnam. Dec. 3 1775 Lt. John Paul Jones raises the Grand Union flag on USS Alfred. It was the First American flag raised over American naval vessel. 1940 President Franklin Roosevelt embarks on cruis er USS Tuscaloosa (CA-37) to inspect bases acquired from Great Britain under Destroyerfor Bases agreement. 1983 Two F-14 Tomcats fly ing over Lebanon were fired upon. Dec. 4 1918 President Woodrow Wilson sails in USS George Washington for Paris Peace Conference. 1943 Aircraft from USS Lexington (CV-16) and USS Independence (CVL-22) attack Kwajalein Atoll, sinking four Japanese ships and damag ing five others. Only three U.S. ships suffered damage. 1944 USS Flasher (SS249) sinks Japanese destroyer Kishinami and damages a mer chant ship in South China Sea. Flasher is only U.S. submarine to sink more than 100,000 tons of enemy shipping in World War II. 1965 Launch of Gemini 7 piloted by Cmdr. James Lovell. This flight consisted of 206 orbits at an altitude of 327 km, lasting 13 days and 18 hours. Recovery by HS-11 helicopters from USS Wasp (CVS-18). 1983 Aircraft from USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) and USS Independence (CV-62) launch strike against anti-aircraft positions in Lebanon that fired on U.S. aircraft. Two U.S. Navy planes shot down. People sometimes wonder if I love or hate being a military dependent. Its a good question, and one Ive asked myself. Ive been known to write about things that drive me crazy about military life: deployments, fre quent moves, seabags full of clothes that are shipgrey and smell like JP-5 (jet fuel). Ive also been known to write about things I love about military life: most notably, the culture, unique experiences and relationships with other military families. If Facebook had a status update option for users feelings about the military, mine would be, Its complicated. To be fair, I dont know what its like for people who arent military dependents. Ive been one since the day I was born. In fact, there only have been six weeks, between my college graduation and wedding, when I didnt have a military iden tification card. During those six weeks, I broke my right leg. So thats what I think about not being in the military: I break things, and I dont have insur ance. I often view the military as a parent. Ive gone through cyclical, childlike feelings about it, and while I can criticize and complain about Uncle Sam, my heart hurts when anyone else does (Hey, thats MY uncle youre talking about!). My dad was an F-14 pilot. His office was located on an aircraft carrier or above a hangar. Until I was about 13 years old, when I saw a documentary about aircraft carriers on television, I didnt realize this was unusual to those outside of the military. Going to see my dad on the ship was, from what I can tell, like a civilian child going to see her dad in an office building. The distinct odor of steel mixed with JP-5 is as familiar to me as the antiques smell of the house I grew up in. When I smell anything vaguely similar like the greasy handrails of old stairwells it stops me in my tracks. I remember going to see my dad on the aircraft carrier before ships were made to accommodate women. There werent any female restrooms. For some reason, that always made an impression on me. I sat on Dads small bed and usually complained of needing to use the bathroom (of course!) while I watched mom put his clothes away in metal draw ers. If I gave Dad a picture to take on deployment, it had to be secured to his desk or wall so that it wouldnt slide. I didnt second-guess any of this. It was just the way it was. Then came what well call my teen years with the military. Only, I wasnt a teen. I was in my 20s and married to Dustin, another military pilot. By then, I could easily list all the ways in which the military was dumb. Not having female restrooms on the aircraft car rier? Dumb. Asking families for their top choice for a duty station and then sending them else where? Dumb. Using taxpayer dollars to move a family back and forth across the country when their top choice wouldnt have required transfer ring? Dumb, dumb, dumb. By this point, the military was something I couldnt wait to put behind me. It was wasteful, demanding, annoying, and so 1980s. If the mili tary were a person, Id scream that I hated it. Then Id cry, You dont care about me at all, do you? and slam my door. I begged Dustin to get out when his commitment was up. Thirteen years later, were still in the military and nearing Dustins 20-year mark. There will always be things I dont understand or like about the military (Detailers really are blindfolded when they throw darts at a map, arent they?), but, wow, the military somehow, magically even, became smarter and less annoying now that Im not in those teen years with it anymore. I watched my human parents go through a simi lar process: they were everything, then they got all weird, and then, when I turned 25, suddenly they were super smart again! Funny how those things happen, huh? Just the other day, as I drove past the airport, a Navy P-3 was about to takeoff. I actually pulled off the side of the road and watched from my car. I was surprised when I got a little teary. The aircraft seemed old, but it was familiar and looked like home to me. Its complicated. My feelings about the military, much like my feelings about my parents, cant be teased out. Theyre all mixed up in my childhood, who I am, and how I view the world. At times the military has disappointed me, infuriated me, and gotten in my way. But it has always been there. Always. So, as this is the week of giving thanks, it seems appropriate to take time to acknowledge the mili tary for raising me, shaping me, and, ultimately, always providing for me and my family. Yes, I get mad, but dear military, when youre not looking, I smile and whisper, thank you. My feelings about Uncle Sam . its complicated Notice of upcoming NAS Jax power outageNAS Jacksonville Public Works Department periodi cally schedules power outages in order to safely per form required maintenance in the high voltage substa tion serving family housing and the Naval Hospital Jacksonville campus. The next scheduled power outage is Dec. 7, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Your understanding of the necessity for these power outages is sincerely appreciated because the required maintenance will greatly improve the reliability of the substation equipment and the installations overall elec trical distribution system. Outages are scheduled in order to minimize the impact they will have on opera tions and the daily lives of our family housing residents. Single Navy mothers needed for research study If you are a single Navy mothers who have been on deployment and have completed an entire deployment cycle your participation is needed for a research study to determine what is the emotional re-adjustment of com ing home and reentering post deployment life after being deployed. A doctoral psychology student at Capella University wishes to ask you a few questions about your experience on deployment. Your participation should take about one hour. You must have completed a deployment within the past 12 months and be at least 18 years old. All par ticipants will receive a $10 Starbuck gift card. To learn more, contact Juanita Bruno-Jacob at (703) 618-9668 or email jbrunojacob2@capellaunivesity.edu. This research is conducted under the direction of Dr. Eleni Pinnow and has been reviewed and approved by the Capella University Institutional Review Board.

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Cmdr. George Austin assumed com mand of Helicopter Maritime Strike Weapons School Atlantic (HSMWSL) Nov. 22, relieving Cmdr. Raymond Marsh III during a change of com mand ceremony held at Naval Station Mayport. The HSM Weapons School serves as the Atlantic Fleets center of tactical excellence for training and evaluation of maritime strike combat helicopter aircrews. The command is responsi ble for ensuring that todays Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing, Atlantic squad rons and detachments deploy with the most comprehensive and up to date training available. Additionally, the Weapons School is charged with pro gressing and ensuring the future com bat success of all East Coast Helicopter Maritime Strike aircraft. During his 15-month tour as com manding officer, Marsh made immedi ate and enduring readiness improve ments for deploying combat aircrews. His direction and leadership pushed the Weapons Schools personnel to grow and excel professionally. He focused their talents and expertise to provide unprecedented levels of train ing and support for fleet operators. His next assignment will be as the Air Operations Officer onboard the USS Iwo Jima (LHD-7), home-ported in Norfolk, Va. A native of West Deptford, N.J., Austin enlisted in the Navy in January 1990 and served as a machinist mate (nuclear) until his selection to the United States Naval Academy. He grad uated from the Naval Academy with a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering and received his commis sion in 1996. He also holds a Masters Degree in Aeronautical Engineering from the Naval Postgraduate School and a Developmental Test Pilot designa tion. He brings extensive fleet experi ence from flying tours on the East and West Coast, he has completed multiple Western Pacific and 5th Fleet deploy ments, MH-60R and MH-60S Seahawk Helicopter developmental testing and evaluation, as well as an Individual Augmentee tour with Task Force Raptor in Baghdad, Iraq supporting a Special Forces team. He also brings overseas staff experience from a tour at European Command Headquarters in Stuttgart, Germany. Helicopter Maritime Strike Weapons School, Atlantic holds change of command JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013 3

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Operational Health Support Unit (OHSU) Jacksonville, the Reserve Unit of Naval Hospital Jacksonville, will hold a Change of Command Ceremony Dec. 8 at 10 a.m. Capt. Lee Kiolbasa, a healthcare administrator who currently serves as the executive officer of OHSU San Diego, will assume command of the OHSU Jacksonville Unit from Capt. Kenneth LaPolla, a general dentist from Ohio, who will trans fer to OHSU Camp Lejuene. Capt. Gayle Shaffer, command ing officer of Naval Hospital Jacksonville, will be the guest speaker for the ceremony. Kiolbasa comes to OHSU Jacksonville with a wealth of expe rience within Navy Medicine to include tours at Navy military treatment facilities, operation al commands with the Marines, mobilizations to Germany and Afghanistan and several executive leadership positions.He attend ed the University of Nebraska in Lincoln, where he received a bachelor of science and a masters degree in business administration. During LaPollastwo-year com mand tenure, OHSU Jacksonville provided more than 220,000 hours of direct operational medical & dental care in the form of annual training to Navy active duty com mands and missions throughout the world, including deployments of many members to Landstuhl Regional Medical Centerand Afghanistan. Under LaPollas lead ership, every one of the commands 18 detachments was awarded the Navy Surgeon Generals coveted The NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville (FLCJ) Detachment Southeast Regional Maintenance Center (SERMC) Mayport team recent ly conducted a continuous process improvement project focused on cap turing warehouse material storage capacity. The NAVSUP FLCJ team is a cross functional cadre of experts embedded at SERMC that directly supports the warfighter and the fleet by providing all aspects of integrated logistics ser vices to support mission related opera tions and functions for Naval Station Mayport-based Navy vessels, as well as numerous visiting ships. One of the major logistics services that the team provides is the receipt, inspection, and accommodation stor age of government furnished materi al, contractor furnished material, and sponsor owned material (SOM) at the detachments warehouse site before turnover to the alteration installa tion team, or to the waterfront opera tions maintenance team. Ultimately, the material stored in the sites ware house is transferred and used to accomplish repairs and moderniza tion for ships scheduled dry-docking selected Rrestricted availability, select ed restricted availability, continuous maintenance availability, and emergent work performed during an unscheduled window of opportunity. With the recent changing of the patrol craft, USS Shamal (PC 13), USS Zepher (PC 8), and USS Tornado (PC14) homeports to NS Mayport, determining warehousing space availability became a primary focal point for the SERMC team. Furthermore, with future Navy plans including the homeport change for an Amphibious Ready Group (ARG), the USS New York (LPD 21) arriving in Dec., and the USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43) and the USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) in 2014, the team questioned whether or not there was adequate available space to accommodate additional material storage required to support the increase in ship repair and modification sched ules. Geared to provide superior cus tomer support, the SERMC team pro actively enlisted the help of NAVSUP CPI Blackbelt, Ricky Toups, to jumpstart the CPI project designed to capture the current warehousing operational foot print. From the initial onset of the proj ect, the team was faced with some dis tinctive challenges including resource restraints and an austere fiscal environ ment. To help alleviate resource chal lenges, the team developed a detailed plan of action which called for FLCJ personnel, SERMC resources, along with the assistance of Navy drilling reservists. Our team was able to make nec essary staffing adjustments required for the project, by bringing in Naval Reserve sailors to assist with con ducting some of the work-heavy tasks including a detailed wall to wall inven tory, said FLCJ Detachment Site Director Lt. Cmdr. Paul Havens. With the help of the Navy reservists, the team was able to successfully con duct an in-depth analysis which estab lished a baseline inventory, helped identify areas for process improvement as well as opportunities to reconcile discrepancies caused due to vary ing record keeping methodologies. Furthermore, as part of the projects Measure phase, the team was able to capture other critical statistics includ ing the current quantity and length of time that parts were being stored at the customers request. These results included the capturing of an average GFM stock turn rate of approximately 4.21 years, with SOM stock turn rates averaging approximately 1.33 years over the 24 month threshold. During the analyze phase of the project, final inventory numbers showed that of the 1,127 fixed storage locations; approxi mately 532 or 45 percent of the loca tions were empty, thus proving ware housing capacity to be adequate for any increased ship repair and modification workload. In order to enhance customer sup port and to help eliminate future inven tory discrepancies and inconsistencies, the team was also able to successfully establish clear business rules for all receipted material. Furthermore, the team developed a Microsoft Access database tool that allows for increased material visibility, as well as quick and accurate identification of storage capacity. Both of the above solutions were identified during a brainstorming session of the process Improvement phase of the project. The database tool that the team developed has many benefits that can help influence customer decisions regarding disposition of material with above average stock turn rates, said Havens. Furthermore, to help expedite and plan for ship repairs, SERMC personnel including planners and managers were granted access to the database tool, which will also allow the reallocation of material not being used for future ship repairs, thus, leading to future cost avoidance due to being able to manage on-hand material. With regards to the success of the CPI project, Havens commented, The con duction of the wall to wall inventory and the creation of the Access database helped to provide increased visibility of end-use assets. It also allowed us to drive enhancements and efficiencies in our warehousing processes as well as the opportunity to further enhance our commitment to providing world class support to the fleet, while being the best possible stewards of NAVSEA owned parts, and taxpayer money. NAVSUP FLCJ captures warehouse efficiencies through CPI Project Operational Health Support Unit Jacksonville change of command JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013 Four Physical Security Specialists from the Navy Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) spent a week at NAS Jacksonville teaching secu rity personnel from both NAS Jacksonville and NSB Kings Bay the Active Shooter Response Course. From Nov. 18-22, Rick McNeely, Robert Harmon, Lt. David Highsmith, and Chief James Fuller taught the 40-hour course covering the four stages of response to an active shooter situation. After receiving classroom instruction, security person nel then practiced their new knowledge in order to improve their law enforcement skills. The ultimate evaluation was an active shooter simulation in an abandoned building on base using airsoft weapons and actors simulating bad guys, victims and innocent person nel. The first day consisted of classroom instruction in improvised explosives, the components of rapid response, apprehension, communication, and weapons fundamentals. The second day continued the classroom instruction of the first, with discussions of weapons handling and medi cal first aid specific to active shooter situations. Hands-on practice began this day as well, with students practicing the application of tourniquets on each other, as well as beginning outside group drills. These drills allow for instructors to teach basic skills in a group setting. Wednesday and Thursday the students began advanced practical drills, working through cones set up with police tape to simulate the hallways and rooms of an actu al building while still allow ing for instructors to maintain awareness of the entire scenar io. Airsoft weaponry replaced the fake rubber weapons of the previous day and adding addi tional realism. Each student wears the same gear they wear on the job, with the addition of a full face mask for safety while training with the airsoft weaponry. Friday was the final evalu ation, utilizing the old aban doned Gateway Inn and Suites building (Building 11) as the staging ground for a simu lated active shooter situation. Students had to utilize all their skills to deal with a hostile tar get, role-played by one of the instructors. Instructors based their por trayal on studies of active shooter incidents from the past 40 years in order to best present the type of situation security personnel may actually face in the future. Students not only participated as security forces, but also as actors in the scenario. The evaluation had to be repeated six times in order to allow all stu dents to practice each of the roles. Each scenario was different, however, to avoid those students who start the day playing the victims from hav ing an unfair advantage when it is their turn to practice being the response team. McNeely said, NCIS trav els to installations upon com mand request to perform the Active Shooter Response Course. Each class optimally consists of 12 to18 students to keep a quality instructorto-student ratio. Once a com mands security forces com plete the course, they become a Certified Reaction Force, and the command is responsible for maintaining the skills acquired through the Active Shooter Response Course. NCISshows security department the ropes during active shooter response course

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Our role during COMPTUEX will be similar to previous underways, said Lt. j.g. Jared Good, a pilot in Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 9. We will continue to provide support for antiterrorism force protection, and such things as vertical replenishment and man-overboard drills. The Spartans of NAS Jacksonvillebased Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 70 operate the MH-60R anti-submarine Seahawk heli copter from onboard the Bush and her accompanying ships. CSG 2 is conducting its final predeployment evaluation to ensure safe and effective coordination with the strike group to achieve mission readi ness and the ability to work alongside international allies in the execution of the Navys maritime strategy. COMPTUEXincluded HSM-74 detachment 1. It was a busy time, yet our Gravely/Swamp Foxes team performed in an outstand ing manner, said Nadder. We also took part in exercises with Egyptian, French and British armed forces. The largest part of our squadron, embarked on USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), passed Gravely on their way to 5th Fleet in August. HSM-74 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Jim Miller flew over from Truman and gave a bra vo-zulu to Det 1, said Nadder. Over all, we accomplished our mission with a great team of men and women. I couldnt ask for anything more as the officer in charge. HSM-74 Blue H Award. The command has also been recog nized Navy wide for its development of an innovative exportable Trauma Nurse Training Course that enhanced trauma care capabilities for Navy nurses throughout the enterprise to serve in Iraq, Afghanistan, Germany, and the Horn ofAfrica. Navy Band Southeast and the Naval Hospital Jacksonville Honor Guard will support the Change of Command Ceremony. OHSU Jacksonville is the largest medi cal command within Navy Reserve Command Southeast, with 775 mem bers in 18 detachments over four states and Puerto Rico. Its Sailors provide essential medical and dental readi ness support for the more than 9,400 sailors and Marines assigned to Naval Operational Support Commands in the southeast region. OHSU Navy Wounded Warrior call center connects with service members The Navy Wounded Warrior (NWW) Safe Harbor call center which con nects people to the catalog of services provided by the Navys sole wounded warrior support program received more than 1,100 calls throughout its first year of operation. Established at the start of Fiscal Year 2013, the call center is based in Millington, Tenn. Representatives field telephone inquiries 24 hours a day, every day of the year. It is the first call center dedicated exclusively to the Navys wounded warrior program. The call center is a critical benefit for the wounded warriors enrolled in our program, and for service members with health concerns who may need to be enrolled, said NWW Deputy Director Merissa Larson. It ensures that, regardless of the date or time of their calls, and regardless of the sta tus of their cases, wounded warriors can connect to a trained professional whenever they need assistance. NWW is a Fleet and Family Readiness program that has assist ed nearly 2,500 wounded warriors nationwide. NWW provides a life time of non-medical care to seriously wounded, ill and injured Sailors and Coast Guardsmen, guiding them through recovery, rehabilitation and reintegration. The NWW call center can be reached at 855-NAVP WWP (6289997). Sailors and Coast Guardsmen may self-refer to NWW, or be referred by a family member, their command leadership or their medical team. In addition to fielding inbound calls, the call center began in March making hundreds of outbound calls to NWW enrollees. Representatives provided wounded warriors critical information about the Servicemembers Group Life Insurance Disability Extension, adap tive athletics opportunities and transi tion services. The call center uses sophisticated technology a voice-over, cloud-based Internet phone system to ensure there are no service interruptions, said Brad Nelson, director of revenue at Immersion Hospitality, the firm that manages the call center. As a result, the call center can do things more cost-effectively, faster and with total redundancy. The call center is staffed by three HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act)-certified pro fessionals, who use customized intake forms to capture the details of every call. Additionally, the call center staff will soon receive in-depth training on various NWW programs and services to better equip them to answer any type of inquiry they may receive. Call volume continues to increase every month, and the call centers capabilities are expanding. We hope to continue to spread the word about the call center and encourage people to use it whenever a need may surface, added Nelson. November marks Warrior Care Month its a time to honor the service and sacrifices of seriously wounded, ill 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013 9 A team of volunteers from Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility (FACSFAC) Jacksonville assisted with the 10th annual American Cancer Society Making Strides Against Breast Cancer walk, Oct. 25-26. The event is a non-competitive, three to five mile event that is held along the beautiful Jacksonville Landing on the St. Johns River waterfront to support the fight to end breast cancer. The FACSFAC Jacksonville team, organized by AC2 Persephone Dechario, assisted with the event setup, registration, water stations and clean up. There were 345 teams consisting of 2,585 participants that helped raise more than $174,000. The efforts by those who donated their time and money helped bring a lifetime of change to those fighting breast cancer, as well as their families. Every Making Strides Against Breast Cancer event is an incredible and inspiring opportunity to unite as a com munity to honor breast cancer survivors and raise awareness about what we can do to reduce our breast cancer risk. Dechario was impressed and hum bled by the turnout, stating, I am extremely proud to be a part of todays event and am in awe of the participa tion. This is a great opportunity to help others. The donations will help the American Cancer Society withbreast cancer research, information and services, and access to mammograms for women who need them. Since 1993, more than nine million participants across the country have raised more than $528 million to help fight breast cancer. AC2 Jekia Dowdell said, Everybody Ive met today knows someone who has been affected by this horrible disease. Participating in this cause is our way of supporting the fight. As VP-5 continues its busy schedule operating and main taining the P8-A Poseidon, the squadron shines a spotlight on one outstanding Mad Fox each week. This weeks superior Sailor is YN2 Robert Atutubo. Born in San Diego, Atutubo joined the Navy and entered boot camp in August 2009. He went on to Yeoman A school in Meridian, Miss. His first operational com mand was the 31st Seabee Readiness Group, where he worked from January 2010 to March 2012. He transferred to NSA Bahrain for a 12-month tour, after which he joined VP-5 at NAS Jacksonville. As a Yeoman, Atutobo is tasked with administrative support for the squadron. Specifically, he is in charge of disseminating and maintain ing command instructions, evaluations, and fellow Mad Foxes personnel records. He also makes the reserva tions for all DTS travel within the command and makes sure every Mad Foxes travel experi ence while on orders is efficient and uneventful. The most challenging part of my job is managing com mand budgets for travel and the intricacies of the paper work. I want everyones travels to run smoothly because just one error can cause delays, explained YN2 Atutobo. When a fellow Mad Fox gets back from TAD orders and comes to me and says how smoothly his travel went, it confirms why I make sure every detail is correct. Atutubos current goal is to make E6 and his long-term goals are to make Chief and provide at least 20 years of naval service to his country. He also plans to start work on his bachelors degree and plans to major in Homeland Security. When he is away from the squadron he enjoys hiking at Little Talbot Island and taking his dog to the park. VP-5 is currently in the interdeployment readiness cycle aboard NAS Jacksonville. VP-5 Mad Fox of the Week YN2 Robert AtutuboFACSFAC Jax Making Strides Against Breast Cancer

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tary bases like NAS Jacksonville. In 1998, while serving in Japan, my CO asked me to put together a safety stand down. I didnt really know how to go about it, so I asked him if I could do something with magic or hypnosis. His only reply was, Dont get me in trouble. So I did it and it could have been bet ter but the troops seemed to like it. Then I came back to CONUS and the chain of command asked if Id like to do safety as my primary responsibility and I said, Sure. Now, as a full-time stage hypnotist and magician, McDaniel books about a dozen safety presentations at military bases each year. He said, According to feedback from the troops, they like it because its more entertaining than the standard PowerPoint presentation or a highway patrol officer reciting statistics about DUIs and traffic deaths. When McDaniel called for volunteers who wanted to be hypnotized, dozens stormed the stage in Deweys big hall. He picked 19 enthusiastic Sailors and civilians. Hypnosis is a trance state characterized by extreme suggestibility, relaxation and heightened imagination. Its not really like sleep because the subject is alert the whole time. Whether youre a skeptic or a believer, hypnosis is an interesting phenomenon. According to the American Psychological Association, hypnosis has been used for centuries and a growing body of scien tific research supports its benefits in treat ing a range of conditions, including pain, depression, anxiety and phobias. McDaniel also pointed out that stage hypnotism is interactive, too, because peo ple get to see their friends on stage and they talk about each scenario. The most touching was when a Sailor is told that his careless driving has killed a shipmate. After dealing with the grief-filled scenar io, McDaniel removed the memory of the suggested accident from the Sailor with a touch to his forehead. After McDaniels performance, Williamson reminded the audience about Club 2000. It works like this: If you find yourself impaired in a bar, club, lounge, restaurant or private residence within Baker, Clay, Duval, Nassau or St. Johns counties call the NAS Jacksonville OOD office at 542-2338. You will be provided a taxi ride, paid for by the station, to your residence within the five-county area. If you are in an on-base club and over imbibe, the club bartender can contact the OOD no questions asked. Pick up a wallet-size NAS Jax Club 2000 card from MWR, carry it with you and do not hesitate to use it, said Williamson. He added, There always seem to be more accidents in the holiday season than during the rest of the year. So this safety stand down is a good reminder for every one to be more vigilant to safety measures, not only on the roads, but also at home. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander stressed the importance of planning and the use of operational risk management (ORM) in all facets of life especially when vacationing. Before you travel, have a plan, think it through and consider all the problems that could possibly happen. Think about what could go wrong ahead of time and avoid hazards. Also, be able to identify new hazards as your plan changes or when new situa tions pop up, said Undersander. Ours is the finest shore installation in the Navy and Im proud to serve with you. This Thanksgiving, Ill be grate ful for the wonderful team we have at NAS Jax. Enjoy this special season, be safe and come back to continue the outstanding work that you provide for our base and our country. SAFETY 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013

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The Seabees of Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 202, Detail Jacksonville, are always improving facilities at NAS Jacksonville and recently com pleted a high-profile project of a unique nature. On the site of the former Atlantic Fleet Air Photographic Laboratory now sits a new gazebo recently constructed with a $250k budget. This proj ect was unique for the Seabees of CBMU 202, says Operations Chief UTC (SCW) Duane Jerry, because Seabees are used to doing construction, but this time we had a little bit of every thing. We had landscaping, which is something we dont normally do, and we had to do a lot of cosmetic construction, meaning pavers and brickwork, more than general contract ing. So it was kind of a differ ent project for us. This fine detail provided quality training for the Seabees, who normally provide expeditionary con struction and engineering sup port to the Navy, Marine Corps, joint, and other operational forces. In addition to the gazebo, Seabees at NAS Jax recently completed three head facilities at the marina, PRT site, and golf course, and are working on a fourth at the antennae farm. These facilities are constructed in an environmentally friendly way, with solar panels on the roofs to provide electricity and skylights for illumination. Once the antennae farm head facility is complete, planned construction for a con tractor laydown lot will begin in December of 2013, paving the way for future construction and improvements to NAS Jax. This lot will provide a location for contractors working on onsite to have a base of operations while completing their work. Plans call for 16 spots to be available for contractors, and the lot will be similar to an RV park says Chief Jerry. Projects like these allow Seabees to maintain and improve their construction skills. We have seven rates, and all those rates can take an open area, we can all come together, and build a full 250man tent camp with nothing else, says Chief Jerry. These projects ashore, however, allow the 50 Seabees of CBMU 202 to develop new construction skills as well maintain their current skills. In addition to support ing NAFAC and public works, Were also the disaster recov ery unit, so in the case of a hur ricane or anything that hits this area, this whole region south east, we deploy units to sup port this base and Mayport explained Chief Jerry. We have everything for disaster recovery. The Seabees were found ed March 5th, 1942 and have served in all major U.S. con flicts since World War II. Projects at Naval Station Mayport were recognized by the American Concrete Institute, Florida First Coast Chapter Nov. 14 in Jacksonville at the chapters 2013 annual awards banquet. The awards recognized constructions with a Significant Concrete Structure. Two of the seven projects receiving an award were Navy structures aboard Naval Station (NS) Mayport the Wharf Charlie (C-1) Improvements project and the Mayport Fitness Center were recognized. A Significant Concrete Structure is a concrete structure in which concrete is used in a unique or innovative way and/or concrete is used because of its advantages over other materials with consideration to aesthetics, durability, cost and scheduling flexibility. Wharf Charlie is a general purpose berthing wharf originally constructed in 1952. The berth is one of two primary deep draft berths at Mayport. When con struction began the existing bulkhead was 57 years old and exhibited signs of severe corrosion and partial failure. The Wharf is considered a Significant Concrete Structure because precast/prestressed marine con crete products and specifically designed marine and flowable grout mixes were used to enhance the dura bility of the concrete structure. The contractor developed a new marine mix designed to enhance the structures durability, increase its propensity to protect it from the severe environment, and overall sustainability. The mix design exceeded the compressive strength require ments while retaining a high resistance to chorlide ion penetration and possible subsequent steel corrosion. Having the opportunity to work on a unique, dura ble and lasting mission-related construction effort is rare, said NS Mayport Public Works Department Construction Engineering Technician Joann Mason of the Wharf Charlie construction team. I am honored to be a part the NAVFAC Southeast Mayport team as a contributing member on this his torical first a double deck wharf development. A first for the U.S. Navy, she continued. The NS Mayport Fitness Center included a 100,000-square-foot addition and renovation project that required the design and construction of a onestory indoor pool addition. The gym centralizes all desired fitness programs in one facility on base. It has 18,000 plus square-feet of weight training and cardio area, a cycling studio, two championship-sized basketball courts, two racquet ball courts, three group exercise rooms, a family fit ness room, and the 10 lane 50-meter indoor pool. The renovated facility also includes locker rooms, offices, a child care area and a sauna. A significant amount of concrete was used con structing the 50-meter indoor pool and renovating the now 100,000-square-foot facility, said Mason. The fitness center will support Navy training requirements and offer multiple opportunities for selfdirected and group led physical fitness options. The centers facility spaces were designed to serve multiple purposes, and include systems that extend the build ings service life far beyond traditional projects. The ACI asks for nominations each year to showcase the best projects that display concrete structures that are unique and innovative. Seabees improve facilities, pave way for future work Regional projects recognized by American Concrete Institute $15 per person ($20 after Dec. 27). Pick up your tickets starting Dec. 1st. Tickets include glow in the dark bowling, shoe rental, DJ with Karaoke & a midnight toast. Full lanes may be reserved by purchasing 6 tickets. NAS Freedom Lanes reserves the right to put up to 6 people on a lane. Call (904) 542-3493 for questions.Strike in the New Year at NAS Freedom Lanes Tuesday, Dec. 31, 7 pm 1 am JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013 11

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Holiday Giving Tree helps military families Children from the NAS Jax Child Development Center cheered in the hol iday season as they gathered at the Navy Exchange (NEX) kick off the annual Giving Tree program Nov. 21. This is the seventh year, the NEX and USO have sponsored the tree which helps military families who may have some financial challenges during the holiday season. The event began as NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander welcomed the children and officially lit the tree which is on dis play at the NEX Courtyard through the holiday season. The group of preschoolers were then tasked with singing Jingle Bells and We Wish you a Merry Christmas as loud as they could to see if a special guest might hear their merriment from afar. As the children and a small group of parents and teachers sang, Santa arrived to greet the children for photos and to hear their holiday wishes. We love sponsoring this program in conjunction with our USO. They pro vide us with wish list items needed by children from local commands whose families might be a little financially challenged during the holidays. It will ensure that some of our military chil dren will have a Christmas that they otherwise probably wouldnt have, said NEX General Manager Marsha Brooks. While shopping at the NEX, custom ers can pick an ornament from the tree. Each ornament contains a small list and sizes of children needing clothing arti cles or toys this holiday season. Once the items are purchased, they can be taken to Personalized Services inside the NEX for wrapping and distri bution to the families registered at the USO. The gifts need to be returned by Dec. 15 so they can be delivered in time to bring joy to a childs Christmas. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast active duty military visited local classrooms Nov. 12 and 13 as part of the City of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor. Naval Station (NS) Mayport Public Works Officer Cmdr. Phillip Lavallee spoke to 40 fourth-graders at Arlington Heights Elementary Nov. 12. I spoke to the kids about the history of Veterans Day and what Veterans Day means to me, said Lavallee. I also explained to them the reasons why I joined the Navy and the impor tance of learning, listening and staying out of trouble if they wanted to consider a career in the Navy when they grew up. Lavallee said the children asked more questions than he had time to answer. Overall it was a great experience and I think the kids enjoyed the discussion, he said. SWCS Jose Torres, NAVFAC Southeast senior enlisted advisor, spoke to about 50 fifth-grade students Nov. 12 at Ortega Museum Magnet Elementary School just north of NAS Jacksonville. The Week of Valor is always a great opportunity to get out and talk with children about what we do in the mili tary, said Torres. I really am honored that schools take time out of their busy curriculum to spend some time with Seabees, Sailors, Marines, Airman and Soldiers. It is exciting to know that the children are very interested in what we do for our nation. The kids were very engaged, said Torres. I could tell they were anxious to ask questions. They made me smile and realize that this is why we enjoy making sacrifices for them to be able to be kids and to get a great education. On Nov. 3, NS Mayport Commodity Manager Lt. j.g. Stephen Baker spoke to 150 seventh-grade children at Mayport Middle School. I started my comments by speaking about my background and career thus far and my experience at the U.S. Naval Academy, said Baker. I then fielded a lengthy series of questions about life on submarines and at the Naval Academy and finished with a discussion about what we do at NAVFAC. Baker enjoyed talking to the children about Veterans Day and being thankful for what others do for our freedoms. It was a really good experience, said Baker. The citywide Week of Valor celebra tion saluted the sacrifice and service of military service men and women. The list of educational, patriotic, community and civic events that took place during the week also included a Military Appreciation Luncheon, a Salute to Veterans 5K run, the annu al Veterans Day Parade, a Veterans Housing Convention, and a Jacksonville Jaguars game dedicated to honoring the military. Jacksonvilles goal for hosting the series of events for active duty, reserv ists and veterans, is to showcase Jacksonville as the most military friendly city in the country. NAVFAC Southeast military support Week of Valor with school visits JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013 13

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Childrens Holiday Bingo December 20 Doors open at 5 p.m., games begin at 6 p.m. $10 per childFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Youth Bowling League: Every Sat., 10:30 am noon $17 annually or $8 per week. Includes shoes, awards will be given at the end of the season! Rising Stars Youth League: Every Sat., 10:30 am 12:30 pm. Pee Wee Division (6 years & under) 2 games, $6 per week. Juniors Division (7 years & older) 3 games, $8 per week. Special Stars Bowling League for families with special needs children. All ages welcome! Ramps available for the non-ambulatory as well as bumpers for beginners. Runs for 10 weeks at a cost of $7 per week, shoes are included. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4 6 pm. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4 10 pm. Thursdays: Free bowling for Active Duty 11 am 1 pm. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4 6 pm, Party Extreme $10, 8 pm midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Oct. 19, 1 4 pm. $20 per person, registra tion begins at noon. *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise* Strike in the New Year at NAS Freedom Lanes December 31, 7 p.m. 1 a.m. $15 per personFitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6 8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Jingle Bell Jog 5K December 13 at 11:30 a.m. Perimeter Rd. / Antenna Farm Powerlifting Competition Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014 7 a.m. at the Fitness Center $10 registration feeI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil Waves of Honor Special: Seaworld Orlando Adult $46.50, Child $42.25. Busch Gardens Tampa Adult $45, Child $40.50. Monster Jam: Club seating (includes pit pass) $42, regular seating (includes pit pass) $22. Jacksonville Jaguars: Section 147 Bud Zone, $70. Jags shuttle bus $12. Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2013 2014 Season: Tickets now available! MOSH: $7 $12. The Artist Series Broadway in Jax 2013 2014 Season: Tickets available now! Celtic Thunder: Nov. 10, 2013, 7 pm, $80. Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus: Jan. 17 & 18, 2014, $51. War Horse: Feb. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $68.50. Memphis: Mar. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $65. Million Dollar Quartet: Apr. 26, 2014, 8 pm, $65. The D* Word: Oct. 4 Oct. 25, 2014, $43.75 $46. Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27,2014) 4 day Hopper ticket$166 4 day 1 park per day and water park ticket-$166 4 day Hopper and Water park combo ticket$194 Gatorbowl $35 Capital One Bowl $98 Russell Athletic Bowl $78 Soul Food Festival Special $20 General Admission $32 Preferred $42 VIP $65 Ringling Brothers Barnum & Bailey Circus $15 Veterans Memorial Arena January 17, 2013 (7:30pm) January 18, 2013 (11:30am) January 18, 2014 (7:30pm) January 19, 2014 (1:00pm) January 19, 2014 (5:00pm) Legoland Free admission for active duty at park Tickets for family members available at ITT ITT is now selling $18 tickets for the Harlem Globetrotters! The show is February 28, 7 pm at Veterans Memorial Arena.The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restrict ed to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Mall & Movie Trip Nov. 30 at noon Orange Park Mall & AMC Theater Ice Skating Trip December 14 at 6 p.m. The Avenues Mall Shuttle December 17 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Dec. 3 & 17 for active duty Dec. 5 & 19 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Daily Twilight Golf Special Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1 p.m. Santa Sez Golf Scramble December 20 at 10 a.m. $40 military, $50 civilian guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m.Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Dashing Through the Grove Dec. 6, 4 8 p.m. Free snow sledding, tree lighting, photos with Santa and more! Movie Under the Stars featuring The Grinch Dec. 13, 6 p.m. Patriots GroveFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013

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For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil. In November and December, NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) is offering Suicide Prevention Awareness Training for base and tenant commands. Should your command be in need of this training, select a date and time that is convenient for your command and call 542-2776 to reserve seating, said FFSC Education and Training Coordinator Wilhelmina Nash. Attending this one-hour class could help you save someones life. Thank you for your concern and support. Dec. 2 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 3 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 4 8 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 5 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 10 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 11 1 & 3 p.m. Dec. 12 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 17 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 18 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 30 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 31 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Suicide prevention awareness training available through FFSC Sailors from Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville volunteered at the New Life Hope Christian Church, during an extensive renovation and restructuring project Nov. 6. Getting out and volunteering shows the community a positive side to the Navy, said YN2 Marquita Greene. I make an effort to volunteer for these types of projects as often as I can. NRD Jacksonville Sailors were tasked with disposal of discarded scaffolding, carpet and other items used during the remodel. According to PS1 Anthony Sonola, volunteerism is very worthwhile and is an important part of building positive relationships between the Navy and the local community. It is important for Sailors to be seen in the communities that we live in, said Sonola. Helping is a gratifying experience. According to YN1Willie Sheppard it is important to give back. I have always made it a point to vol unteer for community service my entire career, said Sheppard. Both members of the New Life Christian Church and Sailors will con tinue to volunteer time to the continu ing renovation project which will take several additional weeks to complete Community service projects allow Sailors to support the Jacksonville and say thanks to the community. I volunteer to show a sense of pride, said IC1Will Adkinson. New Life Christian Fellowship is 99,000 square foot facility with a 2,900 seat sanctuary and family life center that includes a full-size activity gym, youth pavilion, preschool nursery and Sunday school and Bible study rooms. Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville announced the selection of PS1 Anthony Sonola as the 2013 Sailor of the Year (SOY) Nov. 9. Sonola serves as the command career counselor for NRD Jacksonville and oversees the training and careers of more than 100 Sailors throughout the district. He also serves as the coordi nator for United Services Military Apprenticeship Program (USMAP) and command indoctrination coordinator. It is humbling to be selected for SOY, said Sonola. I was competing against so many other outstanding Sailors. Sonola credits excellent command leadership for both his professional growth and nomination to the SOY competition against other highly quali fied Sailors. I was called on by the command to take over the career counseling pro gram, said Sonola. When the call comes you do it. According to Command Master Chief LaDon Washington, Sonola has dis played leadership and continues to dis play the key skill sets of a successful Sailor and role model. Petty Officer Sonola has exhibited deck-plate leadership, professionalism, and effective communication through out his duties, said Washington. Ive liked being a career counsel or and personnelman because both jobs let me help Sailors, said Sonola. Command career counselor has been challenging but I look at it as a new opportunity to excel. He provides consistent valuable insight. His foresight has assisted a number of our Sailors in making career enhancing choices, Washington said. Sonola holds a bachelors degree in Real Estate management from Federal Polytechnic, Ilaro Ogun State, Nigeria and a masters degree in business administration from the University of Phoenix. Other SOY finalists were HM1 Tadrus, Navy Officer Recruiting Station Savannah; and SH1 Pierre Jean-Louis, Navy Recruiting Station Mayport. NRD Jacksonville has the mission of recruiting the best men and women for Americas Navy to accomplish todays missions and meet tomorrows chal lenges. The command philosophy is to pro vide strong integrity-based leadership, spirited teamwork and a commitment to excellence. Former Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Elmo Zumwalt and former Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy John Whittet established the SOY program in 1972 to recognize an individual Sailor who best represents the dedicated Sailors at each command and the entire US Navy. Within 10 years, the Sailor of the Year program was expanded to include the shore establishment and Navy Reserve Sailors. NRD Jacksonville recruiters build community relationships Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville announces Sailor of the Year and injured service members. To learn more about NWW or Warrior Care Month, call 855-NAVP WWP (628-9997), visit the Web site at http://safeharbor.navylive.dodlive.mil or email navywoundedwarrior@navy. mil. NWW JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013 17

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Change is an invariable attribute of life in the Navy, with milestones that are often marked by custom and tradi tion. On Nov. 20, one such milestone occurred in the career transition of Cmdr. Joseph Moorhouse, commanding officer, VP-30 Squadron Augment Unit, when he concluded his last flight as a Navy pilot before his change of com mand Nov. 23. Customary wetting down, with the aid of fire department emergency response vehicles, is currently restrict ed due to ongoing budget constraints. Nevertheless, a glimpse of the tra dition was upheld by Moorhouses daughter, Gracen and son, Jonah who were each armed with water guns. Moorhouse reciprocated by rendering precious career mementoes to his chil dren. Moorhouse carried the same national ensign in his helmet bag from the time of he was first winged in July 1996 to his last flight as a reminder of the rea son he was flying, service to country. He surrendered the flag to Jonah at the conclusion of his last naval flight. He also gave Gracen the flight suit flag patch that he had worn since his ninth flight in the Navy during flight school. Moorhouses previous flag patch was lost when his flight suit was cut off at the hospital after bailing out of a T-34 on the eighth flight. Moorhouses parents, Joe and Jane Moorhouse were also present at the event. Delighted to witness their sons career milestone achievement, they took pride in his resilience after sus taining serious injuries in the T-34 bail out Feb. 14, 1995. Challenges and setbacks did not over ride determination to serve his country as a naval pilot. Moorhouse has accrued more than 4,000 hours of flying time on T-34, T-44, TC-12, and P-3 platforms. Moorhouse also gave his chil dren his dog tags, that were issued in flight school and a required item for every naval flight. The symbolism he expressed to his children was giving them something that was with him every time he was away and missing them. Earlier in the final flight, Moorhouse had the opportunity to conduct a touch and go on the runway of NAS Pensacola, Fla. which is where his naval pilot career commenced nearly 20 years ago. His wife, Faith is currently tak ing a career break from the Case Management Department at UF Health as she prepares to deliver their third child, Ava in December. Meanwhile, Moorhouse is preparing for non-fly ing Navy duty as an instructor for the Senior Officer Leadership Course at the Center for Personal and Professional Development Southeast at Navy Operational Support Center Atlanta. Moorhouse conducts last flight Your commissary is the place for holiday savings The holidays are right around the corner, and special in-store promo tions make the commis sary the place to go to save on holiday grocer ies, said the Defense Commissary Agencys director of sales. Weve got some great promotions lined up for the holiday season, said Randy Chandler, DeCA sales director. Customers will find great savings and quality products for their holiday entertainment and meal needs, thanks to our industry partners. They might even sneak a peek at a jolly old man in a red suit! Chandler also reminds patrons that the holiday season is a perfect oppor tunity to consider giv ing the gift of groceries through Commissary Gift Cards. Our gift cards are a quick and easy way to spread holiday cheer to military service members and their family mem bers around the world, he said. Anyone can purchase them online through www.commis saries.com, or at a com missary for authorized shoppers to use. Managers specials and power buys provide big savings every day dur ing the holiday season in commissaries worldwide. Overseas stores may have substitute events for cer tain promotional pro grams, and customers should check their local commissary for details on dates and times for their promotions. FIGHT deadly childhood diseases.St. Jude Childrens Research Hospitalstjude.org A CFC participant provided as a public service. 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013 Members of Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeasts Employee Benefits Association (EBA) have come up with a new way to say thank you to its employees this Thanksgiving deliver ing handmade gifts to its workforce Nov. 21 at NAS Jacksonville. Times are tough with a continuing resolution and budget constraints, said NAVFAC Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus. Our employee morale team continues to find ways to build morale among our workforce and foster teamwork. Each year we look at ways to raise money to hold our annual holiday luncheon to keep the cost to a minimum for our employees, said Joanne Bailey, EBA president and NAVFAC Southeast plan ner. This week we are delivering a sweet treat. A turkey made out of a sucker, a fall leaf, and a chocolate kiss for its face. The EBA members are very passionate about what they do to help build morale among the work force. Every year the team comes up with new and more creative ideas. This fundraiser was a huge success. The team delivered 1,300 thank yous that say, A heartfelt thanks to you, for all that you do. We are thrilled to see how many employees really enjoy what we do, said Bailey. It is so exciting to see the look on someones face when we deliver a surprise to them. It really does put a smile on every ones face. NAVFAC Southeast employees work in five different buildings at NAS Jacksonville supporting Navy Region Southeast, along with others located on installations through out the southeast. This thank you came just in time for Thanksgiving, and well deserved to a team that has accomplished so much already this year, said Kiwus. As part of the Florida governments Cabinet Meeting Nov. 19 in Tallahassee, Fla., Gov. Rick Scott honored five edu cators certified through the Troops to Teachers Program with the Governors Shine Award for exemplary service to their country and contributions to Floridas students. Kim Stefansson, a Navy veteran and currently history teacher at Bellview Middle School was asked to address the cabinet meeting and represent the vet erans. Both the military and education career fields call for flexibility and those who are not easily deterred, said Stefansson. Both careers call for service 24/7 whether you are standing watch or spending your weekends grading papers, and both jobs ask our families to be supportive when we need extra time to do our jobs. The Governors Shine Award is pre sented to Floridians who have positively impacted children through education. It is an honor to thank these teachers who went from serving their country to serving Florida students in the class room, said Scott. A great education system is key to creating a highly-skilled workforce and driving our economy forward. These teachers have gone above and beyond the call of duty by preparing our stu dents today for the jobs of tomorrow and I thank for their continued service to Florida families. David Silverman, a veteran of both the Marine Corps and Florida Army National Guard, is now teaching adults at the Clay County Center for Adult & Community education in Orange Park. He said that like many of the jobs he held in the military, teaching adults is enjoyable. Teaching adults in many respects is easier than teaching kids they want to be here and really care about getting an education; they need to get their diplo ma or GED to get or keep a job, so they are definitely motivated with a positive attitude. William McAleer, Chief of the Troops to Teachers Program for the Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support in Pensacola, Fla. said that teaching is an outstanding fit for many veterans. Every service member was training their replacement while on active duty, said McAleer. They bring real-life experiences into the classroom and add perspective to subjects. Florida is one of the leaders in hiring veterans through the Troops to Teachers Program and in the past three years has helped 393 veterans obtain positions in Floridas schools. Its gratifying to see that Governor Scott is recognizing the service, hard work and contributions that veterans bring to education. The other Florida Troops to Teachers veterans honored with Shine Awards at the cabinet meeting were: Kenneth McAllister, Air Force veteran now teaching at Clay High School in Green Cove Springs; Jacqueline Williams, Navy veteran now teaching at A. Phillip Randolph High School Academies of Technology in Jacksonville; and Glenn Meyer, an Air Force veteran and 5th grade teacher at Navy Point Elementary in Pensacola. NAVFAC Southeast employees find creative ways to say thanks Gov. Rick Scott honors Troops to Teachers veterans in Tallahassee Commissary CEO shares sequestration consequences Offering a glimpse at what commissary and mili tary exchange services could become in light of smaller and unpredictable budgets, the Defense Commissary Agency director and CEO described to Congress yesterday the consequences sequestra tion and the government shutdown have already imposed. Customers packed commissaries Oct. 1, the first day of the government shutdown, Joseph Jeu told the House Armed Service Committees Military Personnel Subcommittee. Not knowing what was ahead, shoppers stocked up on food and supplies, racking up twice the typical days sales, at $30.5 million. That was our highest sale day ever, Jeu told the House panel. But as the furlough dragged on, its effects increas ingly became evident. The department-wide hiring freeze had already put a dent in the customer service that been the pride of the Defense Commissary Agency. Because turnover tends to be high among the com missaries lower-grade employees, manning levels quickly dropped, Jeu explained. Two-thirds of all commissaries fell below the manning levels required to run the stores effectively. Even when DoD gave some relief and authorized personnel hiring, the results came slowly due to time lags in employee vetting. Exacerbating the situation, civilian furloughs forced most commissaries to close one day a week for six weeks. Customer complaints rose by over 50 percent and hit an all-time high during the furlough, Jeu reported. While our employees struggled to provide our goal of excellent customer service, they could not always overcome the challenges. Customers were often confronted with long check out lines, closed registers and empty shelves, he said. Sometimes waits for checkouts dragged on for 20 to 30 minutes. Meanwhile, sales figures that had been on an upward trajectory dropped. Commissaries experi enced a sales loss totally over $99 million driven by sequestration closures in fiscal year 2013 and gov ernment shutdown closures in October of fiscal year 2014, Jeu reported. Distributors who supply the commissaries felt the impact, too, he said. They faced sporadic delays in offloading their deliveries, and orders were frequent ly held up or delayed. In some cases, the wrong products were shipped, damages werent processed in a timely manner, and orders were delayed due to closures that made scheduling a logistical nightmare. All this followed what Jue told the congressional panel had been an impressive year in fiscal 2012, before sequestration. Sales were up, topping the $6 billion level for the first time since 1992, he reported. The cost of deliv ering commissary services came in under budget. Customer satisfaction surveys that were indepen dently verified ranked commissaries above all but one commercial grocery chain. The commissary continues to be one of the most valued non-pay compensation benefits our mili tary members, past and present, and their families enjoy, Jeu said. Calling the commissary benefit an integral ele ment of the total compensation package, he said it saves patrons about 30 percent compared to com mercial supermarkets. That equates to about $1,500 a year for a single ser vice member who consistently uses the commissary and as much as $4,500 for an average family of four, he said. This quality-of-life enhancement comes at a rate of $2 in patron savings for every taxpayer dollar invest ed, Jue reported. However, this two-for-one return on investment is insufficient to shield the commissary from scrutiny as it faces the same fiscal challenges as other govern ment agencies, he lamented. Jue noted the Defense Commissary Agencys proven history of taking cost out of the system, and progress in reducing operating costs and overhead and introducing efficiencies and innovation. Warehouses and associated inventory has been eliminated, manpower has been reduced, account ing functions have been centralized and automated and headquarters and regional offices consolidated. Over the past 20 years, we have picked the longhanging fruit by seeking innovative initiatives to achieve operating efficiencies, and through good stewardship of taxpayer dollars, we made the com missary system significantly less costly to operate, Jeu said. With this history, any further reduction resulting from sequestration will diminish the commissary benefit, he continued. Even with commissaries to receive full funding in the proposed fiscal 2014 budget, Jeu warned that the impact of sequestration is likely to be considerable as the department establishes priorities and bal ances resources. Even with the budget uncertainty due to seques tration, as we move into this net era, the [Defense Commissary Agency] is excited about its ongoing initiatives to seek innovative and efficient methods of benefit delivery, he said. Jue testified yesterday with other senior defense officials who urged Congress to preserve military exchange and commissary services they call key to the morale and quality of life of service members and their families. Joining him in the House chamber were Rosemary Williams, deputy assistant secretary of defense for Military Community and Family Policy; retired Navy Rear Adm. Robert Bianchi, CEO of Navy Exchange Service Command; Thomas Shull, director and CEO of the Army and Air Force Exchange Service; William Dillon, director of the Marine Corps Semper Fit and Exchange Services; Thomas Gordy, presi dent of the Armed Forces Marketing Council; and Patrick Nixon, president of the American Logistics Association.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 28, 2013 21 Over the static of crackling radios and phone lines, a lit tle-known group of dedicat ed Native American warriors joined the call to arms in both world wars with what would prove to be among the United States most powerful weapons: language. Known as Code Talkers, Native Americans learned early on the advantages of their trib al tongues, using indecipher able messages to confuse the enemy and bring combat vic tory to the United States. The code talker mission remained classified for decades after World War II. In observance of National Native American Heritage Month, the collabora tion between the Defense Departments Office of Diversity Management and Equal Opportunity and the Smithsonian Institution recently brought Native Words, Native Warriors to the Pentagon for a two-day exhibit. Developed by the Smithsonians National Museum of the American Indian and the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, the 15-panel display includes writing, images and videos depicting battlefield experiences and telling the remarkable story of a dozen tribes who offered their lan guage in support of the U.S. military. The displays really tell the personal contribution that each of the Code Talkers made with each other as a team, said Keevin Lewis, National Museum of the American Indian outreach coordinator. Navajo Code Talkers ... cre ated a code that was within the Navajo language -so even another Navajo speaker would not be able to determine what was being talked about, Lewis said. Others tribes, he said, also coded their languages, and oth ers used original form, though typically most languages were not written. Lewis said the U.S. government surprisingly soon recognized many native lan guages, despite the fact that in reservation boarding schools, many Native American chil dren were instead encouraged to speak English. Its strange, but growing up as a child, I was forbidden to speak my native language at school, said Charles Chibitty, a Comanche Code Talker with the U.S. Army. Later, my coun try asked me to. My language helped win the war, and that makes me very proud very proud. According to the Smithsonians website, although the United States did not consid er American Indians citizens until as late as 1924, the mili tary first enlisted American Indians to relay messages in their native languages during World War I. The Navajo lan guage, among other Native American tongues, became for malized and recognized as a program which expanded dur ing World War II. Soldiers from the Comanche, Meskwaki, Sioux, Crow, Hopi and Cree nations, among oth ers, took part in the effort, said Lewis, adding that out of more than 500 tribes, each with dis tinct languages, about 200 to 250 dialects remain in use today. One display video depicts the Marines, who used Navajo language to create their code in 1942. As noted in the nar ration, the encoded messages proved to be a fast, accurate and indecipherable-to-the-ene my alternative, which suited the demands of the battlefield better than the painfully slow military devices that had been standard. The National Museum of the American Indian is one of 18 museums within the Smithsonian Institution and has affiliate locations at the Cultural Resources Center in Suitland, Md., the National Museum on the mall in Washington, D.C., and in the lower Manhattan region of New York. To have the Smithsonian recognize this accomplishment is remarkable, Lewis said. Native American code talkers who transmitted codes based on 33 tribal dialects during World Wars I and II so enemies could not decipher them were patriots with unique capabilities and willingness to give their talents and lives to the nation, the vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said today at a Congressional Gold Medal ceremony to honor them. Navy Adm. James Winnefeld Jr., joined in the U.S. Capitols Emancipation Hall by House and Senate leaders and other officials, recognized 216 code talkers and members of their families from those wars with the highest honor Congress can bestow. Winnefeld said, During Native American Heritage Month, I have the great privilege of representing the finest military in the world in recognizing hun dreds of Native Americans who wore the cloth of our nation in the distinctive way we celebrate today, and in such a coura geous way, defending a country that did not always keep its word to their ances tors. Conceived in 1918, the code talker pro gram eventually comprised more than 400 Native Americans who volunteered to defend the nation, the vice chairman said. The role of the code talkers during the two world wars was kept a secret until 1968, officials said. Throughout history, military leaders have sought the perfect code signals the enemy cannot break, no matter how able the intelligence team, the vice chairman said. It was our code talkers who created voice codes that defied decoding. Winnefeld said the codes were doubly clever by using words that were confus ing to the enemy, such as crazy white man for Adolf Hitler and tortoise for tank. Our code talkers role in combat required intelligence, adaptability, grace under pressure, and bravery key attri butes handed down by their ancestors, the admiral said. Winnefeld said the code talkers endured some of the nations most dan gerous battles and served proudly dur ing critical combat operations, such as the Choctaws at the Meuse-Argonne, Comanches on Utah Beach on D-Day, Hopis in the Caroline Islands and the Cherokees at the Second Battle of the Somme. These men were integral mem bers of their teams -the 36th Infantry Division, the 4th Signals Company, the 81st Infantry Division, the 30th Infantry Division -learning Morse code and operating equipment to transmit mes sages quickly and accurately, he added. Contributing even more than battle skills, the code talkers also fundamen tally contributed to our military intelli gence communitys work in cryptology, Winnefeld said. The National Security Agency Museum highlights the code talkers of World War I and World War II as pioneers of this spe cialty, he added. The code talkers are a national resource, a wellspring of intelligence, innovation, hard work and resilience, the vice chairman said. We can best honor these great war riors among us not just with welldeserved and long overdue recognition, the vice chairman said, but also with our own efforts to continue leverag ing our nations diversity and to forever honor our veterans.Native American Code Talkers get Congressional Gold MedalWord Power: How Native American code talkers helped win wars

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