Jax air news

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Material Information

Title:
Jax air news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note:
Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID:
UF00028307:02068


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2013 ASSISTING VETS CARNI VA L NEW PILOTS Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com In the wake of Typhoon Haiyans devastation in the Republic of the Philippines, a massive multinational effort, dubbed Operation Damayan, is underway to bring aid to those affected by the unprecedented storm. Navy patrol squadrons VP26 Tidents and VP-62 Broadarrows based at NAS Jacksonville and cur rently deployed to Kadena Airbase in Okinawa, Japan with Commander, Task Group (CTG) 72.2 have contributed to this effort by repositioning three P-3C Orions, three air crews, and a detachment of maintenance professionals to Clark International Airport near Manila. As the storm approached on Nov. 9, these aircrews were placed on an alert sta tus prior to the storms land fall in preparation for the search and rescue missions. When the government of the Philippines requested assis tance and declared a nation al state of calamity on Nov. 11, the aircrews were able to reposition to the Philippines in just a few hours. Immediately upon arrival, they began working with the 3rd Marine Expeditionary Brigade that was in charge of the U.S. mili tary effort, to ensure every hour flown provided benefit to disaster relief operations. The Tridents and Broadarrows P-3C aircrews have flown missions over the hardest-hit areas since Nov. 11, assessing damage and search ing for populations cut off from sources of food, clean water and medical care. The geography of the Philippines makes the determination of where to focus relief efforts particu larly difficult. The archipelag ic nation, comprised of more than 7,000 islands, includes countless remote and isolated populations in desperate need of relief. P-3C aircrews help solve this problem by search ing for and reporting highneed areas so rescue and relief efforts can arrive as quickly as possible. Among the hardest-hit areas is the small island of Homonhan, in the province of East Samar. The 12-mile long island lay directly in the path of Typhoon Haiyan and was devastated by winds that measured more than 200 miles per hour. A CTG 72.2 P-3C was the first aircraft on scene and the first to make contact with those on the ground in Homonhan. VP-62 P-3C Mission Commander Lt. Cmdr. Jace Dasenbrock described what his crew witnessed on Nov. 12 as they first approached the Island. We arrived on scene at noon in the and immediately saw devastation throughout the entire island. Our first pass around the island saw no sign of life below. Buildings were destroyed, with few structures surviving. The only building left intact was the church that stood on the southeastern edge of the island. A sailboat was in a tree about 20 feet off the ground. After a second pass, a few heads popped out. A third pass around the tiny island saw about 100 residents send ing S.O.S. signals.A fourth pass was made to give hope to the survivors. With roads washed out, relief needed to be brought in by air. We were able to identify several areas suit able for helicopters and Marine Ospreys (MV-22B) to land. This discovery was the first of several like it for the CTG 72.2 aircrews. The information and photographs they collect are sent in-flight to intelligence specialists who collate the products and provide them to the Marines coordinating U.S. military relief efforts on the ground. This enables U.S. and Philippine commanders and government officials to identify and prioritize humanitarian assistance requirements. Within days of the first P-3C flight over Homonhan Island, the USS George Washington (CVN-73) Carrier Strike Group re-positioned close enough to bring relief to citizens as well as other communities in the region. SH-60 Seahawks and Ospreys fly countless round trip sorties carrying 20-pound bags of food, water, and medi cal supplies ashore. The air space has become so crowded with relief aircraft that E-2C Hawkeyes are now orbiting overhead to direct and de-conflict air traffic. The P-3C and E-2C aircrews are coordinat ing to pass locations of suit able landing zones as well as locations of more un-reached disaster areas to relief aircraft in real time. The magnitude of the destruction in remote areas like Homonhan Island make restoring infrastructure and rebuilding communities a slow process. For now the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps, with Defense Commissary Agency Director and Chief Executive Officer Joseph Jeu visited the NAS Jacksonville Commissary to thank the employees for their dedication to providing out standing customer service and to learn about store operations Nov. 15. During a surprise ceremony, Jeu awarded NAS Jacksonville Commissary Store Director Larry Bentley with the 2013 Michael W. Blackwell Leadership Award for dis playing exceptional leadership, cour age and integrity in the performance of his duties at the commissary. History was made Nov. 12 when two NFL players toured the Navys newest Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance P-8A aircraft. Jacksonville Jaguars Defensive Tackle SenDerrick Marks and Guard Will Rackley became the first professional football players to set foot inside a Poseidon. The two players visited VP-16 War Eagles to meet the Sailors and sign autographs for squadron personnel, including Sailors from VP-5, VP-10 and VP-45. Im really appreciative of them coming out to meet with us today. Even though Im a Tennessee Titans fan, its great of them to take time out of their busy schedules and spend time with us in the hangar, said AWO2(NAC) Chris Walsh of VP-16. After thanking the Sailors for their service, Marks and Rackley were given VP-26 and VP-62 join in typhoon relief Top DeCA executive visits NAS Jax Commissary VP-16 hosts Jacksonville Jaguars, makes history

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Nov. 21 1918 U.S. battleships witness sur render of German High Seas fleet at Rosyth, Firth of Forth, Scotland, to U.S. and British fleets. Nov. 22 1914 The title, Director of Naval Aeronautics is established. Nov. 23 1940 President Franklin D. Roosevelt appoints Adm. William Leahy as U.S. Ambassador to Vichy France to try to prevent the French fleet and naval bases from falling into German hands. Nov. 24 1852 Commodore Matthew Perry sails from Norfolk, Va., to negotiate a treaty with Japan for friendship and commerce. 1964 USS Princeton (LPH-5) com pletes 7-day humanitarian relief to South Vietnam which suffered damage from typhoon and floods. 1969 HS-4 from USS Hornet (CVS12) recovers Apollo 12s all-Navy crew of astronauts Commanders Richard Gordon, Charles Conrad and Alan Bean after moon landing by Conrad and Bean. Nov. 25 1775 Continental Congress autho rizes privateering. 1943 In Battle of Cape St. George, five ships of Destroyer Squadron 23 (Capt. Arleigh Burke) intercept five Japanese destroyers sinking three and damaging one without suffering any damage. 1961 Commissioning of USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65), the first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, at Newport News, Va. Nov. 26 1847 Lt. William Lynch in Supply sails from New York to Haifa for an expedition to the River Jordan and the Dead Sea. His group charted the Jordan River from the Sea of Galilee to the Dead Sea and compiled reports of the flora and fauna of the area. 1940 Sixth and last group of ships involved in Destroyers-for-Bases Agreement are transferred to British at Nova Scotia. Nov. 27 1941 Chief of Naval Operations sends war warning to commanders of Pacific and Asiatic Fleets. 1961 Navy reports first use of its cyclotron at Harvard University to treat a human brain tumor. After three treatments, the tumor of the 2-year old patient shrank by 80 percent. Again, Dustin said I shouldnt write this column. Last week, apparently he was right. This week, he is not. Dustin doesnt want me to write a fol low-up to last weeks Veterans Day col umn because he doesnt want me to even acknowledge online commenters or their vitriol. Its the same reason he didnt want me to write last weeks column: to save me from that experience. Dustins forgotten that 12 years ago, when I first started writing my newspaper column, he told me to never read comments. So I dont. I just dont. Sometimes, however, people send me screen shots: Sarah, did you see this one? (Interestingly, people dont forward the good ones. Only the hateful ones.) Last week was no different. Yet, some readers including some friends who dis agreed with my Veterans Day column made reasonable, unemotional points, without attacking my character, and they deserve response. Since I began writing, Ive always hon ored veterans in my Veterans Day column. This year, fearing it would be repetitive and falsely assuming readers had read my other 12 Veterans Day columns, I decided to take a different perspective that of a military spouse. My biggest regret is that I did not also thank veterans in the column, because I certainly meant to. But something else was on my heart as I wrote. As we approached Veterans Day, my mind was solely on my friend Theresa, who lost her Navy-pilot husband in a helicopter crash seven weeks ago. I knew people would thank Dustin for his service on Veterans Day. Thats the way its always been and should be. I knew that Theresa had experienced that with Landon, too. And then I realized that this Veterans Day, her veteran was not here to thank. She would no longer hear, Thank your husband for his service, please. So I wanted to thank Theresa for all that her family has lost in service to the country. That train of thought got me thinking about all the other spouses who have lost loved ones and the spouses of wounded warriors who have uprooted their lives to care for the sick and injured. Believe me, I was not thinking of myself. My husband has been deployed a handful of times, and now he works at the Pentagon. We have been incredibly fortunate, even though, as with all military families, we have had our share of sacrifices and challenges. I have not been through what Theresa is going through now, and I have not experi enced what the spouses of wounded veter ans do on a daily basis. They are left with much to shoulder, even though they tech nically did not take an oath of service. (In some ways, this fact is what amazes me all the more!) When I think of these spouses who have lost so much due their loved ones duty to the country, I cannot help but think they deserve some thanks for supporting a veteran. They are not veterans, but they certainly have been the support system for one. My mistake in last weeks column was my tone. It came across whiney and with a hint of thats not fair. I apologize for that. Yet, honestly, when I talk to Theresa and think about her circumstances, lately I struggle with the urge to scream, Thats not fair! My other mistake was the column title. I wrote the first instance of military-spouse veterans in quotation marks for a reason. I dont actually believe that spouses are true veterans. Nor do I think Veterans Day is for or about them. But I do believe its appropriate to thank people like Theresa today and everyday. Interestingly, I had planned to use todays column to address Tom Cruises assertion that filming a movie overseas is like being deployed to Afghanistan. I already wrote about Cruises comments on Huffington Post (Link: http://www.huffington post.com/sarah-smiley/if-cruise-aban doned-suri-what-have-military-fathersdone_b_4252053.html), but I wasnt done with him yet. Then, after my column and the reaction last week, I paused to reflect. Wouldnt the world be better if we stopped to give people the benefit of the doubt? How do I know what Cruise really said? How do I know for sure he doesnt know what a deployment is like? How do I know what his life is like? How can I hate someone that I dont even know? How can I judge the character of a person Ive never met? Arent I aware that Cruise is a human being, and although he makes mistakes, he is a person with feelings and a family? Trust me, people who hate me will still respond negatively to this column. While my hope is that they use this as a springboard for honest discussion, they will call me disgusting, self-centered, and miserable. But I wont read it or see it. So, if you are a friend, please only send the comments that add to the discussion about what it means to be a veteran, a military family, or, even, civil. Responding to last weeks Veterans Day column Notice of upcoming NAS Jax power outages NAS Jacksonville Public Works Department has scheduled three power outages in order to safely perform required maintenance in the high voltage substation serving family housing and the Naval Hospital Jacksonville campus. Your understanding of the necessity for these power outages is sincerely appreciated because the required maintenance will greatly improve the reliability of the substation equipment and the installations overall electrical distribution system. Every outage has been carefully scheduled in order to minimize the impact they will have on operations and the daily lives of our family housing residents. These short term outages will pay long term divi dends not only to the installation, but also to you, the customer. The power outages are scheduled as follows: Nov. 23, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Several hospital campus buildings, Youth Center Gym, Heritage Cottages, All of Patriot Point Housing, including Fleet Angel Court and Woodpecker Drive Dec. 7, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. All of the buildings affected by the first two outages. While the contractor performing the maintenance will strive to shorten the duration of each power outage, all affected tenants and family housing residents should plan to be without power during the hours listed above.

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The award is presented each year to an outstanding DeCA employee in honor of the late Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Michael W. Blackwell, DeCAs first senior enlisted advisor. Periodically, I need to assess store operations but more importantly, I use this type of opportunity to thank employees because they work so hard and are so committed to supporting military families, said Jeu, who over sees 245 commissaries worldwide. This is the first time Ive been here and Im very pleasantly surprised. The store is in fantastic shape, he added. I think NAS Jacksonville has one of the best store directors and the employees are top notch. I can see why the com munity is so happy with their store here. During the visit, Jeu was briefed on holiday food items, deli operations, produce department challenges and goals, meat department procedures, seafood department operations, how the store moves items from the receiving area to the floor and line items on the floor. While touring the produce depart ment, which was a mass of brightly colored fresh fruits and vegetables, Produce Manager Roberto Ramos dis cussed daily operations. Each day, we strive to do our best to deliver fresh, quality produce to our customers. Its very challenging some days but we have a great team, said Ramos. And, Im here because I love to see our customers smile. Our produce department sold almost $6 million of goods last year. We are continually moving items from the trucks out to the floor. Its important to have fresh produce every day, said Bentley. According to Meat Department Manager John Crayon, they also work hard to keep customers happy. We want to give our customers the very best; we are always looking for new products. No commercial store can deliver savings like the commis sary. During holidays, we will often do $40,000 a day in sales, so you know we are really serving our customers. We have a great group of meat cut ters here and Im so proud of them, he explained. Jeu also discussed the strategies of building a new commissary aboard the station. The new store is a fiscal year 2014 construction project. Right now, we are awaiting final approval from Congress. Once that comes, construction should begin at the beginning of fiscal year 2015 with the project completed by the end of fiscal year 2016, said Jeu. While this store is pretty large, there are some limitations. In the new store, we will concentrate more on healthy food choices such as natural/organic and gluten-free foods, bigger aisles and more modern features. Following the tour, Jeu presented several DeCA Director Coins to commis sary employees Nancy Garcia, Linda Hunter and Max Dimaya for their outstanding contributions. He also thanked other employees for their hard work. Ive heard many store directors say that their store is the best. I think you are definitely up there with the best and you should all be very proud. You are doing a great job and the store looks wonderful. And Im glad to be here in person to say, thank you, Jeu told the store workers before presenting Bentley with his award. This award is given to those who demonstrate outstanding leadership qualities, and I believe Mr. Bentley has the qualities and characteristics to receive this award. He is truly an ambassador for the commissary benefit and has built a great team here, said Jeu. As Bentley graciously accepted the award, he stressed this importance of the team. It takes all 250 of us, employees, contractors and vendors, to do this job. We have a remarkable team here and our goal is to con tinue to provide top service to our customers, he said. COMMISSARY JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013 3

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Will enhance offerings, provide one-stop veteran servicesThe ribbon for the new City of Jacksonville and Jacksonville Jaguars Veterans Resource and Reintegration Center was cut Nov. 15 at City Hall by Mayor Alvin Brown, Jaguars owner Shad Khan, Deutsche Bank Managing Director Michael Fleming, U.S. Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Tom Allan, Blount Island Command Commanding Office Col. Matt Crabill, NAS Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker and City Military Affairs, Veterans and Disabled Services Director Vic Guillory. The center is part of a five-year, $1 million partnership between the city and the Jaguars Foundation that will enhance and expand services for Jacksonville-area military and veterans. Im proud of this partnership, high lighting the city and Jaguars commitment to the dedicated men and women who serve, or have served, in the United States military, said Brown. By working together, we are able to enhance and expand the services available to our military and vet erans, showing our communitys grati tude and support in strong and meaning ful ways. The Jaguars, along with the entire city of Jacksonville, owe a significant debt to all of our servicemen and women, Khan said.The opening of the Veterans Resource and Reintegration Center is one way we can collectively return the favor.Whether through assistance with employment, education, housing, medi cal treatment, or just to provide a hand in connecting all the services together, its important and wonderful to know that Jacksonville will stand united with our veterans as they return home. This is a great day for Jacksonville because we now have a one-stop resource when it comes to reintegrating warf ighters back into our community, said Wanamaker. The knowledgeable staff here will provide direction when service men and women need assistance to access their rightful benefits whether educa tional, financial or health related. Each veteran will have a mentor assigned to assist in the process. Its fantastic! The new center will be housed and managed by the citys Military Affairs, Veterans and Disabled Services Department (MAVDS) and will expand the core services already available. City Council approved an ordinance (2013-559) earlier this year to appropriate $100,000 in grant funds from the Jaguars Foundation for revamping the MAVDS offices and to provide social ser vices, housing assistance, career-related services and emergency financial assis tance to veterans and transitioning mili tary personnel. The ordinance also created a new position of social services specialist to help provide these new services. In addition to the new center, the fiveyear partnership with the city and Jaguars creates a new program to help allocate $50,000 in grant money to area service providers to increase and enhance their services for area military and veterans. Grant funding will be allocated by an advisory board with members from the city, Jaguars Foundation and other area part ners. Deutsche Bank provided the first cor porate contribution to the fund. Fridays announcement falls during the citys 2013 Week of Valor, honoring the ser vice and sacrifice of Jacksonvilles military and veteran community. The week is highlighted by events including the Veterans Day parade, school visits by veterans and military personnel, and the Jaguars Military Appreciation Game against the Arizona Cardinals on Nov. 17. With the holiday season approaching, Navy officials announced the launch of its annual holiday stress navigation campaign Nov. 1. This years campaign, Thrive During the Holidays, will provide Sailors and families proactive resources to get ahead of holiday chaos while focusing on building resilience for the New Year. For many of us, the most wonderful time of the year is as demanding as it is joyous, said Capt. Kurt Scott, Navy resilience chief. Our Sailors and families are operating under more stress and uncertainty than ever this year, and planning for the holidays can be overwhelming. Our annual campaign will address everything from financial preparations to maintaining diet and fitness goals, so that we can help everyone stay in the holiday spirit and position themselves to thrive in the New Year. Navy Operational Stress Controls 2013 Thrive During the Holidays campaign will include collaboration between Navys 21st Century Sailor programs and other readiness programs to offer resources on topics such as responsible alcohol use during holiday cele brations; planning and time management; budgeting; incorporating physical fitness into busy schedules; healthy eating tips; spirituality and relationship fit ness; and more. Our focus is helping Sailors and families proactively identify these sources of stress before things start to pile up on them, so that they can truly enjoy their holidays and do so responsibly, said Scott. Continuing our effort to promote a sense of com munity, we really have something for everyone this year from families navigating the holidays with a loved one on deployment to helping Navy youths Track Santa. Engagement with the North American Aerospace Defense Commands annual NORAD Tracks Santa promotion is a new initiative for the OPNAV N171 annual holiday campaign this year, part of an expanded effort to reach out to Navy kids. The Thrive During the Holidays campaign will continue through early January 2014. Releases can be found on Navy Operational Stress Controls blog, www.navynavstress.com, and the Navy Suicide Prevention Web site, www.suicide.navy.mil. Follow Navy Operational Stress Control on Twitter and Facebook @NavStress for the latest updates to help you and your family Thrive During the Holidays. New holiday stress navigation campaign: Thrive During the HolidaysCity, Jaguars open veteran resource & reintegration center 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013

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Brett Tracy and Twilla Smith were named Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Senior and Junior Civilian of the Third Quarter 2013 Award, respectively, Nov. 1. As a regional program analyst and Continuous Process Improvement specialist in the CNRSE Strategic Planning and Lean Sigma Six (LSS) divi sion, Tracy provided customer service to internal and external customers and trained and mentored other program analysts throughout the region. His recent efforts resulted in him developing the Navy Region Southeasts Sexual Assualt Database which contrib uted to the fulfillment of customer requirements for program implementation, said Henry Burkard, Tracys supervisor. Having won the Senior Civilian of the Quarter twice in two years demonstrates Bretts sustained commitment to excellence and continued high value to the organization. I am very fortunate to have him as a team member, Burkard said. Tracy said it was the support of his co-workers that were most instrumental to his selection. Knowing your work efforts are appreciated gives any employee the drive to continually do a great job, he said. Im always well supported by my collegues and management and they are the biggest contributors to my professional growth. I want to convey my sincerest thanks for all their cooperation and assistance on a daily basis. Smith is the assistant to the public affairs officer and the Navy Community Service Program (NCSP) regional coordinator for the Southeast. She worked with 17 installations and dozens of tenant commands to guide them through the NCSP Awards Package submission process. She also identified and trained 14 judges on the rating process for the flagship nominations submitted by the regions tenant commands, and coordinating the judging of 40 nomination packages. Nominating Ms. Smith for this award was the most logical thing for us to do, and I couldnt be proud er of her for receiving this recognition, said Mike Andrews, public affairs officer for Navy Region Southeast. She is the personification of team player and never backs off from any challenge. A perfect example is her work as coordinator of the regions inputs to the Commander Navy Installations Command (CNIC) Community Service Award Program. Despite her lack of prior experience, she took this program, made it her own and made it work. Im continually amazed by all that she does, while still finding time to pursue two masters degrees. Were lucky to have her. Like Tracy, Smith also commented that her co-workers provided substantial support in their professional success. I feel privileged to work in a department that supports professional growth and mentors employees to be successful in their career, she said. The Southeast Region public affairs office is one of the most experienced and knowledgable departments in the region, who takes pride in their work and is dedicated to providing assistance to others whether on the staff or in the public realm. I am truly grateful to work on a team of this caliber. Individual selection criteria for the awards was based upon exemplary performance of tasks, contri butions that enhanced organization accomplishment of command objectives, mission, teamwork or public image, and ones professional attitude toward self and others.CNRSE announces Senior, Junior Civilian of the Third Quarter 2013 CSADD event for junior SailorsThe Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) will host a bowling event Dec. 5 at 2 p.m. at NAS Freedom Lanes. Five-player teams. For more info, contact AC3 Ray (alexis.ray@navy. mil), or MAC Henderson (vanessa.henderson@ navy.mil). JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013 Cloudy skies and the threat of rain did not inhibit thousands of children and parents from enjoying the annual MWR Military Family Appreciation Carnival Nov. 16 at the Allegheny Softball Fields across from the Navy Exchange/ Commissary complex. Children and adults of all ages enjoyed the spinning rides, a giant slide, bounce houses, a Ferris wheel, bungee jumping, swings and an air plane ride. Other activities included a balloon dart game and camel race where the children and their parents could try their luck by rolling balls up a ramp into holes and throwing darts at balloons for prizes. Dawn Mills, school liaison officer, provided free school supplies for the children and Child and Youth Programs provided information as well as snacks and water. This is a great showing for the Month of the Military Family Appreciation Carnival at NAS Jax. More than 1,700 patrons are enjoying the inflatables, rides and carnival foods. This is a small way to show our gratitude and recog nize the sacrifices that the military families make with the service men and women, said Youth Activities Center Director Jason McKenzie. We have been coordinating this event for months and its really prov en to be a popular event. Id really like to thank our sponsors VyStar Credit Union, USAA, University of Phoenix, Sprint, Armed Forces Benefit Association and USA Discounters for their contributions, continued McKenzie. Id also like to thank the many vol unteers and workers who are absolutely essential to putting on this successful event. The patrons agreed on the success of the event. I think this event is awesome, it totally wears the kids out and it is free. My daughter loved every ride and activity she participated in today, said Aliye Fulton. The next MWR celebration for mili tary families will be in April to celebrate the Month of the Military Child. Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government offi cially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. MWR hosts fall carnival for military families

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013 7

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their ever-vigilant forward presence in the Asia-Pacific region, are on station bringing needed support and hope to the people of devastated locations in the Philippines. VP-26 and VP-62 were among the first to provide crucial information about where to best focus relief efforts in response to this crisis. The Commander of CTG-72.2, Cmdr. Mark Sohaney, is extremely proud of the opportunity to support this effort. Our thoughts and prayers are with the Philippine people, and we are honored to help them in their time of need, stated Sohaney, We are postured to remain as long as the Philippine and U.S. government needs us. TYPHOON 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013

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a tour of one of VP-16s new P-8A Poseidon aircraft. I enjoy visiting with them just as much as they do. Its an honor to be here to thank them for what they do for our country every day, said Rackley. According to VP-16 Executive Officer Cmdr. Daniel Papp, the visit was a huge boost to his squadrons morale. We think its great to have the Jaguars out here visiting our squadron and touring the P-8A. The Jaguars are our home team just as we are the City of Jacksonvilles antisubmarine warfare home team. The Navy has a wonderful partnership with the city and our local community, he stated. The squadron will be the first in the Navy to deploy with the new aircraft to Kadena, Japan later this month. This is really cool Ive never been on an aircraft like this. Im really hon ored to be here today, you dont get the chance to see this too often, commented Marks after spending time with VP-16 pilot Lt. j.g. Johnny Kozlowski in the cockpit learning about the instru ments. The two Jaguars also visited the Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing Atlantic Helicopter Training Facility at NAS Jax where they learned how helicopter pilots hone their skills and were given the opportunity to fly in the SH-60F Seahawk simulator. Cmdr. Ross Mackenzie, offi cer in charge, Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing Atlantic, Detachment Jacksonville, escorted Marks and Rackley into the simulator and explained how the instruments and throttle maneuver the simulated heli copter. He then let Marks fly the helicopter from the NAS Jacksonville flight line across the Jacksonville skyline to land in Everbank Field. Rackley also took charge of the controls flying across the city. This has been an awesome visit and Ive really had a great time today. Im glad I had the opportunity to learn what some of the Navy does at NAS Jacksonville, said Marks. They are a great bunch of guys and we are happy to support our local Jacksonville Jaguars and we wish them all the best. We are so glad they took time out of their busy schedules to come what the Navy does here, said Mackenzie. Marks and Rackley also provided 65 pizzas from Papa Johns to feed the hungry Sailors as they waited to meet them. The Jacksonville Jaguars will pay tribute to military members, veterans and their families during a military appre ciation home game Nov. 17 against the Arizona Cardinals. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government official ly endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. JAGUARS JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013 9

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Residents from the Clyde E. Lassen State Veterans Nursing Home located in St. Augustine, Fla. visited NAS Jacksonville Nov. 13 to reminisce their military service and receive a tour of the base. I have been volunteer ing at the Lassen facility for some time and frequently the vets there ask me about whats happening on the base, said Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast NEPA Planning and Compliance Coordinator Greg Timoney. Some are prior Navy and almost all of them are still interested in how the military has developed since they left service. The group of seven veter ans were treated to a walking tour of the base historic air craft display park and a windshield tour of the base flight line. NAS Jacksonville Assistant Hazardous Waste Manager Jody Smith provided a narra tion of the aircraft on display and spoke to the many efforts of the base to remain environmentally friendly while sup porting operations during the flight line portion of the tour. Its incredible being able to spend time with these veter ans, said Smith. Being a veteran myself with 21 years of service in the Navy, I just love having a chance to interact with these folks who paved the way for me to serve. Following the flight line tour, the group made their way to the Black Point Interpretive Center where NAS Jacksonville Natural Resources Manager Christine Bauer briefed the group on the centers mis sion. The group then headed to Mulligans restaurant at the base golf course for lunch. Sgt. Joseph Tie-dye Tillman, a former Marine who joined the Corps in 1967 and spent time in combat in Vietnam as an FO (Forward Observer), was a first-time visitor to NAS Jacksonville. This base and its historic aircraft display is very impressive, said Tillman. Ive really enjoyed the tour and our time here. Navy retiree Roy Lightfoot was the oldest, but also one of the liveliest members of the group. He first came to NAS Jacksonville in 1942 to attend A school when he was 19 years old. He met and married his wife, Mildred, that sum mer in St Augustine. After his 22-year career in the Navy, they settled in Jacksonville. Its wonderful and reju venating to be back at NAS Jacksonville, said Lightfoot. There have been tremen dous improvements to the base since I was stationed here. I am impressed with the sharp sailors Ive seen during the visit. Im proud to be a part of the Navy. Timoney volunteers with the veterans because he feels like hes got to put a little karma back in the bucket, but explained that he feels like he gets a lot more back from these heroes than he gives them. The Clyde E. Lassen State Veterans Nursing Home locat ed in St. Johns County at 4650 State Road 16, is one of six Florida State nursing homes for veterans. The 120-bed facility opened to residents in 2010 and offers skilled nursing care to veterans. Stuck on that routine of firing up a cigarette in the morning with a cup of coffee, after a meal or to relax after a stressful day? Due to the highly addictive nature of nicotine, tobacco use is a habit that is difficult to quit but not impossible. Truth is, the time to stop is now, and Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles Wellness Center provides the tools you need to quit. In recognition of the American Cancer Society Great American Smokeout observed the third Thursday of November every year the Wellness Center will conduct a fair to help smokers quit. The fair will be held at Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonvilles Navy Exchange pavilion Nov. 21 from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. According to World Health Organization (WHO), tobacco kills up to half of its usersnearly six million people each year. More than five million of those deaths are the result of direct tobacco use while more than 600,000 are the result of non-smokers being exposed through second-hand smoke. The hazards of smoking are well known but not everyone is aware that there are more than 4,000 chemicals in tobacco smoke, of which at least 250 are known to be harmful and more than 50 are known to cause cancer. It is important for tobacco users to know that there is help, said Charlene Rees, NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center smoking cessation coordinator. Many young active-duty sailors start smoking because of boredom or as a socialization tool. This could eventu ally lead to addiction as well as many medical complications. The Wellness Center can help patients kick the habit in a variety of ways to include classes, medications and counseling. Smokers need to also be aware that the use of tobacco not only affects them, but the innocent people around them by way of second-hand smoke one of the most widespread exposures in the indoor environment. Our ultimate goal is to reduce tobacco use and improve the health and wellness of our nations heroes and their families. Tobacco use is the top preventable cause of illness and premature death in the U.S. and tobacco products are the only legal consumer commodities that are harmful when used exactly as the manufacturer intended. There is no safe level of exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke. Separate or ventilated smoking areas do not protect non-smokers from second-hand smoke. It can cause serious cardiovas cular and respiratory diseases coronary heart disease and lung cancer in adults, low birth weight in pregnant women and sudden death in infants. Quitting smoking has immediate as well as long-term benefits for smokers and their loved ones. Some improve ments are immediate within 20 minutes heart rate and blood pressure drop and within a few hours the level of carbon monoxide in the blood declines. S mokers who quit at age 30 reduce their chance of dying prematurely from smoking-related diseases by more than 90 percent, and by 50 percent for those who quit at age 50. The current trend for smokers who are attempting to avoid some of the hazards of smoking cigarettes is the electronic cigarette or e-cigarette. E-cigarettes are neither supported nor used as an aid by the Wellness Center. According to WHO, the potential risks e-cigarettes pose for the health of its users remains undetermined, and their efficacy for helping people quit smok ing has not been scientifically demon strated. It is just as hard to quit smoking as it is to quit using heroin, cocaine or alcohol, said Rees. Quitting the use of tobacco, in any form, is the greatest single step that one can take in improving their health. It doesnt matter how long you have used tobacco, how old you are or the condition of your health just quit! NH Jacksonvilles wellness fair will feature displays, educational materials and give-away items for those who are interested in quittingall active duty, retirees and family members are eligi ble. Experts will be on hand to discuss available methods of treatment provid ed by the Wellness Center. There will also be a free turkey raffle to smokers who are willing to throw away their cigarettes for the day go cold turkey. The ultimately decision to stop using tobacco depends on the indi Some of Floridas oldest veterans tour base Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles Wellness Center stands ready to help smokers kick the habit 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013

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Defense Department and Transportation Security Administration officials today announced a partner ship to expand TSA Precheck expedited screening benefits to all U.S. armed forces ser vice members, includ ing those serving in the Coast Guard, Reserves and National Guard, during their official or leisure travel. As a result of the agreement, these individuals will be able to enjoy the benefits of the program at the 100 participating airports across the country beginning Dec. 20, offi cials said. Currently, members of the armed forces can use TSA Precheck lanes at 10 domestic airports by presenting their common access cards. The part nership expands the program to all 100 airports offering TSA Precheck, allowing service mem bers to keep their foot wear and light outer wear on and their laptop in its case, as well as to have their 3-1-1 compli ant liquids and gels bag in a carry-on bag in select screening lanes. Expanding TSA Precheck screening ben efits is great news for our service members and is a tangible sign of this nations gratitude for the men and women who serve this nation bravely each and every day, said Mary Snavely-Dixon, director of the Defense Manpower Data Center. We will continue to work with the Transportation Security Administration to help expand this pro gram further. TSA joins with the American people in showing its appreciation for the service and sac rifices of our men and women in the Armed Forces, said TSA Deputy Administrator John Halinski.Providing expedited screening while on travel is the least we can do for these courageous men and women. The new process being established under this agreement allows all active duty, Coast Guard, Reserve and National Guard service members to use their DOD iden tification number when making reservations. That ID number will be used as their Known Traveler Number. When arriving at the airport, service members will then be permitted access to TSA Precheck lanes for official or leisure travel on participating airlines. TSA also noted that wounded service mem bers can get expedited screening without hav ing to remove footwear, light outerwear, jackets or headwear. Wounded warriors or their care coordinators can contact TSA Cares toll free at 1-855787-2227 with details of the itinerary once flight arrange ments are made with the airline. TSA will incorporate random and unpredict able security measures throughout the airport so no one is guaran teed expedited screen ing. Travelers can check the TSA Precheck Participating Airports Web page for more infor mation. Partnership means faster airport screening for service members JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013 11

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Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville kicked off its 2014 Science, Service, Medicine and Mentoring (S2M2) program with approximately 100 ninth-, 10thand 11thgrade students at Darnell-Cookman Middle/ High School of the Medical Arts Nov. 13. This is a phenomenal opportunity for our kids, said Mark Ertel, Darnell-Cookmans principal. The fact that some of these students will be able to apply and be selected to participate in a program at Naval Hospital Jacksonville is an opportunity one cant pass. During the event, NH Jacksonville clinicians shared inspirational stories of their careers in Navy Medicine, the paths they took to get there and their accomplishments. After panelists introductions and an interactive Q-and-A session, students gathered in smaller groups rotating to each clini cian, hearing first hand about the unique role each medical profession contributes to healing our nations heroes. Rising 11th-grade students are eligible to apply for the oneweek summer program. Those selected will receive a realworld medical facility expe rience in numerous patient care areas at NH Jacksonville to include operating rooms, emergency department, phar macy and physical/occu pational therapy. Along with hands-on medical activities, students will participate in discussions, job-shadowing and mentoring with clinicians and other medical professionals. S2M2 provides Naval Hospital Jacksonville with an opportunity to connect with Darnell-Cookman stu dents to mentor the next gen eration of medical profession als, said Cmdr. Jim Keck, NH Jacksonville Family Medicine Residency program director. It not only offers the stu dents an opportunity to ask questions and explore differ ent avenues of the medical arts, but also to get involved in an experience at Naval Hospital Jacksonville and help decide whether this is the career field for them. Developed in 2004 by the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, and adopted in 2010 by NH Jacksonville, S2M2s mission is to encourage, nurture and enhance the commitment to science and medicine in a welcoming and intellectually stimulating environment for diverse groups of students. NH Jacksonvilles priority since its founding in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. The command is comprised of the Navys thirdlargest hospital and five branch health clinics across Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia. Of its patient popu lation about 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their families more than 57,000 are enrolled with a pri mary care manager at one of its facilities.To find out more, visit the command website at www.med.navy. mil/sites/NavalHospitalJax. Sailors from Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 11 visit ed two schools, one in St. Johns County and another on Jacksonvilles Westside, on Nov. 8 to commemorate Veterans Day. Members of the CPRW-11 TacMobile Department visited Durbin Creek Elementary school where Cmdr. Glen Pierce led a Cub Scouts pack and Mandarin High Schools Navy Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (NJROTC) unit in parading the colors to begin the ceremony. Lt. Jason York, officer in charge of Mobile Tactical Operations Center (MTOC) 9, led his group of Sailors to the Lighthouse Christian Schools Veterans Day ceremony. When the ceremonies ended at each school, the children were split up into smaller groups for question and answer sessions with CPRW-11 Sailors and other service veterans. Some of the most common questions were, What is it like to be in the Navy? and Have you ever traveled around the world in an airplane? The children particularly enjoyed trying on flight gear, looking at patches and going through old cruise books. One of the grandparents at Durbin Creek Elementary was a World War II veteran who served in the Navy during 11 island invasions in the South Pacific where he earned two Bronze Stars. York said, We owe these Veterans a great deal of respect I am personally honored to serve and carry on the traditions of Americas military. The Veterans Day ceremonies were widely viewed as extremely successful at both schools. Students handed out thank-you letters to all of the veterans and active duty military members who participated in the ceremonies. Both schools anticipate organizing Veterans Day ceremonies next year due to their popularity, as well as helping to teach the students about men and women who serve in our nations armed forces. Hospital kicks off S2M2 mentorship program at Darnell-Cookman CPRW-11 visits schools to commemorate Veterans Day FIGHT deadly childhood diseases.St. Jude Childrens Research Hospitalstjude.org A CFC participant provided as a public service. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013 13

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Friday at 7 p.m. Nov. 22 2nd Time Around Band (outside stage) Deweys Family Night third Friday of the month Deweys will be open for dinner & beverages Dec. 20 Childrens Holiday Bingo Childrens Holiday Bingo will start at 6 p.m. and has a cost of $10 per person and includes soft drinks, hot dog, dauber, bingo card and gift bag for each child.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Youth Bowling League: Every Sat., 10:30 a.m. noon $17 annually or $8 per week. Includes shoes, awards will be given at the end of the season! Rising Stars Youth League: Every Sat., 10:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m. Pee Wee Division (6 years & under) 2 games, $6 per week. Juniors Division (7 years & older) 3 games, $8 per week. Special Stars Bowling League for families with special needs children. All ages welcome! Ramps available for the non-ambulatory as well as bumpers for beginners. Runs for 10 weeks at a cost of $7 per week, shoes are included. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for Active Duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4 6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Jingle Bell Jog 5K Dec. 13 at 11:30 a.m. Perimeter Rd./Antenna Farm Powerlifting Competition Feb. 8, 2014, 7 a.m. at the Fitness Center $10 registration feeI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil Waves of Honor Special: Seaworld Orlando Adult $46.50, Child $42.25. Busch Gardens Tampa Adult $45, Child $40.50. Monster Jam: Club seating (includes pit pass) $42, regular seating (includes pit pass) $22. Jacksonville Jaguars: Section 147 Bud Zone, $70. Jags shuttle bus $12. The Artist Series Broadway in Jax 201314 Season: Tickets available now! Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus: Jan. 17 & 18, 2014, $51. War Horse: Feb. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $68.50. Memphis: March. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $65. Million Dollar Quartet: April. 26, 2014, 8 pm, $65. The D* Word: Oct. 4 Oct. 25, 2014, $43.75 $46. Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket (Expires Sept. 27, 2014) 4-day Hopper ticket$166 4-day, 1-park per day and water park ticket-$166 4-day Hopper and Water park combo ticket$194 Gatorbowl $35 Capital One Bowl $98 Russell Athletic Bowl $78 Soul Food Festival Special $20 General Admission $32 Preferred $42 VIP $65 Ringling Brothers Barnum & Bailey Circus $15 Veterans Memorial Arena Call for days and times. Legoland Free admission for active duty at park Tickets for family members available at ITT ITT is now selling $18 tickets for the Harlem Globetrotters! The show is Feb. 28, 7 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Arena.The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Car & Bike Show Nov. 22, 4 10 p.m. Deweys Parking Lot Live entertainment featuring 2nd Time Around Band Mall & Movie Trip Nov. 30 at noon Orange Park Mall & AMC TheaterNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Dec. 3 & 17 for active duty Dec. 5 & 19 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m. Turkey Trot Golf Scramble Nov. 25, 10 a.m. shotgun start $60 entry fee, $70 for civilian guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m.Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Dashing Through the Grove Dec. 6, 4 8 p.m. Free snow sledding, tree lighting, photos with Santa and more! Movie Under the Stars featuring The Grinch Dec. 13, 6 p.m. Patriots GroveFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013

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Annual Turkey Trot brings out runnersIt was a cool fall day for the annu al Turkey Trot Nov. 15 as 102 run ners turned out to participate in the 5K run. The event is sponsored by the University of Phoenix and USAA and coordinated by the NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department. Placing first overall and first in the mens 35-39 age category was Lt. Cmdr William Lutat of VR-62 with a time of 18:12. AT3 Jessica Thomas took first in the womens 20-24 category and was the first female to cross the finish line with a time of 23:00. Other winners were: The next run will be the annual Jingle Bell Jog Dec. 13 at 11:30 a.m.For more information, call 5423239/3518. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013 15

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An increasing number of base residents throughout the Southeast Region are reducing energy bills through the Switch4Good energy savings program, that is now in place at 11 of the regions installations. Balfour Beatty Investments, the Navys housing manage ment partner, designed the program to inform housing residents on ways to reduce energy consumption and lower their energy bills. The company decided to expand Switch4Good to installations throughout the region after a pilot progam at Travis Air Force Base in 2011 reduced energy consumption by 18 percent. The program rolled out alongside the Resident Energy Conservation Program (RECP) and attributed to the success and effectiveneness of meeting energy savings expectations, said Richard Dye, Navy Region Southeast (NRSE) housing program director. Participation in the Switch4Good program has been outstanding and impact on energy savings has been right in line with, or exceeded, expectations. The programs first phase began in October and con sisted of a three-month period where residents received mock bills and energy saving tips. The mock reports and sav ing tips served as a tool for residents to know how much energy they were using compared to like homes, Dye said. It was a good opportunity for residents to monitor and change any behavior that could help to reduce their consumption before actual billing started. Under RECP, utility accounts are either charged or credited if they are more than 10 percent over or under the established baseline energy consumption. The mock billing period provided residents three months to monitor and change any behavior to help reduce con sumption before actual billing started. According to Tabitha Crawford, senior vice presi dent of sustainability and innovation, Balfour Beatty Investments, the program has been a success. The program clearly dem onstrates that using smart meter data to provide person alized habit cues for residents results in reduced energy consumption, without retrofits, Crawford said. With housing comprising 20 to 25 percent of a military installations energy consumption, this program is an important tool in support ing the sustainability goals of our Army, Navy and Air Force partners. Switch4Good consists of three levels of resi dent engagement: Info and Peers, Digital Outreach and In-Home Coaching. The application of these methods varies from base to base. Info and peers is in place at 11 of the regions installations, Dye said. Residents receive monthly savings reports and access to a web portal with feedback on household energy usage. Its a great tool because they have immediate access to energy consumption data that updates every hour. Digital Outreach provides participating residents the same resources as Info and Peers, but with personalized, detailed tracking and analysis of their energy consumption via Twitter and text messages. Its very precise monitor ing of energy usage, not just throughout the base, but for each individual household, Dye said. If there is a con sistent spike in energy usage during certain times of the day, you might receive a text or tweet, then residents can take a look and determine what hap pened during that time that may have caused the spike. Its a valuable tool for people to become more efficient energy consumers. So far, Digital Outreach has been implemented aboard three installations: Joint Base Charleston, Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville and NAS Pensacola. More than 1,800 homes are eligible to enroll in the voluntary program. In addition to Digital Outreach and Info and Peers, residents on board NAS Key West and Naval Station Mayport have access to home visits from a personal trainer. These optional visits are designed to engage the entire family on specific ways to reduce energy costs. Many people dont realize how much energy they can save through very simple practices, Dye said. For example, they might not realize how much they could save from limiting television use or simply unplugging the television when theyre done. According to Lea Williford, regional team lead for pub lic and private ventures, even a modest reduction in energy usage throughout the region can have a significant impact on the installations total con sumption. A reduction of 10 percent in energy costs across the 11 installations currently imple menting Switch4Good would result in savings of more than $100,000 monthly and more than $1 million annually, Williford said. Its good for both the Navy and base residents, because the money saved from lower util ity bills goes back to the com munity to help pay for main tenance and updgrades. In addition, residents can receive a rebate for using less energy than the baseline. As of June, energy con sumption was down 10-15 percent at installations using the program. Base residents interested in enrolling in the Switch4Good program should contact their base housing authority.Southeast Region cuts energy costs through Switch4Good 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013

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Through a collaboration with the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Military Community and Family Policy, Duval County Public Schools, and NS Mayport and NAS Jacksonville, Military Family Life Consultants (MFLCs) have been provided to 12 Duval County Public Schools. The consultants services are designed to offer extra support to assist with the unique challenges which military families experience. The primary focus of the Military & Family Life Counseling Program is prevention, education, and counseling support. The services are provided confidentially and no case records or documentation is kept. The consultants do not assess or diagnose, and when they encounter more in depth issues/diagnoses, they offer to connect military families with other helping agencies avail able on the installation or in the com munity. While meeting with children, MFLCs always remain in line of sight of a teacher, staff member, or a parent. The consultants are licensed clini cians who have demonstrated expertise in working with children. They can pro vide short-term non-medical counseling support in a variety of different ways: individual meetings with children, pre sentations about life skills issues, skillbuilding group discussions, and meet ings with parents and families at the familys request for additional counsel ing/coaching support. Some of the common issues that MFLCs help with include the following: skills tion and divorce The seven MFLCs have been assigned to work in the following schools: Elementary with school counselor Donna Davis, Elementary and Jax Beach Elementary with school counselors Melissa Hammond and Carla Forest-Crumley, with school counselor Adrienne Wakefield, Elementary and John Stockton Elementary with school counselors and San Mateo Elementary with school counselors Amelia Williams and Duane Monte, Elementary and Sheffield Elementary with school counselors Marisa Negron and Ginger Brown, and Learning Academy and Chimney Lakes Elementary with school counselors Ellen Golden and Shelia Handress. The school program model is designed to provide an informal context in which children can access a behav ioral consultant in a non-threatening and supportive environment. MFLCs circulate throughout the school facility making themselves available in class rooms, libraries, staff lounges, athletic events and other areas as identified. By virtue of these efforts to become inte grated into the day-to-day fabric of the school, the consultant becomes the friendly face on the playground, the compassionate listener in the lunch room, and an objective resource to teachers and staff alike. All military families will be given the opportunity to consent for their chil dren to participate in this free service or to opt-out. For more information about MFLC services, you can contact your school to request the direct number for the MFLC on campus. Dawn Mills is the school liaison offi cer for NAS Jacksonville. If you have questions or need a copy of the un/ underfunded mandates for Duval Schools, or have concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at dawn.m.mills@navy.mil or by phone at (904) 778-2236 [office] or (904) 486-8221 [cell].Local schools assigned military family life consultants JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013 17

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Sailors from Navy Band Southeast and Aviation Survival Training Center (ASTC) Jacksonville participat ed in a Veterans Day Assembly at Mandarin High School in Jacksonville, Fla. Nov. 13. The event was part of the City of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor which recognizes military members, veterans and their families for their service. Navy Band Southeasts MU2 Laura Carey kicked off the event singing the nation al anthem as the Mandarin High School NJROTC pre sented the colors. Mandarin High School Civics Teacher Calvin McFarland Jr. hosted the event. After thanking those in attendance, he welcomed Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown to the podium. Im excited to be here today. This week in honor of men and women who are members of our nations military we can never thank them enough for their service and sacri fices. Jacksonville has a large population of veterans. That means you probably know someone who serves or has served including some of your teachers. I want you to think about people in your life who served and take the time to say, thank-you, Brown told the students. He concluded his speech by having all the veterans in the audience stand to be recog nized thanking them for serv ing. The keynote speaker for the event was Dr. Dan Davis, senior adult pastor at Mandarin Baptist Church and retired U.S. Army chaplain. The state of liberty must be protected where our nations military comes into play. Think about the vets you know and what they have taught you about patriotism, duty and sacrifice, Davis reminded the audience. Life in America dares us to prepare to respond to nations needs with a spirit of commitment that we find in the veterans that we honor today. HM2(FMF) Justin Cardente and ND3(DSW/PJ) Ben Lee of ASTC Jax also talked about what it means to be a veteran and some of their experiences in the Navy. Ive been in the Navy for eight years and have been for tunate to have done a lot and been many places. I worked with the Marines in places like Iraq and Afghanistan. Everywhere that Ive been, the people that Ive come in contact with have looked up to the U.S. military, said Cardente. For me Veterans Day means remembering those who came before me. As a Navy diver, we do a lot of dangerous missions and unfortunately, you never know when your turn to serve is up. I am proud to serve today for all those who served before me and all those who come after me, added Lee. The assembly concluded with the Navy Band playing the official songs of the different U.S. Armed Forces. The Sailors spent the rest of the school day visiting various class rooms talking with students about their careers, educational opportunities and some of their experiences.Sailors participate in Veterans Day Assembly at local school Suicide prevention awareness trainingIn November and December, NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) is offering Suicide Prevention Awareness Training for base and tenant commands. Should your command be in need of this training, select a date and time that is convenient for your command and call 542-2776 to reserve seating, said FFSC Education and Training Coordinator Wilhelmina Nash. Attending this one-hour class could help you save someones life. Thank you for your concern and support. Dashing Through The Grove at NAS Jax Patriots GroveFriday, December 6, 4 8 p.m.FREEsnow Sledding Photos with Santa Tree Lighting Musical Entertainment Refreshments And more! (904) 778-9772 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013 19 viduals desire to stop. The Wellness Center offers onetime group tobacco cessa tion classes every week Mondays at 9 a.m., Tuesdays at 1 p.m. and Thursdays at noon. Private appoint ments, with a tobacco edu cator, are also available. Contact the NH Jacksonville Wellness Center locat ed adjacent to NAS Jacksonvilles fitness cen terat (904) 542-5292/5293. Additional resources include DoDs www.ucan quit2.org and The Florida Quitline at 877-U-CANNOW or www.floridaquit line.com SMOKEOUT Lt. j.g. Nathan Shuey banks left as he prepares for his first aircraft carrier landing. The familiar feel of G-forces drive him down into his seat as he rehearses his rhythmic breathing. He flexes his grip to remind himself that he is in control, then he corrects his heading as he hears the air traffic controller granting him permission to land. His aircraft rapidly approaches the carrier. The flaps go down. Its a mile away. He pulls back slightly to slow the jet, never removing his eyes from the heads-up dis play. Seconds away from landing, Shuey eases off the throttle and drops altitude. He feels the thud of touchdown and slams the throttle forward. The trap tries to rip the aircraft from beneath him as it slows from 130 miles per hour to zero in just over a second. Shuey eases back the throttle and breathes. Success. Shuey was among the pilots of Training Wing (TW) One and Two who completed take offs, landings and taxiing maneu vers onboard USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) Oct. 31, en route to their carrier qualifi cations. For the pilots of TW-1 and TW-2, it was an honor to make their first aircraft carrier landing on TR. The first pass was absolutely terrifying, said Shuey of TW-1. It was a touch and go and your nerves are so high you kind of forget what youre doing. Pilots practice carrier land ing and taxying on a simulator before flying out to a ship. The simulator is extremely lifelike, but it does not compare to the visceral experience of the real thing, said Shuey. The landing signal officers always teach us to fly the ball to touchdown, which means keep your eyes on the lens and be aware of everything else. So, when you approach the wires, dont follow them with your eyes. Dont look down or try to catch a certain wire. Keep your eye on the ball until you slam forward in the cockpit. You honestly fly until your jet stops moving. I just kept saying to myself, fly the ball to touchdown, fly the ball to touch down, said Shuey. Being a pilot was always a dream, but Shuey never thought to actively pursue it until his senior year in college. I went to Naval Air Station Oceana for an event with Penn State [Reserve Officers Training Corps], he said. There was a squadron of F-18s there, and I got to ride in one. I knew from that point on that if I could make [flying] an occupation, I wanted to do it. Thats when I got really motivated to work towards it. The path to becoming a naval aviator is long and chal lenging. I actually trained with the Air Force for half a year and that was pretty challenging because I moved to a place that I never expected to be, said Shuey. I was in Oklahoma for that at Vance Air Force Base and that was pretty rigorous train ing. I chose to go there and was hoping it would set me up to fly jets, and it actually worked out but was really difficult. Pilots complete an aerobatics course designed to boost con fidence and familiarize pilots with the aircrafts limitations after more than a year of training. Im sure every pilot can appreciate their first aerobatic solo or aerobatic flight, said Lt. j.g. Daniel Knight, a heli copter pilot assigned to the Dragonslayers of HS-11. You are basically given the controls with a training pilot and are told to do flips and barrel rolls. Then you are told to go up and do it again alone. Its meant to build your confidence as a pilot. Its terrifying but also a lot of fun. Aviators receive their gold wings at the conclusion of their nearly two year training pipe line. It was a lot of relief know ing that I made it through the program and a good amount of pride knowing what I had accomplished, said Knight. Also knowing my fam ily was there and that they had been looking forward to it for so long. It was a great sense of accomplishment, much more so than obtaining my bach elors degree. It wasnt some thing someone told me to do, it was something I sought out and that made it much more rewarding. As he steps out of the cock pit, Shuey is reminded of the countless hours in a simula tor, days of actual flight, weeks away from home and years of education and training that led him to this point. He fills with pride at the thought that soon he will join the ranks of elite naval aviators. Cashiers at military com missaries soon will begin scanning customers Defense Department ID cards as part of the checkout process, Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA) officials said. The Fort Lee, Va., commis sary, where DeCA has its headquarters, became the first store to scan ID cards Oct. 22 as the first part of a rollout through out the agency that began Nov. 10 and will be completed by mid-January, officials said. Noting that commissary shoppers are used to showing their ID cards to establish their eligibility to use the stores, officials explained that by scan ning the ID at checkout, DeCA no longer will need to main tain any personal information on customers in its computer systems, such as the system used for customers who write checks. Scanning also will help to improve the commissary ben efit for all patrons, said Joseph H. Jeu, DeCA director and CEO. In addition to verifying customers as authorized commissary patrons, well gain infor mation that will give us a better understanding of our patrons, allowing the agency to provide the commissary benefit more effectively and efficiently, he said. Cross-referenced with other Defense Department data, the scan data will give DeCA use ful information about patron usage by military service, officials said, along with customer demographics that do not identify specific personal data of an individual. This eventually will help the agency identify shopping needs and preferences and will also allow more accurate report ing to the military services on commissary use, officials said. The demographic informa tion DeCA will use is strictly limited to card ID number, rank, military status, branch of service, age, household size, and ZIP codes of residence and duty station, DeCA officials emphasized, adding that the agency will not be using any personal information such as names, addresses or phone numbers. The methods, processes and information well use will not compromise our customers privacy they can be sure of that, Jeu said. Were putting technology to work to better understand our customers and ensure the commissary benefit continues to remain relevant to them now and in the future. The Defense Commissary Agency operates a worldwide chain of grocery stores for military personnel, retirees and their families. Authorized patrons purchase items at cost plus a 5-percent surcharge, that covers the costs of build ing new commissaries and modernizing existing ones. Scanning the Department of Defense ID card bar code allows the Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA) to positively identify an individual and verify that he or she is authorized to shop in the commissary. There is a small number of older ID cards without bar codes, however, it must still be presented to prove ID of the cardholder. The only information captured at the regis ter is the ID card number, that is crossed-refer enced with the Defense Manpower Data Centers Defense Enrollment Eligibility System (DEERS) to obtain rank, military status, branch of service, age, household size, residential ZIP code, and duty station. This data provides information about patron usage by military service and basic cus tomer demographics. Specific, personal data about an individual is not collected. The basic demographic information we cap ture will allow us to better understand our patrons and their preferences. This will enable us to provide products and services that are directly related to the entire patron base not individuals at specific commissary locations. Customers must present valid ID cards to make their commissary purchases. Unfortunately, those with expired cards will not be allowed to finish their purchases. They must make an appointment at a military installations Pass and ID office to get a new ID card. Yes. You will still present the same documen tation as before, based on guidelines for your respective installation. Required documentation is usually an Agent Letter or an Agent Card. When you present your DOD ID card at the register, the cashier can verify that you are the cardholder by looking at the card photograph. These two cards are independent of each other. Scanning your DOD ID card is part of the validation process. We scan your Rewards Card to apply digital coupon discounts to your total shopping purchase. Scanning is done before the checkout process begins. If youre using the self-checkout, you hand your card to the attendant, who will check your photograph to verify you are the cardholder and then hand the card back to you, at which time you will scan your ID. Since only authorized patrons can use the commissary, and scanning the card is the means of verification, no patron can opt out of having their ID card scanned. Only DeCA not a third party collects this information. The collected data is maintained at DeCA Headquarters, not at any of our commis saries. Yes, but not at an individual level. We will link purchases to the patron base as a whole, as it relates to basic demographics such as military status, branch of service, distance from commissary, age and household size. Matching purchases to this broad demographic information allows us to better understand our patron base and its preferences at each geographic location. New pilots make first launches, traps on Theodore Roosevelt Commissaries to begin scanning patrons ID Cards

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As Congress considers new legislation that could restrict military commanders author ity to overturn sexual assault convictions, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said senior Defense Department leaders are working through various options to identify a way ahead. Civilian and uniformed military leaders have consistently said that commander involve ment is essential to changing the military culture and eradi cating sexual assault crimes. Little indicated during a reg ular news briefing today that leaders havent altered their stance on the question. To my knowledge, theres been no change in the depart ments position on how to grapple with what we all know is a serious issue inside the mil itary, Little told reporters in response to questions. Its important to many senior leaders in the depart ment to try to address this problem inside the institution, he said. When it comes to getting at it, getting at this serious problem and fixing it, and holding people accountable, we think that we can work this internally. The press secretary said the department is working close ly with members of Congress to find solutions. He noted that Army Maj. Gen. Gary Patton, director of DODs Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office, testified before a Congressional panel Nov.7. Little noted that a report released recently shows a rise in the number of sexual assaults over the past year, and attributed it to the militarys efforts to reach out to assault victims with a range of report ing options and medical and counseling services. We believe that this increase in reporting is con sistent with a growing level of confidence in our response system, he said. Little said another telling metric is the growing number of service members who report assaults that occurred before they joined the military. Were continuing to review these metrics to make sure thats in fact the case, but we dont view an increase in reporting as necessarily a bad thing, Little said. In fact, it could be a posi tive development because vic tims of sexual assault might feel more comfortable coming forward. Little said DOD is working to lock into place just such a system, and that leaders hope to see an increase in the number of victims who choose unrestricted reporting, which opens the possibility for pros ecution of alleged assailants. Cultural and behavioral change is also key to reducing or eliminating sexual assault in the military, Little acknowledged. Our strong goal is to make sure that all U.S. military per sonnel, men and women . [live and work in] an environ ment free from this crime, he said. Military Retirees Seminar set for Feb. 15Retirees should mark their calendars now for the upcoming Retiree Seminar to be held Feb. 15 at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center at NAS Jacksonville, said Retired Activities Office Director James Ryan. He explained that the seminar is designed in the County Fair format with continuous presentations and exhibits throughout the day. This allows maximum expo sure with subject matter experts who can help retirees with issues such as retiree pay, healthcare con cerns, veterans benefits, long-term care and assistance, and other issues of concern to retirees approaching Social Security and Medicare age, said Ryan. This years keynote speaker is retired Vice Adm. John Cotton, for mer chief of Navy Reserve, and commander, Naval Reserve Force. He also served as the assistant deputy Chief of Naval Operations, Warfare Requirements and Programs, and as a member of the Secretary of Defense Reserve Force Policy Board. Reservations are not required, but registration will take place at the door. The mission of Retired Activities Branch under OPNAV N135F is to ensure the retired community is kept apprised of their benefits, entitlements, rights, privileges and other changes in retirement law. The Retired Activities Branch is dedicat ed to supporting more than 650,000 Navy retirees, families, annuitants, and survivors worldwide.DoD spokesman says commanders essential to stop sexual assault 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013 21 The X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System Demonstrator (UCAS-D) con ducted flight operations Nov. 10 aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). The event, the most recent in a series of carrier-based tests, demonstrated the integra tion of the latest in naval avia tion technology with the most advanced and capable carrier. The tests demonstrated the X-47Bs ability to integrate with the carrier environment. The aircraft performed precise touch and go maneuvers on the ship to generate data that characterizes the environment in close proximity of the car rier flight deck. In addition, the aircraft took part in flight deck handling drills, complet ed arrested landings and cata pult launches. Mission opera tors monitored the aircrafts autonomous flight from a por table command and control unit from Theodore Roosevelts flight deck during each of its 45-minute flights. It is a tremendous oppor tunity for the Big Stick to be a part of the development and testing of the future of Naval Aviation, said Capt. Daniel Grieco, Theodore Roosevelts commanding officer. The UCAS is an impressive system that gives us all a glimpse into the support and strike capabilities we can expect to join the fleet in the years to come. The tactical and support possibilities for such platforms are endless, and I know the crew of TR are proud to be able to be a part of that development. A major objective for the UCAS-D program is to demon strate a digitized carrier con trolled environment to allow for robust communications between the aircraft and all carrier personnel involved with launching, recovering and con trolling the aircraft. A digitized carrier environment will ulti mately increase flexibility and improve safety. This weekends resump tion of carrier-based flights for the X-47 continues our efforts to mature critical unmanned enabling technologies and reduce the technical risk for the follow-on Unmanned Carrier Launched Airborne Surveillance and Strike (UCLASS) system, said Capt. Beau Duarte, the Program Manager for Unmanned Carrier Aviation. Current and future test events will continue to mature unmanned technologies and refine concept of operations to further inform unmanned car rier requirements. These pro gram successes represent sig nificant advancements in naval aviation technology and pro vide a glimpse into the future integration of manned and unmanned aircraft aboard the carrier fleet. Today, we took another sig nificant step toward integra tion of unmanned capabilities into our carrier airwings and aircraft carrier environments, said Rear Adm. Mat Winter. The Navy remains steadfast in its commitment to matur ing todays technologies which have established a realistic path to tomorrows affordable, flexible unmanned carrier avi ation capabilities for our warf ighters. Carrier-based tests of the X-47B began in December 2012 with flight deck operations aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). Carrier testing resumed in May 2013 aboard USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), where the X-47B completed its first carrier-based catapult launch, followed by its first carrier-based arrested landing in July. Jaguars tickets available at USOThe Greater Jax Area USO has tickets available at the NAS Jax and NS Mayport USO for $15 each, cash transactions only. Tickets are available the follow ing days and times: Guidelines: duty including Florida National Guard and Reservists on current active duty orders and dependents are eligible to purchase/use these tickets. may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equals four. If you have less than four you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but dependent children are not authorized to represent the service member/spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO director. mum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest. No exceptions. a block of game day tickets may be request ed by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the sea son.Requests, with justification, must be sent to Mike OBrien at mobrien@usojax.com Anyone caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets will be prohibited from buying any more tickets for the entire season. No over the phone transactions, tickets are first come, first served. For more information, call 7782821. X-47B operates aboard Theodore Roosevelt

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2013 ASSISTING VETS CARNI VA L NEW PILOTS Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com In the wake of Typhoon Haiyans devastation in the Republic of the Philippines, a massive multinational effort, dubbed Operation Damayan, is underway to bring aid to those affected by the unprecedented storm. Navy patrol squadrons VP26 Tidents and VP-62 Broadarrows based at NAS Jacksonville and cur rently deployed to Kadena Airbase in Okinawa, Japan with Commander, Task Group (CTG) 72.2 have contributed to this effort by repositioning three P-3C Orions, three air crews, and a detachment of maintenance professionals to Clark International Airport near Manila. As the storm approached on Nov. 9, these aircrews were placed on an alert sta tus prior to the storms land fall in preparation for the search and rescue missions. When the government of the Philippines requested assis tance and declared a nation al state of calamity on Nov. 11, the aircrews were able to reposition to the Philippines in just a few hours. Immediately upon arrival, they began working with the 3rd Marine Expeditionary Brigade that was in charge of the U.S. mili tary effort, to ensure every hour flown provided benefit to disaster relief operations. The Tridents and Broadarrows P-3C aircrews have flown missions over the hardest-hit areas since Nov. 11, assessing damage and search ing for populations cut off from sources of food, clean water and medical care. The geogra phy of the Philippines makes the determination of where to focus relief efforts particu larly difficult. The archipelag ic nation, comprised of more than 7,000 islands, includes countless remote and isolated populations in desperate need of relief. P-3C aircrews help solve this problem by search ing for and reporting highneed areas so rescue and relief efforts can arrive as quickly as possible. Among the hardest-hit areas is the small island of Homonhan, in the province of East Samar. The 12-mile long island lay directly in the path of Typhoon Haiyan and was devastated by winds that mea sured more than 200 miles per hour. A CTG 72.2 P-3C was the first aircraft on scene and the first to make contact with those on the ground in Homonhan. VP-62 P-3C Mission Commander Lt. Cmdr. Jace Dasenbrock described what his crew witnessed on Nov. 12 as they first approached the Island. We arrived on scene at noon in the and immediately saw devastation throughout the entire island. Our first pass around the island saw no sign of life below. Buildings were destroyed, with few structures surviving. The only building left intact was the church that stood on the southeastern edge of the island. A sailboat was in a tree about 20 feet off the ground. After a second pass, a few heads popped out. A third pass around the tiny island saw about 100 residents send ing S.O.S. signals.A fourth pass was made to give hope to the survivors. With roads washed out, relief needed to be brought in by air. We were able to identify several areas suit able for helicopters and Marine Ospreys (MV-22B) to land. This discovery was the first of several like it for the CTG 72.2 aircrews. The information and photographs they collect are sent in-flight to intelligence specialists who collate the products and provide them to the Marines coordinating U.S. military relief efforts on the ground. This enables U.S. and Philippine commanders and government officials to identify and prioritize humanitarian assistance requirements. Within days of the first P-3C flight over Homonhan Island, the USS George Washington (CVN-73) Carrier Strike Group re-positioned close enough to bring relief to citizens as well as other communities in the region. SH-60 Seahawks and Ospreys fly countless round trip sorties carrying 20-pound bags of food, water, and medi cal supplies ashore. The air space has become so crowded with relief aircraft that E-2C Hawkeyes are now orbiting overhead to direct and de-con flict air traffic. The P-3C and E-2C aircrews are coordinat ing to pass locations of suit able landing zones as well as locations of more un-reached disaster areas to relief aircraft in real time. The magnitude of the destruction in remote areas like Homonhan Island make restoring infrastructure and rebuilding communities a slow process. For now the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps, with Defense Commissary Agency Director and Chief Executive Officer Joseph Jeu visited the NAS Jacksonville Commissary to thank the employees for their dedication to providing out standing customer service and to learn about store operations Nov. 15. During a surprise ceremony, Jeu awarded NAS Jacksonville Commissary Store Director Larry Bentley with the 2013 Michael W. Blackwell Leadership Award for dis playing exceptional leadership, cour age and integrity in the performance of his duties at the commissary. History was made Nov. 12 when two NFL players toured the Navys newest Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance P-8A aircraft. Jacksonville Jaguars Defensive Tackle SenDerrick Marks and Guard Will Rackley became the first professional football players to set foot inside a Poseidon. The two players visited VP-16 War Eagles to meet the Sailors and sign autographs for squadron personnel, including Sailors from VP-5, VP-10 and VP-45. Im really appreciative of them coming out to meet with us today. Even though Im a Tennessee Titans fan, its great of them to take time out of their busy schedules and spend time with us in the hangar, said AWO2(NAC) Chris Walsh of VP-16. After thanking the Sailors for their service, Marks and Rackley were given VP-26 and VP-62 join in typhoon relief Top DeCA executive visits NAS Jax Commissary VP-16 hosts Jacksonville Jaguars, makes history

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Nov. 21 1918 U.S. battleships witness sur render of German High Seas fleet at Rosyth, Firth of Forth, Scotland, to U.S. and British fleets. Nov. 22 1914 The title, Director of Naval Aeronautics is established. Nov. 23 1940 President Franklin D. Roosevelt appoints Adm. William Leahy as U.S. Ambassador to Vichy France to try to prevent the French fleet and naval bases from falling into German hands. Nov. 24 1852 Commodore Matthew Perry sails from Norfolk, Va., to negotiate a treaty with Japan for friendship and commerce. 1964 USS Princeton (LPH-5) com pletes 7-day humanitarian relief to South Vietnam which suffered damage from typhoon and floods. 1969 HS-4 from USS Hornet (CVS12) recovers Apollo 12s all-Navy crew of astronauts Commanders Richard Gordon, Charles Conrad and Alan Bean after moon landing by Conrad and Bean. Nov. 25 1775 Continental Congress autho rizes privateering. 1943 In Battle of Cape St. George, five ships of Destroyer Squadron 23 (Capt. Arleigh Burke) intercept five Japanese destroyers sinking three and damaging one without suffering any damage. 1961 Commissioning of USS Enterprise (CVA(N)-65), the first nucle ar-powered aircraft carrier, at Newport News, Va. Nov. 26 1847 Lt. William Lynch in Supply sails from New York to Haifa for an expedition to the River Jordan and the Dead Sea. His group charted the Jordan River from the Sea of Galilee to the Dead Sea and compiled reports of the flora and fauna of the area. 1940 Sixth and last group of ships involved in Destroyers-for-Bases Agreement are transferred to British at Nova Scotia. Nov. 27 1941 Chief of Naval Operations sends war warning to commanders of Pacific and Asiatic Fleets. 1961 Navy reports first use of its cyclotron at Harvard University to treat a human brain tumor. After three treatments, the tumor of the 2-year old patient shrank by 80 percent. Again, Dustin said I shouldnt write this column. Last week, apparently he was right. This week, he is not. Dustin doesnt want me to write a fol low-up to last weeks Veterans Day col umn because he doesnt want me to even acknowledge online commenters or their vitriol. Its the same reason he didnt want me to write last weeks column: to save me from that experience. Dustins forgotten that 12 years ago, when I first started writing my newspaper column, he told me to never read comments. So I dont. I just dont. Sometimes, however, people send me screen shots: Sarah, did you see this one? (Interestingly, people dont forward the good ones. Only the hateful ones.) Last week was no different. Yet, some read ers including some friends who dis agreed with my Veterans Day column made reasonable, unemotional points, without attacking my character, and they deserve response. Since I began writing, Ive always hon ored veterans in my Veterans Day column. This year, fearing it would be repetitive and falsely assuming readers had read my other 12 Veterans Day columns, I decided to take a different perspective that of a military spouse. My biggest regret is that I did not also thank veterans in the column, because I certainly meant to. But something else was on my heart as I wrote. As we approached Veterans Day, my mind was solely on my friend Theresa, who lost her Navy-pilot husband in a helicopter crash seven weeks ago. I knew people would thank Dustin for his service on Veterans Day. Thats the way its always been and should be. I knew that Theresa had experienced that with Landon, too. And then I realized that this Veterans Day, her veteran was not here to thank. She would no longer hear, Thank your husband for his service, please. So I wanted to thank Theresa for all that her family has lost in ser vice to the country. That train of thought got me thinking about all the other spouses who have lost loved ones and the spouses of wounded war riors who have uprooted their lives to care for the sick and injured. Believe me, I was not thinking of myself. My husband has been deployed a handful of times, and now he works at the Pentagon. We have been incredibly fortunate, even though, as with all military families, we have had our share of sacrifices and challenges. I have not been through what Theresa is going through now, and I have not experi enced what the spouses of wounded veter ans do on a daily basis. They are left with much to shoulder, even though they tech nically did not take an oath of service. (In some ways, this fact is what amazes me all the more!) When I think of these spouses who have lost so much due their loved ones duty to the country, I cannot help but think they deserve some thanks for supporting a veter an. They are not veterans, but they certainly have been the support system for one. My mistake in last weeks column was my tone. It came across whiney and with a hint of thats not fair. I apologize for that. Yet, honestly, when I talk to Theresa and think about her circumstances, lately I struggle with the urge to scream, Thats not fair! My other mistake was the column title. I wrote the first instance of military-spouse veterans in quotation marks for a reason. I dont actually believe that spouses are true veterans. Nor do I think Veterans Day is for or about them. But I do believe its appropri ate to thank people like Theresa today and everyday. Interestingly, I had planned to use todays column to address Tom Cruises assertion that filming a movie overseas is like being deployed to Afghanistan. I already wrote about Cruises comments on Huffington Post (Link: http://www.huffington post.com/sarah-smiley/if-cruise-aban doned-suri-what-have-military-fathersdone_b_4252053.html), but I wasnt done with him yet. Then, after my column and the reaction last week, I paused to reflect. Wouldnt the world be better if we stopped to give people the benefit of the doubt? How do I know what Cruise really said? How do I know for sure he doesnt know what a deployment is like? How do I know what his life is like? How can I hate someone that I dont even know? How can I judge the character of a person Ive never met? Arent I aware that Cruise is a human being, and although he makes mistakes, he is a person with feelings and a family? Trust me, people who hate me will still respond negatively to this column. While my hope is that they use this as a springboard for honest discussion, they will call me dis gusting, self-centered, and miserable. But I wont read it or see it. So, if you are a friend, please only send the comments that add to the discussion about what it means to be a veteran, a military family, or, even, civil. Responding to last weeks Veterans Day column Notice of upcoming NAS Jax power outages NAS Jacksonville Public Works Department has scheduled three power outages in order to safely perform required maintenance in the high voltage substation serving family housing and the Naval Hospital Jacksonville campus. Your understanding of the necessity for these power outages is sin cerely appreciated because the required maintenance will greatly improve the reliability of the substation equipment and the installa tions overall electrical distribution system. Every outage has been carefully scheduled in order to minimize the impact they will have on operations and the daily lives of our family housing residents. These short term outages will pay long term divi dends not only to the installation, but also to you, the customer. The power outages are scheduled as follows: Nov. 23, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Several hospital campus buildings, Youth Center Gym, Heritage Cottages, All of Patriot Point Housing, including Fleet Angel Court and Woodpecker Drive Dec. 7, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. All of the buildings affected by the first two outages. While the contractor performing the maintenance will strive to shorten the duration of each power outage, all affected tenants and family housing residents should plan to be without power during the hours listed above.

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The award is presented each year to an outstanding DeCA employee in honor of the late Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Michael W. Blackwell, DeCAs first senior enlisted advisor. Periodically, I need to assess store operations but more importantly, I use this type of opportunity to thank employees because they work so hard and are so committed to supporting military families, said Jeu, who over sees 245 commissaries worldwide. This is the first time Ive been here and Im very pleasantly surprised. The store is in fantastic shape, he added. I think NAS Jacksonville has one of the best store directors and the employees are top notch. I can see why the com munity is so happy with their store here. During the visit, Jeu was briefed on holiday food items, deli operations, pro duce department challenges and goals, meat department procedures, seafood department operations, how the store moves items from the receiving area to the floor and line items on the floor. While touring the produce depart ment, which was a mass of brightly colored fresh fruits and vegetables, Produce Manager Roberto Ramos dis cussed daily operations. Each day, we strive to do our best to deliver fresh, quality produce to our customers. Its very challenging some days but we have a great team, said Ramos. And, Im here because I love to see our customers smile. Our produce department sold almost $6 million of goods last year. We are continually moving items from the trucks out to the floor. Its important to have fresh produce every day, said Bentley. According to Meat Department Manager John Crayon, they also work hard to keep customers happy. We want to give our customers the very best; we are always looking for new products. No commercial store can deliver savings like the commis sary. During holidays, we will often do $40,000 a day in sales, so you know we are really serving our customers. We have a great group of meat cut ters here and Im so proud of them, he explained. Jeu also discussed the strategies of building a new commissary aboard the station. The new store is a fiscal year 2014 construction project. Right now, we are awaiting final approval from Congress. Once that comes, construction should begin at the beginning of fiscal year 2015 with the project completed by the end of fiscal year 2016, said Jeu. While this store is pretty large, there are some limitations. In the new store, we will concentrate more on healthy food choices such as natural/organic and gluten-free foods, bigger aisles and more modern features. Following the tour, Jeu presented sev eral DeCA Director Coins to commis sary employees Nancy Garcia, Linda Hunter and Max Dimaya for their outstanding contributions. He also thanked other employees for their hard work. Ive heard many store directors say that their store is the best. I think you are definitely up there with the best and you should all be very proud. You are doing a great job and the store looks wonderful. And Im glad to be here in person to say, thank you, Jeu told the store workers before presenting Bentley with his award. This award is given to those who demonstrate outstanding leadership qualities, and I believe Mr. Bentley has the qualities and characteristics to receive this award. He is truly an ambassador for the commissary benefit and has built a great team here, said Jeu. As Bentley graciously accepted the award, he stressed this importance of the team. It takes all 250 of us, employees, contractors and vendors, to do this job. We have a remarkable team here and our goal is to con tinue to provide top service to our customers, he said. COMMISSARY JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013 3

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Will enhance offerings, provide one-stop veteran servicesThe ribbon for the new City of Jacksonville and Jacksonville Jaguars Veterans Resource and Reintegration Center was cut Nov. 15 at City Hall by Mayor Alvin Brown, Jaguars owner Shad Khan, Deutsche Bank Managing Director Michael Fleming, U.S. Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Tom Allan, Blount Island Command Commanding Office Col. Matt Crabill, NAS Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker and City Military Affairs, Veterans and Disabled Services Director Vic Guillory. The center is part of a five-year, $1 million partnership between the city and the Jaguars Foundation that will enhance and expand services for Jacksonville-area military and veterans. Im proud of this partnership, high lighting the city and Jaguars commitment to the dedicated men and women who serve, or have served, in the United States military, said Brown. By working togeth er, we are able to enhance and expand the services available to our military and vet erans, showing our communitys grati tude and support in strong and meaning ful ways. The Jaguars, along with the entire city of Jacksonville, owe a significant debt to all of our servicemen and women, Khan said.The opening of the Veterans Resource and Reintegration Center is one way we can collectively return the favor.Whether through assistance with employment, education, housing, medi cal treatment, or just to provide a hand in connecting all the services together, its important and wonderful to know that Jacksonville will stand united with our vet erans as they return home. This is a great day for Jacksonville because we now have a one-stop resource when it comes to reintegrating warf ighters back into our community, said Wanamaker. The knowledgeable staff here will provide direction when service men and women need assistance to access their rightful benefits whether educa tional, financial or health related. Each veteran will have a mentor assigned to assist in the process. Its fantastic! The new center will be housed and man aged by the citys Military Affairs, Veterans and Disabled Services Department (MAVDS) and will expand the core services already available. City Council approved an ordinance (2013-559) earlier this year to appropriate $100,000 in grant funds from the Jaguars Foundation for revamping the MAVDS offices and to provide social ser vices, housing assistance, career-related services and emergency financial assis tance to veterans and transitioning mili tary personnel. The ordinance also created a new position of social services specialist to help provide these new services. In addition to the new center, the fiveyear partnership with the city and Jaguars creates a new program to help allocate $50,000 in grant money to area service providers to increase and enhance their services for area military and veterans. Grant funding will be allocated by an advi sory board with members from the city, Jaguars Foundation and other area part ners. Deutsche Bank provided the first cor porate contribution to the fund. Fridays announcement falls during the citys 2013 Week of Valor, honoring the ser vice and sacrifice of Jacksonvilles military and veteran community. The week is high lighted by events including the Veterans Day parade, school visits by veterans and military personnel, and the Jaguars Military Appreciation Game against the Arizona Cardinals on Nov. 17. With the holiday season approaching, Navy officials announced the launch of its annual holiday stress navigation campaign Nov. 1. This years campaign, Thrive During the Holidays, will provide Sailors and families proactive resources to get ahead of holiday chaos while focusing on build ing resilience for the New Year. For many of us, the most wonderful time of the year is as demanding as it is joyous, said Capt. Kurt Scott, Navy resilience chief. Our Sailors and families are operating under more stress and uncertainty than ever this year, and plan ning for the holidays can be overwhelming. Our annu al campaign will address everything from financial preparations to maintaining diet and fitness goals, so that we can help everyone stay in the holiday spirit and position themselves to thrive in the New Year. Navy Operational Stress Controls 2013 Thrive During the Holidays campaign will include collaboration between Navys 21st Century Sailor programs and other readiness programs to offer resources on topics such as responsible alcohol use during holiday cele brations; planning and time management; budgeting; incorporating physical fitness into busy schedules; healthy eating tips; spirituality and relationship fit ness; and more. Our focus is helping Sailors and families proactive ly identify these sources of stress before things start to pile up on them, so that they can truly enjoy their holi days and do so responsibly, said Scott. Continuing our effort to promote a sense of com munity, we really have something for everyone this year from families navigating the holidays with a loved one on deployment to helping Navy youths Track Santa. Engagement with the North American Aerospace Defense Commands annual NORAD Tracks Santa promotion is a new initiative for the OPNAV N171 annual holiday campaign this year, part of an expand ed effort to reach out to Navy kids. The Thrive During the Holidays campaign will continue through early January 2014. Releases can be found on Navy Operational Stress Controls blog, www.navynavstress.com, and the Navy Suicide Prevention Web site, www.suicide.navy.mil. Follow Navy Operational Stress Control on Twitter and Facebook @NavStress for the latest updates to help you and your family Thrive During the Holidays. New holiday stress navigation campaign: Thrive During the HolidaysCity, Jaguars open veteran resource & reintegration center 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013

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Brett Tracy and Twilla Smith were named Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Senior and Junior Civilian of the Third Quarter 2013 Award, respectively, Nov. 1. As a regional program analyst and Continuous Process Improvement specialist in the CNRSE Strategic Planning and Lean Sigma Six (LSS) divi sion, Tracy provided customer service to internal and external customers and trained and mentored other program analysts throughout the region. His recent efforts resulted in him developing the Navy Region Southeasts Sexual Assualt Database which contrib uted to the fulfillment of customer requirements for program implementation, said Henry Burkard, Tracys supervisor. Having won the Senior Civilian of the Quarter twice in two years demonstrates Bretts sustained commitment to excellence and continued high value to the organization. I am very fortunate to have him as a team member, Burkard said. Tracy said it was the support of his co-workers that were most instrumental to his selection. Knowing your work efforts are appreciated gives any employee the drive to continually do a great job, he said. Im always well supported by my collegues and management and they are the biggest contributors to my professional growth. I want to convey my sincer est thanks for all their cooperation and assistance on a daily basis. Smith is the assistant to the public affairs officer and the Navy Community Service Program (NCSP) regional coordinator for the Southeast. She worked with 17 installations and dozens of tenant commands to guide them through the NCSP Awards Package submission process. She also identified and trained 14 judges on the rating process for the flagship nomina tions submitted by the regions tenant commands, and coordinating the judging of 40 nomination packages. Nominating Ms. Smith for this award was the most logical thing for us to do, and I couldnt be proud er of her for receiving this recognition, said Mike Andrews, public affairs officer for Navy Region Southeast. She is the personification of team player and never backs off from any challenge. A perfect example is her work as coordinator of the regions inputs to the Commander Navy Installations Command (CNIC) Community Service Award Program. Despite her lack of prior experience, she took this program, made it her own and made it work. Im continually amazed by all that she does, while still finding time to pursue two masters degrees. Were lucky to have her. Like Tracy, Smith also commented that her co-work ers provided substantial support in their professional success. I feel privileged to work in a department that sup ports professional growth and mentors employees to be successful in their career, she said. The Southeast Region public affairs office is one of the most experienced and knowledgable departments in the region, who takes pride in their work and is dedicated to providing assistance to others whether on the staff or in the public realm. I am truly grateful to work on a team of this caliber. Individual selection criteria for the awards was based upon exemplary performance of tasks, contri butions that enhanced organization accomplishment of command objectives, mission, teamwork or public image, and ones professional attitude toward self and others.CNRSE announces Senior, Junior Civilian of the Third Quarter 2013 CSADD event for junior SailorsThe Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) will host a bowling event Dec. 5 at 2 p.m. at NAS Freedom Lanes. Five-player teams. For more info, contact AC3 Ray (alexis.ray@navy. mil), or MAC Henderson (vanessa.henderson@ navy.mil). JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013 Cloudy skies and the threat of rain did not inhibit thousands of children and parents from enjoying the annual MWR Military Family Appreciation Carnival Nov. 16 at the Allegheny Softball Fields across from the Navy Exchange/ Commissary complex. Children and adults of all ages enjoyed the spinning rides, a giant slide, bounce houses, a Ferris wheel, bungee jumping, swings and an air plane ride. Other activities included a balloon dart game and camel race where the children and their parents could try their luck by rolling balls up a ramp into holes and throwing darts at balloons for prizes. Dawn Mills, school liaison officer, provided free school supplies for the children and Child and Youth Programs provided information as well as snacks and water. This is a great showing for the Month of the Military Family Appreciation Carnival at NAS Jax. More than 1,700 patrons are enjoying the inflatables, rides and carnival foods. This is a small way to show our gratitude and recog nize the sacrifices that the military families make with the service men and women, said Youth Activities Center Director Jason McKenzie. We have been coordinating this event for months and its really prov en to be a popular event. Id really like to thank our sponsors VyStar Credit Union, USAA, University of Phoenix, Sprint, Armed Forces Benefit Association and USA Discounters for their contributions, continued McKenzie. Id also like to thank the many vol unteers and workers who are absolutely essential to putting on this successful event. The patrons agreed on the success of the event. I think this event is awesome, it totally wears the kids out and it is free. My daughter loved every ride and activ ity she participated in today, said Aliye Fulton. The next MWR celebration for mili tary families will be in April to celebrate the Month of the Military Child. Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government offi cially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. MWR hosts fall carnival for military families

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their ever-vigilant forward presence in the Asia-Pacific region, are on station bringing needed support and hope to the people of devastated locations in the Philippines. VP-26 and VP-62 were among the first to provide crucial information about where to best focus relief efforts in response to this crisis. The Commander of CTG-72.2, Cmdr. Mark Sohaney, is extremely proud of the opportunity to support this effort. Our thoughts and prayers are with the Philippine people, and we are honored to help them in their time of need, stated Sohaney, We are postured to remain as long as the Philippine and U.S. government needs us. TYPHOON 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013

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a tour of one of VP-16s new P-8A Poseidon aircraft. I enjoy vis iting with them just as much as they do. Its an honor to be here to thank them for what they do for our country every day, said Rackley. According to VP-16 Executive Officer Cmdr. Daniel Papp, the visit was a huge boost to his squadrons morale. We think its great to have the Jaguars out here visiting our squadron and touring the P-8A. The Jaguars are our home team just as we are the City of Jacksonvilles antisubmarine warfare home team. The Navy has a wonderful partnership with the city and our local community, he stated. The squadron will be the first in the Navy to deploy with the new aircraft to Kadena, Japan later this month. This is really cool Ive never been on an aircraft like this. Im really hon ored to be here today, you dont get the chance to see this too often, com mented Marks after spending time with VP-16 pilot Lt. j.g. Johnny Kozlowski in the cockpit learning about the instru ments. The two Jaguars also visited the Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing Atlantic Helicopter Training Facility at NAS Jax where they learned how helicopter pilots hone their skills and were given the opportunity to fly in the SH-60F Seahawk simulator. Cmdr. Ross Mackenzie, offi cer in charge, Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing Atlantic, Detachment Jacksonville, escorted Marks and Rackley into the simulator and explained how the instruments and throttle maneuver the simulated heli copter. He then let Marks fly the heli copter from the NAS Jacksonville flight line across the Jacksonville skyline to land in Everbank Field. Rackley also took charge of the controls flying across the city. This has been an awesome visit and Ive really had a great time today. Im glad I had the opportunity to learn what some of the Navy does at NAS Jacksonville, said Marks. They are a great bunch of guys and we are happy to support our local Jacksonville Jaguars and we wish them all the best. We are so glad they took time out of their busy schedules to come what the Navy does here, said Mackenzie. Marks and Rackley also provided 65 pizzas from Papa Johns to feed the hun gry Sailors as they waited to meet them. The Jacksonville Jaguars will pay trib ute to military members, veterans and their families during a military appre ciation home game Nov. 17 against the Arizona Cardinals. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government official ly endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. JAGUARS JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013 9

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Residents from the Clyde E. Lassen State Veterans Nursing Home located in St. Augustine, Fla. visited NAS Jacksonville Nov. 13 to reminisce their mili tary service and receive a tour of the base. I have been volunteer ing at the Lassen facility for some time and frequently the vets there ask me about whats happening on the base, said Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast NEPA Planning and Compliance Coordinator Greg Timoney. Some are prior Navy and almost all of them are still interested in how the military has developed since they left service. The group of seven veter ans were treated to a walking tour of the base historic air craft display park and a wind shield tour of the base flight line. NAS Jacksonville Assistant Hazardous Waste Manager Jody Smith provided a narra tion of the aircraft on display and spoke to the many efforts of the base to remain environ mentally friendly while sup porting operations during the flight line portion of the tour. Its incredible being able to spend time with these veter ans, said Smith. Being a veteran myself with 21 years of service in the Navy, I just love having a chance to interact with these folks who paved the way for me to serve. Following the flight line tour, the group made their way to the Black Point Interpretive Center where NAS Jacksonville Natural Resources Manager Christine Bauer briefed the group on the centers mis sion. The group then headed to Mulligans restaurant at the base golf course for lunch. Sgt. Joseph Tie-dye Tillman, a former Marine who joined the Corps in 1967 and spent time in combat in Vietnam as an FO (Forward Observer), was a first-time visi tor to NAS Jacksonville. This base and its historic aircraft display is very impres sive, said Tillman. Ive really enjoyed the tour and our time here. Navy retiree Roy Lightfoot was the oldest, but also one of the liveliest members of the group. He first came to NAS Jacksonville in 1942 to attend A school when he was 19 years old. He met and married his wife, Mildred, that sum mer in St Augustine. After his 22-year career in the Navy, they settled in Jacksonville. Its wonderful and reju venating to be back at NAS Jacksonville, said Lightfoot. There have been tremen dous improvements to the base since I was stationed here. I am impressed with the sharp sail ors Ive seen during the visit. Im proud to be a part of the Navy. Timoney volunteers with the veterans because he feels like hes got to put a little karma back in the bucket, but explained that he feels like he gets a lot more back from these heroes than he gives them. The Clyde E. Lassen State Veterans Nursing Home locat ed in St. Johns County at 4650 State Road 16, is one of six Florida State nursing homes for veterans. The 120-bed facility opened to residents in 2010 and offers skilled nursing care to veterans. Stuck on that routine of firing up a cigarette in the morning with a cup of coffee, after a meal or to relax after a stressful day? Due to the highly addic tive nature of nicotine, tobacco use is a habit that is difficult to quit but not impossible. Truth is, the time to stop is now, and Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles Wellness Center provides the tools you need to quit. In recognition of the American Cancer Society Great American Smokeout observed the third Thursday of November every year the Wellness Center will conduct a fair to help smokers quit. The fair will be held at Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonvilles Navy Exchange pavilion Nov. 21 from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. According to World Health Organization (WHO), tobacco kills up to half of its usersnearly six million peo ple each year. More than five million of those deaths are the result of direct tobacco use while more than 600,000 are the result of non-smokers being exposed through second-hand smoke. The hazards of smoking are well known but not everyone is aware that there are more than 4,000 chemicals in tobacco smoke, of which at least 250 are known to be harmful and more than 50 are known to cause cancer. It is important for tobacco users to know that there is help, said Charlene Rees, NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center smoking cessation coordinator. Many young active-duty sailors start smoking because of boredom or as a socialization tool. This could eventu ally lead to addiction as well as many medical complications. The Wellness Center can help patients kick the habit in a variety of ways to include classes, medications and counseling. Smokers need to also be aware that the use of tobacco not only affects them, but the innocent people around them by way of second-hand smoke one of the most widespread exposures in the indoor environment. Our ultimate goal is to reduce tobacco use and improve the health and wellness of our nations heroes and their families. Tobacco use is the top preventable cause of illness and premature death in the U.S. and tobacco products are the only legal consumer commodities that are harmful when used exactly as the manufacturer intended. There is no safe level of exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke. Separate or ventilated smoking areas do not pro tect non-smokers from second-hand smoke. It can cause serious cardiovas cular and respiratory diseases coro nary heart disease and lung cancer in adults, low birth weight in pregnant women and sudden death in infants. Quitting smoking has immediate as well as long-term benefits for smokers and their loved ones. Some improve ments are immediate within 20 min utes heart rate and blood pressure drop and within a few hours the level of car bon monoxide in the blood declines. S mokers who quit at age 30 reduce their chance of dying prematurely from smoking-related diseases by more than 90 percent, and by 50 percent for those who quit at age 50. The current trend for smokers who are attempting to avoid some of the hazards of smoking cigarettes is the electronic cigarette or e-cigarette. E-cigarettes are neither supported nor used as an aid by the Wellness Center. According to WHO, the potential risks e-cigarettes pose for the health of its users remains undetermined, and their efficacy for helping people quit smok ing has not been scientifically demon strated. It is just as hard to quit smoking as it is to quit using heroin, cocaine or alcohol, said Rees. Quitting the use of tobacco, in any form, is the greatest single step that one can take in improv ing their health. It doesnt matter how long you have used tobacco, how old you are or the condition of your health just quit! NH Jacksonvilles wellness fair will feature displays, educational materials and give-away items for those who are interested in quittingall active duty, retirees and family members are eligi ble. Experts will be on hand to discuss available methods of treatment provid ed by the Wellness Center. There will also be a free turkey raffle to smokers who are willing to throw away their cig arettes for the day go cold turkey. The ultimately decision to stop using tobacco depends on the indi Some of Floridas oldest veterans tour base Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles Wellness Center stands ready to help smokers kick the habit 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013

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Defense Department and Transportation Security Administration officials today announced a partner ship to expand TSA Precheck expedited screening benefits to all U.S. armed forces ser vice members, includ ing those serving in the Coast Guard, Reserves and National Guard, dur ing their official or leisure travel. As a result of the agree ment, these individuals will be able to enjoy the benefits of the program at the 100 participating air ports across the country beginning Dec. 20, offi cials said. Currently, members of the armed forces can use TSA Precheck lanes at 10 domestic airports by presenting their common access cards. The part nership expands the pro gram to all 100 airports offering TSA Precheck, allowing service mem bers to keep their foot wear and light outer wear on and their laptop in its case, as well as to have their 3-1-1 compli ant liquids and gels bag in a carry-on bag in select screening lanes. Expanding TSA Precheck screening ben efits is great news for our service members and is a tangible sign of this nations gratitude for the men and women who serve this nation bravely each and every day, said Mary Snavely-Dixon, director of the Defense Manpower Data Center. We will continue to work with the Transportation Security Administration to help expand this pro gram further. TSA joins with the American people in showing its appreciation for the service and sac rifices of our men and women in the Armed Forces, said TSA Deputy Administrator John Halinski.Providing expedited screening while on travel is the least we can do for these courageous men and women. The new process being established under this agreement allows all active duty, Coast Guard, Reserve and National Guard service members to use their DOD iden tification number when making reservations. That ID number will be used as their Known Traveler Number. When arriving at the airport, service members will then be permitted access to TSA Precheck lanes for official or leisure travel on participating airlines. TSA also noted that wounded service mem bers can get expedited screening without hav ing to remove footwear, light outerwear, jackets or headwear. Wounded war riors or their care coordi nators can contact TSA Cares toll free at 1-855787-2227 with details of the itiner ary once flight arrange ments are made with the airline. TSA will incorporate random and unpredict able security measures throughout the airport so no one is guaran teed expedited screen ing. Travelers can check the TSA Precheck Participating Airports Web page for more infor mation. Partnership means faster airport screening for service members JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013 11

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Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville kicked off its 2014 Science, Service, Medicine and Mentoring (S2M2) program with approximately 100 ninth-, 10thand 11thgrade students at Darnell-Cookman Middle/ High School of the Medical Arts Nov. 13. This is a phenomenal opportunity for our kids, said Mark Ertel, Darnell-Cookmans principal. The fact that some of these students will be able to apply and be selected to par ticipate in a program at Naval Hospital Jacksonville is an opportunity one cant pass. During the event, NH Jacksonville clinicians shared inspirational stories of their careers in Navy Medicine, the paths they took to get there and their accomplishments. After panelists introductions and an interactive Q-and-A session, students gathered in smaller groups rotating to each clini cian, hearing first hand about the unique role each medical profession contributes to heal ing our nations heroes. Rising 11th-grade students are eligible to apply for the oneweek summer program. Those selected will receive a realworld medical facility expe rience in numerous patient care areas at NH Jacksonville to include operating rooms, emergency department, phar macy and physical/occu pational therapy. Along with hands-on medical activities, students will participate in dis cussions, job-shadowing and mentoring with clinicians and other medical professionals. S2M2 provides Naval Hospital Jacksonville with an opportunity to connect with Darnell-Cookman stu dents to mentor the next gen eration of medical profession als, said Cmdr. Jim Keck, NH Jacksonville Family Medicine Residency program director. It not only offers the stu dents an opportunity to ask questions and explore differ ent avenues of the medical arts, but also to get involved in an experience at Naval Hospital Jacksonville and help decide whether this is the career field for them. Developed in 2004 by the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, and adopted in 2010 by NH Jacksonville, S2M2s mission is to encourage, nurture and enhance the commitment to science and medicine in a welcoming and intellectually stimulating environment for diverse groups of students. NH Jacksonvilles priority since its founding in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. The command is comprised of the Navys thirdlargest hospital and five branch health clinics across Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia. Of its patient popu lation about 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their families more than 57,000 are enrolled with a pri mary care manager at one of its facilities.To find out more, visit the com mand website at www.med.navy. mil/sites/NavalHospitalJax. Sailors from Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 11 visit ed two schools, one in St. Johns County and another on Jacksonvilles Westside, on Nov. 8 to commemorate Veterans Day. Members of the CPRW-11 TacMobile Department visited Durbin Creek Elementary school where Cmdr. Glen Pierce led a Cub Scouts pack and Mandarin High Schools Navy Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (NJROTC) unit in parading the colors to begin the ceremony. Lt. Jason York, officer in charge of Mobile Tactical Operations Center (MTOC) 9, led his group of Sailors to the Lighthouse Christian Schools Veterans Day ceremony. When the ceremonies ended at each school, the children were split up into smaller groups for question and answer sessions with CPRW-11 Sailors and other service veterans. Some of the most common questions were, What is it like to be in the Navy? and Have you ever traveled around the world in an airplane? The children particularly enjoyed try ing on flight gear, looking at patches and going through old cruise books. One of the grandparents at Durbin Creek Elementary was a World War II veteran who served in the Navy during 11 island invasions in the South Pacific where he earned two Bronze Stars. York said, We owe these Veterans a great deal of respect I am personally honored to serve and carry on the tradi tions of Americas military. The Veterans Day ceremonies were widely viewed as extremely successful at both schools. Students handed out thank-you letters to all of the veterans and active duty military members who participated in the ceremonies. Both schools anticipate organizing Veterans Day ceremonies next year due to their popularity, as well as helping to teach the students about men and women who serve in our nations armed forces. Hospital kicks off S2M2 mentorship program at Darnell-Cookman CPRW-11 visits schools to commemorate Veterans Day FIGHT deadly childhood diseases.St. Jude Childrens Research Hospitalstjude.org A CFC participant provided as a public service. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013 13

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Friday at 7 p.m. Nov. 22 2nd Time Around Band (out side stage) Deweys Family Night third Friday of the month Deweys will be open for dinner & bev erages Dec. 20 Childrens Holiday Bingo Childrens Holiday Bingo will start at 6 p.m. and has a cost of $10 per per son and includes soft drinks, hot dog, dauber, bingo card and gift bag for each child.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Youth Bowling League: Every Sat., 10:30 a.m. noon $17 annually or $8 per week. Includes shoes, awards will be given at the end of the season! Rising Stars Youth League: Every Sat., 10:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m. Pee Wee Division (6 years & under) 2 games, $6 per week. Juniors Division (7 years & older) 3 games, $8 per week. Special Stars Bowling League for fami lies with special needs children. All ages welcome! Ramps available for the non-ambulatory as well as bumpers for beginners. Runs for 10 weeks at a cost of $7 per week, shoes are included. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for Active Duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4 6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Jingle Bell Jog 5K Dec. 13 at 11:30 a.m. Perimeter Rd./Antenna Farm Powerlifting Competition Feb. 8, 2014, 7 a.m. at the Fitness Center $10 registration feeI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil Waves of Honor Special: Seaworld Orlando Adult $46.50, Child $42.25. Busch Gardens Tampa Adult $45, Child $40.50. Monster Jam: Club seating (includes pit pass) $42, regular seating (includes pit pass) $22. Jacksonville Jaguars: Section 147 Bud Zone, $70. Jags shuttle bus $12. The Artist Series Broadway in Jax 201314 Season: Tickets available now! Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus: Jan. 17 & 18, 2014, $51. War Horse: Feb. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $68.50. Memphis: March. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $65. Million Dollar Quartet: April. 26, 2014, 8 pm, $65. The D* Word: Oct. 4 Oct. 25, 2014, $43.75 $46. Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket (Expires Sept. 27, 2014) 4-day Hopper ticket$166 4-day, 1-park per day and water park ticket-$166 4-day Hopper and Water park combo ticket$194 Gatorbowl $35 Capital One Bowl $98 Russell Athletic Bowl $78 Soul Food Festival Special $20 General Admission $32 Preferred $42 VIP $65 Ringling Brothers Barnum & Bailey Circus $15 Veterans Memorial Arena Call for days and times. Legoland Free admission for active duty at park Tickets for family members available at ITT ITT is now selling $18 tickets for the Harlem Globetrotters! The show is Feb. 28, 7 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Arena.The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restrict ed to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Car & Bike Show Nov. 22, 4 10 p.m. Deweys Parking Lot Live entertainment featuring 2nd Time Around Band Mall & Movie Trip Nov. 30 at noon Orange Park Mall & AMC TheaterNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Dec. 3 & 17 for active duty Dec. 5 & 19 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m. Turkey Trot Golf Scramble Nov. 25, 10 a.m. shotgun start $60 entry fee, $70 for civilian guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m.Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Dashing Through the Grove Dec. 6, 4 8 p.m. Free snow sledding, tree lighting, pho tos with Santa and more! Movie Under the Stars featuring The Grinch Dec. 13, 6 p.m. Patriots GroveFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013

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Annual Turkey Trot brings out runnersIt was a cool fall day for the annu al Turkey Trot Nov. 15 as 102 run ners turned out to participate in the 5K run. The event is sponsored by the University of Phoenix and USAA and coordinated by the NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department. Placing first overall and first in the mens 35-39 age category was Lt. Cmdr William Lutat of VR-62 with a time of 18:12. AT3 Jessica Thomas took first in the womens 20-24 category and was the first female to cross the finish line with a time of 23:00. Other winners were: The next run will be the annual Jingle Bell Jog Dec. 13 at 11:30 a.m.For more information, call 5423239/3518. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013 15

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An increasing number of base residents throughout the Southeast Region are reducing energy bills through the Switch4Good energy savings program, that is now in place at 11 of the regions installations. Balfour Beatty Investments, the Navys housing manage ment partner, designed the program to inform housing residents on ways to reduce energy consumption and lower their energy bills. The company decided to expand Switch4Good to instal lations throughout the region after a pilot progam at Travis Air Force Base in 2011 reduced energy consumption by 18 per cent. The program rolled out alongside the Resident Energy Conservation Program (RECP) and attributed to the success and effectiveneness of meeting energy savings expectations, said Richard Dye, Navy Region Southeast (NRSE) housing pro gram director. Participation in the Switch4Good program has been outstanding and impact on energy savings has been right in line with, or exceeded, expectations. The programs first phase began in October and con sisted of a three-month period where residents received mock bills and energy saving tips. The mock reports and sav ing tips served as a tool for resi dents to know how much ener gy they were using compared to like homes, Dye said. It was a good opportunity for res idents to monitor and change any behavior that could help to reduce their consumption before actual billing started. Under RECP, utility accounts are either charged or credited if they are more than 10 percent over or under the established baseline energy consumption. The mock billing period pro vided residents three months to monitor and change any behavior to help reduce con sumption before actual billing started. According to Tabitha Crawford, senior vice presi dent of sustainability and innovation, Balfour Beatty Investments, the program has been a success. The program clearly dem onstrates that using smart meter data to provide person alized habit cues for residents results in reduced energy con sumption, without retrofits, Crawford said. With housing comprising 20 to 25 percent of a military installations energy consumption, this program is an important tool in support ing the sustainability goals of our Army, Navy and Air Force partners. Switch4Good consists of three levels of resi dent engagement: Info and Peers, Digital Outreach and In-Home Coaching. The application of these methods varies from base to base. Info and peers is in place at 11 of the regions installations, Dye said. Residents receive monthly savings reports and access to a web portal with feedback on household energy usage. Its a great tool because they have immediate access to energy consumption data that updates every hour. Digital Outreach provides participating residents the same resources as Info and Peers, but with personalized, detailed tracking and analysis of their energy consumption via Twitter and text messages. Its very precise monitor ing of energy usage, not just throughout the base, but for each individual household, Dye said. If there is a con sistent spike in energy usage during certain times of the day, you might receive a text or tweet, then residents can take a look and determine what hap pened during that time that may have caused the spike. Its a valuable tool for people to become more efficient energy consumers. So far, Digital Outreach has been implemented aboard three installations: Joint Base Charleston, Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville and NAS Pensacola. More than 1,800 homes are eligible to enroll in the voluntary program. In addition to Digital Outreach and Info and Peers, residents on board NAS Key West and Naval Station Mayport have access to home visits from a personal trainer. These optional visits are designed to engage the entire family on specific ways to reduce energy costs. Many people dont realize how much energy they can save through very simple prac tices, Dye said. For example, they might not realize how much they could save from limiting television use or simply unplugging the television when theyre done. According to Lea Williford, regional team lead for pub lic and private ventures, even a modest reduction in energy usage throughout the region can have a significant impact on the installations total con sumption. A reduction of 10 percent in energy costs across the 11 installations currently imple menting Switch4Good would result in savings of more than $100,000 monthly and more than $1 million annually, Williford said. Its good for both the Navy and base residents, because the money saved from lower util ity bills goes back to the com munity to help pay for main tenance and updgrades. In addition, residents can receive a rebate for using less energy than the baseline. As of June, energy con sumption was down 10-15 percent at installations using the program. Base residents interested in enrolling in the Switch4Good program should contact their base housing authority.Southeast Region cuts energy costs through Switch4Good 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013

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Through a collaboration with the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Military Community and Family Policy, Duval County Public Schools, and NS Mayport and NAS Jacksonville, Military Family Life Consultants (MFLCs) have been provid ed to 12 Duval County Public Schools. The consultants services are designed to offer extra support to assist with the unique challenges which military fami lies experience. The primary focus of the Military & Family Life Counseling Program is prevention, education, and counseling support. The services are provided con fidentially and no case records or docu mentation is kept. The consultants do not assess or diagnose, and when they encounter more in depth issues/diagno ses, they offer to connect military fami lies with other helping agencies avail able on the installation or in the com munity. While meeting with children, MFLCs always remain in line of sight of a teacher, staff member, or a parent. The consultants are licensed clini cians who have demonstrated expertise in working with children. They can pro vide short-term non-medical counseling support in a variety of different ways: individual meetings with children, pre sentations about life skills issues, skillbuilding group discussions, and meet ings with parents and families at the familys request for additional counsel ing/coaching support. Some of the common issues that MFLCs help with include the following: skills tion and divorce The seven MFLCs have been assigned to work in the following schools: Elementary with school counselor Donna Davis, Elementary and Jax Beach Elementary with school counselors Melissa Hammond and Carla Forest-Crumley, with school counselor Adrienne Wakefield, Elementary and John Stockton Elementary with school counselors and San Mateo Elementary with school counselors Amelia Williams and Duane Monte, Elementary and Sheffield Elementary with school counselors Marisa Negron and Ginger Brown, and Learning Academy and Chimney Lakes Elementary with school counselors Ellen Golden and Shelia Handress. The school program model is designed to provide an informal context in which children can access a behav ioral consultant in a non-threatening and supportive environment. MFLCs circulate throughout the school facility making themselves available in class rooms, libraries, staff lounges, athletic events and other areas as identified. By virtue of these efforts to become inte grated into the day-to-day fabric of the school, the consultant becomes the friendly face on the playground, the compassionate listener in the lunch room, and an objective resource to teachers and staff alike. All military families will be given the opportunity to consent for their chil dren to participate in this free service or to opt-out. For more information about MFLC services, you can contact your school to request the direct number for the MFLC on campus. Dawn Mills is the school liaison offi cer for NAS Jacksonville. If you have questions or need a copy of the un/ underfunded mandates for Duval Schools, or have concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, she can be reached via email at dawn.m.mills@navy.mil or by phone at (904) 778-2236 [office] or (904) 486-8221 [cell].Local schools assigned military family life consultants JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013 17

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Sailors from Navy Band Southeast and Aviation Survival Training Center (ASTC) Jacksonville participat ed in a Veterans Day Assembly at Mandarin High School in Jacksonville, Fla. Nov. 13. The event was part of the City of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor which recognizes military members, veterans and their families for their service. Navy Band Southeasts MU2 Laura Carey kicked off the event singing the nation al anthem as the Mandarin High School NJROTC pre sented the colors. Mandarin High School Civics Teacher Calvin McFarland Jr. hosted the event. After thanking those in attendance, he welcomed Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown to the podium. Im excited to be here today. This week in honor of men and women who are members of our nations military we can never thank them enough for their service and sacri fices. Jacksonville has a large population of veterans. That means you probably know someone who serves or has served including some of your teachers. I want you to think about people in your life who served and take the time to say, thank-you, Brown told the students. He concluded his speech by having all the veterans in the audience stand to be recog nized thanking them for serv ing. The keynote speaker for the event was Dr. Dan Davis, senior adult pastor at Mandarin Baptist Church and retired U.S. Army chaplain. The state of liberty must be protected where our nations military comes into play. Think about the vets you know and what they have taught you about patriotism, duty and sacrifice, Davis reminded the audience. Life in America dares us to prepare to respond to nations needs with a spirit of commitment that we find in the veterans that we honor today. HM2(FMF) Justin Cardente and ND3(DSW/PJ) Ben Lee of ASTC Jax also talked about what it means to be a veteran and some of their experiences in the Navy. Ive been in the Navy for eight years and have been for tunate to have done a lot and been many places. I worked with the Marines in places like Iraq and Afghanistan. Everywhere that Ive been, the people that Ive come in con tact with have looked up to the U.S. military, said Cardente. For me Veterans Day means remembering those who came before me. As a Navy diver, we do a lot of dangerous missions and unfortunately, you never know when your turn to serve is up. I am proud to serve today for all those who served before me and all those who come after me, added Lee. The assembly concluded with the Navy Band playing the official songs of the different U.S. Armed Forces. The Sailors spent the rest of the school day visiting various class rooms talking with students about their careers, education al opportunities and some of their experiences.Sailors participate in Veterans Day Assembly at local school Suicide prevention awareness trainingIn November and December, NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) is offering Suicide Prevention Awareness Training for base and tenant commands. Should your command be in need of this training, select a date and time that is convenient for your com mand and call 542-2776 to reserve seating, said FFSC Education and Training Coordinator Wilhelmina Nash. Attending this one-hour class could help you save someones life. Thank you for your concern and support. Dashing Through The Grove at NAS Jax Patriots GroveFriday, December 6, 4 8 p.m.FREEsnow Sledding Photos with Santa Tree Lighting Musical Entertainment Refreshments And more! (904) 778-9772 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013 19 viduals desire to stop. The Wellness Center offers onetime group tobacco cessa tion classes every week Mondays at 9 a.m., Tuesdays at 1 p.m. and Thursdays at noon. Private appoint ments, with a tobacco edu cator, are also available. Contact the NH Jacksonville Wellness Center locat ed adjacent to NAS Jacksonvilles fitness cen terat (904) 542-5292/5293. Additional resources include DoDs www.ucan quit2.org and The Florida Quitline at 877-U-CANNOW or www.floridaquit line.com SMOKEOUT Lt. j.g. Nathan Shuey banks left as he prepares for his first aircraft carrier landing. The familiar feel of G-forces drive him down into his seat as he rehearses his rhythmic breath ing. He flexes his grip to remind himself that he is in control, then he corrects his heading as he hears the air traffic control ler granting him permission to land. His aircraft rapidly approaches the carrier. The flaps go down. Its a mile away. He pulls back slightly to slow the jet, never removing his eyes from the heads-up dis play. Seconds away from land ing, Shuey eases off the throttle and drops altitude. He feels the thud of touchdown and slams the throttle forward. The trap tries to rip the aircraft from beneath him as it slows from 130 miles per hour to zero in just over a second. Shuey eases back the throttle and breathes. Success. Shuey was among the pilots of Training Wing (TW) One and Two who completed take offs, landings and taxiing maneu vers onboard USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) Oct. 31, en route to their carrier qualifi cations. For the pilots of TW-1 and TW-2, it was an honor to make their first aircraft carrier landing on TR. The first pass was absolutely terrifying, said Shuey of TW-1. It was a touch and go and your nerves are so high you kind of forget what youre doing. Pilots practice carrier land ing and taxying on a simulator before flying out to a ship. The simulator is extremely lifelike, but it does not compare to the visceral experience of the real thing, said Shuey. The landing signal officers always teach us to fly the ball to touchdown, which means keep your eyes on the lens and be aware of everything else. So, when you approach the wires, dont follow them with your eyes. Dont look down or try to catch a certain wire. Keep your eye on the ball until you slam forward in the cockpit. You honestly fly until your jet stops moving. I just kept saying to myself, fly the ball to touch down, fly the ball to touch down, said Shuey. Being a pilot was always a dream, but Shuey never thought to actively pursue it until his senior year in college. I went to Naval Air Station Oceana for an event with Penn State [Reserve Officers Training Corps], he said. There was a squadron of F-18s there, and I got to ride in one. I knew from that point on that if I could make [flying] an occupation, I wanted to do it. Thats when I got really motivated to work towards it. The path to becoming a naval aviator is long and chal lenging. I actually trained with the Air Force for half a year and that was pretty challenging because I moved to a place that I never expected to be, said Shuey. I was in Oklahoma for that at Vance Air Force Base and that was pretty rigorous train ing. I chose to go there and was hoping it would set me up to fly jets, and it actually worked out but was really difficult. Pilots complete an aerobatics course designed to boost con fidence and familiarize pilots with the aircrafts limitations after more than a year of train ing. Im sure every pilot can appreciate their first aerobatic solo or aerobatic flight, said Lt. j.g. Daniel Knight, a heli copter pilot assigned to the Dragonslayers of HS-11. You are basically given the controls with a training pilot and are told to do flips and bar rel rolls. Then you are told to go up and do it again alone. Its meant to build your confidence as a pilot. Its terrifying but also a lot of fun. Aviators receive their gold wings at the conclusion of their nearly two year training pipe line. It was a lot of relief know ing that I made it through the program and a good amount of pride knowing what I had accomplished, said Knight. Also knowing my fam ily was there and that they had been looking forward to it for so long. It was a great sense of accomplishment, much more so than obtaining my bach elors degree. It wasnt some thing someone told me to do, it was something I sought out and that made it much more rewarding. As he steps out of the cock pit, Shuey is reminded of the countless hours in a simula tor, days of actual flight, weeks away from home and years of education and training that led him to this point. He fills with pride at the thought that soon he will join the ranks of elite naval aviators. Cashiers at military com missaries soon will begin scanning customers Defense Department ID cards as part of the checkout process, Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA) officials said. The Fort Lee, Va., commis sary, where DeCA has its head quarters, became the first store to scan ID cards Oct. 22 as the first part of a rollout through out the agency that began Nov. 10 and will be completed by mid-January, officials said. Noting that commissary shoppers are used to showing their ID cards to establish their eligibility to use the stores, offi cials explained that by scan ning the ID at checkout, DeCA no longer will need to main tain any personal information on customers in its computer systems, such as the system used for customers who write checks. Scanning also will help to improve the commissary ben efit for all patrons, said Joseph H. Jeu, DeCA director and CEO. In addition to verifying cus tomers as authorized commis sary patrons, well gain infor mation that will give us a better understanding of our patrons, allowing the agency to provide the commissary benefit more effectively and efficiently, he said. Cross-referenced with other Defense Department data, the scan data will give DeCA use ful information about patron usage by military service, offi cials said, along with customer demographics that do not iden tify specific personal data of an individual. This eventually will help the agency identify shopping needs and preferences and will also allow more accurate report ing to the military services on commissary use, officials said. The demographic informa tion DeCA will use is strictly limited to card ID number, rank, military status, branch of service, age, household size, and ZIP codes of residence and duty station, DeCA officials emphasized, adding that the agency will not be using any personal information such as names, addresses or phone numbers. The methods, processes and information well use will not compromise our customers privacy they can be sure of that, Jeu said. Were putting technology to work to better understand our customers and ensure the commissary benefit continues to remain relevant to them now and in the future. The Defense Commissary Agency operates a worldwide chain of grocery stores for military personnel, retirees and their families. Authorized patrons purchase items at cost plus a 5-percent surcharge, that covers the costs of build ing new commissaries and modernizing existing ones. Scanning the Department of Defense ID card bar code allows the Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA) to positively identify an individual and verify that he or she is authorized to shop in the commissary. There is a small number of older ID cards without bar codes, however, it must still be presented to prove ID of the cardholder. The only information captured at the regis ter is the ID card number, that is crossed-refer enced with the Defense Manpower Data Centers Defense Enrollment Eligibility System (DEERS) to obtain rank, military status, branch of service, age, household size, residential ZIP code, and duty station. This data provides information about patron usage by military service and basic cus tomer demographics. Specific, personal data about an individual is not collected. The basic demographic information we cap ture will allow us to better understand our patrons and their preferences. This will enable us to provide products and services that are directly related to the entire patron base not individuals at specific commissary locations. Customers must present valid ID cards to make their commissary purchases. Unfortunately, those with expired cards will not be allowed to finish their purchases. They must make an appointment at a military installations Pass and ID office to get a new ID card. Yes. You will still present the same documen tation as before, based on guidelines for your respective installation. Required documentation is usually an Agent Letter or an Agent Card. When you present your DOD ID card at the register, the cashier can verify that you are the cardholder by looking at the card photograph. These two cards are independent of each other. Scanning your DOD ID card is part of the valida tion process. We scan your Rewards Card to apply digital coupon discounts to your total shopping purchase. Scanning is done before the checkout process begins. If youre using the self-checkout, you hand your card to the attendant, who will check your photograph to verify you are the cardholder and then hand the card back to you, at which time you will scan your ID. Since only authorized patrons can use the commissary, and scanning the card is the means of verification, no patron can opt out of having their ID card scanned. Only DeCA not a third party collects this information. The collected data is maintained at DeCA Headquarters, not at any of our commis saries. Yes, but not at an individual level. We will link purchases to the patron base as a whole, as it relates to basic demographics such as military status, branch of service, distance from commis sary, age and household size. Matching purchases to this broad demographic information allows us to better understand our patron base and its preferences at each geograph ic location. New pilots make first launches, traps on Theodore Roosevelt Commissaries to begin scanning patrons ID Cards

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As Congress considers new legislation that could restrict military commanders author ity to overturn sexual assault convictions, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said senior Defense Department leaders are working through various options to identify a way ahead. Civilian and uniformed mili tary leaders have consistently said that commander involve ment is essential to changing the military culture and eradi cating sexual assault crimes. Little indicated during a reg ular news briefing today that leaders havent altered their stance on the question. To my knowledge, theres been no change in the depart ments position on how to grap ple with what we all know is a serious issue inside the mil itary, Little told reporters in response to questions. Its important to many senior leaders in the depart ment to try to address this problem inside the institution, he said. When it comes to getting at it, getting at this serious prob lem and fixing it, and holding people accountable, we think that we can work this internal ly. The press secretary said the department is working close ly with members of Congress to find solutions. He noted that Army Maj. Gen. Gary Patton, director of DODs Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office, testified before a Congressional panel Nov.7. Little noted that a report released recently shows a rise in the number of sexual assaults over the past year, and attributed it to the militarys efforts to reach out to assault victims with a range of report ing options and medical and counseling services. We believe that this increase in reporting is con sistent with a growing level of confidence in our response system, he said. Little said another telling metric is the growing number of service members who report assaults that occurred before they joined the military. Were continuing to review these metrics to make sure thats in fact the case, but we dont view an increase in reporting as necessarily a bad thing, Little said. In fact, it could be a posi tive development because vic tims of sexual assault might feel more comfortable coming forward. Little said DOD is working to lock into place just such a system, and that leaders hope to see an increase in the number of victims who choose unrestricted reporting, which opens the possibility for pros ecution of alleged assailants. Cultural and behavioral change is also key to reducing or eliminating sexual assault in the military, Little acknowl edged. Our strong goal is to make sure that all U.S. military per sonnel, men and women . [live and work in] an environ ment free from this crime, he said. Military Retirees Seminar set for Feb. 15Retirees should mark their calen dars now for the upcoming Retiree Seminar to be held Feb. 15 at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center at NAS Jacksonville, said Retired Activities Office Director James Ryan. He explained that the seminar is designed in the County Fair format with continuous presentations and exhibits throughout the day. This allows maximum expo sure with subject matter experts who can help retirees with issues such as retiree pay, healthcare con cerns, veterans benefits, long-term care and assistance, and other issues of concern to retirees approaching Social Security and Medicare age, said Ryan. This years keynote speaker is retired Vice Adm. John Cotton, for mer chief of Navy Reserve, and com mander, Naval Reserve Force. He also served as the assistant deputy Chief of Naval Operations, Warfare Requirements and Programs, and as a member of the Secretary of Defense Reserve Force Policy Board. Reservations are not required, but registration will take place at the door. The mission of Retired Activities Branch under OPNAV N135F is to ensure the retired community is kept apprised of their benefits, entitlements, rights, privileges and other changes in retirement law. The Retired Activities Branch is dedicat ed to supporting more than 650,000 Navy retirees, families, annuitants, and survivors worldwide.DoD spokesman says commanders essential to stop sexual assault 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 21, 2013 21 The X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System Demonstrator (UCAS-D) con ducted flight operations Nov. 10 aboard the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). The event, the most recent in a series of carrier-based tests, demonstrated the integra tion of the latest in naval avia tion technology with the most advanced and capable carrier. The tests demonstrated the X-47Bs ability to integrate with the carrier environment. The aircraft performed precise touch and go maneuvers on the ship to generate data that characterizes the environment in close proximity of the car rier flight deck. In addition, the aircraft took part in flight deck handling drills, complet ed arrested landings and cata pult launches. Mission opera tors monitored the aircrafts autonomous flight from a por table command and control unit from Theodore Roosevelts flight deck during each of its 45-minute flights. It is a tremendous oppor tunity for the Big Stick to be a part of the development and testing of the future of Naval Aviation, said Capt. Daniel Grieco, Theodore Roosevelts commanding officer. The UCAS is an impressive system that gives us all a glimpse into the support and strike capabilities we can expect to join the fleet in the years to come. The tacti cal and support possibilities for such platforms are endless, and I know the crew of TR are proud to be able to be a part of that development. A major objective for the UCAS-D program is to demon strate a digitized carrier con trolled environment to allow for robust communications between the aircraft and all carrier personnel involved with launching, recovering and con trolling the aircraft. A digitized carrier environment will ulti mately increase flexibility and improve safety. This weekends resump tion of carrier-based flights for the X-47 continues our efforts to mature critical unmanned enabling technologies and reduce the technical risk for the follow-on Unmanned Carrier Launched Airborne Surveillance and Strike (UCLASS) system, said Capt. Beau Duarte, the Program Manager for Unmanned Carrier Aviation. Current and future test events will continue to mature unmanned technologies and refine concept of operations to further inform unmanned car rier requirements. These pro gram successes represent sig nificant advancements in naval aviation technology and pro vide a glimpse into the future integration of manned and unmanned aircraft aboard the carrier fleet. Today, we took another sig nificant step toward integra tion of unmanned capabilities into our carrier airwings and aircraft carrier environments, said Rear Adm. Mat Winter. The Navy remains steadfast in its commitment to matur ing todays technologies which have established a realistic path to tomorrows affordable, flexible unmanned carrier avi ation capabilities for our warf ighters. Carrier-based tests of the X-47B began in December 2012 with flight deck operations aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). Carrier testing resumed in May 2013 aboard USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77), where the X-47B completed its first carrier-based catapult launch, followed by its first car rier-based arrested landing in July. Jaguars tickets available at USOThe Greater Jax Area USO has tickets available at the NAS Jax and NS Mayport USO for $15 each, cash transactions only. Tickets are available the follow ing days and times: Guidelines: duty including Florida National Guard and Reservists on current active duty orders and depen dents are eligible to purchase/use these tickets. may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equals four. If you have less than four you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but dependent children are not authorized to represent the service member/spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO director. mum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest. No exceptions. a block of game day tickets may be request ed by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the sea son.Requests, with justification, must be sent to Mike OBrien at mobrien@usojax.com Anyone caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets will be prohibited from buying any more tickets for the entire season. No over the phone transactions, tickets are first come, first served. For more information, call 7782821. X-47B operates aboard Theodore Roosevelt

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