Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
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Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

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Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
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Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
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Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID:
UF00028307:02067


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2013 SAU COC NEW FACILITY TIM MCGRA W Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Reporters from seven Northeast Florida media out lets attended a flight line news conference Nov. 6 at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 511 to learn about the draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) that was recently issued by U.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFFC) in Norfolk, Va., relat ing to the home basing of the Navys P-8A Poseidon squad rons. The Secretary of the Navy reduced the number of P-8A Poseidon bases from three (in 2008) to two (in 2012) located at NAS Jacksonville and NAS Whidbey Island, Wash. What this comes down to for NAS Jacksonville and its surrounding communities is the difference between bas ing five or six operational P-8A squadrons, said Lisa Padgett, USFFC SEIS project manager. The P-8A training squadron (VP-30) has operated at NAS Jacksonville for many years and will also remain here. Padgett added that all SEIS information was available online at www.mmaseis.com for those who wanted to down load analyses of impacted environmental resources on the bases. Rick Keys, a civilian environ mentalist with U.S. Fleet Forces Command in Norfolk, Va., talk ed about noise issues and facil ity requirements. The Navy released this draft SEIS in September and encour ages people to attend and voice The NAS Jacksonville Commissary held a Vietnam Veteran Commemoration Ceremony to recognize area veterans for their service and sacrifices Nov. 8. A small group of Vietnam veterans gathered with store patrons and employees to participate in the event. I am honored to be part of this ceremony today. We are not just another grocery store in town; were the grocery store for the fin est military in the world. During this Veterans Day weekend, we are holding several promotions to mark the introduction of the 50th anniversary Vietnam War com memoration flag recognizing the service, valor and sacrifices of those who made it possible for America to remain strong as a defender of democracy worldwide, said NAS Jax Commissary Store Director Larry Bentley. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander thanked the Vietnam veterans for their ser vice. For those of you who have not studied what happened during the Vietnam War, I want to stress that it was the politics of the day that drove the outcome of that war, he said. What people need to remember is that the veterans who served in that war, were just as professional and did their jobs. The U.S. mili tary has had a culture since 1775 of getting the job done by doing what it takes including self sacrifice. Those from the Vietnam Era are no different. What overshadowed that Jacksonville media get overview of P-8A Poseidon environmental impact NAS Jax Commissary recognizes Vietnam veterans More than 1,000 people attended the 11th annual JAX Chamber Military Appreciation Luncheon Nov. 6 at the Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront. The event kicked off the City of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor which rec ognizes military members and veterans for their service and sacrifices. Maj. Thomas McWilliams, area commander of The Salvation Army Northeast Florida Area Command, gave the invocation and MU2 Laura Carey of Navy Band Southeast sang the national anthem while members of the Florida Air National Guard presented the col ors. After lunch, Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown addressed the crowd. Thank you for your service and sacrifice to our nation and the ide als we hold most dearly. As we all know, Jacksonville plays a key role in Americas defense, supporting our mili tary bases through training and opera tions. The military plays a big role in our city and that is why my administra tion is focusing on supporting service members and the thousands of men and women who choose Jacksonville when transitioning from active duty to the civilian workforce, Brown told the audience. He stressed the importance of local companies hiring veterans. I believe that once you serve your country and you transition out of the service, you should be able to get a job to be able to take care of your family, said Brown. Congressman Ander Crenshaw (R-Fla.) also thanked the military mem bers and veterans in attendance. I am proud to represent you in our nations capital and for those here who we are honoring today, thank you for your service to our country, thank you for your commitment to each other and thank you for the sacrifice you make for millions of people all across the globe in troubled countries, said Crenshaw. There are many unsung heroes in the military, from those who stand the watch to the cooks and those who keep the planes in the air, they are the strength of our military on the pointy end of the spear. I am proud to be here today in the company of heroes and I hope we all remember the blood and sacrifices of those who have gone before us, he added. The keynote speaker for the event was retired Navy Adm. Mark Fitzgerald who discussed his views of the past and future of the United States Armed Forces and talked about honor, courage and commitment traits of some of the military personnel he served with. I remember in 1975, coming out of Vietnam, tensions were tough, funding was poor and we were transitioning to an all volunteer force. And then, going through the 1980s, we had a resurgence JAX Chamber hosts military appreciation luncheon

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Dustin told me not to write about military spouses on Veterans Day, but Im going to do it anyway. I understand Dustins concern: when one holi day is confused with another, such as when people erroneously recognize my husband and other living veterans on Memorial Day, all the tributes become diluted. Also, according to Dustin, some might think Im being disrespectful for writing about spouses of veterans on Veterans Day. Veterans Day is for veterans and Military Spouse Appreciation Day is for military spouses. But, did anyone get a three-day weekend on Military Spouse Appreciation Day? Does anyone out side of military spouses know when Military Spouse Appreciation Day is? I didnt think so. There is a reason why at every reenlistment, change of command or retirement ceremony Ive ever been to that the spouse receives recognition and, some times, flowers. There is a reason why service members always thank their spouse when they reflect back on their careers. Being in the military affects the entire family. When you see a veteran, you can be sure there is a veteran spouse, family and/or children supporting him or her. These veterans dont get a nationally rec ognized three-day weekend, but they serve just the same. Most of us are aware of what service-member vet erans have given for our country, but the sacrifices of their spouses sacrifices that contribute to the service member being able to carry out their duties sometimes go unnoticed. So today, on Veterans Day, and despite my hus bands better judgment, I want to thank the person behind the veteran, the military-spouse veteran. Military-spouse veterans have given up careers. Its not complaining or being sour when military spouses point out that they have put their careers or higher education on hold due to frequent moves. Its just the truth. The government knows this is a sacrifice, and thats why divorced spouses are entitled to a portion of the service members retirement if they were married for at least 10 years of that members service. Ten years of military marriage is 10 years that a spouse prob ably lost in building his or her own career and retire ment. Ten years of military marriage is a commitment beyond matrimony; its a commitment to understand ing their your spouses obligations are sometimes to our country first, and then to your family. Its hard to be selfish when youre married to the military. Military-spouse veterans have done a lot of wait ing. By the time my parents had been married for 23 years, my dad had accumulated 11 years of active-duty sea time. Thats basically half their marriage, and it means that my mom did a lot of single-parenting and waiting. With deployments increasing in frequency and length, todays military spouses are spending even more time without their loved one. And the most dif ficult part about this process is that military spouses have no choice in it (outside of the fact that they fell in love with someone who happens to work for Uncle Sam). Uncle Sam does not ask for spouses approval to deploy a ship or unit. Furthermore, Uncle Sam has notoriously bad timing, and he doesnt send people home when their spouse is in labor or their kids have pneumonia. Military spouses accept this, and (heres the best part), they carry on anyway. Military-spouse veterans take care of the sick and injured. More and more service members are return ing home wounded. Their injuries are physical and emotional, and no one knows this better than the spouses. The military has a commitment to care for our wounded veterans, but it is the spouse who shoul ders most of the responsibility. They are the ones who are waiting in hospital and rehab hallways or relocat ing their families to be closer to better care. Long after Uncle Sam has done what he can to get these service members back to better health, the spouses will live with the aftermath on a daily basis. They rise to the challenge of new responsibilities as nurse, advocate and counselor. Military-spouse veterans sometimes give every thing. My friend Theresa should have welcomed home her Navy pilot husband, Landon, from a deployment this month. Instead, she was having his funeral. She is living in a city that Uncle Sam chose for her 3,000 miles away from her family. She has two young sons, one of whom was just born four months ago. The mili tary will have a memorial for Landon, and it will care financially for Theresa and her boy. But the military cannot bring back what my friend has lost. On Memorial Day 2014, Landon will be in the fore front of our minds as we think about those who have died for our country. But today, on Veterans Day, I am remembering Theresa and so many other spouses who have given some or all in support of the person they love who happens to work for Uncle Sam. Nov. 14 1846 Naval forces capture Tampico, Mexico. 1910 Civilian Eugene Ely pilots first aircraft to take-off from a ship, USS Birmingham (CL-2) at Hampton Roads, Va. He lands safely on Willoughby Spit, Norfolk, Va. 1941 Order to withdraw Marines at Shanghai, Peiping and Tientsin, China. 1944 Carrier aircraft attack Japanese shipping in Philippines sinking five ships and damaging one. Nov. 15 1882 Lt. Cmdr. French Chadwick reports to American Legation in London as first Naval Attache. 1942 Although the U.S. lost several ships in Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, Naval Force under Rear Adm. Willlis Lee, on board USS Washington (BB-56), turns back Japanese transports trying to reinforce Guadalcanal. The Japanese never again tried to send large naval forces to Guadalcanal. 1960 First Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine, USS George Washington (SSBN598), leaves Charleston, S.C., on initial fleet ballistic missile patrol. Nov. 16 1776 First salute to an American flag (Grand Union flag) flying from Continental Navy ship Andrew Doria, by Dutch fort at St. Eustatius, West Indies. 1942 Navys first night fighter squadron (VMF(N)-531) established at Cherry Point, N.C. 1963 President John F. Kennedy on USS Observation Island witnesses launch of Polaris A-2 missile by USS Andrew Jackson (SSBN-619). 1968 Operation Tran Hung Dao began in Mekong Delta. 1973 Launch of Skylab 4 under command of Lt. Col. Gerald Carr, USMC. The mis sions lasted 84 days and included 1,214 Earth orbits. Recovery by USS New Orleans (LPH-11). Nov. 17 1917 Destroyers USS Fanning (DD-37) and USS Nicholson (DD-52) sink first enemy submarine, U-58, off Milford Haven, Wales. 1924 USS Langley, first air craft carrier, reports for duty. 1941 Congress amends Neutrality Act to allow U.S. merchant ships to be armed. Navys Bureau of Navigation directs Navy personnel with Armed Guard training to be assigned for further training before going to Armed Guard Centers for assignment to mer chant ships. 1955 Navy sets up Special Projects Office under Rear Adm. William Raborn to devel op a solid propellant ballistic missile for use in submarines. Nov. 18 1890 USS Maine, the first American battleship, is launched. 1922 Cmdr. Kenneth Whiting in a PT seaplane, makes first catapult launching from the aircraft carrier USS Langley at anchor in the York River. 1962 USS Currituck (AV-7) rescues 13 Japanese fishermen from their disabled fishing boat Seiyu Maru, which was damaged in Typhoon Karen. Nov. 19 1813Capt. David Porter claims Marquesas Islands for the United States. 1943 Carrier force attacks bases on Tarawa and Makin islands. 1943 USS Nautilus (SS-168) enters Tarawa lagoon in first submarine photograph recon naissance mission. 1961 At the request of presi dent of Dominican Republic, U.S. Naval Task Force sails to Dominican Republic to bolster the countrys government and to prevent a coup. 1969 Navy astronauts Cmdr. Charles Conrad Jr. and Cmdr. Alan Bean are third and fourth men to walk on the moon. They were part of Apollo 12 mis sion. Cmdr. Richard Gordon Jr., the Command Module Pilot, remained in lunar orbit. The mission lasted 19 days, 4 hours, and 36 minutes, the astronauts recovered 243 lbs of lunar material. Recovery by HS-4 helicopters from USS Hornet (CVS-12). Nov. 20 1856 Cmdr. Andrew Foote lands at Canton, China, with 287 Sailors and Marines to stop attacks by Chinese on U.S. mil itary and civilians. 1917 USS Kanawha, Noma and Wakiva sink German sub off coast of France. 1933 Navy crew (Lt. Cmdr. Thomas Settle, USN, and Maj. Chester I. Fordney, USMC) sets a world altitude record in balloon (62,237 ft.) flight into stratosphere. 1943 Operation Galvanic, under command of Vice Adm. Raymond Spruance, lands Navy, Marine, and Army forces on Tarawa and Makin. 1962 President John F. Kennedy lifts the Blockade of Cuba. Are military spouses veterans, too?

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013 3

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Cmdr. David Lundahl, Jr. will relieve Cmdr. Joseph Moorhouse as commanding officer of the VP-30 Squadron Augment Unit (SAU) Nov. 23 at 10 a.m. at the VP-30 Auditorium. Retired Navy Capt. Greg Miller will be the guest speaker. Lundahl, a native of Honolulu, Hawaii, earned his commission from the United States Naval Academy in May 1997 earning a bachelor of sci ence in history. After flight school at VT-6, VT-31 and various temporary assignments including Sailing Center, U.S. Naval Academy and N88 in Washington, DC, Lundahl received his wings in September 1999 in Corpus Christi, Texas. Lundahl served as a selec tively retained graduate at VT-31 in Corpus Christi from September 1999 to May 2001. He flew more than 800 flight instructor hours in the T-44 Pegasus King Air while earn ing his MBA at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University. In December 2001, upon completion of initial training in the P-3 Orion at VP-30, Lundahl reported to VQ-2 in Rota, Spain. While there, Lundahl served as pilot scheduling offi cer, pilot training officer and pilot NATOPS officer. He com pleted multiple detachments in the 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility including EP-3 operations out of Crete, Cypress and Bahrain in support of Operation Iraqi Enduring Freedom. At VQ-2, he was des ignated as an electronic war fare mission commander and EP-3/P-3C NATOPS evaluator and instructor pilot. In 2005, Lundahl returned to Jacksonville to serve at the P-3 Fleet Replacement Squadron as an instructor pilot. At VP-30, he worked in the Command Services Department as the First Lieutenant Division officer and then as the lead instruc tor pilot for the VP-30 Fleet Instructor Under Training team ensuring instructor standard ization throughout the mari time patrol and reconnaissance community. In 2007, Lundahl joined the Navy Reserve and affiliated with the VP-30 SAU where he continued to serve as a flight instructor. On the civilian side he accepted a position as first officer at Southwest Airlines and continues to fly out of Orlando, Fla. in the Boeing 737300/500/700/800 series aircraft. During his tour as com manding officer of VP-30 SAU, Moorhouse oversaw the SAUs completion of more than 1,000 sorties and 1,230 student flight events, accounting for more than 10 percent of all flight events at the fleet replace ment squadron. A testament to Moorhouses leadership, the SAU flawlessly executed every event during his tenure with zero incidents and a perfect safety record. As he approaches 20 years of service, Moorhouse is thank ful to have remained flying the entire time enabling the use of his talents to train tomorrows leaders. Congressman Ander Crenshaw (R-Fla.) formally recognized 33 Northeast Florida Veterans with Veterans Special Recognition Certificates at a ceremony at the Ocean Breeze Conference Center at Naval Station Mayport Nov.8. During the annual ceremony, veterans who who served the country from World War II through Operation Storm were honored. Crenshaw was joined by United States Postal Service District Manager Charles Miller who also presented cer tificates of recognition from the Postal Service to Purple Heart recipients. Jacksonvilles Week of Valor Jacksonvilles is a fitting time to honor all our veterans, including 33 service men and women from Northeast Florida communities who received the Fourth Congressional District Special Recognition Certificate, said Crenshaw. The United States Postal Service also gave special tribute to regional Purple Heart recipients. In all, let us never forget that our nations greatness is drawn from the blood and sacrifices of honorable and courageous men and women. I thank each of our honorees for standing in the face of incredible danger and hardship and give them my deep appreciation. Through the years, Crenshaw has hon ored thousands of veterans who served from the 1940s through Operation Desert Storm. However, some veterans who served during this time period may not have been honored because fed eral Congressional district lines were redrawn at the beginning of 2013 and eligible veterans did not previously live in the Fourth Congressional District. Fleet Engagement Team to visit NAS Jax A Fleet Engagement Team from Navy Personnel Command will visit NAS Jacksonville Nov. 20. All briefs will be held at the VP-30 Auditorium. The following is the schedule: 9-10:30 a.m. BuPers 3 Military Community Management Overview Brief for leadership/all khakis 10:30 a.m. noon PERS 40 Detailing/Distribution Brief for leadership/all khakis 1-2:30 p.m. Enlisted Force Management/Career Waypoints Brief for all hands 2:30-4 p.m. Enlisted Detailing Distribution Brief for all hands For more information, contact NCC Jacqueline Gonzalez at 5423399 or Jacqueline.gonzalez@navy. mil Lundahl to take helm of VP-30 Squadron Augment Unit Crenshaw honors 33 veterans during ceremony 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013 Construction is scheduled to wrap up by Dec. 17 on the new facility that will house opera tor training for the MQ-4C Triton unmanned aircraft sys tem and the P-8A Maintenance Training Facility. The two projects share a common building adjacent to the P-8A Integrated Training Center on Yorktown Avenue. The new schoolhouses also share a common secured entrance on Child Street, where students will enter either the 8,938-sq.-ft., single-story MQ-4C Triton schoolhouse or the 58,262-sq.-ft., two-story P-8A Poseidon schoolhouse for maintainers. Despite a delay with the furniture order for classrooms and administrative spaces the building will still be turned over on schedule, said Celio Cedeno, a civil engineer with NAS Jax Public Works. The furniture will be treat ed as a punch list exception that is now scheduled for deliv ery in January. Assistant Project Manager Mohammed Raoof of Elkins Constructors said, With the major construction complete, most of our work involves inside finishing. You can feel the chilled-water/air-condi tioning system thats required for human comfort as well as for ventilation of the computer rooms. The facilitys fire-suppres sion system is also up and run ning. The largest space in the facil ity is the P-8A maintenance bay that will eventually house a full-size cutaway of the air craft, to include components such as an ordnance load trainer, integrated avionics trainer, flight control hydrau lics, landing gear, engine and environmental control sys tems, said Cedeno. He added that the building is designed with special raised flooring so technicians can easily access electrical wiring and computer cables for future modifications or repairs. Raoof also noted the projects LEED (Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design) fea tures, including: ground cistern that collects and filters rainwater to be used for flushing toilets panels that generate hot water for the building pavers in parking lots absorb rainwater water retention ponds that is native to Florida. Schoolhouses near completion

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013 7

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COMMISSARYeffort was the politics and culture of the time. Im just happy that there are so many Vietnam vets still around so we can show our appreciation and say, thank-you. And thats what I want to say to you today thank you for your service. I hope you feel that you are proud members of our military team. Youve gone before us and have set the foun dation for the successes we enjoy today, stressed Undersander. The guest speaker for the event was Vietnam Veteran Lowell Bernheimer, a member of the Disabled American Veterans Chapter 38 in Orange Park, and a NAS Jax Commissary employee. Bernheimer recalled a mission he participated in during the Vietnam War when he was a heli copter door gunner on a Green Hornet helo. We were in charge of inserting spec ops into Cambodia and Laos. We headed into an area to pick up 15 tribesmen and five-man Green Beret team that had been inserted about a week earlier. When we were heading in, we received word that they were under heavy attack by more than 200 Viet Cong and North Vietnamese troops, he said. We were able to extract everyone, but unfortu nately many of them were dead. I remember the dedication of those Green Berets two of them who were shot went right back in three weeks later. They were lost and never picked up, Bernheimer contin ued. Our troops always kept the faith. From the founding of our military through Afghanistan and Iraq, we continue to keep the faith. Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville Commanding Officer, Capt. Gayle Shaffer, was inducted into the International College of Dentists (ICD) as a fellow at its 84th Annual Convocation Nov. 1 in New Orleans, La., in recognition for her service to the field of dentistry. It is a tremendous honor to have been selected for this prestigious fellowship, said Shaffer. This is one of the most signifi cant accomplishments of a den tists career, and I am honored to be a part of this great organiza tion. Shaffer was one of five Navy dentist inducted during the cap and gown ceremony for 300 U.S. dentists, bringing the total of U.S. Section ICD Navy Fellows to 53. Established in 1928, the ICD is the oldest and largest worldwide honorary dental organization, with more than 12,000 members (desig nated as fellows). Fellowship in the college is by invitation only and is granted in recognition of an indi vidual dentists outstanding pro fessional achievement, meritorious service and dedication to the con tinued progress of dentistry for the benefit of humankind. Prior to being recognized as a fellow of the ICD, a candidates qualifications and achievements are evaluated by a series of cre dential committees to ensure the candidate is deserving of this high honor and that they adhere to the ICD goals, objectives and motto Recognizing Service and the Opportunity to Serve Once induct ed, a fellow is authorized to use the letters FICD after their name. Shaffer, a 22-year Navy vet eran, maintains an active mem bership in the American Dental Association, is an Academy of General Dentistry Fellow, and is board certified in the American Board of General Dentistry. Naval Hospital Jacksonville commanding officer inducted as a Fellow 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013

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of patriotism and saw how people came together and were again proud of the military, recalled Fitzgerald. And today, its so good to be here seeing people thanking the military for what they do because a lot of what they do is not recognized by people on the street. The sacrifices they and their fami lies make day in and day out are incred ible, Fitzgerald said. So I want to thank you all the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, and Coast Guard along with the fami lies who support them, industries that create the incred ible weapons systems that we have and our government employees who help us maintain our assets. Other events planned throughout the city during the Week of Valor included a ceremony at the Jacksonville National Cemetery, the Veterans Day Parade and the Jacksonville Jaguars Military Appreciation Game. their comments. We want to make sure that no area of concern is missed before releasing the final SEIS in spring of 2014. Capt. Chris Janke, chief of staff at Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 11, told the reporters, The P-8 Poseidon is a vast improvement over the venerable P-3 Orion not only in anti-submarine warfare (ASW) sensor and weapon capability but it also gets on station faster and stays on station longer. That allows the Navy to decrease the num ber of P-8 assets needed to accomplish the same mission in a P-3. Proof of that is evident when you consider a typical P-3 squadron is assigned up to nine aircraft. Compare that to a P-8 squadron flying just six aircraft. Crew ergonomics is also a big improvement on the P-8. When we fly 12-hour or even longer missions, an alert and responsive crew is vital to mission success, said Janke. A significant environmental factor that saves fuel is that 70 percent of pilot training takes place in the P-8A flight simulator fleet that is housed at NAS Jacksonville. When asked about noise levels, Janke responded, Theres a slight increase when comparing the P-8 and P-3 decibels at take-off but the P-8s higher rate of climb takes it away from ground level much faster. SEIS The Navy suspended Nov. 8 the access to classified material of Vice Adm. Ted Branch, director of Naval Intelligence, and Rear Adm. Bruce Loveless, director of Intelligence Operations. The decision to suspend their classi fied access was made based upon the nature of allegations against Admirals Branch and Loveless in connection with an ongoing Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) investiga tion into illegal and improper relations with Leonard Francis, CEO of Glenn Defense Marine. The suspension was deemed prudent given the sensitive nature of their cur rent duties and to protect and support the integrity of the investigative pro cess. The allegations against Branch and Loveless involve inappropriate conduct prior to their current assignments and flag officer rank. There is no indication, nor do the allegations suggest, that in either case there was any breach of classified infor mation. It is important to note that allegations are just that, allegations. Neither officer has been charged with any crime or violation. Both men retain their rank and secu rity clearances. They are on temporary leave. NCIS initiated this investigation in 2010. The Navy appreciates the sup port we have received from the U.S. Attorneys office and other law enforce ment agencies. We will continue to make public as much information as we can without prejudicing the conduct of this investi gation.U.S. Navy admirals investigated by NCIS MILITARY LUNCHEON JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013 9

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10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013 MCPON sends 2013 Veterans Day message Veterans, Shipmates and Navy Families, This past Monday, we honored those who have stood the watch, pay respect to those who have given the ultimate sacrifice, and say thanks to those cur rently in uniform. There have always been men and women willing to serve at the nations call, to protect the very fabric of what makes our country great. It is a very humbling moment for me every time I meet someone who is or has done their part to continue this rich legacy. Our veterans represent every facet of the best of America making a positive impact on our great nation in countless ways. For each veteran comes a new set of people inspired to serve by amazing stories of wars won, lives lost, valor, and patriotism. Veterans Day represents more than a day for our veterans, but offers an opportunity to recognize also their families and the many support groups of our veterans, service members and their families. The dedication and unwavering commitment to our military from the American people is undeniable and this great support allows us to do our job and fulfill our duties without hesitation. Our military could truly not function properly without your commitment and support. I am thankful to be among such hon ored citizens, and for the continued efforts our Sailors and their families make every day to preserve our liber ties. May God bless you and may God bless the United States of America. Happy Veterans Day and all the best. The Pelicans of VP-45, home based at NAS Jacksonville, continued their tradition of giving back to the community by adopting a roadway near I-295. The Pelicans are now responsi ble for a nearly mile-long stretch of Argyle Forest Road from Youngerman Circle to Rampart Road in support of the Keep Jacksonville Beautiful Foundations campaign to clean up and enhance roads in the area. Adopt-A-Road allows citizens to demonstrate community pride, make a positive statement for a clean, attrac tive community and help the city keep down the costs of litter abatement. As part of their adoption, the Pelicans collaborated to hit the ground running in cleaning up their stretch of road. A dedicated crew of 22 Pelicans assembled for more than four hours working to clear all of the dead vegeta tion and trash that had accumulated over the years. It was a lot of work, said Lt. j.g. John Norris. There was a lot more trash than I was expecting, but everyone came together and did a great job in clean ing it up and getting the job done. In the end, the Pelicans made a noticeable impact on their stretch of real estate by collecting more than 24 bags of trash and debris and also having a great time doing it. Anytime you can have fun with your co-workers and give back to the community is a win-win, said AME1 Scott Walker. The Pelicans are already planning their next excursion to their adopt ed road and look forward to their next opportunity to give back to the Jacksonville community that has sup ported VP-45 and the rest of the Navy presence in the area. VP-45 Sailors clean up Jacksonville roadway Joining the Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) can be a smart move for career-minded junior Sailors at NAS Jacksonville. NAS Jax Security Department Senior Enlisted Advisor MACM Edward Santiago said, CSADD provides opportunities for those with personal issues, such as drink ing and smoking cessation, or family con cerns, who may feel more comfortable reaching out to a fellow junior Sailor rather than talking with someone in their chain of command. CSAAD is a peer mentoring program for active and reserve Sailors, Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) candidates, and Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) cadets aimed at promoting good decision-making and leadership develop ment at the most junior levels. The program exists as a way for junior Sailors to guide their shipmates from mak ing decisions detrimental to their careers, as well as foster an environment of men toring and support within the enlisted lev els. CSAAD community events include: teers to set up/take down and hand out water. CSAAD fundraising events include: a.m. to noon. Freedom Lanes at 2 p.m. Five-player teams.For more info, contact AC3 Ray (alexis. ray@navy.mil), or MAC Henderson (vanessa. henderson@navy.mil). CSADD can be key to advancement for junior Sailors

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Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Rick Williamson praised the 2013 Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) keypersons and stressed the importance of 100 per cent contact of all federal employees Nov. 4. The CFC is currently underway through Jan. 15, 2014, for all federal agencies worldwide to donate to quali fying charitable organizations. This year has been a little bit of a challenge with furloughs and sequestration. We took a brief pause with the campaign but are now back on track and I have a lot of faith in the generos ity of our military and civilian employ ees, said Williamson. Many people say, when times are hard, expect to have a bad campaign, but Ive been in the Navy for 28 years and although weve seen some issues arise, weve never had a bad cam paign, he added. My hope is that the trend continues and our military and civilian members are given the oppor tunity to contribute in this worthwhile campaign. In order for a command or agency to conduct a successful fund drive, they must have proactive keypersons who volunteer to coordinate the campaign. The keypersons have a big job and I greatly appreciate them stepping up and volunteering. They conduct 100 percent contact of the members of the commands, coordinate fundrais ing events, collect money or allotment slips and keep track of donations. They do all of it out of the kindness of their hearts and Im very appreciative of them, said Williamson. Although there are no specific dollar amount goals set, there is a 100 percent contact goal for all keypersons. When you visit the different bases and you see the CFC thermometers up, you see the generosity of the people. The key is communication getting the word out to ensure people understand what the CFC is all about and how the program works, Williamson stated. With literally hundreds of organi zations available to donate to, federal employees who dont have a specific choice can review descriptions of agen cies in the CFC program guide, includ ing the percentage of donated funds that go to cover administrative costs. This enables contributors to discern between charities based on their per sonal preferences and priorities. The ones that particularly resonate with me are educational organiza tions. My parents instilled in me the value of education at a very young age. From the military standpoint, there are different programs our members can benefit from to get an education. But there are many people who may not get the opportunities that the military offers, said Williamson. I think the opportunity of education enriches lives and betters communities. For those not in the military, who arent blessed with a lot of money and need a scholar ship opportunity, hopefully donating to these organizations will give them a chance at better education. Individuals can donate to CFC with a cash contribution or by pledging a spe cific amount to be withheld from their pay beginning in January 2014. Many commands also hold special fundrais ing events to benefit the CFC drive. Command involvement and leadership are essential ingredients to making the campaign successful. For more infor mation on the CFC drive, contact your command keyperson. P-8A aircrewmen graduate at VP-30Capt. Curtis Phillips, commanding cfficer of VP-30, congratu lated graduates of the P-8A Acoustic and NonAcoustic initial training (CAT I) syllabus Oct. 18. The graduates of Acoustic Operator Class 1304 and Non-Acoustic Operator Class 1304 will now report to their assigned operational P-8 squad rons at NAS Jacksonville to begin their initial sea tours. Honor graduates were AWO3 Justin Burns and AWO3 Derek Dymer. Acoustic Operator: AWO3 Justin Burns AWO3 Anthony Campolongo AWO3 Eric Lujan Non-acoustic Operator: AWO3 Alexander Dworak AWO3 Derek Dymer AWO3 Adam Huszar AWO3 Tyler Touchstone As VP-5 continues its busy schedule operating and maintaining its P8-A Poseidons, the squadron proudly shines its spotlight of excellence on AT1(AW/ SW) Abalo Meba. Born in Lome, Republic of Togo, in western Africa, Meba immigrated to the United States in 2003 and became a naturalized citi zen in April 2005. He and his wife, Vim, are raising their son Peter and daugh ter Makayla. Meba entered boot camp in August 2004 at Great Lakes, Ill. Upon graduation, he reported to the USS Gunston Hall (LSD 44) in Little Creek, Va. until 2007. Following his time at sea, he reported to NAS Pensacola for Aviation Electronic Technician A School. After complet ing his training syllabus, he reported to VP-5 in July 2007. As a Mad Fox, he has deployed to Kadena, Japan in 2008 and 2012 and also deployed to El Salvador in 2010. As an aviation electronics tech nician, Meba is tasked with trouble shooting and maintaining the com munication mission systems aboard the P-8A Poseidon, including the radar, Link 11/16, SATCOM, TACAN, and INMARSAT. Currently, he works as the VP-5 Line Division LPO. The Line Division is in charge of the launch and recovery of all of VP-5 aircraft and the daily turnaround inspections per formed on them. Being able to serve my country and work along side fellow Mad Foxes and friends each day keeps me energized its always exciting to come to work, explained Meba. My goals are always to put those who are junior to me in the best position to succeed. I always want to push them to get their personal quali fications accomplished so they can be successful. His current goal is continuing to help manage a successful line division. His long-term goals are to make chief or LDO and retire after 30 years of service. When he is away from the squadron, Meba enjoys playing soccer, taking his son to football practice and spending time with his family at the beach. VP-5 is currently in the inter-deploy ment readiness cycle aboard NAS Jacksonville.Commander, Navy Region Southeast stresses importance of Combined Federal Campaign VP-5 Mad Fox of the Week JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013 11

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Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel directed U.S. Pacific Command to support U.S. gov ernment humanitarian relief operations in the Philippines in the wake of a deadly typhoon that has left more than 1,000 dead, defense officials announced Nov. 10. The support, provided at the request of the Philippines gov ernment, will initially focus on surface maritime search and rescue, medium-heavy helicopter lift support, airborne maritime SAR, fixed-wing lift support and logistics enablers, officials said. DOD is working in coordina tion with the U.S. Agency for International Development and U.S. ambassador in Manila, they said, and will continue to monitor the effects of Typhoon Haiyan while standing ready to help the Philippines recover from the monster storm. Super Typhoon Haiyan hammered six central islands Nov. 8, devastating the city of Tacloban and leaving a huge storm surge and widespread flooding in its wake. Secretary of State John Kerry immediately offered assurance of U.S support, and Pentagon Press Secretary George Little told reporters that day the U.S. military was prepared to respond, if requested. Little noted that U.S. forces frequently provide direct relief and recovery support during and after natural disasters. Nowhere in the world are natural disasters as prevalent as in the Asia-Pacific region. It sits on the earthquakeprone Ring of Fire and is tormented by hurricanes, cyclones, tsunamis, floods and mudslides. As part of its extensive regional engagement, Pacom works closely with regional nations to promote disaster preparedness and build resil ience; and to respond quickly and effectively should disaster strike. One of the best ways to do that is through the exercise program, command officials said. Its the right thing to do, particularly in light of frequent and often devastating natu ral disasters that strike across the region, Navy Adm. Samuel Locklear III, the Pacom com mander, told American Forces Press Service last week. The Philippines is one of five U.S. allies in the Asia-Pacific region. During his visit there in August, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel praised the deep and unbreakable alliance between the two countries, calling it an anchor for peace and stability and prosperity in this region. Our close ties to the Philippines have been forged through a history of shared sacrifice and common pur pose, he added, and continu ing to strengthen the close partnership between our nations is an important part of Americas long-term strat egy of rebalancing in the AsiaPacific. U.S. Military to aid typhoon-devastated Philippines JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013 13

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More than 20,000 Navy country music fanatics helped country music super star Tim McGraw honor veterans dur ing the Chase Presents Live from the HomeFront concert at Naval Station Mayport, Nov. 10. McGraw created the HomeFront program with JP Morgan Chase and charity Operation Homefront last year to help give mortgagefree homes to wounded veterans and military members. So far, the partnership has provid ed more than 70 homes to veterans. According to McGraw, it is a small price to pay to honor those who sacrifice so much. Its easy for me to show up and play music to honor the men and women who have the tough jobs, he said. To me, its just one small thing I can do to help show how much we appreciate what they put on the line and what families sacrifice every single day. I have had the privilege of meeting many service members and their fami lies and have heard many inspiring sto ries. Its something Im proud to do and want to take it as far as we can! McGraw got the crowd into a frenzy performing his latest single Highway Dont Care from his 2013 album and many others including one of his biggest hits Live Like You Were Dying, which is a song about a man with a terminal illness and came out around the time his father (Tug McGraw) passed away. Even though the theme of the concert was remembering the veterans, it was a great show enjoyed by many. Im so excited about Tim McGraw! It means so much that he took time out to play this concert for us, said OS2 Stacie Neely. We dont get to experience these types of festivities all the time because we are deployed for eight to nine months at a time. Im thankful that he has put this show on for us service members and veterans. The free concert was one of many perfor mances that JP Morgan Chase has sponsored over the last 18 months. According to JP Morgan Chase Southeast U.S. Chairman Mel Martinez, this event was to honor those who sacri fice everyday on the eve of Veterans Day. We are happy to be able to give back through this concert as well as through the firms military programs to a com munity that has given so much to us, he said. This is an opportunity to say thank you to our service members and their families who wear the cloth of this great nation. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. Tim McGraw salutes veterans 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013 15 Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Asset Management Business Line Coordinator (BLC) Bill Sloan retired Nov. 1 after dedicating more than 40 years to government service. Sloan said goodbye to many of his co-workers and friends at an informal retirement luncheon held on board NAS Jacksonville Oct. 31. I would like to express my sincere appreciation for your superb perfor mance over the past 43 years of ser vice to the Naval Facilities Engineering Command and the Department of the Defense, said NAVFAC Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus. NAVFAC Southeast is losing an extremely valuable employee, team member and leader. Sloan, an unassuming quiet profes sional, began his engineering career serving as an officer with the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers from 1970 to 1973. He began his service with NAVFAC in August of 1973. My first civil service job with NAVFAC was as a PDC (Professional Development Center) intern in the Environmental Branch, Utilities Division at SOUTHDIV (NAVFAC Southern Division), said Sloan. Sloan went on to assume posi tions of great responsibility with the NAVFAC Southeast leadership team and Executive Support Group, serving as Capital Improvements BLC from 20062008 before finishing his career as the Asset Management BLC. My most memorable experience was being part of the establishment of NAVFAC Southeast (June 2006). The biggest test we faced back then was the transition of the Capital Improvements Business Line from SOUTHDIV (in Charleston, S.C.) to NAVFAC Southeast (in Jacksoville). Moving from Charleston to Jacksonville and re-orga nizing and transforming during a time of record high workloads was particu larly challenging, said Sloan. During the transition from Charleston to Jacksonville, NAVFAC Southeast lost more than 80 percent of its engineers and architects and more than 90 percent of its real estate pro fessionals. Sloans first task was to rebuild the commands engineering organization during the largest con struction program on record for either Southern Division or the newly estab lished NAVFAC Southeast organization. His efforts were immensely successful enlisting a diverse and talented body of professionals capable of designing, managing, and constructing over $1 bil lion a year of facility improvements. Teamwork combined with dedicated professionals across the organization made the re-organization successful, said Sloan. When asked what sage advice he could pass on, Sloan answered a famil iar theme. Always remember the value and importance of good teamwork. Your versatility and knowledge were invaluable in providing warf ighter mission and family support, not only at NAVFAC Southeast, but direct ly supporting the warfighters in Iraq, Afghanistan, Haiti, and other locations throughout the world, said Kiwus. I hope your retirement provides you with new challenges as rewarding and fulfilling as those you have achieved throughout your combined 43 year civil service and military career. Although Sloan wanted to quietly slip into retirement, his friends and coworkers at NAVFAC Southeast would have none of it. Said Sloan of the lun cheon, I enjoyed the kinds words and the luncheon, all of it, very much. Sloan plans to spend his early retire ment years traveling with his wife to the national parks in the western United States. NAVFAC Southeast senior civilian retires after four decades of service With the strike of a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow by the ships sponsor, the Navy christened its new est aircraft carrier, Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78), the lead ship of the new Gerald R. Ford class, Nov. 9, in a ceremony at Huntington Ingalls Newport News Shipbuilding in Newport News, Va. Susan Ford Bales, Fords daughter and the ships spon sor, had the honor of christen ing the ship in front of more than 20,000 Sailors, shipbuild ers and civilians bringing to life the Navys newest aircraft carrier design in more than 40 years. I christen thee United States Ship Gerald R. Ford, said Bales, breaking the bottle across the bow. May God bless all those who sail in her. The Ford class is designed with significant quality-of-life improvements and reduced maintenance. These innova tions are expected to improve operational availability and capability, and reduce total ownership cost over its 50-year service life by $4 billion com pared with Nimitz-class car riers. The ship is also designed to evolve with advances in tech nology. The carrier is our Navys most adaptable platform, said Adm. Jonathan Greenert, chief of naval operations. This ship will not only launch the aircraft we currently have in inven tory, it will launch aircraft we havent even begun to design. USS Enterprise (CVN 65), a ship we inactivated after more than 50 years of service, was rele vant from her first day in ser vice through her last. Greenert praised the design ers, shipbuilders and Sailors who together have brought the ship to this important mile stone. Ford will herald a new era of our carrier fleet, said Greenert. She is truly a technological marvel. We should embrace technology, but it is our people who underpin our success. The christening of the ship comes after more than 12 years of planning and construction. Newport News Shipbuilidng laid the keel in 2009 and is scheduled to deliver the ship to the Navy in 2016. While the shipbuilder con struction and systems instal lations continue, the Navy is building, training and develop ing Fords crew to operate and maintain the state-of-the-art ship. Navy tradition dictates that todays christening ceremony will spark life and luck into this great ship, but the true life of this ship will come from the unparalleled hard work, pro fessionalism and dedication of the Gerald R. Ford crew, said Capt. John Meier, commanding officer of Pre-Commissioning Unit Gerald R. Ford. In part nership with Newport News Shipbuilding, we will match the most technologically advanced and adaptable plat form in our Navys history with the most adaptable and techni cally proficient crew. CVN 78 honors the 38th President of the United States and pays tribute to his lifetime of service in the Navy, in the U.S. government and to the nation. During World War II he attained the rank of lieuten ant commander in the Navy, serving on the light carrier USS Monterey (CVL 26). Ford was the first vice president and, in the aftermath of the Watergate scandal, succeeded the first president ever to resign, serv ing in the countrys highest office from 1974-1977. Bales reflected upon her fathers final letter before his death, written to then-Secre tary of the Navy Donald Winter, where the president wrote, Thus, it is a great source of pride and humility to know that an aircraft carrier bearing my name will be forever con nected with the valor and patri otic service of men and women of the United States Navy. In ALNAV 077/13, released Nov. 8 to all Navy and Marine Corps personnel, the Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) designated November 2013 as Warrior Care Month. Providing assistance to seriously wounded, ill and injured service mem bers and their families is a top priority for the Navy, said SECNAV Ray Mabus. We take care of our own including active-duty, Reserve and veteran Sailors and Marines. Warrior Care Month is a joint-service event that recognizes wounded war riors as well as those who care for them for their service, sacrifices and achievements. It also is an opportuni ty to raise awareness of the resources available to service members should ill ness or injury strike unexpectedly. One especially critical resource is Navy Wounded Warrior (NWW) Safe Harbor, the Navys support program for seriously wounded, ill and injured Sailor and Coast Guardsmen. The pro gram a department within Fleet and Family Readiness at Commander, Navy Installations Command has assisted nearly 2,500 service members and their families since its inception. NWW [is] part of an extensive cata log of Navy programs that enhance the mental, physical and emotional health of service members, said Mabus. [It] provide[s] the gold standard of non-medical care to wounded warriors and their families, offering resources that promote healing and opportuni ties for success, both within and beyond military service. The theme of Warrior Care Month 2013 is Warrior Care Building a Ready and Resilient Force. Promoting readi ness and resiliency ensures that wound ed warriors can cope with adversity on the front lines or at home. To that end, NWW offers many essential services, including connecting families to respite care resources; addressing pay and per sonnel issues; assisting with housing and transportation adaptation; provid ing transition assistance; offering adap tive athletics opportunities; and more. Oftentimes, NWW serves as a key link between the Navy and a Sailor who is recovering away from his command, said NWW Deputy Director Merissa Larson. Our program addresses whatev er non-medical needs surface, which allows seriously wounded, ill and injured service members and their fam ilies to focus on healing without dis tractions. NWW non-medical care provid ers are located at major military treat ment facilities throughout the conti nental United States. They collaborate closely with the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (BUMED), which pro vides expert restorative and rehabili tative medical care for wounded war riors. Additionally, the Naval Center for Combat and Operational Stress Control help service members and their fami lies grapple with operational stress before, during and after deployment. During Warrior Care Month, SECNAV Mabus urges the Navy family to become more familiar with the many programs available to seriously wounded, ill and injured service members, and to join him in saluting wounded warriors and those who care for them. Our commitment to seriously wounded, ill and injured Sailors and Marines, as well as their families and caregivers, is unwavering, he said. I encourage all Navy personnel to take an opportunity during Warrior Care Month to join me in expressing our heartfelt gratitude and support. SECNAV names November Warrior Care Month Ford christening connects president to Navy roots

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Benjamin Bittner, Boy Scouts of America Troop 101 Life Scout, pre sented his Eagle Scout project to NAS Jacksonville Natural Resources Manager Christine Bauer at the Black Point Interpretive Center Nov. 6. Eagle Scout is the highest rank attain able in the Boy Scouts of America pro gram. The title of Eagle Scout is held for life, giving rise to the phrase Once an Eagle, always and Eagle. Requirements for attaining this rank include earn ing a total of 21 merit badges, demon strating Scout spirit, service, and lead ership. Also included in the require ments development of an extensive service project that benefits the com munity, or an organization other than Boy Scouting. Eagle Scout Candidate Ben Bittner, a student at Mandarin High School, designed and constructed a mobile electronic interactive display board that mirrors a wall mural affixed to the outside of the NAS Jacksonville Black Point Interpretive Center. The display features a rendering of the mural with LED lights located near each of the 13 protected animals in the artwork. Momentary push buttons correspond ing with each animal are mounted next to a listing of the common and scien tific names of each protected species. The display is battery powered and on wheels so it can be used in or out doors. The Black Point Interpretive Center is part of NAS Jacksonvilles educa tion and outreach program, that also includes a watchable wildlife area and two nature trails. The project plan was approved by the NAS Jacksonville Environmental Department, Troop 101 Scoutmaster Walter Carter, and the Riverbend Scouting District, North Florida Council. Bauer had praise and thanks for all who participated, especially Bittner for his dedication and initiative in plan ning and carrying out this project. The Eagle Scout program has pro vided several enhancements to our con servation education areas that we could not have otherwise obtained, such as wildlife signs and live exhibit enclo sures, a redesigned butterfly garden, and now the protected species elec tronic quiz board, said Bauer. Many thanks also to Roger OConnor (former Troop 101 scoutmaster, Eagle Scout and NAVFAC employee) for bringing wonderful young men like Ben to NAS Jacksonville for project ideas. Much planning and effort went into the project prior to delivery Nov. 6. Bittner drew up the design for the display, put together a project plan and contacted donors for purchasing materials. Family and friends provided donations in excess of $200 and others loaned tools and equipment during the construction phase. During assembly Nov. 2, Bittner led a dozen Troop 101 scouts and adult leaders in the five-hour assembly in a two pronged approach of building the mobile display and then wiring the electronics. Adult leader Bob Van Pelt was especially helpful bring ing years of electronic experience to the project. I am very proud of Ben and his ambi tious, unique project, said Carter. We hope that many people will enjoy the fruits of his work for years to come. The project also helped other scouts earn credit towards an electronics merit badge, which is a wonderful plus! Bens mother and I are just ecstatic that this piece of Bens journey to Eagle is finally complete, said Earl Bittner, Bens father and NAVFAC Southeast employee. We are very thankful to Ms. Bauer for her patience waiting on Ben to get his plan and the resources together for this challenging project. When the project was complete it was apparent a great deal of time and crafts manship were devoted to making the display quiz board an interactive work of art. I wanted this to be a project that would provide the Black Point Center with an educational tool for those who visit the center, especially the little kids. We spent a lot of time discussing the display size and height of the buttons because I wanted to ensure little kids could use the board, said Ben Bittner. The project also helped me to show leadership by teaching the younger scouts to follow in my footsteps.Local Eagle Scout candidate supports Black Point Interpretive Center 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Deweys Family Night 3rd Friday of the Month Deweys will be open for dinner & beverages Nov. 15 Karaoke with Tom Turner Dec. 20 Childrens Holiday Bingo Childrens Holiday Bingo will start at 6:30 p.m. and has a cost of $10 per per son and includes soft drinks, hot dog, dauber, bingo card and gift bag for each child. DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Youth Bowling League: Every Sat., 10:30 a.m. noon $17 annually or $8 per week. Includes shoes, awards will be given at the end of the season! Rising Stars Youth League: Every Sat., 10:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m. Pee Wee Division (6 years & under) 2 games, $6 per week. Juniors Division (7 years & older) 3 games, $8 per week. Special Stars Bowling League for fami lies with special needs children. All ages welcome! Ramps available for the non-ambulatory as well as bumpers for beginners. Runs for 10 weeks at a cost of $7 per week, shoes are included. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for Active Duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4 6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Turkey Trot 5K Nov. 15 at 11:30 a.m. Perimeter Rd. / Antenna Farm Powerlifting Competition Feb. 8, 2014, 7 a.m. at the Fitness Center $10 registration feeI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil. Waves of Honor Special: Seaworld Orlando Adult $46.50, Child $42.25. Busch Gardens Tampa Adult $45, Child $40.50. Monster Jam: Club seating (includes pit pass) $42, regular seating (includes pit pass) $22. Jacksonville Jaguars: Section 147 Bud Zone, $70. Jags shuttle bus $12. Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2013-14 Season: Tickets now available! The Artist Series Broadway in Jax 2013 2014 Season: Tickets available now! Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus: Jan. 17 & 18, 2014, $51. War Horse: Feb. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $68.50. Memphis: March 22, 2014, 8 pm, $65. Million Dollar Quartet: April 26, 2014, 8 pm, $65. The D* Word: Oct. 4-25, 2014, $43.75 $46. Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept. 27, 2014) 4 day Hopper ticket$166 4 day 1 park per day and water park ticket-$166 4 day Hopper and Water park combo ticket$194 Gatorbowl $35 Capital One Bowl $98 Russell Athletic Bowl $78 Soul Food Festival Special $20 General Admission $32 Preferred $42 VIP $65 Ringling Brothers Barnum & Bailey Circus $15 Veterans Memorial Arena call for dates/times. ITT is now selling $18 tickets for the Harlem Globetrotters! The show is Feb. 28, 7 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Arena.The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. St. Augustine Outlet Mall Trip Nov. 16 at 12 p.m. Dirty Stache Contest Nov. 16 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Nov. 26 for active duty Nov. 14 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m. Turkey Trot Golf Scramble Nov. 25, 10 a.m. shotgun start $60 entry fee, $70 for civilian guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m.Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Military Family Appreciation Carnival Nov. 16, 11 a.m. 4 p.m. Free admission, food available for pur chase Dashing Through the Grove Dec. 6, 48 p.m. Free snow sledding, tree lighting, pho tos with Santa and more!Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person The NAS Jacksonville Golf Course hosted the 2013 Mary Burnside Tournament Oct. 30. The tournament was created by the Jacksonville Womens Golf Association (JWGA), the third oldest golf associa tion in the country, to honor the late retired Navy Lt. Cmdr. Mary Burnside. Burnside joined JWGA in 1968 and served as president for the organization 1983-85. Her devotion to JWGA and love of golf catapulted the organization into the public eye and served as inspiration to everyone involved. The winners on the course were Therese Quinn who was the Low Gross Overall Winner with a score of 73 and Bertha Frazier, the Overall Net Winner at the tournament, who shot a 68. Shan Giordano, current president of the JWGA, said, We are so excited to be at NAS Jax to celebrate the life of Mary Burnside whose entire family served our country. Mary served not only her country but also served all of us with her vol unteerism. It is a great day to be able to celebrate who she was and to sustain her memories with our organization. NAS Jax Golf Course hosts womens tournament JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013 17

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013 19 For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. SPORTS The National Park Service and the U.S. Navy announced plans Nov. 1 to host a joint memorial ceremony at the Pearl Harbor Visitor Center at the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument, looking directly out to the USS Arizona Memorial. The ceremony, to start at 7:45 a.m. Dec. 7, will commemorate the 72nd anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. This years keynote speaker will be Max Cleland, secre tary of the American Battle Monuments Commission. A former U.S. senator and the youngest-ever admin istrator of the U.S. Veterans Administration, Cleland has been a distinguished public servant for nearly 50 years. In 1967, Cleland joined the armed forces where he served in the Vietnam War as a bat talion signal officer. In 1968, as an Army captain, Cleland was seriously wounded in combat and received both the Bronze Star for meritorious service and the Silver Star for gallantry in action. Adm. Harry Harris Jr., who assumed duties as Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet Oct. 16, is also scheduled to speak. As commander of Pacific Fleet, Harris is responsi ble for 100 million square miles in which commerce worth tril lions of dollars is transported each year. Today, U.S. Pacific Fleet leads Americas rebalance to the Pacific. This years Dec. 7 ceremo ny will be co-hosted by Paul DePrey, superintendent of the National Park Service, WWII Valor in the Pacific National Monument, and Rear Adm. Rick Williams, commander of Navy Region Hawaii and Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific. More than 2,500 distin guished guests and the general public are expected to join cur rent and former military per sonnel, including Pearl Harbor survivors and other WWII vet erans, for the annual obser vance of the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor. Our Pearl Harbor Survivors were young men 72 years ago when they experienced the attack on Oahu. Many were teenagers, Williams said. The attack launched our country into World War II, and most of the young Pearl Harbor Survivors, went on to fight in that war. They fought across the Pacific leading the Battle of Midway from here in Pearl Harbor; fighting a bloody and brutal Guadalcanal Campaign; and hitting beaches, enemy ships and island strongholds with everything we had from the winter of 1941/42 through the summer of 1945, Williams noted. The Pearl Harbor Day cere mony commemorates both the attack and Americas ultimate victory in the Second World War. The theme of this years historic commemoration, Sound the Alarm, examines how thousands of Americans answered a call to duty in the wake of the attack. Sound the Alarm also explores how the nation was unified through communication in 1941 and throughout the war but shows how slow or incomplete infor mation was, especially in the early days and weeks of the war. Sites across the U.S. will include the United States Navy Memorial Museum (Washington, DC); Great Lakes Naval Museum (Chicago, Ill.); Rosie the Riveter National Historic Site (Oakland, Calif.); Arizona State Museum (Phoenix, Ariz.); and the National WWII Museum (New Orleans, La.). Prior to the start of the cer emony, Pearl Harbor survivors and WWII veterans will be able to interact with one another via new media, and those who are unable to attend the ceremony on Oahu will be able to view the event in their hometown as it takes place. At 7:55 a.m., the exact moment the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor began 72 years ago, a moment of silence will be observed. A guided-missile destroyer will render honors to the USS Arizona, and a flyover will be conducted above Pearl Harbor. The ceremony will con clude with a walk of honor by Pearl Harbor survivors and other WWII Veterans through an honor cordon of military service members and National Park Service men and women. The U.S. Naval Academy needs quali fied Navy Reserve officers, especially at the ranks of lieutenant and lieuten ant commander, with at least a masters degree in an appropriate academic dis cipline to instruct in designated aca demic departments for Fall 2014 and to serve as outstanding military role mod els and mentors for midshipmen. Recall opportunities will be con sidered for the following disciplines: cyber security, information systems, and information technology; electri cal engineering, computer engineer ing, general engineering, nuclear engi neering, mechanical engineering, naval architecture, ocean engineering, aero space engineering, and control systems engineering; mathematics, chemistry, physics, computer science, and ocean ography; political science, economics, English, history, and foreign languages, including Spanish, French, German, Russian, Arabic, Chinese, or Japanese. Interested Navy Reservists should email the following: discipline(s) you are applying for and your qualifications for the position. ic, professional, and naval experience, including any recent mobilizations, recalls, or extended active duty peri ods). For more information and to apply, email: reserve.recall@usna.edu or call Cmdr. John Schedel at (410) 293-6513/ DSN: 281-6513 To receive full consideration, inter ested officers for Academic Year 2014-15 should apply no later than Dec. 15, 2013. Officers selected will be recalled to active duty and assigned orders for an officer-instructor tour, not to exceed three years, commencing July 2014. Recalled officers will remain on the reserve active status list and will remain eligible for promotion consid eration before reserve selection boards. Selections will be made only after USNA placement officers are confident that USNA billets will not be filled from the active duty pool of potential officer instructors. Applicants will be made aware of their selection status by mid-April 2014. Final arrangements are contingent upon PCS funding being available through the Navy. Naval Academy is looking for Naval Reserve officers for instructorsSpeakers, theme announced for 72nd Pearl Harbor Day ceremony 1 2 3 4 5 6

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013 The Navy commenced the first E-2 Hawkeye and C-2 Greyhound Field Carrier Landing Practice (FCLP) opera tions at Wallops Flight Facility Nov. 4, following a ceremony to commemorate an agreement with NASA to support FCLP training for E-2 and C-2 squad rons operating from Naval Station Norfolk Chambers Field. Previously, E-2 and C-2 squadrons had to conduct out-of-area detachments to NAS Jacksonville, Fla., or when oper ating at NALF Fentress, fly a modified landing pattern to comply with local noise abatement procedures. NASA officials, Accomack County officials and Navy personnel attend ed the ceremony in recognition of an agreement that culminates a more than 10-year search to acquire additional local FLCP airfield capacity. It would be very difficult for any one to overstate just how important this agreement is to NASA, the Navy, and to the future of Naval aviation in the Hampton Roads region, said Vice Adm. Nora Tyson, deputy director of U.S. Fleet Forces Command, in a speech during the ceremonys opening. The agreement with NASA provides the Navy with the ability to relieve near-term FCLP capacity issues at Navy Auxiliary Landing Field (NALF) Fentress and affords pilots the oppor tunity to practice carrier landings in a controlled training environment that closely replicates conditions encoun tered at sea. Additionally, the agreement will help reduce training costs, decrease the time Sailors have to spend away from home while preparing for deployment, and provide a boost to the local economy on the Eastern Shore. These detachments resulted in an increase to training costs, wear and tear on the airframes, and more time our Sailors had to spend away from their families, said Tyson. This is huge because of the realis tic carrier landing practice that it pro vides to our aviators, said Capt. Todd Watkins, commodore of the Airborne Command Control and Logistics Wing. Here we are able to fly a pattern exactly the way we do it at sea. The Navy completed approximately $1.9 million in necessary minor con struction, including installation of run way lighting and markings to simulate the flight deck of an aircraft carrier, as well as the pouring of concrete pads for an Improved Fresnel Lens Optical Landing System and a work station for Landing Signal officers. With construction complete, the facil ity is now capable of hosting day and night E-2 and C-2 FCLP operations. Norfolk-based E-2 and C-2 squadrons will conduct up to 20,000 FCLP passes annually at Wallops Flight Facility. Calling Israels self-defense capabilities and its qualitative military edge central to both Israel and U.S. security inter ests, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel announced Oct. 31 that Israel will buy six V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft for its air force. Hagel made the announce ment during his keynote address at the 100th annual Anti-Defamation League meet ing in New York. Israel will get six V-22s out of the next order to go on the assembly line, and they will be compatible with other [Israeli defense force] capabilities, he said. The Israeli and American defense relationship is stronger than ever. With Afghanistan the second of Americas two longest wars winding down, Hagel said, we continue to face a complicated and volatile world. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the Middle East, where the United States and our allies are facing an unprecedented set of complex challenges. For Israel, the secretary noted, progress with one neigh bor tends to bring new threats from other directions. There are no margins for Israel, he said. One challenge that threatens U.S. and Israeli security inter ests is preventing Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon, Hagel said. Iran is a state sponsor of ter ror, responsible for spreading hatred and extremism through out the region, the secretary said. But foreign policy is not a zero-sum game. If we can find ways to resolve disputes peace fully, we are wise to explore them. Ridding the world of hatred takes more than just work, imagination and songs, Hagel told his audience; it also demands commitment, sacri fice and courage. It demands that we must continue to march our armies of tolerance, equality, and justice around the globe. Hagel said. And it demands that we remember the timeless ques tions of Rabbi Hillel: If I am not for myself, who will be for me? If I am only for myself, what am I? And if not now, when? Wallops Flight Facility opens for E-2/C-2 FCLP operations Israel will buy 6 Osprey aircraft, Hagel announces In November and December, NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) is offering Suicide Prevention Awareness Training for base and tenant commands. Should your command be in need of this training, select a date and time that is convenient for your command and call 542-2776 to reserve seating, said FFSC Education and Training Coordinator Wilhelmina Nash. Attending this one-hour class could help you save someones life. Thank you for your concern and support. Nov. 14 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Nov. 20 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Nov. 26 8 a.m. & 1 p.m. Nov. 27 8 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 2 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 3 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 4 8 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 5 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 10 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 11 1 & 3 p.m. Dec. 12 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 17 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 18 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 30 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 31 9 a.m. & 1 p.m.Suicide prevention awareness training available through FFSC

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013 21 An increasing number of residents throughout the Southeast Region are reducing energy bills through the Switch4Good energy savings program, which is now in place at 11 of the regions installa tions. Balfour Beatty Investments, the Navys housing manage ment partner, designed the program to inform housing residents on ways to reduce energy consumption and lower their energy bills. The company decided to expand Switch4Good to installations throughout the region after a pilot progam at Travis Air Force Base in 2011 reduced energy consumption by 18 percent. The program rolled out alongside the Resident Energy Conservation Program (RECP) and attributed to the success and effectiveneness of meeting energy savings expectations, said Richard Dye, Navy Region Southeast (NRSE) housing pro gram director. Participation in the Switch4Good program has been outstanding and impact on energy savings has been right in line with, or exceeded, expectations. The programs first phase began in October and con sisted of a three-month period where residents received mock bills and energy saving tips. The mock reports and sav ing tips served as a tool for resi dents to know how much ener gy they were using compared to like homes, Dye said. It was a good opportunity for residents to monitor and change any behavior that could help to reduce their consump tion before actual billing start ed. Under RECP, utility accounts are either charged or credited if they are more than 10 percent over or under the established baseline energy consumption. The mock billing period pro vided residents three months to monitor and change any behavior to help reduce con sumption before actual billing started. According to Tabitha Crawford, senior vice presi dent of sustainability and innovation, Balfour Beatty Investments, the program has been a success. The program clearly dem onstrates that using smart meter data to provide person alized habit cues for residents results in reduced energy con sumption, without retrofits, Crawford said. With housing comprising 20-25 percent of a military installations energy consumption, this program is an important tool in support ing the sustainability goals of our Army, Navy and Air Force partners. Switch4Good consists of three levels of resident engage ment: Info and Peers, Digital Outreach and In-Home Coaching. The application of these methods varies from base to base. Info and peers is in place at 11 of the regions installations, Dye said. Residents receive monthly savings reports and access to a web portal with feedback on household energy usage. Its a great tool because they have immediate access to energy consumption data that updates every hour. Digital Outreach provides participating residents the same resources as Info and Peers, but with personalized, detailed tracking and analysis of their energy consumption via Twitter and text messages. Its very precise monitor ing of energy usage, not just throughout the base, but for each individual household, Dye said. If there is a con sistent spike in energy usage during certain times of the day, you might receive a text or tweet, then residents can take a look and determine what hap pened during that time that may have caused the spike. Its a valuable tool for people to become more efficient energy consumers. So far, Digital Outreach has been implemented on board three installations: Joint Base Charleston, NAS Jacksonville and NAS Pensacola. More than 1,800 homes are eligible to enroll in the voluntary pro gram. In addition to Digital Outreach and Info and Peers, residents on board NAS Key West and Naval Station Mayport have access to home visits from a personal train er. These optional visits are designed to engage the entire family on specific ways to reduce energy costs. Many people dont realize how much energy they can save through very simple prac tices, Dye said. For example, they might not realize how much they could save from limiting television use or sim ply unplugging the television when theyre done. According to Lea Williford, regional team lead for pub lic and private ventures, even a modest reduction in energy usage throughout the region can have a significant impact on the installations total con sumption. A reduction of 10 percent in energy costs across the 11 installations currently imple menting Switch4Good would result in savings of more than $100,000 monthly and more than $1 million annually, Williford said. Its good for both the Navy and base residents, because the money saved from lower util ity bills goes back to the com munity to help pay for main tenance and updgrades. In addition, residents can receive a rebate for using less energy than the baseline. As of June, energy con sumption was down 10-15 percent at installations using the program. Base residents interested in enrolling in the Switch4Good program should contact their base housing authority. Southeast Region cuts energy costs with Switch4Good Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2013: (7:30 a.m.4:15 p.m.) Dec. 2-6. (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) Nov. 18-22, Dec. 16-20. (9 a.m.-noon) Nov. 27, Dec. 11. (Noon-3 p.m.) (8-9:30 a.m.) Nov. 25. (9:40 a.m.noon) Nov. 25. (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Dec. 9-13. (9-10:30 a.m.) Nov. 26. (1:30-3 p.m.) Dec. 12. (1:30-4 p.m.) Nov. 14. Nov. 21 (5-6:30 p.m.) (9-11 a.m.) Dec. 9. (9-10:30 a.m.) Dec. 10. (8 a.m.-noon) Nov. 26, Dec. 17. (11 a.m.-1 p.m.) Nov. 19. (1-3 p.m.) Nov. 19, 26. (9:30-11 a.m.) Every Wednesday (9 a.m.-3 p.m.) Dec. 3. (10 a.m.-noon) Nov. 16; Dec. 10, 17. (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) Dec. 5.To register for any of the above workshops call 542-5745.Fleet and Family Support Center offers life skills workshops for service members and families

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2013 SAU COC NEW FACILITY TIM MCGRAW Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Reporters from seven Northeast Florida media out lets attended a flight line news conference Nov. 6 at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 511 to learn about the draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) that was recently issued by U.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFFC) in Norfolk, Va., relat ing to the home basing of the Navys P-8A Poseidon squad rons. The Secretary of the Navy reduced the number of P-8A Poseidon bases from three (in 2008) to two (in 2012) located at NAS Jacksonville and NAS Whidbey Island, Wash. What this comes down to for NAS Jacksonville and its surrounding communities is the difference between bas ing five or six operational P-8A squadrons, said Lisa Padgett, USFFC SEIS project manager. The P-8A training squadron (VP-30) has operated at NAS Jacksonville for many years and will also remain here. Padgett added that all SEIS information was available online at www.mmaseis.com for those who wanted to download analyses of impacted environmental resources on the bases. Rick Keys, a civilian environmentalist with U.S. Fleet Forces Command in Norfolk, Va., talked about noise issues and facility requirements. The Navy released this draft SEIS in September and encourages people to attend and voice The NAS Jacksonville Commissary held a Vietnam Veteran Commemoration Ceremony to recognize area veterans for their service and sacrifices Nov. 8. A small group of Vietnam veterans gathered with store patrons and employees to participate in the event. I am honored to be part of this ceremony today. We are not just another grocery store in town; were the grocery store for the fin est military in the world. During this Veterans Day weekend, we are holding several promotions to mark the introduction of the 50th anniversary Vietnam War com memoration flag recognizing the service, valor and sacrifices of those who made it possible for America to remain strong as a defender of democracy worldwide, said NAS Jax Commissary Store Director Larry Bentley. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander thanked the Vietnam veterans for their service. For those of you who have not studied what happened during the Vietnam War, I want to stress that it was the politics of the day that drove the outcome of that war, he said. What people need to remember is that the veterans who served in that war, were just as professional and did their jobs. The U.S. mili tary has had a culture since 1775 of getting the job done by doing what it takes including self sacrifice. Those from the Vietnam Era are no different. What overshadowed that Jacksonville media get overview of P-8A Poseidon environmental impact NAS Jax Commissary recognizes Vietnam veterans More than 1,000 people attended the 11th annual JAX Chamber Military Appreciation Luncheon Nov. 6 at the Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront. The event kicked off the City of Jacksonvilles Week of Valor which recognizes military members and veterans for their service and sacrifices. Maj. Thomas McWilliams, area commander of The Salvation Army Northeast Florida Area Command, gave the invocation and MU2 Laura Carey of Navy Band Southeast sang the national anthem while members of the Florida Air National Guard presented the col ors. After lunch, Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown addressed the crowd. Thank you for your service and sacrifice to our nation and the ide als we hold most dearly. As we all know, Jacksonville plays a key role in Americas defense, supporting our military bases through training and opera tions. The military plays a big role in our city and that is why my administration is focusing on supporting service members and the thousands of men and women who choose Jacksonville when transitioning from active duty to the civilian workforce, Brown told the audience. He stressed the importance of local companies hiring veterans. I believe that once you serve your country and you transition out of the service, you should be able to get a job to be able to take care of your family, said Brown. Congressman Ander Crenshaw (R-Fla.) also thanked the military members and veterans in attendance. I am proud to represent you in our nations capital and for those here who we are honoring today, thank you for your service to our country, thank you for your commitment to each other and thank you for the sacrifice you make for millions of people all across the globe in troubled countries, said Crenshaw. There are many unsung heroes in the military, from those who stand the watch to the cooks and those who keep the planes in the air, they are the strength of our military on the pointy end of the spear. I am proud to be here today in the company of heroes and I hope we all remember the blood and sacrifices of those who have gone before us, he added. The keynote speaker for the event was retired Navy Adm. Mark Fitzgerald who discussed his views of the past and future of the United States Armed Forces and talked about honor, courage and commitment traits of some of the military personnel he served with. I remember in 1975, coming out of Vietnam, tensions were tough, funding was poor and we were transitioning to an all volunteer force. And then, going through the 1980s, we had a resurgence JAX Chamber hosts military appreciation luncheon

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Dustin told me not to write about military spouses on Veterans Day, but Im going to do it anyway. I understand Dustins concern: when one holi day is confused with another, such as when people erroneously recognize my husband and other living veterans on Memorial Day, all the tributes become diluted. Also, according to Dustin, some might think Im being disrespectful for writing about spouses of veterans on Veterans Day. Veterans Day is for veterans and Military Spouse Appreciation Day is for military spouses. But, did anyone get a three-day weekend on Military Spouse Appreciation Day? Does anyone out side of military spouses know when Military Spouse Appreciation Day is? I didnt think so. There is a reason why at every reenlistment, change of command or retirement ceremony Ive ever been to that the spouse receives recognition and, some times, flowers. There is a reason why service members always thank their spouse when they reflect back on their careers. Being in the military affects the entire family. When you see a veteran, you can be sure there is a veteran spouse, family and/or children supporting him or her. These veterans dont get a nationally rec ognized three-day weekend, but they serve just the same. Most of us are aware of what service-member veterans have given for our country, but the sacrifices of their spouses sacrifices that contribute to the service member being able to carry out their duties sometimes go unnoticed. So today, on Veterans Day, and despite my hus bands better judgment, I want to thank the person behind the veteran, the military-spouse veteran. Military-spouse veterans have given up careers. Its not complaining or being sour when military spouses point out that they have put their careers or higher education on hold due to frequent moves. Its just the truth. The government knows this is a sacrifice, and thats why divorced spouses are entitled to a portion of the service members retirement if they were married for at least 10 years of that members service. Ten years of military marriage is 10 years that a spouse prob ably lost in building his or her own career and retirement. Ten years of military marriage is a commitment beyond matrimony; its a commitment to understanding their your spouses obligations are sometimes to our country first, and then to your family. Its hard to be selfish when youre married to the military. Military-spouse veterans have done a lot of wait ing. By the time my parents had been married for 23 years, my dad had accumulated 11 years of active-duty sea time. Thats basically half their marriage, and it means that my mom did a lot of single-parenting and waiting. With deployments increasing in frequency and length, todays military spouses are spending even more time without their loved one. And the most difficult part about this process is that military spouses have no choice in it (outside of the fact that they fell in love with someone who happens to work for Uncle Sam). Uncle Sam does not ask for spouses approval to deploy a ship or unit. Furthermore, Uncle Sam has notoriously bad timing, and he doesnt send people home when their spouse is in labor or their kids have pneumonia. Military spouses accept this, and (heres the best part), they carry on anyway. Military-spouse veterans take care of the sick and injured. More and more service members are returning home wounded. Their injuries are physical and emotional, and no one knows this better than the spouses. The military has a commitment to care for our wounded veterans, but it is the spouse who shoulders most of the responsibility. They are the ones who are waiting in hospital and rehab hallways or relocating their families to be closer to better care. Long after Uncle Sam has done what he can to get these service members back to better health, the spouses will live with the aftermath on a daily basis. They rise to the challenge of new responsibilities as nurse, advocate and counselor. Military-spouse veterans sometimes give every thing. My friend Theresa should have welcomed home her Navy pilot husband, Landon, from a deployment this month. Instead, she was having his funeral. She is living in a city that Uncle Sam chose for her 3,000 miles away from her family. She has two young sons, one of whom was just born four months ago. The military will have a memorial for Landon, and it will care financially for Theresa and her boy. But the military cannot bring back what my friend has lost. On Memorial Day 2014, Landon will be in the forefront of our minds as we think about those who have died for our country. But today, on Veterans Day, I am remembering Theresa and so many other spouses who have given some or all in support of the person they love who happens to work for Uncle Sam. Nov. 14 1846 Naval forces capture Tampico, Mexico. 1910 Civilian Eugene Ely pilots first aircraft to take-off from a ship, USS Birmingham (CL-2) at Hampton Roads, Va. He lands safely on Willoughby Spit, Norfolk, Va. 1941 Order to withdraw Marines at Shanghai, Peiping and Tientsin, China. 1944 Carrier aircraft attack Japanese shipping in Philippines sinking five ships and damaging one. Nov. 15 1882 Lt. Cmdr. French Chadwick reports to American Legation in London as first Naval Attache. 1942 Although the U.S. lost several ships in Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, Naval Force under Rear Adm. Willlis Lee, on board USS Washington (BB-56), turns back Japanese transports trying to reinforce Guadalcanal. The Japanese never again tried to send large naval forces to Guadalcanal. 1960 First Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine, USS George Washington (SSBN598), leaves Charleston, S.C., on initial fleet ballistic missile patrol. Nov. 16 1776 First salute to an American flag (Grand Union flag) flying from Continental Navy ship Andrew Doria, by Dutch fort at St. Eustatius, West Indies. 1942 Navys first night fighter squadron (VMF(N)-531) established at Cherry Point, N.C. 1963 President John F. Kennedy on USS Observation Island witnesses launch of Polaris A-2 missile by USS Andrew Jackson (SSBN-619). 1968 Operation Tran Hung Dao began in Mekong Delta. 1973 Launch of Skylab 4 under command of Lt. Col. Gerald Carr, USMC. The mis sions lasted 84 days and included 1,214 Earth orbits. Recovery by USS New Orleans (LPH-11). Nov. 17 1917 Destroyers USS Fanning (DD-37) and USS Nicholson (DD-52) sink first enemy submarine, U-58, off Milford Haven, Wales. 1924 USS Langley, first air craft carrier, reports for duty. 1941 Congress amends Neutrality Act to allow U.S. merchant ships to be armed. Navys Bureau of Navigation directs Navy personnel with Armed Guard training to be assigned for further training before going to Armed Guard Centers for assignment to merchant ships. 1955 Navy sets up Special Projects Office under Rear Adm. William Raborn to develop a solid propellant ballistic missile for use in submarines. Nov. 18 1890 USS Maine, the first American battleship, is launched. 1922 Cmdr. Kenneth Whiting in a PT seaplane, makes first catapult launching from the aircraft carrier USS Langley at anchor in the York River. 1962 USS Currituck (AV-7) rescues 13 Japanese fishermen from their disabled fishing boat Seiyu Maru, which was damaged in Typhoon Karen. Nov. 19 1813Capt. David Porter claims Marquesas Islands for the United States. 1943 Carrier force attacks bases on Tarawa and Makin islands. 1943 USS Nautilus (SS-168) enters Tarawa lagoon in first submarine photograph recon naissance mission. 1961 At the request of president of Dominican Republic, U.S. Naval Task Force sails to Dominican Republic to bolster the countrys government and to prevent a coup. 1969 Navy astronauts Cmdr. Charles Conrad Jr. and Cmdr. Alan Bean are third and fourth men to walk on the moon. They were part of Apollo 12 mis sion. Cmdr. Richard Gordon Jr., the Command Module Pilot, remained in lunar orbit. The mission lasted 19 days, 4 hours, and 36 minutes, the astronauts recovered 243 lbs of lunar material. Recovery by HS-4 helicopters from USS Hornet (CVS-12). Nov. 20 1856 Cmdr. Andrew Foote lands at Canton, China, with 287 Sailors and Marines to stop attacks by Chinese on U.S. military and civilians. 1917 USS Kanawha, Noma and Wakiva sink German sub off coast of France. 1933 Navy crew (Lt. Cmdr. Thomas Settle, USN, and Maj. Chester I. Fordney, USMC) sets a world altitude record in balloon (62,237 ft.) flight into stratosphere. 1943 Operation Galvanic, under command of Vice Adm. Raymond Spruance, lands Navy, Marine, and Army forces on Tarawa and Makin. 1962 President John F. Kennedy lifts the Blockade of Cuba. Are military spouses veterans, too?

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Cmdr. David Lundahl, Jr. will relieve Cmdr. Joseph Moorhouse as commanding officer of the VP-30 Squadron Augment Unit (SAU) Nov. 23 at 10 a.m. at the VP-30 Auditorium. Retired Navy Capt. Greg Miller will be the guest speaker. Lundahl, a native of Honolulu, Hawaii, earned his commission from the United States Naval Academy in May 1997 earning a bachelor of sci ence in history. After flight school at VT-6, VT-31 and various temporary assignments including Sailing Center, U.S. Naval Academy and N88 in Washington, DC, Lundahl received his wings in September 1999 in Corpus Christi, Texas. Lundahl served as a selec tively retained graduate at VT-31 in Corpus Christi from September 1999 to May 2001. He flew more than 800 flight instructor hours in the T-44 Pegasus King Air while earn ing his MBA at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University. In December 2001, upon completion of initial training in the P-3 Orion at VP-30, Lundahl reported to VQ-2 in Rota, Spain. While there, Lundahl served as pilot scheduling offi cer, pilot training officer and pilot NATOPS officer. He com pleted multiple detachments in the 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility including EP-3 operations out of Crete, Cypress and Bahrain in support of Operation Iraqi Enduring Freedom. At VQ-2, he was des ignated as an electronic war fare mission commander and EP-3/P-3C NATOPS evaluator and instructor pilot. In 2005, Lundahl returned to Jacksonville to serve at the P-3 Fleet Replacement Squadron as an instructor pilot. At VP-30, he worked in the Command Services Department as the First Lieutenant Division officer and then as the lead instruc tor pilot for the VP-30 Fleet Instructor Under Training team ensuring instructor standard ization throughout the mari time patrol and reconnaissance community. In 2007, Lundahl joined the Navy Reserve and affiliated with the VP-30 SAU where he continued to serve as a flight instructor. On the civilian side he accepted a position as first officer at Southwest Airlines and continues to fly out of Orlando, Fla. in the Boeing 737300/500/700/800 series aircraft. During his tour as com manding officer of VP-30 SAU, Moorhouse oversaw the SAUs completion of more than 1,000 sorties and 1,230 student flight events, accounting for more than 10 percent of all flight events at the fleet replace ment squadron. A testament to Moorhouses leadership, the SAU flawlessly executed every event during his tenure with zero incidents and a perfect safety record. As he approaches 20 years of service, Moorhouse is thank ful to have remained flying the entire time enabling the use of his talents to train tomorrows leaders. Congressman Ander Crenshaw (R-Fla.) formally recognized 33 Northeast Florida Veterans with Veterans Special Recognition Certificates at a ceremony at the Ocean Breeze Conference Center at Naval Station Mayport Nov.8. During the annual ceremony, veterans who who served the country from World War II through Operation Storm were honored. Crenshaw was joined by United States Postal Service District Manager Charles Miller who also presented cer tificates of recognition from the Postal Service to Purple Heart recipients. Jacksonvilles Week of Valor Jacksonvilles is a fitting time to honor all our veterans, including 33 service men and women from Northeast Florida communities who received the Fourth Congressional District Special Recognition Certificate, said Crenshaw. The United States Postal Service also gave special tribute to regional Purple Heart recipients. In all, let us never forget that our nations greatness is drawn from the blood and sacrifices of honorable and courageous men and women. I thank each of our honorees for standing in the face of incredible danger and hardship and give them my deep appreciation. Through the years, Crenshaw has honored thousands of veterans who served from the 1940s through Operation Desert Storm. However, some veterans who served during this time period may not have been honored because fed eral Congressional district lines were redrawn at the beginning of 2013 and eligible veterans did not previously live in the Fourth Congressional District. Fleet Engagement Team to visit NAS Jax A Fleet Engagement Team from Navy Personnel Command will visit NAS Jacksonville Nov. 20. All briefs will be held at the VP-30 Auditorium. The following is the schedule: 9-10:30 a.m. BuPers 3 Military Community Management Overview Brief for leadership/all khakis 10:30 a.m. noon PERS 40 Detailing/Distribution Brief for leadership/all khakis 1-2:30 p.m. Enlisted Force Management/Career Waypoints Brief for all hands 2:30-4 p.m. Enlisted Detailing Distribution Brief for all hands For more information, contact NCC Jacqueline Gonzalez at 5423399 or Jacqueline.gonzalez@navy. mil Lundahl to take helm of VP-30 Squadron Augment Unit Crenshaw honors 33 veterans during ceremony 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013 Construction is scheduled to wrap up by Dec. 17 on the new facility that will house opera tor training for the MQ-4C Triton unmanned aircraft sys tem and the P-8A Maintenance Training Facility. The two projects share a common building adjacent to the P-8A Integrated Training Center on Yorktown Avenue. The new schoolhouses also share a common secured entrance on Child Street, where students will enter either the 8,938-sq.-ft., single-story MQ-4C Triton schoolhouse or the 58,262-sq.-ft., two-story P-8A Poseidon schoolhouse for maintainers. Despite a delay with the furniture order for classrooms and administrative spaces the building will still be turned over on schedule, said Celio Cedeno, a civil engineer with NAS Jax Public Works. The furniture will be treat ed as a punch list exception that is now scheduled for delivery in January. Assistant Project Manager Mohammed Raoof of Elkins Constructors said, With the major construction complete, most of our work involves inside finishing. You can feel the chilled-water/air-condi tioning system thats required for human comfort as well as for ventilation of the computer rooms. The facilitys fire-suppres sion system is also up and running. The largest space in the facility is the P-8A maintenance bay that will eventually house a full-size cutaway of the air craft, to include components such as an ordnance load trainer, integrated avionics trainer, flight control hydrau lics, landing gear, engine and environmental control sys tems, said Cedeno. He added that the building is designed with special raised flooring so technicians can easily access electrical wiring and computer cables for future modifications or repairs. Raoof also noted the projects LEED (Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design) fea tures, including: ground cistern that collects and filters rainwater to be used for flushing toilets panels that generate hot water for the building pavers in parking lots absorb rainwater water retention ponds that is native to Florida. Schoolhouses near completion

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COMMISSARYeffort was the politics and culture of the time. Im just happy that there are so many Vietnam vets still around so we can show our appreciation and say, thank-you. And thats what I want to say to you today thank you for your service. I hope you feel that you are proud members of our military team. Youve gone before us and have set the foundation for the successes we enjoy today, stressed Undersander. The guest speaker for the event was Vietnam Veteran Lowell Bernheimer, a member of the Disabled American Veterans Chapter 38 in Orange Park, and a NAS Jax Commissary employee. Bernheimer recalled a mission he participated in during the Vietnam War when he was a heli copter door gunner on a Green Hornet helo. We were in charge of inserting spec ops into Cambodia and Laos. We headed into an area to pick up 15 tribesmen and five-man Green Beret team that had been inserted about a week earlier. When we were heading in, we received word that they were under heavy attack by more than 200 Viet Cong and North Vietnamese troops, he said. We were able to extract everyone, but unfortu nately many of them were dead. I remember the dedication of those Green Berets two of them who were shot went right back in three weeks later. They were lost and never picked up, Bernheimer continued. Our troops always kept the faith. From the founding of our military through Afghanistan and Iraq, we continue to keep the faith. Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville Commanding Officer, Capt. Gayle Shaffer, was inducted into the International College of Dentists (ICD) as a fellow at its 84th Annual Convocation Nov. 1 in New Orleans, La., in recognition for her service to the field of dentistry. It is a tremendous honor to have been selected for this prestigious fellowship, said Shaffer. This is one of the most signifi cant accomplishments of a den tists career, and I am honored to be a part of this great organiza tion. Shaffer was one of five Navy dentist inducted during the cap and gown ceremony for 300 U.S. dentists, bringing the total of U.S. Section ICD Navy Fellows to 53. Established in 1928, the ICD is the oldest and largest worldwide honorary dental organization, with more than 12,000 members (designated as fellows). Fellowship in the college is by invitation only and is granted in recognition of an indi vidual dentists outstanding pro fessional achievement, meritorious service and dedication to the continued progress of dentistry for the benefit of humankind. Prior to being recognized as a fellow of the ICD, a candidates qualifications and achievements are evaluated by a series of cre dential committees to ensure the candidate is deserving of this high honor and that they adhere to the ICD goals, objectives and motto Recognizing Service and the Opportunity to Serve Once inducted, a fellow is authorized to use the letters FICD after their name. Shaffer, a 22-year Navy vet eran, maintains an active mem bership in the American Dental Association, is an Academy of General Dentistry Fellow, and is board certified in the American Board of General Dentistry. Naval Hospital Jacksonville commanding officer inducted as a Fellow 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013

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of patriotism and saw how people came together and were again proud of the military, recalled Fitzgerald. And today, its so good to be here seeing people thanking the military for what they do because a lot of what they do is not recognized by people on the street. The sacrifices they and their fami lies make day in and day out are incred ible, Fitzgerald said. So I want to thank you all the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, and Coast Guard along with the fami lies who support them, industries that create the incredible weapons systems that we have and our government employees who help us maintain our assets. Other events planned throughout the city during the Week of Valor included a ceremony at the Jacksonville National Cemetery, the Veterans Day Parade and the Jacksonville Jaguars Military Appreciation Game. their comments. We want to make sure that no area of concern is missed before releasing the final SEIS in spring of 2014. Capt. Chris Janke, chief of staff at Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 11, told the reporters, The P-8 Poseidon is a vast improvement over the venerable P-3 Orion not only in anti-submarine warfare (ASW) sensor and weapon capability but it also gets on station faster and stays on station longer. That allows the Navy to decrease the number of P-8 assets needed to accomplish the same mission in a P-3. Proof of that is evident when you consider a typical P-3 squadron is assigned up to nine aircraft. Compare that to a P-8 squadron flying just six aircraft. Crew ergonomics is also a big improvement on the P-8. When we fly 12-hour or even longer missions, an alert and responsive crew is vital to mission success, said Janke. A significant environmental factor that saves fuel is that 70 percent of pilot training takes place in the P-8A flight simulator fleet that is housed at NAS Jacksonville. When asked about noise levels, Janke responded, Theres a slight increase when comparing the P-8 and P-3 decibels at take-off but the P-8s higher rate of climb takes it away from ground level much faster. SEIS The Navy suspended Nov. 8 the access to classified material of Vice Adm. Ted Branch, director of Naval Intelligence, and Rear Adm. Bruce Loveless, director of Intelligence Operations. The decision to suspend their classi fied access was made based upon the nature of allegations against Admirals Branch and Loveless in connection with an ongoing Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) investiga tion into illegal and improper relations with Leonard Francis, CEO of Glenn Defense Marine. The suspension was deemed prudent given the sensitive nature of their cur rent duties and to protect and support the integrity of the investigative pro cess. The allegations against Branch and Loveless involve inappropriate conduct prior to their current assignments and flag officer rank. There is no indication, nor do the allegations suggest, that in either case there was any breach of classified information. It is important to note that allegations are just that, allegations. Neither officer has been charged with any crime or violation. Both men retain their rank and security clearances. They are on temporary leave. NCIS initiated this investigation in 2010. The Navy appreciates the sup port we have received from the U.S. Attorneys office and other law enforcement agencies. We will continue to make public as much information as we can without prejudicing the conduct of this investigation.U.S. Navy admirals investigated by NCIS MILITARY LUNCHEON JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013 9

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10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013 MCPON sends 2013 Veterans Day message Veterans, Shipmates and Navy Families, This past Monday, we honored those who have stood the watch, pay respect to those who have given the ultimate sacrifice, and say thanks to those cur rently in uniform. There have always been men and women willing to serve at the nations call, to protect the very fabric of what makes our country great. It is a very humbling moment for me every time I meet someone who is or has done their part to continue this rich legacy. Our veterans represent every facet of the best of America making a positive impact on our great nation in countless ways. For each veteran comes a new set of people inspired to serve by amazing stories of wars won, lives lost, valor, and patriotism. Veterans Day represents more than a day for our veterans, but offers an opportunity to recognize also their families and the many support groups of our veterans, service members and their families. The dedication and unwavering commitment to our military from the American people is undeniable and this great support allows us to do our job and fulfill our duties without hesitation. Our military could truly not function properly without your commitment and support. I am thankful to be among such honored citizens, and for the continued efforts our Sailors and their families make every day to preserve our liber ties. May God bless you and may God bless the United States of America. Happy Veterans Day and all the best. The Pelicans of VP-45, home based at NAS Jacksonville, continued their tradition of giving back to the community by adopting a roadway near I-295. The Pelicans are now responsi ble for a nearly mile-long stretch of Argyle Forest Road from Youngerman Circle to Rampart Road in support of the Keep Jacksonville Beautiful Foundations campaign to clean up and enhance roads in the area. Adopt-A-Road allows citizens to demonstrate community pride, make a positive statement for a clean, attractive community and help the city keep down the costs of litter abatement. As part of their adoption, the Pelicans collaborated to hit the ground running in cleaning up their stretch of road. A dedicated crew of 22 Pelicans assembled for more than four hours working to clear all of the dead vegetation and trash that had accumulated over the years. It was a lot of work, said Lt. j.g. John Norris. There was a lot more trash than I was expecting, but everyone came together and did a great job in clean ing it up and getting the job done. In the end, the Pelicans made a noticeable impact on their stretch of real estate by collecting more than 24 bags of trash and debris and also having a great time doing it. Anytime you can have fun with your co-workers and give back to the community is a win-win, said AME1 Scott Walker. The Pelicans are already planning their next excursion to their adopt ed road and look forward to their next opportunity to give back to the Jacksonville community that has supported VP-45 and the rest of the Navy presence in the area. VP-45 Sailors clean up Jacksonville roadway Joining the Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) can be a smart move for career-minded junior Sailors at NAS Jacksonville. NAS Jax Security Department Senior Enlisted Advisor MACM Edward Santiago said, CSADD provides opportunities for those with personal issues, such as drinking and smoking cessation, or family concerns, who may feel more comfortable reaching out to a fellow junior Sailor rather than talking with someone in their chain of command. CSAAD is a peer mentoring program for active and reserve Sailors, Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) candidates, and Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) cadets aimed at promoting good decision-making and leadership develop ment at the most junior levels. The program exists as a way for junior Sailors to guide their shipmates from making decisions detrimental to their careers, as well as foster an environment of men toring and support within the enlisted levels. CSAAD community events include: teers to set up/take down and hand out water. CSAAD fundraising events include: a.m. to noon. Freedom Lanes at 2 p.m. Five-player teams.For more info, contact AC3 Ray (alexis. ray@navy.mil), or MAC Henderson (vanessa. henderson@navy.mil). CSADD can be key to advancement for junior Sailors

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Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Rick Williamson praised the 2013 Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) keypersons and stressed the importance of 100 per cent contact of all federal employees Nov. 4. The CFC is currently underway through Jan. 15, 2014, for all federal agencies worldwide to donate to quali fying charitable organizations. This year has been a little bit of a challenge with furloughs and sequestration. We took a brief pause with the campaign but are now back on track and I have a lot of faith in the generosity of our military and civilian employees, said Williamson. Many people say, when times are hard, expect to have a bad campaign, but Ive been in the Navy for 28 years and although weve seen some issues arise, weve never had a bad cam paign, he added. My hope is that the trend continues and our military and civilian members are given the oppor tunity to contribute in this worthwhile campaign. In order for a command or agency to conduct a successful fund drive, they must have proactive keypersons who volunteer to coordinate the campaign. The keypersons have a big job and I greatly appreciate them stepping up and volunteering. They conduct 100 percent contact of the members of the commands, coordinate fundrais ing events, collect money or allotment slips and keep track of donations. They do all of it out of the kindness of their hearts and Im very appreciative of them, said Williamson. Although there are no specific dollar amount goals set, there is a 100 percent contact goal for all keypersons. When you visit the different bases and you see the CFC thermometers up, you see the generosity of the people. The key is communication getting the word out to ensure people understand what the CFC is all about and how the program works, Williamson stated. With literally hundreds of organi zations available to donate to, federal employees who dont have a specific choice can review descriptions of agencies in the CFC program guide, including the percentage of donated funds that go to cover administrative costs. This enables contributors to discern between charities based on their per sonal preferences and priorities. The ones that particularly resonate with me are educational organiza tions. My parents instilled in me the value of education at a very young age. From the military standpoint, there are different programs our members can benefit from to get an education. But there are many people who may not get the opportunities that the military offers, said Williamson. I think the opportunity of education enriches lives and betters communities. For those not in the military, who arent blessed with a lot of money and need a scholarship opportunity, hopefully donating to these organizations will give them a chance at better education. Individuals can donate to CFC with a cash contribution or by pledging a specific amount to be withheld from their pay beginning in January 2014. Many commands also hold special fundrais ing events to benefit the CFC drive. Command involvement and leadership are essential ingredients to making the campaign successful. For more infor mation on the CFC drive, contact your command keyperson. P-8A aircrewmen graduate at VP-30Capt. Curtis Phillips, commanding cfficer of VP-30, congratu lated graduates of the P-8A Acoustic and NonAcoustic initial training (CAT I) syllabus Oct. 18. The graduates of Acoustic Operator Class 1304 and Non-Acoustic Operator Class 1304 will now report to their assigned operational P-8 squad rons at NAS Jacksonville to begin their initial sea tours. Honor graduates were AWO3 Justin Burns and AWO3 Derek Dymer. Acoustic Operator: AWO3 Justin Burns AWO3 Anthony Campolongo AWO3 Eric Lujan Non-acoustic Operator: AWO3 Alexander Dworak AWO3 Derek Dymer AWO3 Adam Huszar AWO3 Tyler Touchstone As VP-5 continues its busy schedule operating and maintaining its P8-A Poseidons, the squadron proudly shines its spotlight of excellence on AT1(AW/ SW) Abalo Meba. Born in Lome, Republic of Togo, in western Africa, Meba immigrated to the United States in 2003 and became a naturalized citi zen in April 2005. He and his wife, Vim, are raising their son Peter and daughter Makayla. Meba entered boot camp in August 2004 at Great Lakes, Ill. Upon graduation, he reported to the USS Gunston Hall (LSD 44) in Little Creek, Va. until 2007. Following his time at sea, he reported to NAS Pensacola for Aviation Electronic Technician A School. After complet ing his training syllabus, he reported to VP-5 in July 2007. As a Mad Fox, he has deployed to Kadena, Japan in 2008 and 2012 and also deployed to El Salvador in 2010. As an aviation electronics tech nician, Meba is tasked with trouble shooting and maintaining the com munication mission systems aboard the P-8A Poseidon, including the radar, Link 11/16, SATCOM, TACAN, and INMARSAT. Currently, he works as the VP-5 Line Division LPO. The Line Division is in charge of the launch and recovery of all of VP-5 aircraft and the daily turnaround inspections per formed on them. Being able to serve my country and work along side fellow Mad Foxes and friends each day keeps me energized its always exciting to come to work, explained Meba. My goals are always to put those who are junior to me in the best position to succeed. I always want to push them to get their personal qualifications accomplished so they can be successful. His current goal is continuing to help manage a successful line division. His long-term goals are to make chief or LDO and retire after 30 years of service. When he is away from the squadron, Meba enjoys playing soccer, taking his son to football practice and spending time with his family at the beach. VP-5 is currently in the inter-deployment readiness cycle aboard NAS Jacksonville.Commander, Navy Region Southeast stresses importance of Combined Federal Campaign VP-5 Mad Fox of the Week JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013 11

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Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel directed U.S. Pacific Command to support U.S. government humanitarian relief operations in the Philippines in the wake of a deadly typhoon that has left more than 1,000 dead, defense officials announced Nov. 10. The support, provided at the request of the Philippines government, will initially focus on surface maritime search and rescue, medium-heavy helicopter lift support, airborne maritime SAR, fixed-wing lift support and logistics enablers, officials said. DOD is working in coordination with the U.S. Agency for International Development and U.S. ambassador in Manila, they said, and will continue to monitor the effects of Typhoon Haiyan while standing ready to help the Philippines recover from the monster storm. Super Typhoon Haiyan hammered six central islands Nov. 8, devastating the city of Tacloban and leaving a huge storm surge and widespread flooding in its wake. Secretary of State John Kerry immediately offered assurance of U.S support, and Pentagon Press Secretary George Little told reporters that day the U.S. military was prepared to respond, if requested. Little noted that U.S. forces frequently provide direct relief and recovery support during and after natural disasters. Nowhere in the world are natural disasters as prevalent as in the Asia-Pacific region. It sits on the earthquakeprone Ring of Fire and is tormented by hurricanes, cyclones, tsunamis, floods and mudslides. As part of its extensive regional engagement, Pacom works closely with regional nations to promote disaster preparedness and build resil ience; and to respond quickly and effectively should disaster strike. One of the best ways to do that is through the exercise program, command officials said. Its the right thing to do, particularly in light of frequent and often devastating natu ral disasters that strike across the region, Navy Adm. Samuel Locklear III, the Pacom com mander, told American Forces Press Service last week. The Philippines is one of five U.S. allies in the Asia-Pacific region. During his visit there in August, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel praised the deep and unbreakable alliance between the two countries, calling it an anchor for peace and stability and prosperity in this region. Our close ties to the Philippines have been forged through a history of shared sacrifice and common pur pose, he added, and continuing to strengthen the close partnership between our nations is an important part of Americas long-term strat egy of rebalancing in the AsiaPacific. U.S. Military to aid typhoon-devastated Philippines JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013 13

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More than 20,000 Navy country music fanatics helped country music super star Tim McGraw honor veterans dur ing the Chase Presents Live from the HomeFront concert at Naval Station Mayport, Nov. 10. McGraw created the HomeFront program with JP Morgan Chase and charity Operation Homefront last year to help give mortgagefree homes to wounded veterans and military members. So far, the partnership has provid ed more than 70 homes to veterans. According to McGraw, it is a small price to pay to honor those who sacrifice so much. Its easy for me to show up and play music to honor the men and women who have the tough jobs, he said. To me, its just one small thing I can do to help show how much we appreciate what they put on the line and what families sacrifice every single day. I have had the privilege of meeting many service members and their fami lies and have heard many inspiring stories. Its something Im proud to do and want to take it as far as we can! McGraw got the crowd into a frenzy performing his latest single Highway Dont Care from his 2013 album and many others including one of his biggest hits Live Like You Were Dying, which is a song about a man with a terminal illness and came out around the time his father (Tug McGraw) passed away. Even though the theme of the concert was remembering the veterans, it was a great show enjoyed by many. Im so excited about Tim McGraw! It means so much that he took time out to play this concert for us, said OS2 Stacie Neely. We dont get to experience these types of festivities all the time because we are deployed for eight to nine months at a time. Im thankful that he has put this show on for us service members and veterans. The free concert was one of many perfor mances that JP Morgan Chase has sponsored over the last 18 months. According to JP Morgan Chase Southeast U.S. Chairman Mel Martinez, this event was to honor those who sacrifice everyday on the eve of Veterans Day. We are happy to be able to give back through this concert as well as through the firms military programs to a com munity that has given so much to us, he said. This is an opportunity to say thank you to our service members and their families who wear the cloth of this great nation. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. Tim McGraw salutes veterans 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013 15 Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Asset Management Business Line Coordinator (BLC) Bill Sloan retired Nov. 1 after dedicating more than 40 years to government service. Sloan said goodbye to many of his co-workers and friends at an informal retirement luncheon held on board NAS Jacksonville Oct. 31. I would like to express my sincere appreciation for your superb perfor mance over the past 43 years of ser vice to the Naval Facilities Engineering Command and the Department of the Defense, said NAVFAC Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus. NAVFAC Southeast is losing an extremely valuable employee, team member and leader. Sloan, an unassuming quiet profes sional, began his engineering career serving as an officer with the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers from 1970 to 1973. He began his service with NAVFAC in August of 1973. My first civil service job with NAVFAC was as a PDC (Professional Development Center) intern in the Environmental Branch, Utilities Division at SOUTHDIV (NAVFAC Southern Division), said Sloan. Sloan went on to assume posi tions of great responsibility with the NAVFAC Southeast leadership team and Executive Support Group, serving as Capital Improvements BLC from 20062008 before finishing his career as the Asset Management BLC. My most memorable experience was being part of the establishment of NAVFAC Southeast (June 2006). The biggest test we faced back then was the transition of the Capital Improvements Business Line from SOUTHDIV (in Charleston, S.C.) to NAVFAC Southeast (in Jacksoville). Moving from Charleston to Jacksonville and re-orga nizing and transforming during a time of record high workloads was particu larly challenging, said Sloan. During the transition from Charleston to Jacksonville, NAVFAC Southeast lost more than 80 percent of its engineers and architects and more than 90 percent of its real estate pro fessionals. Sloans first task was to rebuild the commands engineering organization during the largest con struction program on record for either Southern Division or the newly estab lished NAVFAC Southeast organization. His efforts were immensely successful enlisting a diverse and talented body of professionals capable of designing, managing, and constructing over $1 billion a year of facility improvements. Teamwork combined with dedicated professionals across the organization made the re-organization successful, said Sloan. When asked what sage advice he could pass on, Sloan answered a familiar theme. Always remember the value and importance of good teamwork. Your versatility and knowledge were invaluable in providing warf ighter mission and family support, not only at NAVFAC Southeast, but direct ly supporting the warfighters in Iraq, Afghanistan, Haiti, and other locations throughout the world, said Kiwus. I hope your retirement provides you with new challenges as rewarding and fulfilling as those you have achieved throughout your combined 43 year civil service and military career. Although Sloan wanted to quietly slip into retirement, his friends and coworkers at NAVFAC Southeast would have none of it. Said Sloan of the lun cheon, I enjoyed the kinds words and the luncheon, all of it, very much. Sloan plans to spend his early retire ment years traveling with his wife to the national parks in the western United States. NAVFAC Southeast senior civilian retires after four decades of service With the strike of a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow by the ships sponsor, the Navy christened its new est aircraft carrier, Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78), the lead ship of the new Gerald R. Ford class, Nov. 9, in a ceremony at Huntington Ingalls Newport News Shipbuilding in Newport News, Va. Susan Ford Bales, Fords daughter and the ships spon sor, had the honor of christen ing the ship in front of more than 20,000 Sailors, shipbuild ers and civilians bringing to life the Navys newest aircraft carrier design in more than 40 years. I christen thee United States Ship Gerald R. Ford, said Bales, breaking the bottle across the bow. May God bless all those who sail in her. The Ford class is designed with significant quality-of-life improvements and reduced maintenance. These innova tions are expected to improve operational availability and capability, and reduce total ownership cost over its 50-year service life by $4 billion com pared with Nimitz-class car riers. The ship is also designed to evolve with advances in tech nology. The carrier is our Navys most adaptable platform, said Adm. Jonathan Greenert, chief of naval operations. This ship will not only launch the aircraft we currently have in inven tory, it will launch aircraft we havent even begun to design. USS Enterprise (CVN 65), a ship we inactivated after more than 50 years of service, was rele vant from her first day in ser vice through her last. Greenert praised the design ers, shipbuilders and Sailors who together have brought the ship to this important mile stone. Ford will herald a new era of our carrier fleet, said Greenert. She is truly a technological marvel. We should embrace technology, but it is our people who underpin our success. The christening of the ship comes after more than 12 years of planning and construction. Newport News Shipbuilidng laid the keel in 2009 and is scheduled to deliver the ship to the Navy in 2016. While the shipbuilder con struction and systems instal lations continue, the Navy is building, training and developing Fords crew to operate and maintain the state-of-the-art ship. Navy tradition dictates that todays christening ceremony will spark life and luck into this great ship, but the true life of this ship will come from the unparalleled hard work, pro fessionalism and dedication of the Gerald R. Ford crew, said Capt. John Meier, commanding officer of Pre-Commissioning Unit Gerald R. Ford. In part nership with Newport News Shipbuilding, we will match the most technologically advanced and adaptable plat form in our Navys history with the most adaptable and technically proficient crew. CVN 78 honors the 38th President of the United States and pays tribute to his lifetime of service in the Navy, in the U.S. government and to the nation. During World War II he attained the rank of lieuten ant commander in the Navy, serving on the light carrier USS Monterey (CVL 26). Ford was the first vice president and, in the aftermath of the Watergate scandal, succeeded the first president ever to resign, serv ing in the countrys highest office from 1974-1977. Bales reflected upon her fathers final letter before his death, written to then-Secre tary of the Navy Donald Winter, where the president wrote, Thus, it is a great source of pride and humility to know that an aircraft carrier bearing my name will be forever con nected with the valor and patriotic service of men and women of the United States Navy. In ALNAV 077/13, released Nov. 8 to all Navy and Marine Corps personnel, the Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) designated November 2013 as Warrior Care Month. Providing assistance to seriously wounded, ill and injured service members and their families is a top priority for the Navy, said SECNAV Ray Mabus. We take care of our own including active-duty, Reserve and veteran Sailors and Marines. Warrior Care Month is a joint-service event that recognizes wounded war riors as well as those who care for them for their service, sacrifices and achievements. It also is an opportuni ty to raise awareness of the resources available to service members should illness or injury strike unexpectedly. One especially critical resource is Navy Wounded Warrior (NWW) Safe Harbor, the Navys support program for seriously wounded, ill and injured Sailor and Coast Guardsmen. The program a department within Fleet and Family Readiness at Commander, Navy Installations Command has assisted nearly 2,500 service members and their families since its inception. NWW [is] part of an extensive cata log of Navy programs that enhance the mental, physical and emotional health of service members, said Mabus. [It] provide[s] the gold standard of non-medical care to wounded warriors and their families, offering resources that promote healing and opportuni ties for success, both within and beyond military service. The theme of Warrior Care Month 2013 is Warrior Care Building a Ready and Resilient Force. Promoting readi ness and resiliency ensures that wounded warriors can cope with adversity on the front lines or at home. To that end, NWW offers many essential services, including connecting families to respite care resources; addressing pay and personnel issues; assisting with housing and transportation adaptation; provid ing transition assistance; offering adaptive athletics opportunities; and more. Oftentimes, NWW serves as a key link between the Navy and a Sailor who is recovering away from his command, said NWW Deputy Director Merissa Larson. Our program addresses whatev er non-medical needs surface, which allows seriously wounded, ill and injured service members and their families to focus on healing without dis tractions. NWW non-medical care provid ers are located at major military treat ment facilities throughout the conti nental United States. They collaborate closely with the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (BUMED), which pro vides expert restorative and rehabili tative medical care for wounded war riors. Additionally, the Naval Center for Combat and Operational Stress Control help service members and their fami lies grapple with operational stress before, during and after deployment. During Warrior Care Month, SECNAV Mabus urges the Navy family to become more familiar with the many programs available to seriously wounded, ill and injured service members, and to join him in saluting wounded warriors and those who care for them. Our commitment to seriously wounded, ill and injured Sailors and Marines, as well as their families and caregivers, is unwavering, he said. I encourage all Navy personnel to take an opportunity during Warrior Care Month to join me in expressing our heartfelt gratitude and support. SECNAV names November Warrior Care Month Ford christening connects president to Navy roots

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Benjamin Bittner, Boy Scouts of America Troop 101 Life Scout, pre sented his Eagle Scout project to NAS Jacksonville Natural Resources Manager Christine Bauer at the Black Point Interpretive Center Nov. 6. Eagle Scout is the highest rank attainable in the Boy Scouts of America program. The title of Eagle Scout is held for life, giving rise to the phrase Once an Eagle, always and Eagle. Requirements for attaining this rank include earn ing a total of 21 merit badges, demon strating Scout spirit, service, and lead ership. Also included in the require ments development of an extensive service project that benefits the com munity, or an organization other than Boy Scouting. Eagle Scout Candidate Ben Bittner, a student at Mandarin High School, designed and constructed a mobile electronic interactive display board that mirrors a wall mural affixed to the outside of the NAS Jacksonville Black Point Interpretive Center. The display features a rendering of the mural with LED lights located near each of the 13 protected animals in the artwork. Momentary push buttons correspond ing with each animal are mounted next to a listing of the common and scien tific names of each protected species. The display is battery powered and on wheels so it can be used in or out doors. The Black Point Interpretive Center is part of NAS Jacksonvilles educa tion and outreach program, that also includes a watchable wildlife area and two nature trails. The project plan was approved by the NAS Jacksonville Environmental Department, Troop 101 Scoutmaster Walter Carter, and the Riverbend Scouting District, North Florida Council. Bauer had praise and thanks for all who participated, especially Bittner for his dedication and initiative in plan ning and carrying out this project. The Eagle Scout program has pro vided several enhancements to our conservation education areas that we could not have otherwise obtained, such as wildlife signs and live exhibit enclo sures, a redesigned butterfly garden, and now the protected species elec tronic quiz board, said Bauer. Many thanks also to Roger OConnor (former Troop 101 scoutmaster, Eagle Scout and NAVFAC employee) for bringing wonderful young men like Ben to NAS Jacksonville for project ideas. Much planning and effort went into the project prior to delivery Nov. 6. Bittner drew up the design for the display, put together a project plan and contacted donors for purchasing materials. Family and friends provided donations in excess of $200 and others loaned tools and equipment during the construction phase. During assembly Nov. 2, Bittner led a dozen Troop 101 scouts and adult leaders in the five-hour assembly in a two pronged approach of building the mobile display and then wiring the electronics. Adult leader Bob Van Pelt was especially helpful bring ing years of electronic experience to the project. I am very proud of Ben and his ambitious, unique project, said Carter. We hope that many people will enjoy the fruits of his work for years to come. The project also helped other scouts earn credit towards an electronics merit badge, which is a wonderful plus! Bens mother and I are just ecstatic that this piece of Bens journey to Eagle is finally complete, said Earl Bittner, Bens father and NAVFAC Southeast employee. We are very thankful to Ms. Bauer for her patience waiting on Ben to get his plan and the resources together for this challenging project. When the project was complete it was apparent a great deal of time and craftsmanship were devoted to making the display quiz board an interactive work of art. I wanted this to be a project that would provide the Black Point Center with an educational tool for those who visit the center, especially the little kids. We spent a lot of time discussing the display size and height of the buttons because I wanted to ensure little kids could use the board, said Ben Bittner. The project also helped me to show leadership by teaching the younger scouts to follow in my footsteps.Local Eagle Scout candidate supports Black Point Interpretive Center 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Deweys Family Night 3rd Friday of the Month Deweys will be open for dinner & beverages Nov. 15 Karaoke with Tom Turner Dec. 20 Childrens Holiday Bingo Childrens Holiday Bingo will start at 6:30 p.m. and has a cost of $10 per person and includes soft drinks, hot dog, dauber, bingo card and gift bag for each child. DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Youth Bowling League: Every Sat., 10:30 a.m. noon $17 annually or $8 per week. Includes shoes, awards will be given at the end of the season! Rising Stars Youth League: Every Sat., 10:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m. Pee Wee Division (6 years & under) 2 games, $6 per week. Juniors Division (7 years & older) 3 games, $8 per week. Special Stars Bowling League for families with special needs children. All ages welcome! Ramps available for the non-ambulatory as well as bumpers for beginners. Runs for 10 weeks at a cost of $7 per week, shoes are included. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for Active Duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4 6 p.m., Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Turkey Trot 5K Nov. 15 at 11:30 a.m. Perimeter Rd. / Antenna Farm Powerlifting Competition Feb. 8, 2014, 7 a.m. at the Fitness Center $10 registration feeI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil. Waves of Honor Special: Seaworld Orlando Adult $46.50, Child $42.25. Busch Gardens Tampa Adult $45, Child $40.50. Monster Jam: Club seating (includes pit pass) $42, regular seating (includes pit pass) $22. Jacksonville Jaguars: Section 147 Bud Zone, $70. Jags shuttle bus $12. Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2013-14 Season: Tickets now available! The Artist Series Broadway in Jax 2013 2014 Season: Tickets available now! Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus: Jan. 17 & 18, 2014, $51. War Horse: Feb. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $68.50. Memphis: March 22, 2014, 8 pm, $65. Million Dollar Quartet: April 26, 2014, 8 pm, $65. The D* Word: Oct. 4-25, 2014, $43.75 $46. Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept. 27, 2014) 4 day Hopper ticket$166 4 day 1 park per day and water park ticket-$166 4 day Hopper and Water park combo ticket$194 Gatorbowl $35 Capital One Bowl $98 Russell Athletic Bowl $78 Soul Food Festival Special $20 General Admission $32 Preferred $42 VIP $65 Ringling Brothers Barnum & Bailey Circus $15 Veterans Memorial Arena call for dates/times. ITT is now selling $18 tickets for the Harlem Globetrotters! The show is Feb. 28, 7 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Arena.The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. St. Augustine Outlet Mall Trip Nov. 16 at 12 p.m. Dirty Stache Contest Nov. 16 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Nov. 26 for active duty Nov. 14 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m. Turkey Trot Golf Scramble Nov. 25, 10 a.m. shotgun start $60 entry fee, $70 for civilian guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m.Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Military Family Appreciation Carnival Nov. 16, 11 a.m. 4 p.m. Free admission, food available for purchase Dashing Through the Grove Dec. 6, 48 p.m. Free snow sledding, tree lighting, photos with Santa and more!Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person The NAS Jacksonville Golf Course hosted the 2013 Mary Burnside Tournament Oct. 30. The tournament was created by the Jacksonville Womens Golf Association (JWGA), the third oldest golf associa tion in the country, to honor the late retired Navy Lt. Cmdr. Mary Burnside. Burnside joined JWGA in 1968 and served as president for the organization 1983-85. Her devotion to JWGA and love of golf catapulted the organization into the public eye and served as inspiration to everyone involved. The winners on the course were Therese Quinn who was the Low Gross Overall Winner with a score of 73 and Bertha Frazier, the Overall Net Winner at the tournament, who shot a 68. Shan Giordano, current president of the JWGA, said, We are so excited to be at NAS Jax to celebrate the life of Mary Burnside whose entire family served our country. Mary served not only her country but also served all of us with her vol unteerism. It is a great day to be able to celebrate who she was and to sustain her memories with our organization. NAS Jax Golf Course hosts womens tournament JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013 17

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013 19 For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. SPORTS The National Park Service and the U.S. Navy announced plans Nov. 1 to host a joint memorial ceremony at the Pearl Harbor Visitor Center at the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument, looking directly out to the USS Arizona Memorial. The ceremony, to start at 7:45 a.m. Dec. 7, will commemorate the 72nd anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. This years keynote speaker will be Max Cleland, secre tary of the American Battle Monuments Commission. A former U.S. senator and the youngest-ever admin istrator of the U.S. Veterans Administration, Cleland has been a distinguished public servant for nearly 50 years. In 1967, Cleland joined the armed forces where he served in the Vietnam War as a bat talion signal officer. In 1968, as an Army captain, Cleland was seriously wounded in combat and received both the Bronze Star for meritorious service and the Silver Star for gallantry in action. Adm. Harry Harris Jr., who assumed duties as Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet Oct. 16, is also scheduled to speak. As commander of Pacific Fleet, Harris is responsi ble for 100 million square miles in which commerce worth tril lions of dollars is transported each year. Today, U.S. Pacific Fleet leads Americas rebalance to the Pacific. This years Dec. 7 ceremo ny will be co-hosted by Paul DePrey, superintendent of the National Park Service, WWII Valor in the Pacific National Monument, and Rear Adm. Rick Williams, commander of Navy Region Hawaii and Naval Surface Group Middle Pacific. More than 2,500 distin guished guests and the general public are expected to join current and former military per sonnel, including Pearl Harbor survivors and other WWII vet erans, for the annual obser vance of the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor. Our Pearl Harbor Survivors were young men 72 years ago when they experienced the attack on Oahu. Many were teenagers, Williams said. The attack launched our country into World War II, and most of the young Pearl Harbor Survivors, went on to fight in that war. They fought across the Pacific leading the Battle of Midway from here in Pearl Harbor; fighting a bloody and brutal Guadalcanal Campaign; and hitting beaches, enemy ships and island strongholds with everything we had from the winter of 1941/42 through the summer of 1945, Williams noted. The Pearl Harbor Day cere mony commemorates both the attack and Americas ultimate victory in the Second World War. The theme of this years historic commemoration, Sound the Alarm, examines how thousands of Americans answered a call to duty in the wake of the attack. Sound the Alarm also explores how the nation was unified through communication in 1941 and throughout the war but shows how slow or incomplete infor mation was, especially in the early days and weeks of the war. Sites across the U.S. will include the United States Navy Memorial Museum (Washington, DC); Great Lakes Naval Museum (Chicago, Ill.); Rosie the Riveter National Historic Site (Oakland, Calif.); Arizona State Museum (Phoenix, Ariz.); and the National WWII Museum (New Orleans, La.). Prior to the start of the cer emony, Pearl Harbor survivors and WWII veterans will be able to interact with one another via new media, and those who are unable to attend the ceremony on Oahu will be able to view the event in their hometown as it takes place. At 7:55 a.m., the exact moment the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor began 72 years ago, a moment of silence will be observed. A guided-missile destroyer will render honors to the USS Arizona, and a flyover will be conducted above Pearl Harbor. The ceremony will con clude with a walk of honor by Pearl Harbor survivors and other WWII Veterans through an honor cordon of military service members and National Park Service men and women. The U.S. Naval Academy needs qualified Navy Reserve officers, especially at the ranks of lieutenant and lieuten ant commander, with at least a masters degree in an appropriate academic discipline to instruct in designated aca demic departments for Fall 2014 and to serve as outstanding military role models and mentors for midshipmen. Recall opportunities will be con sidered for the following disciplines: cyber security, information systems, and information technology; electri cal engineering, computer engineer ing, general engineering, nuclear engineering, mechanical engineering, naval architecture, ocean engineering, aero space engineering, and control systems engineering; mathematics, chemistry, physics, computer science, and ocean ography; political science, economics, English, history, and foreign languages, including Spanish, French, German, Russian, Arabic, Chinese, or Japanese. Interested Navy Reservists should email the following: discipline(s) you are applying for and your qualifications for the position. ic, professional, and naval experience, including any recent mobilizations, recalls, or extended active duty peri ods). For more information and to apply, email: reserve.recall@usna.edu or call Cmdr. John Schedel at (410) 293-6513/ DSN: 281-6513 To receive full consideration, inter ested officers for Academic Year 2014-15 should apply no later than Dec. 15, 2013. Officers selected will be recalled to active duty and assigned orders for an officer-instructor tour, not to exceed three years, commencing July 2014. Recalled officers will remain on the reserve active status list and will remain eligible for promotion consid eration before reserve selection boards. Selections will be made only after USNA placement officers are confident that USNA billets will not be filled from the active duty pool of potential officer instructors. Applicants will be made aware of their selection status by mid-April 2014. Final arrangements are contingent upon PCS funding being available through the Navy. Naval Academy is looking for Naval Reserve officers for instructorsSpeakers, theme announced for 72nd Pearl Harbor Day ceremony 1 2 3 4 5 6

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013 The Navy commenced the first E-2 Hawkeye and C-2 Greyhound Field Carrier Landing Practice (FCLP) operations at Wallops Flight Facility Nov. 4, following a ceremony to commemorate an agreement with NASA to support FCLP training for E-2 and C-2 squad rons operating from Naval Station Norfolk Chambers Field. Previously, E-2 and C-2 squadrons had to conduct out-of-area detachments to NAS Jacksonville, Fla., or when operating at NALF Fentress, fly a modified landing pattern to comply with local noise abatement procedures. NASA officials, Accomack County officials and Navy personnel attend ed the ceremony in recognition of an agreement that culminates a more than 10-year search to acquire additional local FLCP airfield capacity. It would be very difficult for any one to overstate just how important this agreement is to NASA, the Navy, and to the future of Naval aviation in the Hampton Roads region, said Vice Adm. Nora Tyson, deputy director of U.S. Fleet Forces Command, in a speech during the ceremonys opening. The agreement with NASA provides the Navy with the ability to relieve near-term FCLP capacity issues at Navy Auxiliary Landing Field (NALF) Fentress and affords pilots the oppor tunity to practice carrier landings in a controlled training environment that closely replicates conditions encoun tered at sea. Additionally, the agreement will help reduce training costs, decrease the time Sailors have to spend away from home while preparing for deployment, and provide a boost to the local economy on the Eastern Shore. These detachments resulted in an increase to training costs, wear and tear on the airframes, and more time our Sailors had to spend away from their families, said Tyson. This is huge because of the realis tic carrier landing practice that it pro vides to our aviators, said Capt. Todd Watkins, commodore of the Airborne Command Control and Logistics Wing. Here we are able to fly a pattern exactly the way we do it at sea. The Navy completed approximately $1.9 million in necessary minor con struction, including installation of runway lighting and markings to simulate the flight deck of an aircraft carrier, as well as the pouring of concrete pads for an Improved Fresnel Lens Optical Landing System and a work station for Landing Signal officers. With construction complete, the facility is now capable of hosting day and night E-2 and C-2 FCLP operations. Norfolk-based E-2 and C-2 squadrons will conduct up to 20,000 FCLP passes annually at Wallops Flight Facility. Calling Israels self-defense capabilities and its qualitative military edge central to both Israel and U.S. security inter ests, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel announced Oct. 31 that Israel will buy six V-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft for its air force. Hagel made the announce ment during his keynote address at the 100th annual Anti-Defamation League meet ing in New York. Israel will get six V-22s out of the next order to go on the assembly line, and they will be compatible with other [Israeli defense force] capabilities, he said. The Israeli and American defense relationship is stronger than ever. With Afghanistan the second of Americas two longest wars winding down, Hagel said, we continue to face a complicated and volatile world. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the Middle East, where the United States and our allies are facing an unprecedented set of complex challenges. For Israel, the secretary noted, progress with one neigh bor tends to bring new threats from other directions. There are no margins for Israel, he said. One challenge that threatens U.S. and Israeli security inter ests is preventing Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon, Hagel said. Iran is a state sponsor of terror, responsible for spreading hatred and extremism through out the region, the secretary said. But foreign policy is not a zero-sum game. If we can find ways to resolve disputes peacefully, we are wise to explore them. Ridding the world of hatred takes more than just work, imagination and songs, Hagel told his audience; it also demands commitment, sacri fice and courage. It demands that we must continue to march our armies of tolerance, equality, and justice around the globe. Hagel said. And it demands that we remember the timeless ques tions of Rabbi Hillel: If I am not for myself, who will be for me? If I am only for myself, what am I? And if not now, when? Wallops Flight Facility opens for E-2/C-2 FCLP operations Israel will buy 6 Osprey aircraft, Hagel announces In November and December, NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) is offering Suicide Prevention Awareness Training for base and tenant commands. Should your command be in need of this training, select a date and time that is convenient for your command and call 542-2776 to reserve seating, said FFSC Education and Training Coordinator Wilhelmina Nash. Attending this one-hour class could help you save someones life. Thank you for your concern and support. Nov. 14 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Nov. 20 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Nov. 26 8 a.m. & 1 p.m. Nov. 27 8 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 2 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 3 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 4 8 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 5 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 10 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 11 1 & 3 p.m. Dec. 12 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 17 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 18 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 30 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 31 9 a.m. & 1 p.m.Suicide prevention awareness training available through FFSC

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013 21 An increasing number of residents throughout the Southeast Region are reducing energy bills through the Switch4Good energy savings program, which is now in place at 11 of the regions installa tions. Balfour Beatty Investments, the Navys housing manage ment partner, designed the program to inform housing residents on ways to reduce energy consumption and lower their energy bills. The company decided to expand Switch4Good to installations throughout the region after a pilot progam at Travis Air Force Base in 2011 reduced energy consumption by 18 percent. The program rolled out alongside the Resident Energy Conservation Program (RECP) and attributed to the success and effectiveneness of meeting energy savings expectations, said Richard Dye, Navy Region Southeast (NRSE) housing program director. Participation in the Switch4Good program has been outstanding and impact on energy savings has been right in line with, or exceeded, expectations. The programs first phase began in October and con sisted of a three-month period where residents received mock bills and energy saving tips. The mock reports and sav ing tips served as a tool for residents to know how much energy they were using compared to like homes, Dye said. It was a good opportunity for residents to monitor and change any behavior that could help to reduce their consumption before actual billing start ed. Under RECP, utility accounts are either charged or credited if they are more than 10 percent over or under the established baseline energy consumption. The mock billing period pro vided residents three months to monitor and change any behavior to help reduce con sumption before actual billing started. According to Tabitha Crawford, senior vice presi dent of sustainability and innovation, Balfour Beatty Investments, the program has been a success. The program clearly dem onstrates that using smart meter data to provide person alized habit cues for residents results in reduced energy consumption, without retrofits, Crawford said. With housing comprising 20-25 percent of a military installations energy consumption, this program is an important tool in support ing the sustainability goals of our Army, Navy and Air Force partners. Switch4Good consists of three levels of resident engagement: Info and Peers, Digital Outreach and In-Home Coaching. The application of these methods varies from base to base. Info and peers is in place at 11 of the regions installations, Dye said. Residents receive monthly savings reports and access to a web portal with feedback on household energy usage. Its a great tool because they have immediate access to energy consumption data that updates every hour. Digital Outreach provides participating residents the same resources as Info and Peers, but with personalized, detailed tracking and analysis of their energy consumption via Twitter and text messages. Its very precise monitor ing of energy usage, not just throughout the base, but for each individual household, Dye said. If there is a con sistent spike in energy usage during certain times of the day, you might receive a text or tweet, then residents can take a look and determine what hap pened during that time that may have caused the spike. Its a valuable tool for people to become more efficient energy consumers. So far, Digital Outreach has been implemented on board three installations: Joint Base Charleston, NAS Jacksonville and NAS Pensacola. More than 1,800 homes are eligible to enroll in the voluntary pro gram. In addition to Digital Outreach and Info and Peers, residents on board NAS Key West and Naval Station Mayport have access to home visits from a personal train er. These optional visits are designed to engage the entire family on specific ways to reduce energy costs. Many people dont realize how much energy they can save through very simple practices, Dye said. For example, they might not realize how much they could save from limiting television use or sim ply unplugging the television when theyre done. According to Lea Williford, regional team lead for pub lic and private ventures, even a modest reduction in energy usage throughout the region can have a significant impact on the installations total con sumption. A reduction of 10 percent in energy costs across the 11 installations currently imple menting Switch4Good would result in savings of more than $100,000 monthly and more than $1 million annually, Williford said. Its good for both the Navy and base residents, because the money saved from lower util ity bills goes back to the com munity to help pay for main tenance and updgrades. In addition, residents can receive a rebate for using less energy than the baseline. As of June, energy con sumption was down 10-15 percent at installations using the program. Base residents interested in enrolling in the Switch4Good program should contact their base housing authority. Southeast Region cuts energy costs with Switch4Good Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2013: (7:30 a.m.4:15 p.m.) Dec. 2-6. (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) Nov. 18-22, Dec. 16-20. (9 a.m.-noon) Nov. 27, Dec. 11. (Noon-3 p.m.) (8-9:30 a.m.) Nov. 25. (9:40 a.m.noon) Nov. 25. (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Dec. 9-13. (9-10:30 a.m.) Nov. 26. (1:30-3 p.m.) Dec. 12. (1:30-4 p.m.) Nov. 14. Nov. 21 (5-6:30 p.m.) (9-11 a.m.) Dec. 9. (9-10:30 a.m.) Dec. 10. (8 a.m.-noon) Nov. 26, Dec. 17. (11 a.m.-1 p.m.) Nov. 19. (1-3 p.m.) Nov. 19, 26. (9:30-11 a.m.) Every Wednesday (9 a.m.-3 p.m.) Dec. 3. (10 a.m.-noon) Nov. 16; Dec. 10, 17. (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) Dec. 5.To register for any of the above workshops call 542-5745.Fleet and Family Support Center offers life skills workshops for service members and families

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24 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 14, 2013