Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note:
Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
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Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID:
UF00028307:02066


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2013 NAS JAX SOYS SCUBA VP-26 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Military bug pros collaborate against mosquitoesThe Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) at NAS Jacksonville participated with other military ser vices and public health agencies to eval uate aerial spraying techniques Oct. 29-30 in order to control the mosquito that transmits dengue fever and yellow fever to humans in urban settings. The research mission was led by the U. S. Department of AgricultureAgricultural Research Service-Center for Medical, Agriculture and Veterinary Entomology (USDA-ARS-CMAVE). In addition to USDA, were collabo rating with the Air Force 757th Airlift Squadron, and Florida National Guards Surface rescue swimmers from guided-missile destroyer USS Mason (DDG 87) and avia tion rescue swimmers from the Jacksonville-based Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 74 Swamp Foxes, con ducted a combined search-andrescue (SAR) exercise in the Mediterranean Sea, Oct. 29. An MH-60R Seahawk heli copter from HSM-74 performed aerial searches and swimmer insertions while a rigid hull inflatable boat (RHIB) from Mason was used to deliver swimmers to recover simulated survivors more than two nauti cal miles from Mason. The goal was to provide a safe, practical and realistic training experience in accor dance with our quarterly and annual training requirements that offered the chance to apply our skills in a combined event, said AWR1 Michael Reilly, an aviation rescue swimmer assigned to HSM 74 embarked aboard Mason. HSM-74 showcased their SAR capabilities by recovering sim ulated survivors with a rescue strop and a two-person rescue basket extended from the heli copter hovering more than 50 feet above the sea. This was the first time Ive seen the rescue basket used outside of training videos or television programming, said Reilly. It was easy to control and worked well during the event. Masons RHIB-based team successfully navigated the choppy water, deployed finned surface rescue swimmers and swam simulated survivors to safety. Each team took turns alter nating between the roles of sur vivor or rescuer, said Ensign Timothy McDaniel, a sur face rescue swimmer aboard A little more than a year ago, AWFAN Brett Parks life was forever changed in a split second. On that fateful day, Oct. 17, 2012, Parks had just ended his day at VP-30 where he was training to become a flight engineer and headed to his part-time job as a personal trainer. While waiting for his client, he attempted to thwart a robbery and was shot in the abdomen. Today, after being saved by, as he says, a series of miracles, Parks is in top physical shape despite los ing a kidney, part of his colon, and having his right leg amputated below the knee. His days are spent work ing with several therapists for his medical conditions, going to doctors appointments and working out at the NAS Jax Fitness Source to build up his strength. I definitely work much harder than I did before the incident because the doctors told me if I hadnt been in such good physical shape, I would certainly have died. That gives me motivation to work as hard as I can and never take a day off. Fitness was instilled in me at a very early age and it all came into play that day I was shot, said Parks, after completing a weightlift ing session at the Fitness Source. Brett is so inspiring and motivating. He is always here training to better his physical fitness standards whether its in the weight room, doing Pilates or yoga. Its just amazing to see what hes accomplished and can do, said NAS Jax Fitness Director Tanya Henigman. While he is currently on medical board hold with the Navy, Parks continues to plan for the future. If Im found fit for duty, Ill stay in and see what I can do next. The Navy has been great and my command has been very supportive but if they dont need me, Ill do other things, said Parks. He has written a book about his experiences, called Training for Life which hasnt been published yet and has created a non-profit agency called Second Shot Ministries to offer outreach programs such as speaking engagements and benefit those in need. There was so much that went on that fateful day. God was truly looking out for me from the hematoma in my abdomen that helped stop the bleed ing to all the doctors being in the right place at the right time. Thats just not coincidence. Even when I was in a coma, God was with me the whole time, he explained. Parks continued, Im not here today just live my life by going skydiving, Im here to live my life for the Lord. And thats why I started Second Shot Ministries so I can help others in need. Hes given me a second shot at life. I want to spread the word that Im alive USS Mason, HSM-74 team up for SAREX in Mediterranean Sea Sailor thrives after surviving gunshot wound one year ago

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Nov. 7 1861 Naval forces under Rear Adm. Samuel DuPont capture Port Royal Sound, S.C. 1881 Naval Advisory Board submits report recommending the new ships in U.S. Navy be constructed of steel instead of iron. 1973 War Powers Resolution becomes law. Nov. 8 1861 Capt. Charles Wilkes seizes two Confederate diplo mats from the British steamer Trent, causing an international controversy with Great Britain (known as the Trent Affair). 1942 In Operation Torch (Allied landings in French Northwest Africa), American forces land at Casablanca. French naval forces attack U.S. Navy ships resulting in 13 French ships sunk without a loss to the U.S. 1956 Navy Stratolab bal loon (Lt. Cmdrs. Malcolm Ross and M. Lee Lewis) betters world altitude record soaring to 76,000 feet above Black Hills of S.D. on flight to gather meteo rological, cosmic ray and other scientific data. 1975 More than 100 Sailors and Marines from USS Inchon (LPH-12) and USS Bagley (DE1069) fight a fire on board a Spanish merchant vessel at Palma. Nov. 9 1921 USS Olympia arrives at the Washington Navy Yard from France, carrying the body of the Unknown Soldier for internment at Arlington National Cemetery. 1950 Task Force 77 makes first attack on the Yalu River bridges in Korea. In first engagement between MIG15 and F9F jets (from USS Philippine Sea), Lt. Cmdr. William Amen (VF-111) shoots down a MIG and becomes first Navy pilot to down a jet air craft. 1956 Secretary of the Navy proposes the Polaris missile program to the Secretary of Defense. Nov. 10 1775 Congress votes to raise two battalions of Continental Marines, establishing the Marine Corps. 1941 U.S. escorted convoy WS 12, carrying 20,000 British troops to Singapore, sails from Halifax, Nova Scotia. Nov. 11 1870 Navy expedi tion to explore the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, southern Mexico, commanded by Capt. Robert Shufeldt, enters the Coatzacoalcos River to begin a survey for possible interoceanic canal. Support pro vided by USS Kansas and USS Mayflower. 1918 Armistice ends World War I. 1920 Lenah Higbee becomes the first woman to be awarded the Navy Cross for her World War I service. 1921 Washington Naval Conference begins. 1943 Two Carrier Task Forces strike Japanese shipping at Rabaul, sinking one carri er and damaging other ships. Raid was first use of SB2C Curtiss Helldivers in combat. 1954 Nov. 11 designated as Veterans Day to honor veterans of all U.S. wars. 1966 Launch of Gemini 12, with Cmdr. James Lovell Jr., the command pilot. Mission last ed three days, 22 hours and 34 minutes and included 59 orbits at an altitude of 162.7 nautical miles. Recovery by HS-11 heli copter from USS Wasp (CVS18). 1981 Commissioning of first Trident-class nuclearpowered Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine, USS Ohio (SSBN726). Nov. 12 1912 Lt. Theodore Ellyson makes first successful launch ing of an airplane (A-3) by cata pult at the Washington Navy Yard. 1940 CNO Adm. Stark submits memorandum to Secretary of the Navy on four plans if U.S. enters war. He favors the fourth, Plan Dog, calling for strong offense in the Atlantic and defense in the Pacific. 1942 First of the three days of fighting in the Battle of Guadalcanal. 1943 President Franklin Roosevelt embarks on USS Iowa (BB-61) to go to the Allied conferences at Teheran, Iran, and Cairo, Egypt. Nov. 13 1776 Capt. John Paul Jones in Alfred, and with brig Providence, captures British transport Mellish, carrying winter uniforms later used by Washingtons troops. 1942 Loss of light cruiser USS Juneau (CL-52) during Battle of Guadalcanal results in loss of five Sullivan brothers. 1943 Fifth Fleet carri ers begin long-range night bombing attacks on Japanese positions in the Gilberts and Marshall islands in prepara tion for landings. 1957 First firing of Regulus II bombardment missile. Since the ubiquitous integration of GPS into the devices of our everyday lives I have found myself off the beaten path more often. That seems counterintuitive, doesnt it? With better navigation and a hands-free, robot voice giving step-bystep directions, I should be getting from Point A to Point B more directly. Except, it seems that iPhones Siri, in particular, has a mind of her own, and I sometimes end up in unchartered territory when I follow her commands. And I do follow her commands. Dustin does not. Dustin knows better than Siri. He tempts fate by see ing the exit shes told him to take, and then passing it by because it doesnt seem like the right one. Always follow Siri, I tell him. It doesnt matter what you think. You dont know what Siri knows. Sometimes Siri can predict traffic. Sometimes she knows about detours. Shes like a wizard on the dash board, and I do not second-guess her. Even when I fear shes sending me off track. This happened last week when I headed north for a book club event in Houlton, Maine, which, for anyone south of Houlton, basically feels like Canada. Indeed, Houlton is at the very top of the map, and as I drove, I had a distinct feeling of climbing a vertical wall, like my car was literally traveling up the United States and teetering on the top. Interstate 95 is the main road to Houlton, and Im no stranger to it. When we lived in Jacksonville, Florida, I used I-95 daily. There, it passes by the Jaguars stadium and winds through high-rise buildings. When Dustin and I traveled from Jacksonville to our hometowns in Virginia, the directions basically were, get on I-95, head north for 700 miles, and then get off I-95. Since moving to Maine, we travel the northeastern part of I-95 on family vacations through Massachusetts, New York City, New Jersey and Washington, D.C. Despite minor differences, in all these areas, I-95 is basically the same. But the stretch of it that runs from Bangor, Maine, to Houlton is so different that it almost deserves another name. Here, the road signs become sparse (except for the moose warnings, of course), and there are no billboards or rest stops. There are very few exits and long stretches of road where there is nothing but pine trees. Indeed, I had a Bill Murray moment from What About Bob? when I realized I was totally alone on I-95 for about 30 minutes on my way to Houlton last week. Siri was unusually quiet. She had no instructions to give except, maybe, keep going north . for a very long time. But somewhere around Sherman, Maine, her voice pierced the silence. She wanted me to take the next exit, even though I was still about an hour away from the des tination. I was skeptical and a little afraid. But remember, I always follow Siri. I left I-95 in my rear view mirror and merged onto a long, winding road that seemed even more lonely than the one before. Now, I was terrified. What if I lost my sig nal and Siri left me stranded on a deserted road in north ern Maine? I held my breath as I drove, but soon, general stores and empty gas stations gave way to hillsides dotted with grand, old homes with attached barns. Cows grazed in the fields. There was no hustle and bustle here. No cars zooming past. No honking, billboards or stop lights. Just quiet. And sometimes its hard to be quiet. I worried about my schedule Would I be on time? and the directions Where was I? and yet I kept following Siri. Then I came around a bend and saw the most spec tacular sight: behind the cows and the orange and red autumn leaves, Mt. Katahdin rose in the distance. Clouds hugged the top of the mountain, but sun shone all around the base. I stopped my car in the middle of the road, which didnt matter because there was no one else around. The tires landed on a pile of cow manure, and the earthy smell filled my nose as I rolled down the window to take a picture. The picture didnt do the vision justice. I moved on. Its a good thing the world is slower and less crowded up there, because I was a reckless driver peering at the views and snapping pictures at every turn. I was sad when Siri told me to get back on I-95. I dont know why the GPS sent me off the highway for 45 miles that day. There seemed to be no reason for it. On my way home, I tried to take the detour again, but Siri insisted I use I-95 instead. As I drove, I caught dis tance glimpses of the hillsides, cows and barns, and for a moment, I was insanely jealous of all those people over there, off the beaten path. Siri sent me off the beaten path Notice of upcoming NAS Jax power outages NAS Jacksonville Public Works Department has scheduled three power outages in order to safely perform required maintenance in the high volt age substation serving family housing and the Naval Hospital Jacksonville campus. Your understanding of the necessity for these power outages is sincerely appreciated because the required maintenance will greatly improve the reliability of the substation equipment and the installations overall electrical distribution system.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013 3

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Every outage has been carefully scheduled in order to minimize the impact they will have on operations and the daily lives of our family housing residents. These short term outages will pay long term dividends not only to the installation, but also to you, the cus tomer. The power outages are scheduled as follows: Nov. 16, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Several hos pital campus buildings, Youth Activities Center, Child Development Center, All housing on Mustin Road south of Child Street, excluding Fleet Angel Court and Woodpecker Drive Nov. 23, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Several hos pital campus buildings, Youth Center Gym, Heritage Cottages, All of Patriot Point Housing, including Fleet Angel Court and Woodpecker Drive Dec. 7, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. All of the buildings affected by the first two out ages. While the contractor performing the maintenance will strive to short en the duration of each power outage, all affected tenants and family hous ing residents should plan to be without power during the hours listed above. POWER OUTAGES NAS Jacksonville announced its 2013 Sailors of the Year Oct. 25. AC1(AW) Dax Bonnett of the NAS Jax Air Operations Department has been selected as the 2013 NAS Jax Senior Sailor of the Year. I am extremely honored and grateful to be selected. Representing the Sailors of NAS Jax is a huge honor and respon sibility that I will not take lightly, said Bonnett. Bonnett praises his superiors and shipmates for this prestigious recogni tion. I would like to thank my senior leadership and mentors within the chiefs mess who inspire me every day by setting the standard and by taking care of their Sailors. I would like to give a special thank-you to the professional Sailors of the Air Traffic Control (ATC) Division and Operations Department who do the heavy lifting through week ends and holidays without complaint in support of the mission, he said. Bonnett, a native of New Orleans, La. is a graduate of Archbishop Shaw High School Class of 1989. After attending the University of Southeastern Louisiana, Bonnett enlisted in the United States Navy on May 5, 1995. He completed boot camp at Recruit Training Center, Great Lakes, Ill. in July 1995 and then reported to Air Traffic Control A School at the Naval Air Technical Training Center (NATTC) in Millington, Tenn. After graduation, he served as an instruction operation sta tion controller on the NATTC pre-com missioning team for NATTC Pensacola, Fla. where he also advanced to third class petty officer. In June 1997, Bonnett reported on board USS Independence (CV-62) where he qualified as air operation supervi sor, CASE I supervisor, PALS final con troller and radar final controller at Iwo Jima Air Base. A year later, he crossdecked to USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63). In March 1999, Bonnett reported to NAVSTA Rota, Spain where he qualified as facility watch supervisor. In February 2001, he transferred to NAF Atsugi, Japan where he qualified local control, a qualification previously not earned in 20 years by an American controller. He was also advanced to first class petty officer and qualified as a facility watch supervisor at Iwo Jima Air Base. In February 2004, Bonnett transferred to NAVSTA Mayport where he quali fied as facility watch supervisor. He then reported to NAS Sigonella, Italy before volunteering for an Individual Augmentee (IA) assignment to Anbar Providence, Iraq in February 2009 in support of Operations Iraq Freedom and New Dawn. He reported to the NAS Jax Air Operations Department in 2010 and was designated facility watch supervisor in September 2011. Bonnett was selected as the 2011 and 2012 NAS Jacksonville Air Traffic Controller of the Year and recently earned his bachelors degree in psychology. Bonnett is currently focusing his goal on earning chief anchors and to con tinue mentoring junior Sailors. He also enjoys spending time with his family. My advice for aspiring junior Sailors is to stay engaged and seek out the guid ance and mentorship of those who have forged the path to success. You still have to do the heaving lifting, but it is much easier when you have the map and dont have to reinvent the wheel, said Bonnett. MA2 Keith Danalewich of the NAS Jax Security Department is the 2013 NAS Jax Sailor of the Year. Being chosen NAS Jax Sailor of the Year is truly an remarkable accom plishment. It gives my subordinates and peers someone to look up to; some one to learn from. It gives my chain of command and mentors throughout the years a pat on the back knowing that all the hard work they have put into me has done something and that they molded their replacement, said Danalewich, a native of Palos Hills, Ill. Danalewich joined the Navy in 2006. After boot camp and complet ing Master-at-Arms A School, he com pleted a tour at Naval Support Facility Diego Garcia. After attending Military Working Dog Handler School, he trans ferred to Yokosuka, Japan and complet ed an IA deployment to Djibouti, Africa. He reported to NAS Jax in March 2011 where he currently works as a military working dog handler. I plan to stay in the Navy and become a kennel master, said Danalewich. In his spare time, he volunteers for Duval County Special Olympics. Danalewich is grateful to his family and mentors for their continued sup port. I would like to thank my parents and brothers for being there for me and my mentors MAC Benjamin Cook, MA1 Thomas Kelly and MA1 Ronald Hughes who have been behind me the whole time, molding me and shaping me into a better Sailor, master-at-arms and dog handler, he said. He offers this advice to junior Sailors, No matter how many hours you put in, how many times you cant see a rhyme or reason for doing something, keep your head high and do things the right way. AC3 Alexis Ray of the NAS Jax Air Operations Department has been named the 2013 NAS Jax Junior Sailor of the Year. A native of Anniston, Ala., Ray joined the Navy in March 2011 and graduated from ATC A School in September 2011. She reported to the NAS Jax in October 2011 where her primary duties are to monitor aircraft and provide traffic and safety alerts. I think its an honor and a privilege to be selected as Junior Sailor of the Year. It took a lot of hard work and dedi cation to achieve this accomplishment, said Ray. I would like to thank God, my family and friends who have supported me throughout this year, and last but not least, my fellow shipmates who have given me every opportunity to succeed at achieving my goals. Rays future goals are to earn her bachelors degree in aeronautical sci ence and control tower operator quali fication. When shes not working, Ray spends her time volunteering for Habitat for Humanity and the Wounded Warrior Project. She is also president of the new NAS Jax Chapter of Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions. She offers this advice to her peers, keep your head up no matter how bad things may seem, and to strive to be the best Sailor you can possibly be. MASN Stephan Moore of the NAS Jax Security Department is the 2013 NAS Jax Blue Jacket of the Year. Being recognized as Blue Jacket of the Year was a major milestone in my career and Ive come a long way from when I first joined the Navy. I followed a blueprint that my leading petty offi cer provided me on how to become a successful Sailor which helps me stay motivated. I feel blessed to be in this NAS Jacksonville selects top Sailors for 2013 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013

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position, said Moore. A native of Atlanta, Moore joined the Navy in 2012, attending boot camp at RTC Great Lakes, Ill. I actually had a good experience in boot camp. I learned a lot of new things about myself. I was mentally and physically tested every day. I learned discipline and to look out for my shipmates, Moore explained. He reported to NAS Jax in May 2012 where he currently works as a patrol man. In his free time, Moore enjoys working out, playing flag football and basketball. He plans to reenlist and become a limited duty officer. I owe all my success to God who has guided all the great things in my life. I would also like to thank CWO3 Roshell Booker, MACM Ed Santiago, MAC Henderson, MA1 Kelly and MA1 Hughes for their support, said Moore. Moore also offers this advice to his peers. Strive to be the best at every thing you do in your career. I started off bad with a major hiccup and wanted to give up. I had no hope, but eventually having great mentors to motivate me every day changed my whole attitude and the hard work paid off. SOY JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013 Scuba courses return to base pool After a near year-long suspension of Scuba train ing at the NAS Jax indoor pool due to renovations, the courses have once again resumed allowing Sailors the opportunity to learn how to dive at a variety of certifi cation levels. The Scuba Diving program, offered through the base Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department offers certifications for Junior (10 to 14 yrs old) and Open Water Scuba Divers (15 and up), Nitrox Divers, Advanced Open Water Divers, Rescue Divers, Master Scuba Diver and Pro level Dive-Masters and Instructors. The courses are taught by Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI) IDC Staff Instructor and Master Scuba Diver Trainer Bob Collins, a Navy retiree who spent much of his time conducting hull inspections and training Navy divers. Collins joined the Navy Reserves in 1969, and was stationed at Mayport as a diver for two years. After a four-year stint on active duty with the Army, he went back into the Naval Reserves for a few years before being asked to join the Navy as a ships serviceman, although he spent much of the time diving. Collins retired in 1994. Following retirement, he worked in the log home construction industry. After doing well for a number of years, it faltered due to the declining housing market, so Collins went back to scuba diving. My wife and I were on a cruise, and I asked her if I could sign up for a dive trip in Grand Cayman, which turned into several dive trips at the next stops in Cozumel, Belize and Honduras. My enthusiasm was back for an activity I loved. A short time later, I went to an Atlanta area dive shop and took courses to become a PADI instructor, said Collins. In 2007, he moved to Jacksonville and later began teaching scuba at a local dive shop. He met the folks at the Navy Rescue Swimmer School and certified several staff mem bers and who helped him become a dive instructor at the base pool. Despite the indoor pool being closed for nearly a year, Collins has continued to offer Scuba courses to Sailors at the Cecil Field Aquatic Center. I love all the improvements to the facility and being back in the NAS Jax pool to teach Scuba again. Its like being back home. Ive got people who have been put ting off taking the courses because of the gym closure and now they are coming over to sign up, said Collins. Ive been teaching off base, but my heart is here. Im real ly happy to be back. He also stressed some of the high lights of what the program offers. I think what makes our Scuba courses so popular and makes them work so well, is that weve put together a personal program that works around each Sailor, not where the Sailor has to work around the program, he stated. And, we keep the sessions small so students get more oneon-one interaction. This personal approach is what makes us unique and successful. Session times are flexible and held at the conve nience of the student. Collins also works with the Liberty Program, offering single Sailors, a Try Scuba experience, to allow them to decide if its some thing they want to pursue before spending the money to get certified. I know what its like to be a young person in the Navy, not having a lot of money, and needing some thing to do thats interesting and exciting, Collins explained. All equipment is provided free for the Try Scuba experiences, however, if a student plans to continue to a certification, they will need to have a mask, fins, snorkel, booties and wetsuit. I can advise and help folks get the equipment theyll need. I do provide the BCDs (buoyancy control devices), regulators, tanks and weights in the cost of the course, he said. They must also pass a simple swim test, to make sure they are confident in the water. You dont have to

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013 7 be an Olympic swimmer to be a diver, but you have to be able to swim and be comfortable in the water. Classes are also offered to all military members, their families, retirees and Department of Defense employees. The knowledge review and pool sessions are normally conducted at the base indoor pool, with open water sessions held in various springs such as Blue Grotto, Rainbow River or Devils Den in Central Florida. Dive trips are also conducted to West Palm and Disneys Aquarium at Epcot Center. I really love Scuba. I was a little wor ried going under water the first time, but Bob makes it really comfortable. I was really surprised how well every thing has gone. Ive wanted to do this for quite some time and learned how convenient the classes were so I signed up, said AWO3 Mike Herman of VP-16, who is working on his open water certi fication. I earned my open water certification recently and absolutely enjoy Scuba div ing. Since then, Ive gone on a drift dive down Rainbow River. I think its kind of like getting a license to explore a differ ent planet because most of our Earth is covered in water so why not discover it, added Lt. Hanayo Arimoto of the Navy Entomology Center of Excellence. A Scuba Expo will be held Nov. 16 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the base indoor pool to let people get in the water to try the sport, conduct refresher training and sign up for courses. For more information on Scuba train ing offered here, call 542-2930 or e-mail scubawithbob@yahoo.com. SCUBA

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Mason. The swimmers all had an opportunity to experience what the other team has been trained to do and, as a result, gain some appreciation for the role they play in the surface or aviation commu nities. Both surface rescue and avia tion rescue swimmers go through a similar curriculum in order to earn their respective posts. The SAR component at each of our schools is virtually the same, said Reilly. However, most of the training takes place in a controlled environment like a pool or bay. Training in the Mediterranean Sea was a rare opportunity. We all found out first hand today that physical fitness is a top priority when dealing with res cues in a sea state, said McDaniel. Once fatigue takes hold, it becomes more difficult to remain objective in an emergency. Given the teams performances and the benefits of an open-ocean SAR event, Mason and HSM-74 have already begun outlining plans for the next integrated train ing exercise. We all performed as expected, said Reilly. Both teams have welltrained swimmers who did their jobs in a professional manner and had a lot of fun doing it. HSM-74, homeported at NAS Jacksonville, is embarked as part of Carrier Air Wing 3 which is currently deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibil ity. HSM-74 PARKSbecause he let me live. Im a walking miracle. He also stresses how supportive his family has been throughout the process. At the time of the shooting, Parks and his wife, Susan, had a toddler son and were expecting their daughter. I have a wonderful family and am so very grate ful to be here for them. Im thrilled to be able to play in the backyard with my children. I was feeding my daughter the other day and my son was helping make sure she ate all her food. It was such a great moment, Parks exclaimed happily. Police arrested a suspect in the shooting who may go to trial in January. I will probably be testifying in court so Im not allowed to go to the trial but I do plan to visit him to see if he needs anything because he needs Christ just like I do, Parks said. He needs to be forgiven. He needs a second chance just like I was given. In the meantime, Parks continues to set fitness goals and offer motivational talks at churches and high schools. The next challenge I hope to achieve is to complete a mud run. I just got my swim foot so I can get it wet but havent been able to run just yet, he said. But with his ambition and motivation, Parks is sure to be running around NAS Jax in the near future. To see some of his inspirational messages, find Second Shot Ministry on Facebook. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013

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CPRW-11 hosts admirals Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven (CPRW-11) hosted Commander, Naval Air Forces Vice Adm. David Buss and Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group Rear Adm. Matthew Carter Oct. 23-24. Their visits were centered around the first P-8A Poseidon deployment and meeting the Sailors who are responsible for bringing the Navys newest aircraft to initial operational capacity. The admirals toured the P-8 Integrated Training Facility, NAS Jacksonville flight line and Mobile Tactical Operations Center (MTOC) Three during the visit. The main topics of conver sation were centered on work already been completed to bring the P-8A to its current state, work still needed before the first deployment and dur ing deployment. Carter spent the afternoon talking to Sailors in order to accurately get a pulse of all maritime patrol and recon naissance aircraft (MPRA) squadrons on station. During Buss tour of MTOC Three, Sailors explained the cooperative relationship between the P-8A squadrons and the MTOCs. CWO5 Joe Chaput stated, Its an exciting time for the MRPA community and I am very happy to show off all the hard work our Sailors have put into making the P-8A such a form able weapon platform. Capt. Sean Liedman, Prospective Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven Capt. Sean Liedman and VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Curtis Phillips awarded naval flight officer (NFO) wings to 13 officers during a ceremony Oct. 25. The following officers were recog nized for their achievement: Lt. j.g. Ashley Butner, Ensign Joshua Cohen, Ensign Joshua Curry, Ensign Karmann DeBurkarte, Ensign Stuart Grinch, Ensign Matthew Hutson, Ensign Harry Lesher, Ensign Jared Lochmueller, Ensign Tobias Marczewski, Ensign James Molinari, Ensign Christopher Roberts, Ensign Justin Roberts and Ensign Christina Smith. Also in attendance was Commanding Officer, 2nd German Air Force Training Squadron Lt. Col. Arne Heitzmann to witness Marczewski, who is part of a Foreign Exchange program be awarded his wings. The program exposes naval officers from allied nations to standard U.S. naval aviation training. The recipients completed the Undergraduate Maritime Flight Officer (UMFO) syllabus at VP-30, earning their coveted wings of gold. These newly winged aviators will now enroll in the CAT I Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) syllabus at VP-30. Upon com pletion of the CAT I syllabus, they will report to operational Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance squadrons to begin their initial sea tours in either Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, Whidbey Island, Wash. or Jacksonville. The NFO training pipeline begins with Aviation Preflight Introduction (API) instruction in Pensacola, Fla. where all aviation officers undergo a classroom syllabus and are taught the basics of naval aviation which includes aerodynamics, meteorology and prin ciples of navigation. After completing API, all student NFOs report for pri mary training at VT-10, co-located at NAS Pensacola. While assigned to VT-10 they transition from a classroom learning environment to initial air borne flight training in the T-6A Texan II. Upon completion of primary flight training at NAS Pensacola, officers who are selected for the P-3, EP-3 or P-8 training pipeline report to VP-30 for specific aircraft training. VP-30 Wings Navys newest naval flight officers 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013

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Memories abound at VP-10 Heritage DayThe VP-10 Red Lancers recently had the pleasure of rolling out the red carpet for its Sailors and distin guished alumni at the inaugural Red Lancer Heritage Day celebration. The alumni came from across the United States, and counted Red Lancers from as far back as the 1960s, including a former commanding officer and two command master chiefs. The days events provided an invaluable opportu nity for current and former Lancers to swap sea stories and other experiences in the squadron. This was a great experience for everyone. We were able to showcase our new spaces and interact with our alums, while they were able to see the newest maritime patrol plane in the Navy. They also shared some of their experiences in the P-3C with our junior Sailors, said Cmdr. Charles Stickney, VP-10s com manding officer. The Lancer alumni kicked off their weekend with a visit to the squadrons new home at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 511. For most of the alumni, this was their first visit to the squadron since VP-10s homeport change in 2009 from NAS Brunswick, Maine. They were greeted with personal tours of the spaces; a social breakfast with the CO, XO, and CMC; and briefs on VP-10s operations and upcoming transition to the P-8A. The alumni were then invited to participate in the squadrons safety stand down where the aircrew pro vided a tour of the familiar P-3 Orion, as well as a look at the P-8A Poseidon. The aircraft tours allowed both current Red Lancers and the visiting alumni the opportunity to check out the newest production air craft coming into the fleet that the squadron will be transitioning to in 2015. Following the aircraft tours, the entire Lancer fam ily sat down for a barbeque lunch in the squadron hangar. It was great to have an opportunity to sit down and listen to some of the experiences that the alumni had and compare them to our own, said AWO2 Marcus Ditch. It was a fitting end to a day that combined tradition, history and safety, while allow ing everyone to celebrate 39 years and 240,000 mishap free flight hours. CSADD can be key to advancement for junior SailorsJoining the Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) can be a smart move for careerminded junior Sailors at NAS Jacksonville. NAS Jax Security Department Senior Enlisted Advisor MACM Edward Santiago said, CSADD pro vides opportunities for those with personal issues, such as drinking and smoking cessation, or family concerns, who may feel more comfortable reaching out to a fellow junior Sailor rather than talking with someone in their chain of command. CSAAD is a peer mentoring program for active and reserve Sailors, Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) candidates, and Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) cadets aimed at promoting good decision-making and leadership development at the most junior levels. The program exists as a way for junior Sailors to guide their shipmates from making decisions detri mental to their careers, as well as foster an environ ment of mentoring and support within the enlisted levels. CSAAD community events include: take down and hand out water. CSAAD fundraising events include: at 2 p.m. Five-player teams.For more info, contact AC3 Ray (alexis.ray@navy.mil), or MAC Henderson (vanessa.henderson@navy.mil). JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013 11

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Camp Blanding Joint Training Center to evaluate aerial techniques of con trolling the Aedes aegypti mosquito in urban settings, said NECE Officer in Charge Capt. Eric Hoffman. He added, Reducing adult popula tions by aerial insecticide application have shown mixed results. However, advances in aerial application technol ogy that deliver smaller droplets may result in an effective control method to reduce the risk of human disease transmitted by blood-feeding insects while positively impacting readiness and global public health. Lt. Col. Mark Breidenbaugh, an entomologist with the Air Force aer ial spray flight, said This mission is looking at how to control the dengue vector a particular mosquito named Aedes aegypti that is found globally in tropical or sub-tropical areas such as Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Central and South America, said Breidenbaugh. We help provide scientific and techni cal expertise on how to control insects of medical importance. With this spe cially equipped aircraft, were develop ing instructions that deliver pesticides in a safe and environmentally friendly manner. Maj. Peter Nunn an Army entomolo gist who is currently stationed at NECE, said This project is an excellent repre sentation of how valuable collaboration between different government organi zations can be to the military. Joint field operations like these allow us to lever age outside resources while increas ing our ability to protect the deployed war fighter. According to the Florida Department of Health, dengue viruses are related to those that cause West Nile infection and yellow fever.Globally, there are an estimated 50 to 100 mil lion cases per year. Dengue infection is acquired through the bite of certain species of mosquitoes, primarily Aedes aegypti but also Aedes albopictus -both of which are present in Florida. In 2013, more than 20 people in Floridas Martin County developed den gue symptoms. Dengue fever is rarely fatal. Symptoms include sudden onset of fever, severe headache, eye pain, muscle and joint pain. Symptoms usually lasts 4-7 days. The disease is often diagnosed incorrectly because the symptoms are similar to influenza and other viruses. Dengue can largely be prevented by taking personal protective measures against mosquitoes by using insect repellent and staying inside when mos quitoes are biting. Breidenbaugh explained, This mos quito is tough to kill because it moves indoors and lives with us hiding in closets and the folds of clothes. So were using Camp Blanding Joint Training Center and its urban warfare range to emulate housing targeted by dengue mosquitoes. Specifically, we want to see how pesticides delivered by airplane can penetrate into housing areas and kill these mosquitoes. Air Force entomologists tested nozzle configurations for different size drop lets that were sprayed from the C-130H aircraft. NECE entomologists handled mos quitoes and gathered pesticide droplets on the ground at Camp Blanding. Applied at one ounce per acre, its like using an aerosol shot glass of pesticide and distributing it over a football field. About 30 gallons of pesticide was used. DENGUE 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013

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The VP-26 Tridents recent ly sent Combat Air Crew Nine (CAC-9) to represent Carrier Task Group 72.2 in the island nation of Palau where they aided Palaus government in assuring fishing activity in their exclusive economic zone and national fisheries com plied with international law. Departing Kadena Air Base and accompanied by their team of maintenance pro fessionals, the crew made the four-hour flight to Palau International Airport, out of which they operated for a week. The Republic of Palau, a sov ereign state, has signed The Compact of Free Association with the United States. The compact established a free and voluntary association between the U.S. and the Republic of Palau, in addi tion to the Federated States of Micronesia and the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Its primary focus is on the issues of military relations and economic assistance. Palau has no independent military and relies on the United States for its defense. The overarching purpose of the detachment was to support an operation named Kuru Kuru 13 which involved patrolling the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of Palau for illegal fish ing. This is imperative to the eco nomic well-being of the nation, as fishing is one of their key economic pillars along with tourism and subsistence farm ing. During the six-day detach ment, CAC-9 flew three flights in support of Kuru Kuru-13, monitoring Palaus fisheries, identifying vessels illegally fishing the nations EEZ, which is internationally recognized as extending 200 miles out to sea from their coastlines. The detachment was a resounding success. CAC-9 covered more than 260,000 square miles of ocean, iden tifying more than 130 ves sels via radar, the Automatic Identification System (AIS), and visual scan. Of the 130 ves sels located, 13 were deemed vessels of interest and were turned over to the authorities. CAC-9 covered both the Northern and Southern EEZ regions as well as portions of the Number One High Seas Pocket, a wide area of the Pacific containing Palau, Micronesia, Papua New Guinea and Indonesia, which has been closed to commercial fishing in order to protect migratory spe cies, such as the Pacific tuna. Kuru Kuru 13 was a an out standing opportunity to dem onstrate U.S. commitment to maritime security in the region and to assist the Republic of Palau in developing its capa bilities, said Cmdr. Mark Sohaney, VP-26 commanding officer and commander, Task Group 72.2. When not flying, detach ment personnel were able to mingle with the local culture and explore the beautiful land scape of Palau, which boasts some of the worlds most beau tiful beaches. Additionally, the presence of a U.S. Navy P-3C aircraft drew the attention of the local community. A stat ic display of the aircraft was scheduled by the U.S. Embassy and tours were provided to interested personnel. Particular interest came from members of local emer gency response crews based at Palau International Airport. The local fire chief explained that, this tour and visit has been incredibly beneficial to us as an emergency response team. Getting to view the air craft at a close distance allows us to provide better assistance in the future in the event of an emergency. CAC-9 and their mainte nance support personnel also took time to become famil iar with the law enforcement assets of Palau. Tours were arranged by Lt. Cmdr. Alan Willmore of the Australian Navy, who acts as the mili tary liaison and maritime security adviser to Palau. The U.S. Sailors toured the PSS Remeliik, a Pacific class patrol boat manufactured by Australia and given to 12 differ ent island nations throughout Oceania. The detachment provid ed a valuable opportunity to enhance regional mari time security and develop the interoperability between the U.S. Navy and Palaus law enforcement agencies.SURFLANT force master chief turns over Commander, Naval Surface Force Atlantic (SURFLANT) held a Force Master Chief Change of Charge ceremony Oct. 31, at their new Naval Station Norfolk location. Just one day before officially opening the new SURFLANT headquarters, Force Master Chief (FORCM) FORCM Susan Suz Whitman relieved FORCM(SW/AW) James Williams. Williams is set to retire in January after serving the Navy for 30 years. It went by fast, said Williams. It went by very fast and thats an indicator of being somewhere you liked to be. Looking back, Williams was very proud of the prog ress made within the chiefs mess and the direction the Navy is headed with the Sailors the Navy is bring ing in. I love seeing the younger Sailors coming into the Navy today and how awesome they are, how much smarter they are and how bright of a future, not just that they have, but that the Navy has as well. The Navy is going to be 110 percent better as this new generation takes over. Its just been awesome seeing the transi tion, he said. Combat Aircrew 9 travels to Palau to enforce fisheries JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013 13

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VP-5 opened its doors to former Mad Foxes who were in town Oct. 19 as part of the annual VP-5 Alumni Association reunion. The former Mad Foxes took the opportunity to share sea stories and tour the Navys newest Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft asset, the P-8A Poseidon. The VP-5 Alumni Association started hosting reunions in 1980. Prior to 1980, former members of VPB-135 (which was the squadrons name before it was des ignated VP-5) met in Seattle, Wash. With the desire to have a reunion closer to where these Mad Foxes had served, they started the VP-5 Alumni Association and hosted their reunions in Jacksonville. The first reunion we had 35 Mad Foxes show up. Today we have 130, explained retired AWC Ernest Nick Mulich, who served from 1961-63 with VP-5. We always have a good turnout, but this year the alumni were very eager to attend the event given the opportunity to tour the P8-A Poseidon. With the opportunity to tour the P8-A Poseidon, former Mad Foxes attended the reunion from as far east as Spain and Sweden. The oldest guest in attendance was CWO David Williamson, 91, who served in VP-5 from 1959-61 as an chief avia tion electrician. Another former Mad Fox, retired AWC Roger Straley, was the first person to locate the re-entry pod of Astronaut Virgil Gus Grissom, the second American in space. Former VP-5 Commanding Officer retired Capt. Charles Conley, who served as both executive officer and commanding officer from 1978-79, made the trip down from his home in Lakewood, N.J. When the Mad Fox Alumni arrived, they were greeted by current squadron members in the hangar. Current Mad Foxes were afforded the opportunity to learn about the rich tradition of VP-5 from those that forged it. The Mad Foxes then returned the favor and gave the alumni guests and their families a guided tour of the P8-A Poseidon. After the tour, former Mad Foxes were shown around the squadron spaces and viewed a video showcasing the squad rons history. VP-5 Mad Fox alumni tour new aircraft during association reunion 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013

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The Navys newest variant of the Fire Scout unmanned heli copter completed its first day of test flights Oct. 31 at Naval Base Ventura County at Point Mugu, Calif. The MQ-8C Fire Scout took off and flew for seven minutes in restricted airspace to vali date the autonomous control systems. The second flight was also flown in a pattern around the airfield, reaching an alti tude of 500 feet. The MQ-8C air vehicle upgrade will provide longer endurance, range and greater payload capability than the MQ-8B, which is currently operating on board the guidedmissile frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts. The MQ-8C is a larger air vehicle, has a range of 150 nau tical miles and a payload capac ity of more than 700 pounds. It is a big accomplishment for the integrated government and industry team to fly this air vehicle for the first time, said Capt. Patrick Smith, Fire Scout program manager at Patuxent River, Md. MQ-8C will require fewer aircraft [than the MQ-8B] to operate at maximum perfor mance and will meet the U.S. Africa and Special Operation Commands urgent needs requirement. The MQ-8Cs will conduct ini tial shipboard testing on guided missile destroyers (DDG)-class ships but the program is looking into supporting littoral combat ship (LCS) missions. The Navy will continue to use the MQ-8B as it phases in the MQ-8C. Lessons learned from MQ-8B have been applied to MQ-8C variant, Smith said. Initial operating capabil ity for the MQ-8C is planned for 2016, with a potential for early deployment in 2014. The project to improve storm water drainage from grassy areas between the runways at NAS Jacksonville is proceeding on schedule. This project began months ago with construc tion of fabric form concrete storm water outfalls along the St. Johns River, said Deputy Airfield Facilities Manager Winston Rogers. Managing storm water collection and discharge is vital to keeping our runways free from flooding. The goal here is to eliminate stand ing water on the airfield after torrential downpours. Rogers added that the outfall improvements aid in wildlife control by creating a clean and clear habitat that is not attractive to birds, reptiles and small mammals an important issue in air field management. Now, were preparing to grade this 33-acre grass sec tion of the airfield so rain water is directed to the exist ing drains and then flows to an outfall at the river. Mark Barton, site super visor with BGCO Inc., explained that his crew uses a mixer machine to turn over the grass and dirt. This allows the grader to more precisely finish con touring the acreage and direct storm water flow into the central drain boxes. Upon comple tion of grading, acreage within 50 feet of the runway will get sod and the rest will be seeded to prevent erosion, said Barton. First flight of new Fire Scout unmanned copter Airfield drainage project moves forward JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013 15

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It was the perfect day for the NAS Jax Monster Dash Oct. 31 as 132 runners turned out to participate in the 5K run decked out in some of their favorite character costumes. The event was coordinated by the NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department (MWR). Placing first overall and first in the mens 40-44 cat egory was Lt. Cmdr. David Kummings of the Center for Naval Technical Training Unit Jax with a time of 20:03. Sarah Reed of Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast took first in the womens 35-39 category and was the first female to cross the finish line with a time of 26:30. Other winners were: Mens 19 and under First Jason Kilgore, 20:33 Second Gavin Baker, 39:54 Womens 19 and under First None Second None Mens 20-24 First John Prokop, 27:46 Second Stanley Norton, 30:28 Womens 20-24 First Josephine Tripi, 27:49 Second Andretia Pinkney, 32:35 Mens 25-29 First Robert Garske, 23:15 Second Thomas MacIntyre, 24:41 Womens 25-29 First Brooke Tijerina, 26:00 Second Elizabeth Lienhart, 27:14 Mens 30-34 First Daniel Sears, 21:35 Second Allen Mathis, 21:51 Womens 30-34 First Melissa Gomez, 22:13 Second Christine Doss, 25:43 Mens 35-39 First Joe Kovacocy, 20:41 Second Doug Herin, 22:20 Womens 35-39 Second Lyr McWatters, 23:59 Mens 40-44 Second Timothy Covey, 25:39 Womens 40-44 First Kerry Dawley, 25:55 Second Katherine Sears Mens 45-49 First William Powers, 22:32 Second Brett Tracy, 25:14 Womens 45-49 First Elaine Gallant, 35:20 Second Sandy Robinson, 36:17 Mens 50 and up First Steve Damit, 21:58 Second Stanley Lomax, 26:05 Womens 50 and up First Gloria Lohman, 27:11 Second Alice Ciani, 27:15 The next run will be the annual Turkey Trot Nov. 15 at 11:30 a.m.For more information, call 542-3239/3518. Monster Dash brings out runners For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil. 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Nov. 8, 7 p.m. Acoustic Holliday (Kenny Holliday) Deweys Family Night third Friday of the Month Deweys will be open for dinner & bev erages Nov. 15 Karaoke with Tom Turner Dec. 20 Childrens Holiday Bingo Childrens Holiday Bingo will start at 6:30 p.m. and costs of $10 per person which includes soft drinks, hot dog, dauber, bingo card and gift bag for each child. DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Youth Bowling League: Every Sat., 10:30 a.m. noon $17 annually or $8 per week. Includes shoes, awards will be given at the end of the season! Rising Stars Youth League: Every Sat., 10:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m. Pee Wee Division (6 years & under) 2 games, $6 per week. Juniors Division (7 years & older) 3 games, $8 per week. Special Stars Bowling League for fami lies with special needs children. All ages welcome! Ramps available for the non-ambulatory as well as bumpers for beginners. Runs for 10 weeks at a cost of $7 per week, shoes are included. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 pm. Thursdays: Free bowling for Active Duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 pm, Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes included. Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Oct. 19, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person, regis tration begins at noon. *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Turkey Trot 5K Nov. 15 at 11:30 a.m. Perimeter Rd. / Antenna Farm Pre-register by Nov. 8 Powerlifting Competition Feb. 8, 2014 7 a.m. at the Fitness Center $10 registration feeI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil Waves of Honor Special: Seaworld Orlando Adult $46.50, Child $42.25. Busch Gardens Tampa Adult $45, Child $40.50. Monster Jam: Club seating (includes pit pass) $42, regular seating (includes pit pass) $22. Jacksonville Jaguars: Section 147 Bud Zone, $70. Jags shuttle bus $12. Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2013 2014 Season: Tickets now available! The Artist Series Broadway in Jax 2013/14 Season: Tickets available now! Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus: Jan. 17 & 18, 2014, $51. War Horse: Feb. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $68.50. Memphis: March 22, 2014, 8 pm, $65. Million Dollar Quartet: April 26, 2014, 8 pm, $65. Soul Food Festival Special $20 General Admission $32 Preferred $42 VIP $65 Ringling Brothers Barnum & Bailey Circus $15 Veterans Memorial Arena Jan. 17-19 (call for times) ITT is now selling $18 tickets for the Harlem Globetrotters! The show is Feb. 28, 7 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Arena.The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restrict ed to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. St. Augustine Outlet Mall Trip Nov. 16 at 12 p.m. Dirty Stache Contest Nov. 16 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Nov. 12 & 26 for active duty Nov. 14 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m. Turkey Trot Golf Scramble Nov. 25, 10 a.m. shotgun start $60 entry fee, $70 for civilian guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m.Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Military Family Appreciation Carnival Nov. 16, 11 a.m. 4 p.m. Free admission, food available for pur chaseFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013 17

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Three Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville clinicians were honored during the Jacksonville Business Journals 10th annual Health Care Heroes event held at University of North Florida Oct. 31. More than 400 regional health care leaders and clinicians attended the event, which honors Northeast Florida health care professionals who improve health care and save lives. Of the 118 award nominations, 30 clinicians were recognized from var ious health care organizations such as Mayo Clinic, Baptist Health and UF Health Jacksonville. Three awardees (10 percent of all awards) were NH Jacksonville clini cians. Cmdr. James Keck, NH Jacksonville Family Medicine Residency Program coordina tor (education category); Shirley Harrison, mental health case man ager (mental health category); and Capt. Terence McGee, ophthalmolo gist (accepted by NH Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Christine Sears on his behalf) (surgeon cat egory). Key event attendees were Dawn Emerick Northeast Florida Health Planning Council President and Chief Executive Officer and guest speaker, David Sillick Jacksonville Business Journal President and Publisher, and Jeanine Arant Comcast Business Strategic Enterprise Account Executive. We know that health is not just the responsibility of clinicians everyone contributes, stated Emerick during her address. The clinicians selected were also profiled in a special section of the Nov. 1-7 issue of The Jacksonville Business Journal. DEFY team raises awareness Children with the Department of Defensesponsored Drug Education for Youth (DEFY) spent Oct. 26, raising drug awareness and handing out promotional items to shoppers outside the NAS Jacksonville Navy Exchange in support of the nationally rec ognized Red Ribbon Week. Red Ribbon Week started as an outpouring of commu nity support after the brutal murder of Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Special Agent Enrique Camarena in 1985. Citizens residing in agent Camarenas hometown of Calexico, Calif., donned red ribbons and became a voice for the prevention of illegal drugs. For their awareness event, DEFY students set up an infor mational booth and prepared Red Ribbon Week gift bags that contained red ribbons, rulers, pencils, wristbands, lapel pins and dog tags. Patrons passing by were offered the Red Ribbon Week gift bags and also given a quick history of how influential Red Ribbon Week has been in drug and violence prevention efforts. These kids have an inherent zest for life and drive to stand up and stand out, said AWO1 Jason Lankhorst, a DEFY men tor currently assigned to VP-30. The group of DEFY kids who participated in the event brought forth their passion for helping others and were determined to be positive role models as they eagerly passed out items in support for Red Ribbon Week. The DEFY students also used the event as an opportunity to share with the community what the DEFY programs core values and missions are. As they passed out drug aware ness material, the children spoke about DEFY phase one summer camp and also about the monthly meetings that incorporate fun and lessons on drug prevention efforts. Watching these kids have fun while learning to stay away from drugs brings a great deal of pride, said AWO1 Brett Aasen, one of DEFYs assistant operations program coordi nators currently assigned to VP-30. To see their excitement means that the program is working well. The DEFY program contin ues to hold monthly meetings and events to further strength en the bond between students, mentors, and the community. Naval Hospital Jax clinicians honored during Business Journals Health Care Heroes event 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013

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Dr. Jill Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden, joined Senate spouses and White House interns yesterday to help USO volunteers in putting together warrior care packs to aid wounded, injured and ill troops in their recovery pro cess. The event was hosted on the grounds of the vice presi dents residence, where Biden emphasized the importance of everyone coming together to help wounded service mem bers, citing the Joining Forces campaign she has champi oned with First Lady Michelle Obama over the last two years. This is what is really and truly important that were working together to help our troops, she said. Biden noted the event had been postponed because of the government shutdown and called the day a way to honor and support military families. Im speaking for them, she said, and I think God gave us this day as a gift so we could come out here and pack boxes. Biden said she and the vice president make every effort to visit and talk with wounded troops. She recalled meeting a service member named Cedric, who came to a barbecue the Bidens hosted for wounded warriors. He got off that bus . and he had lost both of his legs, and he had metal legs, she said. And now he is training for the Paralympics. I mean, it was just incred ible. And guess what he was training for? Mountain climb ing! It was just so incredible. He had such a beautiful spirit, a beautiful smile. USO President Sloan Gibson, who President Barack Obama nominated Sept. 10 to be the next deputy secretary of veter ans affairs, noted that all of the items being packed were spe cifically requested by troops. We know, because we sur vey regularly, he said. We know what they need, and we make those [things] available to them. When our troops come off of the line wounded, injured or ill, ... typi cally they show up with gen erally nothing more than the uniforms on their backs. Each warrior care pack included shortand longsleeved shirts, sweatshirts, shorts, tearaway pants, under wear, socks, shower shoes, fleece blankets and hygiene kits with shampoo, condition er, body wash, shaving gel and other toiletries. Biden said the items are based on requests from wound ed warriors, and expressed gratitude to everyone who pitched in to help. We have all the items that [were] requested, I think, from wounded warriors and so you are packing exactly what they want, she said. Once again, thank you for being here, and I truly appreciate it. Our troops truly appreciate it. The NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department and Fleet and Family Support Center hosted The With You All The Way! USO Tour fea turing motivational speaker and childrens author Trevor Romain Oct. 28-31. Romain, co-founder of The Comfort Crew for Military Kids, visited area elementary schools, along with the NAS Jax and NS Mayport Youth Activities Centers to offer a pre sentation to help military chil dren cope with deployment, bullying, moving, homework and other stressful issues. I am here today to help mili tary kids deal with some of the burdens they have to carry when a parent is deployed, having to move a lot, making new friends and keeping old friends. We partnered with the USO to bring this to military bases and local communities around the world, said Romain. We want to provide these kids tools to help one another, feel connected to military kids, learn how to ask for help when needed and how to tell others what is going on in their lives instead of keeping it all in, he continued. The presentation involves five key points tell people what is going on in your life, ask for help, keep a jour nal, exercise and be kind and empathetic. Weve found that by keep ing a journal or drawing helps bring out what you feel. Exercising or exerting energy also helps, Romain added. And when going through a tough time, being kind really helps your self value and may help you realize that some times others are worse off than you are. Romains presentation con sists of a short introduction, video clips from his PBS ani mated series, music video fea turing messages of support from military children around the world and an interactive session. We try to bring our message to not only military children, but those who go to school with and are friends of military kids because many times they dont understand how to support them. We try to create a peer-topeer culture where they can look out and take care of each other, stated Romain. At the end of the presenta tions, all military children were given a copy of Romains Military Empowerment Pack. Dr. Biden, USO join forces to provide warrior care packs MWR and FFSC present The With You All The Way! tour JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013 19

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013 Williams memorable 30-year Navy career began at Great Lakes, Ill., in 1984. His commands include: USS Blue Ridge (LCC 19) in Yokosuka, Japan; USS Oldendorf (DD 972) also in Yokosuka; USS Peterson (DD 969) in Norfolk and from there, he cross-decked to USS Austin (LPD 4). He then transferred to shore duty at Navy Recruiting District, Memphis, Tenn., and in September 1994, he was initiated into the chief petty officer ranks. Upon completing his recruiting tour, he reported to USS Estocin (FFG 15) and then the staff of the Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic/United States Joint Forces Command in Norfolk, where he served as Senior Enlisted Advisor for the J3 director ate. In May 2002, he reported aboard USS Nassau (LHA 4). He next reported to USS Mahan (DDG 72) and assumed the duties as Command Master Chief (CMC). His follow-on CMC billet was aboard USS Wasp (LHD 1), before wrap ping up his career at SURFLANT. At the top of his list of accomplish ments, he cited the Chief Petty Officer Waterfront Training as one of the pro grams of which he was most proud. Someone could make chief and receive their initial training at CPO 365 Phase II, but could potentially go years without any additional training, until they go to the senior enlisted academy, explained Williams. There was a gap in leadership train ing and we wanted to bridge that gap. Thats why we started it. I had an oppor tunity to get out from behind my desk and see Sailors on ships, he said, sum marizing his career. Its the best job in the Navy. Prior to reporting to SURFLANT, Whitman served as the CMC of the Naval Safety Center here. As the new senior enlisted advisor at SURFLANT, Whitman now oversees more than 23,000 Sailors assigned to more than 70 ships and nearly 30 special mission and fleet support units. I love Sailors, said Whitman. Its all about the Sailors. If Sailors are hurt ing, then something is wrong. I want them to understand theyre a part of the team, that without Sailors, those ships wouldnt go anywhere. Whitman aims to be proactive with a strong emphasis on teamwork. My goal here is to let every Sailor know their job is important, said Whitman. I want them to know, the job they do is a cog in the wheel for SURFLANTs success, that they are part of our success no matter what job it is. SURFLANT The United States fourth astronaut to fly in space and the second to orbit the Earth, U.S. Navy Cmdr. Malcolm Scott Carpenter (retired), was cele brated at his funeral Nov. 2 in St. Johns Episcopal Church in Boulder, Colo., with full mili tary honors. Carpenter, 88, died Oct. 10 at the Denver Hospice following complications from a stroke. Born in Boulder, Colo., May 1, 1925, the son of research chemist Dr. M. Scott Carpenter and Florence Kelso Noxon Carpenter, he was chris tened in St. Johns and was an active member of the church throughout his youth and life. Carpenter attended the University of Colorado from 1945 to 1949 and received a Bachelor of Science in Aeronautical Engineering. Carpenter was commis sioned in the U.S. Navy in 1949 and designated a naval avia tor in April 1951. During the Korean War he served with patrol Squadron Six, attended the Navy Test Pilot School at Patuxent River, Md., in 1954 and was subsequently assigned to the Electronics Test Division of the Naval Air Test Center at Patuxent. From 1957 to 1959 he attended the Navy General Line School and the Navy Air Intelligence School. He was exploring an unknown, and that was a way of life with him, said fel low Mercury Astronaut and Senator John Glenn. He was not only in competition with others, but in competition with himself. Scotts curiosity knew no bounds, thats just who he was. One of the last two surviv ing astronauts of Americas original space program, Project Mercury, and the last surviving original member of Mercury Seven, Carpenter was selected for the program April 9, 1959. He underwent intensive training with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), specializing in communication and navigation. He served as backup pilot for Glenn during the preparation for Americas first manned orbital space flight in February 1962. Scott was entranced by the ideas and concepts and the opportunities of Project Mercury, Glenn said. We were going to experience space flight for the first time and no one had ever done this before. Carpenter flew the sec ond American manned orbit al flight May 24, 1962. He piloted his Aurora 7 space craft through three revolu tions of the earth, reaching a maximum altitude of 164 miles. The spacecraft landed in the Atlantic Ocean about 1,000 miles southeast of Cape Canaveral after four hours and 54 minutes of flight time. Quoting Carpenter from an article in The Rocky Mountain News, NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden, Jr., said, Space flight is transcendent. It is a view of the grand plan of all things that is simply unforget table. On leave of absence from NASA, Carpenter participated in the Navys Man-in the-Sea Project as an aquanaut in the SeaLab II program off the coast of La Jolla, Calif., in the sum mer of 1965. During the 45-day experiment, Carpenter spent 30 days living and working on the ocean floor. He was team lead er for two of the three 10-man teams of Navy and civilian div ers who conducted deep-sea diving activities in a seafloor habitat at a depth of 205 feet. Carpenter, a dynamic pio neer of modern exploration, earned the unique distinc tion of being the first human to penetrate both inner and outer space, thereby acquiring the dual titles of astronaut and aquanaut from NASA. More than an astronaut, Scott was a tireless explorer, whose thirst for knowledge and commitment to service lead him to soar to uncharted places above the sky, below the earth, down into the depths of the ocean and deep into our hearts, Bolden said. In 1967, Carpenter returned to the Navys Deep Submergence Systems Project as director of aquanaut opera tions during the SeaLab III experiment. Upon retirement from the Navy in 1969, after 25 years of service, Carpenter authored several books and founded and served as chief executive officer of Sear Sciences Inc. Working closely with French oceanographer J.Y. Cousteau, he contributed to design improvements in diving instru ments, underwater breathing equipment and other underwa ter devices. Scott taught us much and left this world better than he found it, Bolden said. Carpenter is survived by his wife, Patricia Carpenter, two daughters, four sons, one granddaughter, three step-chil dren and five step-grandchil dren. The Center for Security Forces (CENSECFOR) announced Nov. 1, the anticipated release of the first apprenticeship trade for Military Working Dog (MWD) handlers by years end. The proposed apprenticeship is currently under review by the Department of Labor (DoL), which is the final step in the approval process. Once approved, Sailors, Marines and Coast Guardsman will then be able to enroll and work towards earning this unique and specialized certification. This new apprenticeship will apply to personnel performing security and law enforcement duties that work with a MWD. Some of the duties a MWD han dler performs include patrol, crowd control, security operations, and explosive and drug detection and of course, suspect apprehension, said CENSECFOR Master-at-Arms (MA) Programs manager, Jose Bautista. A handler is also responsible for the daily care, grooming and general well-being of his or her assigned MWD, which also includes the cleaning and care of the dogs kennel. Pre-registration credits will be given to personnel who have graduated MA A school and/or earned the Navy classification code for dog handler and kennel master. All of which would count towards the pro posed 2,500 hours of practical experience needed to complete the apprenticeship. Those who take advantage of these credentialing opportunities will not only enhance their military career and be set apart from their peers; they will also enhance their marketing potential in the civilian workforce when their military service is complete, said Bautista. Sailors serving in the MA rating can select from eight available apprenticeship trades that include Police Officer I, Security Specialist, Protective Security Specialist; Master Homeland Security Specialist; Armory Technician; Corrections Officer and on the horizon, Working Dog Handler. For more information about Navy credentialing opportunities, visit https://www.cool.navy.mil/index. htm. It could not be any easier for todays Sailors, said Bautista. A Sailor enrolled in an apprenticeship sim ply documents his or her military duties while work ing in his/her rate or occupational specialty and if its that easy, what Sailor would not want to enhance his or her career? The Center for Security Forces provides specialized training to more than 28,000 students each year and has 14 training locations across the U.S. and around the world Where Training Breeds Confidence. With the holiday season approach ing, Navy officials announced the launch of its annual holiday stress nav igation campaign Nov. 1. This years campaign, Thrive During the Holidays, will provide Sailors and families proactive resourc es to get ahead of holiday chaos while focusing on building resilience for the New Year. For many of us, the most wonderful time of the year is as demanding as it is joyous, said Capt. Kurt Scott, Navy resilience chief. Our Sailors and families are operat ing under more stress and uncertainty than ever this year, and planning for the holidays can be overwhelming. Our annual campaign will address every thing from financial preparations to maintaining diet and fitness goals, so that we can help everyone stay in the holiday spirit and position themselves to thrive in the New Year. Navy Operational Stress Controls 2013 Thrive During the Holidays campaign will include collaboration between Navys 21st Century Sailor programs and other readiness pro grams to offer resources on topics such as responsible alcohol use during holi day celebrations; planning and time management; budgeting; incorporat ing physical fitness into busy sched ules; healthy eating tips; spirituality and relationship fitness; and more. Our focus is helping Sailors and families proactively identify these sources of stress before things start to pile up on them, so that they can truly enjoy their holidays and do so respon sibly, said Scott. Continuing our effort to promote a sense of community, we really have something for everyone this year from families navigating the holidays with a loved one on deployment to helping Navy youths Track Santa. Engagement with the North American Aerospace Defense Commands annual NORAD Tracks Santa promotion is a new initiative for the OPNAV N171 annual holiday cam paign this year, part of an expanded effort to reach out to Navy kids. The Thrive During the Holidays campaign will continue through early January 2014. Releases can be found on Navy Operational Stress Controls blog, www.navynavstress.com, and the Navy Suicide Prevention website, www.suicide.navy.mil. Follow Navy Operational Stress Control on Twitter and Facebook @ NavStress for the latest updates to help you and your family Thrive During the Holidays. Fourth U.S. astronaut Scott Carpenter laid to restApprenticeship trade for MWD handlers on horizon On Nov. 11-18, Brides Across America will thank our heroes for their service and sacrifice by giving away free wed ding gowns to military brides for the annual nationwide event. Operation Wedding Gown is Brides Across Americas mission to give away free wedding gowns to military brides on a national effort. Often times military brides find it difficult to plan their fairy tale wed ding due to deploy ment, injury and/or economic hardship. Brides Across America and bridal salons want to roll out the red carpet for our deserving military brides making their wedding dress dreams come true. Brides Across Americas continued support and commitment has donated over 10,000 gowns to military brides. Featured in PEOPLE magazine, June 24 and Aug. 26 issues, Brides Across America is making a difference-one wedding dress at a time. This is our mission to say thank you and support our heroes, said Founder Heidi Janson. For more information on how to qualify and register for an event visit www.bridesacrossamerica.com. In order to qualify, brides or their fianc must be serving in the mili tary; either currently deployed, have a future deployment, or have been deployed within the last five years to Iraq, Afghanistan, Middle East, Korea, or Japan. Brides must pre-reg ister for the event and bring proper identifica tion along with deploy ment papers on the day of the event. Brides Across America is a nation wide 501c3 non-profit that provides free wed ding gowns to our deserving military brides-making wedding dress dreams come true. Founded in 2007, Brides Across America and its affiliate salons con tinue to honor our heroes. To date, Brides Across America, in collaboration with bridal salons, designers, and individual donations has donated more than 10,000 wedding gowns.Free wedding gowns for military brides New holiday stress navigation campaign

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22 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013 App stores are offering myPay apps claiming to make your smartphone access easier or more productive. Wrong! Other than the DFAS Info2Go app, there are no officially sanctioned myPay apps and those that are avail able only take you to the myPay mobile site already available and designed specifically for smartphones and tab lets. An application called MyPay DFAS LES was initially released on July 13, 2013 as a free application on Google Play Android App Store. The App provides the user with the ability to control their military pay after the user enters their myPay login information to access their individual account. Additionally, it provides the ability for the user to update their security questions to reset their password. Google Play estimates that between 10,000-50,000 members have already installed this App. A broader review of mobile App sites disclosed several other myPay related Apps for Android and iPhone devices. This App is not sponsored or endorsed by the Department of Defense or DFAS. Those who download and use the third party apps may even have their user names and passwords compro mised without their knowledge. The Defense Department will celebrate the accomplish ments and contributions of Native Americans and Alaska natives during November in observance of Native American Heritage Month. November was designated such as month by President George H.W. Bush in 1990. In a joint interview with American Forces Press Service and the Pentagon Channel, Joe Sarcinella, DoDs senior advisor and liaison for Native American Affairs, discussed the departments efforts to recognize Native Americans and their contributions to the country dating back to Revolutionary War. DoD is really committed to celebrating all sorts of diversity -race, ethnicity, gender, sexu al orientation, Sarcinella said. I really feel that theyre lead ing the charge and November just happens to be that time of the year when we can focus on Native Americans. In addition to his senior advi sor duties, Sarcinella manages the Native American Lands and Environment Mitigation program, which deals with cleanup of DoD activities on tribal lands and other treaty lands. Im also the lead trainer, he said. Im in charge of manag ing American Indian Cultural Communication Course and the Native Hawaiian Cultural Communication Course as well where I go ... instruct DoD personnel ... as how to consult with indigenous people. Sarcinella said he also leads outreach for tribal people. I interface with all of the federal departments and agencies on interagency collaboration and working with Native American governments. Native American Heritage Month is an opportunity for the department to recognize that contribution and the rich cultures that there are, Sarcinella said. There are 566 federally recognized tribes throughout the lower 48 [states] and Alaska. Sarcinella said the theme of this years observance is: Guiding Our Destiny with Heritage and Tradition. Many people dont real ize that the Indian Wars were fought all the way through the late 1800s, he said. But actu ally, [some American Indian] tribes were fighting right alongside colonials during the Revolutionary War. Many people today, he said, are aware of the important contributions made by the Navaho code talkers in the Pacific campaign during World War II, and Sarcinella said he believes Native Americans and Alaskan natives now have the highest per capita rate of mili tary service of any ethnic group throughout the U.S. He noted that Native Americans and Alaska natives make up almost 16,000 members of the active force, and that nearly 160,000 others are veterans. In 2008, President [George W.] Bush posthumously award ed the Congressional Medal of Honor to Woodrow Wilson Keeble, who was a Sisseton Wahpeton tribal member from Lake Traverse Sioux, and that was for his valor during the Korean War, Sarcinella said. In addition, there are about 6,000 Native American DoD civilian employees. Native Americans may con stitute a small part of the pop ulation, but we contribute a lot, Sarcinella said. The Defense Department also wants to increase those numbers through outreach. The Office of Diversity Management and Equal Opportunity -they do a lot of outreach with different profes sional organizations. Sarcinella also spoke of DoDs outreach efforts with the American Indian Sciences and Engineering Society, and SAIGE -the Society of American Indian Government Employees. University outreach is a big one too, he said. Reaching out to different tribal confer ences and gatherings, like [the] National Conference of American Indians. Sarcinella noted that President Barack Obama creat ed the White House Council on Native American Affairs, and DoD submitted its list of goals to increase outreach and part nerships with Native American governments. Its a new angle that DoD is taking, he said. Its not so much consulting with tribes but actually considering creat ing ongoing relationships with them. Its really an exciting time right now. Sarcinella said the best thing Native Americans and Alaska natives can do for themselves is professional development and education. Education is a huge prior ity in Indian Country, he noted. With that educa tion, and trying to give your self newer opportunities and develop those skill sets that you have, theres a great amount of opportunity at DoD. As Veterans Day approaches, Secretary of State John Kerry today announced a new publicprivate partnership intended to help veterans find interna tional employment opportuni ties in the private and public sectors. The Veterans Innovation Partnership, VIP as we are call ing it, is not about just what the State Department can do for veterans, its really based on the notion that veterans can do a lot for the State Department and that we would be fool ish not to try to reach out and harness the talent that exists, Kerry told an audience at the State Department. Kerry, a Vietnam veteran, said hes always believed that military experience helps vali date ways in which those with such experience can project Americas force and values abroad. Through the VIP we hope to bring together U.S. government agencies and private-sector leaders to seek out those who have served America and who are interested in international issues, Kerry said. The program will pro vide veterans with fellow ship opportunities at the State Department and other part ners in the effort, including USAID, the Overseas Private Investment Corp., and the Millennium Challenge Corp. Through VIP, Kerry said, vet erans get help finding interna tional employment opportuni ties in the private and public sectors. We need more people like Corneal Hunter, who served with the Army in Operation Desert Storm and in Kosovo and who now brings his under standing of budgeting and management as a budget ana lyst in the State Departments Bureau of Diplomatic Service, the secretary said. Kerry also mentioned Phil Schlatter, executive director of the Bureau of the Comptroller and Global Financial Services, whose 10-year career at the State Department was preced ed by 22 years of military ser vice that gave him experience at command levels and staff levels. And Joan St. Marie, whose Air Force experience in disas ter preparedness, shelter oper ations and emergency manage ment prepared her for her cur rent role in the departments Bureau of African Affairs. I am absolutely convinced of the enormous talent and capacity that veterans can bring to this department to augment what we try to do on a global basis, Kerry said, and do so with a unique credibil ity, a unique ability to validate both the values and the interest that we are trying to represent. The secretary expressed gratitude for partners who have signed up to work with the VIP program, including the University of Massachusetts in Boston and iRobot, a Bedford, Mass., robot design and man ufacturing company found ed in 1990 by Massachusetts Institute of Technology roboti cists to make practical robots. Kerry welcomed others from the private sector and civil society who wish to contribute to the VIP initiative. The bottom line is pretty simple, he said. I believe that those whove worn the uni form and gone through the training and the experience of leadership and partner ship in so many different ways ... within our armed services all have shown that they know how to serve in one capacity and through that capacity have developed a capacity to be able to serve yet again on another front. Kerry said he wants the State Department, USAID and the other VIP partners to welcome every veteran who is interested in the program. More than that, he added, we want to find them, we want to seek them out, and we want to put them back into service for their country, knowing that will make our country stronger and it will make our depart ments that much more effec tive. DoD celebrates Native American Heritage MonthSecretary of state announces public-private veterans partnership Smartphone myPay users beware

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2013 NAS JAX SOYS SCUBA VP-26 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Military bug pros collaborate against mosquitoesThe Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) at NAS Jacksonville participated with other military ser vices and public health agencies to evaluate aerial spraying techniques Oct. 29-30 in order to control the mosquito that transmits dengue fever and yellow fever to humans in urban settings. The research mission was led by the U. S. Department of AgricultureAgricultural Research Service-Center for Medical, Agriculture and Veterinary Entomology (USDA-ARS-CMAVE). In addition to USDA, were collabo rating with the Air Force 757th Airlift Squadron, and Florida National Guards Surface rescue swimmers from guided-missile destroyer USS Mason (DDG 87) and aviation rescue swimmers from the Jacksonville-based Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 74 Swamp Foxes, con ducted a combined search-andrescue (SAR) exercise in the Mediterranean Sea, Oct. 29. An MH-60R Seahawk heli copter from HSM-74 performed aerial searches and swimmer insertions while a rigid hull inflatable boat (RHIB) from Mason was used to deliver swimmers to recover simulated survivors more than two nautical miles from Mason. The goal was to provide a safe, practical and realistic training experience in accor dance with our quarterly and annual training requirements that offered the chance to apply our skills in a combined event, said AWR1 Michael Reilly, an aviation rescue swimmer assigned to HSM 74 embarked aboard Mason. HSM-74 showcased their SAR capabilities by recovering sim ulated survivors with a rescue strop and a two-person rescue basket extended from the heli copter hovering more than 50 feet above the sea. This was the first time Ive seen the rescue basket used outside of training videos or television programming, said Reilly. It was easy to control and worked well during the event. Masons RHIB-based team successfully navigated the choppy water, deployed finned surface rescue swimmers and swam simulated survivors to safety. Each team took turns alter nating between the roles of survivor or rescuer, said Ensign Timothy McDaniel, a sur face rescue swimmer aboard A little more than a year ago, AWFAN Brett Parks life was forever changed in a split second. On that fateful day, Oct. 17, 2012, Parks had just ended his day at VP-30 where he was training to become a flight engineer and headed to his part-time job as a personal trainer. While waiting for his client, he attempted to thwart a robbery and was shot in the abdomen. Today, after being saved by, as he says, a series of miracles, Parks is in top physical shape despite los ing a kidney, part of his colon, and having his right leg amputated below the knee. His days are spent working with several therapists for his medical conditions, going to doctors appointments and working out at the NAS Jax Fitness Source to build up his strength. I definitely work much harder than I did before the incident because the doctors told me if I hadnt been in such good physical shape, I would certainly have died. That gives me motivation to work as hard as I can and never take a day off. Fitness was instilled in me at a very early age and it all came into play that day I was shot, said Parks, after completing a weightlifting session at the Fitness Source. Brett is so inspiring and motivating. He is always here training to better his physical fitness standards whether its in the weight room, doing Pilates or yoga. Its just amazing to see what hes accomplished and can do, said NAS Jax Fitness Director Tanya Henigman. While he is currently on medical board hold with the Navy, Parks continues to plan for the future. If Im found fit for duty, Ill stay in and see what I can do next. The Navy has been great and my command has been very supportive but if they dont need me, Ill do other things, said Parks. He has written a book about his experiences, called Training for Life which hasnt been published yet and has created a non-profit agency called Second Shot Ministries to offer outreach programs such as speaking engagements and benefit those in need. There was so much that went on that fateful day. God was truly looking out for me from the hematoma in my abdomen that helped stop the bleed ing to all the doctors being in the right place at the right time. Thats just not coincidence. Even when I was in a coma, God was with me the whole time, he explained. Parks continued, Im not here today just live my life by going skydiving, Im here to live my life for the Lord. And thats why I started Second Shot Ministries so I can help others in need. Hes given me a second shot at life. I want to spread the word that Im alive USS Mason, HSM-74 team up for SAREX in Mediterranean Sea Sailor thrives after surviving gunshot wound one year ago

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Nov. 7 1861 Naval forces under Rear Adm. Samuel DuPont capture Port Royal Sound, S.C. 1881 Naval Advisory Board submits report recommending the new ships in U.S. Navy be constructed of steel instead of iron. 1973 War Powers Resolution becomes law. Nov. 8 1861 Capt. Charles Wilkes seizes two Confederate diplo mats from the British steamer Trent, causing an international controversy with Great Britain (known as the Trent Affair). 1942 In Operation Torch (Allied landings in French Northwest Africa), American forces land at Casablanca. French naval forces attack U.S. Navy ships resulting in 13 French ships sunk without a loss to the U.S. 1956 Navy Stratolab bal loon (Lt. Cmdrs. Malcolm Ross and M. Lee Lewis) betters world altitude record soaring to 76,000 feet above Black Hills of S.D. on flight to gather meteo rological, cosmic ray and other scientific data. 1975 More than 100 Sailors and Marines from USS Inchon (LPH-12) and USS Bagley (DE1069) fight a fire on board a Spanish merchant vessel at Palma. Nov. 9 1921 USS Olympia arrives at the Washington Navy Yard from France, carrying the body of the Unknown Soldier for internment at Arlington National Cemetery. 1950 Task Force 77 makes first attack on the Yalu River bridges in Korea. In first engagement between MIG15 and F9F jets (from USS Philippine Sea), Lt. Cmdr. William Amen (VF-111) shoots down a MIG and becomes first Navy pilot to down a jet air craft. 1956 Secretary of the Navy proposes the Polaris missile program to the Secretary of Defense. Nov. 10 1775 Congress votes to raise two battalions of Continental Marines, establishing the Marine Corps. 1941 U.S. escorted convoy WS 12, carrying 20,000 British troops to Singapore, sails from Halifax, Nova Scotia. Nov. 11 1870 Navy expedi tion to explore the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, southern Mexico, commanded by Capt. Robert Shufeldt, enters the Coatzacoalcos River to begin a survey for possible interoceanic canal. Support pro vided by USS Kansas and USS Mayflower. 1918 Armistice ends World War I. 1920 Lenah Higbee becomes the first woman to be awarded the Navy Cross for her World War I service. 1921 Washington Naval Conference begins. 1943 Two Carrier Task Forces strike Japanese shipping at Rabaul, sinking one carri er and damaging other ships. Raid was first use of SB2C Curtiss Helldivers in combat. 1954 Nov. 11 designated as Veterans Day to honor veterans of all U.S. wars. 1966 Launch of Gemini 12, with Cmdr. James Lovell Jr., the command pilot. Mission last ed three days, 22 hours and 34 minutes and included 59 orbits at an altitude of 162.7 nautical miles. Recovery by HS-11 heli copter from USS Wasp (CVS18). 1981 Commissioning of first Trident-class nuclearpowered Fleet Ballistic Missile Submarine, USS Ohio (SSBN726). Nov. 12 1912 Lt. Theodore Ellyson makes first successful launch ing of an airplane (A-3) by catapult at the Washington Navy Yard. 1940 CNO Adm. Stark submits memorandum to Secretary of the Navy on four plans if U.S. enters war. He favors the fourth, Plan Dog, calling for strong offense in the Atlantic and defense in the Pacific. 1942 First of the three days of fighting in the Battle of Guadalcanal. 1943 President Franklin Roosevelt embarks on USS Iowa (BB-61) to go to the Allied conferences at Teheran, Iran, and Cairo, Egypt. Nov. 13 1776 Capt. John Paul Jones in Alfred, and with brig Providence, captures British transport Mellish, carrying winter uniforms later used by Washingtons troops. 1942 Loss of light cruiser USS Juneau (CL-52) during Battle of Guadalcanal results in loss of five Sullivan brothers. 1943 Fifth Fleet carri ers begin long-range night bombing attacks on Japanese positions in the Gilberts and Marshall islands in prepara tion for landings. 1957 First firing of Regulus II bombardment missile. Since the ubiquitous integration of GPS into the devices of our everyday lives I have found myself off the beaten path more often. That seems counterintuitive, doesnt it? With better navigation and a hands-free, robot voice giving step-bystep directions, I should be getting from Point A to Point B more directly. Except, it seems that iPhones Siri, in particular, has a mind of her own, and I sometimes end up in unchartered territory when I follow her commands. And I do follow her commands. Dustin does not. Dustin knows better than Siri. He tempts fate by see ing the exit shes told him to take, and then passing it by because it doesnt seem like the right one. Always follow Siri, I tell him. It doesnt matter what you think. You dont know what Siri knows. Sometimes Siri can predict traffic. Sometimes she knows about detours. Shes like a wizard on the dash board, and I do not second-guess her. Even when I fear shes sending me off track. This happened last week when I headed north for a book club event in Houlton, Maine, which, for anyone south of Houlton, basically feels like Canada. Indeed, Houlton is at the very top of the map, and as I drove, I had a distinct feeling of climbing a vertical wall, like my car was literally traveling up the United States and teetering on the top. Interstate 95 is the main road to Houlton, and Im no stranger to it. When we lived in Jacksonville, Florida, I used I-95 daily. There, it passes by the Jaguars stadium and winds through high-rise buildings. When Dustin and I traveled from Jacksonville to our hometowns in Virginia, the directions basically were, get on I-95, head north for 700 miles, and then get off I-95. Since moving to Maine, we travel the northeastern part of I-95 on family vacations through Massachusetts, New York City, New Jersey and Washington, D.C. Despite minor differences, in all these areas, I-95 is basically the same. But the stretch of it that runs from Bangor, Maine, to Houlton is so different that it almost deserves another name. Here, the road signs become sparse (except for the moose warnings, of course), and there are no billboards or rest stops. There are very few exits and long stretches of road where there is nothing but pine trees. Indeed, I had a Bill Murray moment from What About Bob? when I realized I was totally alone on I-95 for about 30 minutes on my way to Houlton last week. Siri was unusually quiet. She had no instructions to give except, maybe, keep going north . for a very long time. But somewhere around Sherman, Maine, her voice pierced the silence. She wanted me to take the next exit, even though I was still about an hour away from the des tination. I was skeptical and a little afraid. But remember, I always follow Siri. I left I-95 in my rear view mirror and merged onto a long, winding road that seemed even more lonely than the one before. Now, I was terrified. What if I lost my signal and Siri left me stranded on a deserted road in northern Maine? I held my breath as I drove, but soon, general stores and empty gas stations gave way to hillsides dotted with grand, old homes with attached barns. Cows grazed in the fields. There was no hustle and bustle here. No cars zooming past. No honking, billboards or stop lights. Just quiet. And sometimes its hard to be quiet. I worried about my schedule Would I be on time? and the directions Where was I? and yet I kept following Siri. Then I came around a bend and saw the most spec tacular sight: behind the cows and the orange and red autumn leaves, Mt. Katahdin rose in the distance. Clouds hugged the top of the mountain, but sun shone all around the base. I stopped my car in the middle of the road, which didnt matter because there was no one else around. The tires landed on a pile of cow manure, and the earthy smell filled my nose as I rolled down the window to take a picture. The picture didnt do the vision justice. I moved on. Its a good thing the world is slower and less crowded up there, because I was a reckless driver peering at the views and snapping pictures at every turn. I was sad when Siri told me to get back on I-95. I dont know why the GPS sent me off the highway for 45 miles that day. There seemed to be no reason for it. On my way home, I tried to take the detour again, but Siri insisted I use I-95 instead. As I drove, I caught dis tance glimpses of the hillsides, cows and barns, and for a moment, I was insanely jealous of all those people over there, off the beaten path. Siri sent me off the beaten path Notice of upcoming NAS Jax power outages NAS Jacksonville Public Works Department has scheduled three power outages in order to safely perform required maintenance in the high volt age substation serving family housing and the Naval Hospital Jacksonville campus. Your understanding of the necessity for these power outages is sincerely appreciated because the required maintenance will greatly improve the reliability of the substation equipment and the installations overall electrical distribution system.

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Every outage has been carefully scheduled in order to minimize the impact they will have on operations and the daily lives of our family housing residents. These short term outages will pay long term dividends not only to the installation, but also to you, the cus tomer. The power outages are scheduled as follows: Nov. 16, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Several hospital campus buildings, Youth Activities Center, Child Development Center, All housing on Mustin Road south of Child Street, excluding Fleet Angel Court and Woodpecker Drive Nov. 23, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Several hospital campus buildings, Youth Center Gym, Heritage Cottages, All of Patriot Point Housing, including Fleet Angel Court and Woodpecker Drive Dec. 7, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. All of the buildings affected by the first two outages. While the contractor performing the maintenance will strive to short en the duration of each power outage, all affected tenants and family hous ing residents should plan to be without power during the hours listed above. POWER OUTAGES NAS Jacksonville announced its 2013 Sailors of the Year Oct. 25. AC1(AW) Dax Bonnett of the NAS Jax Air Operations Department has been selected as the 2013 NAS Jax Senior Sailor of the Year. I am extremely honored and grateful to be selected. Representing the Sailors of NAS Jax is a huge honor and responsibility that I will not take lightly, said Bonnett. Bonnett praises his superiors and shipmates for this prestigious recogni tion. I would like to thank my senior leadership and mentors within the chiefs mess who inspire me every day by setting the standard and by taking care of their Sailors. I would like to give a special thank-you to the professional Sailors of the Air Traffic Control (ATC) Division and Operations Department who do the heavy lifting through weekends and holidays without complaint in support of the mission, he said. Bonnett, a native of New Orleans, La. is a graduate of Archbishop Shaw High School Class of 1989. After attending the University of Southeastern Louisiana, Bonnett enlisted in the United States Navy on May 5, 1995. He completed boot camp at Recruit Training Center, Great Lakes, Ill. in July 1995 and then reported to Air Traffic Control A School at the Naval Air Technical Training Center (NATTC) in Millington, Tenn. After graduation, he served as an instruction operation station controller on the NATTC pre-commissioning team for NATTC Pensacola, Fla. where he also advanced to third class petty officer. In June 1997, Bonnett reported on board USS Independence (CV-62) where he qualified as air operation supervi sor, CASE I supervisor, PALS final con troller and radar final controller at Iwo Jima Air Base. A year later, he crossdecked to USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63). In March 1999, Bonnett reported to NAVSTA Rota, Spain where he qualified as facility watch supervisor. In February 2001, he transferred to NAF Atsugi, Japan where he qualified local control, a qualification previously not earned in 20 years by an American controller. He was also advanced to first class petty officer and qualified as a facility watch supervisor at Iwo Jima Air Base. In February 2004, Bonnett transferred to NAVSTA Mayport where he quali fied as facility watch supervisor. He then reported to NAS Sigonella, Italy before volunteering for an Individual Augmentee (IA) assignment to Anbar Providence, Iraq in February 2009 in support of Operations Iraq Freedom and New Dawn. He reported to the NAS Jax Air Operations Department in 2010 and was designated facility watch supervisor in September 2011. Bonnett was selected as the 2011 and 2012 NAS Jacksonville Air Traffic Controller of the Year and recently earned his bachelors degree in psychology. Bonnett is currently focusing his goal on earning chief anchors and to con tinue mentoring junior Sailors. He also enjoys spending time with his family. My advice for aspiring junior Sailors is to stay engaged and seek out the guidance and mentorship of those who have forged the path to success. You still have to do the heaving lifting, but it is much easier when you have the map and dont have to reinvent the wheel, said Bonnett. MA2 Keith Danalewich of the NAS Jax Security Department is the 2013 NAS Jax Sailor of the Year. Being chosen NAS Jax Sailor of the Year is truly an remarkable accom plishment. It gives my subordinates and peers someone to look up to; someone to learn from. It gives my chain of command and mentors throughout the years a pat on the back knowing that all the hard work they have put into me has done something and that they molded their replacement, said Danalewich, a native of Palos Hills, Ill. Danalewich joined the Navy in 2006. After boot camp and complet ing Master-at-Arms A School, he completed a tour at Naval Support Facility Diego Garcia. After attending Military Working Dog Handler School, he transferred to Yokosuka, Japan and completed an IA deployment to Djibouti, Africa. He reported to NAS Jax in March 2011 where he currently works as a military working dog handler. I plan to stay in the Navy and become a kennel master, said Danalewich. In his spare time, he volunteers for Duval County Special Olympics. Danalewich is grateful to his family and mentors for their continued sup port. I would like to thank my parents and brothers for being there for me and my mentors MAC Benjamin Cook, MA1 Thomas Kelly and MA1 Ronald Hughes who have been behind me the whole time, molding me and shaping me into a better Sailor, master-at-arms and dog handler, he said. He offers this advice to junior Sailors, No matter how many hours you put in, how many times you cant see a rhyme or reason for doing something, keep your head high and do things the right way. AC3 Alexis Ray of the NAS Jax Air Operations Department has been named the 2013 NAS Jax Junior Sailor of the Year. A native of Anniston, Ala., Ray joined the Navy in March 2011 and graduated from ATC A School in September 2011. She reported to the NAS Jax in October 2011 where her primary duties are to monitor aircraft and provide traffic and safety alerts. I think its an honor and a privilege to be selected as Junior Sailor of the Year. It took a lot of hard work and dedication to achieve this accomplishment, said Ray. I would like to thank God, my family and friends who have supported me throughout this year, and last but not least, my fellow shipmates who have given me every opportunity to succeed at achieving my goals. Rays future goals are to earn her bachelors degree in aeronautical sci ence and control tower operator quali fication. When shes not working, Ray spends her time volunteering for Habitat for Humanity and the Wounded Warrior Project. She is also president of the new NAS Jax Chapter of Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions. She offers this advice to her peers, keep your head up no matter how bad things may seem, and to strive to be the best Sailor you can possibly be. MASN Stephan Moore of the NAS Jax Security Department is the 2013 NAS Jax Blue Jacket of the Year. Being recognized as Blue Jacket of the Year was a major milestone in my career and Ive come a long way from when I first joined the Navy. I followed a blueprint that my leading petty offi cer provided me on how to become a successful Sailor which helps me stay motivated. I feel blessed to be in this NAS Jacksonville selects top Sailors for 2013 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013

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position, said Moore. A native of Atlanta, Moore joined the Navy in 2012, attending boot camp at RTC Great Lakes, Ill. I actually had a good experience in boot camp. I learned a lot of new things about myself. I was mentally and physically tested every day. I learned discipline and to look out for my shipmates, Moore explained. He reported to NAS Jax in May 2012 where he currently works as a patrol man. In his free time, Moore enjoys working out, playing flag football and basketball. He plans to reenlist and become a limited duty officer. I owe all my success to God who has guided all the great things in my life. I would also like to thank CWO3 Roshell Booker, MACM Ed Santiago, MAC Henderson, MA1 Kelly and MA1 Hughes for their support, said Moore. Moore also offers this advice to his peers. Strive to be the best at every thing you do in your career. I started off bad with a major hiccup and wanted to give up. I had no hope, but eventually having great mentors to motivate me every day changed my whole attitude and the hard work paid off. SOY JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013 Scuba courses return to base pool After a near year-long suspension of Scuba train ing at the NAS Jax indoor pool due to renovations, the courses have once again resumed allowing Sailors the opportunity to learn how to dive at a variety of certification levels. The Scuba Diving program, offered through the base Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department offers certifications for Junior (10 to 14 yrs old) and Open Water Scuba Divers (15 and up), Nitrox Divers, Advanced Open Water Divers, Rescue Divers, Master Scuba Diver and Pro level Dive-Masters and Instructors. The courses are taught by Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI) IDC Staff Instructor and Master Scuba Diver Trainer Bob Collins, a Navy retiree who spent much of his time conducting hull inspections and training Navy divers. Collins joined the Navy Reserves in 1969, and was stationed at Mayport as a diver for two years. After a four-year stint on active duty with the Army, he went back into the Naval Reserves for a few years before being asked to join the Navy as a ships serviceman, although he spent much of the time diving. Collins retired in 1994. Following retirement, he worked in the log home construction industry. After doing well for a number of years, it faltered due to the declining housing market, so Collins went back to scuba diving. My wife and I were on a cruise, and I asked her if I could sign up for a dive trip in Grand Cayman, which turned into several dive trips at the next stops in Cozumel, Belize and Honduras. My enthusiasm was back for an activity I loved. A short time later, I went to an Atlanta area dive shop and took courses to become a PADI instructor, said Collins. In 2007, he moved to Jacksonville and later began teaching scuba at a local dive shop. He met the folks at the Navy Rescue Swimmer School and certified several staff mem bers and who helped him become a dive instructor at the base pool. Despite the indoor pool being closed for nearly a year, Collins has continued to offer Scuba courses to Sailors at the Cecil Field Aquatic Center. I love all the improvements to the facility and being back in the NAS Jax pool to teach Scuba again. Its like being back home. Ive got people who have been putting off taking the courses because of the gym closure and now they are coming over to sign up, said Collins. Ive been teaching off base, but my heart is here. Im really happy to be back. He also stressed some of the highlights of what the program offers. I think what makes our Scuba courses so popular and makes them work so well, is that weve put together a personal program that works around each Sailor, not where the Sailor has to work around the program, he stated. And, we keep the sessions small so students get more oneon-one interaction. This personal approach is what makes us unique and successful. Session times are flexible and held at the conve nience of the student. Collins also works with the Liberty Program, offering single Sailors, a Try Scuba experience, to allow them to decide if its something they want to pursue before spending the money to get certified. I know what its like to be a young person in the Navy, not having a lot of money, and needing some thing to do thats interesting and exciting, Collins explained. All equipment is provided free for the Try Scuba experiences, however, if a student plans to continue to a certification, they will need to have a mask, fins, snorkel, booties and wetsuit. I can advise and help folks get the equipment theyll need. I do provide the BCDs (buoyancy control devices), regulators, tanks and weights in the cost of the course, he said. They must also pass a simple swim test, to make sure they are confident in the water. You dont have to

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013 7 be an Olympic swimmer to be a diver, but you have to be able to swim and be comfortable in the water. Classes are also offered to all military members, their families, retirees and Department of Defense employees. The knowledge review and pool sessions are normally conducted at the base indoor pool, with open water sessions held in various springs such as Blue Grotto, Rainbow River or Devils Den in Central Florida. Dive trips are also conducted to West Palm and Disneys Aquarium at Epcot Center. I really love Scuba. I was a little wor ried going under water the first time, but Bob makes it really comfortable. I was really surprised how well every thing has gone. Ive wanted to do this for quite some time and learned how convenient the classes were so I signed up, said AWO3 Mike Herman of VP-16, who is working on his open water certification. I earned my open water certification recently and absolutely enjoy Scuba diving. Since then, Ive gone on a drift dive down Rainbow River. I think its kind of like getting a license to explore a different planet because most of our Earth is covered in water so why not discover it, added Lt. Hanayo Arimoto of the Navy Entomology Center of Excellence. A Scuba Expo will be held Nov. 16 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the base indoor pool to let people get in the water to try the sport, conduct refresher training and sign up for courses. For more information on Scuba train ing offered here, call 542-2930 or e-mail scubawithbob@yahoo.com. SCUBA

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Mason. The swimmers all had an opportunity to experience what the other team has been trained to do and, as a result, gain some appreciation for the role they play in the surface or aviation communities. Both surface rescue and avia tion rescue swimmers go through a similar curriculum in order to earn their respective posts. The SAR component at each of our schools is virtually the same, said Reilly. However, most of the training takes place in a controlled environment like a pool or bay. Training in the Mediterranean Sea was a rare opportunity. We all found out first hand today that physical fitness is a top priority when dealing with res cues in a sea state, said McDaniel. Once fatigue takes hold, it becomes more difficult to remain objective in an emergency. Given the teams performances and the benefits of an open-ocean SAR event, Mason and HSM-74 have already begun outlining plans for the next integrated training exercise. We all performed as expected, said Reilly. Both teams have welltrained swimmers who did their jobs in a professional manner and had a lot of fun doing it. HSM-74, homeported at NAS Jacksonville, is embarked as part of Carrier Air Wing 3 which is currently deployed as part of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibil ity. HSM-74 PARKSbecause he let me live. Im a walking miracle. He also stresses how supportive his family has been throughout the process. At the time of the shooting, Parks and his wife, Susan, had a toddler son and were expecting their daughter. I have a wonderful family and am so very grate ful to be here for them. Im thrilled to be able to play in the backyard with my children. I was feeding my daughter the other day and my son was helping make sure she ate all her food. It was such a great moment, Parks exclaimed happily. Police arrested a suspect in the shooting who may go to trial in January. I will probably be testifying in court so Im not allowed to go to the trial but I do plan to visit him to see if he needs anything because he needs Christ just like I do, Parks said. He needs to be forgiven. He needs a second chance just like I was given. In the meantime, Parks continues to set fitness goals and offer motivational talks at churches and high schools. The next challenge I hope to achieve is to complete a mud run. I just got my swim foot so I can get it wet but havent been able to run just yet, he said. But with his ambition and motivation, Parks is sure to be running around NAS Jax in the near future. To see some of his inspirational messages, find Second Shot Ministry on Facebook. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013

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CPRW-11 hosts admirals Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven (CPRW-11) hosted Commander, Naval Air Forces Vice Adm. David Buss and Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group Rear Adm. Matthew Carter Oct. 23-24. Their visits were centered around the first P-8A Poseidon deployment and meeting the Sailors who are responsible for bringing the Navys newest aircraft to initial operational capacity. The admirals toured the P-8 Integrated Training Facility, NAS Jacksonville flight line and Mobile Tactical Operations Center (MTOC) Three during the visit. The main topics of conver sation were centered on work already been completed to bring the P-8A to its current state, work still needed before the first deployment and dur ing deployment. Carter spent the afternoon talking to Sailors in order to accurately get a pulse of all maritime patrol and recon naissance aircraft (MPRA) squadrons on station. During Buss tour of MTOC Three, Sailors explained the cooperative relationship between the P-8A squadrons and the MTOCs. CWO5 Joe Chaput stated, Its an exciting time for the MRPA community and I am very happy to show off all the hard work our Sailors have put into making the P-8A such a form able weapon platform. Capt. Sean Liedman, Prospective Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven Capt. Sean Liedman and VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Curtis Phillips awarded naval flight officer (NFO) wings to 13 officers during a ceremony Oct. 25. The following officers were recog nized for their achievement: Lt. j.g. Ashley Butner, Ensign Joshua Cohen, Ensign Joshua Curry, Ensign Karmann DeBurkarte, Ensign Stuart Grinch, Ensign Matthew Hutson, Ensign Harry Lesher, Ensign Jared Lochmueller, Ensign Tobias Marczewski, Ensign James Molinari, Ensign Christopher Roberts, Ensign Justin Roberts and Ensign Christina Smith. Also in attendance was Commanding Officer, 2nd German Air Force Training Squadron Lt. Col. Arne Heitzmann to witness Marczewski, who is part of a Foreign Exchange program be awarded his wings. The program exposes naval officers from allied nations to standard U.S. naval aviation training. The recipients completed the Undergraduate Maritime Flight Officer (UMFO) syllabus at VP-30, earning their coveted wings of gold. These newly winged aviators will now enroll in the CAT I Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) syllabus at VP-30. Upon com pletion of the CAT I syllabus, they will report to operational Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance squadrons to begin their initial sea tours in either Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, Whidbey Island, Wash. or Jacksonville. The NFO training pipeline begins with Aviation Preflight Introduction (API) instruction in Pensacola, Fla. where all aviation officers undergo a classroom syllabus and are taught the basics of naval aviation which includes aerodynamics, meteorology and prin ciples of navigation. After completing API, all student NFOs report for pri mary training at VT-10, co-located at NAS Pensacola. While assigned to VT-10 they transition from a classroom learning environment to initial air borne flight training in the T-6A Texan II. Upon completion of primary flight training at NAS Pensacola, officers who are selected for the P-3, EP-3 or P-8 training pipeline report to VP-30 for specific aircraft training. VP-30 Wings Navys newest naval flight officers 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013

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Memories abound at VP-10 Heritage DayThe VP-10 Red Lancers recently had the pleasure of rolling out the red carpet for its Sailors and distinguished alumni at the inaugural Red Lancer Heritage Day celebration. The alumni came from across the United States, and counted Red Lancers from as far back as the 1960s, including a former commanding officer and two command master chiefs. The days events provided an invaluable opportu nity for current and former Lancers to swap sea stories and other experiences in the squadron. This was a great experience for everyone. We were able to showcase our new spaces and interact with our alums, while they were able to see the newest maritime patrol plane in the Navy. They also shared some of their experiences in the P-3C with our junior Sailors, said Cmdr. Charles Stickney, VP-10s com manding officer. The Lancer alumni kicked off their weekend with a visit to the squadrons new home at NAS Jacksonville Hangar 511. For most of the alumni, this was their first visit to the squadron since VP-10s homeport change in 2009 from NAS Brunswick, Maine. They were greeted with personal tours of the spaces; a social breakfast with the CO, XO, and CMC; and briefs on VP-10s operations and upcoming transition to the P-8A. The alumni were then invited to participate in the squadrons safety stand down where the aircrew provided a tour of the familiar P-3 Orion, as well as a look at the P-8A Poseidon. The aircraft tours allowed both current Red Lancers and the visiting alumni the opportunity to check out the newest production air craft coming into the fleet that the squadron will be transitioning to in 2015. Following the aircraft tours, the entire Lancer family sat down for a barbeque lunch in the squadron hangar. It was great to have an opportunity to sit down and listen to some of the experiences that the alumni had and compare them to our own, said AWO2 Marcus Ditch. It was a fitting end to a day that combined tradition, history and safety, while allow ing everyone to celebrate 39 years and 240,000 mishap free flight hours. CSADD can be key to advancement for junior SailorsJoining the Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) can be a smart move for careerminded junior Sailors at NAS Jacksonville. NAS Jax Security Department Senior Enlisted Advisor MACM Edward Santiago said, CSADD pro vides opportunities for those with personal issues, such as drinking and smoking cessation, or family concerns, who may feel more comfortable reaching out to a fellow junior Sailor rather than talking with someone in their chain of command. CSAAD is a peer mentoring program for active and reserve Sailors, Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) candidates, and Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) cadets aimed at promoting good decision-making and leadership development at the most junior levels. The program exists as a way for junior Sailors to guide their shipmates from making decisions detri mental to their careers, as well as foster an environ ment of mentoring and support within the enlisted levels. CSAAD community events include: take down and hand out water. CSAAD fundraising events include: at 2 p.m. Five-player teams.For more info, contact AC3 Ray (alexis.ray@navy.mil), or MAC Henderson (vanessa.henderson@navy.mil). JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013 11

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Camp Blanding Joint Training Center to evaluate aerial techniques of con trolling the Aedes aegypti mosquito in urban settings, said NECE Officer in Charge Capt. Eric Hoffman. He added, Reducing adult popula tions by aerial insecticide application have shown mixed results. However, advances in aerial application technol ogy that deliver smaller droplets may result in an effective control method to reduce the risk of human disease transmitted by blood-feeding insects while positively impacting readiness and global public health. Lt. Col. Mark Breidenbaugh, an entomologist with the Air Force aer ial spray flight, said This mission is looking at how to control the dengue vector a particular mosquito named Aedes aegypti that is found globally in tropical or sub-tropical areas such as Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Central and South America, said Breidenbaugh. We help provide scientific and technical expertise on how to control insects of medical importance. With this spe cially equipped aircraft, were developing instructions that deliver pesticides in a safe and environmentally friendly manner. Maj. Peter Nunn an Army entomolo gist who is currently stationed at NECE, said This project is an excellent representation of how valuable collaboration between different government organi zations can be to the military. Joint field operations like these allow us to lever age outside resources while increas ing our ability to protect the deployed war fighter. According to the Florida Department of Health, dengue viruses are related to those that cause West Nile infection and yellow fever.Globally, there are an estimated 50 to 100 mil lion cases per year. Dengue infection is acquired through the bite of certain species of mosquitoes, primarily Aedes aegypti but also Aedes albopictus -both of which are present in Florida. In 2013, more than 20 people in Floridas Martin County developed dengue symptoms. Dengue fever is rarely fatal. Symptoms include sudden onset of fever, severe headache, eye pain, muscle and joint pain. Symptoms usually lasts 4-7 days. The disease is often diagnosed incorrectly because the symptoms are similar to influenza and other viruses. Dengue can largely be prevented by taking personal protective measures against mosquitoes by using insect repellent and staying inside when mosquitoes are biting. Breidenbaugh explained, This mos quito is tough to kill because it moves indoors and lives with us hiding in closets and the folds of clothes. So were using Camp Blanding Joint Training Center and its urban warfare range to emulate housing targeted by dengue mosquitoes. Specifically, we want to see how pesticides delivered by airplane can penetrate into housing areas and kill these mosquitoes. Air Force entomologists tested nozzle configurations for different size drop lets that were sprayed from the C-130H aircraft. NECE entomologists handled mos quitoes and gathered pesticide droplets on the ground at Camp Blanding. Applied at one ounce per acre, its like using an aerosol shot glass of pesticide and distributing it over a football field. About 30 gallons of pesticide was used. DENGUE 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013

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The VP-26 Tridents recent ly sent Combat Air Crew Nine (CAC-9) to represent Carrier Task Group 72.2 in the island nation of Palau where they aided Palaus government in assuring fishing activity in their exclusive economic zone and national fisheries com plied with international law. Departing Kadena Air Base and accompanied by their team of maintenance pro fessionals, the crew made the four-hour flight to Palau International Airport, out of which they operated for a week. The Republic of Palau, a sovereign state, has signed The Compact of Free Association with the United States. The compact established a free and voluntary association between the U.S. and the Republic of Palau, in addi tion to the Federated States of Micronesia and the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Its primary focus is on the issues of military relations and economic assistance. Palau has no independent military and relies on the United States for its defense. The overarching purpose of the detachment was to support an operation named Kuru Kuru 13 which involved patrolling the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of Palau for illegal fish ing. This is imperative to the economic well-being of the nation, as fishing is one of their key economic pillars along with tourism and subsistence farming. During the six-day detach ment, CAC-9 flew three flights in support of Kuru Kuru-13, monitoring Palaus fisheries, identifying vessels illegally fishing the nations EEZ, which is internationally recognized as extending 200 miles out to sea from their coastlines. The detachment was a resounding success. CAC-9 covered more than 260,000 square miles of ocean, iden tifying more than 130 ves sels via radar, the Automatic Identification System (AIS), and visual scan. Of the 130 vessels located, 13 were deemed vessels of interest and were turned over to the authorities. CAC-9 covered both the Northern and Southern EEZ regions as well as portions of the Number One High Seas Pocket, a wide area of the Pacific containing Palau, Micronesia, Papua New Guinea and Indonesia, which has been closed to commercial fishing in order to protect migratory species, such as the Pacific tuna. Kuru Kuru 13 was a an outstanding opportunity to dem onstrate U.S. commitment to maritime security in the region and to assist the Republic of Palau in developing its capa bilities, said Cmdr. Mark Sohaney, VP-26 commanding officer and commander, Task Group 72.2. When not flying, detach ment personnel were able to mingle with the local culture and explore the beautiful landscape of Palau, which boasts some of the worlds most beautiful beaches. Additionally, the presence of a U.S. Navy P-3C aircraft drew the attention of the local community. A stat ic display of the aircraft was scheduled by the U.S. Embassy and tours were provided to interested personnel. Particular interest came from members of local emer gency response crews based at Palau International Airport. The local fire chief explained that, this tour and visit has been incredibly beneficial to us as an emergency response team. Getting to view the air craft at a close distance allows us to provide better assistance in the future in the event of an emergency. CAC-9 and their mainte nance support personnel also took time to become famil iar with the law enforcement assets of Palau. Tours were arranged by Lt. Cmdr. Alan Willmore of the Australian Navy, who acts as the mili tary liaison and maritime security adviser to Palau. The U.S. Sailors toured the PSS Remeliik, a Pacific class patrol boat manufactured by Australia and given to 12 different island nations throughout Oceania. The detachment provid ed a valuable opportunity to enhance regional mari time security and develop the interoperability between the U.S. Navy and Palaus law enforcement agencies.SURFLANT force master chief turns over Commander, Naval Surface Force Atlantic (SURFLANT) held a Force Master Chief Change of Charge ceremony Oct. 31, at their new Naval Station Norfolk location. Just one day before officially opening the new SURFLANT headquarters, Force Master Chief (FORCM) FORCM Susan Suz Whitman relieved FORCM(SW/AW) James Williams. Williams is set to retire in January after serving the Navy for 30 years. It went by fast, said Williams. It went by very fast and thats an indicator of being somewhere you liked to be. Looking back, Williams was very proud of the progress made within the chiefs mess and the direction the Navy is headed with the Sailors the Navy is bringing in. I love seeing the younger Sailors coming into the Navy today and how awesome they are, how much smarter they are and how bright of a future, not just that they have, but that the Navy has as well. The Navy is going to be 110 percent better as this new generation takes over. Its just been awesome seeing the transi tion, he said. Combat Aircrew 9 travels to Palau to enforce fisheries JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013 13

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VP-5 opened its doors to former Mad Foxes who were in town Oct. 19 as part of the annual VP-5 Alumni Association reunion. The former Mad Foxes took the opportunity to share sea stories and tour the Navys newest Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft asset, the P-8A Poseidon. The VP-5 Alumni Association started hosting reunions in 1980. Prior to 1980, former members of VPB-135 (which was the squadrons name before it was des ignated VP-5) met in Seattle, Wash. With the desire to have a reunion closer to where these Mad Foxes had served, they started the VP-5 Alumni Association and hosted their reunions in Jacksonville. The first reunion we had 35 Mad Foxes show up. Today we have 130, explained retired AWC Ernest Nick Mulich, who served from 1961-63 with VP-5. We always have a good turnout, but this year the alumni were very eager to attend the event given the opportunity to tour the P8-A Poseidon. With the opportunity to tour the P8-A Poseidon, former Mad Foxes attended the reunion from as far east as Spain and Sweden. The oldest guest in attendance was CWO David Williamson, 91, who served in VP-5 from 1959-61 as an chief avia tion electrician. Another former Mad Fox, retired AWC Roger Straley, was the first person to locate the re-entry pod of Astronaut Virgil Gus Grissom, the second American in space. Former VP-5 Commanding Officer retired Capt. Charles Conley, who served as both executive officer and commanding officer from 1978-79, made the trip down from his home in Lakewood, N.J. When the Mad Fox Alumni arrived, they were greeted by current squadron members in the hangar. Current Mad Foxes were afforded the opportunity to learn about the rich tradition of VP-5 from those that forged it. The Mad Foxes then returned the favor and gave the alumni guests and their families a guided tour of the P8-A Poseidon. After the tour, former Mad Foxes were shown around the squadron spaces and viewed a video showcasing the squad rons history. VP-5 Mad Fox alumni tour new aircraft during association reunion 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013

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The Navys newest variant of the Fire Scout unmanned heli copter completed its first day of test flights Oct. 31 at Naval Base Ventura County at Point Mugu, Calif. The MQ-8C Fire Scout took off and flew for seven minutes in restricted airspace to vali date the autonomous control systems. The second flight was also flown in a pattern around the airfield, reaching an alti tude of 500 feet. The MQ-8C air vehicle upgrade will provide longer endurance, range and greater payload capability than the MQ-8B, which is currently operating on board the guidedmissile frigate USS Samuel B. Roberts. The MQ-8C is a larger air vehicle, has a range of 150 nautical miles and a payload capacity of more than 700 pounds. It is a big accomplishment for the integrated government and industry team to fly this air vehicle for the first time, said Capt. Patrick Smith, Fire Scout program manager at Patuxent River, Md. MQ-8C will require fewer aircraft [than the MQ-8B] to operate at maximum perfor mance and will meet the U.S. Africa and Special Operation Commands urgent needs requirement. The MQ-8Cs will conduct initial shipboard testing on guided missile destroyers (DDG)-class ships but the program is looking into supporting littoral combat ship (LCS) missions. The Navy will continue to use the MQ-8B as it phases in the MQ-8C. Lessons learned from MQ-8B have been applied to MQ-8C variant, Smith said. Initial operating capabil ity for the MQ-8C is planned for 2016, with a potential for early deployment in 2014. The project to improve storm water drainage from grassy areas between the runways at NAS Jacksonville is proceeding on schedule. This project began months ago with construc tion of fabric form concrete storm water outfalls along the St. Johns River, said Deputy Airfield Facilities Manager Winston Rogers. Managing storm water collection and discharge is vital to keeping our runways free from flooding. The goal here is to eliminate stand ing water on the airfield after torrential downpours. Rogers added that the outfall improvements aid in wildlife control by creating a clean and clear habitat that is not attractive to birds, reptiles and small mammals an important issue in air field management. Now, were preparing to grade this 33-acre grass section of the airfield so rain water is directed to the existing drains and then flows to an outfall at the river. Mark Barton, site super visor with BGCO Inc., explained that his crew uses a mixer machine to turn over the grass and dirt. This allows the grader to more precisely finish con touring the acreage and direct storm water flow into the central drain boxes. Upon completion of grading, acreage within 50 feet of the runway will get sod and the rest will be seeded to prevent erosion, said Barton. First flight of new Fire Scout unmanned copter Airfield drainage project moves forward JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013 15

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It was the perfect day for the NAS Jax Monster Dash Oct. 31 as 132 runners turned out to participate in the 5K run decked out in some of their favorite character costumes. The event was coordinated by the NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department (MWR). Placing first overall and first in the mens 40-44 cat egory was Lt. Cmdr. David Kummings of the Center for Naval Technical Training Unit Jax with a time of 20:03. Sarah Reed of Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast took first in the womens 35-39 category and was the first female to cross the finish line with a time of 26:30. Other winners were: Mens 19 and under First Jason Kilgore, 20:33 Second Gavin Baker, 39:54 Womens 19 and under First None Second None Mens 20-24 First John Prokop, 27:46 Second Stanley Norton, 30:28 Womens 20-24 First Josephine Tripi, 27:49 Second Andretia Pinkney, 32:35 Mens 25-29 First Robert Garske, 23:15 Second Thomas MacIntyre, 24:41 Womens 25-29 First Brooke Tijerina, 26:00 Second Elizabeth Lienhart, 27:14 Mens 30-34 First Daniel Sears, 21:35 Second Allen Mathis, 21:51 Womens 30-34 First Melissa Gomez, 22:13 Second Christine Doss, 25:43 Mens 35-39 First Joe Kovacocy, 20:41 Second Doug Herin, 22:20 Womens 35-39 Second Lyr McWatters, 23:59 Mens 40-44 Second Timothy Covey, 25:39 Womens 40-44 First Kerry Dawley, 25:55 Second Katherine Sears Mens 45-49 First William Powers, 22:32 Second Brett Tracy, 25:14 Womens 45-49 First Elaine Gallant, 35:20 Second Sandy Robinson, 36:17 Mens 50 and up First Steve Damit, 21:58 Second Stanley Lomax, 26:05 Womens 50 and up First Gloria Lohman, 27:11 Second Alice Ciani, 27:15 The next run will be the annual Turkey Trot Nov. 15 at 11:30 a.m.For more information, call 542-3239/3518. Monster Dash brings out runners For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil. 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Nov. 8, 7 p.m. Acoustic Holliday (Kenny Holliday) Deweys Family Night third Friday of the Month Deweys will be open for dinner & beverages Nov. 15 Karaoke with Tom Turner Dec. 20 Childrens Holiday Bingo Childrens Holiday Bingo will start at 6:30 p.m. and costs of $10 per person which includes soft drinks, hot dog, dauber, bingo card and gift bag for each child. DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Youth Bowling League: Every Sat., 10:30 a.m. noon $17 annually or $8 per week. Includes shoes, awards will be given at the end of the season! Rising Stars Youth League: Every Sat., 10:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m. Pee Wee Division (6 years & under) 2 games, $6 per week. Juniors Division (7 years & older) 3 games, $8 per week. Special Stars Bowling League for families with special needs children. All ages welcome! Ramps available for the non-ambulatory as well as bumpers for beginners. Runs for 10 weeks at a cost of $7 per week, shoes are included. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 pm. Thursdays: Free bowling for Active Duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4-6 pm, Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes included. Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Oct. 19, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person, registration begins at noon. *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Turkey Trot 5K Nov. 15 at 11:30 a.m. Perimeter Rd. / Antenna Farm Pre-register by Nov. 8 Powerlifting Competition Feb. 8, 2014 7 a.m. at the Fitness Center $10 registration feeI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil Waves of Honor Special: Seaworld Orlando Adult $46.50, Child $42.25. Busch Gardens Tampa Adult $45, Child $40.50. Monster Jam: Club seating (includes pit pass) $42, regular seating (includes pit pass) $22. Jacksonville Jaguars: Section 147 Bud Zone, $70. Jags shuttle bus $12. Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2013 2014 Season: Tickets now available! The Artist Series Broadway in Jax 2013/14 Season: Tickets available now! Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus: Jan. 17 & 18, 2014, $51. War Horse: Feb. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $68.50. Memphis: March 22, 2014, 8 pm, $65. Million Dollar Quartet: April 26, 2014, 8 pm, $65. Soul Food Festival Special $20 General Admission $32 Preferred $42 VIP $65 Ringling Brothers Barnum & Bailey Circus $15 Veterans Memorial Arena Jan. 17-19 (call for times) ITT is now selling $18 tickets for the Harlem Globetrotters! The show is Feb. 28, 7 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Arena.The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. St. Augustine Outlet Mall Trip Nov. 16 at 12 p.m. Dirty Stache Contest Nov. 16 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Nov. 12 & 26 for active duty Nov. 14 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m. Turkey Trot Golf Scramble Nov. 25, 10 a.m. shotgun start $60 entry fee, $70 for civilian guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m.Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Military Family Appreciation Carnival Nov. 16, 11 a.m. 4 p.m. Free admission, food available for purchaseFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013 17

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Three Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville clinicians were honored during the Jacksonville Business Journals 10th annual Health Care Heroes event held at University of North Florida Oct. 31. More than 400 regional health care leaders and clinicians attended the event, which honors Northeast Florida health care professionals who improve health care and save lives. Of the 118 award nominations, 30 clinicians were recognized from various health care organizations such as Mayo Clinic, Baptist Health and UF Health Jacksonville. Three awardees (10 percent of all awards) were NH Jacksonville clinicians. Cmdr. James Keck, NH Jacksonville Family Medicine Residency Program coordina tor (education category); Shirley Harrison, mental health case man ager (mental health category); and Capt. Terence McGee, ophthalmologist (accepted by NH Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Christine Sears on his behalf) (surgeon cat egory). Key event attendees were Dawn Emerick Northeast Florida Health Planning Council President and Chief Executive Officer and guest speaker, David Sillick Jacksonville Business Journal President and Publisher, and Jeanine Arant Comcast Business Strategic Enterprise Account Executive. We know that health is not just the responsibility of clinicians everyone contributes, stated Emerick during her address. The clinicians selected were also profiled in a special section of the Nov. 1-7 issue of The Jacksonville Business Journal. DEFY team raises awareness Children with the Department of Defensesponsored Drug Education for Youth (DEFY) spent Oct. 26, raising drug awareness and handing out promotional items to shoppers outside the NAS Jacksonville Navy Exchange in support of the nationally rec ognized Red Ribbon Week. Red Ribbon Week started as an outpouring of commu nity support after the brutal murder of Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Special Agent Enrique Camarena in 1985. Citizens residing in agent Camarenas hometown of Calexico, Calif., donned red ribbons and became a voice for the prevention of illegal drugs. For their awareness event, DEFY students set up an informational booth and prepared Red Ribbon Week gift bags that contained red ribbons, rulers, pencils, wristbands, lapel pins and dog tags. Patrons passing by were offered the Red Ribbon Week gift bags and also given a quick history of how influential Red Ribbon Week has been in drug and violence prevention efforts. These kids have an inherent zest for life and drive to stand up and stand out, said AWO1 Jason Lankhorst, a DEFY men tor currently assigned to VP-30. The group of DEFY kids who participated in the event brought forth their passion for helping others and were determined to be positive role models as they eagerly passed out items in support for Red Ribbon Week. The DEFY students also used the event as an opportunity to share with the community what the DEFY programs core values and missions are. As they passed out drug aware ness material, the children spoke about DEFY phase one summer camp and also about the monthly meetings that incorporate fun and lessons on drug prevention efforts. Watching these kids have fun while learning to stay away from drugs brings a great deal of pride, said AWO1 Brett Aasen, one of DEFYs assistant operations program coordi nators currently assigned to VP-30. To see their excitement means that the program is working well. The DEFY program contin ues to hold monthly meetings and events to further strengthen the bond between students, mentors, and the community. Naval Hospital Jax clinicians honored during Business Journals Health Care Heroes event 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013

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Dr. Jill Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden, joined Senate spouses and White House interns yesterday to help USO volunteers in putting together warrior care packs to aid wounded, injured and ill troops in their recovery process. The event was hosted on the grounds of the vice presi dents residence, where Biden emphasized the importance of everyone coming together to help wounded service mem bers, citing the Joining Forces campaign she has champi oned with First Lady Michelle Obama over the last two years. This is what is really and truly important that were working together to help our troops, she said. Biden noted the event had been postponed because of the government shutdown and called the day a way to honor and support military families. Im speaking for them, she said, and I think God gave us this day as a gift so we could come out here and pack boxes. Biden said she and the vice president make every effort to visit and talk with wounded troops. She recalled meeting a service member named Cedric, who came to a barbecue the Bidens hosted for wounded warriors. He got off that bus . and he had lost both of his legs, and he had metal legs, she said. And now he is training for the Paralympics. I mean, it was just incred ible. And guess what he was training for? Mountain climb ing! It was just so incredible. He had such a beautiful spirit, a beautiful smile. USO President Sloan Gibson, who President Barack Obama nominated Sept. 10 to be the next deputy secretary of veter ans affairs, noted that all of the items being packed were spe cifically requested by troops. We know, because we sur vey regularly, he said. We know what they need, and we make those [things] available to them. When our troops come off of the line wounded, injured or ill, ... typically they show up with gen erally nothing more than the uniforms on their backs. Each warrior care pack included shortand longsleeved shirts, sweatshirts, shorts, tearaway pants, under wear, socks, shower shoes, fleece blankets and hygiene kits with shampoo, condition er, body wash, shaving gel and other toiletries. Biden said the items are based on requests from wounded warriors, and expressed gratitude to everyone who pitched in to help. We have all the items that [were] requested, I think, from wounded warriors and so you are packing exactly what they want, she said. Once again, thank you for being here, and I truly appreciate it. Our troops truly appreciate it. The NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department and Fleet and Family Support Center hosted The With You All The Way! USO Tour fea turing motivational speaker and childrens author Trevor Romain Oct. 28-31. Romain, co-founder of The Comfort Crew for Military Kids, visited area elementary schools, along with the NAS Jax and NS Mayport Youth Activities Centers to offer a presentation to help military children cope with deployment, bullying, moving, homework and other stressful issues. I am here today to help military kids deal with some of the burdens they have to carry when a parent is deployed, having to move a lot, making new friends and keeping old friends. We partnered with the USO to bring this to military bases and local communities around the world, said Romain. We want to provide these kids tools to help one another, feel connected to military kids, learn how to ask for help when needed and how to tell others what is going on in their lives instead of keeping it all in, he continued. The presentation involves five key points tell people what is going on in your life, ask for help, keep a jour nal, exercise and be kind and empathetic. Weve found that by keeping a journal or drawing helps bring out what you feel. Exercising or exerting energy also helps, Romain added. And when going through a tough time, being kind really helps your self value and may help you realize that some times others are worse off than you are. Romains presentation consists of a short introduction, video clips from his PBS ani mated series, music video fea turing messages of support from military children around the world and an interactive session. We try to bring our message to not only military children, but those who go to school with and are friends of military kids because many times they dont understand how to support them. We try to create a peer-topeer culture where they can look out and take care of each other, stated Romain. At the end of the presenta tions, all military children were given a copy of Romains Military Empowerment Pack. Dr. Biden, USO join forces to provide warrior care packs MWR and FFSC present The With You All The Way! tour JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013 19

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013 Williams memorable 30-year Navy career began at Great Lakes, Ill., in 1984. His commands include: USS Blue Ridge (LCC 19) in Yokosuka, Japan; USS Oldendorf (DD 972) also in Yokosuka; USS Peterson (DD 969) in Norfolk and from there, he cross-decked to USS Austin (LPD 4). He then transferred to shore duty at Navy Recruiting District, Memphis, Tenn., and in September 1994, he was initiated into the chief petty officer ranks. Upon completing his recruiting tour, he reported to USS Estocin (FFG 15) and then the staff of the Supreme Allied Commander Atlantic/United States Joint Forces Command in Norfolk, where he served as Senior Enlisted Advisor for the J3 director ate. In May 2002, he reported aboard USS Nassau (LHA 4). He next reported to USS Mahan (DDG 72) and assumed the duties as Command Master Chief (CMC). His follow-on CMC billet was aboard USS Wasp (LHD 1), before wrapping up his career at SURFLANT. At the top of his list of accomplish ments, he cited the Chief Petty Officer Waterfront Training as one of the pro grams of which he was most proud. Someone could make chief and receive their initial training at CPO 365 Phase II, but could potentially go years without any additional training, until they go to the senior enlisted academy, explained Williams. There was a gap in leadership training and we wanted to bridge that gap. Thats why we started it. I had an opportunity to get out from behind my desk and see Sailors on ships, he said, summarizing his career. Its the best job in the Navy. Prior to reporting to SURFLANT, Whitman served as the CMC of the Naval Safety Center here. As the new senior enlisted advisor at SURFLANT, Whitman now oversees more than 23,000 Sailors assigned to more than 70 ships and nearly 30 special mission and fleet support units. I love Sailors, said Whitman. Its all about the Sailors. If Sailors are hurting, then something is wrong. I want them to understand theyre a part of the team, that without Sailors, those ships wouldnt go anywhere. Whitman aims to be proactive with a strong emphasis on teamwork. My goal here is to let every Sailor know their job is important, said Whitman. I want them to know, the job they do is a cog in the wheel for SURFLANTs success, that they are part of our success no matter what job it is. SURFLANT The United States fourth astronaut to fly in space and the second to orbit the Earth, U.S. Navy Cmdr. Malcolm Scott Carpenter (retired), was cele brated at his funeral Nov. 2 in St. Johns Episcopal Church in Boulder, Colo., with full mili tary honors. Carpenter, 88, died Oct. 10 at the Denver Hospice following complications from a stroke. Born in Boulder, Colo., May 1, 1925, the son of research chemist Dr. M. Scott Carpenter and Florence Kelso Noxon Carpenter, he was chris tened in St. Johns and was an active member of the church throughout his youth and life. Carpenter attended the University of Colorado from 1945 to 1949 and received a Bachelor of Science in Aeronautical Engineering. Carpenter was commis sioned in the U.S. Navy in 1949 and designated a naval avia tor in April 1951. During the Korean War he served with patrol Squadron Six, attended the Navy Test Pilot School at Patuxent River, Md., in 1954 and was subsequently assigned to the Electronics Test Division of the Naval Air Test Center at Patuxent. From 1957 to 1959 he attended the Navy General Line School and the Navy Air Intelligence School. He was exploring an unknown, and that was a way of life with him, said fel low Mercury Astronaut and Senator John Glenn. He was not only in competition with others, but in competition with himself. Scotts curiosity knew no bounds, thats just who he was. One of the last two surviv ing astronauts of Americas original space program, Project Mercury, and the last surviving original member of Mercury Seven, Carpenter was selected for the program April 9, 1959. He underwent intensive training with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), specializing in communication and navigation. He served as backup pilot for Glenn during the preparation for Americas first manned orbital space flight in February 1962. Scott was entranced by the ideas and concepts and the opportunities of Project Mercury, Glenn said. We were going to experience space flight for the first time and no one had ever done this before. Carpenter flew the sec ond American manned orbit al flight May 24, 1962. He piloted his Aurora 7 space craft through three revolu tions of the earth, reaching a maximum altitude of 164 miles. The spacecraft landed in the Atlantic Ocean about 1,000 miles southeast of Cape Canaveral after four hours and 54 minutes of flight time. Quoting Carpenter from an article in The Rocky Mountain News, NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden, Jr., said, Space flight is transcendent. It is a view of the grand plan of all things that is simply unforget table. On leave of absence from NASA, Carpenter participated in the Navys Man-in the-Sea Project as an aquanaut in the SeaLab II program off the coast of La Jolla, Calif., in the sum mer of 1965. During the 45-day experiment, Carpenter spent 30 days living and working on the ocean floor. He was team leader for two of the three 10-man teams of Navy and civilian divers who conducted deep-sea diving activities in a seafloor habitat at a depth of 205 feet. Carpenter, a dynamic pio neer of modern exploration, earned the unique distinc tion of being the first human to penetrate both inner and outer space, thereby acquiring the dual titles of astronaut and aquanaut from NASA. More than an astronaut, Scott was a tireless explorer, whose thirst for knowledge and commitment to service lead him to soar to uncharted places above the sky, below the earth, down into the depths of the ocean and deep into our hearts, Bolden said. In 1967, Carpenter returned to the Navys Deep Submergence Systems Project as director of aquanaut opera tions during the SeaLab III experiment. Upon retirement from the Navy in 1969, after 25 years of service, Carpenter authored several books and founded and served as chief executive officer of Sear Sciences Inc. Working closely with French oceanographer J.Y. Cousteau, he contributed to design improvements in diving instru ments, underwater breathing equipment and other underwa ter devices. Scott taught us much and left this world better than he found it, Bolden said. Carpenter is survived by his wife, Patricia Carpenter, two daughters, four sons, one granddaughter, three step-chil dren and five step-grandchil dren. The Center for Security Forces (CENSECFOR) announced Nov. 1, the anticipated release of the first apprenticeship trade for Military Working Dog (MWD) handlers by years end. The proposed apprenticeship is currently under review by the Department of Labor (DoL), which is the final step in the approval process. Once approved, Sailors, Marines and Coast Guardsman will then be able to enroll and work towards earning this unique and specialized certification. This new apprenticeship will apply to personnel performing security and law enforcement duties that work with a MWD. Some of the duties a MWD han dler performs include patrol, crowd control, security operations, and explosive and drug detection and of course, suspect apprehension, said CENSECFOR Master-at-Arms (MA) Programs manager, Jose Bautista. A handler is also responsible for the daily care, grooming and general well-being of his or her assigned MWD, which also includes the cleaning and care of the dogs kennel. Pre-registration credits will be given to personnel who have graduated MA A school and/or earned the Navy classification code for dog handler and kennel master. All of which would count towards the pro posed 2,500 hours of practical experience needed to complete the apprenticeship. Those who take advantage of these credentialing opportunities will not only enhance their military career and be set apart from their peers; they will also enhance their marketing potential in the civilian workforce when their military service is complete, said Bautista. Sailors serving in the MA rating can select from eight available apprenticeship trades that include Police Officer I, Security Specialist, Protective Security Specialist; Master Homeland Security Specialist; Armory Technician; Corrections Officer and on the horizon, Working Dog Handler. For more information about Navy credentialing opportunities, visit https://www.cool.navy.mil/index. htm. It could not be any easier for todays Sailors, said Bautista. A Sailor enrolled in an apprenticeship simply documents his or her military duties while working in his/her rate or occupational specialty and if its that easy, what Sailor would not want to enhance his or her career? The Center for Security Forces provides specialized training to more than 28,000 students each year and has 14 training locations across the U.S. and around the world Where Training Breeds Confidence. With the holiday season approach ing, Navy officials announced the launch of its annual holiday stress navigation campaign Nov. 1. This years campaign, Thrive During the Holidays, will provide Sailors and families proactive resources to get ahead of holiday chaos while focusing on building resilience for the New Year. For many of us, the most wonderful time of the year is as demanding as it is joyous, said Capt. Kurt Scott, Navy resilience chief. Our Sailors and families are operating under more stress and uncertainty than ever this year, and planning for the holidays can be overwhelming. Our annual campaign will address every thing from financial preparations to maintaining diet and fitness goals, so that we can help everyone stay in the holiday spirit and position themselves to thrive in the New Year. Navy Operational Stress Controls 2013 Thrive During the Holidays campaign will include collaboration between Navys 21st Century Sailor programs and other readiness pro grams to offer resources on topics such as responsible alcohol use during holiday celebrations; planning and time management; budgeting; incorporat ing physical fitness into busy sched ules; healthy eating tips; spirituality and relationship fitness; and more. Our focus is helping Sailors and families proactively identify these sources of stress before things start to pile up on them, so that they can truly enjoy their holidays and do so responsibly, said Scott. Continuing our effort to promote a sense of community, we really have something for everyone this year from families navigating the holidays with a loved one on deployment to helping Navy youths Track Santa. Engagement with the North American Aerospace Defense Commands annual NORAD Tracks Santa promotion is a new initiative for the OPNAV N171 annual holiday campaign this year, part of an expanded effort to reach out to Navy kids. The Thrive During the Holidays campaign will continue through early January 2014. Releases can be found on Navy Operational Stress Controls blog, www.navynavstress.com, and the Navy Suicide Prevention website, www.suicide.navy.mil. Follow Navy Operational Stress Control on Twitter and Facebook @ NavStress for the latest updates to help you and your family Thrive During the Holidays. Fourth U.S. astronaut Scott Carpenter laid to restApprenticeship trade for MWD handlers on horizon On Nov. 11-18, Brides Across America will thank our heroes for their service and sacrifice by giving away free wed ding gowns to military brides for the annual nationwide event. Operation Wedding Gown is Brides Across Americas mission to give away free wedding gowns to military brides on a national effort. Often times military brides find it difficult to plan their fairy tale wed ding due to deploy ment, injury and/or economic hardship. Brides Across America and bridal salons want to roll out the red carpet for our deserving military brides making their wedding dress dreams come true. Brides Across Americas continued support and commitment has donated over 10,000 gowns to military brides. Featured in PEOPLE magazine, June 24 and Aug. 26 issues, Brides Across America is making a difference-one wedding dress at a time. This is our mission to say thank you and support our heroes, said Founder Heidi Janson. For more information on how to qualify and register for an event visit www.bridesacrossamerica.com. In order to qualify, brides or their fianc must be serving in the mili tary; either currently deployed, have a future deployment, or have been deployed within the last five years to Iraq, Afghanistan, Middle East, Korea, or Japan. Brides must pre-reg ister for the event and bring proper identification along with deployment papers on the day of the event. Brides Across America is a nation wide 501c3 non-profit that provides free wed ding gowns to our deserving military brides-making wedding dress dreams come true. Founded in 2007, Brides Across America and its affiliate salons con tinue to honor our heroes. To date, Brides Across America, in collaboration with bridal salons, designers, and individual donations has donated more than 10,000 wedding gowns.Free wedding gowns for military brides New holiday stress navigation campaign

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22 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013 App stores are offering myPay apps claiming to make your smartphone access easier or more productive. Wrong! Other than the DFAS Info2Go app, there are no officially sanctioned myPay apps and those that are avail able only take you to the myPay mobile site already available and designed specifically for smartphones and tab lets. An application called MyPay DFAS LES was initially released on July 13, 2013 as a free application on Google Play Android App Store. The App provides the user with the ability to control their military pay after the user enters their myPay login information to access their individual account. Additionally, it provides the ability for the user to update their security questions to reset their password. Google Play estimates that between 10,000-50,000 members have already installed this App. A broader review of mobile App sites disclosed several other myPay related Apps for Android and iPhone devices. This App is not sponsored or endorsed by the Department of Defense or DFAS. Those who download and use the third party apps may even have their user names and passwords compro mised without their knowledge. The Defense Department will celebrate the accomplish ments and contributions of Native Americans and Alaska natives during November in observance of Native American Heritage Month. November was designated such as month by President George H.W. Bush in 1990. In a joint interview with American Forces Press Service and the Pentagon Channel, Joe Sarcinella, DoDs senior advisor and liaison for Native American Affairs, discussed the departments efforts to recognize Native Americans and their contributions to the country dating back to Revolutionary War. DoD is really committed to celebrating all sorts of diversity -race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, Sarcinella said. I really feel that theyre lead ing the charge and November just happens to be that time of the year when we can focus on Native Americans. In addition to his senior advisor duties, Sarcinella manages the Native American Lands and Environment Mitigation program, which deals with cleanup of DoD activities on tribal lands and other treaty lands. Im also the lead trainer, he said. Im in charge of managing American Indian Cultural Communication Course and the Native Hawaiian Cultural Communication Course as well where I go ... instruct DoD personnel ... as how to consult with indigenous people. Sarcinella said he also leads outreach for tribal people. I interface with all of the federal departments and agencies on interagency collaboration and working with Native American governments. Native American Heritage Month is an opportunity for the department to recognize that contribution and the rich cultures that there are, Sarcinella said. There are 566 federally recognized tribes throughout the lower 48 [states] and Alaska. Sarcinella said the theme of this years observance is: Guiding Our Destiny with Heritage and Tradition. Many people dont real ize that the Indian Wars were fought all the way through the late 1800s, he said. But actu ally, [some American Indian] tribes were fighting right alongside colonials during the Revolutionary War. Many people today, he said, are aware of the important contributions made by the Navaho code talkers in the Pacific campaign during World War II, and Sarcinella said he believes Native Americans and Alaskan natives now have the highest per capita rate of military service of any ethnic group throughout the U.S. He noted that Native Americans and Alaska natives make up almost 16,000 members of the active force, and that nearly 160,000 others are veterans. In 2008, President [George W.] Bush posthumously awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor to Woodrow Wilson Keeble, who was a Sisseton Wahpeton tribal member from Lake Traverse Sioux, and that was for his valor during the Korean War, Sarcinella said. In addition, there are about 6,000 Native American DoD civilian employees. Native Americans may con stitute a small part of the population, but we contribute a lot, Sarcinella said. The Defense Department also wants to increase those numbers through outreach. The Office of Diversity Management and Equal Opportunity -they do a lot of outreach with different professional organizations. Sarcinella also spoke of DoDs outreach efforts with the American Indian Sciences and Engineering Society, and SAIGE -the Society of American Indian Government Employees. University outreach is a big one too, he said. Reaching out to different tribal confer ences and gatherings, like [the] National Conference of American Indians. Sarcinella noted that President Barack Obama created the White House Council on Native American Affairs, and DoD submitted its list of goals to increase outreach and partnerships with Native American governments. Its a new angle that DoD is taking, he said. Its not so much consulting with tribes but actually considering creating ongoing relationships with them. Its really an exciting time right now. Sarcinella said the best thing Native Americans and Alaska natives can do for themselves is professional development and education. Education is a huge prior ity in Indian Country, he noted. With that educa tion, and trying to give your self newer opportunities and develop those skill sets that you have, theres a great amount of opportunity at DoD. As Veterans Day approaches, Secretary of State John Kerry today announced a new publicprivate partnership intended to help veterans find interna tional employment opportuni ties in the private and public sectors. The Veterans Innovation Partnership, VIP as we are calling it, is not about just what the State Department can do for veterans, its really based on the notion that veterans can do a lot for the State Department and that we would be fool ish not to try to reach out and harness the talent that exists, Kerry told an audience at the State Department. Kerry, a Vietnam veteran, said hes always believed that military experience helps validate ways in which those with such experience can project Americas force and values abroad. Through the VIP we hope to bring together U.S. government agencies and private-sector leaders to seek out those who have served America and who are interested in international issues, Kerry said. The program will pro vide veterans with fellow ship opportunities at the State Department and other part ners in the effort, including USAID, the Overseas Private Investment Corp., and the Millennium Challenge Corp. Through VIP, Kerry said, veterans get help finding interna tional employment opportuni ties in the private and public sectors. We need more people like Corneal Hunter, who served with the Army in Operation Desert Storm and in Kosovo and who now brings his understanding of budgeting and management as a budget ana lyst in the State Departments Bureau of Diplomatic Service, the secretary said. Kerry also mentioned Phil Schlatter, executive director of the Bureau of the Comptroller and Global Financial Services, whose 10-year career at the State Department was preced ed by 22 years of military ser vice that gave him experience at command levels and staff levels. And Joan St. Marie, whose Air Force experience in disas ter preparedness, shelter oper ations and emergency management prepared her for her cur rent role in the departments Bureau of African Affairs. I am absolutely convinced of the enormous talent and capacity that veterans can bring to this department to augment what we try to do on a global basis, Kerry said, and do so with a unique credibil ity, a unique ability to validate both the values and the interest that we are trying to represent. The secretary expressed gratitude for partners who have signed up to work with the VIP program, including the University of Massachusetts in Boston and iRobot, a Bedford, Mass., robot design and man ufacturing company found ed in 1990 by Massachusetts Institute of Technology roboticists to make practical robots. Kerry welcomed others from the private sector and civil society who wish to contribute to the VIP initiative. The bottom line is pretty simple, he said. I believe that those whove worn the uni form and gone through the training and the experience of leadership and partner ship in so many different ways ... within our armed services all have shown that they know how to serve in one capacity and through that capacity have developed a capacity to be able to serve yet again on another front. Kerry said he wants the State Department, USAID and the other VIP partners to welcome every veteran who is interested in the program. More than that, he added, we want to find them, we want to seek them out, and we want to put them back into service for their country, knowing that will make our country stronger and it will make our depart ments that much more effec tive. DoD celebrates Native American Heritage MonthSecretary of state announces public-private veterans partnership Smartphone myPay users beware

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24 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, November 7, 2013