Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
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Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

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Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
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Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
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Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID:
UF00028307:02065


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013 2014 AIR SHOW FRCSE DIABETES Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) has select ed NAS Jacksonville as the 2014 Installation Excellence Award (IEA) nominee for the Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) IEA for the third consecutive year. The station was also the recipient of the 2013 CNIC IEA and 2012 CNIC IEA and Presidential IEA. It will now go on to compete with 76 other naval installations throughout the world for the CNIC IEA. I am very pleased to announce that NAS Jacksonville and NSA Panama City have been selected as our nominees for large and small installations respectively for the 2014 CNIC Installation Excellence Award. Our crossfunctional panel of experts considered excellent pack ages from all of our installa tions. NAS Jacksonville and NSA Panama City submit ted the best packages in their respective categories, demon strating how they exceeded the criteria set forth by the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense to support the fleet, fighter and family, said CNRSE Rear Adm. Ricky Williamson in his message announcing the award win ners. On behalf of the entire CNRSE organization, I offer congratulations to Capt. Roy Undersander and Cmdr. Christopher Serow, and their entire teams, and wish them all the best in the forthcoming competition, Williamson said. NAS Jacksonville sustained excellence in a wide range of operational and warfighter readiness support functions, better mission performance and superb quality of life for Air traffic controllers at NAS Jacksonville are increasing their profi ciency thanks to a new tower simulator suite recently installed in Building 118. Like most professions today, air traffic controllers (ACs) are impacted by technology. Every year, there are more aircraft operating in NAS Jacksonville air space. On any given day, controllers may handle a potentially volatile mix of high-speed fighter jets along with lower-speed turboprop patrol planes NECEs new insect enclosure opens doors to new projects The Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) held a ribbon-cut ting ceremony Oct. 18 to unveil its new outdoor enclosure that will be used for entomological studies. The screened enclosure is located behind NECEs main building, and has several sophisticated features, includ ing an automated irrigation system, timed lights, and an air curtain to pre vent insects entering or escaping from the enclosure. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander, NECE Officer in Charge Capt. Eric Hoffman and Maj. Peter Nunn, an Army entomologist currently stationed at NECE, cut the ribbon to represent the joint effort between the Army and Navy. This new addition to NECE grounds would not have been made possible without Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR), said Hoffman. Funding from WRAIR allowed for the construction of this unique capability. Joint cooperation is essential to developing and evaluating products that directly impact the health a readi ness of the joint force world-wide, said Nunn. What we are seeing here today is how jointness can amplify value across the services. This new enclosure increases our ability to perform collaborative proj ects under semi-field conditions, said Cmdr. Peter Obenauer, NECE assistant officer in charge. We are now able to evaluate insect control products outside the laboratory thereby enabling us to take environ NAS Jax best in region for third consecutive year Tower simulator broadens air-traffic controller proficiency

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Oct. 31 1941 German submarine U-552 sinks USS Reuben James (DD245), which was escorting Convoy HX 156, with loss of 115 lives. First U.S. ship lost to enemy action in World War II. 1943 Lt. Hugh ONeill of VF(N)-75 destroys a Japanese aircraft during night attack off Vella Lavella in the first kill by a radar-equipped night fighter of the Pacific Fleet. 1956 Sailors land in R4D Skytrain on the ice at the South Pole. Rear Adm. George Dufek, Capt. Douglas Cordiner, Capt William Hawkes, Lt. Cmdr. Conrad Shinn, Lt. John Swadener, AD2 J. P. Strider and AD2 William Cumbie are the first men to stand on the South Pole since Capt. Robert Scott in 1912. 1956 USS Burdo (APD-133) and USS Harlan R. Dickson (DD-708) evacuate 166 persons from Haifa, Israel due to the fighting between Egypt and Israel. 1961 End of lighter-than-air era in U.S. Navy with disestablishment of Fleet Airship Wing One and ZP-1 and ZP-3, the last operating units in LTA branch of naval aviation, at Lakehurst, New Jersey. Nov. 1 1841 Mosquito Fleet command ed by Lt. Cmdr. J. T. McLaughlin car ries 750 Sailors and Marines into the Everglades to fight the Seminole Indians. 1941 President Franklin D. Roosevelt places Coast Guard under jurisdiction of Department of the Navy for duration of national emergency. 1967 Operation Coronado IX began in Mekong Delta. 1979 Retirement of Polaris A-3 program begins with removal of mis siles from USS Abraham Lincoln. Last Polaris missile removed in February 1982. Nov. 2 1943 In battle of Empress Augusta Bay, U.S. cruisers and destroyers turn back Japanese forces trying to attack transports off Bougainville, Solomons. 1968 Operation Search Turn began in Mekong Delta. Nov. 3 1853 USS Constitution seizes sus pected slaver H. N. Gambrill. 1931 Dirigible USS Los Angeles makes 10-hour flight out of NAS Lakehurst, N.J., carrying 207 persons, establishing a new record for the num ber of passengers carried into the air by a single craft. 1943 Battleship Oklahoma, sunk at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, is refloat ed. 1956 USS Cambria (APA-36) removes 24 members of United Nations Truce Commission team from the Gaza Strip. 1956 USS Chilton (APA-38), USS Thuban (AKA-19), and USS Fort Snelling (LSD-30) evacuate more than 1,500 U.S. and foreign nationals from Egypt and Israel because of the fighting. 1961 After Hurricane Hattie, heli copters from USS Antietam begin relief operations at British Honduras provid ing medical personnel, medical sup plies, general supplies and water. Nov. 4 1967 Landing craft from USS Navarro (APA-215) rescue 43 men from British SS Habib Marikar aground on a reef at Lincoln Island in the Tonkin Gulf. 1971 USS Nathanael Greene (SSBN636) launches a Poseidon C-3 missile in first surface launch of Poseidon missile. Nov. 5 1775 Commodore Esek Hopkins appointed to Commander in Chief of the Continental Navy. 1915 In AB-2 flying boat, Lt. Cmdr. Henry Mustin makes first underway catapult launch from a ship, USS North Carolina, at Pensacola Bay, Fla. 1917 German submarine torpedoes USS Alcedo off French coast. 1923 Tests designed to prove the feasibility of launching a small seaplane from a submarine occur at Hampton Roads Naval Base. A Martin MS-1, stored disassembled in a tank on board USS S-1, was removed and assembled. Then the submarine submerged allow ing the plane to float free and take off. 1944 TF 38 (Vice Admiral John McCain) begins two days of carrier strikes on Luzon, Philippines. 1945 Ensign Jake West (VF-41) makes first jet landing on board a car rier, USS Wake Island (CVE-65) Nov. 6 1851 U.S. Navy expedition under command of Lt. William Lewis Herndon, on a mission to explore the valley of the Amazon and its tributaries, reaches Iquitos in the jungle region of the upper Amazon after their departure from Lima, Peru. 1941 On Neutrality Patrol, USS Omaha (CL-4) and USS Somers (DD381) intercept the German blockade runner Odenwald disguised as U.S. freighter, board her after the German crew abandoned the ship, and brought the ship to San Juan, Puerto Rico, where the boarding party was awarded sal vage shares. 1942 First officer and enlisted women from training schools report for shore duty around the USA. 1951 Soviet aircraft shoot at P-2V Neptune patrol bomber (VP-6) on weather reconnaissance mission near Siberia. U.S. aircraft fails to return. 1967 Helicopter from USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) rescues 37-man crew of Liberian freighter Royal Fortunes aground on reef in Tonkin Gulf. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS When the boys asked what I wanted for my birthday last week, I decided to make it less painful for them. Just take me to the Star Wars concert performed the Portland Symphony Orchestra, I said, and (wink, wink) that will be a great birthday. I would, of course, be the one who paid (and drove and ordered the tickets), but the boys like Star Wars, so everyone would be happy. Thats what moms do for their birthdays: they make everyone else happy. We arrived at the auditorium early and just in time to see a couple storm troopers and Darth Vader posing for pictures on the sidewalk. Oh, my gosh, I screamed. Look! Its Darth! Lets get our pictures taken. How about I take one of you with Darth Vader, Mom, Ford said, reaching for my phone. Oh? Are you sure? I said. I can take one of you with him next. No, its fine, he said. Then he motioned with his hand for me to get closer to Darth. Inside the auditorium, hundreds of chil dren, most of them 5-, 6-, and 7-years old, waved light sabers and glow sticks as they waited for the music to begin. I thought about George Lucass cleverness: for a film that is as old as me, it still manages to induct devotees with each new generation. And there was a man in his 20s in front of us dressed as a storm trooper, so clearly the devotion stays strong with age. I made a mental note about not wanting the boys to dress as storm troopers when they are 20. Then I clapped my hands and looked at Ford. Isnt this exciting? Just like old times, right? (We saw Star Wars Live performed by the Boston Pops in 2010.) Just then, the lights dimmed and the audience grew quiet. The conductor, dressed in a Jedi robe, raised his arms, and the violinists drew their bows. When the first notes of the Star Wars theme song came, I started to cry. Mom? Ford said. Ummmm... Lindell fidgeted in his seat and asked me to open his glow stick. In front of me, little boys stood in their seats and leaned on their moms shoulders as they bounced up and down with the music. Isnt this great? I said, grabbing Fords hand. Tears were spilling down my cheeks now. Sure, Mom, he said. An hour later, the show was over, and I wanted to find the face painters we saw earlier. A Death Star tattoo on someones (Ford? Owen?) left cheek was all that was left to complete this birthday. (What do you mean no one wants their face painted?) All in all, it was a great day that was supposed to be about me, but which I had managed to actually make about them. I patted myself on my back. From Lindell, 6: Once me and my family went to a Star Wars concert where there were songs and actors. Also we got glow sticks. I think it was fun. From Owen, 10: We trudged up several flights of stairs, excited for the music. When we final ly reached the top, a lady said to me, Do you want a glow stick little boy? I said as politely as I could that I didnt want one. She handed me the concert program instead. I decided it was best to just take it. After those long, tiring speeches they give you before a concert, the music started. They had stormtroopers and rebels on stage acting out scenes from the movie on stage. But they got some of the facts wrong. For instance, they made Yoda say one of ObiWans most famous quotes! I sat back and laughed. Do they think were 2? From Ford, almost 13: Star Wars used to be my favorite. But that was a long time ago. Now its different. I dont care who shot first, or what Darth Vaders motives were. So when I learned Mom wanted to see a Star Wars concert, I was a little skeptical. It had been a long time since I really had any interest in Star Wars. I didnt understand who this trip was for. Then I realized: it was for Mom. She wanted to re-live that part of our lives. As I listened to the music, all I could hear were the memories of Owen and me playing lightsabers and talking about when we were going to see Revenge of the Sith. Although Mom apparently still misses those times, and maybe Owen does too, I dont. Halloween is approaching, and I can remember many times complaining about my Boba Fett costume being too cold, and Owen complaining his was too stuffy. But thats the past, and I am a different kid now.He said (and also him and him)/she said Reminder: Set clocks back one hour this weekendDaylight Saving Time ends Sunday, Nov. 3 so remember to set your clocks back (fall back) one hour. The NAS Jax Fire Prevention Division also reminds everyone to change your batteries in your smoke detector at the same time. 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013

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The U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels, will return to its full schedule for the 2014 air show season. Community outreach is key to connecting Americans to the military, said Blue Angels Commanding Officer and Flight Leader, Cmdr. Thomas Frosch. Our performances provide a unique opportunity to inspire millions to connect with and support our service members. Our team is looking forward to an exciting 2014 season. NAS Jacksonville is proud to host the Blue AngelsOct. 25-26, 2014, said NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander. He added that he was delighted the Navys Blue Angels will return to its birthplace NAS Jacksonville. Undersander also praised City of Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown and the Beaches mayors for agreeing to switch the 2014 air show venue as a result of the 2013 sequestration cancellation. Following winter training, the flight demonstration team begins the season Mar. 15 at Naval Air Facility El Centro, Calif., and will conclude the season Nov. 8 at NAS Pensacola. The Blue Angels are scheduled to perform 65 shows at 34 locations throughout the nation in 2014. The Blue Angels 2014 air show schedule can be found at: http://www.blueangels.navy. mil/media/show/2014ShowSchedule.pdf. Blue Angels announce 2014 air show scheduleScheduled to perform at NAS Jax Oct. 25-26 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013 Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) continues its leadership in providing nondestructive inspection (NDI) tools that enhance its maintenance support capabilities for the Fleet. FRCSE Materials Engineering Division personnel are leading the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) effort to evolve NDI. First is the transi tion from filmand chemicals-based radiography (x-ray) to digital radiogra phy. Next, is adapting second-generation, mid-wave infrared imaging for naval paint systems analysis, and third, is continued training and implementa tion of ultrasonic testing with Sailors throughout the Fleet. Materials Engineer Ian Hawkins and Materials Engineering Technician Warren Hansen work on the NDI Branch transition from traditional film radiography to computed radiography (CR). The transition takes time because hundreds of pages of instructions are required, and they must prove that each step along the way satisfies NAVAIR standards. The technical training to safely operate CR is a complex process that Hansen says will be complete in 2015. Hawkins explained that the advan tages of CR are numerous. Since CR cassettes replace film cassettes, the same x-ray generator and x-ray tube equip ment can be used, which saves con siderable costs. Digital images may be viewed in multiple locations at the same time. Images may be rapidly transferred to other locations. Storage of digital images takes less space than film storage. Image retrieval is less labor intensive and faster. Since software enhances the image, CR reduces retakes. Repeats will be primarily due to positioning errors. Hazards, such as chemicals and darkroom maintenance are eliminated. Senior Materials Engineer Jack Benfer is in charge of the mid-wave infrared imaging system in the FRCSE Corrosion & Wear Branch. Navy paint systems are designed to protect aircraft from the harsh mar AVI A TION INSPECTION TECHNOLOGIES EVOLVE AT FR CSE

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013 5 itime environment. Were constantly changing coatings due to regulatory requirements or to improve perfor mance, stated Benfer. This sophisticated camera allows us to see through organic coatings paint systems to observe any substrate degradation. It enhances our visual inspection ability so we can make better engineering decisions, said Benfer. This is not a tool that we deploy to production, but instead use it in the lab for engineering investigations, along with research and development of new coatings. The depot benefits from the paint materials we select for the cor rosion program, as well as identifying corrosion without removing the paint system. FRCSE Metals Inspector Pete Bethley works in the NDI Branch. We provide routine ultrasonic inspections for cor rosion and other irregularities on air craft undergoing depot-level mainte nance at NAS Jax, NS Mayport and Cecil Airport. Theres a set-up procedure in our hand-held ultrasonic testers that includes baseline readings for various surfaces and materials of each aircraft type that helps our inspectors identify problem areas. FRCSE

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013 According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), nearly 26 million children and adults in the U.S. have diabetes, and another 79 million have prediabetesglucose levels that are higher than normal, but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. November is designated as American Diabetes Month, with Nov. 14 being World Diabetes Daythemed Protect our Future. This years focus raises awareness to the evergrowing incidence of diabe tes and directing attention to issues surrounding it, the many people impacted and resources available to help. Diabetes is a group of dis eases characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from defects in the bodys ability to produce and or use insulinthe hormone needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy to sus tain the body each day. ADA recognizes three types of dia betes; type 1, type 2 and gesta tional. Symptoms of diabetes include frequent urination, thirst, extreme fatigue, blurry vision and weight loss to name a few. Type 1previously known as juvenile diabetesoften runs in families. Although it can occur at any age, it usually presents before 40 years of age. Type 1 diabetes is when the body does not produce insulin, due to an autoimmune process which destroys the insulin producing cells of the pancreas. Treatment of this type is usu ally through careful dieting, insulin injections and regular blood glucose monitoring. Type 2formerly known as adult onset diabetesis the most common form of diabe tes and is due either the lack of insulin production and/or the cells are not reacting to insu lin. Risk factors include obe sity, race/ethnicity (African American, Native American, Pacific Islander, Asian and Hispanic), family history, over 40 years of age and sed entary lifestyles. Treatment of this type includes weight loss, proper dieting, regular exercise and blood glucose monitoring. Some cases may require oral medications or insulin injec tions. Gestational diabetes is when pregnant women show signs of high blood glucose levels, usually around the 24th week of pregnancy. This diagnosis doesnt mean that one has had, or will have dia betes afterbirth. Risk factors include women over 25 years of age, obesity, family or personal history and race. Treatment includes frequent monitoring of blood glucose, proper diet ing, regular exercise and close monitoring of unborn child. Diabetes screenings should be considered in younger adults and children who are overweight or obese, or who are at high risk for diabetes based on risk factors. Given the lower incidence of type 1 diabetes, there is no consensus to screen. Screening is based on individ ual risk factors or concerning symptoms. Screening for type 2 diabetes should be consid ered in all adults 45 years of age and older. There are several blood tests to diagnose diabetes: A1C, fasting glucose, oral glu cose tolerance test and ran dom glucose test, said Cmdr. Julie Lundstad, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles Diabetes Nurse Educator. There must be a second testsame test or a different oneconducted on a different day to confirm the diagnosis. Denial about the diagnosis of diabetes and risk of com plications is common among patients. This may be partly due to the fact that diabetes symptoms arent painful, like chest pain with heart attacks. But the truth is, that uncon trolled diabetes (high blood sugars) can cause complica tions such as heart disease, high blood pressure, blindness, kidney disease and lower-limb amputation, added Lundstad. NH Jacksonville will be promoting diabetes aware ness throughout the month of November, sharing information about health related services for its patients who already have diabetes as well as dis seminating information about the risk factors and screening for the disease, as part of the ongoing preventive health care services of its Medical Home Port teams. A wellness dis play will be available at Naval Air Station Jacksonvilles Navy Exchange Nov. 14 from noon to 2 p.m. to provide diabetes information to our nations heroesactive duty, retirees and their families. Diabetes is a serious dis ease. Regular check-ups and eye exams are vital to diagnosing diabetes or managing your health. Establish a relationship with your diabetes educator and ask for help when needed. For more information about American Diabetes Month, go to www.diabetes.org or talk to your primary care manager. NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville (NAVSUP FLCJs) per sonnel celebrated the U.S. Navys 238th Birthday and Hispanic Heritage Month Oct.10. Hispanic Heritage Month is celebrated each year from Sept. 15 through Oct. 15. NAVSUP FLCJ Commanding Officer Capt. Duke Heinz, kicked off the event by highlighting and expressing his innate appreciation for the participa tion of NAVSUP FLCJs talented and diversified workforce in the event. We are here today to commemorate two nationally recognized observanc es, said Heinz. Looking around the room, I think its apparent that diver sity is incorporated into all aspects of our Navy business, said Heinz. I truly believe that our diversified workforce is an enabler to us being a strong and unified Navy. Following Heinzs address, CMDCM Glenda Atwood, (a native of El Salvador) introduced the guest speakers. Today, we have the honor of hearing from Hispanic military member, Chief Luis Moreno, as well as from a member of our civilian workforce, Jose Santa, she said. Up first was NAVSUP FLCJ DET NAS Jacksonvilles HAZMAT and Material Control Leading Chief Petty Officer, Chief Moreno. Moreno explained some important dates in Hispanic Heritage history as well as memories from his early family life. Morenos parents (natives of Michoacn and Tijuana, Mexico) had migrated to the United States in 1968, but made frequent family visits back to Mexico while he was growing up. Reflecting on childhood memories, he described his most treasured and fondest moments, including his account of the holiday celebrations, an experience in which he paralleled to his time in the United States Navy. Up and down the streets of Mexico during the holiday season, you would see a gathering of neighbors and the sharing of food and celebration among the people, said Moreno. Much like my time in the Navy, as well as today, we are all gathered here, people of all races, as a unified team to commem orate Hispanic Heritage Month as a cohesive community. Following Morenos address, Santa spoke about growing up in Puerto Rico, his six years of service in the Navy, and his current career with NAVSUP FLCJ. Santa is a program analyst in the com mands business office with respon sibilities of budget formulation, exe cution and analysis. He is also one of 10 in the field of more than 100 appli cants enrolled in NAVSUPs elite and extensive Corporate Management Development Program. Like Moreno, Santa expressed his deep appreciation for the military and also presented some demographics of Hispanics and Latino Americans serv ing in the U.S. Armed Forces. Did you know that there are over 1.2 million Hispanics, aged 18 and older who are veterans of the U.S. Armed Forces? Santa asked the crowd. He also talked of the 50,000 Hispanic Sailors and officers who currently serve in the Navy, and specifically pointed out NAVSUPs own workforce ratios. Ten percent of our total NAVSUP civilian workforce is Hispanic. Moreover, according to our recent EEO survey, approximately 15 per cent of our NAVSUP FLCJ workforce is Hispanic, stated Santa. I can look around this room and tell that there are other Hispanics from South America, Central America, Mexico, the Caribbean and the U.S. among us that are all well deserving of this great privilege to speak to you today, so I am very honored for the opportunity. The command wrapped up the event by conducting a cake cutting ceremony in honor of Hispanic Heritage Month and the Navys 238th Birthday which was Oct. 13. After the cake cutting cer emony, personnel enjoyed traditional Hispanic delicacies buffet style. Roberto Santiago, information assurance man ager, provided entertainment by play ing songs on his guitar. FLCJ maintains a deep level of commitment in terms of fostering a culture that embraces diversity, said Heinz. Todays events helped to promote the commands commitment with a dem onstration and celebration of teamwork and unity, by a diversified workforce of dedicated Navy professionals. Naval Hospital Jacksonville recognizes American Diabetes Month FLC Jacksonville partakes in dual celebration: Hispanic Heritage Month and Navy birthday

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Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus presented the Meritorious Service Medal (second award) to Cmdr. Miguel Dieguez, NAVFAC Southeast assistant regional engineer, in a brief ceremony Oct. 21. Dieguez was recognized for outstanding meritorious service while serving as public works officer for NAVFAC Southeast at Public Works Department Naval Station (NS) Mayport from October 2011 through March 2013. Dieguez displayed dynamic leader ship, visionary innovation, and relent less commitment to excellence revi talized the Public Works Department and improved customer service, while enhancing the alignment and alloca tion of fiscal resources, according to the award citation. He expertly ensured the effective execution of $180 million while provid ing support for installation facilities management, recapitalization, base operating support, and environmental management, said Kiwus during the award presentation. He superbly managed construction programs valued at more than $161 million that included work at NS Mayport, Marine Corps Blount Island Command, and the Navy Fuel Farm. One initiative accomplished by Dieguez was a waterfront energy con servation program that resulted in a decrease of 12 percent in electric ity consumption at NS Mayport, net ting $3 million in savings and leading to the installation receiving the 2012 Secretary of the Navy Energy and Water Management Gold Level Achievement Award. The opportunity to support the fleet, warfighter, and their families at Naval Station Mayport made my tour as Mayports Public Works officer one of the most challenging and rewarding of my career, said Dieguez. The successes and accomplishments highlighted by the award were a com plete team effort. Much of the credit (for the award) belongs to the men and women of Naval Station Mayports Public Works Department, continued Dieguez. They are without a doubt the most talented and dedicated group of professionals I have had the pleasure of serving with. NAVFAC Southeast recognizes officer IT1(SW) Paul Voigt and MA3 Kiara Walker were named Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Senior and Junior Sailor of the Fourth Quarter 2013, respectively, Oct. 18. As a battle watch specialist in the Regional Operations Center (ROC), Voigt ensured his team processed and filed more than 1,500 messages for 16 installations and successfully completed 15 Response Task Force drills dur ing a staff shortage. As a result, mis sion essential communication for the Southeast Region was uninterrupted. He also provided training to help ROC personnel qualify as battle watch spe cialists and assistant regional watch officers. In addition, Voigt is a volunteer in the local community, committing time to the Jacksonville Ronald McDonald house and the Cub Scouts of America Troop 0554. Petty Officer Voigt displays the leadership qualities that in time will result in him wearing anchors, said QMC(SW) Joseph Ziro, Voigts supervisor. His maturity level and ability to work while under time constraints provide a stellar example for his fellow Sailors. Voigt attributed his success to his ROC co-workers. I would say the genuine work effort from my department and command has enabled me to be successful and fulfill everyday mission tasks, he said. We have a great operations team from top to bottom. While Sailor of the quarter is an individual achievement, it really is the result of the hard work and dedication of an entire team of people. Walker is assigned to the CNRSE Force Protection Department. She organized the monthly security officer teleconferences for 16 Navy installations and collected information throughout the region for the region security offi cer. She was also directly responsible for providing CNRSE force protection plan of the week notes, which provide staff members with critical force protection and safety information. An active member of the communi ty, Walker volunteered three hours per month as a tutor at Mattie V. Rutherford Middle School and dedicated 10 hours to the Ronald McDonald House. Petty Officer Walker is a talented, devoted and motivated security pro fessional who is always willing to accept any task without reservation, said MAC(SW) Jonathon Benninger, Walkers supervisor. She performs her work proficiently and has a strong work ethic and can-do spirit. Walker said its a great honor to accept the award, but she had to give CNRSE announces Senior, Junior Sailor of the Fourth Quarter 2013 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013 7

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military men and women and their families, and a community outreach program set it apart from 15 other southeast installations. The nomina tion exemplified the total commitment to excellence by its military and civilian personnel and sets the air installation as one of the contenders for the CNIC award. This is unprecedented and I want to congratulate all the military, civilian, and contractors all 20,000 who make NAS Jax the best, day in and day out. They have built and maintained a cul ture of excellence that has been unsur passed. Their commitment to the warfighter and forward deployed forcesis what allows NAS Jax to be recognized for this award for three consecutive years, NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander stated upon receiving the congratulatory email from Williamson. With the mission of supporting the fleet, fighter and family, NAS Jax is the premier installation for delivering effective, sustained and improved shore readiness for Sailors, their families and civilian employees. Base personnel worked around the clock providing services to 14 homebased squadrons, numerous detach ments, joint commands, government agencies and carrier strike group exercises. Air Operations handled more than 33,029 flight operations and supported 20 detachments. NAS Jaxs Safety program continued its unmatched excellence in safety by being recertified by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration Voluntary Protection Program STAR status and mishap rates continue to be 36 percent below industry guidelines. In partnership with 110 tenant com mands, station personnel provided support and service to transition the P-3C Orion to the P-8A Poseidon; HS to HSM, logistic and reserve squadrons, joint services and allies. The station also completed or started construction on nearly $100 million of construction in support of the P-8A as well as the Triton and Fire Scout heli copter unmanned aerial systems. Achieving the Secretary of the Navys gold level of achievement for energy savings, NAS Jax installed 1,140 squarefeet of solar panels bringing the total to 5,500 saving approximately $300,000 annually. NAS Jacksonville looks forward to competing at the CNIC level. The win ner of the CNIC IEA will be nominated for the Commander in Chiefs annual award for installation excellence. Established in 1984, the award recognizes the outstanding efforts of personnel in the operations and maintenance of U.S. military installations worldwide. EXCELLENCEmental factors into consideration when testing products for use in protecting the deployed warfighter. Some of the studies NECE plans to perform in the enclosure involve test ing mosquito repellants in open spac es, testing the efficacy of insect traps and testing novel surveillance equip ment. Once the studies are completed the results will be given to the Armed Forces Pest Management Board and will be used to determine Department of Defense wide policy regarding pest management and vector control pro grams. NECE is very excited to utilize this new resource and take our testing and evaluation process to the next level, said Obenauer. This sort of research capability represents the next step in protecting the warfighter against insect borne diseases. Undersander ended the ceremo ny saying, NECE is a unique Navy asset and you all [attendees] are really unsung heroes for the work that gets done here. credit to the people in her department who support her every day. I think support from my command was the most important thing leading to my selection, she said. They were the ones who provided me with the guid ance and support I needed to do my job at a high level and get out there and have an impact on the command. Individual selection criteria for the awards was based upon exemplary performance of tasks, contributions that enhanced organization accomplish ment of command objectives, mission, teamwork or public image, and ones professional attitude toward self and others. CNRSE SOQ NECE The Florida Department of Health in Duval County (DOHDuval) has issued a mosquitoborne illness alert for Duval County. A human case of West Nile virus (WNV) illness was recently confirmed in a 54-year old male. Duval County has two confirmed cases of WNV in 2013. About one in 150 people infected with WNV will devel op severe illness. Symptoms can include high fever, head ache, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness, vision loss, numbness and paralysis. These symptoms may last several weeks, and neurologi cal effects may be permanent. The state monitors animals as sentinels for WNV, to deter mine if any of the viruses are present in the community. DOH-Duval continues to advise the public to remain diligent in their personal mosquito protection efforts. These should include remembering, drain and cover. Drain standing water to stop mosquitoes from multiplying garbage cans, house gutters, buckets, pool covers, coolers, toys, flowerpots or any other con tainers where sprinkler or rainwater has collected. bottles, cans, pots and pans, broken appliances and other items that arent being used. and pets water bowls at least once or twice a week. from rain with tarps that dont accumulate water. in good condition and appro priately chlorinated. Empty plastic swimming pools when not in use. Cover skin with clothing or repellent socks, and long pants and longsleeves. This type of protection may be necessary for people who must work in areas where mosquitoes are present. to repellent to bare skin and clothing. lents according to the label. Repellents with DEET, picari din, oil of lemon eucalyptus, and IR3535 are effective. protect children younger than two months old. Cover doors and windows with screens to keep mosquitoes out of your house windows, doors, porches, and patios. Tips on repellent use directions careful ly for the approved usage before you apply a repel lent. Some repellents are not suitable for children. concentrations of up to 30 percent DEET are generally recommended. Other EPAapproved repellents contain Picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus, or IR3535. These products are generally available at local pharmacies. Look for active ingredients to be listed on the product label. exposed skin, or onto clothing, but not under clothing. label instructions to be sure the repellent is age-appropri ate. According to the CDC, mosquito repellents containing oil of lemon eucalyptus should not be used on children under the age of 3 years. DEET is not recommended on children younger than two months old. the hands of children. Adults should apply repellent first to their own hands and then transfer it to the childs skin and clothing. necessary, apply a permethrin repellent directly to your clothing. Again, always follow the manufacturers directions. DOH continues to conduct statewide surveillance for mos quito borne illnesses, includ ing West Nile virus infections, Eastern equine encephalitis, St. Louis encephalitis, malaria, and dengue. Residents of Florida are encouraged to report dead birds via the website http:// www.MyFWC.com/bird. For more information, visit DOHs Environmental Public Health website at http://www. floridahealth.gov/diseasesand-conditions/mosquitoborne-diseases/prevention. html or call DOH-Duval at 904253-1850.Mosquito-borne illness alert issued Beginning early next year, WorkSource will become CareerSource Northeast Florida as part of a new universal brand identity to align Floridas nationally rec ognized workforce sys tem and improve customer awareness and use of the systems services and resources. The new brand, CareerSource Florida, is a result of extensive market research and input from local leaders, employers, job seekers, workforce professionals and community partners throughout Florida. The name, logo and charter for the entire workforce system were approved unanimously by the Workforce Florida Inc. Board of Directors this spring. The WorkSource Board of Directors approved its aligned regional brand name in August. Companies do busi ness throughout the state, and the new brand will make it easier to find hiring assistance in every county, said local businessman Ron Avery, chair of the WorkSource board of directors. Jobseekers also relocate for school, for new jobs, and as they exit the military. Theyll be able to find services more eas ily with just one name to search for. As a member of the CareerSource Florida System, CareerSource Northeast Floridaand its eight one-stop career centers that serve job seekers, workers and businesses Baker, Clay, Duval, Nassau,Putnam, and St. Johns counties will begin using our new name following a state wide brand launch in early 2014. The statewide rebranding effort was initiated to provide greater WorkSource changing name: CareerSource Northeast Florida 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013

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and multi-mission heli copters, said Air Traffic Control Facilities Officer Lt. Lance Breeding. They must also coor dinate air space activ ity with Jacksonville International Airport, Cecil Field Airport, gen eral aviation airfields and Outlying Landing Field Whitehouse. Steve Sessoms and Josh Cosgrove, air traffic control specialists with UFA Inc., installed the tower simulator suite in less than a week. This suite provides the latest 3D graphics along with simulated weather information, integrated radar displays and simu lation of other key tower systems to provide the highest-fidelity training capability through a photo-realistic airfield data base, said Sessoms. It also includes a voice recognition and response feature that trains con trollers without the need for additional support staff who would normally pretend to be pilots. At UFA, we use com mercial off-the-shelf (COTS) equipment and technology to keep acquisition, installation and operational costs down, said Cosgrove. The system provides a 210-degree panoram ic view of the station through seven monitors. The simulator allows operators to choose from 360 degrees of view from the NAS Jax control tower. Features include a close-up binocular view, as well as night-vision capability. Breeding said, Sequencing is one of the biggest challenges that controllers face in a VFR (visual flight rules) envi ronment. VFR requires a pilot to be able to see outside the cockpit, to control the aircrafts altitude, navigate, and avoid obstacles and other aircraft. Sequencing involves taking an addi tional aircraft and fitting it into the traffic pattern for a particular airspace. After each training session, the instructor fills out an OJT critique sheet and the controller gets to play back the scenario and view the correct procedures. Over all, the sys tem works according to the Air Traffic Control Publication 7110.65 that contains all the Navy rules and regulations. AC2 Jeremy Funk explained that the tower (and simulator) is popu lated by four positions: first is the local control ler responsibility for planes in the air; two is the ground controller responsibility for taxi ing aircraft; and three is the data controller who coordinates with enti ties such as Jacksonville International airport and Cecil Field Airport; and fourth is the tower supervisor. AC1 Ayanna Gregg said, This simulator will only increase consistency within our ranks. There are times especially during holidays when our air operations vol ume is low. The simula tor gives our controllers a venue to maintain their proficiency levels during periods of reduced activity. Breeding added, These simulations are very realistic because they mimic our air traf fic, air field facilities and local geography. The simulator view is much the same as working in our tower. Whether its a P-8A, P-3C, C-130T, C-40A, MH-60R or transient air craft our controllers will now train to simulated 3D images that match the reality of the control tower environment. TOWER This Veterans Day holiday weekend your commissary will highlight the service of Vietnam War veterans with special sales promotions and events to mark the introduction of the 50th anniversary Vietnam War commemoration flag. The flag recognizes the service, valor and sacri fice of our military members who made it possible for America to remain strong and safe as a defender of democracy worldwide, said Larry Bentley, NAS Jacksonville Commissary store director. We hope that every time a Vietnam War veteran and their family sees this flag, they will know that a grateful nation remembers, thanks and honors them. On Nov. 8 at 8:30 a.m., in addition to the exclu sive savings offered on this special day, the NAS Jacksonville Commissary will be hosting a commemorative event recognizing the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War. Commissary customers are invited to join us in thanking our Vietnam veterans and their families, as well as all war veterans, young and old. With their devoted families who stood by strong and resilient under these war time conditions. It is with great honor that your local commissary serves our nations veterans with dignity and gratitude for everything they have done to keep our country safe, Bentley said. We cannot thank the Vietnam War veterans and all war veterans enough for what they have done for our country, our Constitution and our families. For more information about this special event, call 542-5311. Military families facing the annual ritual of planning their holiday menus need look no farther than their commissary for quality and savings. Your commissary has the most affordable, high-quality, namebrand ingredients for the perfect holiday meal, said Randy Chandler, Defense Commissary Agency sales director. Throughout November, the commissarys indus try partners vendors, suppliers and brokers are collaborating with stores to offer discounts. Customers are asked to check their local commissary for the following promotions: Get All the Fixins Save Big on Your Bird. This worldwide promo tion revolves around a recipe booklet with cou pons valued at more than $43. The coupons provide commissary shoppers with greater than normal savings or free turkeys when purchasing holi day meal essentials. Look for these recipe booklets in your local commis sary with coupons good through Nov. 28. Nestls Make Your Home Extra Special for the Holidays This contest will award one grand prize of $6,000 along with 147 runnersup prizes of $25 commissary gift cards. Look for entry forms and boxes adjacent to Nestls Good Food, Good Life name-brand products. Participants must be 18 years of age or older and eligible to use the com missary. Look for this promotion in November. Acosta and its partici pating brand products present the Believe in Heroes! promotion. Commissaries world wide will receive fly ers containing coupons. During the sale, most participating brands will provide donations to the Wounded Warrior Project foundation.Commissary to honor Vietnam vetsYour commissary offers more savings for the holidaysIn November and December, The NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) is offering Suicide Prevention Awareness Training for base and tenant commands in November and December. Should your command be in need of this train ing, select a date and time that is convenient for your command and contact us, said FFSC Education and Training Coordinator Wilhelmina Nash. Attending this one-hour class could help you save someones life. The following is the schedule of classes: Nov. 1 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Nov. 5 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Nov. 6 9 a.m. & 3 p.m. Nov. 7 1 & 3 p.m. Nov. 13 1 & 3 p.m. Nov. 14 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Nov. 20 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Nov. 26 8 a.m. & 1 p.m. Nov. 27 8 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 2 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 3 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 4 8 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 5 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 10 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 11 1 & 3 p.m. Dec. 12 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 17 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 18 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 30 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 31 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. For more information or to reserve seating, call 542-2776.FFSC offers suicide prevention awareness training clarity and consistency among publicly funded workforce entities that serve job seekers and businesses. Regional workforce boards retain their flexibility to design and deliver pro grams that best address local workforce needs. WorkSources commit ment to providing service to jobseekers and busi nesses will not change. For more information, go to http://careersourceflbrand.com. NAME JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013 9

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FRCSE Sailors share insights with NAE leaders at BOGFlag-level officers from across Naval Aviation Enterprise (NAE) visited Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Detachment (Det.) Mayport, Oct. 23, to meet with junior Sailors and tour the helicopter repair facilities at Naval Station (NS) Mayport as part of Boots on Ground (BOG). BOG is an ongoing program designed to give NAE leaders a better understanding of the issues impact ing aviation readiness from Sailors working at the Deckplate. Vice Adm. David Buss, commander, Naval Air Forces, headed the multidisciplinary team of senior-level Navy and Marine Corps officers, Senior Executive Service (SES) civilians and Department of Defense personnel. They started the day with briefs at the Ocean Breeze Conference Center. PR1 Jerry Rodriguez and AS1 Domingo Cisneros, both Six Sigma Black Belt trained, presented an AIRSpeed/continuous process improvement (CPI) project for the helicopter rescue hoist. Buss encouraged the Sailors to keep using AIRSpeed tools to look for ways to enhance operations and reduce costs. Rodriquez said deployment, execution and sus tainment were the keys to success. Buss said NAE had come a long way on its decadelong CPI journey and the results of CPI training were paying off for the Fleet. The admiral recognized Rodriguez efforts in a letter read to the BOG participants. He was cited for his hard work to instill a CPI culture at the detachment and his role as the AirSpeed core team leading petty officer. Rodriguez oversaw 15 projects that resulted in a cost avoidance of $14.5 million with an additional $20.4 million in potential savings to the NAE. Buss presented Rodriguez and Cisneros with com manders coins for identifying innovative solutions to Deckplate problems. The NAE leaders next visited FRCSE Det. Mayport Level II divisions where they discussed with junior Sailors CPI projects such as the H-60 blade rotary wing, main landing gear, blade retention bearing, and the RAST probe assembly. The Sailors identified innovative solutions to reduce cycle time, increase throughput, reduce work-in-process, reduce operating expenses and improve scheduling accuracy to enhance support to the Fleet. BOG is a great opportunity to interact with young Sailors; they are on the point of attack for innovation and will look for creative ways to stretch our resources, said Buss. Vice Adm. David Dunaway, commander Naval Air Systems Command, was also very impressed with the savvy Sailors. AE2 Joshua Saffa presented his main motor slip ring project. With the support of the AirSpeed Team, he identified a quick fix costing $142.09 in parts already stocked in Navy supply. By replacing the jam nuts and O-rings and adding the part numbers to the technical publications, the Sailors were able to repair the component for a cost avoidance of $165,580 on 10 units (annual average). When the red light comes on in your car, you say I have to do something about it, said Dunaway. A red light was going off, and these Sailors pursued it. We do have the CPI culture. If each one finds something to pursue like this electrical connector, we can have an enormous impact on readiness. After lunch, BOG members visited the maintenance hangars to discuss tool room rapid improvement events and concluded the day with an out brief. Rear Adm. John King, commander, Naval Supply Systems Command Weapons Systems Support, said he makes these BOG trips a top priority and knows the ingenuity these petty officers possess. We can help them find a solution or they will find a solution on their own. A major theme heard throughout the day was how to institutionalize these great CPI initiatives. Rear Adm. Paul Sohl who commands eight Fleet Readiness Centers said he is looking for ways to share good ideas among our repair sites. The best solutions are often found within 50 feet of where the work is performed, said Sohl. Our job as leaders is to ensure these maintenance solutions and best practices are replicated in similar sites or where they make sense. FRCSE Commanding Officer Capt. John Kemna praised Cmdr. Michael Barriere, the detachments officer in charge, for his leadership, as well as the AirSpeed core team for their ingenuity and tireless efforts to drive down costs. Team members included Rodriguez, Cisneros, Saffa, Lt. Javier Castro, ADCS Richard Davis, and AT2 John Ivicic. BOG highlighted some of the successes weve had in supporting the H-60 community, and our Sailors got some well-deserved recognition for their hard work from the Air Boss and top leaders, said Kemna. Although we still face some challenges, we will continue working as a team to produce cost-wise readiness to the Fleet. Other Sailors who presented projects at BOG were AE1 Richard Stridiron, AS1 Johnny Opdenbosch, AM2 Charles Beatty, AM2 Phillip Schultz, AM2 Joshua Herring, AO2 Jason Parry and PR3 Tineshia NeillBarnes. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013 11

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Navy Lodges offer business travelers comfortable accom modations at a value up to 45 percent less than comparable civilian hotels. With 39 locations around the world, Navy Lodge guests have a number of destinations to choose from. Navy Lodges are great for business travelers, said Melanie Peters, gen eral manager for Navy Lodge Jacksonville. Our businessclass rooms offer guests a queen-size bed, sofa, a desk with computer hookup and task lighting. Navy Lodges are also conveniently located near other on-base amenities, such as the NEX and its food out lets and Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) facilities. Navy Lodge guests will also find oversized rooms and family suites, cable TV with DVD player and a kitchenette with microwave and utensils, as well as video rental service, guest laundry facilities and handi capped accessible and nonsmoking rooms. Navy Lodges also offer guests a light breakfast and morning newspaper. Free Wi-Fi is now available throughout the Navy Lodge, said Peters. Business travelers can feel comfortable working in their rooms or in the lobby. We want every guest, whether travel ing for business, a permanent change of station move, or on vacation, to be comfortable and have all the amenities they come to expect when away from home. Theyll find it all at a Navy Lodge. To make reservations, call 800-628-9466 (800-NAVY-INN), 24 hours a day, seven days a week or go online at www. navy-lodge.com. Reservations are accepted on an as-received basis without regard to rank. For other military lodging options go to www.dodlodging. com. U.S. Fleet Forces and Pacific Fleet released a joint message Oct. 24 detail ing the use and wear of the new Flame Resistant Variant (FRV) coveralls, which will begin being distributed to Sailors in the fleet before the end of the year. Scheduled to start arriving in December, the new coveralls will initially be provided to the crews of ships sched uled to deploy in early 2014. We made the decision to supply flame-resistant coveralls to all Sailors assigned to ships as an added safety precaution, said Adm. Bill Gortney, com mander, USFF. The information pro vided in the manner wear message will ensure everyone understands what is expected in the wearing of this new organizational clothing. According to the message the FRV will be distributed to several fleet units before the end of the year. Early ship ments will focus on next deployers and forward deployed naval forces. The type commanders will hold a series of show and tell road shows in November and December in fleet concentration areas to ensure sailors have an opportunity to see and feel the FRV. The goal is to pro vide an understanding on the basics of where, when and how to wear the new coverall. Based on production schedules, initial fleet outfitting should complete by October 2014. Flame resistant organizational cloth ing had previously been limited to Sailors working in engineering departments, on flight decks and in other high-risk areas, but the Organizational Clothing Working Group recommended every Sailor afloat be outfitted with the additional protec tion. Once outfitted, Sailors are directed to wear the FRV while underway. The NWU type I and other polyester and poly blend uniforms are no longer authorized for wear while underway except for spe cial events such as manning the rails, change of command or receptions held at anchor. Exceptions: (1) Personnel assigned to submarines will continue to wear the poly/cotton utility coverall due to its low lint characteristics. Once a long-term, allpurpose coverall solution that is flame resistant and low lint version is available, it is expected that it will be made avail able to the submarine force. (2) The FRV will not be worn in place of organization al clothing mandated for specific opera tional environments such as flight decks or while performing work on electrical systems requiring arc flash protection. The new coveralls are expected to maintain performance properties, dura bility and appearance for typical deploy ments of six to nine months, with an optimal wear life of 18-24 months. Like other organizational clothing, the FRV coveralls will be replaced by each ship over time based on normal wear and tear. The name/rank configuration of the FRV coverall will consist of a Velcrobacked name tag and metal collar devices. To build unit esprit de corps, each unit CO has the discretion to authorize the wear of the embossed leather name tag (same as worn on the V-neck sweater) or develop a fabric embroidered unit specific name tag similar to those worn on green Nomex flight jackets. Command ball caps are authorized for wear with the FRV. Materials making the coveralls flameresistant are incorporated into the fabric fibers. Wear life is dependent on many factors, including wear and cleaning frequency, cleaning method and environ mental exposure. The joint message from Adm. Bill Gortney (USFF) and Adm. Harry Harris (PACFLT) emphasized the Navys com mitment on safety. We operate in an environment that contains inherent risks. Given what has been learned through the organization al clothing working group analysis and NWU type I burn test, we are striving to make shipboard environments safer. We have made initial progress toward that goal and believe that providing the FRV coverall to all afloat sailors will help reduce the risk of injury aboard ship. When worn properly, the FRV offers sig nificant protection from flame and flash fire. We are committed to always improving safety. Navy Lodges are great for business travelers Flame-resistant coveralls coming soon to the Fleet 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Friday at 7 p.m. Oct. 25 Second Tyme Around Band Deweys Family Night 3rd Friday of the Month Deweys will be open for dinner & beverages Nov. 15 Karaoke with Tom Turner Dec. 20 Childrens Holiday Bingo Childrens Holiday Bingo will start at 1830 and has a cost of $10 per person and includes soft drinks, hot dog, dauber, bingo card and gift bag for each child. DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Youth Bowling League: Every Sat., 10:30 am noon $17 annually or $8 per week. Includes shoes, awards will be given at the end of the season! Rising Stars Youth League: Every Sat., 10:30 am 12:30 pm. Pee Wee Division (6 years & under) 2 games, $6 per week. Juniors Division (7 years & older) 3 games, $8 per week. Special Stars Bowling League for families with special needs children. All ages welcome! Ramps available for the non-ambulatory as well as bumpers for beginners. Runs for 10 weeks at a cost of $7 per week, shoes are included. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4 6 pm. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4 10 pm. Thursdays: Free bowling for Active Duty 11 am 1 pm. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4 6 pm, Party Extreme $10, 8 pm midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Oct. 19, 1 4 pm. $20 per person, registration begins at noon. *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6 8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Monster Dash 5K October 31 at 11:30 a.m. Perimeter Rd. / Antenna Farm Pre-register by October 18 Powerlifting Competition Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014 7 a.m. at the Fitness Center $10 registration feeI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil. Jacksonville Zoo Spooktacular $9. Pandemic Haunted Attractions San Jose Blvd in Mandarin, tickets on sale at ITT! Haunting of School House 4 $18 Waves of Honor Special: Seaworld Orlando Adult $46.50, Child $42.25. Busch Gardens Tampa Adult $45, Child $40.50. Monster Jam: Club seating (includes pit pass) $42, regular seating (includes pit pass) $22. Jacksonville Jaguars: Section 147 Bud Zone, $70. Jags shuttle bus $12. Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2013 2014 Season: Tickets now available! MOSH: $7 $12. The Artist Series Broadway in Jax 2013 2014 Season: Tickets available now! Celtic Thunder: Nov. 10, 2013, 7 pm, $80. Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus: Jan. 17 & 18, 2014, $51. War Horse: Feb. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $68.50. Memphis: Mar. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $65. Million Dollar Quartet: Apr. 26, 2014, 8 pm, $65. The D* Word: Oct. 4 Oct. 25, 2014, $43.75 $46. Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27,2014) 4 day Hopper ticket$166 4 day 1 park per day and water park ticket-$166 4 day Hopper and Water park combo ticket$194 Gatorbowl $35 Capital One Bowl $98 Russell Athletic Bowl $78 Soul Food Festival Special $20 General Admission $32 Preferred $42 VIP $65 Legoland Free admission for active duty at park Tickets for family members available at ITT ITT is now selling $18 tickets for the Harlem Globetrotters! The show is February 28, 7 pm at Veterans Memorial Arena.The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Monster Dash 5k Oct. 31 at 11:30 a.m. Wear your costume! Paintball Trip Nov. 2 at 9 a.m. GTF in Yulee Ronald McDonald House Volunteer Trip Nov. 9 at 6:30 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Nov. 12 & 26 for active duty Nov. 14 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m. Turkey Trot Golf Scramble Nov. 25, 10 a.m. shotgun start $60 entry fee, $70 for civilian guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m.Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite! Auto Skills 101 for Women Nov. 7, 5 7 p.m. $5 per personYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Movie Under the Stars Nov. 8 at 6 p.m. Featuring Planes Patriots Grove Park Military Family Appreciation Carnival Nov. 16, 11 a.m. 4 p.m. Free admission, food available for purchaseFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013 13

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14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013 In order to meet the increasing demand for officers with specific com puter network operations knowledge, skills and abilities, requirements for the Cyber Warrant Officer Commissioning Program have changed, Navy officials said Oct. 25. NAVADMIN 259/13 outlines amend ments to the program. The following is a summary of the changes: Classification) has been removed as a requirement. rated Sailors who have been certi fied as Cyber Targeteers, Cyber Fire Support Planners, Cyber Fire Support Coordinators, Cyber Weaponeers and considered highly competitive candi dates. rated Sailors who have graduated from the Naval Postgraduate School with a Master of Science in Applied Cyber Operations have been added as highly competitive candidates. We wanted to increase the number of applicants who are eligible for the Cyber Warrant Officer Commissioning Program, said Capt. Baron V. Reinhold, director of Military Community Management, Bureau of Naval requirement allows for a larger pool of highly-qualified and competitive candidates to apply for the program. duties represent only one of ten work sive and defensive cyber operations. The Cyber Warrant Officer designator identifies, develops, and commissions technically proficient Sailors to operate, analyze, plan and direct full-spectrum cyber operations. All prerequisite criteria for the Chief Warrant Officer Commissioning Program are applicable to the Cyber Warrant Officer program. Selections to the program will be made via the annual Active duty and Reserve Limited Duty Officer (LDO) and Chief Warrant Officer (CWO) In-Service Procurement Boards. active-duty and Reserve LDO/CWO In-Service Procurement Boards must be postmarked no later than Oct. 1, Officer applicants only, the deadline applications for Cyber Warrant Officer must be received by Navy Personnel Command by the new deadline. Basic eligibility requirements are outlined in NAVADMIN 176/13 for active duty and NAVADMIN 177/13 for Reservists. Specific requirements and additional information about LDO/CWO programs Programs Application Administrative Manual, chapter 7. Updated application instructions are For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. NAVFAC team claims womens doubles tennis There were three womCaptains Cup Doubles Tennis Tournament Oct. 7 at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts at NAS Jacksonville. The teams played a round robin for mat for the tournament with each match played scoring. The first match was between Susan Smallwood and Sue Brink from Naval Command Southeast (NAVFAC) against Vanessa Givens and Terri Whitson from Navy Region Southeast. Smallwood and Brink to one. Whitson and Givens had to play again against Kelly Yuska and Amanda Foster from NAVFAC. Givens and Whitson rebounded and won their second match in the tie breaker by the score of 7-6. Smallwood and Brink had to play Yuska and Foster and if they could beat Yuska and Foster, they would win the tournament because they would have beaten both teams in the round robin format. It was not to be as Yuska and Foster were able to defeat Smallwood and Brink so now all three teams had a one and one record. Smallwood and Brink bowed out of the tour nament because Brinks knee could not take any more pounding leaving Yuska and Foster and Givens and Whitson with one win and one loss each. In order to determine first and second place, they had to play one match for the cham pionship. Yuska and Fosters one loss came at the hands of Givens and Whitson in their tiebreaker 7-6 match. Yuska and Foster had revenge written all over them and they were able to come through to defeat Givens and Whitson to win Womens Doubles Tennis Tournament. There were five mens doubles ten Doubles Tennis Tournament Oct. 7. The format for the one-day tourna ment was double elimination with each No add scoring was also used to complete the tournament in one day. Brad Youngers and Jack Benfer from Fleet won their first two matches to vault them into the championship. Tai Pham and Vien Tran, also from pionship having to play four matches in order to get in and Youngers and Benfer only played two matches. Pham and Tran put a great fight, however, Youngers and Benfer won the match 6-4 to win the tournament. Cyber warrant officer need sparks changes in requirements for program, broadens eligibility FRCSE captures top spots in mens doubles tennis

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013 Halloween horrors, fall festival flubs Ghosts and goblins may not be the true threat to trick-or-treaters during this years Halloween festivities. Possibly tainted candy, use of costume materials, and food borne illnesses may really be the hazards. As such, the health professionals at the Florida/ USVI Poison Information Center Jacksonville can be an important resource for parents at this time of year. The Poison Center Help Line, 1-800-222-1222 is available 24 hours a day when these questions come up. Halloween can be a time for fun and adventure for children, but we need to remain diligent that there are still some risks associated with Halloween activities such as those described below or for small children accidentally mistaking medications for treats. Children under the age of six continue to be the number one victim of accidental poisonings. Last year, the Florida/USVI Poison Information Center Jacksonville received almost 36,000 human exposure calls, nearly 17,000 which involved accidental ingestions in children under the age of six. Between Oct. 29 and Nov. 2 last year the Help Line received almost 700 calls. On Oct. 31 alone, there were 135 calls for help and advice to the Poison Center Help Line. This is also the time of the year known for fall festivals, carnivals and fairs. One of the more fun aspects of these events is the various types of food available. The not-so-fun part can be food borne illness associated with undercooked or improperly handled or stored food. The Florida/USVI Poison Information Center Jacksonville can provide food safety education tips and management advice for food poisoning if it does occur. Parents should be vigilant for malicious con tamination and tampering of Halloween candy, said Dr. Jay Schauben, director of the Florida/ USVI Poison Information Center Jacksonville. Likewise, we can decrease the risk to children by using non-toxic paints and materials for costume design and by paying close attention to food/candy labels to prevent food allergies. The following tips can help ensure a safe Halloween for everyone: Parents should inspect all treats their children bring home before any are consumed and imme diately discard treats with puncture holes, tears or signs of re-wrapping. Feed children dinner before they go out or bring along your own candy to give your children to reduce the urge to snack on treats that have not been inspected. Be extra careful with toddlers goodies. Avoid choking hazards by allowing treats that are ageappropriate. Be careful with hard candy, gum, peanuts and toys with small parts. Caution children to not chew or bite on glow sticks or glow jewelry as these products contain an irritating chemical which may cause pain if it gets in their mouth, eyes or throat. If using dry ice for decorations, be aware that direct contact with the skin or mouth can cause a frostbite type injury. Wash immediately with water. Wear reflective costumes in the dark or carry a flashlight. When in doubt, throw it out! For more Halloween safety tips, log on to the Poison Centers website at www.fpicjax.org; click on Poison Info/Prevention/Seasonal Hazards/ Autumn. In a poisoning emergency, dont waste time searching the Internet. Call your Poison Center first at 1-800-222-1222 and a specialist in poison information will assist you. The Poison Center Helpline is toll free and specialists are available 24 hours a day in a poisoning emergency, or to answer your poisoning-related questions. Service members who deploy or are otherwise separated from their families due to mission needs now have an online resource allowing them to hone their parenting skills as they reconnect with their chil dren. Pam Murphy, the Defense Departments lead psychologist for the Web site, said the launch of http://www.militaryparenting. org offers unprecedented, compre hensive and free computer-based training from a service members perspective on parenting and building strong relationships with their children. A clinical psychologist with more than 20 years of experience in community and private practice, Murphy said the Integrated Mental Health Strategy Program is a col laborative initiative between the Veterans Affairs Department and DoD. We initially did an environ mental scan of everything within the DoD as well as commercially available, and one of the areas that seemed to be at a deficit was a comprehensive parenting program that looks at the basics, Murphy said. She noted that while a plethora of parenting information exists online, it was difficult to identify a free, private military-centric program. This is one of the first of its kind, Murphy said. The interactive site, develops and reinforces parenting skills to help families reconnect through in-depth technology solu tions that appeal to young parents. Murphy added that the site goes beyond the job and hits home in terms of affecting family relation ships, building resilience and help ing service members to be happy with their lives within the military. She also noted that service members personalized accounts inter woven into the site make the situations and solutions relatable. We included videos of real ser vice personnel to talk about real-life experiences with parenting, reinte grating and making those everyday decisions, Murphy said. The Web site consolidates and simplifies information that was previously accessible across multiple resources, said Air Force Senior Airman Matthew Siegele, a pro tocol specialist, and his wife, Air Force Staff Sgt. Sabrina Siegele, noncommissioned officer in charge of knowledge operations, both of whom work at Joint Base LewisMcChord, Wash. Weve been through so many parenting classes, counseling and therapy, and a lot of the resourc es and advice is mirrored on this site, Sabrina said. This Web site is excellent its a one-stop shop instead of jumping around to mul tiple appointments. During family separations, Murphy said, Skype and Facetime can help keep families connected, but the military parenting Web site offers ideas for technology-based activities to help in reuniting par ents and children after deployment. Murphy said the Web site can help military parents to reconnect with their children. Military parenting Web site assists communication with children Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service mem bers and their families. The following is the schedule for 2013: Training Nov. 12-15 (5:30-10 p.m.) Program (TAP) Separation Workshop (7:30 a.m.4:15 p.m.) Nov. 4-8, Dec. 2-6. Program (TAP) Retirement Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) Nov. 18-22, Dec. 16-20. Workshop (9 a.m.-noon) Nov. 27, Dec. 11. (Noon-3 p.m.) Interview Techniques Workshop (8-9:30 a.m.) Nov. 25. Letters Workshop (9:40 a.m.-noon) Nov. 25. Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Nov. 13-14. Specialist Training (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Dec. 9-13. Deals in Car Buying (9-10:30 a.m.) Nov. 26. (1:30-3 p.m.) Dec. 12. Workshop (1:30-4 p.m.) Nov. 14. 101 Workshop Nov. 21 (5-6:30 p.m.) (9-11 a.m.) Nov. 4, Dec. 9. 101 Workshop (9-10:30 a.m.) Nov. 5, Dec. 10. Workshop (8 a.m.-noon) Nov. 26, Dec. 17. Individual Communication (11 a.m.1 p.m.) Nov. 19. Logic (1-3 p.m.) Nov. 5, 12, 19, 26. Power 2 Change, Womens Support Group (9:30-11 a.m.) Every Wednesday Expectant Families (9 a.m.-3 p.m.) Dec. 3. Tiny Tots Play Group (10 a.m.-noon) Nov. 12, 16; Dec. 10, 17. Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) Orientation (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) Nov. 7. EFMP Command POC Training (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) Dec. 5. To register for any of the above workshops call 542-5745. FFSC offers life skills workshops for military families

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013 17 With United States military installations spread around the world, it is no wonder that many service members choose to marry foreign nationals overseas. Entering into these marriages goes well beyond traditional premarital consid erations of obtaining paren tal approval. Although most members understand that they must follow the laws in the country in which the marriage takes place, not all are aware that they must also abide by military regulations and United States immigration laws. Many service members are under the mistaken belief that the military does not care who they marry or have any involvement in these mar riages. Many also believe that once married, the marriage certificate with the dependent military identification card will allow the foreign spouse to travel back to the United States with them. In order to avoid potentially lengthy periods of separation between themselves and their spouses, members should be familiar with the military reg ulations relating to overseas marriages and the immigra tion laws controlling the entry of foreign spouses into the U.S. This article will explain the applicable Navy regulations and the immigration process. Before even considering an overseas marriage to a foreign national, members must be mindful that they must receive approval from their service to marry. For naval personnel, the approval process is governed by MILPERSMAN Section 5352-030. That section requires the member to submit an application for permission to marry to the area commander where they intend to marry. Section 5352-030 provides a list of the area commanders and their countries of responsibility. During this part of the pre marital processing, the future spouse will undergo a back ground investigation and medical examination. After the couple is married overseas, they must go through the immigrant visa process. An immigrant visa is a visa that allows the foreign spouse to travel to the U.S. with the intent of living here permanently. It is a multi-part and complicat ed process which requires the member to complete detailed government forms, pay fees and submit certain documents. Failure to do any of these things correctly, will result in significant delays in the pro cessing. Although some of the forms are the same, members must understand that the pro cess varies if a member desires to bring their fianc to the U.S. to marry. The first step is filing a Petition for Alien Relative (USCIS Form I-130) along with documents proving the mar riage is valid. The filing fee for this Petition is $420. Once this document is filed, a receipt is issued and the member may check the status of the petition online at https://ceac.state.gov/ CEACStatTracker Upon the approval of the I-130, the foreign spouse will go through consular process ing through the National Visa Center. During this stage, the spouse will submit an Application for Immigrant Visa and Alien Registration (Form DS-230). Simultaneously, the spouse should obtain a valid passport from his or her home country for overseas travel; as the visa, once approved, will likely only be valid for a period of 6 months. The spouse will thereafter receive an appoint ment package for an interview date. The member, who will be considered the foreign spouses sponsor, must file an Affidavit of Support (USCIS Form I-864) to show that the member can financially sup port their spouse to assure that the foreign spouse will not become a public charge of the U.S. The member must prove their financial ability by submitting their tax returns and employment documents. The Affidavit of Support is a binding 10-year contract between the U.S. requiring that the sponsor reimburse the government for any public benefits the spouse receives for that period or until the spouse becomes a U.S. citizen. The sponsor will remain bound by that contract even if the mar riage is dissolved. At the end of the inter view the consular officer will make a decision on whether the visa should be approved. However, it may take several weeks until the actual visa is received. Upon receiving the visa, the spouse may thereaf ter travel to the U.S. and will receive an I-551 stamp upon his or her passport. If the couple has been married for at least two years, the spouse will receive Lawful Permanent Residence status. If not, the spouses residence will be conditional for two years and is then removed filing Form I-751 (Petition to Remove Conditions of Residence). Entering into an overseas marriage to a foreign national requires a great deal of plan ning. It should be given careful consideration and should never be entered into casually. If you would like more information or to find the legal assistance office closest to you, please contact any of the offices listed at http://www.jag. navy.mil/legal_services/rlso/ rlso_southeast.htm Make every month Energy Awareness MonthIt may seem like an odd question, but a few years back, a naval shipyard adopted a lunchtime lights out policy in the production shops. Naval shipyards were all constructed more than 100 years ago, and many of the shops are in tall brick buildings with a lot of window areas. The lights out policy was intended more to increase energy awareness in the production shops than to save energy over lunchtime. But the energy savings surprised a lot of people. Some of the shops found that on sunny days, they didnt need to turn the lights back on in the afternoon. Another characteristic of shipyard production shops is that they typically are not air-conditioned. Leaving off heat-generating lights on hot afternoons can also improve comfort. That makes two good reasons to try shutting off the lights in the afternoon when you have a source of daylight. A few task lights here and there might be all you need to work safely, productively and energy efficiency. In other types of buildings, it might make more sense to close blinds to keep out the heat, especially on the south and west sides of the building. Legal: Information on marrying a foreign national overseas Instead of lights, have you tried just daylight?

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In response to the Maritime Patrol Association (MPA) 2014 Corporate Sponsorship Program, Systems Planning and Analysis Inc. (SPA) became a MPA Bronze Level corpo rate sponsor by awarding the organization with a financial contribution Oct. 23 for its mission to build a strong foun dation of support for the U.S. Navys Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF). At SPA, we appreciate the dedication of the men and women who keep the MPRF running day in and day out, said President Phillip Lantz. However we can support those folks on the job and beyond, we are honored to do so. The sponsorship by SPA will enable MPA to extend a number of opportunities to the members of the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force, including; networking and education offered through a variety of meetings, events and media; awards, recogni tion and scholarships to those persons who have made sig nificant contributions to this aviation community; and infor mation regarding new developments and accomplishments in the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance community. Incorporated a little more than 24 months ago, MPA has grown from wishful thinking to a thriving official Florida non-profit corporation. In its first two years, MPA has attracted more than 1,000 members, received more than $70,000 from corporate spon sors, raised more than $10,000 for the MPA Scholarship Fund, entertained hundreds of guests during the annual symposium week, and released seven issues of the quarterly newsletter, PLANESIDE. A Florida not-for-profit corporation established in 2011 and headquartered in Jacksonville, Fla., the Maritime Patrol Association is dedicated to its mission to be the premier professional organization rep resenting the U.S. Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance community by promoting the use of the patrol and recon naissance aircraft in the United States Navy. The organiza tion is tax-exempt under sec tion 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code (Tax ID No. 45-1968605).For more information, contact Executive Director September Wilkerson at (904) 563-4036 or info@maritimepatrolassocia tion.org. Visit the MPA website at www.maritimepatrolassociation. org. Navy commands worldwide are participating in Energy Action Month to share infor mation on energy efficiency, highlight the Navys successful energy initiatives, and foster an energy aware culture. President Obama declared October as National Energy Action Month and issued a call to action for all Americans to work together to achieve greater energy security. Navy commands worldwide are participating in Energy Action Month to share infor mation on energy efficiency, highlight Navys successful energy initiatives, and foster an energy aware culture. The goal of 2013 Navy Energy Action Month efforts is to bring about cultural and behavior al change that enables energy security and resiliency. The Navys energy initiatives are highlighted in October, but continue throughout the year. The Navy launched a video this month that describes a new information campaign to inspire energy behavior change and awareness among the Navy workforce. The campaigns theme, Did You Know? highlights the importance of energy to the Navys mission. The video can be viewed here: http://youtu.be/1D8JFugpzg. Energy security and mission success go hand-in-hand for the Navy. Energy is our great est enabler and our greatest vulnerability both afloat and ashore, explained Rear Adm. Kevin Slates, director of Navys Energy and Environmental Readiness Division. Our combat capability is directly tied to the energy we have available and our ability to use it efficiently so we have it when and where its needed. The Department of Defense (DoD) accounts for 80 percent of the Federal governments energy consumption. The Navy accounts for 22 percent of DoDs total petro leum consumption; 84 percent of this figure is consumed in fleet operations. These rates of consumption represent stra tegic and operational vulner abilities. By making more energy effi cient choices, the Navy can increase capability, reduce vulnerabilities, and enhance resiliency. We deliver 1.25 billion gal lons of fuel worldwide to operators annually. This represents an Achilles heel in opera tors, explains Capt. James Goudreau, director of the Navy Energy Coordination Office. Our efforts are focused on technology changing behav ior to provide options for increased payload, range, or endurance, thus giving com manders greater operational flexibility. The Department of the Navy is also providing energy-awareness training opportunities for fleet Sailors and aviators, Marine Corps expeditionary operators, and shore energy managers. The training ses sions will focus on energy sav ings practices, culture change, and increasing awareness of energy use. At the Pentagon, Navy Energy Action Month posters and electronic billboard signs are helping to increase aware ness of Navy energy initiatives. Energy Action Month is also a perfect opportunity to high light ways Sailors and civilian personnel can reduce energy consumption. For lists of ideas, visit http://dld.bz/energyaction-month. How are you taking action to save energy? What does energy resiliency mean to you? Join the conversation at #NavyEnergy. Do you have ideas on how the Navy can take action to save energy? The Navy wants to hear them. The new Collab Lab tool, developed by Navy Warfare Development Center, allows individuals and institutions to submit energy efficiency ideas, comment on ideas posted by others, and vote on the ideas that are already there. Become part of the solution and sub mit your energy ideas on the Collab Lab page at http://dld. bz/collab-lab. Maritime Patrol Association awarded SPA sponsorshipResiliency, culture change are focus of 2013 NavyEnergy Action Month 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2013 2014 AIR SHOW FR CSE DIABET ES Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) has select ed NAS Jacksonville as the 2014 Installation Excellence Award (IEA) nominee for the Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) IEA for the third consecutive year. The station was also the recipient of the 2013 CNIC IEA and 2012 CNIC IEA and Presidential IEA. It will now go on to compete with 76 other naval installations throughout the world for the CNIC IEA. I am very pleased to announce that NAS Jacksonville and NSA Panama City have been selected as our nominees for large and small installations respectively for the 2014 CNIC Installation Excellence Award. Our crossfunctional panel of experts considered excellent pack ages from all of our installa tions. NAS Jacksonville and NSA Panama City submit ted the best packages in their respective categories, demon strating how they exceeded the criteria set forth by the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense to support the fleet, fighter and family, said CNRSE Rear Adm. Ricky Williamson in his message announcing the award win ners. On behalf of the entire CNRSE organization, I offer congratulations to Capt. Roy Undersander and Cmdr. Christopher Serow, and their entire teams, and wish them all the best in the forthcoming competition, Williamson said. NAS Jacksonville sustained excellence in a wide range of operational and warfighter readiness support functions, better mission performance and superb quality of life for Air traffic controllers at NAS Jacksonville are increasing their profi ciency thanks to a new tower simulator suite recently installed in Building 118. Like most professions today, air traf fic controllers (ACs) are impacted by technology. Every year, there are more aircraft operating in NAS Jacksonville air space. On any given day, controllers may handle a potentially volatile mix of high-speed fighter jets along with lower-speed turboprop patrol planes NECEs new insect enclosure opens doors to new projects The Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) held a ribbon-cut ting ceremony Oct. 18 to unveil its new outdoor enclosure that will be used for entomological studies. The screened enclosure is located behind NECEs main building, and has several sophisticated features, includ ing an automated irrigation system, timed lights, and an air curtain to pre vent insects entering or escaping from the enclosure. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander, NECE Officer in Charge Capt. Eric Hoffman and Maj. Peter Nunn, an Army entomologist cur rently stationed at NECE, cut the ribbon to represent the joint effort between the Army and Navy. This new addition to NECE grounds would not have been made possible without Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR), said Hoffman. Funding from WRAIR allowed for the construction of this unique capabil ity. Joint cooperation is essential to developing and evaluating products that directly impact the health a readi ness of the joint force world-wide, said Nunn. What we are seeing here today is how jointness can amplify value across the services. This new enclosure increases our ability to perform collaborative proj ects under semi-field conditions, said Cmdr. Peter Obenauer, NECE assistant officer in charge. We are now able to evaluate insect control products outside the laboratory thereby enabling us to take environ NAS Jax best in region for third consecutive year Tower simulator broadens air-traffic controller proficiency

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Oct. 31 1941 German submarine U-552 sinks USS Reuben James (DD245), which was escorting Convoy HX 156, with loss of 115 lives. First U.S. ship lost to enemy action in World War II. 1943 Lt. Hugh ONeill of VF(N)-75 destroys a Japanese aircraft during night attack off Vella Lavella in the first kill by a radar-equipped night fighter of the Pacific Fleet. 1956 Sailors land in R4D Skytrain on the ice at the South Pole. Rear Adm. George Dufek, Capt. Douglas Cordiner, Capt William Hawkes, Lt. Cmdr. Conrad Shinn, Lt. John Swadener, AD2 J. P. Strider and AD2 William Cumbie are the first men to stand on the South Pole since Capt. Robert Scott in 1912. 1956 USS Burdo (APD-133) and USS Harlan R. Dickson (DD-708) evacuate 166 persons from Haifa, Israel due to the fighting between Egypt and Israel. 1961 End of lighter-than-air era in U.S. Navy with disestablishment of Fleet Airship Wing One and ZP-1 and ZP-3, the last operating units in LTA branch of naval aviation, at Lakehurst, New Jersey. Nov. 1 1841 Mosquito Fleet command ed by Lt. Cmdr. J. T. McLaughlin car ries 750 Sailors and Marines into the Everglades to fight the Seminole Indians. 1941 President Franklin D. Roosevelt places Coast Guard under jurisdiction of Department of the Navy for duration of national emergency. 1967 Operation Coronado IX began in Mekong Delta. 1979 Retirement of Polaris A-3 program begins with removal of mis siles from USS Abraham Lincoln. Last Polaris missile removed in February 1982. Nov. 2 1943 In battle of Empress Augusta Bay, U.S. cruisers and destroyers turn back Japanese forces trying to attack transports off Bougainville, Solomons. 1968 Operation Search Turn began in Mekong Delta. Nov. 3 1853 USS Constitution seizes sus pected slaver H. N. Gambrill. 1931 Dirigible USS Los Angeles makes 10-hour flight out of NAS Lakehurst, N.J., carrying 207 persons, establishing a new record for the num ber of passengers carried into the air by a single craft. 1943 Battleship Oklahoma, sunk at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, is refloat ed. 1956 USS Cambria (APA-36) removes 24 members of United Nations Truce Commission team from the Gaza Strip. 1956 USS Chilton (APA-38), USS Thuban (AKA-19), and USS Fort Snelling (LSD-30) evacuate more than 1,500 U.S. and foreign nationals from Egypt and Israel because of the fighting. 1961 After Hurricane Hattie, heli copters from USS Antietam begin relief operations at British Honduras provid ing medical personnel, medical sup plies, general supplies and water. Nov. 4 1967 Landing craft from USS Navarro (APA-215) rescue 43 men from British SS Habib Marikar aground on a reef at Lincoln Island in the Tonkin Gulf. 1971 USS Nathanael Greene (SSBN636) launches a Poseidon C-3 missile in first surface launch of Poseidon missile. Nov. 5 1775 Commodore Esek Hopkins appointed to Commander in Chief of the Continental Navy. 1915 In AB-2 flying boat, Lt. Cmdr. Henry Mustin makes first underway catapult launch from a ship, USS North Carolina, at Pensacola Bay, Fla. 1917 German submarine torpedoes USS Alcedo off French coast. 1923 Tests designed to prove the fea sibility of launching a small seaplane from a submarine occur at Hampton Roads Naval Base. A Martin MS-1, stored disassembled in a tank on board USS S-1, was removed and assembled. Then the submarine submerged allow ing the plane to float free and take off. 1944 TF 38 (Vice Admiral John McCain) begins two days of carrier strikes on Luzon, Philippines. 1945 Ensign Jake West (VF-41) makes first jet landing on board a car rier, USS Wake Island (CVE-65) Nov. 6 1851 U.S. Navy expedition under command of Lt. William Lewis Herndon, on a mission to explore the valley of the Amazon and its tributaries, reaches Iquitos in the jungle region of the upper Amazon after their departure from Lima, Peru. 1941 On Neutrality Patrol, USS Omaha (CL-4) and USS Somers (DD381) intercept the German blockade runner Odenwald disguised as U.S. freighter, board her after the German crew abandoned the ship, and brought the ship to San Juan, Puerto Rico, where the boarding party was awarded sal vage shares. 1942 First officer and enlisted women from training schools report for shore duty around the USA. 1951 Soviet aircraft shoot at P-2V Neptune patrol bomber (VP-6) on weather reconnaissance mission near Siberia. U.S. aircraft fails to return. 1967 Helicopter from USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) rescues 37-man crew of Liberian freighter Royal Fortunes aground on reef in Tonkin Gulf. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS When the boys asked what I wanted for my birthday last week, I decided to make it less painful for them. Just take me to the Star Wars concert performed the Portland Symphony Orchestra, I said, and (wink, wink) that will be a great birthday. I would, of course, be the one who paid (and drove and ordered the tickets), but the boys like Star Wars, so everyone would be happy. Thats what moms do for their birth days: they make everyone else happy. We arrived at the auditorium early and just in time to see a couple storm troopers and Darth Vader posing for pictures on the sidewalk. Oh, my gosh, I screamed. Look! Its Darth! Lets get our pictures taken. How about I take one of you with Darth Vader, Mom, Ford said, reaching for my phone. Oh? Are you sure? I said. I can take one of you with him next. No, its fine, he said. Then he motioned with his hand for me to get closer to Darth. Inside the auditorium, hundreds of chil dren, most of them 5-, 6-, and 7-years old, waved light sabers and glow sticks as they waited for the music to begin. I thought about George Lucass cleverness: for a film that is as old as me, it still manages to induct devotees with each new generation. And there was a man in his 20s in front of us dressed as a storm trooper, so clearly the devotion stays strong with age. I made a mental note about not wanting the boys to dress as storm troopers when they are 20. Then I clapped my hands and looked at Ford. Isnt this exciting? Just like old times, right? (We saw Star Wars Live performed by the Boston Pops in 2010.) Just then, the lights dimmed and the audience grew quiet. The conductor, dressed in a Jedi robe, raised his arms, and the violinists drew their bows. When the first notes of the Star Wars theme song came, I started to cry. Mom? Ford said. Ummmm... Lindell fidgeted in his seat and asked me to open his glow stick. In front of me, little boys stood in their seats and leaned on their moms shoulders as they bounced up and down with the music. Isnt this great? I said, grabbing Fords hand. Tears were spilling down my cheeks now. Sure, Mom, he said. An hour later, the show was over, and I wanted to find the face painters we saw ear lier. A Death Star tattoo on someones (Ford? Owen?) left cheek was all that was left to complete this birthday. (What do you mean no one wants their face painted?) All in all, it was a great day that was sup posed to be about me, but which I had man aged to actually make about them. I patted myself on my back. From Lindell, 6: Once me and my family went to a Star Wars concert where there were songs and actors. Also we got glow sticks. I think it was fun. From Owen, 10: We trudged up several flights of stairs, excited for the music. When we final ly reached the top, a lady said to me, Do you want a glow stick little boy? I said as politely as I could that I didnt want one. She handed me the concert program instead. I decided it was best to just take it. After those long, tiring speeches they give you before a concert, the music started. They had stormtroopers and rebels on stage acting out scenes from the movie on stage. But they got some of the facts wrong. For instance, they made Yoda say one of ObiWans most famous quotes! I sat back and laughed. Do they think were 2? From Ford, almost 13: Star Wars used to be my favorite. But that was a long time ago. Now its different. I dont care who shot first, or what Darth Vaders motives were. So when I learned Mom wanted to see a Star Wars concert, I was a little skeptical. It had been a long time since I really had any interest in Star Wars. I didnt understand who this trip was for. Then I realized: it was for Mom. She wanted to re-live that part of our lives. As I listened to the music, all I could hear were the memories of Owen and me playing lightsabers and talking about when we were going to see Revenge of the Sith. Although Mom apparently still misses those times, and maybe Owen does too, I dont. Halloween is approaching, and I can remember many times complaining about my Boba Fett costume being too cold, and Owen complaining his was too stuffy. But thats the past, and I am a different kid now.He said (and also him and him)/she said Reminder: Set clocks back one hour this weekendDaylight Saving Time ends Sunday, Nov. 3 so remember to set your clocks back (fall back) one hour. The NAS Jax Fire Prevention Division also reminds everyone to change your batteries in your smoke detector at the same time. 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013

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The U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels, will return to its full schedule for the 2014 air show season. Community outreach is key to connecting Americans to the military, said Blue Angels Commanding Officer and Flight Leader, Cmdr. Thomas Frosch. Our performances provide a unique opportunity to inspire millions to connect with and support our service members. Our team is looking forward to an exciting 2014 sea son. NAS Jacksonville is proud to host the Blue AngelsOct. 25-26, 2014, said NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander. He added that he was delighted the Navys Blue Angels will return to its birthplace NAS Jacksonville. Undersander also praised City of Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown and the Beaches mayors for agreeing to switch the 2014 air show venue as a result of the 2013 sequestra tion cancellation. Following winter training, the flight demonstration team begins the season Mar. 15 at Naval Air Facility El Centro, Calif., and will conclude the season Nov. 8 at NAS Pensacola. The Blue Angels are scheduled to perform 65 shows at 34 locations throughout the nation in 2014. The Blue Angels 2014 air show schedule can be found at: http://www.blueangels.navy. mil/media/show/2014ShowSchedule.pdf. Blue Angels announce 2014 air show scheduleScheduled to perform at NAS Jax Oct. 25-26 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013 Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) continues its leadership in pro viding nondestructive inspection (NDI) tools that enhance its maintenance sup port capabilities for the Fleet. FRCSE Materials Engineering Division personnel are leading the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) effort to evolve NDI. First is the transi tion from filmand chemicals-based radiography (x-ray) to digital radiogra phy. Next, is adapting second-generation, mid-wave infrared imaging for naval paint systems analysis, and third, is continued training and implementa tion of ultrasonic testing with Sailors throughout the Fleet. Materials Engineer Ian Hawkins and Materials Engineering Technician Warren Hansen work on the NDI Branch transition from traditional film radiography to computed radiography (CR). The transition takes time because hundreds of pages of instructions are required, and they must prove that each step along the way satisfies NAVAIR standards. The technical training to safely operate CR is a complex process that Hansen says will be complete in 2015. Hawkins explained that the advan tages of CR are numerous. Since CR cas settes replace film cassettes, the same x-ray generator and x-ray tube equip ment can be used, which saves con siderable costs. Digital images may be viewed in multiple locations at the same time. Images may be rapidly transferred to other locations. Storage of digital imag es takes less space than film storage. Image retrieval is less labor intensive and faster. Since software enhances the image, CR reduces retakes. Repeats will be primarily due to posi tioning errors. Hazards, such as chemi cals and darkroom maintenance are eliminated. Senior Materials Engineer Jack Benfer is in charge of the mid-wave infrared imaging system in the FRCSE Corrosion & Wear Branch. Navy paint systems are designed to protect aircraft from the harsh mar AVI A TION INSPECTION TECHNOLOGIES EVOLVE A T FR CSE

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013 5 itime environment. Were constantly changing coatings due to regulatory requirements or to improve perfor mance, stated Benfer. This sophisticated camera allows us to see through organic coatings paint systems to observe any substrate degradation. It enhances our visual inspection ability so we can make bet ter engineering decisions, said Benfer. This is not a tool that we deploy to pro duction, but instead use it in the lab for engineering investigations, along with research and development of new coatings. The depot benefits from the paint materials we select for the cor rosion program, as well as identifying corrosion without removing the paint system. FRCSE Metals Inspector Pete Bethley works in the NDI Branch. We provide routine ultrasonic inspections for cor rosion and other irregularities on air craft undergoing depot-level mainte nance at NAS Jax, NS Mayport and Cecil Airport. Theres a set-up procedure in our hand-held ultrasonic testers that includes baseline readings for various surfaces and materials of each aircraft type that helps our inspectors identify problem areas. FRCSE

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013 According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), nearly 26 million children and adults in the U.S. have diabetes, and another 79 million have prediabetesglucose levels that are higher than normal, but not high enough to be diag nosed as diabetes. November is designated as American Diabetes Month, with Nov. 14 being World Diabetes Daythemed Protect our Future. This years focus raises awareness to the evergrowing incidence of diabe tes and directing attention to issues surrounding it, the many people impacted and resources available to help. Diabetes is a group of dis eases characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from defects in the bodys ability to produce and or use insulinthe hormone needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy to sus tain the body each day. ADA recognizes three types of dia betes; type 1, type 2 and gesta tional. Symptoms of diabetes include frequent urination, thirst, extreme fatigue, blurry vision and weight loss to name a few. Type 1previously known as juvenile diabetesoften runs in families. Although it can occur at any age, it usually presents before 40 years of age. Type 1 diabetes is when the body does not produce insulin, due to an autoimmune process which destroys the insulin pro ducing cells of the pancreas. Treatment of this type is usu ally through careful dieting, insulin injections and regular blood glucose monitoring. Type 2formerly known as adult onset diabetesis the most common form of diabe tes and is due either the lack of insulin production and/or the cells are not reacting to insu lin. Risk factors include obe sity, race/ethnicity (African American, Native American, Pacific Islander, Asian and Hispanic), family history, over 40 years of age and sed entary lifestyles. Treatment of this type includes weight loss, proper dieting, regular exercise and blood glucose monitoring. Some cases may require oral medications or insulin injec tions. Gestational diabetes is when pregnant women show signs of high blood glucose levels, usually around the 24th week of pregnancy. This diagnosis doesnt mean that one has had, or will have dia betes afterbirth. Risk factors include women over 25 years of age, obesity, family or personal history and race. Treatment includes frequent monitoring of blood glucose, proper diet ing, regular exercise and close monitoring of unborn child. Diabetes screenings should be considered in younger adults and children who are overweight or obese, or who are at high risk for diabetes based on risk factors. Given the lower incidence of type 1 diabetes, there is no consensus to screen. Screening is based on individ ual risk factors or concerning symptoms. Screening for type 2 diabetes should be consid ered in all adults 45 years of age and older. There are several blood tests to diagnose diabetes: A1C, fasting glucose, oral glu cose tolerance test and ran dom glucose test, said Cmdr. Julie Lundstad, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles Diabetes Nurse Educator. There must be a second testsame test or a different oneconducted on a different day to confirm the diagnosis. Denial about the diagnosis of diabetes and risk of com plications is common among patients. This may be partly due to the fact that diabetes symptoms arent painful, like chest pain with heart attacks. But the truth is, that uncon trolled diabetes (high blood sugars) can cause complica tions such as heart disease, high blood pressure, blindness, kidney disease and lower-limb amputation, added Lundstad. NH Jacksonville will be promoting diabetes aware ness throughout the month of November, sharing information about health related services for its patients who already have diabetes as well as dis seminating information about the risk factors and screening for the disease, as part of the ongoing preventive health care services of its Medical Home Port teams. A wellness dis play will be available at Naval Air Station Jacksonvilles Navy Exchange Nov. 14 from noon to 2 p.m. to provide diabetes information to our nations heroesactive duty, retirees and their families. Diabetes is a serious dis ease. Regular check-ups and eye exams are vital to diagnosing diabetes or managing your health. Establish a relationship with your diabetes educator and ask for help when needed. For more information about American Diabetes Month, go to www.diabetes.org or talk to your primary care manager. NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville (NAVSUP FLCJs) per sonnel celebrated the U.S. Navys 238th Birthday and Hispanic Heritage Month Oct.10. Hispanic Heritage Month is celebrated each year from Sept. 15 through Oct. 15. NAVSUP FLCJ Commanding Officer Capt. Duke Heinz, kicked off the event by highlighting and expressing his innate appreciation for the participa tion of NAVSUP FLCJs talented and diversified workforce in the event. We are here today to commemorate two nationally recognized observanc es, said Heinz. Looking around the room, I think its apparent that diver sity is incorporated into all aspects of our Navy business, said Heinz. I truly believe that our diversified workforce is an enabler to us being a strong and uni fied Navy. Following Heinzs address, CMDCM Glenda Atwood, (a native of El Salvador) introduced the guest speakers. Today, we have the honor of hearing from Hispanic military member, Chief Luis Moreno, as well as from a member of our civilian workforce, Jose Santa, she said. Up first was NAVSUP FLCJ DET NAS Jacksonvilles HAZMAT and Material Control Leading Chief Petty Officer, Chief Moreno. Moreno explained some important dates in Hispanic Heritage history as well as memories from his early family life. Morenos parents (natives of Michoacn and Tijuana, Mexico) had migrated to the United States in 1968, but made frequent family visits back to Mexico while he was growing up. Reflecting on childhood memories, he described his most treasured and fond est moments, including his account of the holiday celebrations, an experience in which he paralleled to his time in the United States Navy. Up and down the streets of Mexico during the holiday season, you would see a gathering of neighbors and the sharing of food and celebration among the people, said Moreno. Much like my time in the Navy, as well as today, we are all gathered here, people of all races, as a unified team to commem orate Hispanic Heritage Month as a cohesive community. Following Morenos address, Santa spoke about growing up in Puerto Rico, his six years of service in the Navy, and his current career with NAVSUP FLCJ. Santa is a program analyst in the com mands business office with respon sibilities of budget formulation, exe cution and analysis. He is also one of 10 in the field of more than 100 appli cants enrolled in NAVSUPs elite and extensive Corporate Management Development Program. Like Moreno, Santa expressed his deep appreciation for the military and also presented some demographics of Hispanics and Latino Americans serv ing in the U.S. Armed Forces. Did you know that there are over 1.2 million Hispanics, aged 18 and older who are veterans of the U.S. Armed Forces? Santa asked the crowd. He also talked of the 50,000 Hispanic Sailors and officers who currently serve in the Navy, and specifically pointed out NAVSUPs own workforce ratios. Ten percent of our total NAVSUP civilian workforce is Hispanic. Moreover, according to our recent EEO survey, approximately 15 per cent of our NAVSUP FLCJ workforce is Hispanic, stated Santa. I can look around this room and tell that there are other Hispanics from South America, Central America, Mexico, the Caribbean and the U.S. among us that are all well deserving of this great privilege to speak to you today, so I am very honored for the opportunity. The command wrapped up the event by conducting a cake cutting ceremony in honor of Hispanic Heritage Month and the Navys 238th Birthday which was Oct. 13. After the cake cutting cer emony, personnel enjoyed traditional Hispanic delicacies buffet style. Roberto Santiago, information assurance man ager, provided entertainment by play ing songs on his guitar. FLCJ maintains a deep level of com mitment in terms of fostering a culture that embraces diversity, said Heinz. Todays events helped to promote the commands commitment with a dem onstration and celebration of teamwork and unity, by a diversified workforce of dedicated Navy professionals. Naval Hospital Jacksonville recognizes American Diabetes Month FLC Jacksonville partakes in dual celebration: Hispanic Heritage Month and Navy birthday

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Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus presented the Meritorious Service Medal (second award) to Cmdr. Miguel Dieguez, NAVFAC Southeast assistant regional engineer, in a brief ceremony Oct. 21. Dieguez was recognized for outstand ing meritorious service while serving as public works officer for NAVFAC Southeast at Public Works Department Naval Station (NS) Mayport from October 2011 through March 2013. Dieguez displayed dynamic leader ship, visionary innovation, and relent less commitment to excellence revi talized the Public Works Department and improved customer service, while enhancing the alignment and alloca tion of fiscal resources, according to the award citation. He expertly ensured the effective execution of $180 million while provid ing support for installation facilities management, recapitalization, base operating support, and environmental management, said Kiwus during the award presentation. He superbly managed construction programs valued at more than $161 mil lion that included work at NS Mayport, Marine Corps Blount Island Command, and the Navy Fuel Farm. One initiative accomplished by Dieguez was a waterfront energy con servation program that resulted in a decrease of 12 percent in electric ity consumption at NS Mayport, net ting $3 million in savings and leading to the installation receiving the 2012 Secretary of the Navy Energy and Water Management Gold Level Achievement Award. The opportunity to support the fleet, warfighter, and their families at Naval Station Mayport made my tour as Mayports Public Works officer one of the most challenging and rewarding of my career, said Dieguez. The successes and accomplishments highlighted by the award were a com plete team effort. Much of the credit (for the award) belongs to the men and women of Naval Station Mayports Public Works Department, continued Dieguez. They are without a doubt the most talented and dedicated group of professionals I have had the pleasure of serving with. NAVFAC Southeast recognizes officer IT1(SW) Paul Voigt and MA3 Kiara Walker were named Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Senior and Junior Sailor of the Fourth Quarter 2013, respectively, Oct. 18. As a battle watch specialist in the Regional Operations Center (ROC), Voigt ensured his team processed and filed more than 1,500 messages for 16 installations and successfully complet ed 15 Response Task Force drills dur ing a staff shortage. As a result, mis sion essential communication for the Southeast Region was uninterrupted. He also provided training to help ROC personnel qualify as battle watch spe cialists and assistant regional watch officers. In addition, Voigt is a volunteer in the local community, committing time to the Jacksonville Ronald McDonald house and the Cub Scouts of America Troop 0554. Petty Officer Voigt displays the leadership qualities that in time will result in him wearing anchors, said QMC(SW) Joseph Ziro, Voigts supervi sor. His maturity level and ability to work while under time constraints provide a stellar exam ple for his fellow Sailors. Voigt attributed his success to his ROC co-workers. I would say the genuine work effort from my department and command has enabled me to be successful and fulfill everyday mission tasks, he said. We have a great operations team from top to bottom. While Sailor of the quarter is an individual achievement, it really is the result of the hard work and dedica tion of an entire team of people. Walker is assigned to the CNRSE Force Protection Department. She orga nized the monthly security officer tele conferences for 16 Navy installations and collected information throughout the region for the region security offi cer. She was also directly responsible for providing CNRSE force protection plan of the week notes, which provide staff members with critical force protec tion and safety information. An active member of the communi ty, Walker volunteered three hours per month as a tutor at Mattie V. Rutherford Middle School and dedicated 10 hours to the Ronald McDonald House. Petty Officer Walker is a talented, devoted and motivated security pro fessional who is always willing to accept any task without reservation, said MAC(SW) Jonathon Benninger, Walkers supervisor. She performs her work proficiently and has a strong work ethic and can-do spirit. Walker said its a great honor to accept the award, but she had to give CNRSE announces Senior, Junior Sailor of the Fourth Quarter 2013 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013 7

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military men and women and their families, and a community outreach program set it apart from 15 other southeast installations. The nomina tion exemplified the total commitment to excellence by its military and civilian personnel and sets the air installation as one of the contenders for the CNIC award. This is unprecedented and I want to congratulate all the military, civilian, and contractors all 20,000 who make NAS Jax the best, day in and day out. They have built and maintained a cul ture of excellence that has been unsur passed. Their commitment to the warf ighter and forward deployed forcesis what allows NAS Jax to be recognized for this award for three consecutive years, NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander stated upon receiving the congratulatory email from Williamson. With the mission of supporting the fleet, fighter and family, NAS Jax is the premier installation for delivering effec tive, sustained and improved shore readiness for Sailors, their families and civilian employees. Base personnel worked around the clock providing services to 14 homebased squadrons, numerous detach ments, joint commands, government agencies and carrier strike group exer cises. Air Operations handled more than 33,029 flight operations and supported 20 detachments. NAS Jaxs Safety program continued its unmatched excellence in safety by being recertified by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration Voluntary Protection Program STAR status and mishap rates continue to be 36 percent below industry guidelines. In partnership with 110 tenant com mands, station personnel provided sup port and service to transition the P-3C Orion to the P-8A Poseidon; HS to HSM, logistic and reserve squadrons, joint services and allies. The station also completed or started construction on nearly $100 million of construction in support of the P-8A as well as the Triton and Fire Scout heli copter unmanned aerial systems. Achieving the Secretary of the Navys gold level of achievement for energy savings, NAS Jax installed 1,140 squarefeet of solar panels bringing the total to 5,500 saving approximately $300,000 annually. NAS Jacksonville looks forward to competing at the CNIC level. The win ner of the CNIC IEA will be nominated for the Commander in Chiefs annual award for installation excellence. Established in 1984, the award recog nizes the outstanding efforts of person nel in the operations and maintenance of U.S. military installations worldwide. EXCELLENCEmental factors into consideration when testing products for use in protecting the deployed warfighter. Some of the studies NECE plans to perform in the enclosure involve test ing mosquito repellants in open spac es, testing the efficacy of insect traps and testing novel surveillance equip ment. Once the studies are completed the results will be given to the Armed Forces Pest Management Board and will be used to determine Department of Defense wide policy regarding pest management and vector control pro grams. NECE is very excited to utilize this new resource and take our testing and evaluation process to the next level, said Obenauer. This sort of research capability represents the next step in protecting the warfighter against insect borne diseases. Undersander ended the ceremo ny saying, NECE is a unique Navy asset and you all [attendees] are really unsung heroes for the work that gets done here. credit to the people in her department who support her every day. I think support from my command was the most important thing leading to my selection, she said. They were the ones who provided me with the guid ance and support I needed to do my job at a high level and get out there and have an impact on the command. Individual selection criteria for the awards was based upon exemplary per formance of tasks, contributions that enhanced organization accomplish ment of command objectives, mission, teamwork or public image, and ones professional attitude toward self and others. CNRSE SOQ NECE The Florida Department of Health in Duval County (DOHDuval) has issued a mosquitoborne illness alert for Duval County. A human case of West Nile virus (WNV) illness was recently confirmed in a 54-year old male. Duval County has two confirmed cases of WNV in 2013. About one in 150 people infected with WNV will devel op severe illness. Symptoms can include high fever, head ache, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness, vision loss, numbness and paralysis. These symptoms may last several weeks, and neurologi cal effects may be permanent. The state monitors animals as sentinels for WNV, to deter mine if any of the viruses are present in the community. DOH-Duval continues to advise the public to remain dil igent in their personal mosqui to protection efforts. These should include remembering, drain and cover. Drain standing water to stop mosquitoes from multiplying garbage cans, house gutters, buckets, pool covers, coolers, toys, flowerpots or any other con tainers where sprinkler or rain water has collected. bottles, cans, pots and pans, broken appliances and other items that arent being used. and pets water bowls at least once or twice a week. from rain with tarps that dont accumulate water. in good condition and appro priately chlorinated. Empty plastic swimming pools when not in use. Cover skin with clothing or repellent socks, and long pants and longsleeves. This type of protection may be necessary for people who must work in areas where mosquitoes are present. to repellent to bare skin and clothing. lents according to the label. Repellents with DEET, picari din, oil of lemon eucalyptus, and IR3535 are effective. protect children younger than two months old. Cover doors and windows with screens to keep mosquitoes out of your house windows, doors, porches, and patios. Tips on repellent use directions careful ly for the approved usage before you apply a repel lent. Some repellents are not suitable for children. concentrations of up to 30 percent DEET are generally recommended. Other EPAapproved repellents contain Picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyp tus, or IR3535. These products are generally available at local pharmacies. Look for active ingredients to be listed on the product label. exposed skin, or onto clothing, but not under clothing. label instructions to be sure the repellent is age-appropri ate. According to the CDC, mosquito repellents containing oil of lemon eucalyptus should not be used on children under the age of 3 years. DEET is not recommended on children younger than two months old. the hands of children. Adults should apply repellent first to their own hands and then transfer it to the childs skin and clothing. necessary, apply a permethrin repellent directly to your cloth ing. Again, always follow the manufacturers directions. DOH continues to conduct statewide surveillance for mos quito borne illnesses, includ ing West Nile virus infections, Eastern equine encephalitis, St. Louis encephalitis, malaria, and dengue. Residents of Florida are encouraged to report dead birds via the website http:// www.MyFWC.com/bird. For more information, visit DOHs Environmental Public Health website at http://www. floridahealth.gov/diseasesand-conditions/mosquitoborne-diseases/prevention. html or call DOH-Duval at 904253-1850.Mosquito-borne illness alert issued Beginning early next year, WorkSource will become CareerSource Northeast Florida as part of a new universal brand identity to align Floridas nationally rec ognized workforce sys tem and improve custom er awareness and use of the systems services and resources. The new brand, CareerSource Florida, is a result of extensive market research and input from local leaders, employers, job seekers, workforce professionals and community partners throughout Florida. The name, logo and charter for the entire workforce system were approved unanimously by the Workforce Florida Inc. Board of Directors this spring. The WorkSource Board of Directors approved its aligned regional brand name in August. Companies do busi ness throughout the state, and the new brand will make it easier to find hiring assistance in every county, said local businessman Ron Avery, chair of the WorkSource board of directors. Jobseekers also relocate for school, for new jobs, and as they exit the mili tary. Theyll be able to find services more eas ily with just one name to search for. As a member of the CareerSource Florida System, CareerSource Northeast Floridaand its eight one-stop career centers that serve job seekers, workers and businesses Baker, Clay, Duval, Nassau,Putnam, and St. Johns counties will begin using our new name following a state wide brand launch in early 2014. The statewide rebranding effort was ini tiated to provide greater WorkSource changing name: CareerSource Northeast Florida 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013

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and multi-mission heli copters, said Air Traffic Control Facilities Officer Lt. Lance Breeding. They must also coor dinate air space activ ity with Jacksonville International Airport, Cecil Field Airport, gen eral aviation airfields and Outlying Landing Field Whitehouse. Steve Sessoms and Josh Cosgrove, air traffic con trol specialists with UFA Inc., installed the tower simulator suite in less than a week. This suite provides the latest 3D graphics along with simulated weather information, integrated radar displays and simu lation of other key tower systems to provide the highest-fidelity training capability through a pho to-realistic airfield data base, said Sessoms. It also includes a voice recognition and response feature that trains con trollers without the need for additional support staff who would normally pretend to be pilots. At UFA, we use com mercial off-the-shelf (COTS) equipment and technology to keep acquisition, installation and operational costs down, said Cosgrove. The system provides a 210-degree panoram ic view of the station through seven monitors. The simulator allows operators to choose from 360 degrees of view from the NAS Jax control tower. Features include a close-up binocular view, as well as night-vision capability. Breeding said, Sequencing is one of the biggest challenges that controllers face in a VFR (visual flight rules) envi ronment. VFR requires a pilot to be able to see outside the cockpit, to control the aircrafts altitude, navigate, and avoid obstacles and other aircraft. Sequencing involves taking an addi tional aircraft and fitting it into the traffic pattern for a particular airspace. After each training session, the instructor fills out an OJT critique sheet and the controller gets to play back the scenario and view the correct pro cedures. Over all, the sys tem works according to the Air Traffic Control Publication 7110.65 that contains all the Navy rules and regulations. AC2 Jeremy Funk explained that the tower (and simulator) is popu lated by four positions: first is the local control ler responsibility for planes in the air; two is the ground controller responsibility for taxi ing aircraft; and three is the data controller who coordinates with enti ties such as Jacksonville International airport and Cecil Field Airport; and fourth is the tower super visor. AC1 Ayanna Gregg said, This simulator will only increase consistency within our ranks. There are times especially during holidays when our air operations vol ume is low. The simula tor gives our controllers a venue to maintain their proficiency levels during periods of reduced activ ity. Breeding added, These simulations are very realistic because they mimic our air traf fic, air field facilities and local geography. The sim ulator view is much the same as working in our tower. Whether its a P-8A, P-3C, C-130T, C-40A, MH-60R or transient air craft our controllers will now train to simulat ed 3D images that match the reality of the control tower environment. TOWER This Veterans Day holiday weekend your commis sary will highlight the service of Vietnam War veter ans with special sales promotions and events to mark the introduction of the 50th anniversary Vietnam War commemoration flag. The flag recognizes the service, valor and sacri fice of our military members who made it possible for America to remain strong and safe as a defender of democracy worldwide, said Larry Bentley, NAS Jacksonville Commissary store director. We hope that every time a Vietnam War veteran and their family sees this flag, they will know that a grateful nation remembers, thanks and honors them. On Nov. 8 at 8:30 a.m., in addition to the exclu sive savings offered on this special day, the NAS Jacksonville Commissary will be hosting a commem orative event recognizing the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War. Commissary customers are invited to join us in thanking our Vietnam veterans and their families, as well as all war veterans, young and old. With their devoted families who stood by strong and resilient under these war time conditions. It is with great honor that your local commis sary serves our nations veterans with dignity and gratitude for everything they have done to keep our country safe, Bentley said. We cannot thank the Vietnam War veterans and all war veterans enough for what they have done for our country, our Constitution and our families. For more information about this special event, call 542-5311. Military families facing the annual ritual of plan ning their holiday menus need look no farther than their commissary for quality and savings. Your commissary has the most affordable, high-quality, namebrand ingredients for the perfect holiday meal, said Randy Chandler, Defense Commissary Agency sales director. Throughout November, the commissarys indus try partners vendors, suppliers and brokers are collaborating with stores to offer discounts. Customers are asked to check their local com missary for the following promotions: Get All the Fixins Save Big on Your Bird. This worldwide promo tion revolves around a recipe booklet with cou pons valued at more than $43. The coupons provide commissary shoppers with greater than normal savings or free turkeys when purchasing holi day meal essentials. Look for these recipe booklets in your local commis sary with coupons good through Nov. 28. Nestls Make Your Home Extra Special for the Holidays This contest will award one grand prize of $6,000 along with 147 runnersup prizes of $25 commis sary gift cards. Look for entry forms and boxes adjacent to Nestls Good Food, Good Life name-brand products. Participants must be 18 years of age or older and eligible to use the com missary. Look for this promotion in November. Acosta and its partici pating brand products present the Believe in Heroes! promotion. Commissaries world wide will receive fly ers containing coupons. During the sale, most participating brands will provide donations to the Wounded Warrior Project foundation.Commissary to honor Vietnam vetsYour commissary offers more savings for the holidaysIn November and December, The NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) is offering Suicide Prevention Awareness Training for base and tenant commands in November and December. Should your command be in need of this train ing, select a date and time that is convenient for your command and contact us, said FFSC Education and Training Coordinator Wilhelmina Nash. Attending this one-hour class could help you save someones life. The following is the schedule of classes: Nov. 1 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Nov. 5 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Nov. 6 9 a.m. & 3 p.m. Nov. 7 1 & 3 p.m. Nov. 13 1 & 3 p.m. Nov. 14 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Nov. 20 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Nov. 26 8 a.m. & 1 p.m. Nov. 27 8 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 2 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 3 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 4 8 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 5 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 10 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 11 1 & 3 p.m. Dec. 12 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 17 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 18 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 30 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. Dec. 31 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. For more information or to reserve seating, call 542-2776.FFSC offers suicide prevention awareness training clarity and consistency among publicly funded workforce entities that serve job seekers and businesses. Regional workforce boards retain their flexibility to design and deliver pro grams that best address local workforce needs. WorkSources commit ment to providing service to jobseekers and busi nesses will not change. For more information, go to http://careersource flbrand.com. NAME JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013 9

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FRCSE Sailors share insights with NAE leaders at BOGFlag-level officers from across Naval Aviation Enterprise (NAE) visited Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Detachment (Det.) Mayport, Oct. 23, to meet with junior Sailors and tour the helicopter repair facilities at Naval Station (NS) Mayport as part of Boots on Ground (BOG). BOG is an ongoing program designed to give NAE leaders a better understanding of the issues impact ing aviation readiness from Sailors working at the Deckplate. Vice Adm. David Buss, commander, Naval Air Forces, headed the multidisciplinary team of senior-level Navy and Marine Corps officers, Senior Executive Service (SES) civilians and Department of Defense personnel. They started the day with briefs at the Ocean Breeze Conference Center. PR1 Jerry Rodriguez and AS1 Domingo Cisneros, both Six Sigma Black Belt trained, presented an AIRSpeed/continuous process improvement (CPI) project for the helicopter rescue hoist. Buss encouraged the Sailors to keep using AIRSpeed tools to look for ways to enhance operations and reduce costs. Rodriquez said deployment, execution and sus tainment were the keys to success. Buss said NAE had come a long way on its decadelong CPI journey and the results of CPI training were paying off for the Fleet. The admiral recognized Rodriguez efforts in a let ter read to the BOG participants. He was cited for his hard work to instill a CPI culture at the detachment and his role as the AirSpeed core team leading petty officer. Rodriguez oversaw 15 projects that resulted in a cost avoidance of $14.5 million with an additional $20.4 million in potential savings to the NAE. Buss presented Rodriguez and Cisneros with com manders coins for identifying innovative solutions to Deckplate problems. The NAE leaders next visited FRCSE Det. Mayport Level II divisions where they discussed with junior Sailors CPI projects such as the H-60 blade rotary wing, main landing gear, blade retention bearing, and the RAST probe assembly. The Sailors identified innovative solutions to reduce cycle time, increase throughput, reduce work-in-pro cess, reduce operating expenses and improve sched uling accuracy to enhance support to the Fleet. BOG is a great opportunity to interact with young Sailors; they are on the point of attack for innovation and will look for creative ways to stretch our resourc es, said Buss. Vice Adm. David Dunaway, commander Naval Air Systems Command, was also very impressed with the savvy Sailors. AE2 Joshua Saffa presented his main motor slip ring project. With the support of the AirSpeed Team, he identified a quick fix costing $142.09 in parts already stocked in Navy supply. By replacing the jam nuts and O-rings and adding the part numbers to the technical publications, the Sailors were able to repair the component for a cost avoidance of $165,580 on 10 units (annual average). When the red light comes on in your car, you say I have to do something about it, said Dunaway. A red light was going off, and these Sailors pursued it. We do have the CPI culture. If each one finds some thing to pursue like this electrical connector, we can have an enormous impact on readiness. After lunch, BOG members visited the maintenance hangars to discuss tool room rapid improvement events and concluded the day with an out brief. Rear Adm. John King, commander, Naval Supply Systems Command Weapons Systems Support, said he makes these BOG trips a top priority and knows the ingenuity these petty officers possess. We can help them find a solution or they will find a solution on their own. A major theme heard throughout the day was how to institutionalize these great CPI initiatives. Rear Adm. Paul Sohl who commands eight Fleet Readiness Centers said he is looking for ways to share good ideas among our repair sites. The best solutions are often found within 50 feet of where the work is performed, said Sohl. Our job as leaders is to ensure these maintenance solutions and best practices are replicated in similar sites or where they make sense. FRCSE Commanding Officer Capt. John Kemna praised Cmdr. Michael Barriere, the detachments officer in charge, for his leadership, as well as the AirSpeed core team for their ingenuity and tireless efforts to drive down costs. Team members included Rodriguez, Cisneros, Saffa, Lt. Javier Castro, ADCS Richard Davis, and AT2 John Ivicic. BOG highlighted some of the successes weve had in supporting the H-60 community, and our Sailors got some well-deserved recognition for their hard work from the Air Boss and top leaders, said Kemna. Although we still face some challenges, we will continue working as a team to produce cost-wise read iness to the Fleet. Other Sailors who presented projects at BOG were AE1 Richard Stridiron, AS1 Johnny Opdenbosch, AM2 Charles Beatty, AM2 Phillip Schultz, AM2 Joshua Herring, AO2 Jason Parry and PR3 Tineshia NeillBarnes. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013 11

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Navy Lodges offer business travelers comfortable accom modations at a value up to 45 percent less than comparable civilian hotels. With 39 locations around the world, Navy Lodge guests have a number of destinations to choose from. Navy Lodges are great for business travelers, said Melanie Peters, gen eral manager for Navy Lodge Jacksonville. Our businessclass rooms offer guests a queen-size bed, sofa, a desk with computer hookup and task lighting. Navy Lodges are also conveniently located near other on-base amenities, such as the NEX and its food out lets and Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) facilities. Navy Lodge guests will also find oversized rooms and fam ily suites, cable TV with DVD player and a kitchenette with microwave and utensils, as well as video rental service, guest laundry facilities and handi capped accessible and nonsmoking rooms. Navy Lodges also offer guests a light breakfast and morning newspaper. Free Wi-Fi is now available throughout the Navy Lodge, said Peters. Business travelers can feel comfortable working in their rooms or in the lobby. We want every guest, whether travel ing for business, a permanent change of station move, or on vacation, to be comfortable and have all the amenities they come to expect when away from home. Theyll find it all at a Navy Lodge. To make reservations, call 800-628-9466 (800-NAVY-INN), 24 hours a day, seven days a week or go online at www. navy-lodge.com. Reservations are accepted on an as-received basis without regard to rank. For other military lodging options go to www.dodlodging. com. U.S. Fleet Forces and Pacific Fleet released a joint message Oct. 24 detail ing the use and wear of the new Flame Resistant Variant (FRV) coveralls, which will begin being distributed to Sailors in the fleet before the end of the year. Scheduled to start arriving in December, the new coveralls will initially be provided to the crews of ships sched uled to deploy in early 2014. We made the decision to supply flame-resistant coveralls to all Sailors assigned to ships as an added safety pre caution, said Adm. Bill Gortney, com mander, USFF. The information pro vided in the manner wear message will ensure everyone understands what is expected in the wearing of this new orga nizational clothing. According to the message the FRV will be distributed to several fleet units before the end of the year. Early ship ments will focus on next deployers and forward deployed naval forces. The type commanders will hold a series of show and tell road shows in November and December in fleet concentration areas to ensure sailors have an opportunity to see and feel the FRV. The goal is to pro vide an understanding on the basics of where, when and how to wear the new coverall. Based on production schedules, initial fleet outfitting should complete by October 2014. Flame resistant organizational cloth ing had previously been limited to Sailors working in engineering departments, on flight decks and in other high-risk areas, but the Organizational Clothing Working Group recommended every Sailor afloat be outfitted with the additional protec tion. Once outfitted, Sailors are directed to wear the FRV while underway. The NWU type I and other polyester and poly blend uniforms are no longer authorized for wear while underway except for spe cial events such as manning the rails, change of command or receptions held at anchor. Exceptions: (1) Personnel assigned to submarines will continue to wear the poly/cotton utility coverall due to its low lint characteristics. Once a long-term, allpurpose coverall solution that is flame resistant and low lint version is available, it is expected that it will be made avail able to the submarine force. (2) The FRV will not be worn in place of organization al clothing mandated for specific opera tional environments such as flight decks or while performing work on electrical systems requiring arc flash protection. The new coveralls are expected to maintain performance properties, dura bility and appearance for typical deploy ments of six to nine months, with an optimal wear life of 18-24 months. Like other organizational clothing, the FRV coveralls will be replaced by each ship over time based on normal wear and tear. The name/rank configuration of the FRV coverall will consist of a Velcrobacked name tag and metal collar devices. To build unit esprit de corps, each unit CO has the discretion to authorize the wear of the embossed leather name tag (same as worn on the V-neck sweater) or develop a fabric embroidered unit spe cific name tag similar to those worn on green Nomex flight jackets. Command ball caps are authorized for wear with the FRV. Materials making the coveralls flameresistant are incorporated into the fabric fibers. Wear life is dependent on many factors, including wear and cleaning fre quency, cleaning method and environ mental exposure. The joint message from Adm. Bill Gortney (USFF) and Adm. Harry Harris (PACFLT) emphasized the Navys com mitment on safety. We operate in an environment that contains inherent risks. Given what has been learned through the organization al clothing working group analysis and NWU type I burn test, we are striving to make shipboard environments safer. We have made initial progress toward that goal and believe that providing the FRV coverall to all afloat sailors will help reduce the risk of injury aboard ship. When worn properly, the FRV offers sig nificant protection from flame and flash fire. We are committed to always improv ing safety. Navy Lodges are great for business travelers Flame-resistant coveralls coming soon to the Fleet 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Friday at 7 p.m. Oct. 25 Second Tyme Around Band Deweys Family Night 3rd Friday of the Month Deweys will be open for dinner & bev erages Nov. 15 Karaoke with Tom Turner Dec. 20 Childrens Holiday Bingo Childrens Holiday Bingo will start at 1830 and has a cost of $10 per per son and includes soft drinks, hot dog, dauber, bingo card and gift bag for each child. DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Youth Bowling League: Every Sat., 10:30 am noon $17 annually or $8 per week. Includes shoes, awards will be given at the end of the season! Rising Stars Youth League: Every Sat., 10:30 am 12:30 pm. Pee Wee Division (6 years & under) 2 games, $6 per week. Juniors Division (7 years & older) 3 games, $8 per week. Special Stars Bowling League for fami lies with special needs children. All ages welcome! Ramps available for the non-ambulatory as well as bumpers for beginners. Runs for 10 weeks at a cost of $7 per week, shoes are included. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4 6 pm. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4 10 pm. Thursdays: Free bowling for Active Duty 11 am 1 pm. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4 6 pm, Party Extreme $10, 8 pm midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Oct. 19, 1 4 pm. $20 per person, regis tration begins at noon. *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6 8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Monster Dash 5K October 31 at 11:30 a.m. Perimeter Rd. / Antenna Farm Pre-register by October 18 Powerlifting Competition Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014 7 a.m. at the Fitness Center $10 registration feeI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil. Jacksonville Zoo Spooktacular $9. Pandemic Haunted Attractions San Jose Blvd in Mandarin, tickets on sale at ITT! Haunting of School House 4 $18 Waves of Honor Special: Seaworld Orlando Adult $46.50, Child $42.25. Busch Gardens Tampa Adult $45, Child $40.50. Monster Jam: Club seating (includes pit pass) $42, regular seating (includes pit pass) $22. Jacksonville Jaguars: Section 147 Bud Zone, $70. Jags shuttle bus $12. Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2013 2014 Season: Tickets now available! MOSH: $7 $12. The Artist Series Broadway in Jax 2013 2014 Season: Tickets available now! Celtic Thunder: Nov. 10, 2013, 7 pm, $80. Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus: Jan. 17 & 18, 2014, $51. War Horse: Feb. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $68.50. Memphis: Mar. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $65. Million Dollar Quartet: Apr. 26, 2014, 8 pm, $65. The D* Word: Oct. 4 Oct. 25, 2014, $43.75 $46. Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27,2014) 4 day Hopper ticket$166 4 day 1 park per day and water park ticket-$166 4 day Hopper and Water park combo ticket$194 Gatorbowl $35 Capital One Bowl $98 Russell Athletic Bowl $78 Soul Food Festival Special $20 General Admission $32 Preferred $42 VIP $65 Legoland Free admission for active duty at park Tickets for family members available at ITT ITT is now selling $18 tickets for the Harlem Globetrotters! The show is February 28, 7 pm at Veterans Memorial Arena.The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Monster Dash 5k Oct. 31 at 11:30 a.m. Wear your costume! Paintball Trip Nov. 2 at 9 a.m. GTF in Yulee Ronald McDonald House Volunteer Trip Nov. 9 at 6:30 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Nov. 12 & 26 for active duty Nov. 14 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m. Turkey Trot Golf Scramble Nov. 25, 10 a.m. shotgun start $60 entry fee, $70 for civilian guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m.Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite! Auto Skills 101 for Women Nov. 7, 5 7 p.m. $5 per personYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Movie Under the Stars Nov. 8 at 6 p.m. Featuring Planes Patriots Grove Park Military Family Appreciation Carnival Nov. 16, 11 a.m. 4 p.m. Free admission, food available for pur chaseFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013 13

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14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013 In order to meet the increasing demand for officers with specific com puter network operations knowledge, skills and abilities, requirements for the Cyber Warrant Officer Commissioning Program have changed, Navy officials said Oct. 25. NAVADMIN 259/13 outlines amend ments to the program. The following is a summary of the changes: Classification) has been removed as a requirement. rated Sailors who have been certi fied as Cyber Targeteers, Cyber Fire Support Planners, Cyber Fire Support Coordinators, Cyber Weaponeers and considered highly competitive candi dates. rated Sailors who have graduated from the Naval Postgraduate School with a Master of Science in Applied Cyber Operations have been added as highly competitive candidates. We wanted to increase the number of applicants who are eligible for the Cyber Warrant Officer Commissioning Program, said Capt. Baron V. Reinhold, director of Military Community Management, Bureau of Naval requirement allows for a larger pool of highly-qualified and competitive candi dates to apply for the program. duties represent only one of ten work sive and defensive cyber operations. The Cyber Warrant Officer designator identifies, develops, and commissions technically proficient Sailors to operate, analyze, plan and direct full-spectrum cyber operations. All prerequisite criteria for the Chief Warrant Officer Commissioning Program are applicable to the Cyber Warrant Officer program. Selections to the program will be made via the annual Active duty and Reserve Limited Duty Officer (LDO) and Chief Warrant Officer (CWO) In-Service Procurement Boards. active-duty and Reserve LDO/CWO In-Service Procurement Boards must be postmarked no later than Oct. 1, Officer applicants only, the deadline applications for Cyber Warrant Officer must be received by Navy Personnel Command by the new deadline. Basic eligibility requirements are outlined in NAVADMIN 176/13 for active duty and NAVADMIN 177/13 for Reservists. Specific requirements and additional information about LDO/CWO programs Programs Application Administrative Manual, chapter 7. Updated application instructions are For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. NAVFAC team claims womens doubles tennis There were three wom Captains Cup Doubles Tennis Tournament Oct. 7 at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts at NAS Jacksonville. The teams played a round robin for mat for the tournament with each match played scoring. The first match was between Susan Smallwood and Sue Brink from Naval Command Southeast (NAVFAC) against Vanessa Givens and Terri Whitson from Navy Region Southeast. Smallwood and Brink to one. Whitson and Givens had to play again against Kelly Yuska and Amanda Foster from NAVFAC. Givens and Whitson rebounded and won their second match in the tie breaker by the score of 7-6. Smallwood and Brink had to play Yuska and Foster and if they could beat Yuska and Foster, they would win the tournament because they would have beaten both teams in the round robin format. It was not to be as Yuska and Foster were able to defeat Smallwood and Brink so now all three teams had a one and one record. Smallwood and Brink bowed out of the tour nament because Brinks knee could not take any more pounding leaving Yuska and Foster and Givens and Whitson with one win and one loss each. In order to determine first and second place, they had to play one match for the cham pionship. Yuska and Fosters one loss came at the hands of Givens and Whitson in their tie breaker 7-6 match. Yuska and Foster had revenge written all over them and they were able to come through to defeat Givens and Whitson to win Womens Doubles Tennis Tournament. There were five mens doubles ten Doubles Tennis Tournament Oct. 7. The format for the one-day tourna ment was double elimination with each No add scoring was also used to com plete the tournament in one day. Brad Youngers and Jack Benfer from Fleet won their first two matches to vault them into the championship. Tai Pham and Vien Tran, also from pionship having to play four matches in order to get in and Youngers and Benfer only played two matches. Pham and Tran put a great fight, however, Youngers and Benfer won the match 6-4 to win the tournament. Cyber warrant officer need sparks changes in requirements for program, broadens eligibility FRCSE captures top spots in mens doubles tennis

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013 Halloween horrors, fall festival flubs Ghosts and goblins may not be the true threat to trick-or-treaters during this years Halloween festivities. Possibly tainted candy, use of costume materials, and food borne illnesses may really be the hazards. As such, the health professionals at the Florida/ USVI Poison Information Center Jacksonville can be an important resource for parents at this time of year. The Poison Center Help Line, 1-800-222-1222 is available 24 hours a day when these questions come up. Halloween can be a time for fun and adventure for children, but we need to remain diligent that there are still some risks associated with Halloween activities such as those described below or for small children accidentally mistaking medications for treats. Children under the age of six continue to be the number one victim of accidental poisonings. Last year, the Florida/USVI Poison Information Center Jacksonville received almost 36,000 human exposure calls, nearly 17,000 which involved accidental ingestions in children under the age of six. Between Oct. 29 and Nov. 2 last year the Help Line received almost 700 calls. On Oct. 31 alone, there were 135 calls for help and advice to the Poison Center Help Line. This is also the time of the year known for fall festivals, carnivals and fairs. One of the more fun aspects of these events is the various types of food available. The not-so-fun part can be food borne illness associated with undercooked or improperly handled or stored food. The Florida/USVI Poison Information Center Jacksonville can provide food safety education tips and management advice for food poisoning if it does occur. Parents should be vigilant for malicious con tamination and tampering of Halloween candy, said Dr. Jay Schauben, director of the Florida/ USVI Poison Information Center Jacksonville. Likewise, we can decrease the risk to children by using non-toxic paints and materials for costume design and by paying close attention to food/candy labels to prevent food allergies. The following tips can help ensure a safe Halloween for everyone: Parents should inspect all treats their children bring home before any are consumed and imme diately discard treats with puncture holes, tears or signs of re-wrapping. Feed children dinner before they go out or bring along your own candy to give your children to reduce the urge to snack on treats that have not been inspected. Be extra careful with toddlers goodies. Avoid choking hazards by allowing treats that are ageappropriate. Be careful with hard candy, gum, pea nuts and toys with small parts. Caution children to not chew or bite on glow sticks or glow jewelry as these products contain an irritating chemical which may cause pain if it gets in their mouth, eyes or throat. If using dry ice for decorations, be aware that direct contact with the skin or mouth can cause a frostbite type injury. Wash immediately with water. Wear reflective costumes in the dark or carry a flashlight. When in doubt, throw it out! For more Halloween safety tips, log on to the Poison Centers website at www.fpicjax.org; click on Poison Info/Prevention/Seasonal Hazards/ Autumn. In a poisoning emergency, dont waste time searching the Internet. Call your Poison Center first at 1-800-222-1222 and a specialist in poison infor mation will assist you. The Poison Center Helpline is toll free and specialists are available 24 hours a day in a poisoning emergency, or to answer your poisoning-related questions. Service members who deploy or are otherwise separated from their families due to mission needs now have an online resource allowing them to hone their parenting skills as they reconnect with their chil dren. Pam Murphy, the Defense Departments lead psychologist for the Web site, said the launch of http://www.militaryparenting. org offers unprecedented, compre hensive and free computer-based training from a service members perspective on parenting and build ing strong relationships with their children. A clinical psychologist with more than 20 years of experience in community and private practice, Murphy said the Integrated Mental Health Strategy Program is a col laborative initiative between the Veterans Affairs Department and DoD. We initially did an environ mental scan of everything within the DoD as well as commercially available, and one of the areas that seemed to be at a deficit was a com prehensive parenting program that looks at the basics, Murphy said. She noted that while a plethora of parenting information exists online, it was difficult to identify a free, pri vate military-centric program. This is one of the first of its kind, Murphy said. The interactive site, develops and reinforces parenting skills to help families reconnect through in-depth technology solu tions that appeal to young parents. Murphy added that the site goes beyond the job and hits home in terms of affecting family relation ships, building resilience and help ing service members to be happy with their lives within the military. She also noted that service mem bers personalized accounts inter woven into the site make the situations and solutions relatable. We included videos of real ser vice personnel to talk about real-life experiences with parenting, reinte grating and making those everyday decisions, Murphy said. The Web site consolidates and simplifies information that was pre viously accessible across multiple resources, said Air Force Senior Airman Matthew Siegele, a pro tocol specialist, and his wife, Air Force Staff Sgt. Sabrina Siegele, noncommissioned officer in charge of knowledge operations, both of whom work at Joint Base LewisMcChord, Wash. Weve been through so many parenting classes, counseling and therapy, and a lot of the resourc es and advice is mirrored on this site, Sabrina said. This Web site is excellent its a one-stop shop instead of jumping around to mul tiple appointments. During family separations, Murphy said, Skype and Facetime can help keep families connected, but the military parenting Web site offers ideas for technology-based activities to help in reuniting par ents and children after deployment. Murphy said the Web site can help military parents to reconnect with their children. Military parenting Web site assists communication with children Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service mem bers and their families. The following is the schedule for 2013: Training Nov. 12-15 (5:30-10 p.m.) Program (TAP) Separation Workshop (7:30 a.m.4:15 p.m.) Nov. 4-8, Dec. 2-6. Program (TAP) Retirement Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) Nov. 18-22, Dec. 16-20. Workshop (9 a.m.-noon) Nov. 27, Dec. 11. (Noon-3 p.m.) Interview Techniques Workshop (8-9:30 a.m.) Nov. 25. Letters Workshop (9:40 a.m.-noon) Nov. 25. Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Nov. 13-14. Specialist Training (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Dec. 9-13. Deals in Car Buying (9-10:30 a.m.) Nov. 26. (1:30-3 p.m.) Dec. 12. Workshop (1:30-4 p.m.) Nov. 14. 101 Workshop Nov. 21 (5-6:30 p.m.) (9-11 a.m.) Nov. 4, Dec. 9. 101 Workshop (9-10:30 a.m.) Nov. 5, Dec. 10. Workshop (8 a.m.-noon) Nov. 26, Dec. 17. Individual Communication (11 a.m.1 p.m.) Nov. 19. Logic (1-3 p.m.) Nov. 5, 12, 19, 26. Power 2 Change, Womens Support Group (9:30-11 a.m.) Every Wednesday Expectant Families (9 a.m.-3 p.m.) Dec. 3. Tiny Tots Play Group (10 a.m.-noon) Nov. 12, 16; Dec. 10, 17. Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) Orientation (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) Nov. 7. EFMP Command POC Training (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) Dec. 5. To register for any of the above workshops call 542-5745. FFSC offers life skills workshops for military families

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013 17 With United States military installations spread around the world, it is no wonder that many service members choose to marry foreign nationals overseas. Entering into these marriages goes well beyond traditional premarital consid erations of obtaining paren tal approval. Although most members understand that they must follow the laws in the country in which the mar riage takes place, not all are aware that they must also abide by military regulations and United States immigration laws. Many service members are under the mistaken belief that the military does not care who they marry or have any involvement in these mar riages. Many also believe that once married, the marriage certificate with the dependent military identification card will allow the foreign spouse to travel back to the United States with them. In order to avoid potentially lengthy periods of separation between themselves and their spouses, members should be familiar with the military reg ulations relating to overseas marriages and the immigra tion laws controlling the entry of foreign spouses into the U.S. This article will explain the applicable Navy regulations and the immigration process. Before even considering an overseas marriage to a foreign national, members must be mindful that they must receive approval from their service to marry. For naval personnel, the approval process is governed by MILPERSMAN Section 5352-030. That section requires the member to submit an appli cation for permission to marry to the area commander where they intend to marry. Section 5352-030 provides a list of the area commanders and their countries of responsibility. During this part of the pre marital processing, the future spouse will undergo a back ground investigation and med ical examination. After the couple is married overseas, they must go through the immigrant visa process. An immigrant visa is a visa that allows the foreign spouse to travel to the U.S. with the intent of living here permanently. It is a multi-part and complicat ed process which requires the member to complete detailed government forms, pay fees and submit certain documents. Failure to do any of these things correctly, will result in significant delays in the pro cessing. Although some of the forms are the same, members must understand that the pro cess varies if a member desires to bring their fianc to the U.S. to marry. The first step is filing a Petition for Alien Relative (USCIS Form I-130) along with documents proving the mar riage is valid. The filing fee for this Petition is $420. Once this document is filed, a receipt is issued and the member may check the status of the petition online at https://ceac.state.gov/ CEACStatTracker Upon the approval of the I-130, the foreign spouse will go through consular process ing through the National Visa Center. During this stage, the spouse will submit an Application for Immigrant Visa and Alien Registration (Form DS-230). Simultaneously, the spouse should obtain a valid passport from his or her home country for overseas travel; as the visa, once approved, will likely only be valid for a period of 6 months. The spouse will thereafter receive an appoint ment package for an interview date. The member, who will be considered the foreign spouses sponsor, must file an Affidavit of Support (USCIS Form I-864) to show that the member can financially sup port their spouse to assure that the foreign spouse will not become a public charge of the U.S. The member must prove their financial ability by submitting their tax returns and employment documents. The Affidavit of Support is a binding 10-year contract between the U.S. requiring that the sponsor reimburse the government for any public benefits the spouse receives for that period or until the spouse becomes a U.S. citizen. The sponsor will remain bound by that contract even if the mar riage is dissolved. At the end of the inter view the consular officer will make a decision on whether the visa should be approved. However, it may take several weeks until the actual visa is received. Upon receiving the visa, the spouse may thereaf ter travel to the U.S. and will receive an I-551 stamp upon his or her passport. If the couple has been married for at least two years, the spouse will receive Lawful Permanent Residence status. If not, the spouses residence will be conditional for two years and is then removed filing Form I-751 (Petition to Remove Conditions of Residence). Entering into an overseas mar riage to a foreign national requires a great deal of plan ning. It should be given careful consideration and should never be entered into casually. If you would like more infor mation or to find the legal assistance office closest to you, please contact any of the offices listed at http://www.jag. navy.mil/legal_services/rlso/ rlso_southeast.htm Make every month Energy Awareness MonthIt may seem like an odd question, but a few years back, a naval shipyard adopted a lunchtime lights out policy in the production shops. Naval shipyards were all constructed more than 100 years ago, and many of the shops are in tall brick buildings with a lot of window areas. The lights out policy was intended more to increase energy awareness in the production shops than to save energy over lunchtime. But the energy savings surprised a lot of people. Some of the shops found that on sunny days, they didnt need to turn the lights back on in the afternoon. Another characteristic of shipyard production shops is that they typically are not air-conditioned. Leaving off heat-generating lights on hot afternoons can also improve comfort. That makes two good reasons to try shutting off the lights in the afternoon when you have a source of daylight. A few task lights here and there might be all you need to work safely, productively and energy effi ciency. In other types of buildings, it might make more sense to close blinds to keep out the heat, especially on the south and west sides of the building. Legal: Information on marrying a foreign national overseas Instead of lights, have you tried just daylight?

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In response to the Maritime Patrol Association (MPA) 2014 Corporate Sponsorship Program, Systems Planning and Analysis Inc. (SPA) became a MPA Bronze Level corpo rate sponsor by awarding the organization with a financial contribution Oct. 23 for its mis sion to build a strong foun dation of support for the U.S. Navys Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF). At SPA, we appreciate the dedication of the men and women who keep the MPRF running day in and day out, said President Phillip Lantz. However we can support those folks on the job and beyond, we are honored to do so. The sponsorship by SPA will enable MPA to extend a number of opportunities to the members of the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force, including; networking and education offered through a variety of meetings, events and media; awards, recogni tion and scholarships to those persons who have made sig nificant contributions to this aviation community; and infor mation regarding new develop ments and accomplishments in the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance community. Incorporated a little more than 24 months ago, MPA has grown from wishful thinking to a thriving official Florida non-profit corporation. In its first two years, MPA has attracted more than 1,000 members, received more than $70,000 from corporate spon sors, raised more than $10,000 for the MPA Scholarship Fund, entertained hundreds of guests during the annual symposium week, and released seven issues of the quarterly newsletter, PLANESIDE. A Florida not-for-profit corporation established in 2011 and headquartered in Jacksonville, Fla., the Maritime Patrol Association is dedicated to its mission to be the premier professional organization rep resenting the U.S. Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance community by promoting the use of the patrol and recon naissance aircraft in the United States Navy. The organiza tion is tax-exempt under sec tion 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code (Tax ID No. 45-1968605).For more information, contact Executive Director September Wilkerson at (904) 563-4036 or info@maritimepatrolassocia tion.org. Visit the MPA website at www.maritimepatrolassociation. org. Navy commands worldwide are participating in Energy Action Month to share infor mation on energy efficiency, highlight the Navys successful energy initiatives, and foster an energy aware culture. President Obama declared October as National Energy Action Month and issued a call to action for all Americans to work together to achieve great er energy security. Navy commands worldwide are participating in Energy Action Month to share infor mation on energy efficiency, highlight Navys successful energy initiatives, and foster an energy aware culture. The goal of 2013 Navy Energy Action Month efforts is to bring about cultural and behavior al change that enables energy security and resiliency. The Navys energy initiatives are highlighted in October, but continue throughout the year. The Navy launched a video this month that describes a new information campaign to inspire energy behavior change and awareness among the Navy workforce. The campaigns theme, Did You Know? highlights the importance of energy to the Navys mission. The video can be viewed here: http://youtu.be/1D8JFugpzg. Energy security and mission success go hand-in-hand for the Navy. Energy is our great est enabler and our greatest vulnerability both afloat and ashore, explained Rear Adm. Kevin Slates, director of Navys Energy and Environmental Readiness Division. Our combat capability is directly tied to the energy we have available and our ability to use it efficiently so we have it when and where its needed. The Department of Defense (DoD) accounts for 80 percent of the Federal governments energy consumption. The Navy accounts for 22 percent of DoDs total petro leum consumption; 84 percent of this figure is consumed in fleet operations. These rates of consumption represent stra tegic and operational vulner abilities. By making more energy effi cient choices, the Navy can increase capability, reduce vul nerabilities, and enhance resil iency. We deliver 1.25 billion gal lons of fuel worldwide to opera tors annually. This represents an Achilles heel in opera tors, explains Capt. James Goudreau, director of the Navy Energy Coordination Office. Our efforts are focused on technology changing behav ior to provide options for increased payload, range, or endurance, thus giving com manders greater operational flexibility. The Department of the Navy is also providing energy-aware ness training opportunities for fleet Sailors and aviators, Marine Corps expeditionary operators, and shore energy managers. The training ses sions will focus on energy sav ings practices, culture change, and increasing awareness of energy use. At the Pentagon, Navy Energy Action Month posters and electronic billboard signs are helping to increase aware ness of Navy energy initiatives. Energy Action Month is also a perfect opportunity to high light ways Sailors and civilian personnel can reduce energy consumption. For lists of ideas, visit http://dld.bz/energyaction-month. How are you taking action to save energy? What does energy resiliency mean to you? Join the conversation at #NavyEnergy. Do you have ideas on how the Navy can take action to save energy? The Navy wants to hear them. The new Collab Lab tool, developed by Navy Warfare Development Center, allows individuals and institutions to submit energy efficiency ideas, comment on ideas posted by others, and vote on the ideas that are already there. Become part of the solution and sub mit your energy ideas on the Collab Lab page at http://dld. bz/collab-lab. Maritime Patrol Association awarded SPA sponsorshipResiliency, culture change are focus of 2013 NavyEnergy Action Month 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 31, 2013

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