Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
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Newspaper
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English
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s.n.
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Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
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Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
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30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

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Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
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Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
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Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
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UF00028307:02064


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013 RV UPGRADE LITTLE BIRDS SOQ HONORS Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Shutdown over, but effects on DOD continue, Hagel saysThe government shutdown is over, but it will take a while for the effects to fade, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said Oct. 17. At the shutdowns height, more than 400,000 Defense Department civilian employees were fur loughed because of the lapse of appropriations for the new fiscal year, which began Oct. 1. The Pay Our Military Act allowed the department to bring most back to work Oct. 7. The rest -about 5,000 came back to work Oct. 14. While all of us across the department welcome the fact that the shutdown is now behind us, I know that its impact will continue to be felt by all of our people, Hagel said at a Pentagon news conference. All of them, in different ways, had their lives affected and disrupted during this period of tre mendous uncertainty. All DOD leaders will work to repair the damage from the shutdown, the secretary vowed. I want all of our civilian personnel to know that the work they do is critically important to this department and this country, Hagel said. It matters to this department, and it matters for the country. The military simply cannot succeed without our civilian employees, and the president and I appreciate their professionalism and their patience throughout this very trying period. While the department must refocus on critical work, Hagel noted, Congress did not remove the shadow of uncertainty cast over DOD. DOD is now operating on a short-term continu ing resolution, which limits our ability to start new programs, and the damaging cuts of sequestration remain the law of the land, the secretary said. The continuing resolution passed last night gives Congress the chance to craft a balanced long-term spending bill, Hagel said. If this fiscal uncertainty continues, it will have an impact on our economy, our national security, and Americas standing in the world, he added. If the sequester level continues, there will also be consequences. The cuts could be devastating to training and to maintaining and equipping the force, he said. DOD has a responsibility to give Americas elected leaders and the American people a clear-eyed assessment of what our military can and cannot do after years of sequester-level cuts, Hagel said. In the months ahead, we will continue to pro vide our best and most honest assessment as Congress works to establish the nations long-term spending priorities. The secretary said he is concerned about civilian morale. I dont think anyone questions that the uncer tainty that shutting down the government and closing down peoples jobs has brought a great amount of not only disruption to our government, to our country, but to their lives, to the civilian personnel whose lives have been disrupted by this particular shutdown, he said. Combined with no authorization, no appropria tion, continuing sequestration and the uncertainty of planning, this creates a perfect stew for bad morale, Hagel said. People have to have some confidence that they have a job that they can rely on, he explained. I know there are no guarantees in life, but we cant continue to do this to our people having them live under this cloud of uncertainty. If this continues, he added, DOD will not be able to recruit good people. The government shutdown and the nations debt limit problem are making American allies nervous as well, the secretary said. Our allies are asking questions: Can we rely on our partnership with America? Will America fulfill its commitments and its promises? he said. These are huge issues for all of us, and they do impact our national security and our relationships and our standing in the world. In mid-September, VP-16s Aviation Ordnance Team traveled to Patuxent River, Md. for their Conventional Weapons Technical Proficiency Inspection (CWTPI). Prior to the inspection, the War Eagles were required to complete a weeklong Conventional Weapons Refresher Training course (CWRT). When this was completed, the aviation ordnancemen were tested on their weapons loading and down loading procedures, as well as release and control system checks. In addition, all team members were evaluated on the reporting procedures for explosive mishaps or weapons degradations in cases of non-functional ordnance or accidental damage. VP-16s ordnance crew passed the CWTPI with flying colors, sustaining zero discrepancies on their final evaluation. They are now certified for weapons handling of the AGM-84D Harpoon missile in advance of the War Eagles upcoming deployment to the Western Pacific. This was truly a historic moment for VP-16, as well as the P-8A Poseidon community, VP-16 Commanding Officer Cmdr. William Pennington Jr. remarked. To be the first operational ordnance team to certify to handle the Harpoon is already a major achievement but to do so with no discrepancies? Our Sailors truly hit it out of the park. Their performance embodies the War Eagle culture of excellence and we are extremely proud of their achievement. VP-16s Gunner, CWO5 Rod Wiggins, was extremely proud of his team. When asked how they managed to perform so well, he responded that they merely strove to embody the War Eagles motto: Any time. Any place. Nothing but excellence. NAS Jax recognized for outstanding community serviceCommander, Navy Region Southeast has recog nized NAS Jacksonville for its exceptional community outreach program according to a message released Oct. 16 announcing the winners of the Regional Navy Community Service awards. NAS Jacksonville placed first overall in the Health, Safety and Fitness Flagship (Shore 500 or more) and tied with NSB Kings Bay, Ga. for first place in the War Eagles pass Harpoon test with flying colors Underwater Construction Team Two Detachment Bravo arrived in Timor-Leste for a construction project with a little help from two Navy Reserve C-130s from VR-62 and VR-53. The VR-62 Nomads are based at NAS Jacksonville. VR-53 Capital Express is based at NAF Washington DC. They are two of five Navy Reserve C-130 squad rons serving Navy logistics needs around the globe and around the clock. The two Navy C-130s lifted 41,690 pounds of dive gear and construction equipment plus nine Seabees for this Underwater Construction Team Two Detachment Bravo mission in TimorLeste. This will be a training evolution for the newer members of the team as the more experienced members are looking to pass on vital under water construction knowledge. Training is vital to the growth and success of UCT-2 now and over the generations, said SW2(SCW/DV) Metro Sayer, UCT-2 embark officer VR-62 Nomads team up with VR-53 Capital Express to lift UCT-2

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013 Oct. 24 1944 In air-sea battle in the Sibuyan Sea, U.S. carrier air craft attack Japanese Center Force. 1958 USS Kleinsmith (APD134) evacuates U.S. nationals from Nicaro, Cuba. 1962 Atlantic Fleet begins quarantine operations to force Soviet Union to agree to remove ballistic missiles and long range bombers from Cuba. Oct. 25 1812 USS United States (Capt. Stephen Decatur) cap tures HMS Macedonian. 1924 Airship, USS Shenandoah (ZR-1), completes round trip transcontinental cruise that began Oct. 7. 1944 During Battle of Leyte Gulf in Battle of Surigao Straits, U.S. battleships execute the maneuver of Crossing the T of the Japanese forces. In Battle of Samar, escort carriers, destroy ers and destroyer escorts hero ically resist attacks of Japanese Center Force. In Battle of Cape Engano, 3rd Fleet carriers attack Japanese Northern Force sinking several small carriers. 1950 Chinese Communist forces launch first offensive in Korea. 1966 Operation Sea Dragon logistics interdiction began. 1983 U.S. Marines and U.S. Army troops land on Grenada to evacuate U.S. citizens threat ened by the islands unstable political situation. Oct. 26 1921 The first successful test of a compressed air, turntable catapult, launches an N-9 sea plane. 1922 Lt. Cmdr. Godfrey de Chevalier makes first landing aboard a carrier (USS Langley) while underway off Cape Henry, Virginia. 1942 Battle of the Santa Cruz Island. USS Hornet (CV-8) was lost and USS Enterprise (CV-6) was badly damaged during the battle. 1944 Battle of Leyte Gulf ends with Navy carrier and USAAF aircraft attacks on the retreating Japanese ships. U.S. forces sink many Japanese ships including four carriers, three battleships, 10 cruisers, and nine destroyers for a total of 26 capital ships. Consequently, the Japanese fleet ceases to exist as an organized fighting force. 1944 Special Task Air Group One makes last attack in month long demonstration of TDR drone missile against Japanese shipping and islands in the Pacific. Of 46 missiles fired, 29 reached their target areas. 1950 U.S. Amphibious Force 7th Fleet lands 1st Marine Division at Wonsan, Korea 1963 USS Andrew Jackson (SSBN-619) launches first Polaris A-3 missile from a sub merged submarine, off Cape Canaveral, Florida. Oct. 27 1864 Lt. William Cushing sinks Confederate ram Albemarle with a spar torpe do attached to the bow of his launch. 1922 Navy League of U.S. sponsors first annual celebra tion of Navy Day to focus pub lic attention on the importance of the U.S. Navy. That date was selected because it was Theodore Roosevelts birthday. 1943 First women Marines report for duty on West Coast, Camp Pendleton. 1944 Fast Carrier Task Forces attack Japanese shipping and installations in Visayas and northern Luzon. 1967 Operation Coronado VIII begins in Rung Sat Zone. Oct. 28 1864 Steamer General Thomas and gunboat Stone River destroy Confederate bat teries on Tennessee River near Decatur, Alabama. 1882 Orders issued for first Naval Attach (LCDR French Chadwick sent to London, England). Oct. 29 1814 Launching of Fulton I first American steam pow ered warship, at New York City. The ship was designed by Robert Fulton. 1980 USS Parsons (DDG-33) rescues 110 Vietnamese refugees 330 miles south of Saigon. Oct. 30 1775 Congress authorizes four vessels for the defense of the United Colonies. 1799 William Balch becomes Navys first commissioned Chaplain. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Lately, the family and I have been doing something really old-fashioned at night. Because the sun is setting earlier, we get in our pajamas right after dinner. I light some scented candles, and sometimes I bake cookies or pop popcorn. And then here comes the oldfashioned part we watch television together. Crazy, old-fashioned, right? It sure feels that way. And I havent even told you what we watch, yet: The Cosby Show. The first night we did this, I was so proud of us. We had tossed aside our Kindles, iPhones, different reading-level books and handheld game systems and come together to do something as a family. It was so 1980s of us. I write this slightly tonguein-cheek. A generation ago, watching television together was not necessarily good family time. Or was it? The serious truth is, our television nights have become something I look forward to. Sure, Ive sat in the living room before while the boys watch SpongeBob Squarepants or Gumball, and Ive even shared some laughs with them in between making a men tal to-do list or daydreaming at those shows. But theres something different, some thing wholesome, about being huddled together to watch The Cosby Show. Its the middle ground between annoying cartoons and boring grown-up television. Theres something for everyone. And have you watched The Cosby Show lately? Wow! The boys giggle at the clothes and especially the episode where Theo break-dances (watch ing Dustin recreate the back spin was an added bonus). But, for the most part, little else has changed about family life today. The Huxtables are still relevant. Hollywood doesnt make television like this anymore (Oops, isnt this what our par ents said about the Andy Griffith Show, too?). In most programs aimed at children today, the mother and father are idiots. The dads, in particular, are baffoons. And princi pals and teachers fare no bet ter. Authority is mocked, and the characters voices are loud and grating. How refreshing, then, to watch Bill Cosby, who definitely is silly at times in his portrayal of a father, but who ultimately is respected and liked. And Claire well, she had a full-fledged career and was hardly ever home! It was very forward-thinking for the time. Interestingly, none of the ground-breaking social ele ments of The Cosby Show the fact that the Huxtables are African-American or that the mother is a successful lawyer and not home most of the time seem to measure even as a small blip on my kids radar screens. The Huxtables are just as relatable to them as any other family they see on television. Thats proof, I think, that society has made progress in the areas of race or gender. The only thing the kids struggle with is the 80s clothes and haircuts. Thank goodness for progress there. So I was enjoying our night ly routine of popcorn and old sitcoms. I looked forward to it most of the day: I wonder what the Huxtables will be doing tonight? The boys and I talked about it while driving in the car or at dinner. And thats when something else occurred to me: Is there a Cosby Show today that families, or even society, bond over? Is there one show that creates a shared experience for many? There are approximately 300 channels on my televi sion; what are the chances my neighbor and I are watch ing the same thing at the same time? (The same time ele ment is important. With dig ital recordings, not everyone has seen last nights episode of whatever show, last night.) Were all scattered and individualized. Even in our television viewing. But not the Smileys! If I had anything to say about it, we were watching The Cosby Show together every night, until we had no more episodes left. And then, last week, after I had gotten comfy on the couch under my blanket and called up to the kids, they yelled back down, Um, were kind of bored of the Cosby Show now. You can watch without us. What? I took a deep breath, and then I marched upstairs and screamed like a maniac at them: So youre just going to stay up here and play Wii and let me watch television alone? Youre just going to give up on our family activity? Is this the way were going to be at night, all of us doing our own thing and staring at a screen? Fine. Ill go watch The Cosby Show by myself. A few minutes later, one by one, the boys crept downstairs and stared at me as they took their seats on the couch. They looked frightened. If it means that much to you, Mom, well watch with you, Ford said. And a half-hour after that, we were all staring together at the big screen. Progress?Television: The new way to bond as a family?

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The Secretary of the Navy announced a new Department of the Navy sexual assault survey for 2013, which started Oct. 15, and can be taken online via any device that can access the Internet. The Department of the Navy Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office (DoN SAPRO), which answers directly to Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, created the survey to assess the Departments prog ress, and learn more of what Sailors and Marines think should be done to fight sexual assault. We cant help them if we dont know what the issues are, and we dont know if our training is working, said Jill Loftus, director of DoN SAPRO. If they think our training is horrible, then wed like to know that, so that we can switch gears. Wed also like to know if they think that it is worthwhile and if theyre learning stuff because then we can continue in that vein. From previous surveys, DoN SAPRO has learned that the majority of sexual assaults in the Navy and Marine Corps happen to 18 24 year-olds in social settings involving alcohol, and that the assaults usually occur at A-schools right after boot camp, or at their first duty station. Weve used that information to set up pilot pro grams, said Loftus. Our Great Lakes experiment that weve been very successful with came from informa tion we learned from our surveys. The experiment targeted Training Support Center Great Lakes, mainly the Sailors who have recently graduated boot camp. The program brought together the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS), local hotels, commanding officers, and others to put an end to the risky situations Sailors may encounter. The program also incorporated bystander intervention training, No Zebras, No Excuses training, Sex Signals training, a large group presentation on sexual assault and two small-group presentations with dis cussion groups. Referring to Great Lakes, Loftus said, Using anonymous surveys, we have seen a 60 percent reduction in sexual assaults over the past 34 months. This years survey incorporates questions from previous surveys, Department of Defense surveys and academic surveys. Pulling from the surveys and les sons learned, DoN SAPRO made the survey more concise to pinpoint the information theyre trying to find, while taking less time from Sailors and Marines. The 10-minute online survey focuses directly on the issues surrounding sexual assault, as well as issues such as perceptions, attitudes of Sailors and Marines about the issue of sexual assault, said Cmdr. David McKay, a research psychologist at DoN SAPRO. Were also interested in understanding reporting behaviors and attitudes about reporting. Sexual assault is one of the top priorities of the Secretary, and should be a top priority for all Sailors and Marines, to try to figure out how to combat sexual assault. The survey is important because it does a couple things. One, it helps us gauge progress on the different interventions were implementing. Secondly, it provides an opportunity for Sailors and Marines to speak directly to the Secretary about their experiences about sexual assault. The 21st Century Sailor and Marine Office (N-17) lists combating sexual assault as one of its main priorities. Rear Adm. Sean S. Buck, the director of N-17, spends time with Sailors to get feedback. When I visit with Sailors, I am constantly asked what else can I do to make a difference? Besides looking out for your shipmates and actively intervening when necessary, surveys like this are your chance to do something, to make your voice heard, Buck said. Although the survey is a chance for Sailors and Marines to be heard, it is completely anonymous. No one will get a reminder to complete the survey because no one is tracking the individuals who take the survey. We wont know if you havent filled out the survey, said Loftus. Theres no fingerprint. Theres no elec tronic tag to our survey. It can be taken from a smart phone; it can be taken from a tablet; it can be taken at the Apple store; it can be taken at your desktop or at home. We have no idea who you are and so you wont get that email reminding you to take it. Loftus said that some of the initiatives that Mabus has instituted, based on previous survey results, included doubling the number of sexual assault investigators at NCIS, increasing the number of sexual assault response coordinators, 66 full-time victim advocates that are civilians trained as counselors, who will help victim support. The JAG is also insti tuting a victims legal counsel who will help victims through the process and the Navy is deploying civilian resiliency counselors, who are also certified SARCs, on every big deck. I think that the Navy and the Marine Corps are really spending the resources and putting the atten tion on prevention, victim care and support, said Loftus. We think that if Sailors and Marines are honest and forthright in taking this survey, and we get enough of them, that well be able to show the nation and other service people that were really taking this seriously, that we care, and that we dont want victims. We want to prevent sexual assault. This is a way for every member of the service to help us do that.The survey is available at www.donsapro.navy.mil/ donsas.html. Commissaries honor Vietnam vets with special eventsDuring the Veterans Day holiday weekend, commissaries worldwide will honor all veterans, particularly those who served during the Vietnam War, with commemorative events, special sales promotions, give aways and food demos. The tribute to Vietnam-era veterans is linked to the introduction of the 50th Anniversary Vietnam War Commemoration Flag, said Rogers Campbell, DeCAs executive director of Sales, Marketing and Policy. The flag recognizes the service, valor and sacri fice of our military members who made it possible for America to remain strong and safe as a defender of democracy worldwide, Campbell said. We hope that every time a Vietnam War veteran and their family sees this flag, they will know that a grateful nation remembers, thanks and honors them. In addition to commemorative events in the stores, commissary customers will find discounts on namebrand items thanks to special promotions that run from Oct. 24 to Nov. 13. Throughout this promotional period, DeCAs industry partners vendors, suppliers and brokers are collaborating with commissaries to offer discounts beyond everyday savings. It is with great honor that your local commissary serves our nations veterans with dignity and gratitude for everything they have done to keep our country safe, Campbell said. We cannot thank the Vietnam War veterans and all war veterans enough for what they have done for our country, our Constitution and our families. Customers are asked to check their local commis sary for commemorative events and specific sales events offered at their store.Sailors and Marines encouraged to make a difference with new sexual assault survey JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013 A detachment from the Armys elite 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (SOAR) visited NAS Jacksonville on Oct. 16 to conduct overwater extraction training in the St. Johns River for pilots flying the AH-6 Little Bird light attack helicopter. Two pilots at a time were taken out onto the St. Johns River by a 40-foot SAR vessel from the NAS Jacksonville Air Operations Boat Division. Then, one at a time, the pilots jumped from the boat into the river to simulate a ditched aircraft scenario. When the rescue helicopter located the survivor in the river, a rope lad der was unfurled for recovery, and the survivor was flown back to the shore near the airfield control tower to dry off. They repeated the exercise until about 10 p.m. The military airspace, the nearby St. Johns River and your Surface Rescue Swimmer School were factors in our decision to train here, said Capt. Josh Clemmons. The NAS Jax Boathouse is also supporting us with their international orange SAR vessel and center-console patrol boat. CW2 Justin Hughes explained that each of the four pilots would take his turn in the cockpit and in the water. Were geared up for realism in the river. Each survivor is wearing a com plete uniform, including boots, hel met and life preserver which can get pretty heavy in the water. As for our helicopters, were flying the AH-6 Little Bird equipped with M260 rocket pods and an external fold-down seat, added Hughes. The U.S. Army 160th SOAR (Airborne), also known as Night Stalkers, is the Armys premier night fighting aviation force and the Armys only special operations aviation force. The unit provides helicopter aviation support for general purpose forces and special operations forces. Its missions include reconnaissance and assault that are usually conducted during nightfall, at high speeds, low altitudes and on short notice. Established at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, in 1981, the 160th SOAR has pioneered night flying techniques, as it also contributed to the development of helicopters and equipment. In addi tion to AH/MH-6 Little Birds, the 160th SOAR operates MH-47G Chinooks and MH-60 Black Hawks. AH-6 and MH-6 Little Birds are small, nimble helicopters based on the Hughes MD530F airframe. The MH-6 is a troop transport/scout helicopter, while the AH-6 is configured as a gunship. ARMY LITTLE BIRD PI L OTS CONDUCT RIVER SAR TR A INING

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013 5 PHOTOS BY CLARK PIER CE OVER-WA TER EXTR A CTION TR A INING

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NAS Jacksonville recognized 98 top Sailors from the base and tenant com mands for the fourth quarter during the Sailor of the Quarter (SOQ) luncheon at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center Oct. 17. The operational tempo of todays Navy is insanely hectic. Today, we have 323,000 active duty members, 62,000 Selected Reservists, 285 ships with 102 currently deployed to every area of responsibility in the world with the tremendous supprt of 201,000 Department of the Navy civilians, said NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/ SW) Brad Shepherd. He continued, Our objective is to protect power and deter war to sustain the American way of life. We continue to operate forward despite budget con straints capitalizing on our most valu able asset our people. Which is why we are here today, carving out some time to focus on our sharpest Sailors our SOQs. MU2 Laura Carey of Navy Band Southeast sang the national anthem and NAS Jacksonville Command Chaplain (Lt. Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore delivered the invocation. The events guest speaker was NAS Jax Senior Sailor of the Quarter MA1(SW/AW) Thomas Kelly of the NAS Jax Security Department. I would like to talk about something I truly believe in which contributes to the success of the U.S. Navy which is teamwork, said Kelly. Teamwork is a value that cannot be completed without leaders to direct, guide and promote the team members to do their best at their job or task to complete a mission, Kelly continued. As in the world of sports, the entire team is there to accomplish a mission of winning a game or championship. In the Navy, our mission or championship is on a much larger scale as we are here to protect the American people. Kelly went on to talk about a unique meeting he back in 2006. I was visiting my mom who worked at Evans Army Hospital in Fort Carson, Colorado when I noticed an elderly man letting a young Soldier ahead of him in line. My mom said his name was Norman and took me to meet him. She mentioned I was in the Navy. Much to my surprise the elderly man was Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf and I ended up having a short conversation with him, recalled Kelly. I asked why he let the young Soldier in line ahead of him and he said he was retired and enjoyed watching his team do what they do best and that the young Soldier needed to get back to his team because teamwork is what makes the military force unstoppable. He said I should always thank my team so I would like to thank my team at NAS Jacksonville, said Kelly. Following lunch, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander thanked the Sailors and their spouses. First, take this day to feel good about your accomplishments because youve put a lot of hard work in to earn this recognition. But remember that you did not get here by yourself. Its a family business whether we succeed in the military, said Undersander as he rec ognized the spouses and family mem bers attending the event. He continued, Part of reason you were selected as Sailors of the Quarter is because of the leadership you have displayed. Jack Welch who used to be CEO of General Electric once said, before you are a leader, success is all about growing yourself. When you become a leader, success is all about growing others. So I challenge you as you head back to work to start growing that next Sailor of the Quarter and putting your time into helping a teammate get to that level as well. Undersander then presented each SOQ an award envelope with a $25 gift card from VyStar Credit Union. Top Sailors recognized for achievements 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013

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NRSE RCC holds change of command/retirement ceremonyNavy Region Southeast Reserve Component Command (NRSE RCC) held a change of command ceremony and retirement aboard NAS Jacksonville Oct. 11. Capt. Jerome Hamel relieved Capt. Gregory Smith as commander, NRSE RCC. It is an honor and an extraordinary privilege to inherit this exceptional team following in the foot steps of such a successful commander, said Hamel. I am both proud and excited to assume command, to lead and serve with this diverse and profes sional group of women and men with the 28 Navy Operational Support Centers (NOSCs) and with the region staff as well, here in the Southeast. A native of Methuen, Mass., Hamel received his commission in June 1985 from Massachusetts Maritime Academy. He holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in marine transportation and a Master of Science in financial management from the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif. He also received his Professional Military Education from the Joint Forces Staff College in Norfolk, Va. Hamels most recent assignment was chief of staff to Commander, Naval Reserve Forces Command in Norfolk, Va. To team Southeast, said Hamel addressing NRSE RCC, our Reserves are riding a wave of credibility and relevance, and it is and will remain our job to keep our Sailors engaged and to keep them ready to return to active duty in any and every capacity we own this. Smith commanded NRSE RCC, the largest Reserve Component Command in the country, from August 2011 to October 2013, where he oversaw 14,600 assigned Selective Reservists and Full Time Support (FTS) personnel from 28 NOSCs. Smith managed an annual budget in excess of $331 million at rates greater than 99.7 percent, and his leadership guided his Family Readiness Team to conduct 32 PreDeployment Family Readiness Conferences and eight Returning Warrior Workshops for Sailors deploying and returning from deployment. Smith also led each NOSCs medical and dental readiness to an average of 92 percent. Rear Adm. Rick Williamson was the guest speaker for the event and awarded the Legion of Merit to Smith in recognition of his achievements. The award was Smiths third during his career after 28 years of faithful military service. The change of command ceremony then segued into Smiths retirement ceremony. During the ceremony, Smith thanked the RCC staff and the 28 NOSC commanding officers in Region Southeast. He also recognized the sacrifices of his family, the role of mentors that shaped his leadership and the relationships in the military he developed throughout his career. It was absolutely a difficult decision, said Smith, who retired from naval service in the company of family, friends and colleagues. Being sad reflects how great of a time it was, and I hope that everyone is sad on upon retirement you lose the camaraderie and the teamwork. Smith, accompanied by his family, was piped ashore after being both relieved of command, and the watch. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013 7

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Sponsors included USAA, First Command, University of Phoenix and Columbia College who picked up the cost of the buffet luncheon for the SOQs and their family members. Its a wonderful feeling for a Sailor knowing that our hard work and efforts are being recognized by our com mands. Its a real honor to be recog nized today, said Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven Junior Sailor of the Quarter OS2(AW/ IDW/SW) Cesar Cruz. I think its pretty awesome and motivational because every day you come in and work because you have to. So this is like a bonus or icing on the cake being recognized for what we do every day, added Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jax Sailor of the Quarter AS1(AW/SW) Daphne Guzman. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. SOQ 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013

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for the detachment. Sayer continued, We really appreciate the support and dedication of the sailors of VR-62 and VR-53. Their respective operations departments were very helpful. The mission is to build a breakwater jetty and attached floating pier. The Nomads and Capital Express teamed up and sent one C-130 each to accomplish this mission. UCT-2 Det Bravo is based at Construction Battalion Center, Port Hueneme, Calif. The Timor-Leste mission is expected to take 90 days. VR-62Campaign Drug Free Flagship (Shore 500 or more). The station also placed second in the Environmental Stewardship Flagship (Shore 500 or more) and tied with NAS Pensacola, Fla. for third place in the Personal Excellence Partnership Flagship (Shore 500 or more). In the Project Good Neighbor Flagship (Shore 500 or more), NAS Jacksonville tied with Center for Naval Air Technical Training Unit Corry Station, Pensacola for third place. Bravo Zulu to the winners and to the honorable mentions. Southeast Region commands are com mended for having active and successful commandsponsored Volunteer Community Service pro grams. Award submissions have been forwarded to Commander, Navy Installations Command and other flagship sponsors for Navy-wide competition, stated CNRSE Rear Adm. Rick Williamson in the message. My sincerest personal thanks to all commands and individuals who selflessly volunteered their time to improve the quality of life in their local community and for participation in this years competition. You are an inspiration to us all, said Williamson. COMMUNITY SERVICE JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013 9

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Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) Secretary Herschel Vinyard and key staff were wel comed by NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Oct.18 for a briefing on the stations wastewater reuse system. The biggest concern of FDEP is protecting the water quality of the St. Johns River, so reducing the naval air stations wastewater discharge to zero is very signifi cant. FDEP is also the leader in improving water conservation and this water project serves both purposes, said FDEP Secretary Herschel Vinyard Undersander agreed, The goal here is to reuse 100 percent of the stations wastewater and eliminate the need to withdraw approximately 48 million gallons per year of potable water from the Floridan aquifer. The project will eliminate the discharge of 315 million gallons per year of treated wastewater into the St. Johns River preventing about 9 tons of nutrients from entering the river each year. NAS Jacksonville has a history of reusing treated wastewater instead of discharging to the St. Johns River. In 1997, the station and Timuquana Country Club part nered to construct the first phase of the reuse project a 200,000 gallons-per-day gravity-fed wastewater reuse system from the station to the club to irrigate its golf course. Vinyard said, Today, were fortunate to have a partners like NAS Jacksonville and the City of Jacksonville, who are dedi cated to enhancing the health of the river. We count on people like Kevin Gartland for forwardthinking innovation when it comes to protecting the envi ronment under their control. It shows that when you have dedicated leadership and commit ment its amazing what can be accomplished. Our department will contin ue to focus on nutrient removal from the St. Johns River, so we can reduce the number of algal blooms. And the more we focus on water reuse, the less well be pumping our valuable ground water, added Vinyard. In 2011, NAS Jax built a pumping station and a 2.2-mile pipe line under the airfield to the reuse pond located on the station golf course. In 2013, the City of Jacksonville constructed a pump station and connection to the course under a $400,000 grant from the St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD). The final phase in 2014 will reduce total nitrogen by more than three tons annually through construction of an additional two-mile pipeline to a spray field in the South Antenna Farm, using a $1.4 million SJRWMD grant. The citizens of Northeast Florida are committed to improving the health of the St. Johns River, said NAS Jacksonville Environmental Director Kevin Gartland. When people learn about this project, they understand that NAS Jax in partnership with FDEP, SJRWMD and the City of Jacksonville is doing its best to support that commitment. Vinyard was accompanied by FDEP Northeast District Director Greg Strong, FDEP Water Policy and Ecosystem Restoration Deputy Secretary Drew Bartlett and FDEP Division of Environmental Assessment and Restoration Director Tom Frick.Florida environmental chief checks out zero-discharge wastewater project JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013 11

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At 11:11 on Oct.11, HS-11s Change of Command ceremony commenced as Cmdr. Tim Kinsella Jr. relieved Cmdr. Ryan Keys as commanding officer of the squadron. Capt. Paul Esposito, commander, Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps at Auburn University was the guest speaker and reveled with Keys about past time served together. Esposito also presented Keys with the Navy and Marine Corps Meritorious Service Medal. Keys also received gifts from both the Chiefs and Officers Mess before sharing formal remarks and read ing his orders. At 11:45, Kinsella officially relieved Keys of command and accepted total responsi bility, authority, and accountability of the HS-11 Dragonslayer family. This ceremony was the first for HS-11 in four years to be conducted ashore. HS-11s previous two changes of command were on board USS Enterprise (CVN 65). The extensive planning and tireless efforts of HS-11 culminated in an event full of pride and tradition that reflected the dedication of the men and women of HS-11 who serve their nation proudly. HS-11 change of command embodies naval tradition 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Friday at 7 p.m. Oct. 25 Second Tyme Around Band Deweys Family Night 3rd Friday of the Month Deweys will be open for dinner & beverages Nov. 15 Karaoke with Tom Turner Dec. 20 Childrens Holiday Bingo Childrens Holiday Bingo will start at 6:30 p.m. and has a cost of $10 per person and includes soft drinks, hot dog, dauber, bingo card and gift bag for each child. DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Youth Bowling League: Every Sat., 10:30 a.m. noon $17annually or $8 per week. Includes shoes, awards will be given at the end of the season! Rising Stars Youth League: Every Sat., 10:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m. Pee Wee Division (6 years & under) 2 games, $6 per week. Juniors Division (7 years & older) 3 games, $8 per week. Special Stars Bowling League for families with special needs children. All ages welcome! Ramps available for the non-ambulatory as well as bumpers for beginners. Runs for 10 weeks at a cost of $7 per week, shoes are included. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4 6 pm. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4 10 pm. Thursdays: Free bowling for Active Duty 11 am 1 pm. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4 6 pm, Party Extreme $10, 8 pm midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Oct. 19, 1 4 pm. $20 per person, registration begins at noon. Scratch Sweeper: Oct. 26, 1 4 pm. $30 entry fee, check in starts at noon. *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Learn to Swim Fall Sessions At the Indoor Pool Session 2 Oct. 28 Nov. 7 $40 military, $45 DoD Monster Dash 5K Oct. 31 at 11:30 a.m. Perimeter Rd./Antenna Farm Barktoberfest Oct. 26, 9 a.m. Vet Treatment Facility Bldg. 537 Free 2-mile walk/run with the dogs!I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil Jacksonville Zoo Spooktacular $9. Universal Halloween Horror Nights: Sunday Thursday $42.25, Friday $53, Saturday $74.25 Pandemic Haunted Attractions San Jose Blvd in Mandarin, tickets on sale at ITT! Haunting of School House 4 $18 Waves of Honor Special: Seaworld Orlando Adult $46.50, Child $42.25. Busch Gardens Tampa Adult $45, Child $40.50. Monster Jam: Club seating (includes pit pass) $42, regular seating (includes pit pass) $22. Jacksonville Jaguars: Section 147 Bud Zone, $70. Jags shuttle bus $12. Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2013 2014 Season: Tickets now available! MOSH: $7 $12. The Artist Series Broadway in Jax 2013 2014 Season: Tickets available now! Celtic Thunder: Nov. 10, 2013, 7 pm, $80. Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus: Jan. 17 & 18, 2014, $51. War Horse: Feb. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $68.50. Memphis: Mar. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $65. Million Dollar Quartet: Apr. 26, 2014, 8 pm, $65. The D* Word: Oct. 4 Oct. 25, 2014, $43.75 $46. Gatorbowl $35 Capital One Bowl $98 Russell Athletic Bowl $78 Soul Food Festival Special $20 General Admission $32 Preferred $42 VIP $65 ITT is now selling $18 tickets for the Harlem Globetrotters! The show is Feb. 28, 7 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Arena.The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Camping Trip Oct. 26 & 27 $10 per person Monster Dash 5k Oct. 31 at 11:30 a.m. Wear your costume!NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Nov. 5 & 19 for active duty Oct. 24, Nov. 7 & 21 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. MondayFriday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m. Turkey Trot Golf Scramble Nov. 25, 10 a.m. shotgun start $60 entry fee, $70 for civilian guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m.Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite! Auto Skills 101 for Women Nov. 7, 57 p.m. $5 per personYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Movie Under the Stars Oct. 25 at 7 p.m. Featuring Monsters University Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013

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VP-5 Mad Fox of the WeekAs VP-5 continues its busy schedule operating and maintaining the P8-A Poseidon, the squadron is highlighting one outstanding Mad Fox each week. This weeks Mad Fox of the Week is IS3(AW/IDW) Justin Seikus. Seikus was born in St. Petersburg, and joined the Navy in February 2010. After boot camp, he attended A School at the Navy and Marine Corps Intelligence Training Center in Dam Neck, Va. He then report ed to the Naval Air and Strike Warfare Center in Fallon, Nev. While there, he accepted TAD orders and deployed to the Central Command area of responsibility in 2012. After returning, he joined the Mad Foxes in March 2013. As an intelligence specialist, Seikus is tasked with giving the aircrew as much information as possible for every mission they go on. The job takes countless hours of research to give the most up to date information to the aircrew due to the ever-changing environment of the intelligence community. Along with his assignments in the VP-5 Intelligence Department, he is also the departments Morale, Welfare and Recreation representative and the commands Coalition of Sailors against Destructive Decisions treasurer. Getting the correct information to those in the air and on the ground is always the most stressful part of my job. Each mission, they rely on the information that we provide them with, explained Seikus. After a successful mission and knowing that what we provided helped the crew during the mission is always a great feeling and keeps us motivated each day to do the best job we can. Seikuss current goal is to make second class petty officer. His long-term goal is to be accepted into Officer Candidate School so that he can earn a commission. To help facilitate these plans, in his free time he attends American Military University where he is working towards a degree in political science. When he is away from the squadron he enjoys fishing, hunting, and working on his marksmanship at the range. He is also an avid bowler who has bowled a 300. VP-5 is currently in the inter-deployment readiness cycle aboard NAS Jacksonville. Naval Museums, History and Heritage Headquarters return to previous operations following shutdown The Navys museums, which closed as a result of the government shutdown, have returned to their nor mal operating hours. Additionally, the Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) and the Navy Department Library, both located on the Washington Navy Yard, have reopened. The naval archives will operate under restricted access due to the ongoing remediation efforts in storage facilities and naval history holdings. Access to and support from the naval archives will remain limited to official government inquiries only. Likewise, most of the Navys central historic artifact collection and art collection is stored offsite as part of a long-term initiative to improve the environmental and inventory conditions in which they are kept. Requests for artifact support and for loans will be entertained, but response times will be longer than in the past. Official requests will have priority. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013 15

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SECNAV announces Virginia-class submarines for womenThe fast attack submarines USS Virginia (SSN 774) and USS Minnesota (SSN 783) have been selected as the initial two Virginia-class sub marines to integrate female officers, the Navy announced Oct. 15. A total of six female officers, two Supply Corps and four nuclear-trained, will report aboard no later than January 2015. Both submarines are homeported in Groton, Conn. Female officers serving aboard Virginia-class submarines is the next natural step to more fully integrate women into the submarine force, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. There are many extremely talented and capable women with a desire to succeed in this field and the submarine force will be stronger because of their efforts. Our Navy has proven over the years that one of our greatest advantages is our diversity. This is an advantage we should capitalize on across all platforms, including submarines. Since the Navy officially changed its policy prohibiting women serving on submarines on April 29, 2010, the submarine force has integrated 43 women onto six Ohio-class ballistic-missile (SSBN) and guided-missile submarines (SSGN). Further Virginia-class integration is being planned in the submarine force. My plan is to begin by integrating four Virginiaclass attack submarines, with the second set of two units being integrated in fiscal year 2016, said Vice Adm. Michael Connor, commander, Submarine Forces. Since Virginia and Minnesota are both Atlantic Fleet submarines home ported in Groton, Conn., I intend to select two Pacific Fleet submarines homeported in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii early next year. The female officers will be assigned to the Virginia-class submarines for duty after complet ing the nuclear submarine training pipeline, which consists of nuclear power school, prototype train ing and the Submarine Officer Basic Course. Submarines with women currently serving on board are USS Florida (SSGN 728), USS Georgia (SSGN 729) and USS Wyoming (SSBN 742), home ported in Kings Bay, Ga.; and USS Ohio (SSGN 726), USS Louisiana (SSBN 743), and USS Maine (SSBN 741), homeported in Bangor, Wash. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. Trunk or TreatNAS Jacksonville First Class Petty Officers Association is hosting Trunk or Treat Oct. 30 from 6-7:30 p.m. at the base chapel parking lot. All are invited to join the fun! 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013 17 SOQ LIST NAS Jax defends title as tri-base flag football champsThe 2013 Tri-base Flag Football Tournament took place at NAS Jacksonville Sept. 28. NAS Jacksonville won the 2012 Tri-base Flag Football Tournament here and were poised to defend their title. In 2012, there were six teams in the tourna ment with NS Mayport, Subase Kings Bay and NAS Jacksonville having two teams respectively in the tournament. This year, only NAS Jacksonville had two teams represented and Mayport and Kings Bay had one team each in the tournament. The first two games of the tournament put NAS Jax Gold against NAS Jax Blue and Kings Bay against Mayport. NAS Jax Gold defeated NAS Jax Blue 33-18 and Mayport defeated Kings Bay 21-19. In the second round of the tournament, NAS Jax Gold demolished Mayport 34-0 and NAS Jax Blue beat Kings Bay 27-12. Kings Bay was eliminated from the tournament since it was their second loss and NAS Jax Gold had no losses after two games. Mayport and NAS Jax Blue each had one loss and squared off to see who would be eliminated and who would advance to the championship to take on the defending champions NAS Jax Gold. NAS Jax Blue stayed in command of the game and defeated Mayport 33-21 to eliminate Mayport. NAS Jax Blue found themselves in the same situa tion as the previous year by coming out of the losers bracket to face NAS Jax Gold and having to beat them twice in a row to win the championship. One of the major issues facing NAS Jax Blue was that this was their fourth game in a row and NAS Jax Gold had only played two games. NAS Jax Gold was well rested since they had to wait for the winner of NAS Jax Blue and Mayport. NAS Jax Gold proved that they were the best team on the field as they rolled to a 47-13 victory over NAS Jax Blue to successfully defend their 2012 Tri-base Flag Football title. The following Naval History and Heritage enterprise museums have resumed normal hours: D.C.) Before visiting, please access the museums respective websites to check hours of operation. renovation project for buildings 108 and 44 which is targeted for completion as early as 2014. The ongoing project will result in accommodating 12,000 cubic feet paper, microform and digital media in appropriate environmental conditions. For more information and to access the Navy museum Web sites, please see http://www.history.navy.mil/muse ums/index.html. MUSEUMS Children are twice as likely to be hit and killed by a car on Halloween compared to other days of the year. Walk safely Children under 12 should trick-or-treat and cross streets with an adult. Cross the street at corners, using traffic signals and crosswalks. when crossing and keep looking across the street. Teach children to make eye contact with drivers before crossing in front of them. Always walk on sidewalks or paths. If there are no sidewalks, walk facing traffic as far to the left as possible. Children should walk on direct routes with the fewest street crossings. ing or backing up. Teach children to never dart out into the street or cross between parked cars. Trick or treat with an adult Children under the age of 12 should not be out at night with out adult supervision. If kids are mature enough to be out on their own, they should stick to familiar areas that are well lit and trick-ortreat in groups. Keep costumes both creative and safe make sure it is the right size to prevent trips and falls. Decorate costumes and bags with reflective tape or stickers and, if possible, choose light col ors. Choose face paint and make up whenever possible instead of masks, which can obstruct a childs vision. Have kids carry glow sticks or flashlights to help them see and be seen by drivers. Double check candy and costumes Check treats for signs of tampering before children are allowed to eat them. treats in their original, unopened wrappers. Candy should be thrown away if the wrapper is faded or torn, or if the candy is unwrapped. for visibility, remember that the liquid in glow sticks is also haz ardous, so parents should remind children not to chew on or break them. tions when choosing Halloween makeup. Drive extra safely on Halloween Slow down and be espe cially alert in residential neigh borhoods. Children are excited on Halloween and may move in unpredictable ways. Take extra time to look for kids at intersections, on medians and on curbs. Enter and exit driveways and alleys slowly and carefully. Eliminate any distractions inside your car so you can con centrate on the road and your surroundings. Drive slowly, anticipate heavy pedestrian traffic and turn your headlights on earlier in the day to spot children from greater dis tances. Tuition Assistance payments resumeFollowing the passage of continuing resolution ing funding of voluntary education programs, includEffective immediately, all military TA applications for courses starting on or after Oct. 17 may be submitted. All previously approved TA requests for courses which began on or after Oct.17 will also be honored. regarding classes that began during the dates of the government shutdown, Oct. 1-16. Any authorization for such classes that came prior to Oct. 1 will still be honored. However, Navy will follow guidance from the Department of Defense instruction which states All military TA must be requested and approved prior to the start date of the course. Since funding cannot not be awarded retroactively, classes that started Oct. 1-16 which were not authorized prior to Oct. 1 will not be paid for. According to Navy officials, the service will resume close to normal pre-shutdown operations, with no changes to TA execution anticipated for 2014. The bottom line for Sailors is, if you have a TA voucher printed educational institution in lieu of payment. Halloween safety tips The Florida Department of Health in Duval other water bodies in Florida. Blue-green algae are a group of organisms that can live in freshwater, saltwater or in mixed brackish water and may commonly be referred to as pond scum. They also are referred to as cyanobacteria. Most blue-green algae do not produce chemicals harmful to humans or animals, however, some types make natural substances called cyanotoxins. Over time, these toxins are diluted and eventually break down and disappear. Blue-green algae toxins can affect the liver, ner vous system and skin. Most problems happen when water containing high toxin amounts is ingested. Abdominal cramps, nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting may occur if any untreated surface water is swal lowed. Direct contact or breathing airborne droplets containing high levels of algal toxins during swim ming or showering can cause irritation of the skin, is exposed to the algae. Individuals should avoid coming in to contact with a blue-green algae bloom, especially children and pets. Boiling water does not remove or destroy these toxins. DOH-Duval recommends people refrain from recreational water uses that could result in inges tion of and/or skin exposure to algal blooms in the river. Children should also not be allowed to play along the shoreline where they might be exposed to clumps of algae or drink water from the river. Florida Department of Health also recommends that fish caught in or near the bloom not be consumed. The Florida Department of Health is working with other state and local agencies to assess concentra For additional information on health issues related to algae visit, http://www.floridahealth.gov/healthyenvironments/aquatic-toxins/cyanobacteria.html.Health officials provide water safety tips on algal bloom

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013 RV UPGRADE LITTLE BIR DS SOQ HONORS Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Shutdown over, but effects on DOD continue, Hagel saysThe government shutdown is over, but it will take a while for the effects to fade, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said Oct. 17. At the shutdowns height, more than 400,000 Defense Department civilian employees were fur loughed because of the lapse of appropriations for the new fiscal year, which began Oct. 1. The Pay Our Military Act allowed the department to bring most back to work Oct. 7. The rest -about 5,000 came back to work Oct. 14. While all of us across the department welcome the fact that the shutdown is now behind us, I know that its impact will continue to be felt by all of our people, Hagel said at a Pentagon news conference. All of them, in different ways, had their lives affected and disrupted during this period of tre mendous uncertainty. All DOD leaders will work to repair the damage from the shutdown, the secretary vowed. I want all of our civilian personnel to know that the work they do is critically important to this department and this country, Hagel said. It matters to this department, and it matters for the country. The military simply cannot succeed without our civilian employees, and the president and I appreciate their professionalism and their patience throughout this very trying period. While the department must refocus on critical work, Hagel noted, Congress did not remove the shadow of uncertainty cast over DOD. DOD is now operating on a short-term continu ing resolution, which limits our ability to start new programs, and the damaging cuts of sequestration remain the law of the land, the secretary said. The continuing resolution passed last night gives Congress the chance to craft a balanced long-term spending bill, Hagel said. If this fiscal uncertainty continues, it will have an impact on our economy, our national security, and Americas standing in the world, he added. If the sequester level continues, there will also be consequences. The cuts could be devastating to training and to maintaining and equipping the force, he said. DOD has a responsibility to give Americas elect ed leaders and the American people a clear-eyed assessment of what our military can and cannot do after years of sequester-level cuts, Hagel said. In the months ahead, we will continue to pro vide our best and most honest assessment as Congress works to establish the nations long-term spending priorities. The secretary said he is concerned about civilian morale. I dont think anyone questions that the uncer tainty that shutting down the government and clos ing down peoples jobs has brought a great amount of not only disruption to our government, to our country, but to their lives, to the civilian personnel whose lives have been disrupted by this particular shutdown, he said. Combined with no authorization, no appropria tion, continuing sequestration and the uncertainty of planning, this creates a perfect stew for bad morale, Hagel said. People have to have some confidence that they have a job that they can rely on, he explained. I know there are no guarantees in life, but we cant continue to do this to our people having them live under this cloud of uncertainty. If this continues, he added, DOD will not be able to recruit good people. The government shutdown and the nations debt limit problem are making American allies nervous as well, the secretary said. Our allies are asking questions: Can we rely on our partnership with America? Will America fulfill its commitments and its promises? he said. These are huge issues for all of us, and they do impact our national security and our relationships and our standing in the world. In mid-September, VP-16s Aviation Ordnance Team traveled to Patuxent River, Md. for their Conventional Weapons Technical Proficiency Inspection (CWTPI). Prior to the inspection, the War Eagles were required to complete a weeklong Conventional Weapons Refresher Training course (CWRT). When this was completed, the aviation ordnancemen were tested on their weapons loading and down loading procedures, as well as release and control system checks. In addi tion, all team members were evaluated on the report ing procedures for explosive mishaps or weapons degradations in cases of non-functional ordnance or accidental damage. VP-16s ordnance crew passed the CWTPI with fly ing colors, sustaining zero discrepancies on their final evaluation. They are now certified for weapons han dling of the AGM-84D Harpoon missile in advance of the War Eagles upcoming deployment to the Western Pacific. This was truly a historic moment for VP-16, as well as the P-8A Poseidon community, VP-16 Commanding Officer Cmdr. William Pennington Jr. remarked. To be the first operational ordnance team to certify to handle the Harpoon is already a major achievement but to do so with no discrepancies? Our Sailors truly hit it out of the park. Their performance embodies the War Eagle culture of excellence and we are extremely proud of their achievement. VP-16s Gunner, CWO5 Rod Wiggins, was extremely proud of his team. When asked how they managed to perform so well, he responded that they merely strove to embody the War Eagles motto: Any time. Any place. Nothing but excellence. NAS Jax recognized for outstanding community serviceCommander, Navy Region Southeast has recog nized NAS Jacksonville for its exceptional community outreach program according to a message released Oct. 16 announcing the winners of the Regional Navy Community Service awards. NAS Jacksonville placed first overall in the Health, Safety and Fitness Flagship (Shore 500 or more) and tied with NSB Kings Bay, Ga. for first place in the War Eagles pass Harpoon test with flying colors Underwater Construction Team Two Detachment Bravo arrived in Timor-Leste for a construction project with a little help from two Navy Reserve C-130s from VR-62 and VR-53. The VR-62 Nomads are based at NAS Jacksonville. VR-53 Capital Express is based at NAF Washington DC. They are two of five Navy Reserve C-130 squad rons serving Navy logistics needs around the globe and around the clock. The two Navy C-130s lifted 41,690 pounds of dive gear and construction equipment plus nine Seabees for this Underwater Construction Team Two Detachment Bravo mission in TimorLeste. This will be a training evolution for the newer members of the team as the more experienced members are looking to pass on vital under water construction knowledge. Training is vital to the growth and success of UCT-2 now and over the generations, said SW2(SCW/DV) Metro Sayer, UCT-2 embark officer VR-62 Nomads team up with VR-53 Capital Express to lift UCT-2

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013 Oct. 24 1944 In air-sea battle in the Sibuyan Sea, U.S. carrier air craft attack Japanese Center Force. 1958 USS Kleinsmith (APD134) evacuates U.S. nationals from Nicaro, Cuba. 1962 Atlantic Fleet begins quarantine operations to force Soviet Union to agree to remove ballistic missiles and long range bombers from Cuba. Oct. 25 1812 USS United States (Capt. Stephen Decatur) cap tures HMS Macedonian. 1924 Airship, USS Shenandoah (ZR-1), completes round trip transcontinental cruise that began Oct. 7. 1944 During Battle of Leyte Gulf in Battle of Surigao Straits, U.S. battleships execute the maneuver of Crossing the T of the Japanese forces. In Battle of Samar, escort carriers, destroy ers and destroyer escorts hero ically resist attacks of Japanese Center Force. In Battle of Cape Engano, 3rd Fleet carriers attack Japanese Northern Force sinking several small carriers. 1950 Chinese Communist forces launch first offensive in Korea. 1966 Operation Sea Dragon logistics interdiction began. 1983 U.S. Marines and U.S. Army troops land on Grenada to evacuate U.S. citizens threat ened by the islands unstable political situation. Oct. 26 1921 The first successful test of a compressed air, turntable catapult, launches an N-9 sea plane. 1922 Lt. Cmdr. Godfrey de Chevalier makes first landing aboard a carrier (USS Langley) while underway off Cape Henry, Virginia. 1942 Battle of the Santa Cruz Island. USS Hornet (CV-8) was lost and USS Enterprise (CV-6) was badly damaged during the battle. 1944 Battle of Leyte Gulf ends with Navy carrier and USAAF aircraft attacks on the retreating Japanese ships. U.S. forces sink many Japanese ships including four carriers, three battleships, 10 cruisers, and nine destroyers for a total of 26 capital ships. Consequently, the Japanese fleet ceases to exist as an organized fighting force. 1944 Special Task Air Group One makes last attack in month long demonstration of TDR drone missile against Japanese shipping and islands in the Pacific. Of 46 missiles fired, 29 reached their target areas. 1950 U.S. Amphibious Force 7th Fleet lands 1st Marine Division at Wonsan, Korea 1963 USS Andrew Jackson (SSBN-619) launches first Polaris A-3 missile from a sub merged submarine, off Cape Canaveral, Florida. Oct. 27 1864 Lt. William Cushing sinks Confederate ram Albemarle with a spar torpe do attached to the bow of his launch. 1922 Navy League of U.S. sponsors first annual celebra tion of Navy Day to focus pub lic attention on the importance of the U.S. Navy. That date was selected because it was Theodore Roosevelts birthday. 1943 First women Marines report for duty on West Coast, Camp Pendleton. 1944 Fast Carrier Task Forces attack Japanese shipping and installations in Visayas and northern Luzon. 1967 Operation Coronado VIII begins in Rung Sat Zone. Oct. 28 1864 Steamer General Thomas and gunboat Stone River destroy Confederate bat teries on Tennessee River near Decatur, Alabama. 1882 Orders issued for first Naval Attach (LCDR French Chadwick sent to London, England). Oct. 29 1814 Launching of Fulton I first American steam pow ered warship, at New York City. The ship was designed by Robert Fulton. 1980 USS Parsons (DDG-33) rescues 110 Vietnamese refugees 330 miles south of Saigon. Oct. 30 1775 Congress authorizes four vessels for the defense of the United Colonies. 1799 William Balch becomes Navys first commissioned Chaplain. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Lately, the family and I have been doing something really old-fashioned at night. Because the sun is setting earlier, we get in our pajamas right after dinner. I light some scented candles, and sometimes I bake cookies or pop popcorn. And then here comes the oldfashioned part we watch television together. Crazy, old-fashioned, right? It sure feels that way. And I havent even told you what we watch, yet: The Cosby Show. The first night we did this, I was so proud of us. We had tossed aside our Kindles, iPhones, different reading-level books and handheld game sys tems and come together to do something as a family. It was so 1980s of us. I write this slightly tonguein-cheek. A generation ago, watching television together was not necessarily good fam ily time. Or was it? The serious truth is, our television nights have become something I look forward to. Sure, Ive sat in the living room before while the boys watch SpongeBob Squarepants or Gumball, and Ive even shared some laughs with them in between making a men tal to-do list or daydreaming at those shows. But theres something different, some thing wholesome, about being huddled together to watch The Cosby Show. Its the middle ground between annoying cartoons and boring grown-up television. Theres something for everyone. And have you watched The Cosby Show lately? Wow! The boys giggle at the clothes and especially the episode where Theo break-dances (watch ing Dustin recreate the back spin was an added bonus). But, for the most part, little else has changed about family life today. The Huxtables are still relevant. Hollywood doesnt make television like this anymore (Oops, isnt this what our par ents said about the Andy Griffith Show, too?). In most programs aimed at children today, the mother and father are idiots. The dads, in particu lar, are baffoons. And princi pals and teachers fare no bet ter. Authority is mocked, and the characters voices are loud and grating. How refreshing, then, to watch Bill Cosby, who definitely is silly at times in his portrayal of a father, but who ultimately is respected and liked. And Claire well, she had a full-fledged career and was hardly ever home! It was very forward-thinking for the time. Interestingly, none of the ground-breaking social ele ments of The Cosby Show the fact that the Huxtables are African-American or that the mother is a successful lawyer and not home most of the time seem to measure even as a small blip on my kids radar screens. The Huxtables are just as relatable to them as any other family they see on television. Thats proof, I think, that soci ety has made progress in the areas of race or gender. The only thing the kids struggle with is the 80s clothes and haircuts. Thank goodness for progress there. So I was enjoying our night ly routine of popcorn and old sitcoms. I looked forward to it most of the day: I wonder what the Huxtables will be doing tonight? The boys and I talked about it while driving in the car or at dinner. And thats when something else occurred to me: Is there a Cosby Show today that families, or even society, bond over? Is there one show that creates a shared experience for many? There are approximately 300 channels on my televi sion; what are the chances my neighbor and I are watch ing the same thing at the same time? (The same time ele ment is important. With dig ital recordings, not everyone has seen last nights episode of whatever show, last night.) Were all scattered and individ ualized. Even in our television viewing. But not the Smileys! If I had anything to say about it, we were watching The Cosby Show together every night, until we had no more episodes left. And then, last week, after I had gotten comfy on the couch under my blanket and called up to the kids, they yelled back down, Um, were kind of bored of the Cosby Show now. You can watch without us. What? I took a deep breath, and then I marched upstairs and screamed like a maniac at them: So youre just going to stay up here and play Wii and let me watch television alone? Youre just going to give up on our family activity? Is this the way were going to be at night, all of us doing our own thing and staring at a screen? Fine. Ill go watch The Cosby Show by myself. A few minutes later, one by one, the boys crept downstairs and stared at me as they took their seats on the couch. They looked frightened. If it means that much to you, Mom, well watch with you, Ford said. And a half-hour after that, we were all staring together at the big screen. Progress?Television: The new way to bond as a family?

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The Secretary of the Navy announced a new Department of the Navy sexual assault survey for 2013, which started Oct. 15, and can be taken online via any device that can access the Internet. The Department of the Navy Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office (DoN SAPRO), which answers directly to Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, created the survey to assess the Departments prog ress, and learn more of what Sailors and Marines think should be done to fight sexual assault. We cant help them if we dont know what the issues are, and we dont know if our training is work ing, said Jill Loftus, director of DoN SAPRO. If they think our training is horrible, then wed like to know that, so that we can switch gears. Wed also like to know if they think that it is worthwhile and if theyre learning stuff because then we can continue in that vein. From previous surveys, DoN SAPRO has learned that the majority of sexual assaults in the Navy and Marine Corps happen to 18 24 year-olds in social set tings involving alcohol, and that the assaults usually occur at A-schools right after boot camp, or at their first duty station. Weve used that information to set up pilot pro grams, said Loftus. Our Great Lakes experiment that weve been very successful with came from informa tion we learned from our surveys. The experiment targeted Training Support Center Great Lakes, mainly the Sailors who have recently graduated boot camp. The program brought together the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS), local hotels, commanding officers, and others to put an end to the risky situations Sailors may encounter. The program also incorporated bystander interven tion training, No Zebras, No Excuses training, Sex Signals training, a large group presentation on sexual assault and two small-group presentations with dis cussion groups. Referring to Great Lakes, Loftus said, Using anony mous surveys, we have seen a 60 percent reduction in sexual assaults over the past 34 months. This years survey incorporates questions from pre vious surveys, Department of Defense surveys and academic surveys. Pulling from the surveys and les sons learned, DoN SAPRO made the survey more con cise to pinpoint the information theyre trying to find, while taking less time from Sailors and Marines. The 10-minute online survey focuses directly on the issues surrounding sexual assault, as well as issues such as perceptions, attitudes of Sailors and Marines about the issue of sexual assault, said Cmdr. David McKay, a research psychologist at DoN SAPRO. Were also interested in understanding reporting behaviors and attitudes about reporting. Sexual assault is one of the top priorities of the Secretary, and should be a top priority for all Sailors and Marines, to try to figure out how to combat sex ual assault. The survey is important because it does a couple things. One, it helps us gauge progress on the different interventions were implementing. Secondly, it provides an opportunity for Sailors and Marines to speak directly to the Secretary about their experiences about sexual assault. The 21st Century Sailor and Marine Office (N-17) lists combating sexual assault as one of its main pri orities. Rear Adm. Sean S. Buck, the director of N-17, spends time with Sailors to get feedback. When I visit with Sailors, I am constantly asked what else can I do to make a difference? Besides looking out for your shipmates and actively interven ing when necessary, surveys like this are your chance to do something, to make your voice heard, Buck said. Although the survey is a chance for Sailors and Marines to be heard, it is completely anonymous. No one will get a reminder to complete the survey because no one is tracking the individuals who take the survey. We wont know if you havent filled out the survey, said Loftus. Theres no fingerprint. Theres no elec tronic tag to our survey. It can be taken from a smart phone; it can be taken from a tablet; it can be taken at the Apple store; it can be taken at your desktop or at home. We have no idea who you are and so you wont get that email reminding you to take it. Loftus said that some of the initiatives that Mabus has instituted, based on previous survey results, included doubling the number of sexual assault inves tigators at NCIS, increasing the number of sexual assault response coordinators, 66 full-time victim advocates that are civilians trained as counselors, who will help victim support. The JAG is also insti tuting a victims legal counsel who will help victims through the process and the Navy is deploying civilian resiliency counselors, who are also certified SARCs, on every big deck. I think that the Navy and the Marine Corps are really spending the resources and putting the atten tion on prevention, victim care and support, said Loftus. We think that if Sailors and Marines are hon est and forthright in taking this survey, and we get enough of them, that well be able to show the nation and other service people that were really taking this seriously, that we care, and that we dont want victims. We want to prevent sexual assault. This is a way for every member of the service to help us do that.The survey is available at www.donsapro.navy.mil/ donsas.html. Commissaries honor Vietnam vets with special eventsDuring the Veterans Day holiday weekend, commis saries worldwide will honor all veterans, particularly those who served during the Vietnam War, with com memorative events, special sales promotions, give aways and food demos. The tribute to Vietnam-era veterans is linked to the introduction of the 50th Anniversary Vietnam War Commemoration Flag, said Rogers Campbell, DeCAs executive director of Sales, Marketing and Policy. The flag recognizes the service, valor and sacri fice of our military members who made it possible for America to remain strong and safe as a defender of democracy worldwide, Campbell said. We hope that every time a Vietnam War veteran and their fam ily sees this flag, they will know that a grateful nation remembers, thanks and honors them. In addition to commemorative events in the stores, commissary customers will find discounts on namebrand items thanks to special promotions that run from Oct. 24 to Nov. 13. Throughout this promotional period, DeCAs industry partners vendors, suppliers and brokers are collaborating with commissaries to offer discounts beyond everyday savings. It is with great honor that your local commissary serves our nations veterans with dignity and gratitude for everything they have done to keep our country safe, Campbell said. We cannot thank the Vietnam War veterans and all war veterans enough for what they have done for our country, our Constitution and our families. Customers are asked to check their local commis sary for commemorative events and specific sales events offered at their store.Sailors and Marines encouraged to make a difference with new sexual assault survey JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013 A detachment from the Armys elite 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (SOAR) visited NAS Jacksonville on Oct. 16 to conduct overwater extraction training in the St. Johns River for pilots flying the AH-6 Little Bird light attack helicopter. Two pilots at a time were taken out onto the St. Johns River by a 40-foot SAR vessel from the NAS Jacksonville Air Operations Boat Division. Then, one at a time, the pilots jumped from the boat into the river to simulate a ditched aircraft scenario. When the rescue helicopter located the survivor in the river, a rope lad der was unfurled for recovery, and the survivor was flown back to the shore near the airfield control tower to dry off. They repeated the exercise until about 10 p.m. The military airspace, the nearby St. Johns River and your Surface Rescue Swimmer School were factors in our decision to train here, said Capt. Josh Clemmons. The NAS Jax Boathouse is also sup porting us with their international orange SAR vessel and center-console patrol boat. CW2 Justin Hughes explained that each of the four pilots would take his turn in the cockpit and in the water. Were geared up for realism in the river. Each survivor is wearing a com plete uniform, including boots, hel met and life preserver which can get pretty heavy in the water. As for our helicopters, were flying the AH-6 Little Bird equipped with M260 rocket pods and an external fold-down seat, added Hughes. The U.S. Army 160th SOAR (Airborne), also known as Night Stalkers, is the Armys premier night fighting aviation force and the Armys only special operations aviation force. The unit provides helicopter aviation support for general purpose forces and special operations forces. Its missions include reconnaissance and assault that are usually conducted during nightfall, at high speeds, low altitudes and on short notice. Established at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, in 1981, the 160th SOAR has pioneered night flying techniques, as it also contributed to the development of helicopters and equipment. In addi tion to AH/MH-6 Little Birds, the 160th SOAR operates MH-47G Chinooks and MH-60 Black Hawks. AH-6 and MH-6 Little Birds are small, nimble helicopters based on the Hughes MD530F airframe. The MH-6 is a troop transport/scout helicopter, while the AH-6 is configured as a gunship. ARMY LITTL E BIRD PI L OTS CONDUCT RIVER S A R TR A INING

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013 5 PHOTOS BY CLARK PIER C E OVER-W A TER EXTR A CTION TR A INING

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NAS Jacksonville recognized 98 top Sailors from the base and tenant com mands for the fourth quarter during the Sailor of the Quarter (SOQ) luncheon at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center Oct. 17. The operational tempo of todays Navy is insanely hectic. Today, we have 323,000 active duty members, 62,000 Selected Reservists, 285 ships with 102 currently deployed to every area of responsibility in the world with the tre mendous supprt of 201,000 Department of the Navy civilians, said NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/ SW) Brad Shepherd. He continued, Our objective is to protect power and deter war to sustain the American way of life. We continue to operate forward despite budget con straints capitalizing on our most valu able asset our people. Which is why we are here today, carving out some time to focus on our sharpest Sailors our SOQs. MU2 Laura Carey of Navy Band Southeast sang the national anthem and NAS Jacksonville Command Chaplain (Lt. Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore delivered the invocation. The events guest speaker was NAS Jax Senior Sailor of the Quarter MA1(SW/AW) Thomas Kelly of the NAS Jax Security Department. I would like to talk about something I truly believe in which contributes to the success of the U.S. Navy which is teamwork, said Kelly. Teamwork is a value that cannot be completed without leaders to direct, guide and promote the team members to do their best at their job or task to complete a mission, Kelly continued. As in the world of sports, the entire team is there to accomplish a mission of winning a game or championship. In the Navy, our mission or championship is on a much larger scale as we are here to protect the American people. Kelly went on to talk about a unique meeting he back in 2006. I was visiting my mom who worked at Evans Army Hospital in Fort Carson, Colorado when I noticed an elderly man letting a young Soldier ahead of him in line. My mom said his name was Norman and took me to meet him. She mentioned I was in the Navy. Much to my surprise the elderly man was Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf and I ended up having a short conversa tion with him, recalled Kelly. I asked why he let the young Soldier in line ahead of him and he said he was retired and enjoyed watching his team do what they do best and that the young Soldier needed to get back to his team because teamwork is what makes the military force unstoppable. He said I should always thank my team so I would like to thank my team at NAS Jacksonville, said Kelly. Following lunch, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander thanked the Sailors and their spouses. First, take this day to feel good about your accomplishments because youve put a lot of hard work in to earn this recognition. But remember that you did not get here by yourself. Its a fam ily business whether we succeed in the military, said Undersander as he rec ognized the spouses and family mem bers attending the event. He continued, Part of reason you were selected as Sailors of the Quarter is because of the leadership you have dis played. Jack Welch who used to be CEO of General Electric once said, before you are a leader, success is all about growing yourself. When you become a leader, success is all about growing oth ers. So I challenge you as you head back to work to start growing that next Sailor of the Quarter and putting your time into helping a teammate get to that level as well. Undersander then presented each SOQ an award envelope with a $25 gift card from VyStar Credit Union. Top Sailors recognized for achievements 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013

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NRSE RCC holds change of command/retirement ceremonyNavy Region Southeast Reserve Component Command (NRSE RCC) held a change of command ceremony and retirement aboard NAS Jacksonville Oct. 11. Capt. Jerome Hamel relieved Capt. Gregory Smith as commander, NRSE RCC. It is an honor and an extraordinary privilege to inherit this exceptional team following in the foot steps of such a successful commander, said Hamel. I am both proud and excited to assume command, to lead and serve with this diverse and profes sional group of women and men with the 28 Navy Operational Support Centers (NOSCs) and with the region staff as well, here in the Southeast. A native of Methuen, Mass., Hamel received his commission in June 1985 from Massachusetts Maritime Academy. He holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in marine transportation and a Master of Science in financial management from the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif. He also received his Professional Military Education from the Joint Forces Staff College in Norfolk, Va. Hamels most recent assignment was chief of staff to Commander, Naval Reserve Forces Command in Norfolk, Va. To team Southeast, said Hamel addressing NRSE RCC, our Reserves are riding a wave of credibility and relevance, and it is and will remain our job to keep our Sailors engaged and to keep them ready to return to active duty in any and every capacity we own this. Smith commanded NRSE RCC, the largest Reserve Component Command in the country, from August 2011 to October 2013, where he oversaw 14,600 assigned Selective Reservists and Full Time Support (FTS) personnel from 28 NOSCs. Smith managed an annual budget in excess of $331 million at rates greater than 99.7 percent, and his leadership guided his Family Readiness Team to conduct 32 PreDeployment Family Readiness Conferences and eight Returning Warrior Workshops for Sailors deploying and returning from deployment. Smith also led each NOSCs medical and dental readiness to an average of 92 percent. Rear Adm. Rick Williamson was the guest speaker for the event and awarded the Legion of Merit to Smith in recognition of his achievements. The award was Smiths third during his career after 28 years of faithful military service. The change of command ceremony then segued into Smiths retirement ceremony. During the ceremony, Smith thanked the RCC staff and the 28 NOSC commanding officers in Region Southeast. He also recognized the sacrifices of his family, the role of mentors that shaped his leadership and the relationships in the military he developed throughout his career. It was absolutely a difficult decision, said Smith, who retired from naval service in the company of family, friends and colleagues. Being sad reflects how great of a time it was, and I hope that everyone is sad on upon retirement you lose the camaraderie and the teamwork. Smith, accompanied by his family, was piped ashore after being both relieved of command, and the watch. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013 7

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Sponsors included USAA, First Command, University of Phoenix and Columbia College who picked up the cost of the buffet luncheon for the SOQs and their family members. Its a wonderful feeling for a Sailor knowing that our hard work and efforts are being recognized by our com mands. Its a real honor to be recog nized today, said Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven Junior Sailor of the Quarter OS2(AW/ IDW/SW) Cesar Cruz. I think its pretty awesome and moti vational because every day you come in and work because you have to. So this is like a bonus or icing on the cake being recognized for what we do every day, added Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jax Sailor of the Quarter AS1(AW/SW) Daphne Guzman. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. SOQ 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013

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for the detachment. Sayer continued, We really appreciate the support and dedication of the sailors of VR-62 and VR-53. Their respective operations departments were very helpful. The mission is to build a breakwater jetty and attached floating pier. The Nomads and Capital Express teamed up and sent one C-130 each to accom plish this mission. UCT-2 Det Bravo is based at Construction Battalion Center, Port Hueneme, Calif. The Timor-Leste mission is expected to take 90 days. VR-62Campaign Drug Free Flagship (Shore 500 or more). The station also placed second in the Environmental Stewardship Flagship (Shore 500 or more) and tied with NAS Pensacola, Fla. for third place in the Personal Excellence Partnership Flagship (Shore 500 or more). In the Project Good Neighbor Flagship (Shore 500 or more), NAS Jacksonville tied with Center for Naval Air Technical Training Unit Corry Station, Pensacola for third place. Bravo Zulu to the winners and to the honorable mentions. Southeast Region commands are com mended for having active and successful commandsponsored Volunteer Community Service pro grams. Award submissions have been forwarded to Commander, Navy Installations Command and other flagship sponsors for Navy-wide competition, stated CNRSE Rear Adm. Rick Williamson in the message. My sincerest personal thanks to all commands and individuals who selflessly volunteered their time to improve the quality of life in their local community and for participation in this years competition. You are an inspiration to us all, said Williamson. COMMUNITY SERVICE JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013 9

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Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) Secretary Herschel Vinyard and key staff were wel comed by NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander Oct.18 for a briefing on the stations wastewater reuse system. The biggest concern of FDEP is protecting the water quality of the St. Johns River, so reducing the naval air stations wastewater discharge to zero is very signifi cant. FDEP is also the leader in improving water conservation and this water project serves both purposes, said FDEP Secretary Herschel Vinyard Undersander agreed, The goal here is to reuse 100 percent of the stations wastewater and eliminate the need to withdraw approximately 48 million gallons per year of potable water from the Floridan aquifer. The project will eliminate the discharge of 315 million gallons per year of treated wastewater into the St. Johns River preventing about 9 tons of nutrients from entering the river each year. NAS Jacksonville has a history of reusing treated wastewater instead of discharging to the St. Johns River. In 1997, the station and Timuquana Country Club part nered to construct the first phase of the reuse project a 200,000 gallons-per-day gravity-fed wastewater reuse system from the station to the club to irrigate its golf course. Vinyard said, Today, were fortunate to have a partners like NAS Jacksonville and the City of Jacksonville, who are dedi cated to enhancing the health of the river. We count on people like Kevin Gartland for forwardthinking innovation when it comes to protecting the envi ronment under their control. It shows that when you have dedi cated leadership and commit ment its amazing what can be accomplished. Our department will contin ue to focus on nutrient removal from the St. Johns River, so we can reduce the number of algal blooms. And the more we focus on water reuse, the less well be pumping our valuable ground water, added Vinyard. In 2011, NAS Jax built a pump ing station and a 2.2-mile pipe line under the airfield to the reuse pond located on the station golf course. In 2013, the City of Jacksonville constructed a pump station and connection to the course under a $400,000 grant from the St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD). The final phase in 2014 will reduce total nitrogen by more than three tons annually through construction of an addi tional two-mile pipeline to a spray field in the South Antenna Farm, using a $1.4 million SJRWMD grant. The citizens of Northeast Florida are committed to improving the health of the St. Johns River, said NAS Jacksonville Environmental Director Kevin Gartland. When people learn about this project, they understand that NAS Jax in partnership with FDEP, SJRWMD and the City of Jacksonville is doing its best to support that commitment. Vinyard was accompanied by FDEP Northeast District Director Greg Strong, FDEP Water Policy and Ecosystem Restoration Deputy Secretary Drew Bartlett and FDEP Division of Environmental Assessment and Restoration Director Tom Frick.Florida environmental chief checks out zero-discharge wastewater project JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013 11

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At 11:11 on Oct.11, HS-11s Change of Command ceremony commenced as Cmdr. Tim Kinsella Jr. relieved Cmdr. Ryan Keys as commanding officer of the squadron. Capt. Paul Esposito, command er, Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps at Auburn University was the guest speak er and reveled with Keys about past time served together. Esposito also presented Keys with the Navy and Marine Corps Meritorious Service Medal. Keys also received gifts from both the Chiefs and Officers Mess before sharing formal remarks and read ing his orders. At 11:45, Kinsella officially relieved Keys of command and accepted total responsi bility, authority, and accountability of the HS-11 Dragonslayer family. This ceremony was the first for HS-11 in four years to be conducted ashore. HS-11s previous two changes of command were on board USS Enterprise (CVN 65). The extensive planning and tireless efforts of HS-11 culminated in an event full of pride and tradition that reflected the dedication of the men and women of HS-11 who serve their nation proudly. HS-11 change of command embodies naval tradition 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Friday at 7 p.m. Oct. 25 Second Tyme Around Band Deweys Family Night 3rd Friday of the Month Deweys will be open for dinner & bev erages Nov. 15 Karaoke with Tom Turner Dec. 20 Childrens Holiday Bingo Childrens Holiday Bingo will start at 6:30 p.m. and has a cost of $10 per per son and includes soft drinks, hot dog, dauber, bingo card and gift bag for each child. DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Youth Bowling League: Every Sat., 10:30 a.m. noon $17annually or $8 per week. Includes shoes, awards will be given at the end of the season! Rising Stars Youth League: Every Sat., 10:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m. Pee Wee Division (6 years & under) 2 games, $6 per week. Juniors Division (7 years & older) 3 games, $8 per week. Special Stars Bowling League for fami lies with special needs children. All ages welcome! Ramps available for the non-ambulatory as well as bumpers for beginners. Runs for 10 weeks at a cost of $7 per week, shoes are included. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4 6 pm. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4 10 pm. Thursdays: Free bowling for Active Duty 11 am 1 pm. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4 6 pm, Party Extreme $10, 8 pm midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Oct. 19, 1 4 pm. $20 per person, regis tration begins at noon. Scratch Sweeper: Oct. 26, 1 4 pm. $30 entry fee, check in starts at noon. *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Learn to Swim Fall Sessions At the Indoor Pool Session 2 Oct. 28 Nov. 7 $40 military, $45 DoD Monster Dash 5K Oct. 31 at 11:30 a.m. Perimeter Rd./Antenna Farm Barktoberfest Oct. 26, 9 a.m. Vet Treatment Facility Bldg. 537 Free 2-mile walk/run with the dogs!I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil Jacksonville Zoo Spooktacular $9. Universal Halloween Horror Nights: Sunday Thursday $42.25, Friday $53, Saturday $74.25 Pandemic Haunted Attractions San Jose Blvd in Mandarin, tickets on sale at ITT! Haunting of School House 4 $18 Waves of Honor Special: Seaworld Orlando Adult $46.50, Child $42.25. Busch Gardens Tampa Adult $45, Child $40.50. Monster Jam: Club seating (includes pit pass) $42, regular seating (includes pit pass) $22. Jacksonville Jaguars: Section 147 Bud Zone, $70. Jags shuttle bus $12. Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2013 2014 Season: Tickets now available! MOSH: $7 $12. The Artist Series Broadway in Jax 2013 2014 Season: Tickets available now! Celtic Thunder: Nov. 10, 2013, 7 pm, $80. Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus: Jan. 17 & 18, 2014, $51. War Horse: Feb. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $68.50. Memphis: Mar. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $65. Million Dollar Quartet: Apr. 26, 2014, 8 pm, $65. The D* Word: Oct. 4 Oct. 25, 2014, $43.75 $46. Gatorbowl $35 Capital One Bowl $98 Russell Athletic Bowl $78 Soul Food Festival Special $20 General Admission $32 Preferred $42 VIP $65 ITT is now selling $18 tickets for the Harlem Globetrotters! The show is Feb. 28, 7 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Arena.The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Camping Trip Oct. 26 & 27 $10 per person Monster Dash 5k Oct. 31 at 11:30 a.m. Wear your costume!NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Nov. 5 & 19 for active duty Oct. 24, Nov. 7 & 21 for retir ees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. MondayFriday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m. Turkey Trot Golf Scramble Nov. 25, 10 a.m. shotgun start $60 entry fee, $70 for civilian guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m.Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite! Auto Skills 101 for Women Nov. 7, 57 p.m. $5 per personYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Movie Under the Stars Oct. 25 at 7 p.m. Featuring Monsters University Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013

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VP-5 Mad Fox of the WeekAs VP-5 continues its busy schedule operating and maintaining the P8-A Poseidon, the squadron is high lighting one outstanding Mad Fox each week. This weeks Mad Fox of the Week is IS3(AW/IDW) Justin Seikus. Seikus was born in St. Petersburg, and joined the Navy in February 2010. After boot camp, he attended A School at the Navy and Marine Corps Intelligence Training Center in Dam Neck, Va. He then report ed to the Naval Air and Strike Warfare Center in Fallon, Nev. While there, he accepted TAD orders and deployed to the Central Command area of responsibil ity in 2012. After returning, he joined the Mad Foxes in March 2013. As an intelligence specialist, Seikus is tasked with giving the aircrew as much information as possible for every mission they go on. The job takes countless hours of research to give the most up to date informa tion to the aircrew due to the ever-changing environ ment of the intelligence community. Along with his assignments in the VP-5 Intelligence Department, he is also the departments Morale, Welfare and Recreation representative and the commands Coalition of Sailors against Destructive Decisions treasurer. Getting the correct information to those in the air and on the ground is always the most stressful part of my job. Each mission, they rely on the information that we provide them with, explained Seikus. After a successful mission and knowing that what we pro vided helped the crew during the mission is always a great feeling and keeps us motivated each day to do the best job we can. Seikuss current goal is to make second class petty officer. His long-term goal is to be accepted into Officer Candidate School so that he can earn a com mission. To help facilitate these plans, in his free time he attends American Military University where he is working towards a degree in political science. When he is away from the squadron he enjoys fishing, hunt ing, and working on his marksmanship at the range. He is also an avid bowler who has bowled a 300. VP-5 is currently in the inter-deployment readiness cycle aboard NAS Jacksonville. Naval Museums, History and Heritage Headquarters return to previous operations following shutdown The Navys museums, which closed as a result of the government shutdown, have returned to their nor mal operating hours. Additionally, the Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) and the Navy Department Library, both located on the Washington Navy Yard, have reopened. The naval archives will operate under restricted access due to the ongoing remediation efforts in stor age facilities and naval history holdings. Access to and support from the naval archives will remain limited to official government inquiries only. Likewise, most of the Navys central historic artifact collection and art collection is stored offsite as part of a long-term initiative to improve the environmental and inventory conditions in which they are kept. Requests for artifact support and for loans will be entertained, but response times will be longer than in the past. Official requests will have priority. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013 15

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SECNAV announces Virginia-class submarines for womenThe fast attack submarines USS Virginia (SSN 774) and USS Minnesota (SSN 783) have been selected as the initial two Virginia-class sub marines to integrate female officers, the Navy announced Oct. 15. A total of six female officers, two Supply Corps and four nuclear-trained, will report aboard no later than January 2015. Both submarines are homeported in Groton, Conn. Female officers serving aboard Virginia-class submarines is the next natural step to more fully integrate women into the submarine force, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. There are many extremely talented and capable women with a desire to succeed in this field and the submarine force will be stronger because of their efforts. Our Navy has proven over the years that one of our greatest advantages is our diversity. This is an advantage we should capitalize on across all platforms, including submarines. Since the Navy officially changed its policy pro hibiting women serving on submarines on April 29, 2010, the submarine force has integrated 43 women onto six Ohio-class ballistic-missile (SSBN) and guided-missile submarines (SSGN). Further Virginia-class integration is being planned in the submarine force. My plan is to begin by integrating four Virginiaclass attack submarines, with the second set of two units being integrated in fiscal year 2016, said Vice Adm. Michael Connor, commander, Submarine Forces. Since Virginia and Minnesota are both Atlantic Fleet submarines home ported in Groton, Conn., I intend to select two Pacific Fleet submarines home ported in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii early next year. The female officers will be assigned to the Virginia-class submarines for duty after complet ing the nuclear submarine training pipeline, which consists of nuclear power school, prototype train ing and the Submarine Officer Basic Course. Submarines with women currently serving on board are USS Florida (SSGN 728), USS Georgia (SSGN 729) and USS Wyoming (SSBN 742), home ported in Kings Bay, Ga.; and USS Ohio (SSGN 726), USS Louisiana (SSBN 743), and USS Maine (SSBN 741), homeported in Bangor, Wash. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. Trunk or TreatNAS Jacksonville First Class Petty Officers Association is hosting Trunk or Treat Oct. 30 from 6-7:30 p.m. at the base chapel parking lot. All are invited to join the fun! 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 24, 2013 17 SOQ LIST NAS Jax defends title as tri-base flag football champsThe 2013 Tri-base Flag Football Tournament took place at NAS Jacksonville Sept. 28. NAS Jacksonville won the 2012 Tri-base Flag Football Tournament here and were poised to defend their title. In 2012, there were six teams in the tourna ment with NS Mayport, Subase Kings Bay and NAS Jacksonville having two teams respectively in the tournament. This year, only NAS Jacksonville had two teams represented and Mayport and Kings Bay had one team each in the tournament. The first two games of the tournament put NAS Jax Gold against NAS Jax Blue and Kings Bay against Mayport. NAS Jax Gold defeated NAS Jax Blue 33-18 and Mayport defeated Kings Bay 21-19. In the second round of the tournament, NAS Jax Gold demolished Mayport 34-0 and NAS Jax Blue beat Kings Bay 27-12. Kings Bay was eliminated from the tournament since it was their second loss and NAS Jax Gold had no losses after two games. Mayport and NAS Jax Blue each had one loss and squared off to see who would be eliminated and who would advance to the championship to take on the defending champions NAS Jax Gold. NAS Jax Blue stayed in command of the game and defeated Mayport 33-21 to eliminate Mayport. NAS Jax Blue found themselves in the same situa tion as the previous year by coming out of the losers bracket to face NAS Jax Gold and having to beat them twice in a row to win the championship. One of the major issues facing NAS Jax Blue was that this was their fourth game in a row and NAS Jax Gold had only played two games. NAS Jax Gold was well rested since they had to wait for the winner of NAS Jax Blue and Mayport. NAS Jax Gold proved that they were the best team on the field as they rolled to a 47-13 victory over NAS Jax Blue to successfully defend their 2012 Tri-base Flag Football title. The following Naval History and Heritage enterprise museums have resumed normal hours: D.C.) Before visiting, please access the museums respec tive websites to check hours of operation. renovation project for buildings 108 and 44 which is targeted for completion as early as 2014. The ongoing project will result in accommodating 12,000 cubic feet paper, microform and digital media in appropriate environmental conditions. For more information and to access the Navy museum Web sites, please see http://www.history.navy.mil/muse ums/index.html. MUSEUMS Children are twice as likely to be hit and killed by a car on Halloween compared to other days of the year. Walk safely Children under 12 should trick-or-treat and cross streets with an adult. Cross the street at corners, using traffic signals and crosswalks. when crossing and keep looking across the street. Teach children to make eye contact with drivers before cross ing in front of them. Always walk on sidewalks or paths. If there are no sidewalks, walk facing traffic as far to the left as possible. Children should walk on direct routes with the fewest street crossings. ing or backing up. Teach children to never dart out into the street or cross between parked cars. Trick or treat with an adult Children under the age of 12 should not be out at night with out adult supervision. If kids are mature enough to be out on their own, they should stick to familiar areas that are well lit and trick-ortreat in groups. Keep costumes both creative and safe make sure it is the right size to prevent trips and falls. Decorate costumes and bags with reflective tape or stickers and, if possible, choose light col ors. Choose face paint and make up whenever possible instead of masks, which can obstruct a childs vision. Have kids carry glow sticks or flashlights to help them see and be seen by drivers. Double check candy and costumes Check treats for signs of tampering before children are allowed to eat them. treats in their original, unopened wrappers. Candy should be thrown away if the wrapper is faded or torn, or if the candy is unwrapped. for visibility, remember that the liquid in glow sticks is also haz ardous, so parents should remind children not to chew on or break them. tions when choosing Halloween makeup. Drive extra safely on Halloween Slow down and be espe cially alert in residential neigh borhoods. Children are excited on Halloween and may move in unpredictable ways. Take extra time to look for kids at intersections, on medians and on curbs. Enter and exit driveways and alleys slowly and carefully. Eliminate any distractions inside your car so you can con centrate on the road and your sur roundings. Drive slowly, anticipate heavy pedestrian traffic and turn your headlights on earlier in the day to spot children from greater dis tances. Tuition Assistance payments resumeFollowing the passage of continuing resolution ing funding of voluntary education programs, includ Effective immediately, all military TA applications for courses starting on or after Oct. 17 may be submit ted. All previously approved TA requests for courses which began on or after Oct.17 will also be honored. regarding classes that began during the dates of the government shutdown, Oct. 1-16. Any authorization for such classes that came prior to Oct. 1 will still be honored. However, Navy will follow guidance from the Department of Defense instruction which states All military TA must be requested and approved prior to the start date of the course. Since funding cannot not be awarded retroactively, classes that started Oct. 1-16 which were not authorized prior to Oct. 1 will not be paid for. According to Navy officials, the service will resume close to normal pre-shutdown operations, with no changes to TA execution anticipated for 2014. The bot tom line for Sailors is, if you have a TA voucher printed educational institution in lieu of payment. Halloween safety tips The Florida Department of Health in Duval other water bodies in Florida. Blue-green algae are a group of organisms that can live in freshwater, saltwater or in mixed brack ish water and may commonly be referred to as pond scum. They also are referred to as cyanobacteria. Most blue-green algae do not produce chemicals harmful to humans or animals, however, some types make natural substances called cyanotoxins. Over time, these toxins are diluted and eventually break down and disappear. Blue-green algae toxins can affect the liver, ner vous system and skin. Most problems happen when water containing high toxin amounts is ingested. Abdominal cramps, nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting may occur if any untreated surface water is swal lowed. Direct contact or breathing airborne droplets containing high levels of algal toxins during swim ming or showering can cause irritation of the skin, is exposed to the algae. Individuals should avoid coming in to contact with a blue-green algae bloom, especially children and pets. Boiling water does not remove or destroy these toxins. DOH-Duval recommends people refrain from recreational water uses that could result in inges tion of and/or skin exposure to algal blooms in the river. Children should also not be allowed to play along the shoreline where they might be exposed to clumps of algae or drink water from the river. Florida Department of Health also recommends that fish caught in or near the bloom not be consumed. The Florida Department of Health is working with other state and local agencies to assess concentra For additional information on health issues related to algae visit, http://www.floridahealth.gov/healthyenvironments/aquatic-toxins/cyanobacteria.html.Health officials provide water safety tips on algal bloom

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