Jax air news

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Material Information

Title:
Jax air news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note:
Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID:
UF00028307:02063


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2013 ACT TRAINING AW ARENESS Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Navy environmental leaders met Oct. 10 with state and city regulators at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) aboard NAS Jacksonville to con duct their quarterly meeting that promotes environmental compliance and sustainabili ty through a cooperative effort aimed at environmental excel lence. Bruce Mobley leads the FRCSE environmental depart ment. For more than 11 years, the Northeast Florida Environmental Compliance Partnering Team has fostered trust, coop eration and communication concerning hazardous waste management. Being part of the compliance partnering team is very worthwhile. Were all focused on the same goal as we fine-tune our mission and sus tainment activities, he said. Our most recent accomplish ment involved working with members of the compliance Commander, Task Group 72.2 recently sent a detach ment comprised of VP-26s Combat Aircrew (CAC) 6 and their team of maintenance professionals on a one-week detachment to the Federated States of Micronesia in sup port of Operation Big Eye 2013. The annual exercise seeks to enhance international coop eration with regard to enforce ment of maritime regulations in the Micronesian exclusive economic zones, which stretch across the central Pacific. Operation Big Eye is one of the largest and most complex mar itime surveillance operations held in the Pacific region. CAC-6 traveled to the island of Palau, a 177 squaremile landmass north of New Guinea. On their approach into the airfield, the crew made use of their Automatic Identification System (AIS), which tracks and identi fies surface vessels through a global maritime network, -all in order to begin working in support of Operation Big Eye before even arriving at their destination. Touching down on the small island nation, CAC-6, their team of maintainers and Officer in Charge Lt. Cmdr. Trey Walden were greeted by U.S. Deputy Ambassador Thomas Daley. Next, the crew depart ed Palau for Pohnpei, a 122-square-mile island located in the Caroline Island chain. Once again, CAC-6 performed AIS sweeps while in tran sit, identifying as many sur face contacts as possible. By the end of the second day of the operation, their initiative and resourcefulness laid the groundwork for a successful follow-on maritime domain awareness mission out of Pohnpei the next day. After three days of solid fly Sailors assigned to the Fighting Tigers of VP-8 provided a guided tour to 20 children and their fami lies on Sept. 28 during the squad rons Pilot for a Day event. Each of the youthful pilots that participated are currently fight ing cancer or are in remission from cancer. The American Cancer Society (ACS) and Nemours Childrens Hospital Jacksonville helped plan the event. The guest pilots toured a P-3C aircraft and received train ing on weapons employed by the squadron. Tyson Peacock, a 13-year-old cancer survivor said, I had a great time today. I feel like being a pilot is something I would really like to do when I get older. He added, Today was a great learning experience; Im happy that I was able to come out and experience this. ACS is a nationwide, communi ty-based, voluntary health orga nization dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health prob lem. ACS is seeking cancer fight ers between the ages of 30-65, who have never been diagnosed with cancer, who are interested in par ticipating in Cancer Prevention Study-3 (CPS-3), a historic nation wide study to help researchers bet ter understand the genetic, envi ronmental and lifestyle factors that cause or prevent cancer. Enrollment will be taking place in Jacksonville Nov. 5-8. For more information, or to schedule an enrollment appointment, visit www.cancer.org/cps3florida. VP-8 Chief Aviation Technician Sarah Reitz closed out the event by saying, I am honored to be part of a command that affords us the opportunity to give back to the community. This event was fun for Sailors and children alike. VP-8 hosts American Cancer Society Children in Pilot for a Day VP-26 CAC-6 flies in support of Operation Big Eye in Micronesia Environmental compliance team meets at FRCSE

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Oct. 17 1922 Lt. Cmdr. Virgil Griffin in a Vought VE-7SF makes first takeoff from U.S. Navy aircraft carrier USS Langley (CV-1) anchored in York River, Virginia. 1941 U-568 torpedoes and damages USS Kearny (DD-432) near Iceland, resulting in 11 killed and 22 injured. 1944 Naval forces land Army rangers on islands at the entrance to Leyte Gulf in preparation for landings. 1989 Following San Francisco earthquake, 24 Navy and Military Sealift Command ships rendered assis tance. Oct. 18 1812 U.S. sloop of war Wasp captures HM brig Frolic. 1859 U.S. Marines reach Harpers Ferry, Va. and assault the arsenal seized by John Brown and his fol lowers. 1867 USS Ossippee and USS Resaca participate in formal transfer of Alaska to U.S. authority at Sitka and remain to enforce law and order in new territory. 1944 3rd Fleet carrier aircraft attack Japanese ships in harbor and land forces around Manila. 1968 In Operation Sea Lords, the Navys three major operating forces in Vietnam (TF 115, 116, and 117) are brought together for the first time to stop Vietcong infiltration deep into South Vietnams Mekong Delta. Oct. 19 1843 Capt. Robert Stockton in Princeton, the first screw-propelled naval steamer, challenges British mer chant ship Great Western to a race off New York, which Princeton won easily. 1915 Establishment of submarine base at New London, Conn. 1944 Secretary of Navy orders African-American women accepted into Naval Reserve. 1987 Destruction of an Iranian oil-drilling platform used for military purposes. Oct. 20 1824 U.S. Schooner Porpoise captures four pirate ships off Cuba. 1944 Seventh Fleet lands more than 60,000 Army troops on Leyte, Philippines while Japanese aircraft attack. 1952 Task Force 77 establishes ECM hunter/killer teams of two ECM-equipped aircraft and an armed escort of four Skyraiders and four Corsairs. 1967 Operation Coronado VII began in Mekong Delta, Vietnam. 1983 Due to political strife, USS Independence (CV59 ) ordered to Grenada. Oct. 21 1797 Launching of USS Constitution at the Hartts Boston shipyard, Boston, Mass. The ship is now the oldest commissioned ship in the U.S. Navy. 1942 British submarine lands Capt. Jerauld Wright, USN, and four Army officers at Cherchel, French North Africa, to meet with a French military delegation to learn the French attitude toward future Allied land ings. Oct. 22 1846 Miss Lavinia Fanning Watson of Philadelphia christens the sloop-of-war Germantown, the first U.S. Navy ship sponsored by a woman. 1951 First of seven detonations, Operation BusterJangle nuclear test. 1962 President John F. Kennedy orders surface blockade (quarantine) of Cuba to prevent Soviet offen sive weapons from reaching Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis. Oct. 23 1944 Battle of Leyte Gulf, a series of separate bat tles, begins with attacks on Japanese ships. 1983 A suicide truck bomber attacks the Marine barracks at Beirut airport, Lebanon killing 241 (220 Marines, 18 Sailors, and 3 soldiers). 1983 Operation Urgent Fury (Grenada, West Indies) begins. My experience with weight as a child went something like this: I was skinny. The end. I never had a weight problem until I started having children. Then, it seemed, I never lost baby weight before I was pregnant with the next one. Sound familiar? Dustins experience with weight as a child was much differ ent. In fact, we grew up together, so I remember Dustin as an awkward, overweight fifth grader who needed braces. He even was the hall patrol. With his orange vest and shiny badge, he told me to walk, dont run, in the hallways. But when Dustin hit puberty, after years of growing out, he finally grew up. By the time he graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy, he almost looked too thin. When we married, we were both very skinny. And then we had babies. Thirteen years later, I was 70 pounds heavier than my wed ding day. Only, I never saw this happening. Not really. In my mind, I was always the knobby-kneed girl who ran track and had to use belts to keep her jeans up. My perception of myself did not match what the reality on the outside. If I happened to catch an unexpected glimpse of myself in a reflective window on a building, or in a mirror at the mall, I was shocked. Well, who is that chubby lady? Certainly not me! I use chubby because that feels more friendly. I didnt even comprehend the extra weight after a year of being photographed once a week for Dinner with the Smileys, nor during all my television interviews for the books publicity. Sure, I saw my double chin on the Today Show, but I chalked that up to the camera adding 70 pounds. And, yes, some helpful readers passed along links to online commenters wisecracks about my weight, but, well, they were online comments, and no one takes those seriously, right? Dustin, by the way, has the opposite problem: despite being nothing more than a little overweight since he lost all his childhood pounds, he still views himself as that kid in grade school who didnt look like the others. Despite being compared to the handsome good looks of Tom Cruise today, Dustin is not arrogant. That little (Im using the word loosely) fifth grade boy keeps him humble. Dustin will always view himself as he was when he was 11 years old, and unfortunately, I was doing the same with myself. Then I had a blood test in early-August. It was a routine test that was part of my yearly physical. I didnt think much about it, and I was rushing to have lunch with a friend as the nurse poked my vein. A few days later, while I was in D.C., the doctor called. My blood glucose level was high. Really high. I needed an A1c hemoglobin test to check for diabetes. What? But Im that skinny girl from grade school who eats whatever she wants and doesnt gain weight. The next day, I stepped on the bathroom scale and saw I number I never wanted to see. My heart sort of sank to the floor. I was over weight. Finally, I got it. Dustin and I walked around the nations capitol that day, and I recognized that my legs felt heavy. My ankles kept swell ing. And, actually, that had been happening for some time. I needed to stop and rest in between monuments. I felt like crud. The good news, however, is that my A1c hemoglobin test, which checks blood glucose levels over a period of time, came back fine. I dont have diabetes. Not yet, at least. But the doctor agreed I was headed that way. Plus, I take more blood pressure medication than an almost-37-year old should. So I decided to get serious about losing weight. One month later, I lost eight pounds. After 10 pounds, my ankles quit swelling. Fifteen pounds down, and my collar bones emerged. Ive been watching what I eat, thanks to years of Weight Watchers, for a little over eight weeks now, and Ive lost 17 pounds. My blood glucose has dropped even further, and in another 10 pounds, the doctor will reevaluate my need for blood pressure medicine. I still have a long way to go, but Im feeling great. Ive tried sometimes in earnest; sometimes not to lose weight for years. I even had some success in 2009. But theres nothing like a good old diabetes scare to make you serious. People ask how Ive done it, and I tell them that its deceptively simple: I dont want to get diabetes. That fear, coupled with what Ive learned from Weight Watchers, has made it relatively easy. I look forward to the day when my inner view of myself and my reflection in the mirror at the mall are finally in sync. How I lost 17 pounds in eight weeks Single active duty Navy mothers needed What is the emotional readjustment of coming home and reentering post deploy ment life after being deployed? Single active duty Navy mothers who have been on deployment and have completed an entire deployment cycle are needed for a research study. Doctoral Psychology student Juanita Bruno-Jacob at Capella University wishes to ask you questions about the experience. You will remain anonymous. You may contact her at juanita. brunoja@gmail.com or jbruno jacob2@capellauniversity.edu or via phone at (703) 618-9668. Your call and/or e-mail will be returned as promptly as possible.

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The NAS Jacksonville chaplains host ed several suicide awareness training sessions last week to provide informa tion to military and civilian personnel in an effort to curb the growing number of suicides within the Department of Defense and outside communities. We are holding this training to reit erate the importance of suicide preven tion and to talk about when you should become a first responder and engage someone who might try to take their own life, said NAS Jax Command Chaplain (Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore. He then asked the audience how many people have known someone who committed suicide. Most had. When someone takes their life, the people left behind usually spend years feeling guilty but it is not their fault. Suicide is a personal decision, Skidmore contin ued. But we need to try to prevent that decision by intervening. Eighty percent of those who attempt suicide give some kind of indication before they act. After a short video about a Sailor who attempted suicide and was helped by his command and other Navy resourc es. Luckily, this Sailor survived and got the help he needed, said Skidmore who went on to discuss some of the warning signs and risk factors. Warning signs could include: Sometimes people dealing with economic stress, relationship issues, job situations just dont know how to deal with them. They become over whelmed. Its up to you to establish and keep establishing that first line of defense and be aware of the signs, said Skidmore. The three factors in dealing with those considering suicide is ask, care, treat or ACT. Ask means find out what is bothering them and take the time to listen. Dont judge and be persistent. Then let them know you care by offering hope. Finally, help them get the treat ment they need take them to someone specializing in crisis intervention and suicide prevention like an FFSC coun selor or chaplain. And, make sure you follow up on them, Skidmore said. We are available 24/7 to help by call ing our duty number at (904) 614-7385. For more information about suicide awareness, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255.Suicide prevention training promotes awareness Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast awarded 59 restoration and modernization ener gy projects totaling $40.9 million in fiscal year 2013. The projected savings from these projects is expected to be more than 350,000 MBTU, which is a 3.3 percent reduction in energy usage from the 2003 Navy Region Southeast baseline. A British Thermal Unit (BTU) is defined as the amount of energy needed to cool or heat one pound of water by one degree fahrenheit. An MBTU is one mil lion BTUs and is typically used to measure medi umto large-scale ener gy consumption. Cost savings on average per MBTU for these projects is $21. The Department of the Navy (DoN) issued a new energy policy 4100.5E Shore Energy Management) in June 2012 that is driving ener gy consumption reduc tion at all Navy installa tions, transforming the energy culture and seek ing new or existing tech nical solutions for reduc ing energy, said NAVFAC Southeast Energy Manager Brad Clark. The Shore Energy Manage-ment instruc tion is a complete revi sion from the 1994 ver sion. The instruction affirms the Navys policy and strategy to ensure ener gy security as a strategic imperative. It also directs the Navy to meet or exceed federal mandates and executive orders. Since naval forces require constant support from ashore installations, the Navy is reducing its vulnerabilities related to electrical grids by lower ing consumption, inte grating renewable energy sources and increasing control of energy supply and distribution. Energy reliability, resiliency and redundancy are essential components of the Navys Critical Infrastructure The instruction fur ther directs the Navy to use the most cost effec tive means to meet shore energy goals including a 50 percent ashore con sumption reduction by 2020, achieving a total ashore energy usage rate of 50 percent from alter native sources by 2020, and reducing the amount of petroleum used in commercial vehicle fleets by 50 percent by 2015 and other goals, explained Clark. Some of the technol ogy highlights instituted by NAVFAC Southeast bases in fiscal 2013 included the installation of Light Emitting Diode (LED) exterior lighting, solar water heating, high efficiency chillers and motors, Direct Digital Controls, and HVAC opti mization improvements. NAS Jacksonville exe cuted the most energy projects, a total of 10, expects to save the most energy just under 92,000 MBTU from executed energy projects. contract for $2.8 mil lion was awarded for upgrades to HVAC sys tems, lighting replace ment, and water con sumption upgrades in Buildings 3221, 3460, annual savings are pro jected to be 16,331 MBTU. Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay awarded a con tract valued at $5 million NAVFAC Southeast energy saving projects making strides JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013 NAS Jacksonville fire inspectors made the rounds last week visiting numerous commands and facilities to promote fire safety during the annual fire prevention week. The event is held every year dur ing the week of Oct. 9 to commemorate the anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. The fire inspectors spent hours edu cating the public through static dis plays, lectures and demonstrations. They also held fire drills at various buildings on the base in an effort to increase fire prevention and safety awareness. We recognize Fire Prevention Week every year to promote safety. Many times people take fire prevention and safety measures for granted and its something that can happen at any time. So our job is to educate people, determine causes and prevent fires before they happen, said NAS Jax Fire Inspector Robert Adams. Fire Prevention Week events began with a visit to the Navy Exchange (NEX) Food Court where fire inspectors passed out information on fire safety to NEX patrons, answered questions about their ladder truck and gave firefighter hats to children. Also on hand to help promote fire safety was Pluggie the Fire Hydrant who squirted patrons and talk ed to them about fire hazards. The fire inspectors also visited the NAS Jax Youth Activities Center where they discussed what to do in case of a fire, evacuation routes, safe zones while cooking in the kitchen and the impor tance of having a family plan for emer gencies. The children also watched as Firefighter Russell Russ donned his gear and demonstrated his breathing appa ratus to show them not to be afraid dur ing an emergency. Jairus Achane, 7, said, I learned that firefighters are good people and help save people during a fire. They also help us make good escape plans when we need them. I also learned about the safe zone in the kitchen when my parents are cooking and that its where Im not supposed to be. Naval Hospital Jax also hosted the firefighters who visited the Childrens Ward and Pediatrics Clinic to meet with families. At the NAS Jax Child Development Center, the fire inspectors taught the children that they should never play with matches or lighters and how to stop, drop and roll during a fire and how to call 9-1-1 to report a fire. Overall, the week proved successful in getting the word out about fire safety. We talked to a lot of people and got the word out about preventing fires before they happen, said Adams. The Fire Prevention Division offers classes on fire safety to commands and organizations as requested. For more information, call 542-3928. Prevent Kitchen Fires

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013 5 Paying tribute to fallen firefightersFires take more American lives than all other natural disasters combined. They inflict devastating tolls on families and communities, and they cost our nation billions of dollars each year. During Fire Prevention Week, we pay tribute to the brave men and women who put their lives on the line to pull their neighbors out of harms way, and pledge to do our part to prevent fires in our homes, our cities, and the great outdoors. We all have a responsibility to protect our families against fire. We should be cautious while cooking, using electrical appliances, and heating our homes. Those who live in areas prone to wildfires can help safeguard their homes by clearing flammable vegetation, and they should plan for emergencies by build ing a supply kit and talking with their families about a communications plan and evacuation routes. Every American should install working smoke detectors on each level of their home and remember to test them monthly. It is also essential to develop and practice evacuation plans twice a year. Because fire spreads rap idly and poisonous, disorienting smoke moves even quicker, families should design plans that allow for the quickest possible exit. By preventing fires, we can both protect our loved ones and keep Americas firefighters out of unneces sary danger. To save people they have never met, these skilled professionals battle walls of flame, put them selves in the paths of unpredictable wildfires, and rush into houses on the verge of collapse. This week, as we renew our commitment to fire safety, we thank these courageous first responders for their service and honor those who have made the ultimate sacrifice in the line of duty. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States do hereby proclaim Oct. 6 through Oct.12, 2013, as Fire Prevention Week. On Sunday, Oct. 6, 2013, in accor dance with Public Law 107-51, the flag of the United States will be flown at half-staff at all federal office buildings in honor of the National Fallen Firefighters Memorial Service. I call on all Americans to participate in this observance with appropriate programs and activities and by renew ing their efforts to prevent fires and their tragic consequences. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourth day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand thirteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-eighth.Barack Obama President of the United States of America

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Sending or receiving a text takes a drivers eyes from the road for an average of 4.6 seconds, -the equiva lent (at 55 mph) of driving the length of an entire foot ball field, blind. Its 8 a.m., and you jump in your car to drive to work. You have every intention of driving safely, but within minutes of merging onto the highway youve already checked your makeup in the mirror, fiddled with your cars radio, programmed your GPS for a meeting loca tion, made two calls on your cellphone and sent a text message to your sister. You might not realize it, but youre a distracted driver. Each time you take your focus off the road, even if just for a split second, youre putting your life and the lives of others in danger. An emerging and dead ly epidemic on the nations roads, distracted driv ing-related crashes caused at least 5,500 deaths and nearly 450,000 injuries in 2009, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation. However, since many local law enforcement agen cies dont routinely document distraction factors in crash reports, federal safety officials believe the num bers are actually much higher. Driving a car is a very complex task, says Barbara Harsha, executive director of the Governors Highway Safety Association, which estimates that distractions are associated with 15 percent to 25 percent of crashes at all levels. It requires your complete attention. All it takes is a glance away for more than two seconds and you can get into serious trouble. Distracted driving is any activity that takes your attention away from the road. In everyday driving, however, distractions are common. From talking with passengers, to eating, to turning around to check on fidgety toddlers, distracted driving endangers you, your passengers, pedestrians and others. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention describes three main types of distractions while driving. Visual dis tractions cause you to take your eyes off the road, manual distractions cause you to take your hands off the wheel and cognitive distractions, such as listen ing to a talk radio show, cause you to take your mind off what you are doing. Driving is a great privilege, but with that privilege also comes responsibility. Manage your distractions The good news is that distracted driving crashes can be prevented. The first thing I would tell you is to put your elec tronic device away, Harsha says. Just dont use it. All it takes is a glance thats longer than two seconds for you to get into a crash. Some distractions cant be eliminated, but most can be managed. For example, turn your cellphone off or silence it before you start the engine. Secure your pets properly before you begin to drive. Dont eat or drink on the road. Set your GPS before starting the engine. In a national survey from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, most respondents said there are few driving situations when they would not use the phone or text, yet they reported feeling unsafe when in vehicles in which the driver is texting. They also said they support bans on texting and cellphone use while driving. Distractions and teens Traffic crashes are the leading cause of death for U.S. teens. Teens are especially vulnerable to distrac tions while driving and are more likely than other age groups to be involved in a fatal crash where distraction is reported. Teen drivers are far more likely to send and receive text messages while driving than adults. Also, a teens crash risk goes up when there are teen passengers in the car. Parents need to take a strong stand with their teens, Harsha says. Prohibit teens from using Distracted driving: Stay focused when on the road 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013

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Navy Exchange hosts breast cancer awareness eventNearly 100 employees and patrons of the NAS Jax Navy Exchange (NEX) decked out in pink attire attended a breast cancer awareness event Oct. 11. The guest speakers for the event were First Coast News Anchorwoman and creator of Buddy Check 12 Jeannie Blaylock and Naval Hospital Jacksonville Breast Care Coordinator Nikki Levinson-Lustgarten. NEX General Manager Marsha Brooks kicked off the event by wel coming the crowd under an array of pink balloons and ribbons. Thank you all for coming and being part of this important event to recognize Breast Cancer Awareness Month, said Brooks, who also recognized those involved in coordinating the event, including a bra decorating contest and pink ribbon cupcakes provided by the commissary. She then introduced Blaylock who polled the crowd to recognize breast cancer survivors and give them a round of applause. If you catch breast cancer early these days your odds of staying alive are phenomenal more than 90 percent. So that shows how important it is to do self exams every single month, said Blaylock, who created Buddy Check 12 as a way to get women to do these exams and remind their buddy as well. I started this program after losing one of my best friends to breast cancer more than 20 years ago. She was 29 and had just had baby. Back then, people didnt talk about it so she didnt have the support she needed. And, by then I worked here in TV and kept meeting people with breast cancer, Blaylock continued. So I called my mom and said lets do self exams and call one another the same day of each month to remind ourselves. So thats how Buddy Check 12 started and its saved thou sands of women around the country. Guests were invited to take home Buddy Check 12 kits and a slew of other information about breast cancer and resources available. Levinson-Lustgarten also offered valuable information about how to con duct self examinations, what are some of the possible procedures offered after a diagnosis of breast cancer, and the importance of having a support system. No one should have to deal with breast cancer alone. We have a won derful support group at the hospital called Ribbons and Roses Breast Cancer Support Group which can make a world of difference in a journey to fight this disease, said Levinson-Lustgarten before introducing two survivors, Grace Brown and GiGi Neff, who told the heroic stories of their continuous fight against breast cancer. When I was first diagnosed 18 years ago, there was very little support for those of us battling breast cancer. I call it the thief who keeps coming back to try to steal my life. The thief has visited me several times but times have defi nitely changed and now there are great support systems so please use them because it can make all the difference in the world, said Brown. For more information about the Naval Hospital Jacksonville Ribbons and Roses Breast Cancer Support Group, call 542-7857. Sailors from the VP-8 Fighting Tigers supported a Fleming Island High School Navy Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (NJROTC) drill meet on Sept. 28. Fighting Tiger volunteers judged the Captain M-9s Challenge, that encom passed 12 North Florida High Schools. Events included a 16x100 meter relay race, push-ups, curl-ups, a sea bag carry, and a tug-o-war. The NJROTC program teaches leader ship development, maritime heritage, the significance of sea power, and naval topics such as the fundamentals of naval operations, seamanship, naviga tion and meteorology. Classroom instruction is augmented throughout the year by extra-curricular activities of community service, aca demics, athletics, drill and orienteer ing competitions, field meets, flights, visits to naval activities, marksmanship sports training, and physical fitness training. It was amazing to see these young men and women work, and to observe the high level of professionalism in each of them. It was truly an honor to be a part of this event, stated AE3 Amanda Watkins. I feel the event was a great way to get involved in the lives of young men and women interested in service to the nations military. I look forward to simi lar opportunities like this in future. Fighting Tigers support Navy Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013 7

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partnering team to improve training of hazardous waste coordinators in order to reduce incidents of non-compliance on the shop floor. NAS Jax Environmental Director Kevin Gartland said, We highly value this proactive partnership with state and city environmental regulatory agencies. It helps everybody to identify and implement solutions that enhance environ mental compliance, promote natural resources manage ment and protect public health. Northeast District Director Greg Strong, of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), was enthusiastic about the Navys goal to improve training of hazardous waste coordinators at NAS Jacksonville, FRCSE and other commands. I like how your base environmental leadership is getting behind this training in a very thoughtful and methodical way to identify root causes and clearly youve achieved great success, said Strong. From FDEPs perspective, were putting more resources into environmental outreach and education like this and it seems to be paying off. One great example is the Navys participation as part of the Environmental Compliance Partnering Team. You all have a tremendous reputation for quality in your environmental program. Well done. FRCSE Environmental Engineer Jenna Perry reported a large decrease in non-comformities. Our pre-training non-conformities numbered 106. Compare that to just 11 in a post-training inspection. Our FDEP hazardous waste inspection for 2013 showed zero issues. FRCSE Commanding Officer Capt. John Kemna said that the program brings uncomplicated environmental train ing to artisans at the shop level. He presented a letter of appreciation to Strong that read, in part, We want to thank the Florida Department of Environmental Protection for its strong support of environmental compliance at FRCSE this past quarter when your staff presented four training ses sions to help promote trust, communication and coopera tion among base hazardous waste coordinators. Mobley added, This compliance partnering team has great continuity, thanks to our large reservoir of professional and personal trust and the belief that when something goes wrong, we call each other, discuss solutions and fix it. Gartland agreed, saying, This compliance partnering approach can be used as a model for other industries to develop non-adversarial relationships with environmental regulators. Its all business if we make a mistake, we pay for it. There are no special favors, just a solid working relation ship. ENVIRONMENTAL VP-26ing, CAC-6 and their maintenance team enjoyed a day of rest and adven ture on the island. Members were able to participate in hiking, sightseeing and snorkel ing. This was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity because Pohnpei is home to some of the best snorkeling in the world. The U.S. Navy was not the only force contributing a P-3C Orion to Operation Big Eye. The Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) No. 5 Squadron also brought their variant, the P-3K2. Walden and the aircrew and main tenance team greeted the RNZAF detachment, led by Squadron Leader Marcus Hogan and offered post-flight maintenance support. After their day of exploration and crew rest, CAC-6 was well prepared to execute another mission monitoring the Micronesian fisheries from Palau. On the last full day of operations in support of Operation Big Eye, CAC-6 was joined by four RNZAF aircrew men for their mission. During this flight, the crew made significant contributions to Operation Big Eye by identifying more surface contacts than any other asset in the operation and giving an impressive demonstration of the aircrafts capa bilities to their Kiwi counterparts. This flight was an outstanding opportunity for CAC-6 to expand interoperability with the aircrews of the Royal New Zealand Air Force, said Walden. Sharing experiences and best practices with our coun terparts benefits both crews and strengthens the international mari time patrol community. CAC-6 and Walden debriefed Operation Big Eye on the final day of the exercise while their maintenance professionals prepared the aircraft to return to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. VP-26s CAC-6 and their mainte nance team made a marked contribu tion to the protection of Micronesian fisheries, leaving behind a legacy of multinational cooperation and a reputation for excellence in maritime patrol. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013

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Fighting Tigers support Autism Speaks Sailors from the VP-8 Fighting Tigers volun teered at the Walk Now for Autism Speaks event at the Jacksonville Landing on Sept. 28. Fighting Tiger volunteers arrived at the Jacksonville Landing early in the morning, helped setup necessary equipment, handed out water and tea to the walkers, directed the walking routes, and monitored the safety of more than 1,500 partici pants. Every year, more than 40 autism walks are con ducted nationwide, with all proceeds benefiting biomedical research into the causes, prevention, treatments and a cure for autism. The Jacksonville event raised more than $72,000. This was a great opportunity to get out there and be a part of something that really helps those who need us, said YN1 Kuiwana Harris. I feel its our responsibility to devote some of our time to the bet terment of other peoples lives. The VP-45 Pelicans came together Oct. 11 to celebrate the career of ADCS William Jones and bid him a fond farewell at his retirement ceremony after 27 years of distinguished service. VP-45 Commanding Officer Cmdr. John Brabazon presided over the ceremony at Hangar 117. Jones 27-year career began in August 1986 when he enlisted as a member of the Fair Bluff North Carolina Army National Guard where he stayed until he made the decision to transfer to the Navy in February 1988. His career has included tours at HS-9 on board USS Theodore Roosevelt, VS-32 on board USS Enterprise, and a prestigious tour of duty as #1 and #5 jet crew chief for the Navys Flight Demonstration Team, the Blue Angels. During this tour, Jones met and served as jet crew chief for the guest speaker of his retirement cer emony, Capt. Keith Hoskins, com manding officer NAS Pensacola. Jones reported to VP-45 in November 2011, where he served as Aircraft Division leading chief petty officer, quality assurance supervisor and maintenance con trol supervisor and played an instrumental role in VP-45s suc cessful 2012-13 deployment to Kadena Airbase in Okinawa, Japan. Jones is married to the former Kendra Sherman and is the proud father of five children who he is looking forward to spending time with after his retirement. The Greater Jax Area USO has tickets available at the NAS Jax and NS Mayport USO for $15 each, cash trans actions only. Tickets are available the following days and times: Guidelines including Florida National Guard and Reservists on current active duty orders and dependents are eligible to purchase/use these tickets. may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equals four. If you have less than four you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but dependent children are not authorized to represent the service member/spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO director. of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest. No exceptions. game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the season.Requests, with justification, must be sent to Mike OBrien at mobrien@usojax.com Anyone caught purchasing excess tickets or resell ing tickets will be prohibited from buying any more tickets for the entire season. No over the phone transactions, tickets are first come, first served. For more information, call 7782821. Jones retires after 27 years of service Jaguars tickets available at USO for remaining home games JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013 9

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The NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost pre ventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. The following is the schedule for 2013: To register for any of the above work shops call 542-5745.Fleet and Family Support Center offers life skills workshopsOctober is National Disability Employment Awareness Month Our nation has always drawn its strength from the differences of our people, from a vast range of thought, experience, and ability. Every day, Americans with disabilities enrich our communities and businesses. They are leaders, entrepreneurs, and innovators, each with unique talents to contribute and points of view to express. During National Disability Employment Awareness Month, we nurture our cul ture of diversity and renew our com mitment to building an American workforce that offers inclusion and opportunity for all. Since the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act, we have made great progress in removing barri ers for hardworking Americans. Yet today, only 20 percent of Americans with disabilities, including veterans who became disabled while serving our country, participate in our labor force. We need their talent, dedication, and creativity, which is why my admin istration proudly supports increased employment opportunities for people with disabilities. To that end, I remain dedicated to implementing Executive Order 13548, which called on federal agencies to increase recruitment, hir ing, and retention of people with dis abilities. As a result of our efforts, the federal government is hiring people with disabilities at a higher rate than at any point in over three decades. Most recently, we updated the rules to make sure federal contractors and subcon tractors are doing more to recruit, hire, and promote qualified individuals JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013 11

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VR-62 Nomads left Oct. 1heading out to Pacific Command (PACOM) on their normally scheduled detach ment cycle. Forty-five days after returning from the last PACOM detachment the Nomads are returning to PACOM. VR-62, with a crew of 22 Nomads made up of Selected Reservists and Full Time Support Sailors, departed for PACOM detachment. The squadron will be on detach ment for 90 days and rotate crews every two to three weeks. It doesnt matter if there are funding shortages, the Navy still needs a flexible logistics platform. That is where the VR-62 Nomads add value said AZCM Karen Quinn, VR-62s operations master chief. This is the first detachment for FY-14. The Nomads have completed the most successful year, FY-13 since arriving at NAS Jacksonville and are ready to make FY-14 just as successful. We respond no matter the time of day or night, no matter where on the globe. The VR-62 Nomads are adaptable and flex ible and can respond on short notice worldwide, said VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Tony Scarpino. Located at NAS Jacksonville, VR-62 is one of five Navy Reserve C-130 squadrons serv ing the US Navys high prior ity logistics needs around the globe. VR-62 Nomads detach to Pacific Command Operational security (OPSEC) is a system atic and proven pro cess by which the U.S. Government and its sup porting contractors can deny to potential adver saries information about capabilities and inten tions by identifying, con trolling, and protecting generally unclassified evidence of the planning and execution of sensi tive government activi ties. Adversaries may use multiple methods to col lect information: Searching trash con tainers Monitoring radio fre quencies, cell phones, wireless devices, email, faxes, and telephones Monitoring and exploiting the Internet and social media Elicitation, eaves dropping, and elec tronic surveillance Information available to the public as well as cer tain detectable activities reveal the existence of, and sometimes details about, classified or sen sitive information or undertakings. Such indi cators may assist those seeking to neutralize or exploit U.S. Government actions in the area of national security. The operations secu rity process involves five steps: identification of critical information, analysis of threats, anal ysis of vulnerabilities, assessment of risks, and application of appropri ate countermeasures. Use of OPSEC every day can help make sure this does not happen. Your understanding and use of sound OPSEC practices may save lives . includ ing your own!Operational security protects sensitive information that will see the replace ment of approximately 2,833 lights and fixtures with new LED lighting fixtures and save 7,860 MBTU annually. Chillers in Buildings 126, 300/300B, 321, 484 and 485 will be modern ized at Naval Support Activity Panama City. The award was valued at $1.6 million and will save approximately 4,200 MBTUs annually. During fiscal year 2014, 10 installations through out the Southeast are programmed to receive 27 projects totaling $30.3 million. These projects are pro jected to save 146,000 MBTUs and will put the Navy well on its way to meeting its energy reduc tion goals. Projects range from exterior lighting replace ments to more complex HAVC modernization and controls optimiza tions. ENERGY 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013

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As smartphones and tab lets become more integrated into todays society, so have the applications (or apps) that run on these devices. Most of us cant even leave the house without checking the traf fic on Google or updating our Facebook statuses. OSHA has even recognized how ubiqui tous smartphone apps have become and sponsored a con test last year for the devel opment of safety-oriented applications. An article in Safety+Health Magazine from June 2013 interviewed sev eral safety professionals who now use smartphone apps in their daily work routine. Smartphones and workplace safety-oriented apps can make integrating safety into work practices easier and more effi cient if used correctly. Ergonomics (iOS devices only) Free Winner of the Peoples Choice Award for the Department of Labor Worker Safety and Health App Challenge! Ergonomics is a complete mobile workplace health solution that offers ergo nomic equipment setup advice, a variety of workplace specific stretching exercises, and pro grammable reminders to help you time your breaks. It is a simple application with two goals: improving your workplace health and produc tivity by encouraging stretch breaks, and ensuring that all of your workplace equipment is set up ergonomically for the times that you are sitting. Theres a stretch for that nal illustrations and instruc tions on how to properly posi between individual stretches or a group of stretches targeting timer is included to help you properly time your stretches. Game of adjusting thrones desk, chair, monitor, mouse, and keyboard for enhanced you a summary of the setup at mation supported by OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration). Gimme a break in and are designed to be nontomizable to fit into your indi vidual work schedule. OSHA Heat Safety Tool (iOS & Android devices) Free When youre working in the heat, safety comes first. With the OSHA Heat Safety Tool, you have vital safety information available whenever and wher ever you need it right on your mobile phone. The App allows workers and supervisors to calculate the heat index for their worksite, and, based on the heat index, displays a risk level to outdoor workers. Then, with a simple about the protective measures that should be taken at that risk level to protect workers from heat-related illness-reminders about drinking enough fluids, scheduling rest breaks, plan ning for and knowing what to do in an emergency, adjust ing work operations, gradually building up the workload for new workers, training on heat illness signs and symptoms, and monitoring each other for signs and symptoms of heatrelated illness. Stay informed and safe in the heat, check your risk level. USW Safety (iOS devices only) Free Winner of the Safety and Health Data Award for the Department of Labor Worker Safety and Health App Challenge! The USW Safety app is designed as an easy and acces sible chemical safety reference for workers. Search the New Jersey Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) database by chemi cal name, DOT number, CAS number to view the entire fact sheet. This includes informa tion on workplace exposure limits, health hazards, work place controls, personal protec tive equipment, handling and storage, and emergency infor mation. Flip through an electronic version of the NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards or search for a chemical by name in the index to view its prop erties, exposure limits, recom mended personal protective equipment and first aid. For workers who need more information, the final section of the app uses the locator fea ture to display contact infor mation for the nearest United Steelworkers district office and the OSHA district office. This app is NOT designed to replace SDS in the workplace.Smartphone, tablet apps can help in the workplace The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) announced Sept. 30 that Cmdr. James Oberman, otolaryngol ogy specialty leader, Consultant to the U.S. Navy Surgeon General, and one of three otolar yngologists assigned to Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville, as a recipi Physician Leadership Grant. In a letter from AAOHNSFs Development Coordinator Nikhil Bhatt, Oberman was applauded for distinguishing him self among the many nominees for its leader ship grant, and being one of three physicians selected for the $1,000 grant. have been selected for Leadership Grant, said ognition is a distinc tion that I am certainly proud of, as it exemplifies the American Academy of Otolaryngologys rec ognition of leadership among its military otolar yngologists. The grant consists of two travel stipends: $500 for the recipient to attend the 2013 Annual Meeting and Otolaryngology Exposition in Vancouver, British Columbia and $500 to attend a lead ership forum/Board of Governors meet ing in March 2014 in Alexandria, Va. The AAO-HNS Foundation works to advance education, research, and lifelong learning. The foundation pro vides unique opportuni ties for young otolaryn gologists to hone leader ship skills vital to becom ing not only leaders with in their communities, but also as the future leaders of this specialty.Hospital physician receives Young Physician Leadership Grant JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013 13

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Friday at 7 p.m. Oct. 18 Karaoke with Randy Oct. 25 Second Tyme Around Band Deweys Family Night 3rd Friday of the Month Deweys will be open for dinner & beverages Oct. 18 Balloon Artist Nov. 15 Karaoke with Tom Turner Dec. 20 Childrens Holiday Bingo Childrens Holiday Bingo will start at 1830 and has a cost of $10 per person and includes soft drinks, hot dog, dauber, bingo card and gift bag for each child. DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Youth Bowling League: Every Sat., 10:30 am noon $17 annually or $8 per week. Includes shoes, awards will be given at the end of the season! Rising Stars Youth League: Every Sat., 10:30 am 12:30 pm. Pee Wee Division (6 years & under) 2 games, $6 per week. Juniors Division (7 years & older) 3 games, $8 per week. Special Stars Bowling League for families with special needs children. All ages welcome! Ramps avail able for the non-ambulatory as well as bumpers for beginners. Runs for 10 weeks at a cost of $7 per week, shoes are included. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4 6 pm. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4 10 pm. Thursdays: Free bowling for Active Duty 11 am 1 pm. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4 6 pm, Party Extreme $10, 8 pm midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Oct. 19, 1 4 pm. $20 per person, registration begins at noon. Scratch Sweeper: Oct. 26, 1 4 pm. $30 entry fee, check in starts at noon. *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6 8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Learn to Swim Fall Sessions At the Indoor Pool Session 2 Oct 28 Nov 7 $40 military, $45 DOD Monster Dash 5K October 31 at 11:30 a.m. Perimeter Rd. / Antenna Farm Pre-register by October 18 Fourth Annual Zumba Party October 23, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Fitness Center Outdoor Pavilion Barktoberfest October 26, 9 a.m. Vet Treatment Facility Bldg. 537 Free 2 mile walk/run with the dogs!I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_ nas_mwritt@navy.mil Jacksonville Zoo Spooktacular $9. Universal Halloween Horror Nights: Sunday Thrusday $42.25, Friday $53, Saturday $74.25 Pandemic Haunted Attractions San Jose Blvd in Mandarin, tickets on sale at ITT! Haunting of School House 4 $18 Waves of Honor Special: Seaworld Orlando Adult $46.50, Child $42.25. Busch Gardens Tampa Adult $45, Child $40.50. Monster Jam: Club seating (includes pit pass) $42, regular seating (includes pit pass) $22. Jacksonville Jaguars: Section 147 Bud Zone, $70. Jags shuttle bus $12. Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2013 2014 Season: Tickets now available! MOSH: $7 $12. The Artist Series Broadway in Jax 2013 2014 Season: Tickets available now! Mamma Mia!: Oct. 19, 2013, 8 pm, $60.50. Celtic Thunder: Nov. 10, 2013, 7 pm, $80. Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus: Jan. 17 & 18, 2014, $51. War Horse: Feb. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $68.50. Memphis: Mar. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $65. Million Dollar Quartet: Apr. 26, 2014, 8 pm, $65. The D* Word: Oct. 4 Oct. 25, 2014, $43.75 $46. Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27,2014) 4 day Hopper ticket$166 4 day 1 park per day and water park ticket-$166 4 day Hopper and Water park combo ticket$194 Gatorbowl $35 Capital One Bowl $98 Russell Athletic Bowl $78 Soul Food Festival Special $20 General Admission $32 Preferred $42 VIP $65 Legoland Free admission for active duty at park Tickets for family members available at ITT ITT is now selling $18 tickets for the Harlem Globetrotters! The show is February 28, 7 pm at Veterans Memorial Arena.The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Kayak Trip October 19 at 9 a.m. Grill & Chill October 22 at 6 p.m. Free burgers and hotdogs Camping Trip October 26 & 27 $10 per personNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Oct. 22 for active duty Oct. 24 for retirees, DoD per sonnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holi days. Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Movie Under the Stars October 25 at 7 p.m. Featuring Monsters University Patriots GroveFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013

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It was a beautiful, sunny autumn day for the Navys 238th Birthday 5k run as 219 run ners turned out to improve on their personal bests. The event was sponsored by the NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department. Placing first overall and first in the mens 35-39 age catego ry was Cmdr. Travis Bagwell of VP-10 with a time of 19:25. HMC Melissa Gomez of Naval Hospital Jacksonville took first in the womens 30-34 category and was the first female to cross the fin ish line with a time of 22:24.Other finishers were: Men 19 & Under First Jonathan Tucker, 29:29 Second Timothy Kidwell, 38:41 Women 19 & Under First Reyna Cruz, 27:20 Second Rebecca Harper, 28:30 Men 20-24 First Eric Harroun, 21:32 Second Lane Reynolds, 23:36 Women 20-24 First Chantel Nezbeth, 26:46 Second Kaila Delaney, 26:57 Men 25-29 First Luke Franco, 21:33 Second Richard Carter, 22:08 Women 25-29 First Brooke Tijerina, 25:05 Second Amanda Burns, 26:00 Men 30-34 First Marc Heskett, 21:21 Second Daniel Sears, 21:27 Women 30-34 Second Stephina Ravaioli, 23:54 Men 35-39 Second Gary Patterson, 20:56 Women 35-39 First Stephanie Edwards, 26:30 Second Lisa Brabazon, 27:12 Men 40-44 First Patrick Mitchell, 22:07 Second Jerry Skirvin, 23:54 Women 40-44 First Shannon Leonard, 32:52 Second Susan Stoltman, 34:03 Men 45-49 First Billy Puban, 27:01 Women 45-49 First Janie Senishin, 32:28 Men 50 & Over First Tom Kubalewski, 33:26 Second Alfred Wilson, 35:24 Women 50 & Over First Elisa Jacque, 33:41 Second Lorri Howard, 36:23 The next MWR-sponsored run will be the annual Monster Dash Oct. 31 at 11:30 a.m. For more information, call 542-3239/3518. For more information about any of the sports articles, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil. Visit the MWR website at www.cnic.navy.mil or www.facebook.com nasjaxmwr. The University of Georgia Bulldogs will take home field against the University of Florida Gators on Saturday, Nov. 2, at 3:30 p.m. at EverBank Field. The Florida-Georgia Football Classic has a strong tradition with deep roots here in Jacksonville, said Mayor Alvin Brown. This game draws countless people to the downtown area, show casing our city as a national destination for big-time sports events. We are proud to host this great rivalry, and we look forward to a great game and an unbeatable fan experience, all week long. The rivalry weekend will include the 18th Merrill Lynch/Bank of America Florida-Georgia Hall of Fame Luncheon Presented by Ruths Chris, RV City, the official Florida Georgia Tailgate Party, Touchdown Showdown and Adams Street Experience. Touchdown Showdown and the Adams Street Experience will cre ate the ultimate gameday fan experience with interactive games and displays, food and bev erage, commemorative merchandise, and two jumbo screens to show the game. There will be no alco hol sales in this area. The City of Jacksonville will host six Sideline Safety Zones (SSZ) in the sports complex and throughout downtown. The SSZ sites will pro vide free assistance rang ing from basic medical help, first aid, trans portation, directions, telephone service, food, water, coffee and more. All locations will be open on Friday and Saturday. Heavy traffic is expect ed on game day. Fans should prepare to utilize transportation alterna tives such as the JTA Park-n-Ride and stadium shuttle services. The Jacksonville Sheriffs Office Web site, www.jaxsheriff.org, and the official game Web site, www.flga.org will have regular updates on game day traffic and transportation. Navy Birthday 5k brings out runners City prepares for Florida-Georgia football game JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013 15

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electronic devices while driving and restrict them from carrying teenage passengers. Teenagers get into the most crashes the first six months after they have their license, so its important that they focus on driving and not get distracted by electronic devices, Harsha says. Texting while driving While driver distrac tions come in many forms, texting while driv ing is especially risky. It seems like common sense not to text while driving, but people are so connected to their electronic devices that they kind of forget them selves, Harsha says. According to research from the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute, texting while driving is associated with the high est risk of all cellphonerelated tasks. The research found that text messaging causes drivers to take their eyes off the road for 4.6 seconds over a six-second interval. That means at 55 miles per hour, a texting driver would travel the length of a football field without looking at the road. Remember texting or using hand-held cell phones is prohibited while driving aboard NAS Jacksonville and texting while driving is against the law in the state of Florida. TEXTING Mobile Tactical Operations Center Seven (MTOC-7), a unit of Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 based at NAS Jacksonville, recently trained with MTOC-Juliet personnel to prepare them for their operational read iness evaluation (ORE) prior to deploy ing to U.S. Central Command and the 5th Fleet area of responsibility. MTOCs are rapidly deployable mobile command and control, communica tions, computers and intelligence (C4I) units supporting the Navy Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force expe ditionary operations worldwide. Lt. Patrick Carraher, who drills at MTOC-Selfridge, Mich., said individual reservists from around the nation were training under MTOC-7 to prepare for their ORE taking place at the expedi tionary tent city set up on Allegheny Road at NAS Jacksonville. Wing 11 is hosting reserve Sailors from units in: San Diego; Whidbey Island, Washington; Manchester, New Hampshire; Puerto Rico and other sites, said Carraher. The Navy has two reserve MTOC units one designated MTOC-Juliet (at NAS Jacksonville) and the other MTOCWhiskey (at NAS Whidbey Island, Wash.) You wont find any P-8 gear here. Our job is to give active duty MTOC units time to transition to the P-8 by assuming their P-3 operational deploy ment. Lt. Matt Schell, officer in charge of MTOC-7, explained that his unit was on site to train the reservists of MTOCJuliet. MTOC-7 is fully certified but does not deploy until 2014. So were help ing the reservists of MTOC-Juliet pre pare for deployment. This is all MTOC-7 expeditionary gear (tents, antennas and all kinds of portable equipment). Our full crew is here to assist MTOC-Juliet in preparing for every aspect of their ORE and deployment from pre-flight and mission briefing to flight following and post-flight debriefing. Theyll be manning their operations control cen ter around the clock, said Schell. Lt. Cmdr. Marty Fredrickson, a reservist with MTOC-Juliet, reaffirmed that the focus and purpose of their reserve deployment is to gap-fill (six months) for an active duty MTOC. Its all part of the Navys maritime patrol strategy, so they can efficiently transition their equipment and opera tions to support the new P-8A Poseidon. MTOC-7 has done a great job of training our people for this mission. During operations, MTOC personnel connect P-3 aircrews to the Internet for preflight mission planning, to include commanders tasking, radio frequencies and environmental data. While airborne, P-3C aircrews rely heavily on the critical communications paths provided by the MTOC for bidirectional flow of tasking and opera tional information. When a flight is over, MTOC mem bers utilize their specialized equipment to download data from the aircraft for analysis and quickly disseminate it to commanders. MTOC-Juliet has synchronized its Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle (IDRC) with that of the VP-8 Fighting Tigers. After MTOC-Juliet completes its sixmonth deployment supporting P-3 Orions in the 5th Fleet AOR, the reserv ists will disband and return to their naval reserve units. Reservists train with MTOC-7 to meet readiness requirements 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013 17 Training specialists from the Center for Service Support (CSS) and Naval Technical Training Center (NTTC) Meridian implemented the improved and modernized Yeoman (YN), Personnel Specialist (PS), Ships Serviceman (SH) and Logistics Specialist (LS) courses Oct. 10. The updated course blends computerbased training with traditional class room instruction to bring the course up-to-date and in step with the everchanging world of administration and logistics. As the work environment changes and evolves, so too must the training and the curriculum we use to train the fleets newest Sailors, said PSC(SW/AW) Roger Drumheller, PS rating manager. In developing curriculum, it is the responsibility of CSS and its learning sites to support the Navys forwarddeployed and widely distributed force by delivering Sailors who are already proficient in their future jobs, said Drumheller. This new course is designed to do just that. According to Colette Rupero, CSS cur riculum manager the Navy demands that Sailors be more technically profi cient and well-versed in all aspects of their jobs prior to joining their com mand. Graduates from these courses of instruction have a better understanding of the many technical elements of their ratings and will, as a result, be more efficient and effective members of the commands they join, said Rupero. The transition from computer based training (CBT) to a blended learn ing approach is a result of the Human Performance Requirements Review (HPRR) and feedback from the fleet. The feedback indicated that students would benefit more from interaction and guid ance with instructors. HPPRs are conducted every three years and are designed to revalidate individual training requirements and/ or identify new training requirements as they apply to a rating, grade, commu nity, course, systems configuration, or fleet operating procedure. They also provide stakeholders an opportunity to review existing train ing, identify redundant or unnecessary training, and ensure proper alignment of training based on new or revised requirements. Although the students use online courses, its no longer self-paced, said Recupero. Our courses are much more focused and our students learn to work together in a group. Mike Buechel, CSS learning standards officer said the courses incorporate syn chronous CBT which allow learners to interact with an instructor via the inter net or face to face as they go through the curriculum. This will allow our instructors to become more familiar with the mate rial they instruct, said Buechel. Our instructors will take more ownership of these classes and provide our new Sailors with guidance. Mentorship from seasoned Sailors who have already per formed the job in the fleet is a great ben efit. During synchronous CBT the instruc tor and students are all logged on at the same time, viewing the same content. The students can ask questions by rais ing their hands, via e-mail, a discussion board or chat room. Our courses will also streamline the street to fleet process, said Buechel. This new system allows our students to graduate together which will ease the order writing process which will result in a cost savings to the Navy. Fleet units will also receive their Sailors more quickly. We couldnt have done this without the support of Cmdr. Brett St. George, NTTC Meridian commanding officer or the NTTC military and civilian staff, said Buechel. Their teamwork and help have been remarkable. CSS and its learning sites provide Sailors with the knowledge and skills needed to support the fleets warfight ing mission. More than 300 staff and faculty work hand-in-hand with the fleet and are dedicated to ensure training is current and well executed on behalf of 10,000 Sailors who graduate from CSS courses annually in the administration, logistics and media communities.CSS revamps courses for logistics and administration ratings The Defense Department continues to assist service members and their families in preparing for the tran sition to civilian life with a new virtual curriculum, according to a Defense Department official. During a telephone interview with American Forces Press Service, Susan Kelly, director of the Transition to Veterans Program office, discussed the redesign of the Transition Assistance Program and its evolution to include the Transition GPS virtual curriculum on the Joint Knowledge Online portal, or JKO, which became available today. We recognize that many of our service members dont have access to brick and mortar classrooms for transition instruction Kelly said. The JKO portal is our effort to take all of the redesigned TAP curricu lum, which is called Transition GPS, ... and put it into an environment where they can access it whenever they need it from anywhere in the world. Service members, she said, can improve their job search skills, find out about Veterans Administration benefits, learn how to find and apply to a college or university that fits their goals, or how to start their own business by accessing the Transition GPS virtual curriculum. An essential part of the virtual curriculum capa bility, Kelly added, is to support the ability to meet career readiness standards published by the Defense Department. Those career readiness standards extend all the way from registering in VAs e-Benefits so theyre connected to the Veterans Affairs family immediately, all the way to career readiness standards for employ ment, where service members have to develop a job application packet, resume, personal and professional references as well as job applications, she said. Those standards also include a completed applica tion for institutions of higher learning or technical institutions if service members are planning to go to college or receive a certification using the Post 9/11 GI Bill, Kelly said. Theres a whole expanse of career readiness stan dards that the military members must meet before they separate, she said. The Transition GPS curricu lum has modules that build the skills for the service members to meet each one of those career readiness standards. The ultimate goal is for the service members to determine what their personal goals are when they enter civilian life and to posture them well to be suc cessful in pursuing those goals, Kelly said. The goal of the entire TAP redesign is to get mili tary members career-ready for their civilian lives and to help them do very, very deliberate planning for both themselves and their families to do well as they become civilians, she added. The best way for a service member to begin this process is to contact the transition assistance program staff on their installation, Kelly said. Soldiers should contact the Army Career Alumni Program, sailors and Marines can use fleet and family support centers, and airmen can begin this process at their nearest airmen and family readiness center. Thats the first entry point for them to get sched uled for classes, Kelly said. For those who are geo graphically separated or isolated from installations, she added, the virtual curriculum is there for them on the JKO website. Kelly also noted its important that this virtual cur riculum is being hosted on the JKO portal. Thats where service members go for military train ing now in the joint world, she said. So we are put ting transition preparation training into that military training platform. The virtual curriculum is a major accomplish ment in the TAP redesign according to Kelly. Its the first time that the Veterans Employment Initiative Task Force, as an interagency partnership that includes the DOD and the Veterans Affairs, Labor and Education departments, as well as the Small Business Administration and the Office of Personnel Management, has developed and hosted a complete curriculum for service members on one website. Kelly noted that the virtual curriculum can also be used by service members who are exploring their options as they think about continuing in the military or transitioning out. You dont have to be enrolled in the TAP class to use this website, she said. Any service member can log in and use it, even years before they make the deci sion to transition to civilian life. Preparing for separation is a part of any service members military career, Kelly said. You want to align what youre gaining out of mili tary training and experience with what you want to do as a civilian when you separate, she added. New virtual curriculum assists separating troopswith disabilities, including disabled veterans. And thanks to the Affordable Care Act, states are taking advantage of new options to support and expand home and community-based services. In the years to come, I will remain committed to ensuring the federal government leads by example. This year, as we mark the 40th anniversary of the Rehabilitation Act, I will continue to marshal the full resources of my administration toward effec tive and comprehensive implementation. If we swing wide the doors of opportunity for our family, friends, and neighbors with disabilities, all of us will enjoy the benefits of their professional contributions. This month, let us uphold the ideals of equal access, equal opportunity, and a level play ing field for all Americans. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim October 2013 as National Disability Employment Awareness Month. I urge all Americans to embrace the talents and skills that individuals with disabilities bring to our workplaces and communi ties and to promote the right to equal employment opportunity for all people. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand thirteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-eighth. Barack Obama President of the United States of America DISABILITY The Navy Ball Committee and VyStar Credit Union are non-federal entities operated and controlled by individuals acting in their private capacities. They are not a part of the U.S. Department of Defense or any of its components and have no governmental sta tus.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013 19

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013

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AIR, SURF A CE A ND SUBM A RINE A SA LUTE TO OUR NA VY AN D ALL WHO HA VE SERVED FE A TURING NA VY BIRTHD A YMA RINE S BIRTHD A Y VETER A N S DA Y AND MILIT A RY FA MILY APPRECI A TION MONTH PUBLI S HED BY

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2 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 3 On Friday, October 13, 1775, meet ing in Philadelphia, the Continental Congress voted to fit out two sailing vessels, armed with ten carriage guns, as well as swivel guns, and manned by crews of eighty, and to send them out on a cruise of three months to inter cept transports carrying munitions and stores to the British army in America. This was the original legislation out of which the Continental Navy grew and as such constitutes the birth certificate of the navy. To understand the momentous sig nificance of the decision to send two armed vessels to sea under the author ity of the Continental Congress, we need to review the strategic situation in which it was made and to consider the political struggle that lay behind it. Americans first took up arms in the spring of 1775, not to sever their rela tionship with the king, but to defend their rights within the British Empire. By the autumn of 1775, the British North American colonies from Maine to Georgia were in open rebellion. Royal governments had been thrust out of many colonial capitals and revolution ary governments put in their places. The Continental Congress had assumed some of the responsibilities of a cen tral government for the colonies, cre ated a Continental Army, issued paper money for the support of the troops, and formed a committee to negotiate with foreign countries. Continental forces captured Fort Ticonderoga on Lake Champlain and launched an invasion of Canada. In October 1775 the British held supe riority at sea, from which they threat ened to stop up the colonies' trade and to wreak destruction on seaside settlements. In response, a few of the states had commissioned small fleets of their own for defense of local waters. Congress had not yet authorized pri vateering. Some in Congress worried about pushing the armed struggle too far, hoping that reconciliation with the mother country was still possible. Yet, a small coterie of men in Congress had been advocating a Continental Navy from the out set of armed hostilities. Foremost among these men was John Adams, of Massachusetts. For months, he and a few others had been agitating in Congress for the establishment of an American fleet. They argued that a fleet would defend the seacoast towns, protect vital trade, retaliate against British raiders, and make it possible to seek out among neu tral nations of the world the arms and stores that would make resistance pos sible. Still, the establishment of a navy seemed too bold a move for some of the timid men in Congress. Some southern ers agreed that a fleet would protect and secure the trade of New England but denied that it would do so in the south ern colonies. Most of the delegates did not consid er the break with England as final and feared that a navy implied sovereignty and independence. Others thought a navy a hasty and foolish challenge to the mightiest fleet the world had seen. The most the pro-navy men could do was to get Congress to urge each colony to fit out armed vessels for the protec tion of their coasts and harbors. Then, on 3 October, Rhode Island's delegates laid before Congress a bold resolution for the building and equip ping of an American fleet, as soon as possible. When the motion came to the floor for debate, Samuel Chase, of Maryland, attacked it, saying it was "the maddest Idea in the World to think of building an American Fleet." Even pro-navy mem bers found the proposal too vague. It lacked specifics and no one could tell how much it would cost. If Congress was yet unwilling to embrace the idea of establishing a navy as a permanent measure, it could be tempted by short-term opportunities. Fortuitously, on 5 October, Congress received intelligence of two English brigs, unarmed and without convoy, laden with munitions, leaving England bound for Quebec. Congress immediately appointed a committee to consider how to take advantage of this opportunity. Its mem bers were all New Englanders and all ardent supporters of a navy. They rec ommended first that the governments of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut be asked to dispatch armed vessels to lay in wait to intercept the munitions ships; next they outlined a plan for the equipping by Congress of two armed vessels to cruise to the eastward to intercept any ships bearing supplies to the British army. Congress let this plan lie on the table until 13 October, when another for tuitous event occurred in favor of the naval movement. A letter from General Washington was read in Congress in which he reported that he had taken under his command, at Continental expense, three schooners to cruise off Massachusetts to intercept enemy sup ply ships. The commander in chief had preempted members of Congress reluc tant to take the first step of fitting out warships under Continental authority. Since they already had armed vessels cruising in their name, it was not such a big step to approve two more. The com mittee's proposal, now appearing emi nently reasonable to the reluctant mem bers, was adopted. The Continental Navy grew into an important force. Within a few days, Congress established a Naval Committee charged with equipping a fleet. This committee directed the pur chasing, outfitting, manning, and oper ations of the first ships of the new navy, drafted subsequent naval legislation, and prepared rules and regulations to govern the Continental Navy's conduct and internal administration. Over the course of the War of Independence, the Continental Navy sent to sea more than fifty armed ves sels of various types. The navy's squad rons and cruisers seized enemy sup plies and carried correspondence and diplomats to Europe, returning with needed munitions. They took nearly 200 British vessels as prizes, some off the British Isles themselves, contributing to the demoralization of the enemy and forcing the British to divert warships to protect convoys and trade routes. In addition, the navy provoked dip lomatic crises that helped bring France into the war against Great Britain. The Continental Navy began the proud tra dition carried on today by our United States Navy, and whose birthday we cel ebrate each year in October.~ history.navy.mil Establishment of the Navy, October 13, 1775This resolution of the Continental Congress marked the establishment of what is now the United States Navy. "Resolved, That a swift sailing vessel, to carry ten carriage guns, and a proportionable number of swivels, with eighty men, be fitted, with all possible despatch, for a cruise of three months, and that the commander be instructed to cruize eastward, for intercepting such transports as may be laden with warlike stores and other supplies for our enemies, and for such other purposes as the Congress shall direct. That a Committee of three be appointed to pre pare an estimate of the expence, and lay the same before the Congress, and to contract with proper persons to fit out the vessel. Resolved, that another vessel be fitted out for the same purposes, and that the said committee report their opinion of a proper vessel, and also an esti mate of the expence."Source: Journal of the Continental Congress, 13 October 1775, in William Bell Clark, editor, Naval Documents of the American Revolution, Vol. 2, (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1966): 442. Establishment of the Department of the Navy, April 30, 1798This act established the Department of the Navy as a separate cabinet department. Previously, naval mat ters were under the cognizance of the War Department. AN ACT (Chapter 35, Vol. I, page 553) to establish an executive department to be denominated the depart ment of the navy. SEC. 1. Be it enacted, &c., That there shall be an Executive Department under the denomination of the Department of the Navy, the chief officer of which shall he called the Secretary of the Navy, whose duty it shall be to execute such orders as he shall receive from the President of the United States, relative to the procurement of naval stores and materials, and the construction, armament, equipment, and employment of vessels of war, as well as all other matters connected with the naval establishment of the United States. SEC. 2. And be it further enacted, That a principal clerk, and such other clerks as he shall think necessary, shall be appointed by the Secretary of the Navy, who shall be employed in such manner as he shall deem most expedient. In case of vacancy in the office of the Secretary, by removal or otherwise, it shall be the duty of the principal clerk to take the charge and custody of all the books, records, and documents of the said office. SEC. 3. And be it further enacted, That the Secretary of the Navy be, and he is hereby, authorized and empowered, immediately after he shall be appointed, and shall enter upon the duties of his office, to take pos session of all the records, books, and documents, and all other matters and things appertaining to this depart ment, which are now deposited in the office of the Secretary of War. SEC. 4. And be it further enacted, That there shall be allowed to the Secretary of the Navy an annual salary of three thousand dollars, payable quarter yearly at the Treasury of the United States; and the respective clerks in the office of the said department shall receive the same compensation, and be subject to the same regula tions, as are provided by an act, supplemental to the act establishing the Treasury Department, and for a fur ther compensation to certain officers in the offices of the other executive departments. SEC. 5. And be it further enacted, That so much of an act, Entitled "An act to establish an executive depart ment, to be denominated the department of war,'' as vests any of the powers contemplated by the provisions of this act in the Secretary for the Department of War, shall be repealed, from and after the period when the Secretary of the Navy shall enter on the duties of his office.Approved, April 30, 1798. Air, Surface and Submarine: A salute to our Navy and all who have served is a spe cial advertising section produced by the Military Publications department of The Florida TimesUnion. The section was coordinated and edited by Military Publications Publisher Ellen Rykert. The section was designed by Military Publications designer George Atchley. Advertising was coor dinated by Military Publications Publisher Ellen Rykert and Administrative Assistant Katie Cooper, and facilitated by Pam Browning and LeAnn Hirschman. Material, information and photo graphs used in this section was provided by Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Naval Station Mayport, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, the U.S. Navy, and the U.S. Marine Corps, unless otherwise credited.

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Resolution of the Continental Congress establishing the Marine Corps November 10, 1775This resolution of the Continental Congress marked the establishment of what is now the United States Marine Corps. "Resolved, That two Battalions of marines be raised, consisting of one Colonel, two Lieutenant Colonels, two Majors, and other officers as usual in other regiments; and that they consist of an equal number of privates with other battalions; that particular care be taken, that no persons be appointed to office, or inlist ed into said Battalions, but such as are good seamen, or so acquainted with maritime affairs as to be able to serve to advantage by sea when required: that they be inlisted and commis sioned to serve for and during the present war between Great Britain and the colonies, unless dismissed by order of Congress: that they be dis tinguished by the names of the first and second battalions of American Marines, and that they be considered part of the number which the con tinental Army before Boston is ordered to consist of." Reestablishment of the Marine Corps July 11, 1798An Act for the establishing and organizing a Marine Corps. Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That in addition to the present military establishment, there shall be raised and organized a corps of marines, which shall consist of one major, four captains, sixteen first lieutenants, twelve second lieutenants, fortyeight sergeants, forty-eight corporals, thirty-two drums and fifes, and seven hundred and twenty privates, including the marines who have been enlisted, or are authorized to be raised for the naval armament; and the said corps may be formed into as many companies or detachments, as the President of the United States shall direct, with a proper distri bution of the commissioned and non-commissioned officers and musicians to each company or detachment. Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That the pay and subsisteuce of the said officers, privates and musicians, shall be as follows, to wit: To a major, fifty dollars per month, and four rations per day; to a captain, forty dollars per mouth, aud three rations per day; to a first lieutenant, thirty dollars per mouth, and three rations per day; to a second lieu tenant, twenty-five dollars per month, and two rations per day; and to the nom-commissioned officers, privates and musicians, conformably to the act, intituled "An act providing a naval armament," as shall be fixed by the President of the United States: And the President of the United States shall be, and is hereby authorized to continue the enlistment of marines, until the said corps shall be complete; and of himself, to Appoint the commissioned officers, whenever, in the recess of the Senate, an appointment shall be necessary. And the enlistments, which shall be made by virtue hereof, may be for the term of three years, subject to be discharged by the President of the United States, or by the ceasing or repeal of the laws providing for the naval armament. And if the marine corps, or any part of it, shall be ordered by the President to do duty on shore, aud it shall become necessary to appoint an adjutant, paymaster, quartermaster, sergeant-major, quartermaster-sergeant, and drum and fife-major, or any of them, the major or commandant of the corps, is hereby authorized to appoint such staff officer or officers, from the line of subalterns, sergeants and music, respectively, who shall be entitled, during the time they shall dosuch duty, to the same extra pay and emoluments, which are allowed by law, to officers acting in the same capacities in the infantry. Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That the detachments of the corps of marines hereby authorized, shall be made in lieu of the respective quotas of marines, which have been established or authorized for the frigates, and other armed vessels and gallies, which shall be employed in the service of the United States: And the President of the United States may detach and appoint such of the officers of this marine corps, to act on board the frigates, and any of the armed vessels of the United States, respectively, as he shall, from time to time, judge necessary; any thing in the act "providing a naval armament" to the contrary hereof notwithstanding. Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That the officers, non-commissioned officers, privates and musicians aforesaid, shall take the same oath, and shall be governed by the same rules and articles of war, as are prescribed for the military establishment of the United States, and by the rules for the regulation of the navy, heretofore, or which shall be estab lished by law, according to the nature of the service in which they shall be employed, and shall be entitled to the same allowance, in case of wounds or disabilities, according to their respective ranks, as are granted by the act "to ascertain and fix the military establishment of the United States." Sec. 5. And be it further enacted, That the non-commissioned officers, musicians, seamen and marines, who are or shall be enlisted into the service of the United States; and the non-commissioned officers and musicians, who are or shall be enlisted into the army of the United States, shall be, and they are hereby exempted, during their term of ser vice, from all personal arrests for any debt or contract. Sec. 6. And be it further enacted, That the marine corps, established by this act, shall, at any time, be liable to do duty in the forts and garrisons of the United States, on the sea-coast, or any other duty on shore, as the President, at his discretion, shall direct. Approved, July 11, 1798.During the American Revolution, the Continental Congress passes a resolution stating that two Battalions of Marines be raised for ser vice as landing forces for the recently formed Continental Navy. The resolution, drafted by future U.S. president John Adams and adopt ed in Philadelphia, created the Continental Marines and is now observed as the birth date of the United States Marine Corps. Serving on land and at sea, the original U.S. Marines distinguished themselves in a number of important operations during the Revolutionary War. The first Marine landing on a hostile shore occurred when a force of Marines under Captain Samuel Nicholas captured New Province Island in the Bahamas from the British in March 1776. Nicholas was the first commissioned offi cer in the Continental Marines and is cel ebrated as the first Marine commandant. After American independence was achieved in 1783, the Continental Navy was demobilized and its Marines disbanded. In the next decade, however, increasing con flict at sea with Revolutionary France led the U.S. Congress to establish formally the U.S. Navy in May 1798. Two months later, on July 11, President John Adams signed the bill establishing the U.S. Marine Corps as a permanent military force under the jurisdiction of the Department of Navy. U.S. Marines saw action in the so-called QuasiWar with France and then fought against the Barbary pirates of North Africa during the first years of the 19th century. Since then, Marines have participated in all the wars of the United States and in most cases were the first sol diers to fight. In all, Marines have executed more than 300 landings on foreign shores. Today, there are more than 200,000 activeduty and reserve Marines, divided into three divisions stationed at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina; Camp Pendleton, California; and Okinawa, Japan. Each division has one or more expeditionary units, ready to launch major operations anywhere in the world on two weeks notice. Marines expeditionary units are self-sufficient, with their own tanks, artillery, and air forces. The motto of the service is Semper Fidelis, meaning Always Faithful in Latin.~ history.com Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 5

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6 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013 World War I known at the time as The Great War offi cially ended when the Treaty of Versailles was signed on June 28, 1919, in the Palace of Versailles outside the town of Versailles, France. However, fighting ceased seven months earlier when an armistice, or temporary cessation of hos tilities, between the Allied nations and Germany went into effect on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the elev enth month. For that reason, November 11, 1918, is generally regarded as the end of the war to end all wars. Soldiers of the 353rd Infantry near a church at Stenay, Meuse in France, wait for the end of hostilities. This photo was taken at 10:58 a.m., on November 11, 1918, two min utes before the armistice end ing World War I went into effect In November 1919, President Wilson proclaimed November 11 as the first commemoration of Armistice Day with the fol lowing words: "To us in America, the reflec tions of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the countrys service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations" The original concept for the celebration was for a day observed with parades and public meetings and a brief suspension of business begin ning at 11:00 a.m. The United States Congress officially recognized the end of World War I when it passed a concurrent resolution on June 4, 1926, with these words: Whereas the 11th of November 1918, marked the ces sation of the most destructive, sanguinary, and far reaching war in human annals and the resumption by the people of the United States of peaceful rela tions with other nations, which we hope may never again be severed, and Whereas it is fitting that the recurring anniversary of this date should be commemorated with thanksgiving and prayer and exercises designed to per petuate peace through good will and mutual understanding between nations; and Whereas the legislatures of twenty-seven of our States have already declared November 11 to be a legal holiday: Therefore be it Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives con curring), that the President of the United States is requested to issue a proclamation call ing upon the officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on November 11 and inviting the people of the United States to observe the day in schools and churches, or other suitable plac es, with appropriate ceremonies of friendly relations with all other peoples. An Act (52 Stat. 351; 5 U. S. Code, Sec. 87a) approved May 13, 1938, made the 11th of November in each year a legal holidaya day to be dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be thereafter celebrated and known as "Armistice Day." Armistice Day was primarily a day set aside to honor veter ans of World War I, but in 1954, after World War II had required the greatest mobilization of soldiers, sailors, Marines and airmen in the Nations histo ry; after American forces had fought aggression in Korea, the 83rd Congress, at the urging of the veterans service orga nizations, amended the Act of 1938 by striking out the word "Armistice" and inserting in its place the word "Veterans." With the approval of this legis lation (Public Law 380) on June 1, 1954, November 11th became a day to honor American veter ans of all wars. Later that same year, on October 8th, President Dwight D. Eisenhower issued the first "Veterans Day Proclamation" which stated: "In order to insure proper and widespread observance of this anniversary, all veterans, all veterans' organizations, and the entire citizenry will wish to join hands in the common pur pose. Toward this end, I am des ignating the Administrator of Veterans' Affairs as Chairman of a Veterans Day National Committee, which shall include such other persons as the Chairman may select, and which will coordinate at the national level necessary plan ning for the observance. I am also requesting the heads of all departments and agen cies of the Executive branch of the Government to assist the National Committee in every way possible." President Eisenhower signing HR7786, changing Armistice Day to Veterans Day. From left: Alvin J. King, Wayne Richards, Arthur J. Connell, John T. Nation, Edward Rees, Richard L. Trombla, Howard W. Watts On that same day, President Eisenhower sent a letter to the Honorable Harvey V. Higley, Administrator of Veterans' Affairs (VA), designating him as Chairman of the Veterans Day National Committee. In 1958, the White House advised VA's General Counsel that the 1954 designation of the VA Administrator as Chairman of the Veterans Day National Committee applied to all sub sequent VA Administrators. Since March 1989 when VA was elevated to a cabinet level department, the Secretary of Veterans Affairs has served as the committee's chairman. The Uniform Holiday Bill (Public Law 90-363 (82 Stat. 250)) was signed on June 28, 1968, and was intended to ensure three-day weekends for Federal employees by cel ebrating four national holidays on Mondays: Washington's Birthday, Memorial Day, Veterans Day, and Columbus Day. It was thought that these extended weekends would encourage travel, recreation al and cultural activities and stimulate greater industrial and commercial production. Many states did not agree with this decision and continued to celebrate the holidays on their original dates. The first Veterans Day under the new law was observed with much confusion on October 25, 1971. It was quite apparent that the commemoration of this day was a matter of historic and patriotic significance to a great number of our citizens, and so on September 20th, 1975, President Gerald R. Ford signed Public Law 94-97 (89 Stat. 479), which returned the annual observance of Veterans Day to its original date of November 11, beginning in 1978. This action supported the desires of the overwhelming majority of state legislatures, all major veterans service orga nizations and the American people. Veterans Day continues to be observed on November 11, regardless of what day of the week on which it falls. The res toration of the observance of Veterans Day to November 11 not only preserves the histori cal significance of the date, but helps focus attention on the important purpose of Veterans Day: A celebration to honor America's veterans for their patriotism, love of country, and willingness to serve and sacri fice for the common good.~ U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 7 Veterans Day, 1954 BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA A PROCLAMATION 3071Whereas it has long been our customs to commemorate November 11, the anniversary of the ending of World War I, by paying tribute to the heroes of that tragic struggle and by rededicating ourselves to the cause of peace; and Whereas in the intervening years the United States has been involved in two other great military conflicts, which have added millions of veterans living and dead to the honor rolls of this Nation; and Whereas the Congress passed a concurrent resolution on June 4, 1926 (44 Stat. 1982), calling for the observance of November 11 with appropriate ceremonies, and later provided in an act approved May 13, 1938 (52 Stat. 351) that the eleventh of November should be a legal holiday and should be known as Armistice Day; and Whereas, in order to expand the significance of that commemoration and in order that a grateful Nation might pay appropriate homage to the veterans of all its wars who have contributed so much to the preservation of this Nation, the Congress, by an act approved June 1, 1954 (68 Stat. 168), changed the name of the holiday to Veterans Day: Now, Therefore, I, Dwight D. Eisenhower, President of the United States of America, do hereby call upon all of our citizens to observe Thursday, November 11, 1954, as Veterans Day. On that day let us solemnly remember the sacrifices of all those who fought so valiantly, on the seas, in the air, and on foreign shores, to preserve our heritage of freedom, and let us reconsecrate ourselves to the task of promoting an enduring peace so that their efforts shall not have been in vain I also direct the appropriate officials of the Government to arrange for the display of the flag of the United States on all public buildings on Veterans Day. In order to insure proper and widespread observance of this anniversary, all veterans, all veterans' organizations, and the entire citizenry will wish to wish to join hands in the common purpose. Toward this end, I am designating the Administrator of Veterans' Affairs as Chairman of a Veterans Day National Committee, which shall include such other persons as the Chairman may select, and which will coordinate at the national level necessary planning for the observance. I am also requesting the heads of all departments and agencies of the Executive branch of the Government to assist the National Committee in every way possible. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and cause the all of the United States of America to be affixed. Done at the City of Washington this eighth day of October in the Year of our Lord nineteen hundred and fifty-four, and of the Independence of the (SEAL) United States of America the one hundred and seventy-ninth.DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER

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Sailors Creed I am a United States Sailor. I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States of America and I will obey the orders of those appointed over me. I represent the fighting spirit of the Navy and those who have gone before me to defend freedom and democracy around the world. I proudly serve my country's Navy combat team with Honor, Courage and Commitment. I am committed to excellence and the fair treatment of all. A heartfelt thank you to all advertisers who have taken part in this special Salute to our Navy and all who have served! Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 9

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Each year the President signs a proclamation declaring November Military Family Month. Last year President Obama said that our nation owes "each day of security and freedom that we enjoy to the members of our Armed Forces and their fami lies. Behind our brave service men and women, there are family members and loved ones who share in their sacrifice and provide unending support." This annual proclamation marks the beginning of a monthlong celebration of the Military Family in which the Department of Defense and the nation will honor the commitment and sacri fices made by the families of the nation's servicemembers. Armed Services YMCA Honors Military Families President Proclaims November as Military Family Month Understanding Sacrifices for Freedom Joining Forces Works to Support Military Families Why Appreciate Military Families? Throughout the month of November, military families serving around the world are honored through a variety of observances and recognized for their commitment and the many contribu tions they make every day in support of the military and our nation. Efforts to recognize the sacrifices of the military family by Active, Guard, and Reserve leaders are being joined and support ed by DoD organizations to include the Army Air Force Exchange Service, Defense Commissary Agency, and others. Community leaders, businesses, and military bases and posts are teaming up to recognize military families through special events such as: open houses, fun runs, family fun nights, and community dinners; discounts at MWR facilities, local business and sporting events; and special recognitions during community activities throughout the month of November.~ military.com 10 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013

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16 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013 Navys second P-8A Poseidon squadron begins IDRCThe VP-5 Mad Foxes received their certification from Patrol and Reconnaissance Group Aug. 2 as Safe for Flight in operating the P-8A Poseidon. This concludes nearly seven months of incredibly hard work by every Mad Fox that began on Jan. 4 with their tran sition process from the P-3C Orion to the P-8A. VP-5 has flown the P-3C since 1974. The Mad Foxes history of excellence in the P-3C includes locating pieces of the tragic Space Shuttle Challenger explosion, remaining on top of a sink ing Soviet Yankee Class submarine, support of Operations Desert Shield, Desert Storm, Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom and the first employ ment of an AGM-65F Maverick Missile from a maritime patrol aircraft during Operation Odyssey Dawn. This memorable P-3C history came to an end Dec. 4, 2012 as then VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Erin Osborne landed the squadrons final Orion flight at NAS Jacksonville after a successful 7th Fleet deployment. Safe for Flight was a Herculean accomplishment for 240 Mad Foxes, VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Matthew Pottenburgh told squadron personnel during the Aug. 1 command quarters. The work that began the day when Skipper Osborne landed our last P-3C Orion could not have been possible without the total effort of each and every Mad Fox. VP-5s Safe for Flight inspection was conducted by Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) -11 and began June 3 when the ordnance shop was inspected through a conventional weapons training proficiency inspec tion (CWTPI). Mad Fox ordnance men and women demonstrated proficiency to both safely upload and download ordinance to the P-8A over the course of the three-day inspection. Following CWTPI, Mad Fox aircrew completed five tactical flights in the Poseidon under the instruction of VP-30 instructor aircrew. These flights took VP-5 aircrew members from the Florida Keys to New Orleans to showcase their abilities operating this new aircraft. The month concluded with VP-5 naval flight offi cers, acoustic operators, and electronic warfare operators receiving their successful NATOPS evaluations from VP-30 instructors. The very last stage of Safe for Flight certification began on July 29 as CPRW11 kicked off a comprehensive inspection of every VP-5 maintenance pro gram, administrative instruction, safety program, and NATOPS program to name just a few. Following these intensive four days of drills and inspections, skipper Pottenburgh proudly announced to the assembled squadron that VP-5 was recommended as Safe for Flight by CPRW-11 to Patrol and Reconnaissance Group. Each and every Mad Fox is now focused on beginning the inter-deploy ment readiness cycle (IDRC) with their two new P-8A Poseidon aircraft, side numbers 436 and 437. VP-5 looks to exe cute safely and efficiently in prepara tion for its upcoming 7th Fleet deploy ment. The squadron continues to embody their motto: No Fox Like a Mad Fox! VP-5 certified Safe for Flight Proud Warriors MQ-4C Triton

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 17 A six-plane detachment of F/A-18A+ Hornets from Fighter Squadron Composite (VFC) 12, along with a fiveplane detachment operated by Airborne Tactical Advantage Company (ATAC), a two-plane detachment from L-3, and a two-plane detachment from Phoenix Air are operating from NAS Jacksonville to provide adversary threat training for the Harry S. Truman (CVN 72) Strike Group that is currently underway in the Atlantic for its Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX). Together, the aircraft from VFC-12 and contractor adver sary aircraft, represent a real istic hostile opposing force to sharpen the war fighting capa bilities of Navy expeditionary forces preparing for deploy ment. Cmdr. Jeff Menna, a pilot with VFC-12, explained that the Fighting Omars are the Naval Reserves premier adver sary squadron for providing threat tactics training to Navy strike fighter squadrons, Based at NAS Oceana in Virginia Beach, our main job is to provide tactical dissimilar air combat training for Navy, Marine Corps and other avia tion units. For COMPTUEX, we primarily oppose air strikes from the carrier air wing as they enter or leave the air space of Pinecastle Range Complex, said Menna. Our goal is to enable strike fighter aircrew to hone their warfighting skills against a creditable adversary prior to deploying in the face of real threats. In late 2012, VFC-12 began their transition from the blue camouflage F/A-18C Hornet that they flew for seven years to the upgraded F/A-18A+ Hornet painted in the bold SU-35 Flanker Arctic Splinter camouflage. The unique challenges inherent to the squadrons mission make the Fighting Omars one of the Navys most sought after avia tion duty assignments. ATAC pilot Rob DeStasio said, According to daily task ing from Commander, Strike Force Training Atlantic (CSFTA), ATAC aircraft pres ent a variety of threat profiles either against Carrier Air Wing-3, surface ships in the strike group, or both. We may also fly joint mis sions against the strike group with Hornets from VFC-12 or Lear jets from L-3, said DeStasio. L-3 has provided the Navy with COMPTUEX adversary support for a number of years, explained Jim Bailey. Our Lear jets deliver threat simulations for ship attacks, as well as tow ing aerial targets for ships and fighter aircraft. Local residents are spared much of the ear-throbbing noise produced when Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) conducts out-of-air frame testing to certify the reli ability and performance of gas turbine engines repaired at the facility. Annexed at the far end of NAS Jacksonville along the St Johns River, the Richard Kemen Engine Test Facility is acoustically treated and aerodynamically designed to reduce the powerful sound waves generated by jet engine combustion during testing. The walls around the con crete test chamber are 18 inch es thick, said Mark Stogdon, an electronics engineer work ing at the testing facility. We used to test engines outside in the late 60s, but the sound carried right across the river. Testing inside is easier, and acoustics are contained. It is considerably safer. Stogdon said about 140 engines are tested at FRCSE each year, and Kemen is the Navys only depot engine test facility still in use. He said in the heyday back in the 1970s, six facilities were to be built, but only one other was con structed at the military depot in Norfolk, Va. It was torn down years later following the depot closures in the mid-1990s according to Stogdon. In the engine preparation area, a monorail system allows technicians to suspend each jet engine until it is rolled into a test chamber, an enormous room measuring about 90-feet long, 20-feet wide and 30-feet high. The monorail improves workflow and ensures opti mum efficiency, safety and ease of use for the technicians. Seated in the control room behind two inches of bullet proof glass, test cell opera tors put a variety of off-wing engines through their entire operating range to simulate the engines flight mission. The largest being the F414-GE-400 turbofan engine with 22,000 pounds of static thrust. The F/A-18 Super Hornet and the EA-18G Growler tactical air craft are each powered by two of these engines. The test cell is designed with special air intake baffles for optimal air flow and exhaust to ensure engine performance consistency and to suppress noise to Occupational Safety and Health Administration acceptable levels. An exhaust collector and transfer tube, exhaust diffuser, exhaust ple num and exhaust stack with baffles aid in reducing heat and vibration from engine exhaust during testing. We are not noisy, said Curtis Kimbler, the former test engine supervisor who now serves as the TF34 engine supervisor. It is one of the most people-friendly test cells around. We have testing capa bility for the J52, TF34, F414 and the F404 engine. The Richard Kemen Engine Test Facility was dedicated in 1978 and underwent a major upgrade in 2011. Special aircraft test carrier strike group defenses Fleet Readiness Center Southeast tests jet engines, reduces noise pollution

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18 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013 A message from the Commanding Officer, Naval Station Mayport Established since 1942, Naval Station Mayport has grown to become the third largest fleet concentration in the United States. The unique operational compo sition of the naval installation includes a harbor capable of accommodat ing 34 ships and an 8,000-foot runway capable of handling any aircraft in the Department of Defense inventory. NS Mayport is home to more than 83 tenant commands, including 16 naval ships, USCG Valiant (WMEC 621), 4 helicopter squadrons and Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ Commander, U.S. Fourth Fleet. The mission of Naval Station Mayport is to enhance and sustain the opera tional readiness of its tenant commands and provide unparalleled support to its families. The vision of the command is to be recognized as the leader of shore installations in the Navy and a model facility that employs a premier work force always seeking to provide the fin est service to the fleet, family and com munity. Over the past year, the base has worked towards its mission by under taking vast energy conservation mea sures, completing a state of the art fit ness center to enhance the physical readiness of Sailors and implementing housing improvements to enrich the quality of life. NS Mayport improvements have saved the U.S. Navy nearly $10 million while still providing the fleet with premium services. These improvements not only positively impacts NS Mayport Sailors, but those soon to arrive with USS New York (LPD 21), USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) and USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43.) Mayport is also currently adding three patrol coastal ships to the basin, USS Shamal arrived in October, followed shortly by USS Tornado and USS Zephyr. The base has provided support for 532 Navy ship movements, including 16 homeported vessels, 137 U.S. Coast guard ship movements and 110 foreign and commercial visiting ships. NS Mayport: Enhance and sustain operational readiness

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 19 Darkness wont stop a bullet. Drug runners in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico are finding out the hard way that U.S. Navy helicopters can not only hunt them at night, but now their U.S. Coast Guard precision marks men can use force to stop drug boats 24-hours-a-day. Last year, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light Six Zero (HSL-60), a Navy Reserve squadron from Naval Station Mayport, Fla., became the first Naval unit authorized for nighttime use of force against drug boats. As they prepare for their next deployments, they expect this powerful new tool will increase their effectiveness in the coun ter-narcotics mission. For several years, the Navy helicopters in the U.S. Fourth Fleet area of respon sibility (the Caribbean, and Atlantic and Pacific Oceans around Central and South America) have had Coast Guard precision marksmen aboard who are authorized to fire disabling shots at drug boats. Its a law enforcement action so there are many legal aspects we have to com ply with, said Lt. Cmdr. Cedric Patmon of HSL-60. That is why it is a Coast Guard member who ultimately fires the shots. When we find a suspected drug boat that meets the criteria for interdiction, authority over the helicopter is trans ferred to the regional Coast Guard com mander, Patmon continued. We hail the boat on the radio advising them to stop for inspection. If they do not respond to radio calls, we have a large sign that we use to visually request their cooperation. If the boat still doesnt stop, our Coast Guard marksman fires warning shots. Finally, the shooter will fire disabling shots at the boats engine. The Coast Guard precision marksmen are a small group of less than two dozen law enforcement members who have been selected for the precision marks manship school. They use the M-107 semi-automatic rifle, firing the same .50 caliber round as the M-2 machine gun, to disable the drug boats. While the M-107 rifle is accurate at more than 1,000 yards on land, these shots are taken at much closer range. Delivering more than 10,000 foot pounds of muzzle energy, this rifle and cartridge combination can read ily pierce the hull of fiberglass, wood or metal drug boats. We try to get well inside 200 yards, said one of the Coast Guard shooters. We dont want to cause any harm to personnel aboard the boats. The shooters do not fire at anyone aboard the boat, only at the engine. After the suspected drug boat has stopped, of its own accord or because of disabling fire, our ship will launch a RHIB (rigid hull inflatable boat) with a Coast Guard law enforcement team to conduct VBSS (visit board search and seizure), said Patmon. Once aboard the suspect vessel, the law enforcement team will seize the drugs and take the smugglers into custody. This new program has paid off for HSL-60, with several night time busts. Last year on deployment, we cap tured $1 billion in illegal drugs headed for the United States, said Cmdr. Oscar Toledo, HSL-60s executive officer. It was no simple task, becoming the first Navy unit to have authority for night time use of force. We started in 2010, to get ready for the 2012 deployment, said Toledo. We had to configure our aircraft and put our crews through extensive training before we got Coast Guard approval for this program. One of our first challenges was the night vision, Toledo continued. We needed a heads up display (HUD) inside the goggles. Flying with night vision at 80 to 100 feet over water, while creeping along at less than 30 knots is extremely difficult. Night vision limits peripheral vision and depth perception. Because the HUD displays altitude, attitude, air speed, and other critical flight param eters, allows our pilots to look where they were flying instead of turning their heads constantly to look at the instru ment panel. This increased safety and provided a steadier platform for the Coast Guard marksmen to shoot from, but it takes practice. We did a lot of training for these mis sions, said Toledo. One of our biggest challenges as a Reserve squadron is coordinating our training days with the civilian work schedules of our Reserve aircrew members. Its pretty exciting for a Reserve squadron like the HSL-60 Jaguars, to lead the way with this new program. We had a lot of lessons learned that the fleet can incorporate as more units begin fly ing these missions. Toledo concluded, All of our guys made the sacrifices of their personal time to fly extra days and to be here when necessary. Our maintainers stepped up and kept our aircraft run ning under the increased load and did what was necessary to incorporate the new technology into the aircraft in order to meet our mission. Id say $1 billion in dope off the street is mission accom plished. HSL-60 Jaguars use nighttime force against drug runners

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20 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013 With minimal investment and some impressive Afloat Training Group (ATG) Mayport Sailor inge nuity, a much more effective training tool has been brought to the Fleet. What started as a vision for a better training aid for surface Navigation teams, sparked two Chief Petty Officers from Afloat Training Group Mayport to implement the new team trainer course Mariner Skills Net (MSN). Identifying the need to have an integrated navi gation team training tool, Chief Quartermaster Cunningham and Chief Quartermaster Holder of ATG teamed up with Paul Gibbs of CSCS and Edmar Obenza of NAVAIR to develop the new course. MSN is an effective way to train the surface ships navigation teams. The program is a cost effective, all inclusive simulator for navigation training. It allows officers and enlisted to train together on a dynamic problem. MSN is able to provide refresher training to ships without ever leaving the basin. CSCS provided classrooms to house the new course. NAVAIR provided the computers used for the simula tion. This is a way to integrate the entire navigation team on the bridge, in combat, working on the same dynamic problem, real time, pulling into or out of any port, in any type of weather, day or night all while the ship is in the yard period, Holder said. Just as the aviators have complex flight simulators, the MSN software provides a similar opportunity to the Surface Navy side. Sailors can hone the skills nec essary to ensure the safe navigation of the ship. Another benefit of the MSN course is the cost. ATG Mayport created the whole system for just $2,000. Cunningham, Holder, and Gibbs were able to use existing software and hardware to create the course. They interfaced the existing equipment and inno vated an integrated full bridge and CIC simulator. The $2,000 was spent to purchase a computer, Voyage Management System (VMS) licenses, sound cards, headsets, and reformat existing computers to com plete networked watch stations. This [course] will pay for itself by lessening the amount of underway times necessary to effectively train the bridge team in navigation and ship han dling, Cunningham said. The training is not only cost effective, but it is also receiving ample praise from those who experience the MSN course first hand. USS Taylors Navigation team got to use the system first hand during a recent train ing class at ATG. The training we are now receiving through MSN is far superior to the previous method, said Quartermaster 2nd Class Pierce of USS Taylor. As opposed to individual training, MSN allows the OOD [Officer of the Deck], Conning Officer, QMs, and OSs to train together, allowing for much more realistic training. MSN has the ability for the training to match the experience level of those at the controls. An entire new bridge team to a group of seasoned Sailors can benefit from the course, Cunningham. Training can also be given to VMS and non VMS capable ships. VMS is the Navys version of GPS. The MSN curriculum serves as 1.2/ 1.3 A for MOB-N, enables PQS items to be signed off, and is even able to fully qualify a lookout without ever getting underway. The MSN course simulates relative motion, which means the bearings, tide, and currents are constantly changing, added Operations Specialist 2nd Class Harris of USS Taylor. That definitely shows us where we lacked and where we didnt lack. The ships Navigation team also commented on how shooting an actual bearing at an actual target with the MSN simulation was exponentially better than read ing it off of a paper and applying it just to charts. Currently, 18 real world ports can be simulated in the trainer with the option to add any port to the sys tem with a request 90 days prior to the training date. Cunningham and Holder were awarded Navy Achievement Medals by the command for their actions. This course is provided at Building 1556 CSCS in the VMS Operator classroom. For more information or to schedule a class contact ATG Mayport at 904-270-6344 ext. 3044. Mariner Skills Net an effective, efficient form of navigation team training Budget cuts have reduced Department of Navy spending across the board. Ship deployments have been cancelled and aircraft flying hours have been reduced. This is where U.S. 4th Fleet has turned to innovative ways to continue the fleets important mission. 4th Fleets current missions include security cooperation activities, con tingency operations, and the domi nant mission of maritime security operations. 4th Fleet accomplishes this through Counter Transnational Organized Crime (C-TOC) mission. The illegal transportation of illicit cargo to the U.S. and abroad functions as the greatest means these organiza tions make money and influence and destabilize the region. 4th Fleet and partner nations in the region monitor detect and intercept narcotics being smuggled via the water ways between the Americas. Defending the homeland by preventing narcotics from entering American schools and neighborhoods is an important mission that 4th Fleet must now accomplish with fewer ships, aircraft, and other assets. In the current fiscal environ ment, 4th Fleet is exploring innova tive, cost effective solutions that can address the capability gaps caused by budget cuts. Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/Commander U.S. 4th Fleet said. To continue sustained operations 4th Fleet has employed a combination of resources from the past with new tech nologies to continue the mission. In March of this year 4th Fleet host ed a capabilities demonstration of the Naval Air Warfare Centers MZ-3A Airship, a blimp. 4th Fleet utilized blimps during WWII in the South Atlantic for anti-submarine warfare. Harris discussed the benefits blimps can bring to the C-TOC mission. Transnational criminal organiza tions (TCOs) utilize an array of tactics, low observable and high speed vessels, masked communication signatures and sophisticated coordination to smug gle illicit cargo into the U.S. every year. One way to enhance detection efforts against illicit trafficking within our area of operations is to utilize long-endur ance platforms with the ability to use a multitude of sensors. Lighter-Than-Air (LTA) technologies, like this blimp have the potential to meet these operational needs, Harris said. In May Harris traveled to Key West for a very successful demonstration of the TIF-25K Aerostat (unmanned balloon) and a Puma unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) aboard the High-speed Vessel Swift. The tethered Aerostat provides an aerodynamically stable, reliable and cost effective, unmanned aerial plat form for surveillance, monitoring and detection. The standard system config uration can fly 2,000 to 3,000 feet above a ship like Swift and can deploy rapidly and safely. The Puma UAV delivers flexibil ity, endurance and a payload capability unmatched in its vehicle class. With a wingspan of 8.5 feet, this lightweight, hand-launched UAV provides aerial observation at line-of-sight ranges up to 10 kilometers. Puma can be recov ered in very restricted areas using verti cal descent Auto Land and is currently undergoing sea landing trials. On Aug. 20 a DC-3 coastal survey airplane from Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) visited 4th Fleet headquarters for a capabilities demon stration prior to a scheduled deploy ment to the Caribbean Sea and Central America, another vehicle from the past 4th Fleet wants to use for future opera tions. The DC-3 collects oceanographic and hydrographic data from the worlds oceans and coastlines, using a variety of platforms including, ships, aircraft, satellite sensors and buoys. The equip ment on board this DC-3 allows it not only to survey coastal areas, but also detect surface and underwater contacts essential for the C-TOC mission. It is important for 4th Fleet to find creative ways to continue the C-TOC mission with fewer assets. In 2012, 318,133 pounds of cocaine at a whole sale value of $8.5 billion and an esti mated street value of $25.5 billion were seized in the 4th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AOR), Harris said. Developing, testing and deploying low cost innovative ideas and technol ogy in an uncertain budgetary envi ronment is how 4th Fleet will continue operations now and in the near future. The Counter Transnational Organized Crime mission is of vital importance to our nation, as well as our partners in the region. The effect of crime and corruption that this ille gal activity has brought threatens the stability of emerging countries like Honduras and El Salvador. Preventing the flow of drugs is not an U.S. problem, but a problem for all of the Americas, Harris said. 4th Fleet AORs close proximity to the U.S. makes the Fleets mission that more important. Illegal materials enter ing the U.S. are a direct threat to the homeland. The violence that drug traf ficking creates has impacted our part ner nations in the hemisphere. It is important that 4th Fleet contin ues to explore innovative ways to do more with less. Budget concerns are a problem that is not going away any time soon, and neither is the attempt to smuggle narcotics into the United States. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) employs mari time forces in cooperative maritime security operations in order to maintain access, enhance interoperability, and build enduring partnerships that foster regional security in the U.S. Southern Command Area of Responsibility. 4th Fleet: Fleet of innovation

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 21 East Coast Ohio-class submarine home port continues to thrive What began as an inactive Army Marine Ocean Terminal in 1958 is now home to the most powerful vessels ever created for the U.S. Navy and the world. Enjoying its 35th year, Kings Bay is the largest employer in Camden County with more than 8,000 service members and civilian employees and an estimat ed annual payroll of $500 million. The goods and service the Kings Bay mili tary bring into Camden County is esti mated at $697 million. Kings Bay is the home port to six Ohio-class ballistic missile submarines and two Ohio-Class guided missile sub marines. The Navys move to Kings Bay began when treaty negotiations between the United States and Spain called for the withdrawal of Submarine Squadron 16 from its operational base in Rota, Spain by 1979. Between 1976 and 1978 Navy officials looked at more than 60 sites along the East Coast and decided on Kings Bay as the future refit site for the squadron. In addition to the land already owned by the Army, the Navy acquired other sur rounding properties for a total of 16,900 acres to create the new support base. It also transformed a sleepy com munity of 11,000 into a bustling one of about 50,000. It changed Camden County forev er, said David Rainer during a 2005 interview. It was a defining period for everyone. Rainer, a Camden County Commissioner, was the superintendent of Camden County schools in 1978. During a visit to the base in 2005, for mer president Jimmy Carter jokingly said it was hard not to have an influence in Kings Bays selection during his ten ure as president. However, the former governor and submariner noted, Kings Bay was selected on its own merits. Ken Smith, a Trident Refit Facility employee and mayor of Kingsland, said the base was among the most important events to occur in Camden County his tory. I dont know if [Carter] did anything in office that was more significant to Camden County, Smith said in 2005. He was in office at the time of the bases inception. It helped bring a lot of change, not only to Camden County, but surrounding counties. The first group of Sailors arrived in January 1978 and began the transfer process from the Army to the Navy that was completed by July. Cmdr. Robert Sminkey, along with 37 Sailors and civilian employees, raised the national ensign and changed the sign to read Naval Submarine Support Base Kings Bay near what was to become Stimson Gate. With the transition complete, the commanding officer of the support base and his crew set out to transform the terminal into an operational naval base. Initial construction began to prepare for the arrival of the squadron and the submarine tender USS Simon Lake (AS33). According to base archives and newspaper accounts, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers removed 13.5 mil lion cubic yards of material from the St. Marys Entrance Channel, Cumberland Sound and Kings Bay in preparation for the incoming fleet. Congress also approved funding for many projects such as the development of 250 fam ily housing units, the first base admin istration building (now public works), security building, and a new fire sta tion. When I first arrived at Kings Bay to take command in 1979, it was only a few trailers and a pine forest, said retired Capt. Richard Currier, who was the second commanding officer of Kings Bay. Currier was on hand to greet Squadron 16 and USS Simon Lake upon their arrival at Kings Bay later that year. Making do was our biggest chal lenge as was incorporating change. I had a workforce of 350 personnel when I started. When I left, there was close to 1,000 people working on the base. Following an extensive one-year environmental impact study in October 1980, Kings Bay was selected as the east coast site for the new Ohio-class sub marines. The Navy then called for the construction of three new commands. Trident Training Facility, Trident Refit Facility and Strategic Weapons Facility Atlantic were built to support the mas sive new boats. Trident Training Facility is the largest building in Camden County, with more than 500,000 square feet of classrooms and office space. Trident Refit Facilitys dry dock is the largest covered dry dock in the Western hemisphere. The announcement spurred the larg est peacetime construction project ever undertaken by the Navy. The $1.3 billion, 11-year construction project also fueled a population explosion in Camden County that still persists today. Other milestones achieved dur A message from the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay marks 35th year

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22 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013 ing the first years were the publication of the first Periscope newspaper June 15, 1979, the first annual Combined Federal Campaign conducted at Kings Bay Nov. 1, 1979, and the first submarine to be dry docked at Kings Bay, the USS Henry L. Clay (SSBN 625) in April 1980. When I first arrived in July 1984, I worked for Morale, Welfare and Recreation for two years, said Fred Alexander, a retired chief yeoman who later worked for the base administration. The admin building was still being built, Trident Training Facility was not yet finished and Group 10 was non-existent. Since then he said, construction of new buildings changed the face of the base. The biggest impression I received from my initial arrival to Kings Bay was the (care) put into the design of the base, because everything was within walking distance, Alexander said. The first Trident Ohio-Class submarine, USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) arrived at Kings Bay Jan. 15, 1989, bringing with it two crews of more than 150 Sailors each. By 1997, Kings Bay was the homeport to 10 Trident submarines and a workforce of 11,000. Kings Bay continues to evolve. Five of the Tridents transferred to the West Coast and USS Florida (SSGN 728) and Georgia (SSGN 729) were converted to guided missile submarines and shifted homeport to Kings Bay.USS Alaska (SSBN 732) arrived from the West Coast. In addition, the Coast Guard Maritime Force Protection Unit was commissioned in 2007, bringing 140 Coast Guardsmen and the cutter Sea Dragon to the base. Kings Bay has added additional patrol boats and new buildings to support the Coast Guard, as well as additional support facilities for SWFLANT and Marine Corps Security Force Battalion. The Times-Union contributed to this story. 35 YEARS

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 23 First qualified female sub officers receive Dolphins Three Sailors assigned to USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) and USS Maine (SSBN 741) became the first female unrestricted line officers to qualify in sub marines, Dec. 5. Lt. j.g. Marquette Leveque, a native of Fort Collins, Colo., assigned to the Gold Crew of Wyoming, and Lt. j.g. Amber Cowan and Lt. j.g. Jennifer Noonan of Maines Blue Crew received their subma rine Dolphins during sepa rate ceremonies at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor, Wash. In order to receive their Dolphins, Leveque, Cowan and Noonan were required to qualify as Officer of the Deck and Engineering Officer of the Watch, perform damage con trol functions, and demon strate satisfactory qualities of leadership. In Kings Bay, Leveque, along with fellow Gold Crew officer Lt. j.g. Kyle E. McFadden, par ticipated in a ceremony pre sided by Cmdr. Christopher Nash, commanding officer of Wyomings Gold Crew. Today was a very special occasion Nash said. It was special because two talented young officers earned the right to lead the next gen eration of submarine sailors in the most capable Navy the world has ever known. It was also special because these young leaders fully represent the future of our nations tech nical talent. Nash pinned McFadden at the ceremony. Leveque was pinned by her husband, Lt. j.g. Luke Leveque, a qualified submari ner onboard the ballistic mis sile submarine USS Maryland (SSBN 738). I am honored to be joining the long tradition of the sub marine force by earning my Dolphins and excited for the journey to come, Leveque said. I could not have accom plished this without the help of the wardroom and crew of the USS Wyoming. Cowan, a native of Colorado Springs, Colo., and Noonan, who hails from Boston, joined two other Blue Crew officers Lt. j.g. James Barclay and Lt. j.g. John Schaeffer in receiving their Dolphins. Cowan was pinned by her husband, Naval Flight Officer Lt. Adam Cowan. Noonan chose a former Maine shipmate and mentor, Lt. Jason Brethauer, to pin her Dolphins. Schaeffer decided to have Lt. Joe Westfall, a current shipmate from the Blue Crew, conduct his pinning. The Commanding officer of Maines Blue Crew, Cmdr. William Johnson, pinned Barclay. I am honored to participate in todays ceremony honoring these four fine officers who have proven themselves over the past year, Johnson said. They are truly worthy to join in the great legacy of submari ners that have gone before us as qualified in submarines. Leveque, Cowan and Noonan are three of 24 women 17 line officers and seven supply officers assigned to Maine, Wyoming, USS Ohio (SSGN 726) and USS Georgia (SSGN 729). Wyoming and Georgia are homeported in Kings Bay, while Maine and Ohio are homeported in Bangor. Leveque, Cowan and Noonan have each complet ed strategic deterrent patrols aboard their respective subma rines. Qualifying is a huge accom plishment for any submariner, and it feels no different for me, Noonan said. I am thrilled to finally be a member of this elite commu nity. Im particularly grateful to my crew, officers and enlisted, for supporting me and hold ing me to the same standards as those who have gone before me. I look forward to being able to fully contribute to the crew now that Im a qualified sub marine officer. Cowan said qualification in submarines is more of a per sonal achievement It requires understanding of the many facets of subma rine life and has you perform so many skills that when I take a step back and look at every thing that I have done and what this qualification means I will do, it is pretty amazing, she said. I see it as that point where I have demonstrated the knowl edge and the instinct to per form safely and smartly in all areas of the ship and its mis sions. Ultimately, it is a monu mental mark of the confidence my command and crew has in me. And earning that respect and acceptance is a feeling that I will hold with me for my entire life. Prior to reporting to their boats beginning in November 2011, Leveque, Cowan, Noonan and the other women assigned to Ohio, Maine, Wyoming and Georgia graduated from the Submarine Officer Basic Course in Groton, Conn. In addition, the submarine line officers under instruc tion graduated from the Naval Nuclear Power School at Charleston, S.C., and under went naval nuclear prototype training. Dec. 13, 2012: Milestone day for Navy, Kings Bay

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24 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013



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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2013 ACT TRAINING AW ARENESS Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Navy environmental leaders met Oct. 10 with state and city regulators at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) aboard NAS Jacksonville to con duct their quarterly meeting that promotes environmental compliance and sustainabili ty through a cooperative effort aimed at environmental excel lence. Bruce Mobley leads the FRCSE environmental depart ment. For more than 11 years, the Northeast Florida Environmental Compliance Partnering Team has fostered trust, coop eration and communication concerning hazardous waste management. Being part of the compliance partnering team is very worthwhile. Were all focused on the same goal as we fine-tune our mission and sus tainment activities, he said. Our most recent accomplish ment involved working with members of the compliance Commander, Task Group 72.2 recently sent a detach ment comprised of VP-26s Combat Aircrew (CAC) 6 and their team of maintenance professionals on a one-week detachment to the Federated States of Micronesia in sup port of Operation Big Eye 2013. The annual exercise seeks to enhance international coop eration with regard to enforce ment of maritime regulations in the Micronesian exclusive economic zones, which stretch across the central Pacific. Operation Big Eye is one of the largest and most complex mar itime surveillance operations held in the Pacific region. CAC-6 traveled to the island of Palau, a 177 squaremile landmass north of New Guinea. On their approach into the airfield, the crew made use of their Automatic Identification System (AIS), which tracks and identi fies surface vessels through a global maritime network, -all in order to begin working in support of Operation Big Eye before even arriving at their destination. Touching down on the small island nation, CAC-6, their team of maintainers and Officer in Charge Lt. Cmdr. Trey Walden were greeted by U.S. Deputy Ambassador Thomas Daley. Next, the crew depart ed Palau for Pohnpei, a 122-square-mile island located in the Caroline Island chain. Once again, CAC-6 performed AIS sweeps while in tran sit, identifying as many sur face contacts as possible. By the end of the second day of the operation, their initiative and resourcefulness laid the groundwork for a successful follow-on maritime domain awareness mission out of Pohnpei the next day. After three days of solid fly Sailors assigned to the Fighting Tigers of VP-8 provided a guided tour to 20 children and their fami lies on Sept. 28 during the squad rons Pilot for a Day event. Each of the youthful pilots that participated are currently fight ing cancer or are in remission from cancer. The American Cancer Society (ACS) and Nemours Childrens Hospital Jacksonville helped plan the event. The guest pilots toured a P-3C aircraft and received train ing on weapons employed by the squadron. Tyson Peacock, a 13-year-old cancer survivor said, I had a great time today. I feel like being a pilot is something I would really like to do when I get older. He added, Today was a great learning experience; Im happy that I was able to come out and experience this. ACS is a nationwide, communi ty-based, voluntary health orga nization dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health prob lem. ACS is seeking cancer fight ers between the ages of 30-65, who have never been diagnosed with cancer, who are interested in par ticipating in Cancer Prevention Study-3 (CPS-3), a historic nation wide study to help researchers bet ter understand the genetic, envi ronmental and lifestyle factors that cause or prevent cancer. Enrollment will be taking place in Jacksonville Nov. 5-8. For more information, or to schedule an enrollment appointment, visit www.cancer.org/cps3florida. VP-8 Chief Aviation Technician Sarah Reitz closed out the event by saying, I am honored to be part of a command that affords us the opportunity to give back to the community. This event was fun for Sailors and children alike. VP-8 hosts American Cancer Society Children in Pilot for a Day VP-26 CAC-6 flies in support of Operation Big Eye in Micronesia Environmental compliance team meets at FRCSE

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Oct. 17 1922 Lt. Cmdr. Virgil Griffin in a Vought VE-7SF makes first takeoff from U.S. Navy aircraft carrier USS Langley (CV-1) anchored in York River, Virginia. 1941 U-568 torpedoes and damages USS Kearny (DD-432) near Iceland, resulting in 11 killed and 22 injured. 1944 Naval forces land Army rangers on islands at the entrance to Leyte Gulf in preparation for landings. 1989 Following San Francisco earthquake, 24 Navy and Military Sealift Command ships rendered assis tance. Oct. 18 1812 U.S. sloop of war Wasp captures HM brig Frolic. 1859 U.S. Marines reach Harpers Ferry, Va. and assault the arsenal seized by John Brown and his fol lowers. 1867 USS Ossippee and USS Resaca participate in formal transfer of Alaska to U.S. authority at Sitka and remain to enforce law and order in new territory. 1944 3rd Fleet carrier aircraft attack Japanese ships in harbor and land forces around Manila. 1968 In Operation Sea Lords, the Navys three major operating forces in Vietnam (TF 115, 116, and 117) are brought together for the first time to stop Vietcong infiltration deep into South Vietnams Mekong Delta. Oct. 19 1843 Capt. Robert Stockton in Princeton, the first screw-propelled naval steamer, challenges British mer chant ship Great Western to a race off New York, which Princeton won easily. 1915 Establishment of submarine base at New London, Conn. 1944 Secretary of Navy orders African-American women accepted into Naval Reserve. 1987 Destruction of an Iranian oil-drilling platform used for military purposes. Oct. 20 1824 U.S. Schooner Porpoise captures four pirate ships off Cuba. 1944 Seventh Fleet lands more than 60,000 Army troops on Leyte, Philippines while Japanese aircraft attack. 1952 Task Force 77 establishes ECM hunter/killer teams of two ECM-equipped aircraft and an armed escort of four Skyraiders and four Corsairs. 1967 Operation Coronado VII began in Mekong Delta, Vietnam. 1983 Due to political strife, USS Independence (CV59 ) ordered to Grenada. Oct. 21 1797 Launching of USS Constitution at the Hartts Boston shipyard, Boston, Mass. The ship is now the oldest commissioned ship in the U.S. Navy. 1942 British submarine lands Capt. Jerauld Wright, USN, and four Army officers at Cherchel, French North Africa, to meet with a French military delegation to learn the French attitude toward future Allied land ings. Oct. 22 1846 Miss Lavinia Fanning Watson of Philadelphia christens the sloop-of-war Germantown, the first U.S. Navy ship sponsored by a woman. 1951 First of seven detonations, Operation BusterJangle nuclear test. 1962 President John F. Kennedy orders surface blockade (quarantine) of Cuba to prevent Soviet offen sive weapons from reaching Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis. Oct. 23 1944 Battle of Leyte Gulf, a series of separate bat tles, begins with attacks on Japanese ships. 1983 A suicide truck bomber attacks the Marine barracks at Beirut airport, Lebanon killing 241 (220 Marines, 18 Sailors, and 3 soldiers). 1983 Operation Urgent Fury (Grenada, West Indies) begins. My experience with weight as a child went something like this: I was skinny. The end. I never had a weight problem until I started having children. Then, it seemed, I never lost baby weight before I was pregnant with the next one. Sound familiar? Dustins experience with weight as a child was much differ ent. In fact, we grew up together, so I remember Dustin as an awkward, overweight fifth grader who needed braces. He even was the hall patrol. With his orange vest and shiny badge, he told me to walk, dont run, in the hallways. But when Dustin hit puberty, after years of growing out, he finally grew up. By the time he graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy, he almost looked too thin. When we married, we were both very skinny. And then we had babies. Thirteen years later, I was 70 pounds heavier than my wed ding day. Only, I never saw this happening. Not really. In my mind, I was always the knobby-kneed girl who ran track and had to use belts to keep her jeans up. My perception of myself did not match what the reality on the outside. If I happened to catch an unexpected glimpse of myself in a reflective window on a building, or in a mirror at the mall, I was shocked. Well, who is that chubby lady? Certainly not me! I use chubby because that feels more friendly. I didnt even comprehend the extra weight after a year of being photographed once a week for Dinner with the Smileys, nor during all my television interviews for the books publicity. Sure, I saw my double chin on the Today Show, but I chalked that up to the camera adding 70 pounds. And, yes, some helpful readers passed along links to online commenters wisecracks about my weight, but, well, they were online comments, and no one takes those seriously, right? Dustin, by the way, has the opposite problem: despite being nothing more than a little overweight since he lost all his childhood pounds, he still views himself as that kid in grade school who didnt look like the others. Despite being compared to the handsome good looks of Tom Cruise today, Dustin is not arrogant. That little (Im using the word loosely) fifth grade boy keeps him humble. Dustin will always view himself as he was when he was 11 years old, and unfortunately, I was doing the same with myself. Then I had a blood test in early-August. It was a routine test that was part of my yearly physical. I didnt think much about it, and I was rushing to have lunch with a friend as the nurse poked my vein. A few days later, while I was in D.C., the doctor called. My blood glucose level was high. Really high. I needed an A1c hemoglobin test to check for diabetes. What? But Im that skinny girl from grade school who eats whatever she wants and doesnt gain weight. The next day, I stepped on the bathroom scale and saw I number I never wanted to see. My heart sort of sank to the floor. I was over weight. Finally, I got it. Dustin and I walked around the nations capitol that day, and I recognized that my legs felt heavy. My ankles kept swell ing. And, actually, that had been happening for some time. I needed to stop and rest in between monuments. I felt like crud. The good news, however, is that my A1c hemoglobin test, which checks blood glucose levels over a period of time, came back fine. I dont have diabetes. Not yet, at least. But the doctor agreed I was headed that way. Plus, I take more blood pressure medication than an almost-37-year old should. So I decided to get serious about losing weight. One month later, I lost eight pounds. After 10 pounds, my ankles quit swelling. Fifteen pounds down, and my collar bones emerged. Ive been watching what I eat, thanks to years of Weight Watchers, for a little over eight weeks now, and Ive lost 17 pounds. My blood glucose has dropped even further, and in another 10 pounds, the doctor will reevaluate my need for blood pressure medicine. I still have a long way to go, but Im feeling great. Ive tried sometimes in earnest; sometimes not to lose weight for years. I even had some success in 2009. But theres nothing like a good old diabetes scare to make you serious. People ask how Ive done it, and I tell them that its deceptively simple: I dont want to get diabetes. That fear, coupled with what Ive learned from Weight Watchers, has made it relatively easy. I look forward to the day when my inner view of myself and my reflection in the mirror at the mall are finally in sync. How I lost 17 pounds in eight weeks Single active duty Navy mothers needed What is the emotional readjustment of coming home and reentering post deploy ment life after being deployed? Single active duty Navy mothers who have been on deployment and have completed an entire deployment cycle are needed for a research study. Doctoral Psychology student Juanita Bruno-Jacob at Capella University wishes to ask you questions about the experience. You will remain anonymous. You may contact her at juanita. brunoja@gmail.com or jbruno jacob2@capellauniversity.edu or via phone at (703) 618-9668. Your call and/or e-mail will be returned as promptly as possible.

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The NAS Jacksonville chaplains host ed several suicide awareness training sessions last week to provide informa tion to military and civilian personnel in an effort to curb the growing number of suicides within the Department of Defense and outside communities. We are holding this training to reit erate the importance of suicide preven tion and to talk about when you should become a first responder and engage someone who might try to take their own life, said NAS Jax Command Chaplain (Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore. He then asked the audience how many people have known someone who committed suicide. Most had. When someone takes their life, the people left behind usually spend years feeling guilty but it is not their fault. Suicide is a personal decision, Skidmore contin ued. But we need to try to prevent that decision by intervening. Eighty percent of those who attempt suicide give some kind of indication before they act. After a short video about a Sailor who attempted suicide and was helped by his command and other Navy resourc es. Luckily, this Sailor survived and got the help he needed, said Skidmore who went on to discuss some of the warning signs and risk factors. Warning signs could include: Sometimes people dealing with economic stress, relationship issues, job situations just dont know how to deal with them. They become over whelmed. Its up to you to establish and keep establishing that first line of defense and be aware of the signs, said Skidmore. The three factors in dealing with those considering suicide is ask, care, treat or ACT. Ask means find out what is bothering them and take the time to listen. Dont judge and be persistent. Then let them know you care by offering hope. Finally, help them get the treat ment they need take them to someone specializing in crisis intervention and suicide prevention like an FFSC coun selor or chaplain. And, make sure you follow up on them, Skidmore said. We are available 24/7 to help by call ing our duty number at (904) 614-7385. For more information about suicide awareness, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255.Suicide prevention training promotes awareness Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast awarded 59 restoration and modernization ener gy projects totaling $40.9 million in fiscal year 2013. The projected savings from these projects is expected to be more than 350,000 MBTU, which is a 3.3 percent reduction in energy usage from the 2003 Navy Region Southeast baseline. A British Thermal Unit (BTU) is defined as the amount of energy needed to cool or heat one pound of water by one degree fahrenheit. An MBTU is one mil lion BTUs and is typically used to measure medi umto large-scale ener gy consumption. Cost savings on average per MBTU for these projects is $21. The Department of the Navy (DoN) issued a new energy policy 4100.5E Shore Energy Management) in June 2012 that is driving ener gy consumption reduc tion at all Navy installa tions, transforming the energy culture and seek ing new or existing tech nical solutions for reduc ing energy, said NAVFAC Southeast Energy Manager Brad Clark. The Shore Energy Manage-ment instruc tion is a complete revi sion from the 1994 ver sion. The instruction affirms the Navys policy and strategy to ensure ener gy security as a strategic imperative. It also directs the Navy to meet or exceed federal mandates and executive orders. Since naval forces require constant support from ashore installations, the Navy is reducing its vulnerabilities related to electrical grids by lower ing consumption, inte grating renewable energy sources and increasing control of energy supply and distribution. Energy reliability, resiliency and redundancy are essential components of the Navys Critical Infrastructure The instruction fur ther directs the Navy to use the most cost effec tive means to meet shore energy goals including a 50 percent ashore con sumption reduction by 2020, achieving a total ashore energy usage rate of 50 percent from alter native sources by 2020, and reducing the amount of petroleum used in commercial vehicle fleets by 50 percent by 2015 and other goals, explained Clark. Some of the technol ogy highlights instituted by NAVFAC Southeast bases in fiscal 2013 included the installation of Light Emitting Diode (LED) exterior lighting, solar water heating, high efficiency chillers and motors, Direct Digital Controls, and HVAC opti mization improvements. NAS Jacksonville exe cuted the most energy projects, a total of 10, expects to save the most energy just under 92,000 MBTU from executed energy projects. contract for $2.8 mil lion was awarded for upgrades to HVAC sys tems, lighting replace ment, and water con sumption upgrades in Buildings 3221, 3460, annual savings are pro jected to be 16,331 MBTU. Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay awarded a con tract valued at $5 million NAVFAC Southeast energy saving projects making strides JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013 NAS Jacksonville fire inspectors made the rounds last week visiting numerous commands and facilities to promote fire safety during the annual fire prevention week. The event is held every year dur ing the week of Oct. 9 to commemorate the anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. The fire inspectors spent hours edu cating the public through static dis plays, lectures and demonstrations. They also held fire drills at various buildings on the base in an effort to increase fire prevention and safety awareness. We recognize Fire Prevention Week every year to promote safety. Many times people take fire prevention and safety measures for granted and its something that can happen at any time. So our job is to educate people, determine causes and prevent fires before they happen, said NAS Jax Fire Inspector Robert Adams. Fire Prevention Week events began with a visit to the Navy Exchange (NEX) Food Court where fire inspectors passed out information on fire safety to NEX patrons, answered questions about their ladder truck and gave firefighter hats to children. Also on hand to help promote fire safety was Pluggie the Fire Hydrant who squirted patrons and talk ed to them about fire hazards. The fire inspectors also visited the NAS Jax Youth Activities Center where they discussed what to do in case of a fire, evacuation routes, safe zones while cooking in the kitchen and the impor tance of having a family plan for emer gencies. The children also watched as Firefighter Russell Russ donned his gear and demonstrated his breathing appa ratus to show them not to be afraid dur ing an emergency. Jairus Achane, 7, said, I learned that firefighters are good people and help save people during a fire. They also help us make good escape plans when we need them. I also learned about the safe zone in the kitchen when my parents are cooking and that its where Im not supposed to be. Naval Hospital Jax also hosted the firefighters who visited the Childrens Ward and Pediatrics Clinic to meet with families. At the NAS Jax Child Development Center, the fire inspectors taught the children that they should never play with matches or lighters and how to stop, drop and roll during a fire and how to call 9-1-1 to report a fire. Overall, the week proved successful in getting the word out about fire safety. We talked to a lot of people and got the word out about preventing fires before they happen, said Adams. The Fire Prevention Division offers classes on fire safety to commands and organizations as requested. For more information, call 542-3928. Prevent Kitchen Fires

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013 5 Paying tribute to fallen firefightersFires take more American lives than all other natural disasters combined. They inflict devastating tolls on families and communities, and they cost our nation billions of dollars each year. During Fire Prevention Week, we pay tribute to the brave men and women who put their lives on the line to pull their neighbors out of harms way, and pledge to do our part to prevent fires in our homes, our cities, and the great outdoors. We all have a responsibility to protect our families against fire. We should be cautious while cooking, using electrical appliances, and heating our homes. Those who live in areas prone to wildfires can help safeguard their homes by clearing flammable vegetation, and they should plan for emergencies by build ing a supply kit and talking with their families about a communications plan and evacuation routes. Every American should install working smoke detectors on each level of their home and remember to test them monthly. It is also essential to develop and practice evacuation plans twice a year. Because fire spreads rap idly and poisonous, disorienting smoke moves even quicker, families should design plans that allow for the quickest possible exit. By preventing fires, we can both protect our loved ones and keep Americas firefighters out of unneces sary danger. To save people they have never met, these skilled professionals battle walls of flame, put them selves in the paths of unpredictable wildfires, and rush into houses on the verge of collapse. This week, as we renew our commitment to fire safety, we thank these courageous first responders for their service and honor those who have made the ultimate sacrifice in the line of duty. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States do hereby proclaim Oct. 6 through Oct.12, 2013, as Fire Prevention Week. On Sunday, Oct. 6, 2013, in accor dance with Public Law 107-51, the flag of the United States will be flown at half-staff at all federal office buildings in honor of the National Fallen Firefighters Memorial Service. I call on all Americans to participate in this observance with appropriate programs and activities and by renew ing their efforts to prevent fires and their tragic consequences. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this fourth day of October, in the year of our Lord two thousand thirteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-eighth.Barack Obama President of the United States of America

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Sending or receiving a text takes a drivers eyes from the road for an average of 4.6 seconds, -the equiva lent (at 55 mph) of driving the length of an entire foot ball field, blind. Its 8 a.m., and you jump in your car to drive to work. You have every intention of driving safely, but within minutes of merging onto the highway youve already checked your makeup in the mirror, fiddled with your cars radio, programmed your GPS for a meeting loca tion, made two calls on your cellphone and sent a text message to your sister. You might not realize it, but youre a distracted driver. Each time you take your focus off the road, even if just for a split second, youre putting your life and the lives of others in danger. An emerging and dead ly epidemic on the nations roads, distracted driv ing-related crashes caused at least 5,500 deaths and nearly 450,000 injuries in 2009, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation. However, since many local law enforcement agen cies dont routinely document distraction factors in crash reports, federal safety officials believe the num bers are actually much higher. Driving a car is a very complex task, says Barbara Harsha, executive director of the Governors Highway Safety Association, which estimates that distractions are associated with 15 percent to 25 percent of crashes at all levels. It requires your complete attention. All it takes is a glance away for more than two seconds and you can get into serious trouble. Distracted driving is any activity that takes your attention away from the road. In everyday driving, however, distractions are common. From talking with passengers, to eating, to turning around to check on fidgety toddlers, distracted driving endangers you, your passengers, pedestrians and others. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention describes three main types of distractions while driving. Visual dis tractions cause you to take your eyes off the road, manual distractions cause you to take your hands off the wheel and cognitive distractions, such as listen ing to a talk radio show, cause you to take your mind off what you are doing. Driving is a great privilege, but with that privilege also comes responsibility. Manage your distractions The good news is that distracted driving crashes can be prevented. The first thing I would tell you is to put your elec tronic device away, Harsha says. Just dont use it. All it takes is a glance thats longer than two seconds for you to get into a crash. Some distractions cant be eliminated, but most can be managed. For example, turn your cellphone off or silence it before you start the engine. Secure your pets properly before you begin to drive. Dont eat or drink on the road. Set your GPS before starting the engine. In a national survey from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, most respondents said there are few driving situations when they would not use the phone or text, yet they reported feeling unsafe when in vehicles in which the driver is texting. They also said they support bans on texting and cellphone use while driving. Distractions and teens Traffic crashes are the leading cause of death for U.S. teens. Teens are especially vulnerable to distrac tions while driving and are more likely than other age groups to be involved in a fatal crash where distraction is reported. Teen drivers are far more likely to send and receive text messages while driving than adults. Also, a teens crash risk goes up when there are teen passengers in the car. Parents need to take a strong stand with their teens, Harsha says. Prohibit teens from using Distracted driving: Stay focused when on the road 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013

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Navy Exchange hosts breast cancer awareness eventNearly 100 employees and patrons of the NAS Jax Navy Exchange (NEX) decked out in pink attire attended a breast cancer awareness event Oct. 11. The guest speakers for the event were First Coast News Anchorwoman and creator of Buddy Check 12 Jeannie Blaylock and Naval Hospital Jacksonville Breast Care Coordinator Nikki Levinson-Lustgarten. NEX General Manager Marsha Brooks kicked off the event by wel coming the crowd under an array of pink balloons and ribbons. Thank you all for coming and being part of this important event to recognize Breast Cancer Awareness Month, said Brooks, who also recognized those involved in coordinating the event, including a bra decorating contest and pink ribbon cupcakes provided by the commissary. She then introduced Blaylock who polled the crowd to recognize breast cancer survivors and give them a round of applause. If you catch breast cancer early these days your odds of staying alive are phenomenal more than 90 percent. So that shows how important it is to do self exams every single month, said Blaylock, who created Buddy Check 12 as a way to get women to do these exams and remind their buddy as well. I started this program after losing one of my best friends to breast cancer more than 20 years ago. She was 29 and had just had baby. Back then, people didnt talk about it so she didnt have the support she needed. And, by then I worked here in TV and kept meeting people with breast cancer, Blaylock continued. So I called my mom and said lets do self exams and call one another the same day of each month to remind ourselves. So thats how Buddy Check 12 started and its saved thou sands of women around the country. Guests were invited to take home Buddy Check 12 kits and a slew of other information about breast cancer and resources available. Levinson-Lustgarten also offered valuable information about how to con duct self examinations, what are some of the possible procedures offered after a diagnosis of breast cancer, and the importance of having a support system. No one should have to deal with breast cancer alone. We have a won derful support group at the hospital called Ribbons and Roses Breast Cancer Support Group which can make a world of difference in a journey to fight this disease, said Levinson-Lustgarten before introducing two survivors, Grace Brown and GiGi Neff, who told the heroic stories of their continuous fight against breast cancer. When I was first diagnosed 18 years ago, there was very little support for those of us battling breast cancer. I call it the thief who keeps coming back to try to steal my life. The thief has visited me several times but times have defi nitely changed and now there are great support systems so please use them because it can make all the difference in the world, said Brown. For more information about the Naval Hospital Jacksonville Ribbons and Roses Breast Cancer Support Group, call 542-7857. Sailors from the VP-8 Fighting Tigers supported a Fleming Island High School Navy Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (NJROTC) drill meet on Sept. 28. Fighting Tiger volunteers judged the Captain M-9s Challenge, that encom passed 12 North Florida High Schools. Events included a 16x100 meter relay race, push-ups, curl-ups, a sea bag carry, and a tug-o-war. The NJROTC program teaches leader ship development, maritime heritage, the significance of sea power, and naval topics such as the fundamentals of naval operations, seamanship, naviga tion and meteorology. Classroom instruction is augmented throughout the year by extra-curricular activities of community service, aca demics, athletics, drill and orienteer ing competitions, field meets, flights, visits to naval activities, marksmanship sports training, and physical fitness training. It was amazing to see these young men and women work, and to observe the high level of professionalism in each of them. It was truly an honor to be a part of this event, stated AE3 Amanda Watkins. I feel the event was a great way to get involved in the lives of young men and women interested in service to the nations military. I look forward to simi lar opportunities like this in future. Fighting Tigers support Navy Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013 7

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partnering team to improve training of hazardous waste coordinators in order to reduce incidents of non-compliance on the shop floor. NAS Jax Environmental Director Kevin Gartland said, We highly value this proactive partnership with state and city environmental regulatory agencies. It helps everybody to identify and implement solutions that enhance environ mental compliance, promote natural resources manage ment and protect public health. Northeast District Director Greg Strong, of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), was enthusiastic about the Navys goal to improve training of hazardous waste coordinators at NAS Jacksonville, FRCSE and other commands. I like how your base environmental leadership is getting behind this training in a very thoughtful and methodical way to identify root causes and clearly youve achieved great success, said Strong. From FDEPs perspective, were putting more resources into environmental outreach and education like this and it seems to be paying off. One great example is the Navys participation as part of the Environmental Compliance Partnering Team. You all have a tremendous reputation for quality in your environmental program. Well done. FRCSE Environmental Engineer Jenna Perry reported a large decrease in non-comformities. Our pre-training non-conformities numbered 106. Compare that to just 11 in a post-training inspection. Our FDEP hazardous waste inspection for 2013 showed zero issues. FRCSE Commanding Officer Capt. John Kemna said that the program brings uncomplicated environmental train ing to artisans at the shop level. He presented a letter of appreciation to Strong that read, in part, We want to thank the Florida Department of Environmental Protection for its strong support of environmental compliance at FRCSE this past quarter when your staff presented four training ses sions to help promote trust, communication and coopera tion among base hazardous waste coordinators. Mobley added, This compliance partnering team has great continuity, thanks to our large reservoir of professional and personal trust and the belief that when something goes wrong, we call each other, discuss solutions and fix it. Gartland agreed, saying, This compliance partnering approach can be used as a model for other industries to develop non-adversarial relationships with environmental regulators. Its all business if we make a mistake, we pay for it. There are no special favors, just a solid working relation ship. ENVIRONMENTAL VP-26ing, CAC-6 and their maintenance team enjoyed a day of rest and adven ture on the island. Members were able to participate in hiking, sightseeing and snorkel ing. This was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity because Pohnpei is home to some of the best snorkeling in the world. The U.S. Navy was not the only force contributing a P-3C Orion to Operation Big Eye. The Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) No. 5 Squadron also brought their variant, the P-3K2. Walden and the aircrew and main tenance team greeted the RNZAF detachment, led by Squadron Leader Marcus Hogan and offered post-flight maintenance support. After their day of exploration and crew rest, CAC-6 was well prepared to execute another mission monitoring the Micronesian fisheries from Palau. On the last full day of operations in support of Operation Big Eye, CAC-6 was joined by four RNZAF aircrew men for their mission. During this flight, the crew made significant contributions to Operation Big Eye by identifying more surface contacts than any other asset in the operation and giving an impressive demonstration of the aircrafts capa bilities to their Kiwi counterparts. This flight was an outstanding opportunity for CAC-6 to expand interoperability with the aircrews of the Royal New Zealand Air Force, said Walden. Sharing experiences and best practices with our coun terparts benefits both crews and strengthens the international mari time patrol community. CAC-6 and Walden debriefed Operation Big Eye on the final day of the exercise while their maintenance professionals prepared the aircraft to return to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. VP-26s CAC-6 and their mainte nance team made a marked contribu tion to the protection of Micronesian fisheries, leaving behind a legacy of multinational cooperation and a reputation for excellence in maritime patrol. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013

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Fighting Tigers support Autism Speaks Sailors from the VP-8 Fighting Tigers volun teered at the Walk Now for Autism Speaks event at the Jacksonville Landing on Sept. 28. Fighting Tiger volunteers arrived at the Jacksonville Landing early in the morning, helped setup necessary equipment, handed out water and tea to the walkers, directed the walking routes, and monitored the safety of more than 1,500 partici pants. Every year, more than 40 autism walks are con ducted nationwide, with all proceeds benefiting biomedical research into the causes, prevention, treatments and a cure for autism. The Jacksonville event raised more than $72,000. This was a great opportunity to get out there and be a part of something that really helps those who need us, said YN1 Kuiwana Harris. I feel its our responsibility to devote some of our time to the bet terment of other peoples lives. The VP-45 Pelicans came together Oct. 11 to celebrate the career of ADCS William Jones and bid him a fond farewell at his retirement ceremony after 27 years of distinguished service. VP-45 Commanding Officer Cmdr. John Brabazon presided over the ceremony at Hangar 117. Jones 27-year career began in August 1986 when he enlisted as a member of the Fair Bluff North Carolina Army National Guard where he stayed until he made the decision to transfer to the Navy in February 1988. His career has included tours at HS-9 on board USS Theodore Roosevelt, VS-32 on board USS Enterprise, and a prestigious tour of duty as #1 and #5 jet crew chief for the Navys Flight Demonstration Team, the Blue Angels. During this tour, Jones met and served as jet crew chief for the guest speaker of his retirement cer emony, Capt. Keith Hoskins, com manding officer NAS Pensacola. Jones reported to VP-45 in November 2011, where he served as Aircraft Division leading chief petty officer, quality assurance supervisor and maintenance con trol supervisor and played an instrumental role in VP-45s suc cessful 2012-13 deployment to Kadena Airbase in Okinawa, Japan. Jones is married to the former Kendra Sherman and is the proud father of five children who he is looking forward to spending time with after his retirement. The Greater Jax Area USO has tickets available at the NAS Jax and NS Mayport USO for $15 each, cash trans actions only. Tickets are available the following days and times: Guidelines including Florida National Guard and Reservists on current active duty orders and dependents are eligible to purchase/use these tickets. may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equals four. If you have less than four you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but dependent children are not authorized to represent the service member/spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO director. of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest. No exceptions. game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the season.Requests, with justification, must be sent to Mike OBrien at mobrien@usojax.com Anyone caught purchasing excess tickets or resell ing tickets will be prohibited from buying any more tickets for the entire season. No over the phone transactions, tickets are first come, first served. For more information, call 7782821. Jones retires after 27 years of service Jaguars tickets available at USO for remaining home games JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013 9

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The NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost pre ventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. The following is the schedule for 2013: To register for any of the above work shops call 542-5745.Fleet and Family Support Center offers life skills workshopsOctober is National Disability Employment Awareness Month Our nation has always drawn its strength from the differences of our people, from a vast range of thought, experience, and ability. Every day, Americans with disabilities enrich our communities and businesses. They are leaders, entrepreneurs, and innovators, each with unique talents to contribute and points of view to express. During National Disability Employment Awareness Month, we nurture our cul ture of diversity and renew our com mitment to building an American workforce that offers inclusion and opportunity for all. Since the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act, we have made great progress in removing barri ers for hardworking Americans. Yet today, only 20 percent of Americans with disabilities, including veterans who became disabled while serving our country, participate in our labor force. We need their talent, dedication, and creativity, which is why my admin istration proudly supports increased employment opportunities for people with disabilities. To that end, I remain dedicated to implementing Executive Order 13548, which called on federal agencies to increase recruitment, hir ing, and retention of people with dis abilities. As a result of our efforts, the federal government is hiring people with disabilities at a higher rate than at any point in over three decades. Most recently, we updated the rules to make sure federal contractors and subcon tractors are doing more to recruit, hire, and promote qualified individuals JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013 11

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VR-62 Nomads left Oct. 1heading out to Pacific Command (PACOM) on their normally scheduled detach ment cycle. Forty-five days after returning from the last PACOM detachment the Nomads are returning to PACOM. VR-62, with a crew of 22 Nomads made up of Selected Reservists and Full Time Support Sailors, departed for PACOM detachment. The squadron will be on detach ment for 90 days and rotate crews every two to three weeks. It doesnt matter if there are funding shortages, the Navy still needs a flexible logistics platform. That is where the VR-62 Nomads add value said AZCM Karen Quinn, VR-62s operations master chief. This is the first detachment for FY-14. The Nomads have completed the most successful year, FY-13 since arriving at NAS Jacksonville and are ready to make FY-14 just as successful. We respond no matter the time of day or night, no matter where on the globe. The VR-62 Nomads are adaptable and flex ible and can respond on short notice worldwide, said VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Tony Scarpino. Located at NAS Jacksonville, VR-62 is one of five Navy Reserve C-130 squadrons serv ing the US Navys high prior ity logistics needs around the globe. VR-62 Nomads detach to Pacific Command Operational security (OPSEC) is a system atic and proven pro cess by which the U.S. Government and its sup porting contractors can deny to potential adver saries information about capabilities and inten tions by identifying, con trolling, and protecting generally unclassified evidence of the planning and execution of sensi tive government activi ties. Adversaries may use multiple methods to col lect information: Searching trash con tainers Monitoring radio fre quencies, cell phones, wireless devices, email, faxes, and telephones Monitoring and exploiting the Internet and social media Elicitation, eaves dropping, and elec tronic surveillance Information available to the public as well as cer tain detectable activities reveal the existence of, and sometimes details about, classified or sen sitive information or undertakings. Such indi cators may assist those seeking to neutralize or exploit U.S. Government actions in the area of national security. The operations secu rity process involves five steps: identification of critical information, analysis of threats, anal ysis of vulnerabilities, assessment of risks, and application of appropri ate countermeasures. Use of OPSEC every day can help make sure this does not happen. Your understanding and use of sound OPSEC practices may save lives . includ ing your own!Operational security protects sensitive information that will see the replace ment of approximately 2,833 lights and fixtures with new LED lighting fixtures and save 7,860 MBTU annually. Chillers in Buildings 126, 300/300B, 321, 484 and 485 will be modern ized at Naval Support Activity Panama City. The award was valued at $1.6 million and will save approximately 4,200 MBTUs annually. During fiscal year 2014, 10 installations through out the Southeast are programmed to receive 27 projects totaling $30.3 million. These projects are pro jected to save 146,000 MBTUs and will put the Navy well on its way to meeting its energy reduc tion goals. Projects range from exterior lighting replace ments to more complex HAVC modernization and controls optimiza tions. ENERGY 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013

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As smartphones and tab lets become more integrated into todays society, so have the applications (or apps) that run on these devices. Most of us cant even leave the house without checking the traf fic on Google or updating our Facebook statuses. OSHA has even recognized how ubiqui tous smartphone apps have become and sponsored a con test last year for the devel opment of safety-oriented applications. An article in Safety+Health Magazine from June 2013 interviewed sev eral safety professionals who now use smartphone apps in their daily work routine. Smartphones and workplace safety-oriented apps can make integrating safety into work practices easier and more effi cient if used correctly. Ergonomics (iOS devices only) Free Winner of the Peoples Choice Award for the Department of Labor Worker Safety and Health App Challenge! Ergonomics is a complete mobile workplace health solution that offers ergo nomic equipment setup advice, a variety of workplace specific stretching exercises, and pro grammable reminders to help you time your breaks. It is a simple application with two goals: improving your workplace health and produc tivity by encouraging stretch breaks, and ensuring that all of your workplace equipment is set up ergonomically for the times that you are sitting. Theres a stretch for that nal illustrations and instruc tions on how to properly posi between individual stretches or a group of stretches targeting timer is included to help you properly time your stretches. Game of adjusting thrones desk, chair, monitor, mouse, and keyboard for enhanced you a summary of the setup at mation supported by OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration). Gimme a break in and are designed to be nontomizable to fit into your indi vidual work schedule. OSHA Heat Safety Tool (iOS & Android devices) Free When youre working in the heat, safety comes first. With the OSHA Heat Safety Tool, you have vital safety information available whenever and wher ever you need it right on your mobile phone. The App allows workers and supervisors to calculate the heat index for their worksite, and, based on the heat index, displays a risk level to outdoor workers. Then, with a simple about the protective measures that should be taken at that risk level to protect workers from heat-related illness-reminders about drinking enough fluids, scheduling rest breaks, plan ning for and knowing what to do in an emergency, adjust ing work operations, gradually building up the workload for new workers, training on heat illness signs and symptoms, and monitoring each other for signs and symptoms of heatrelated illness. Stay informed and safe in the heat, check your risk level. USW Safety (iOS devices only) Free Winner of the Safety and Health Data Award for the Department of Labor Worker Safety and Health App Challenge! The USW Safety app is designed as an easy and acces sible chemical safety reference for workers. Search the New Jersey Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) database by chemi cal name, DOT number, CAS number to view the entire fact sheet. This includes informa tion on workplace exposure limits, health hazards, work place controls, personal protec tive equipment, handling and storage, and emergency infor mation. Flip through an electronic version of the NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards or search for a chemical by name in the index to view its prop erties, exposure limits, recom mended personal protective equipment and first aid. For workers who need more information, the final section of the app uses the locator fea ture to display contact infor mation for the nearest United Steelworkers district office and the OSHA district office. This app is NOT designed to replace SDS in the workplace.Smartphone, tablet apps can help in the workplace The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) announced Sept. 30 that Cmdr. James Oberman, otolaryngol ogy specialty leader, Consultant to the U.S. Navy Surgeon General, and one of three otolar yngologists assigned to Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville, as a recipi Physician Leadership Grant. In a letter from AAOHNSFs Development Coordinator Nikhil Bhatt, Oberman was applauded for distinguishing him self among the many nominees for its leader ship grant, and being one of three physicians selected for the $1,000 grant. have been selected for Leadership Grant, said ognition is a distinc tion that I am certainly proud of, as it exemplifies the American Academy of Otolaryngologys rec ognition of leadership among its military otolar yngologists. The grant consists of two travel stipends: $500 for the recipient to attend the 2013 Annual Meeting and Otolaryngology Exposition in Vancouver, British Columbia and $500 to attend a lead ership forum/Board of Governors meet ing in March 2014 in Alexandria, Va. The AAO-HNS Foundation works to advance education, research, and lifelong learning. The foundation pro vides unique opportuni ties for young otolaryn gologists to hone leader ship skills vital to becom ing not only leaders with in their communities, but also as the future leaders of this specialty.Hospital physician receives Young Physician Leadership Grant JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013 13

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Friday at 7 p.m. Oct. 18 Karaoke with Randy Oct. 25 Second Tyme Around Band Deweys Family Night 3rd Friday of the Month Deweys will be open for dinner & beverages Oct. 18 Balloon Artist Nov. 15 Karaoke with Tom Turner Dec. 20 Childrens Holiday Bingo Childrens Holiday Bingo will start at 1830 and has a cost of $10 per person and includes soft drinks, hot dog, dauber, bingo card and gift bag for each child. DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Youth Bowling League: Every Sat., 10:30 am noon $17 annually or $8 per week. Includes shoes, awards will be given at the end of the season! Rising Stars Youth League: Every Sat., 10:30 am 12:30 pm. Pee Wee Division (6 years & under) 2 games, $6 per week. Juniors Division (7 years & older) 3 games, $8 per week. Special Stars Bowling League for families with special needs children. All ages welcome! Ramps avail able for the non-ambulatory as well as bumpers for beginners. Runs for 10 weeks at a cost of $7 per week, shoes are included. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4 6 pm. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4 10 pm. Thursdays: Free bowling for Active Duty 11 am 1 pm. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4 6 pm, Party Extreme $10, 8 pm midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Oct. 19, 1 4 pm. $20 per person, registration begins at noon. Scratch Sweeper: Oct. 26, 1 4 pm. $30 entry fee, check in starts at noon. *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6 8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Learn to Swim Fall Sessions At the Indoor Pool Session 2 Oct 28 Nov 7 $40 military, $45 DOD Monster Dash 5K October 31 at 11:30 a.m. Perimeter Rd. / Antenna Farm Pre-register by October 18 Fourth Annual Zumba Party October 23, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Fitness Center Outdoor Pavilion Barktoberfest October 26, 9 a.m. Vet Treatment Facility Bldg. 537 Free 2 mile walk/run with the dogs!I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_ nas_mwritt@navy.mil Jacksonville Zoo Spooktacular $9. Universal Halloween Horror Nights: Sunday Thrusday $42.25, Friday $53, Saturday $74.25 Pandemic Haunted Attractions San Jose Blvd in Mandarin, tickets on sale at ITT! Haunting of School House 4 $18 Waves of Honor Special: Seaworld Orlando Adult $46.50, Child $42.25. Busch Gardens Tampa Adult $45, Child $40.50. Monster Jam: Club seating (includes pit pass) $42, regular seating (includes pit pass) $22. Jacksonville Jaguars: Section 147 Bud Zone, $70. Jags shuttle bus $12. Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2013 2014 Season: Tickets now available! MOSH: $7 $12. The Artist Series Broadway in Jax 2013 2014 Season: Tickets available now! Mamma Mia!: Oct. 19, 2013, 8 pm, $60.50. Celtic Thunder: Nov. 10, 2013, 7 pm, $80. Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus: Jan. 17 & 18, 2014, $51. War Horse: Feb. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $68.50. Memphis: Mar. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $65. Million Dollar Quartet: Apr. 26, 2014, 8 pm, $65. The D* Word: Oct. 4 Oct. 25, 2014, $43.75 $46. Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27,2014) 4 day Hopper ticket$166 4 day 1 park per day and water park ticket-$166 4 day Hopper and Water park combo ticket$194 Gatorbowl $35 Capital One Bowl $98 Russell Athletic Bowl $78 Soul Food Festival Special $20 General Admission $32 Preferred $42 VIP $65 Legoland Free admission for active duty at park Tickets for family members available at ITT ITT is now selling $18 tickets for the Harlem Globetrotters! The show is February 28, 7 pm at Veterans Memorial Arena.The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Kayak Trip October 19 at 9 a.m. Grill & Chill October 22 at 6 p.m. Free burgers and hotdogs Camping Trip October 26 & 27 $10 per personNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Oct. 22 for active duty Oct. 24 for retirees, DoD per sonnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holi days. Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Movie Under the Stars October 25 at 7 p.m. Featuring Monsters University Patriots GroveFlying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Call for schedule $500 per person 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013

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It was a beautiful, sunny autumn day for the Navys 238th Birthday 5k run as 219 run ners turned out to improve on their personal bests. The event was sponsored by the NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department. Placing first overall and first in the mens 35-39 age catego ry was Cmdr. Travis Bagwell of VP-10 with a time of 19:25. HMC Melissa Gomez of Naval Hospital Jacksonville took first in the womens 30-34 category and was the first female to cross the fin ish line with a time of 22:24.Other finishers were: Men 19 & Under First Jonathan Tucker, 29:29 Second Timothy Kidwell, 38:41 Women 19 & Under First Reyna Cruz, 27:20 Second Rebecca Harper, 28:30 Men 20-24 First Eric Harroun, 21:32 Second Lane Reynolds, 23:36 Women 20-24 First Chantel Nezbeth, 26:46 Second Kaila Delaney, 26:57 Men 25-29 First Luke Franco, 21:33 Second Richard Carter, 22:08 Women 25-29 First Brooke Tijerina, 25:05 Second Amanda Burns, 26:00 Men 30-34 First Marc Heskett, 21:21 Second Daniel Sears, 21:27 Women 30-34 Second Stephina Ravaioli, 23:54 Men 35-39 Second Gary Patterson, 20:56 Women 35-39 First Stephanie Edwards, 26:30 Second Lisa Brabazon, 27:12 Men 40-44 First Patrick Mitchell, 22:07 Second Jerry Skirvin, 23:54 Women 40-44 First Shannon Leonard, 32:52 Second Susan Stoltman, 34:03 Men 45-49 First Billy Puban, 27:01 Women 45-49 First Janie Senishin, 32:28 Men 50 & Over First Tom Kubalewski, 33:26 Second Alfred Wilson, 35:24 Women 50 & Over First Elisa Jacque, 33:41 Second Lorri Howard, 36:23 The next MWR-sponsored run will be the annual Monster Dash Oct. 31 at 11:30 a.m. For more information, call 542-3239/3518. For more information about any of the sports articles, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil. Visit the MWR website at www.cnic.navy.mil or www.facebook.com nasjaxmwr. The University of Georgia Bulldogs will take home field against the University of Florida Gators on Saturday, Nov. 2, at 3:30 p.m. at EverBank Field. The Florida-Georgia Football Classic has a strong tradition with deep roots here in Jacksonville, said Mayor Alvin Brown. This game draws countless people to the downtown area, show casing our city as a national destination for big-time sports events. We are proud to host this great rivalry, and we look forward to a great game and an unbeatable fan experience, all week long. The rivalry weekend will include the 18th Merrill Lynch/Bank of America Florida-Georgia Hall of Fame Luncheon Presented by Ruths Chris, RV City, the official Florida Georgia Tailgate Party, Touchdown Showdown and Adams Street Experience. Touchdown Showdown and the Adams Street Experience will cre ate the ultimate gameday fan experience with interactive games and displays, food and bev erage, commemorative merchandise, and two jumbo screens to show the game. There will be no alco hol sales in this area. The City of Jacksonville will host six Sideline Safety Zones (SSZ) in the sports complex and throughout downtown. The SSZ sites will pro vide free assistance rang ing from basic medical help, first aid, trans portation, directions, telephone service, food, water, coffee and more. All locations will be open on Friday and Saturday. Heavy traffic is expect ed on game day. Fans should prepare to utilize transportation alterna tives such as the JTA Park-n-Ride and stadium shuttle services. The Jacksonville Sheriffs Office Web site, www.jaxsheriff.org, and the official game Web site, www.flga.org will have regular updates on game day traffic and transportation. Navy Birthday 5k brings out runners City prepares for Florida-Georgia football game JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013 15

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electronic devices while driving and restrict them from carrying teenage passengers. Teenagers get into the most crashes the first six months after they have their license, so its important that they focus on driving and not get distracted by electronic devices, Harsha says. Texting while driving While driver distrac tions come in many forms, texting while driv ing is especially risky. It seems like common sense not to text while driving, but people are so connected to their electronic devices that they kind of forget them selves, Harsha says. According to research from the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute, texting while driving is associated with the high est risk of all cellphonerelated tasks. The research found that text messaging causes drivers to take their eyes off the road for 4.6 seconds over a six-second interval. That means at 55 miles per hour, a texting driver would travel the length of a football field without looking at the road. Remember texting or using hand-held cell phones is prohibited while driving aboard NAS Jacksonville and texting while driving is against the law in the state of Florida. TEXTING Mobile Tactical Operations Center Seven (MTOC-7), a unit of Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 based at NAS Jacksonville, recently trained with MTOC-Juliet personnel to prepare them for their operational read iness evaluation (ORE) prior to deploy ing to U.S. Central Command and the 5th Fleet area of responsibility. MTOCs are rapidly deployable mobile command and control, communica tions, computers and intelligence (C4I) units supporting the Navy Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force expe ditionary operations worldwide. Lt. Patrick Carraher, who drills at MTOC-Selfridge, Mich., said individual reservists from around the nation were training under MTOC-7 to prepare for their ORE taking place at the expedi tionary tent city set up on Allegheny Road at NAS Jacksonville. Wing 11 is hosting reserve Sailors from units in: San Diego; Whidbey Island, Washington; Manchester, New Hampshire; Puerto Rico and other sites, said Carraher. The Navy has two reserve MTOC units one designated MTOC-Juliet (at NAS Jacksonville) and the other MTOCWhiskey (at NAS Whidbey Island, Wash.) You wont find any P-8 gear here. Our job is to give active duty MTOC units time to transition to the P-8 by assuming their P-3 operational deploy ment. Lt. Matt Schell, officer in charge of MTOC-7, explained that his unit was on site to train the reservists of MTOCJuliet. MTOC-7 is fully certified but does not deploy until 2014. So were help ing the reservists of MTOC-Juliet pre pare for deployment. This is all MTOC-7 expeditionary gear (tents, antennas and all kinds of portable equipment). Our full crew is here to assist MTOC-Juliet in preparing for every aspect of their ORE and deployment from pre-flight and mission briefing to flight following and post-flight debriefing. Theyll be manning their operations control cen ter around the clock, said Schell. Lt. Cmdr. Marty Fredrickson, a reservist with MTOC-Juliet, reaffirmed that the focus and purpose of their reserve deployment is to gap-fill (six months) for an active duty MTOC. Its all part of the Navys maritime patrol strategy, so they can efficiently transition their equipment and opera tions to support the new P-8A Poseidon. MTOC-7 has done a great job of training our people for this mission. During operations, MTOC personnel connect P-3 aircrews to the Internet for preflight mission planning, to include commanders tasking, radio frequencies and environmental data. While airborne, P-3C aircrews rely heavily on the critical communications paths provided by the MTOC for bidirectional flow of tasking and opera tional information. When a flight is over, MTOC mem bers utilize their specialized equipment to download data from the aircraft for analysis and quickly disseminate it to commanders. MTOC-Juliet has synchronized its Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle (IDRC) with that of the VP-8 Fighting Tigers. After MTOC-Juliet completes its sixmonth deployment supporting P-3 Orions in the 5th Fleet AOR, the reserv ists will disband and return to their naval reserve units. Reservists train with MTOC-7 to meet readiness requirements 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 17, 2013 17 Training specialists from the Center for Service Support (CSS) and Naval Technical Training Center (NTTC) Meridian implemented the improved and modernized Yeoman (YN), Personnel Specialist (PS), Ships Serviceman (SH) and Logistics Specialist (LS) courses Oct. 10. The updated course blends computerbased training with traditional class room instruction to bring the course up-to-date and in step with the everchanging world of administration and logistics. As the work environment changes and evolves, so too must the training and the curriculum we use to train the fleets newest Sailors, said PSC(SW/AW) Roger Drumheller, PS rating manager. In developing curriculum, it is the responsibility of CSS and its learning sites to support the Navys forwarddeployed and widely distributed force by delivering Sailors who are already proficient in their future jobs, said Drumheller. This new course is designed to do just that. According to Colette Rupero, CSS cur riculum manager the Navy demands that Sailors be more technically profi cient and well-versed in all aspects of their jobs prior to joining their com mand. Graduates from these courses of instruction have a better understanding of the many technical elements of their ratings and will, as a result, be more efficient and effective members of the commands they join, said Rupero. The transition from computer based training (CBT) to a blended learn ing approach is a result of the Human Performance Requirements Review (HPRR) and feedback from the fleet. The feedback indicated that students would benefit more from interaction and guid ance with instructors. HPPRs are conducted every three years and are designed to revalidate individual training requirements and/ or identify new training requirements as they apply to a rating, grade, commu nity, course, systems configuration, or fleet operating procedure. They also provide stakeholders an opportunity to review existing train ing, identify redundant or unnecessary training, and ensure proper alignment of training based on new or revised requirements. Although the students use online courses, its no longer self-paced, said Recupero. Our courses are much more focused and our students learn to work together in a group. Mike Buechel, CSS learning standards officer said the courses incorporate syn chronous CBT which allow learners to interact with an instructor via the inter net or face to face as they go through the curriculum. This will allow our instructors to become more familiar with the mate rial they instruct, said Buechel. Our instructors will take more ownership of these classes and provide our new Sailors with guidance. Mentorship from seasoned Sailors who have already per formed the job in the fleet is a great ben efit. During synchronous CBT the instruc tor and students are all logged on at the same time, viewing the same content. The students can ask questions by rais ing their hands, via e-mail, a discussion board or chat room. Our courses will also streamline the street to fleet process, said Buechel. This new system allows our students to graduate together which will ease the order writing process which will result in a cost savings to the Navy. Fleet units will also receive their Sailors more quickly. We couldnt have done this without the support of Cmdr. Brett St. George, NTTC Meridian commanding officer or the NTTC military and civilian staff, said Buechel. Their teamwork and help have been remarkable. CSS and its learning sites provide Sailors with the knowledge and skills needed to support the fleets warfight ing mission. More than 300 staff and faculty work hand-in-hand with the fleet and are dedicated to ensure training is current and well executed on behalf of 10,000 Sailors who graduate from CSS courses annually in the administration, logistics and media communities.CSS revamps courses for logistics and administration ratings The Defense Department continues to assist service members and their families in preparing for the tran sition to civilian life with a new virtual curriculum, according to a Defense Department official. During a telephone interview with American Forces Press Service, Susan Kelly, director of the Transition to Veterans Program office, discussed the redesign of the Transition Assistance Program and its evolution to include the Transition GPS virtual curriculum on the Joint Knowledge Online portal, or JKO, which became available today. We recognize that many of our service members dont have access to brick and mortar classrooms for transition instruction Kelly said. The JKO portal is our effort to take all of the redesigned TAP curricu lum, which is called Transition GPS, ... and put it into an environment where they can access it whenever they need it from anywhere in the world. Service members, she said, can improve their job search skills, find out about Veterans Administration benefits, learn how to find and apply to a college or university that fits their goals, or how to start their own business by accessing the Transition GPS virtual curriculum. An essential part of the virtual curriculum capa bility, Kelly added, is to support the ability to meet career readiness standards published by the Defense Department. Those career readiness standards extend all the way from registering in VAs e-Benefits so theyre connected to the Veterans Affairs family immediately, all the way to career readiness standards for employ ment, where service members have to develop a job application packet, resume, personal and professional references as well as job applications, she said. Those standards also include a completed applica tion for institutions of higher learning or technical institutions if service members are planning to go to college or receive a certification using the Post 9/11 GI Bill, Kelly said. Theres a whole expanse of career readiness stan dards that the military members must meet before they separate, she said. The Transition GPS curricu lum has modules that build the skills for the service members to meet each one of those career readiness standards. The ultimate goal is for the service members to determine what their personal goals are when they enter civilian life and to posture them well to be suc cessful in pursuing those goals, Kelly said. The goal of the entire TAP redesign is to get mili tary members career-ready for their civilian lives and to help them do very, very deliberate planning for both themselves and their families to do well as they become civilians, she added. The best way for a service member to begin this process is to contact the transition assistance program staff on their installation, Kelly said. Soldiers should contact the Army Career Alumni Program, sailors and Marines can use fleet and family support centers, and airmen can begin this process at their nearest airmen and family readiness center. Thats the first entry point for them to get sched uled for classes, Kelly said. For those who are geo graphically separated or isolated from installations, she added, the virtual curriculum is there for them on the JKO website. Kelly also noted its important that this virtual cur riculum is being hosted on the JKO portal. Thats where service members go for military train ing now in the joint world, she said. So we are put ting transition preparation training into that military training platform. The virtual curriculum is a major accomplish ment in the TAP redesign according to Kelly. Its the first time that the Veterans Employment Initiative Task Force, as an interagency partnership that includes the DOD and the Veterans Affairs, Labor and Education departments, as well as the Small Business Administration and the Office of Personnel Management, has developed and hosted a complete curriculum for service members on one website. Kelly noted that the virtual curriculum can also be used by service members who are exploring their options as they think about continuing in the military or transitioning out. You dont have to be enrolled in the TAP class to use this website, she said. Any service member can log in and use it, even years before they make the deci sion to transition to civilian life. Preparing for separation is a part of any service members military career, Kelly said. You want to align what youre gaining out of mili tary training and experience with what you want to do as a civilian when you separate, she added. New virtual curriculum assists separating troopswith disabilities, including disabled veterans. And thanks to the Affordable Care Act, states are taking advantage of new options to support and expand home and community-based services. In the years to come, I will remain committed to ensuring the federal government leads by example. This year, as we mark the 40th anniversary of the Rehabilitation Act, I will continue to marshal the full resources of my administration toward effec tive and comprehensive implementation. If we swing wide the doors of opportunity for our family, friends, and neighbors with disabilities, all of us will enjoy the benefits of their professional contributions. This month, let us uphold the ideals of equal access, equal opportunity, and a level play ing field for all Americans. NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim October 2013 as National Disability Employment Awareness Month. I urge all Americans to embrace the talents and skills that individuals with disabilities bring to our workplaces and communi ties and to promote the right to equal employment opportunity for all people. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth day of September, in the year of our Lord two thousand thirteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-eighth. Barack Obama President of the United States of America DISABILITY The Navy Ball Committee and VyStar Credit Union are non-federal entities operated and controlled by individuals acting in their private capacities. They are not a part of the U.S. Department of Defense or any of its components and have no governmental sta tus.

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AIR, SURF A CE A ND SUBM A RINE A SA LUTE TO OUR NA VY AN D ALL WHO HA VE SERVED FE A TURING NA VY BIRTHD A YMA RINE S BIRTHD A Y VETER A N S DA Y AND MILIT A RY FA MILY APPRECI A TION MONTH PUBLI S HED BY

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 3 On Friday, October 13, 1775, meet ing in Philadelphia, the Continental Congress voted to fit out two sailing vessels, armed with ten carriage guns, as well as swivel guns, and manned by crews of eighty, and to send them out on a cruise of three months to inter cept transports carrying munitions and stores to the British army in America. This was the original legislation out of which the Continental Navy grew and as such constitutes the birth certificate of the navy. To understand the momentous sig nificance of the decision to send two armed vessels to sea under the author ity of the Continental Congress, we need to review the strategic situation in which it was made and to consider the political struggle that lay behind it. Americans first took up arms in the spring of 1775, not to sever their rela tionship with the king, but to defend their rights within the British Empire. By the autumn of 1775, the British North American colonies from Maine to Georgia were in open rebellion. Royal governments had been thrust out of many colonial capitals and revolution ary governments put in their places. The Continental Congress had assumed some of the responsibilities of a cen tral government for the colonies, cre ated a Continental Army, issued paper money for the support of the troops, and formed a committee to negotiate with foreign countries. Continental forces captured Fort Ticonderoga on Lake Champlain and launched an invasion of Canada. In October 1775 the British held supe riority at sea, from which they threat ened to stop up the colonies' trade and to wreak destruction on seaside settlements. In response, a few of the states had commissioned small fleets of their own for defense of local waters. Congress had not yet authorized pri vateering. Some in Congress worried about pushing the armed struggle too far, hoping that reconciliation with the mother country was still possible. Yet, a small coterie of men in Congress had been advocating a Continental Navy from the out set of armed hostilities. Foremost among these men was John Adams, of Massachusetts. For months, he and a few others had been agitating in Congress for the establishment of an American fleet. They argued that a fleet would defend the seacoast towns, protect vital trade, retaliate against British raiders, and make it possible to seek out among neu tral nations of the world the arms and stores that would make resistance pos sible. Still, the establishment of a navy seemed too bold a move for some of the timid men in Congress. Some southern ers agreed that a fleet would protect and secure the trade of New England but denied that it would do so in the south ern colonies. Most of the delegates did not consid er the break with England as final and feared that a navy implied sovereignty and independence. Others thought a navy a hasty and foolish challenge to the mightiest fleet the world had seen. The most the pro-navy men could do was to get Congress to urge each colony to fit out armed vessels for the protec tion of their coasts and harbors. Then, on 3 October, Rhode Island's delegates laid before Congress a bold resolution for the building and equip ping of an American fleet, as soon as possible. When the motion came to the floor for debate, Samuel Chase, of Maryland, attacked it, saying it was "the maddest Idea in the World to think of building an American Fleet." Even pro-navy mem bers found the proposal too vague. It lacked specifics and no one could tell how much it would cost. If Congress was yet unwilling to embrace the idea of establishing a navy as a permanent measure, it could be tempted by short-term opportunities. Fortuitously, on 5 October, Congress received intelligence of two English brigs, unarmed and without convoy, laden with munitions, leaving England bound for Quebec. Congress immediately appointed a committee to consider how to take advantage of this opportunity. Its mem bers were all New Englanders and all ardent supporters of a navy. They rec ommended first that the governments of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut be asked to dispatch armed vessels to lay in wait to intercept the munitions ships; next they outlined a plan for the equipping by Congress of two armed vessels to cruise to the eastward to intercept any ships bearing supplies to the British army. Congress let this plan lie on the table until 13 October, when another for tuitous event occurred in favor of the naval movement. A letter from General Washington was read in Congress in which he reported that he had taken under his command, at Continental expense, three schooners to cruise off Massachusetts to intercept enemy sup ply ships. The commander in chief had preempted members of Congress reluc tant to take the first step of fitting out warships under Continental authority. Since they already had armed vessels cruising in their name, it was not such a big step to approve two more. The com mittee's proposal, now appearing emi nently reasonable to the reluctant mem bers, was adopted. The Continental Navy grew into an important force. Within a few days, Congress established a Naval Committee charged with equipping a fleet. This committee directed the pur chasing, outfitting, manning, and oper ations of the first ships of the new navy, drafted subsequent naval legislation, and prepared rules and regulations to govern the Continental Navy's conduct and internal administration. Over the course of the War of Independence, the Continental Navy sent to sea more than fifty armed ves sels of various types. The navy's squad rons and cruisers seized enemy sup plies and carried correspondence and diplomats to Europe, returning with needed munitions. They took nearly 200 British vessels as prizes, some off the British Isles themselves, contributing to the demoralization of the enemy and forcing the British to divert warships to protect convoys and trade routes. In addition, the navy provoked dip lomatic crises that helped bring France into the war against Great Britain. The Continental Navy began the proud tra dition carried on today by our United States Navy, and whose birthday we cel ebrate each year in October.~ history.navy.mil Establishment of the Navy, October 13, 1775This resolution of the Continental Congress marked the establishment of what is now the United States Navy. "Resolved, That a swift sailing vessel, to carry ten carriage guns, and a proportionable number of swivels, with eighty men, be fitted, with all possible despatch, for a cruise of three months, and that the commander be instructed to cruize eastward, for intercepting such transports as may be laden with warlike stores and other supplies for our enemies, and for such other purposes as the Congress shall direct. That a Committee of three be appointed to pre pare an estimate of the expence, and lay the same before the Congress, and to contract with proper persons to fit out the vessel. Resolved, that another vessel be fitted out for the same purposes, and that the said committee report their opinion of a proper vessel, and also an esti mate of the expence."Source: Journal of the Continental Congress, 13 October 1775, in William Bell Clark, editor, Naval Documents of the American Revolution, Vol. 2, (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1966): 442. Establishment of the Department of the Navy, April 30, 1798This act established the Department of the Navy as a separate cabinet department. Previously, naval mat ters were under the cognizance of the War Department. AN ACT (Chapter 35, Vol. I, page 553) to establish an executive department to be denominated the depart ment of the navy. SEC. 1. Be it enacted, &c., That there shall be an Executive Department under the denomination of the Department of the Navy, the chief officer of which shall he called the Secretary of the Navy, whose duty it shall be to execute such orders as he shall receive from the President of the United States, relative to the procurement of naval stores and materials, and the construction, armament, equipment, and employment of vessels of war, as well as all other matters connected with the naval establishment of the United States. SEC. 2. And be it further enacted, That a principal clerk, and such other clerks as he shall think necessary, shall be appointed by the Secretary of the Navy, who shall be employed in such manner as he shall deem most expedient. In case of vacancy in the office of the Secretary, by removal or otherwise, it shall be the duty of the principal clerk to take the charge and custody of all the books, records, and documents of the said office. SEC. 3. And be it further enacted, That the Secretary of the Navy be, and he is hereby, authorized and empowered, immediately after he shall be appointed, and shall enter upon the duties of his office, to take pos session of all the records, books, and documents, and all other matters and things appertaining to this depart ment, which are now deposited in the office of the Secretary of War. SEC. 4. And be it further enacted, That there shall be allowed to the Secretary of the Navy an annual salary of three thousand dollars, payable quarter yearly at the Treasury of the United States; and the respective clerks in the office of the said department shall receive the same compensation, and be subject to the same regula tions, as are provided by an act, supplemental to the act establishing the Treasury Department, and for a fur ther compensation to certain officers in the offices of the other executive departments. SEC. 5. And be it further enacted, That so much of an act, Entitled "An act to establish an executive depart ment, to be denominated the department of war,'' as vests any of the powers contemplated by the provisions of this act in the Secretary for the Department of War, shall be repealed, from and after the period when the Secretary of the Navy shall enter on the duties of his office.Approved, April 30, 1798. Air, Surface and Submarine: A salute to our Navy and all who have served is a spe cial advertising section produced by the Military Publications department of The Florida TimesUnion. The section was coordinated and edited by Military Publications Publisher Ellen Rykert. The section was designed by Military Publications designer George Atchley. Advertising was coor dinated by Military Publications Publisher Ellen Rykert and Administrative Assistant Katie Cooper, and facilitated by Pam Browning and LeAnn Hirschman. Material, information and photo graphs used in this section was provided by Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Naval Station Mayport, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay, the U.S. Navy, and the U.S. Marine Corps, unless otherwise credited.

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Resolution of the Continental Congress establishing the Marine Corps November 10, 1775This resolution of the Continental Congress marked the establishment of what is now the United States Marine Corps. "Resolved, That two Battalions of marines be raised, consisting of one Colonel, two Lieutenant Colonels, two Majors, and other officers as usual in other regiments; and that they consist of an equal number of privates with other battalions; that particular care be taken, that no persons be appointed to office, or inlist ed into said Battalions, but such as are good seamen, or so acquainted with maritime affairs as to be able to serve to advantage by sea when required: that they be inlisted and commis sioned to serve for and during the present war between Great Britain and the colonies, unless dismissed by order of Congress: that they be dis tinguished by the names of the first and second battalions of American Marines, and that they be considered part of the number which the con tinental Army before Boston is ordered to consist of." Reestablishment of the Marine Corps July 11, 1798An Act for the establishing and organizing a Marine Corps. Section 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That in addition to the present military establishment, there shall be raised and organized a corps of marines, which shall consist of one major, four captains, sixteen first lieutenants, twelve second lieutenants, fortyeight sergeants, forty-eight corporals, thirty-two drums and fifes, and seven hundred and twenty privates, including the marines who have been enlisted, or are authorized to be raised for the naval armament; and the said corps may be formed into as many companies or detachments, as the President of the United States shall direct, with a proper distri bution of the commissioned and non-commissioned officers and musicians to each company or detachment. Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That the pay and subsisteuce of the said officers, privates and musicians, shall be as follows, to wit: To a major, fifty dollars per month, and four rations per day; to a captain, forty dollars per mouth, aud three rations per day; to a first lieutenant, thirty dollars per mouth, and three rations per day; to a second lieu tenant, twenty-five dollars per month, and two rations per day; and to the nom-commissioned officers, privates and musicians, conformably to the act, intituled "An act providing a naval armament," as shall be fixed by the President of the United States: And the President of the United States shall be, and is hereby authorized to continue the enlistment of marines, until the said corps shall be complete; and of himself, to Appoint the commissioned officers, whenever, in the recess of the Senate, an appointment shall be necessary. And the enlistments, which shall be made by virtue hereof, may be for the term of three years, subject to be discharged by the President of the United States, or by the ceasing or repeal of the laws providing for the naval armament. And if the marine corps, or any part of it, shall be ordered by the President to do duty on shore, aud it shall become necessary to appoint an adjutant, paymaster, quartermaster, sergeant-major, quartermaster-sergeant, and drum and fife-major, or any of them, the major or commandant of the corps, is hereby authorized to appoint such staff officer or officers, from the line of subalterns, sergeants and music, respectively, who shall be entitled, during the time they shall dosuch duty, to the same extra pay and emoluments, which are allowed by law, to officers acting in the same capacities in the infantry. Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That the detachments of the corps of marines hereby authorized, shall be made in lieu of the respective quotas of marines, which have been established or authorized for the frigates, and other armed vessels and gallies, which shall be employed in the service of the United States: And the President of the United States may detach and appoint such of the officers of this marine corps, to act on board the frigates, and any of the armed vessels of the United States, respectively, as he shall, from time to time, judge necessary; any thing in the act "providing a naval armament" to the contrary hereof notwithstanding. Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That the officers, non-commissioned officers, privates and musicians aforesaid, shall take the same oath, and shall be governed by the same rules and articles of war, as are prescribed for the military establishment of the United States, and by the rules for the regulation of the navy, heretofore, or which shall be estab lished by law, according to the nature of the service in which they shall be employed, and shall be entitled to the same allowance, in case of wounds or disabilities, according to their respective ranks, as are granted by the act "to ascertain and fix the military establishment of the United States." Sec. 5. And be it further enacted, That the non-commissioned officers, musicians, seamen and marines, who are or shall be enlisted into the service of the United States; and the non-commissioned officers and musicians, who are or shall be enlisted into the army of the United States, shall be, and they are hereby exempted, during their term of ser vice, from all personal arrests for any debt or contract. Sec. 6. And be it further enacted, That the marine corps, established by this act, shall, at any time, be liable to do duty in the forts and garrisons of the United States, on the sea-coast, or any other duty on shore, as the President, at his discretion, shall direct. Approved, July 11, 1798.During the American Revolution, the Continental Congress passes a resolution stating that two Battalions of Marines be raised for ser vice as landing forces for the recently formed Continental Navy. The resolution, drafted by future U.S. president John Adams and adopt ed in Philadelphia, created the Continental Marines and is now observed as the birth date of the United States Marine Corps. Serving on land and at sea, the original U.S. Marines distinguished themselves in a number of important operations during the Revolutionary War. The first Marine landing on a hostile shore occurred when a force of Marines under Captain Samuel Nicholas captured New Province Island in the Bahamas from the British in March 1776. Nicholas was the first commissioned offi cer in the Continental Marines and is cel ebrated as the first Marine commandant. After American independence was achieved in 1783, the Continental Navy was demobilized and its Marines disbanded. In the next decade, however, increasing con flict at sea with Revolutionary France led the U.S. Congress to establish formally the U.S. Navy in May 1798. Two months later, on July 11, President John Adams signed the bill establishing the U.S. Marine Corps as a permanent military force under the jurisdiction of the Department of Navy. U.S. Marines saw action in the so-called QuasiWar with France and then fought against the Barbary pirates of North Africa during the first years of the 19th century. Since then, Marines have participated in all the wars of the United States and in most cases were the first sol diers to fight. In all, Marines have executed more than 300 landings on foreign shores. Today, there are more than 200,000 activeduty and reserve Marines, divided into three divisions stationed at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina; Camp Pendleton, California; and Okinawa, Japan. Each division has one or more expeditionary units, ready to launch major operations anywhere in the world on two weeks notice. Marines expeditionary units are self-sufficient, with their own tanks, artillery, and air forces. The motto of the service is Semper Fidelis, meaning Always Faithful in Latin.~ history.com Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 5

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6 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013 World War I known at the time as The Great War offi cially ended when the Treaty of Versailles was signed on June 28, 1919, in the Palace of Versailles outside the town of Versailles, France. However, fighting ceased seven months earlier when an armistice, or temporary cessation of hos tilities, between the Allied nations and Germany went into effect on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the elev enth month. For that reason, November 11, 1918, is generally regarded as the end of the war to end all wars. Soldiers of the 353rd Infantry near a church at Stenay, Meuse in France, wait for the end of hostilities. This photo was taken at 10:58 a.m., on November 11, 1918, two min utes before the armistice end ing World War I went into effect In November 1919, President Wilson proclaimed November 11 as the first commemoration of Armistice Day with the fol lowing words: "To us in America, the reflec tions of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the countrys service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations" The original concept for the celebration was for a day observed with parades and public meetings and a brief suspension of business begin ning at 11:00 a.m. The United States Congress officially recognized the end of World War I when it passed a concurrent resolution on June 4, 1926, with these words: Whereas the 11th of November 1918, marked the ces sation of the most destructive, sanguinary, and far reaching war in human annals and the resumption by the people of the United States of peaceful rela tions with other nations, which we hope may never again be severed, and Whereas it is fitting that the recurring anniversary of this date should be commemorated with thanksgiving and prayer and exercises designed to per petuate peace through good will and mutual understanding between nations; and Whereas the legislatures of twenty-seven of our States have already declared November 11 to be a legal holiday: Therefore be it Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives con curring), that the President of the United States is requested to issue a proclamation call ing upon the officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on November 11 and inviting the people of the United States to observe the day in schools and churches, or other suitable plac es, with appropriate ceremonies of friendly relations with all other peoples. An Act (52 Stat. 351; 5 U. S. Code, Sec. 87a) approved May 13, 1938, made the 11th of November in each year a legal holidaya day to be dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be thereafter celebrated and known as "Armistice Day." Armistice Day was primarily a day set aside to honor veter ans of World War I, but in 1954, after World War II had required the greatest mobilization of soldiers, sailors, Marines and airmen in the Nations histo ry; after American forces had fought aggression in Korea, the 83rd Congress, at the urging of the veterans service orga nizations, amended the Act of 1938 by striking out the word "Armistice" and inserting in its place the word "Veterans." With the approval of this legis lation (Public Law 380) on June 1, 1954, November 11th became a day to honor American veter ans of all wars. Later that same year, on October 8th, President Dwight D. Eisenhower issued the first "Veterans Day Proclamation" which stated: "In order to insure proper and widespread observance of this anniversary, all veterans, all veterans' organizations, and the entire citizenry will wish to join hands in the common pur pose. Toward this end, I am des ignating the Administrator of Veterans' Affairs as Chairman of a Veterans Day National Committee, which shall include such other persons as the Chairman may select, and which will coordinate at the national level necessary plan ning for the observance. I am also requesting the heads of all departments and agen cies of the Executive branch of the Government to assist the National Committee in every way possible." President Eisenhower signing HR7786, changing Armistice Day to Veterans Day. From left: Alvin J. King, Wayne Richards, Arthur J. Connell, John T. Nation, Edward Rees, Richard L. Trombla, Howard W. Watts On that same day, President Eisenhower sent a letter to the Honorable Harvey V. Higley, Administrator of Veterans' Affairs (VA), designating him as Chairman of the Veterans Day National Committee. In 1958, the White House advised VA's General Counsel that the 1954 designation of the VA Administrator as Chairman of the Veterans Day National Committee applied to all sub sequent VA Administrators. Since March 1989 when VA was elevated to a cabinet level department, the Secretary of Veterans Affairs has served as the committee's chairman. The Uniform Holiday Bill (Public Law 90-363 (82 Stat. 250)) was signed on June 28, 1968, and was intended to ensure three-day weekends for Federal employees by cel ebrating four national holidays on Mondays: Washington's Birthday, Memorial Day, Veterans Day, and Columbus Day. It was thought that these extended weekends would encourage travel, recreation al and cultural activities and stimulate greater industrial and commercial production. Many states did not agree with this decision and continued to celebrate the holidays on their original dates. The first Veterans Day under the new law was observed with much confusion on October 25, 1971. It was quite apparent that the commemoration of this day was a matter of historic and patriotic significance to a great number of our citizens, and so on September 20th, 1975, President Gerald R. Ford signed Public Law 94-97 (89 Stat. 479), which returned the annual observance of Veterans Day to its original date of November 11, beginning in 1978. This action supported the desires of the overwhelming majority of state legislatures, all major veterans service orga nizations and the American people. Veterans Day continues to be observed on November 11, regardless of what day of the week on which it falls. The res toration of the observance of Veterans Day to November 11 not only preserves the histori cal significance of the date, but helps focus attention on the important purpose of Veterans Day: A celebration to honor America's veterans for their patriotism, love of country, and willingness to serve and sacri fice for the common good.~ U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 7 Veterans Day, 1954 BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA A PROCLAMATION 3071Whereas it has long been our customs to commemorate November 11, the anniversary of the ending of World War I, by paying tribute to the heroes of that tragic struggle and by rededicating ourselves to the cause of peace; and Whereas in the intervening years the United States has been involved in two other great military conflicts, which have added millions of veterans living and dead to the honor rolls of this Nation; and Whereas the Congress passed a concurrent resolution on June 4, 1926 (44 Stat. 1982), calling for the observance of November 11 with appropriate ceremonies, and later provided in an act approved May 13, 1938 (52 Stat. 351) that the eleventh of November should be a legal holiday and should be known as Armistice Day; and Whereas, in order to expand the significance of that commemoration and in order that a grateful Nation might pay appropriate homage to the veterans of all its wars who have contributed so much to the preservation of this Nation, the Congress, by an act approved June 1, 1954 (68 Stat. 168), changed the name of the holiday to Veterans Day: Now, Therefore, I, Dwight D. Eisenhower, President of the United States of America, do hereby call upon all of our citizens to observe Thursday, November 11, 1954, as Veterans Day. On that day let us solemnly remember the sacrifices of all those who fought so valiantly, on the seas, in the air, and on foreign shores, to preserve our heritage of freedom, and let us reconsecrate ourselves to the task of promoting an enduring peace so that their efforts shall not have been in vain I also direct the appropriate officials of the Government to arrange for the display of the flag of the United States on all public buildings on Veterans Day. In order to insure proper and widespread observance of this anniversary, all veterans, all veterans' organizations, and the entire citizenry will wish to wish to join hands in the common purpose. Toward this end, I am designating the Administrator of Veterans' Affairs as Chairman of a Veterans Day National Committee, which shall include such other persons as the Chairman may select, and which will coordinate at the national level necessary planning for the observance. I am also requesting the heads of all departments and agencies of the Executive branch of the Government to assist the National Committee in every way possible. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and cause the all of the United States of America to be affixed. Done at the City of Washington this eighth day of October in the Year of our Lord nineteen hundred and fifty-four, and of the Independence of the (SEAL) United States of America the one hundred and seventy-ninth.DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER

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8 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013

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Sailors Creed I am a United States Sailor. I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States of America and I will obey the orders of those appointed over me. I represent the fighting spirit of the Navy and those who have gone before me to defend freedom and democracy around the world. I proudly serve my country's Navy combat team with Honor, Courage and Commitment. I am committed to excellence and the fair treatment of all. A heartfelt thank you to all advertisers who have taken part in this special Salute to our Navy and all who have served! Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 9

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Each year the President signs a proclamation declaring November Military Family Month. Last year President Obama said that our nation owes "each day of security and freedom that we enjoy to the members of our Armed Forces and their fami lies. Behind our brave service men and women, there are family members and loved ones who share in their sacrifice and provide unending support." This annual proclamation marks the beginning of a monthlong celebration of the Military Family in which the Department of Defense and the nation will honor the commitment and sacri fices made by the families of the nation's servicemembers. Armed Services YMCA Honors Military Families President Proclaims November as Military Family Month Understanding Sacrifices for Freedom Joining Forces Works to Support Military Families Why Appreciate Military Families? Throughout the month of November, military families serving around the world are honored through a variety of observances and recognized for their commitment and the many contribu tions they make every day in support of the military and our nation. Efforts to recognize the sacrifices of the military family by Active, Guard, and Reserve leaders are being joined and support ed by DoD organizations to include the Army Air Force Exchange Service, Defense Commissary Agency, and others. Community leaders, businesses, and military bases and posts are teaming up to recognize military families through special events such as: open houses, fun runs, family fun nights, and community dinners; discounts at MWR facilities, local business and sporting events; and special recognitions during community activities throughout the month of November.~ military.com 10 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013

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16 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013 Navys second P-8A Poseidon squadron begins IDRCThe VP-5 Mad Foxes received their certification from Patrol and Reconnaissance Group Aug. 2 as Safe for Flight in operating the P-8A Poseidon. This concludes nearly seven months of incredibly hard work by every Mad Fox that began on Jan. 4 with their tran sition process from the P-3C Orion to the P-8A. VP-5 has flown the P-3C since 1974. The Mad Foxes history of excellence in the P-3C includes locating pieces of the tragic Space Shuttle Challenger explosion, remaining on top of a sink ing Soviet Yankee Class submarine, support of Operations Desert Shield, Desert Storm, Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom and the first employ ment of an AGM-65F Maverick Missile from a maritime patrol aircraft during Operation Odyssey Dawn. This memorable P-3C history came to an end Dec. 4, 2012 as then VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Erin Osborne landed the squadrons final Orion flight at NAS Jacksonville after a successful 7th Fleet deployment. Safe for Flight was a Herculean accomplishment for 240 Mad Foxes, VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Matthew Pottenburgh told squadron personnel during the Aug. 1 command quarters. The work that began the day when Skipper Osborne landed our last P-3C Orion could not have been possible without the total effort of each and every Mad Fox. VP-5s Safe for Flight inspection was conducted by Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) -11 and began June 3 when the ordnance shop was inspected through a conventional weapons training proficiency inspec tion (CWTPI). Mad Fox ordnance men and women demonstrated proficiency to both safely upload and download ordinance to the P-8A over the course of the three-day inspection. Following CWTPI, Mad Fox aircrew completed five tactical flights in the Poseidon under the instruction of VP-30 instructor aircrew. These flights took VP-5 aircrew members from the Florida Keys to New Orleans to showcase their abilities operating this new aircraft. The month concluded with VP-5 naval flight offi cers, acoustic operators, and electronic warfare operators receiving their successful NATOPS evaluations from VP-30 instructors. The very last stage of Safe for Flight certification began on July 29 as CPRW11 kicked off a comprehensive inspection of every VP-5 maintenance pro gram, administrative instruction, safety program, and NATOPS program to name just a few. Following these intensive four days of drills and inspections, skipper Pottenburgh proudly announced to the assembled squadron that VP-5 was recommended as Safe for Flight by CPRW-11 to Patrol and Reconnaissance Group. Each and every Mad Fox is now focused on beginning the inter-deploy ment readiness cycle (IDRC) with their two new P-8A Poseidon aircraft, side numbers 436 and 437. VP-5 looks to exe cute safely and efficiently in prepara tion for its upcoming 7th Fleet deploy ment. The squadron continues to embody their motto: No Fox Like a Mad Fox! VP-5 certified Safe for Flight Proud Warriors MQ-4C Triton

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 17 A six-plane detachment of F/A-18A+ Hornets from Fighter Squadron Composite (VFC) 12, along with a fiveplane detachment operated by Airborne Tactical Advantage Company (ATAC), a two-plane detachment from L-3, and a two-plane detachment from Phoenix Air are operating from NAS Jacksonville to provide adversary threat training for the Harry S. Truman (CVN 72) Strike Group that is currently underway in the Atlantic for its Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX). Together, the aircraft from VFC-12 and contractor adver sary aircraft, represent a real istic hostile opposing force to sharpen the war fighting capa bilities of Navy expeditionary forces preparing for deploy ment. Cmdr. Jeff Menna, a pilot with VFC-12, explained that the Fighting Omars are the Naval Reserves premier adver sary squadron for providing threat tactics training to Navy strike fighter squadrons, Based at NAS Oceana in Virginia Beach, our main job is to provide tactical dissimilar air combat training for Navy, Marine Corps and other avia tion units. For COMPTUEX, we primarily oppose air strikes from the carrier air wing as they enter or leave the air space of Pinecastle Range Complex, said Menna. Our goal is to enable strike fighter aircrew to hone their warfighting skills against a creditable adversary prior to deploying in the face of real threats. In late 2012, VFC-12 began their transition from the blue camouflage F/A-18C Hornet that they flew for seven years to the upgraded F/A-18A+ Hornet painted in the bold SU-35 Flanker Arctic Splinter camouflage. The unique challenges inherent to the squadrons mission make the Fighting Omars one of the Navys most sought after avia tion duty assignments. ATAC pilot Rob DeStasio said, According to daily task ing from Commander, Strike Force Training Atlantic (CSFTA), ATAC aircraft pres ent a variety of threat profiles either against Carrier Air Wing-3, surface ships in the strike group, or both. We may also fly joint mis sions against the strike group with Hornets from VFC-12 or Lear jets from L-3, said DeStasio. L-3 has provided the Navy with COMPTUEX adversary support for a number of years, explained Jim Bailey. Our Lear jets deliver threat simulations for ship attacks, as well as tow ing aerial targets for ships and fighter aircraft. Local residents are spared much of the ear-throbbing noise produced when Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) conducts out-of-air frame testing to certify the reli ability and performance of gas turbine engines repaired at the facility. Annexed at the far end of NAS Jacksonville along the St Johns River, the Richard Kemen Engine Test Facility is acoustically treated and aerodynamically designed to reduce the powerful sound waves generated by jet engine combustion during testing. The walls around the con crete test chamber are 18 inch es thick, said Mark Stogdon, an electronics engineer work ing at the testing facility. We used to test engines outside in the late 60s, but the sound carried right across the river. Testing inside is easier, and acoustics are contained. It is considerably safer. Stogdon said about 140 engines are tested at FRCSE each year, and Kemen is the Navys only depot engine test facility still in use. He said in the heyday back in the 1970s, six facilities were to be built, but only one other was con structed at the military depot in Norfolk, Va. It was torn down years later following the depot closures in the mid-1990s according to Stogdon. In the engine preparation area, a monorail system allows technicians to suspend each jet engine until it is rolled into a test chamber, an enormous room measuring about 90-feet long, 20-feet wide and 30-feet high. The monorail improves workflow and ensures opti mum efficiency, safety and ease of use for the technicians. Seated in the control room behind two inches of bullet proof glass, test cell opera tors put a variety of off-wing engines through their entire operating range to simulate the engines flight mission. The largest being the F414-GE-400 turbofan engine with 22,000 pounds of static thrust. The F/A-18 Super Hornet and the EA-18G Growler tactical air craft are each powered by two of these engines. The test cell is designed with special air intake baffles for optimal air flow and exhaust to ensure engine performance consistency and to suppress noise to Occupational Safety and Health Administration acceptable levels. An exhaust collector and transfer tube, exhaust diffuser, exhaust ple num and exhaust stack with baffles aid in reducing heat and vibration from engine exhaust during testing. We are not noisy, said Curtis Kimbler, the former test engine supervisor who now serves as the TF34 engine supervisor. It is one of the most people-friendly test cells around. We have testing capa bility for the J52, TF34, F414 and the F404 engine. The Richard Kemen Engine Test Facility was dedicated in 1978 and underwent a major upgrade in 2011. Special aircraft test carrier strike group defenses Fleet Readiness Center Southeast tests jet engines, reduces noise pollution

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18 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013 A message from the Commanding Officer, Naval Station Mayport Established since 1942, Naval Station Mayport has grown to become the third largest fleet concentration in the United States. The unique operational compo sition of the naval installation includes a harbor capable of accommodat ing 34 ships and an 8,000-foot runway capable of handling any aircraft in the Department of Defense inventory. NS Mayport is home to more than 83 tenant commands, including 16 naval ships, USCG Valiant (WMEC 621), 4 helicopter squadrons and Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ Commander, U.S. Fourth Fleet. The mission of Naval Station Mayport is to enhance and sustain the opera tional readiness of its tenant commands and provide unparalleled support to its families. The vision of the command is to be recognized as the leader of shore installations in the Navy and a model facility that employs a premier work force always seeking to provide the fin est service to the fleet, family and com munity. Over the past year, the base has worked towards its mission by under taking vast energy conservation mea sures, completing a state of the art fit ness center to enhance the physical readiness of Sailors and implementing housing improvements to enrich the quality of life. NS Mayport improvements have saved the U.S. Navy nearly $10 million while still providing the fleet with premium services. These improvements not only positively impacts NS Mayport Sailors, but those soon to arrive with USS New York (LPD 21), USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) and USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43.) Mayport is also currently adding three patrol coastal ships to the basin, USS Shamal arrived in October, followed shortly by USS Tornado and USS Zephyr. The base has provided support for 532 Navy ship movements, including 16 homeported vessels, 137 U.S. Coast guard ship movements and 110 foreign and commercial visiting ships. NS Mayport: Enhance and sustain operational readiness

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 19 Darkness wont stop a bullet. Drug runners in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico are finding out the hard way that U.S. Navy helicopters can not only hunt them at night, but now their U.S. Coast Guard precision marks men can use force to stop drug boats 24-hours-a-day. Last year, Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron Light Six Zero (HSL-60), a Navy Reserve squadron from Naval Station Mayport, Fla., became the first Naval unit authorized for nighttime use of force against drug boats. As they prepare for their next deployments, they expect this powerful new tool will increase their effectiveness in the coun ter-narcotics mission. For several years, the Navy helicopters in the U.S. Fourth Fleet area of respon sibility (the Caribbean, and Atlantic and Pacific Oceans around Central and South America) have had Coast Guard precision marksmen aboard who are authorized to fire disabling shots at drug boats. Its a law enforcement action so there are many legal aspects we have to com ply with, said Lt. Cmdr. Cedric Patmon of HSL-60. That is why it is a Coast Guard member who ultimately fires the shots. When we find a suspected drug boat that meets the criteria for interdiction, authority over the helicopter is trans ferred to the regional Coast Guard com mander, Patmon continued. We hail the boat on the radio advising them to stop for inspection. If they do not respond to radio calls, we have a large sign that we use to visually request their cooperation. If the boat still doesnt stop, our Coast Guard marksman fires warning shots. Finally, the shooter will fire disabling shots at the boats engine. The Coast Guard precision marksmen are a small group of less than two dozen law enforcement members who have been selected for the precision marks manship school. They use the M-107 semi-automatic rifle, firing the same .50 caliber round as the M-2 machine gun, to disable the drug boats. While the M-107 rifle is accurate at more than 1,000 yards on land, these shots are taken at much closer range. Delivering more than 10,000 foot pounds of muzzle energy, this rifle and cartridge combination can read ily pierce the hull of fiberglass, wood or metal drug boats. We try to get well inside 200 yards, said one of the Coast Guard shooters. We dont want to cause any harm to personnel aboard the boats. The shooters do not fire at anyone aboard the boat, only at the engine. After the suspected drug boat has stopped, of its own accord or because of disabling fire, our ship will launch a RHIB (rigid hull inflatable boat) with a Coast Guard law enforcement team to conduct VBSS (visit board search and seizure), said Patmon. Once aboard the suspect vessel, the law enforcement team will seize the drugs and take the smugglers into custody. This new program has paid off for HSL-60, with several night time busts. Last year on deployment, we cap tured $1 billion in illegal drugs headed for the United States, said Cmdr. Oscar Toledo, HSL-60s executive officer. It was no simple task, becoming the first Navy unit to have authority for night time use of force. We started in 2010, to get ready for the 2012 deployment, said Toledo. We had to configure our aircraft and put our crews through extensive training before we got Coast Guard approval for this program. One of our first challenges was the night vision, Toledo continued. We needed a heads up display (HUD) inside the goggles. Flying with night vision at 80 to 100 feet over water, while creeping along at less than 30 knots is extremely difficult. Night vision limits peripheral vision and depth perception. Because the HUD displays altitude, attitude, air speed, and other critical flight param eters, allows our pilots to look where they were flying instead of turning their heads constantly to look at the instru ment panel. This increased safety and provided a steadier platform for the Coast Guard marksmen to shoot from, but it takes practice. We did a lot of training for these mis sions, said Toledo. One of our biggest challenges as a Reserve squadron is coordinating our training days with the civilian work schedules of our Reserve aircrew members. Its pretty exciting for a Reserve squadron like the HSL-60 Jaguars, to lead the way with this new program. We had a lot of lessons learned that the fleet can incorporate as more units begin fly ing these missions. Toledo concluded, All of our guys made the sacrifices of their personal time to fly extra days and to be here when necessary. Our maintainers stepped up and kept our aircraft run ning under the increased load and did what was necessary to incorporate the new technology into the aircraft in order to meet our mission. Id say $1 billion in dope off the street is mission accom plished. HSL-60 Jaguars use nighttime force against drug runners

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20 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013 With minimal investment and some impressive Afloat Training Group (ATG) Mayport Sailor inge nuity, a much more effective training tool has been brought to the Fleet. What started as a vision for a better training aid for surface Navigation teams, sparked two Chief Petty Officers from Afloat Training Group Mayport to implement the new team trainer course Mariner Skills Net (MSN). Identifying the need to have an integrated navi gation team training tool, Chief Quartermaster Cunningham and Chief Quartermaster Holder of ATG teamed up with Paul Gibbs of CSCS and Edmar Obenza of NAVAIR to develop the new course. MSN is an effective way to train the surface ships navigation teams. The program is a cost effective, all inclusive simulator for navigation training. It allows officers and enlisted to train together on a dynamic problem. MSN is able to provide refresher training to ships without ever leaving the basin. CSCS provided classrooms to house the new course. NAVAIR provided the computers used for the simula tion. This is a way to integrate the entire navigation team on the bridge, in combat, working on the same dynamic problem, real time, pulling into or out of any port, in any type of weather, day or night all while the ship is in the yard period, Holder said. Just as the aviators have complex flight simulators, the MSN software provides a similar opportunity to the Surface Navy side. Sailors can hone the skills nec essary to ensure the safe navigation of the ship. Another benefit of the MSN course is the cost. ATG Mayport created the whole system for just $2,000. Cunningham, Holder, and Gibbs were able to use existing software and hardware to create the course. They interfaced the existing equipment and inno vated an integrated full bridge and CIC simulator. The $2,000 was spent to purchase a computer, Voyage Management System (VMS) licenses, sound cards, headsets, and reformat existing computers to com plete networked watch stations. This [course] will pay for itself by lessening the amount of underway times necessary to effectively train the bridge team in navigation and ship han dling, Cunningham said. The training is not only cost effective, but it is also receiving ample praise from those who experience the MSN course first hand. USS Taylors Navigation team got to use the system first hand during a recent train ing class at ATG. The training we are now receiving through MSN is far superior to the previous method, said Quartermaster 2nd Class Pierce of USS Taylor. As opposed to individual training, MSN allows the OOD [Officer of the Deck], Conning Officer, QMs, and OSs to train together, allowing for much more realistic training. MSN has the ability for the training to match the experience level of those at the controls. An entire new bridge team to a group of seasoned Sailors can benefit from the course, Cunningham. Training can also be given to VMS and non VMS capable ships. VMS is the Navys version of GPS. The MSN curriculum serves as 1.2/ 1.3 A for MOB-N, enables PQS items to be signed off, and is even able to fully qualify a lookout without ever getting underway. The MSN course simulates relative motion, which means the bearings, tide, and currents are constantly changing, added Operations Specialist 2nd Class Harris of USS Taylor. That definitely shows us where we lacked and where we didnt lack. The ships Navigation team also commented on how shooting an actual bearing at an actual target with the MSN simulation was exponentially better than read ing it off of a paper and applying it just to charts. Currently, 18 real world ports can be simulated in the trainer with the option to add any port to the sys tem with a request 90 days prior to the training date. Cunningham and Holder were awarded Navy Achievement Medals by the command for their actions. This course is provided at Building 1556 CSCS in the VMS Operator classroom. For more information or to schedule a class contact ATG Mayport at 904-270-6344 ext. 3044. Mariner Skills Net an effective, efficient form of navigation team training Budget cuts have reduced Department of Navy spending across the board. Ship deployments have been cancelled and aircraft flying hours have been reduced. This is where U.S. 4th Fleet has turned to innovative ways to continue the fleets important mission. 4th Fleets current missions include security cooperation activities, con tingency operations, and the domi nant mission of maritime security operations. 4th Fleet accomplishes this through Counter Transnational Organized Crime (C-TOC) mission. The illegal transportation of illicit cargo to the U.S. and abroad functions as the greatest means these organiza tions make money and influence and destabilize the region. 4th Fleet and partner nations in the region monitor detect and intercept narcotics being smuggled via the water ways between the Americas. Defending the homeland by preventing narcotics from entering American schools and neighborhoods is an important mission that 4th Fleet must now accomplish with fewer ships, aircraft, and other assets. In the current fiscal environ ment, 4th Fleet is exploring innova tive, cost effective solutions that can address the capability gaps caused by budget cuts. Rear Adm. Sinclair M. Harris, Commander, U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/Commander U.S. 4th Fleet said. To continue sustained operations 4th Fleet has employed a combination of resources from the past with new tech nologies to continue the mission. In March of this year 4th Fleet host ed a capabilities demonstration of the Naval Air Warfare Centers MZ-3A Airship, a blimp. 4th Fleet utilized blimps during WWII in the South Atlantic for anti-submarine warfare. Harris discussed the benefits blimps can bring to the C-TOC mission. Transnational criminal organiza tions (TCOs) utilize an array of tactics, low observable and high speed vessels, masked communication signatures and sophisticated coordination to smug gle illicit cargo into the U.S. every year. One way to enhance detection efforts against illicit trafficking within our area of operations is to utilize long-endur ance platforms with the ability to use a multitude of sensors. Lighter-Than-Air (LTA) technologies, like this blimp have the potential to meet these operational needs, Harris said. In May Harris traveled to Key West for a very successful demonstration of the TIF-25K Aerostat (unmanned balloon) and a Puma unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) aboard the High-speed Vessel Swift. The tethered Aerostat provides an aerodynamically stable, reliable and cost effective, unmanned aerial plat form for surveillance, monitoring and detection. The standard system config uration can fly 2,000 to 3,000 feet above a ship like Swift and can deploy rapidly and safely. The Puma UAV delivers flexibil ity, endurance and a payload capability unmatched in its vehicle class. With a wingspan of 8.5 feet, this lightweight, hand-launched UAV provides aerial observation at line-of-sight ranges up to 10 kilometers. Puma can be recov ered in very restricted areas using verti cal descent Auto Land and is currently undergoing sea landing trials. On Aug. 20 a DC-3 coastal survey airplane from Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) visited 4th Fleet headquarters for a capabilities demon stration prior to a scheduled deploy ment to the Caribbean Sea and Central America, another vehicle from the past 4th Fleet wants to use for future opera tions. The DC-3 collects oceanographic and hydrographic data from the worlds oceans and coastlines, using a variety of platforms including, ships, aircraft, satellite sensors and buoys. The equip ment on board this DC-3 allows it not only to survey coastal areas, but also detect surface and underwater contacts essential for the C-TOC mission. It is important for 4th Fleet to find creative ways to continue the C-TOC mission with fewer assets. In 2012, 318,133 pounds of cocaine at a whole sale value of $8.5 billion and an esti mated street value of $25.5 billion were seized in the 4th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AOR), Harris said. Developing, testing and deploying low cost innovative ideas and technol ogy in an uncertain budgetary envi ronment is how 4th Fleet will continue operations now and in the near future. The Counter Transnational Organized Crime mission is of vital importance to our nation, as well as our partners in the region. The effect of crime and corruption that this ille gal activity has brought threatens the stability of emerging countries like Honduras and El Salvador. Preventing the flow of drugs is not an U.S. problem, but a problem for all of the Americas, Harris said. 4th Fleet AORs close proximity to the U.S. makes the Fleets mission that more important. Illegal materials enter ing the U.S. are a direct threat to the homeland. The violence that drug traf ficking creates has impacted our part ner nations in the hemisphere. It is important that 4th Fleet contin ues to explore innovative ways to do more with less. Budget concerns are a problem that is not going away any time soon, and neither is the attempt to smuggle narcotics into the United States. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) employs mari time forces in cooperative maritime security operations in order to maintain access, enhance interoperability, and build enduring partnerships that foster regional security in the U.S. Southern Command Area of Responsibility. 4th Fleet: Fleet of innovation

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 21 East Coast Ohio-class submarine home port continues to thrive What began as an inactive Army Marine Ocean Terminal in 1958 is now home to the most powerful vessels ever created for the U.S. Navy and the world. Enjoying its 35th year, Kings Bay is the largest employer in Camden County with more than 8,000 service members and civilian employees and an estimat ed annual payroll of $500 million. The goods and service the Kings Bay mili tary bring into Camden County is esti mated at $697 million. Kings Bay is the home port to six Ohio-class ballistic missile submarines and two Ohio-Class guided missile sub marines. The Navys move to Kings Bay began when treaty negotiations between the United States and Spain called for the withdrawal of Submarine Squadron 16 from its operational base in Rota, Spain by 1979. Between 1976 and 1978 Navy officials looked at more than 60 sites along the East Coast and decided on Kings Bay as the future refit site for the squadron. In addition to the land already owned by the Army, the Navy acquired other sur rounding properties for a total of 16,900 acres to create the new support base. It also transformed a sleepy com munity of 11,000 into a bustling one of about 50,000. It changed Camden County forev er, said David Rainer during a 2005 interview. It was a defining period for everyone. Rainer, a Camden County Commissioner, was the superintendent of Camden County schools in 1978. During a visit to the base in 2005, for mer president Jimmy Carter jokingly said it was hard not to have an influence in Kings Bays selection during his ten ure as president. However, the former governor and submariner noted, Kings Bay was selected on its own merits. Ken Smith, a Trident Refit Facility employee and mayor of Kingsland, said the base was among the most important events to occur in Camden County his tory. I dont know if [Carter] did anything in office that was more significant to Camden County, Smith said in 2005. He was in office at the time of the bases inception. It helped bring a lot of change, not only to Camden County, but surrounding counties. The first group of Sailors arrived in January 1978 and began the transfer process from the Army to the Navy that was completed by July. Cmdr. Robert Sminkey, along with 37 Sailors and civilian employees, raised the national ensign and changed the sign to read Naval Submarine Support Base Kings Bay near what was to become Stimson Gate. With the transition complete, the commanding officer of the support base and his crew set out to transform the terminal into an operational naval base. Initial construction began to prepare for the arrival of the squadron and the submarine tender USS Simon Lake (AS33). According to base archives and newspaper accounts, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers removed 13.5 mil lion cubic yards of material from the St. Marys Entrance Channel, Cumberland Sound and Kings Bay in preparation for the incoming fleet. Congress also approved funding for many projects such as the development of 250 fam ily housing units, the first base admin istration building (now public works), security building, and a new fire sta tion. When I first arrived at Kings Bay to take command in 1979, it was only a few trailers and a pine forest, said retired Capt. Richard Currier, who was the second commanding officer of Kings Bay. Currier was on hand to greet Squadron 16 and USS Simon Lake upon their arrival at Kings Bay later that year. Making do was our biggest chal lenge as was incorporating change. I had a workforce of 350 personnel when I started. When I left, there was close to 1,000 people working on the base. Following an extensive one-year environmental impact study in October 1980, Kings Bay was selected as the east coast site for the new Ohio-class sub marines. The Navy then called for the construction of three new commands. Trident Training Facility, Trident Refit Facility and Strategic Weapons Facility Atlantic were built to support the mas sive new boats. Trident Training Facility is the largest building in Camden County, with more than 500,000 square feet of classrooms and office space. Trident Refit Facilitys dry dock is the largest covered dry dock in the Western hemisphere. The announcement spurred the larg est peacetime construction project ever undertaken by the Navy. The $1.3 billion, 11-year construction project also fueled a population explosion in Camden County that still persists today. Other milestones achieved dur A message from the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay marks 35th year

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22 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013 ing the first years were the publication of the first Periscope newspaper June 15, 1979, the first annual Combined Federal Campaign conducted at Kings Bay Nov. 1, 1979, and the first submarine to be dry docked at Kings Bay, the USS Henry L. Clay (SSBN 625) in April 1980. When I first arrived in July 1984, I worked for Morale, Welfare and Recreation for two years, said Fred Alexander, a retired chief yeoman who later worked for the base administration. The admin building was still being built, Trident Training Facility was not yet finished and Group 10 was non-existent. Since then he said, construction of new buildings changed the face of the base. The biggest impression I received from my initial arrival to Kings Bay was the (care) put into the design of the base, because everything was within walking distance, Alexander said. The first Trident Ohio-Class submarine, USS Tennessee (SSBN 734) arrived at Kings Bay Jan. 15, 1989, bringing with it two crews of more than 150 Sailors each. By 1997, Kings Bay was the homeport to 10 Trident submarines and a workforce of 11,000. Kings Bay continues to evolve. Five of the Tridents transferred to the West Coast and USS Florida (SSGN 728) and Georgia (SSGN 729) were converted to guided missile submarines and shifted homeport to Kings Bay.USS Alaska (SSBN 732) arrived from the West Coast. In addition, the Coast Guard Maritime Force Protection Unit was commissioned in 2007, bringing 140 Coast Guardsmen and the cutter Sea Dragon to the base. Kings Bay has added additional patrol boats and new buildings to support the Coast Guard, as well as additional support facilities for SWFLANT and Marine Corps Security Force Battalion. The Times-Union contributed to this story. 35 YEARS

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Air, Surface and Submarine, Thursday, October 17, 2013 23 First qualified female sub officers receive Dolphins Three Sailors assigned to USS Wyoming (SSBN 742) and USS Maine (SSBN 741) became the first female unrestricted line officers to qualify in sub marines, Dec. 5. Lt. j.g. Marquette Leveque, a native of Fort Collins, Colo., assigned to the Gold Crew of Wyoming, and Lt. j.g. Amber Cowan and Lt. j.g. Jennifer Noonan of Maines Blue Crew received their subma rine Dolphins during sepa rate ceremonies at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay and Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor, Wash. In order to receive their Dolphins, Leveque, Cowan and Noonan were required to qualify as Officer of the Deck and Engineering Officer of the Watch, perform damage con trol functions, and demon strate satisfactory qualities of leadership. In Kings Bay, Leveque, along with fellow Gold Crew officer Lt. j.g. Kyle E. McFadden, par ticipated in a ceremony pre sided by Cmdr. Christopher Nash, commanding officer of Wyomings Gold Crew. Today was a very special occasion Nash said. It was special because two talented young officers earned the right to lead the next gen eration of submarine sailors in the most capable Navy the world has ever known. It was also special because these young leaders fully represent the future of our nations tech nical talent. Nash pinned McFadden at the ceremony. Leveque was pinned by her husband, Lt. j.g. Luke Leveque, a qualified submari ner onboard the ballistic mis sile submarine USS Maryland (SSBN 738). I am honored to be joining the long tradition of the sub marine force by earning my Dolphins and excited for the journey to come, Leveque said. I could not have accom plished this without the help of the wardroom and crew of the USS Wyoming. Cowan, a native of Colorado Springs, Colo., and Noonan, who hails from Boston, joined two other Blue Crew officers Lt. j.g. James Barclay and Lt. j.g. John Schaeffer in receiving their Dolphins. Cowan was pinned by her husband, Naval Flight Officer Lt. Adam Cowan. Noonan chose a former Maine shipmate and mentor, Lt. Jason Brethauer, to pin her Dolphins. Schaeffer decided to have Lt. Joe Westfall, a current shipmate from the Blue Crew, conduct his pinning. The Commanding officer of Maines Blue Crew, Cmdr. William Johnson, pinned Barclay. I am honored to participate in todays ceremony honoring these four fine officers who have proven themselves over the past year, Johnson said. They are truly worthy to join in the great legacy of submari ners that have gone before us as qualified in submarines. Leveque, Cowan and Noonan are three of 24 women 17 line officers and seven supply officers assigned to Maine, Wyoming, USS Ohio (SSGN 726) and USS Georgia (SSGN 729). Wyoming and Georgia are homeported in Kings Bay, while Maine and Ohio are homeported in Bangor. Leveque, Cowan and Noonan have each complet ed strategic deterrent patrols aboard their respective subma rines. Qualifying is a huge accom plishment for any submariner, and it feels no different for me, Noonan said. I am thrilled to finally be a member of this elite commu nity. Im particularly grateful to my crew, officers and enlisted, for supporting me and hold ing me to the same standards as those who have gone before me. I look forward to being able to fully contribute to the crew now that Im a qualified sub marine officer. Cowan said qualification in submarines is more of a per sonal achievement It requires understanding of the many facets of subma rine life and has you perform so many skills that when I take a step back and look at every thing that I have done and what this qualification means I will do, it is pretty amazing, she said. I see it as that point where I have demonstrated the knowl edge and the instinct to per form safely and smartly in all areas of the ship and its mis sions. Ultimately, it is a monu mental mark of the confidence my command and crew has in me. And earning that respect and acceptance is a feeling that I will hold with me for my entire life. Prior to reporting to their boats beginning in November 2011, Leveque, Cowan, Noonan and the other women assigned to Ohio, Maine, Wyoming and Georgia graduated from the Submarine Officer Basic Course in Groton, Conn. In addition, the submarine line officers under instruc tion graduated from the Naval Nuclear Power School at Charleston, S.C., and under went naval nuclear prototype training. Dec. 13, 2012: Milestone day for Navy, Kings Bay

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24 Air, Surface and Submarine Thursday, October 17, 2013