Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note:
Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID:
UF00028307:02062


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2013 STORE S REOPEN SPORT S EVENT HS-11 COC Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VR) 62 completed a record-breaking year in FY13. The aptly named Nomads were poised to put more than 3,100 flight hours in the squad ron logbook when the fiscal year ended Sept. 30. This is our highest fiscalyear flight-hour record since moving to NAS Jacksonville in 2009 and the second-high est in squadron history, said VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Tony Scarpino. In the course of flying those 3,100 hours, the Nomads com pleted 207 missions and lifted in excess of 2.7 million pounds of cargo. The Nomads moved cargo for the Navy, Army, Air Force, Marines, Royal Navy and Australian Defense Force. Thats an average of 17 mis sions, 260 flight hours and 314,801 pounds of cargo lifted per month for our four-aircraft squadron, said Scarpino. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel announced Oct. 5 he was recalling most of the Defense Department civilians who were placed on furlough as a result of the government shutdown that began Oct. 1. Today, I am announcing that most DOD civilians placed on emergency furlough dur ing the government shutdown will be asked to return to work beginning Oct. 7, he said. Immediately after President [Barack] Obama signed the Pay Our Military Act into law, I directed DODs acting general counsel to determine whether we could reduce the number of civilian personnel furloughed due to the shutdown, Hagel said. The Defense Department, he said, consulted closely with the Department of Justice, which expressed its view that the law does not permit a blanket recall of all civilians. However, DOD and DOJ attorneys concluded that the law does allow the Department of Defense to eliminate fur loughs for employees whose responsibilities contribute to the morale, well-being, capa bilities and readiness of service members, Hagel said. Consequently, I am now directing the military depart ments and other DOD compo nents to move expeditiously to identify all employees whose activities fall under these cat egories, he said. Hagel noted he expects the military departments to be able to significantly reduce but not eliminate civilian fur loughs under this process. The defense secretary said the department has tried to exempt as many DOD civil ian personnel as possible from furloughs, and will continue to try to bring all civilian employ ees back to work as soon as possible. Ultimately, the surest way to end these damaging and irresponsible furloughs, and to enable us to fulfill our mis sion as a department, is for Congress to pass a budget and restore funds for the entire fed eral government, Hagel said. This has been a very dis ruptive year for our people including active duty, National Guard and reserve person nel, and DOD civilians and contractors, he said. Many important activities remain curtailed while the shutdown goes on. Civilians under furlough face the uncertainty of not know ing when they will receive their next paycheck. I strongly support efforts in Congress to enact legislation to retroactively compensate all furloughed employees, he said. And I will continue to urge Congress to fulfill its basic responsibilities to pass a bud get and restore full funding for the Department of Defense and the rest of the government, Hagel said. Commander, Navy Region Southeast Chief of Staff Capt. Steven Blaisdell signed a proclamation declaring October Domestic Violence Awareness Month at NAS Jacksonville, Sept 24, emphasizing the Navys role in the community and calling upon Navy leaders, service members and fam ily members to increase their efforts to prevent domestic violence. We in the Navy community have an obligation to become actively involved in prevention by supporting our Sailors and their families to live and raise chil dren in a safe, nurturing environment, Blaisdell said. According to Jeannette Werby, Navy Region Southeast counseling and advo cacy coordinator, said raising domestic violence awareness is vital to the Navys prevention efforts. It can happen to everybody. Its not particular to any race, ethnic group, social status, income or rank. It can happen anywhere, and it happens a lot more than most people think. Its also important for people to understand what resources the Navy provides to combat domestic violence, whether they are the victim or suspect someone else may be, Werby said. The fastest and most direct way of reporting domestic violence is through the Navys Family Advocacy Program (FAP), which provides victim protection and counseling for those affected by domestic violence. FAP representatives can be found at installation Fleet and Family Support Centers (FFSCs). The FAP looks into each report and takes the appropriate actions to protect victims should the report be substantiated. Its important for people to take action and report any situation where they suspect abuse, Werby said. The goal is to protect victims and provide them with the safety and secu rity they need. Anyone who suspects domestic vio lence can file a report by contacting their installations FFSC. Additional support is also available through the Domestic Abuse Hotline at 1-800-799SAFE. Region Southeast focus on prevention during Domestic Violence Awareness Month Hagel recalls most defense department civilians VR-62 is truly world famous

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Oct. 10 1845 Naval School, later the U.S. Naval Academy, opens in Annapolis, Md. with 50 midshipmen and seven faculty. 1923 First American-built rigid air ship, Shenandoah (ZR-1), is christened. It used helium gas instead of hydrogen. 1944 Opening of Leyte campaign begins with attack of four Carrier Task Groups of Task Force 38 on Okinawa and Ryukyus. 1960 Navy assigned responsibility for program management and technical direction of Project SPASUR, the first U.S. universal satellite detection and tracking network. 1985 Fighter aircraft from USS Saratoga (CV-60) force Egyptian airliner carrying the hijackers of the cruise ship Achille Lauro to land in Italy, where the hijackers were taken into custody. Oct. 11 1776 Battle of Valcour Island on Lake Champlain, New York. Although defeat ed, the American flotilla delayed the British advance and caused it to fall back into winter quarters. 1824 Marquis de Lafayette visits the Washington Navy Yard during his year long tour of America. He returned to the yard the next day, Oct. 12, to continue his visit. 1942 Battle of Cape Esperance begins: In two-day battle, American task force stops Japanese attack on Guadalcanal and sinks two Japanese ships while losing only USS Duncan (DD-485). 1950 Task Force 77 aircraft destroy North Korean vessels off Songjin and Wonsan. 1963 Navy medical team from Norfolk, Va., begins massive inoculation program to safeguard against outbreak of typhoid in the wake of Hurricane Flora. 1967 Operation Coronado VI began in Rung Sat Zone. 1968 Launch of Apollo 7, the first U.S. three-man space mission, commanded by Cmdr. Walter Schirra Jr. USMC Maj. Ronnie Cunningham served as Lunar Module pilot. The mission lasted 10 days and 20 hours. Recovery was by HS-5 helicopters from USS Essex (CVS-9). Oct. 12 1914 USS Jupiter (AC-3) is first Navy ship to complete transit of Panama Canal. 1944 Aircraft from Carrier Task Force 38 attack Formosa. 1957 Rear Adm. Dufek arrives at McMurdo Sound, Antarctica to com mand Operation Deep Freeze III during the International Geophysical Year of 1957-58. 1965 End of Project Sealab II where teams of naval divers and scientists spent 15 days in Sealab moored 205 feet below surface near La Jolla, Calif. 1980 USS Guadalcanal and other ships of Amphibious Forces, 6th Fleet begin assistance to earthquake victims in Al Asnam, Algeria. 2000 Terrorists in a boat make sui cide attack on USS Cole (DDG-67) while the ship refuels in the port of Aden, Yemen. Seventeen Sailors are killed. Oct. 13 1775 Birthday of U.S. Navy. The Continental Congress establishes Continental Navy, later the U.S. Navy. 1954 USS Saipan begins relief and humanitarian aid to Haitians who were victims of Hurricane Hazel. Oct. 14 1918 Naval aviators of Marine Day Squadron 9 make first raid-in-force for the Northern Bombing Group in World War I when they bombed German rail road at Thielt Rivy, Belgium. Oct. 15 1917 USS Cassin (DD-43) torpedoed by German submarine U-61 off coast of Ireland. In trying to save the ship, Gunners Mate Osmond Kelly Ingram becomes first American sailor killed in World War I and later is awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroism. He becomes the first enlisted man to have a ship named for him, in 1919. 1948 First women officers on active duty sworn in as commissioned offi cers in regular Navy under Womens Service Integration Act of June 1948, by Secretary of the Navy John Sullivan. 1960 USS Patrick Henry (SSBN-599) successfully fires four Polaris test vehi cles under operational, rather than test, conditions. 1965 U.S. Naval Support Activity Danang, Vietnam, established. Oct. 16 1885 Capt. Alfred Thayer Mahan becomes Superintendent of the Naval War College. 1891 Baltimore Incident, Valparaiso, Chile. 1940 Fifth group of 10 destroyers from the Destroyers for Bases agree ment is turned over to British at Halifax, Canada. 1942 Carrier aircraft from USS Hornet (CV-8) attack Japanese troops on Guadalcanal. 1943 Navy accepts its first helicopter, a Sikorsky YR-4B (HNS-1) at Bridgeport, Conn. These are the times when its difficult to write a column. After Theresas pow erful message last week, I have nothing more to add. And yet Ive thought of little else, except what she and her boys are going through. I dont have any funny anecdotes about my own sons behavior, and I dont have specific feelings about the shutdown. Every train of thought leads back to Theresa and Landon and their children. In the 13 years Ive been writing my newspaper column, there have been plenty of weeks similar to this, weeks when it was hard to write. There have been times when I had the flu and couldnt bare to think. There have been times when we were in the middle of a move, and I couldnt find my computer. There have been times when I felt sad or depressed, and the last thing I wanted to do was come up with something to say. In 2007, I even wrote a column as I was about to walk out the door and deliver Lindell. In all those times, however, I only missed one week, and that was when Lindell was in the hospital six years ago. Today is the first week I felt like being absent again. Because, where do we go from here? How do we complain about the shutdown or the mud the kids tracked through the house when a Navy wife with a brand new baby just lost her husband? History shows us that we will move on. Think of all the warm and neighbor ly feelings after 9/11. Think about how quickly we regressed back to honking at people on the interstate, going to the store to buy new shoes we dont really need, or worrying about what color to paint our living room, or whether or not we need a new couch. Life goes on. And thats because sad and tragic things happen all the time. Theresas loss isnt novel. Indeed, her husbands helicopter accident didnt even make it onto the mainstream medias radar. Had Landon died a week later, his death might have been tied to a larger story like the government shut down. But as it was, Landon was just another Navy pilot doing his job. Yet theres nothing just about this for Theresa. And so, because Im at a loss for what to say next Ill tell you how Dustin and I knew Theresa and Landon. We met the Jones in Pensacola, where both Landon and Dustin were Navy flight instructors. I remember Dustin talking about how laid back and genuine Landon was. I met Theresa at a military spouse club meeting. She is tall, with long dark hair and not one single blemish on her face. Like me with Dustin, Theresa was the polar opposite of Landon. She is chatty and funny. We got along smashingly. When I had spouse club meetings at my house, Dustin would take our boys to Landons house and hang out. We, of course, eventually moved to Maine, and the Jones were transferred as well. Thanks to Facebook and the Internet, however, Theresa and I were able to stay in contact. Her status updates always made me laugh, and her relationship with Landon continued to remind me of mine with Dustin. So when I woke up that day a few weeks ago and saw that Theresa had posted, I could really use a miracle right now, I thought she was being funny. Then I heard there was a crash in the Red Sea. Could it be? Could Theresa be talking about that? Was Landon involved? Its weird to watch a friend go through something like this on Facebook, where you can scroll back and see how ordi nary their life was before that day. Then you scroll forward and see all the prayers coming in. Dustin was home from his job at the Pentagon the weekend after Landon died. We thought of the Joneses the whole time. The news colored every thing. Monday morning, while the kids were at school, we sat and talked for a long time about how it could have always been anyone. All those times I sent Dustin off to work or on deployment, and I never real ly thought anything would happen. But at times like this, the risks become hor ribly clear. Next week, Ill move on to writing about new things, but I will not forget. None of us will. Time and life go on, but Theresas story, especially as she bravely wrote last week, will leave a mark on all of us. Things that are hard to move beyond

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Military commissaries worldwide returned to normal operating schedules Oct. 7, said the director and CEO of the Defense Commissary Agency. This is certainly good news for our patrons and our employees, said Joseph Jeu. All our stateside stores are now returning to their regular sched ules as of Oct. 7. The DeCA announcement comes in the wake of the Department of Defenses Oct. 5 decision that most Department civilians will be recalled to work beginning Monday. As part of DoDs guidance, commissary opera tions were deemed necessary support to service members and their families. Most stateside stores closed Oct. 2 as part of the government shutdown. Overseas commissaries had been allowed to remain open. Returning to regular schedules on Monday means stores normally open on that day will serve customers. Those stores that are normally closed on Mondays will be open on their nor mal operating schedule. Customers are advised to check www.commissaries. com for their stores operating schedule. We recognize the disruption that the shutdown presented to our stateside patrons as far as access to their com missary benefit, Jeu added. Since the shutdown began, about 11,000 of DeCAs more than 16,000 employees were furloughed. The path to stateside commissaries reopening began upon President Obamas sign ing of the Pay Our Military Act into law. DoD subsequently determined legisla tion allows the DoD to eliminate fur loughs for employees whose responsi bilities contribute to the morale, wellbeing, capabilities and readiness of ser vice members. We will do everything possible to ensure that our shelves are stocked with the products our customers want when they shop, he said. However, there will be a short adjustment period as our stores settle back into their pre-shut down operating and delivery routines.All commissaries return to normal hours JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013 3

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We must not operate any faster than safe In a message released Oct. 4, U.S. Fleet Forces (USFF) com mander, Adm. Bill Gortney, directed that the Fleet will con tinue to provide ready forces to safeguard national security during the government shut down, but limit activities to only those that are absolutely necessary to safely accomplish currently assigned excepted missions. His guidance referenced instructions provided in a memo from the Deputy Secretary of Defense that stat ed, The Department will, of course, continue to prosecute the war in Afghanistan, includ ing preparation of forces for deployment into that conflict. The Department must, as well, continue many other opera tions necessary for the safety of human life and protection of property, including operations essential for the security of our Nation. In the message, Gortney directed his commanders to avoid or delay expenditures unless it is absolutely neces sary. This is not business as usual. He emphasized the quality of training and safety of forc es will not be compromised, but acknowledged the pace of training may need to slow to maintain standards. We must not operate any faster than safe, said Gortney. He focused on commanders responsibility to continually assess their commands and be aware when they are approach ing the limits of safe operation. The admiral directed com manders to report any opera tions or events that are can celed or delayed because they are not considered essential or due to safety concerns as a result of the government shutdown. Commanders will also report the impacts of these decisions. Gortney closed the message by commending his command ers for their professionalism and dedication, and further charging them by saying, You are commanders and I expect you to command. I will con tinue to trust you to make the hard, fiscally responsible deci sions. We will provide leader ship with the best informa tion we have during this very dynamic situation. Commander, Navy Region Europe, Africa, Southwest Asia (EURAFSWA) held a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Activity Naples in the Capodichino district, Oct. 4. Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. relieved Rear Adm. Anthony Gaiani as the regions commander. I couldnt be more proud than to have this opportunity to lead and serve with the outstanding team here, said Scorby. To the men and women of Navy Region Europe, Africa, Southwest Asia, its my privilege to take command here today. I look forward to building on the amazing successes of Rear Adm. Gaiani. Scorby, a 1981 graduate of the State University of New York at Cortland, was commissioned an Ensign after complet ing Aviation Officer Candidate School in March 1983. His early operational assignments include Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron Two (VQ 2) and Patrol Squadron Special Projects Unit One (VPU 1). Scorby, subsequently, served as the officer in charge of VPU-1 and com manding officer of VQ-2. His most recent assignments were Commanding Officer NAS Jacksonville and Commander, Navy Region Southeast. Scorby holds a Master of Science in financial management from the Naval Postgraduate School, a Master of Arts in national security and strategic stud ies from the College of Command and Staff, U.S. Naval War College, and a Master of Arts in national resource strategy from the Industrial College of the Armed Forces. Gaiani commanded Navy Region EURAFSWA since August 2010. Under his leadership, he managed an annual budget of more than $400 million dur ing fiscally challenging times lead ing environmental stewardship projects that resulted in significantly improved resource management, while actively engaging families, government officials and community leaders and strength ening key relationships in the Navys critically important Europe, Africa, Southwest Asia operating environment. It has been an honor and a privi lege to serve with the men and women, military and civilians, of Navy Region Europe, Africa, Southwest Asia, said Gaiani. For the past three years, we have worked together to effectively pro vide world-class shore service and sup port for our maritime strategy, for four Combatant Commanders and forces both ashore and at sea in some of the most challenging areas of the world. I am very proud of what we have accom plished as a team. Gaiani was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal during the cer emony, for his exceptional leadership and for 30 years faithful military ser vice. Gaiani will retire from Naval ser vice. Scorby will oversee a workforce of more than 4,000 host nation employees, U.S. employees and military members responsible for providing efficient and effective shore service support to U.S. and allied forces in the Europe, Africa and Southwest Asia area of responsibil ity. USFF guidance for operations during shutdown Scorby relieves Gaiani as commander of Navy Region EURAFSWA 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013

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Hagel praises U.S. troops for capture of terrorist in AfricaDefense Secretary Chuck Hagel commended U.S. troops here Oct. 6 for the capture of what he described as one of the worlds most sought after terrorists. Over the weekend, U.S. military personnel con ducted targeted operations in Libya and Somalia to bring international terrorists to justice, he said. I want to commend all of the service members who were involved in the planning and execution of these two operations, which demonstrate the unparalleled precision, global reach, and capabilities of the United States military, Hagel said. As a result of the Libya operation, the defense sec retary said, one of the worlds most wanted terrorists was captured and is now in U.S. custody. Abu Anas al Libi was designated as a global ter rorist by Executive Order, was a subject of the U.S. Rewards for Justice Program, and is on the U.N. al-Qaida sanctions list, Hagel said. He was also indicted for his alleged role in the 1998 U.S. embassy bombings in Africa, and other plots to conduct attacks against U.S. interests. The defense secretary noted these operations in Libya and Somalia send a strong message to the world that the U.S. will spare no effort to hold terrorists accountable, no matter where they hide or how long they evade justice. We will continue to maintain relentless pressure on terrorist groups that threaten our people or our interests, Hagel said. We will conduct direct action against them, if nec essary, that is consistent with our laws and our val ues. Secretary Mabus on shutdownWe are grateful for the recent decision about our civilian workforce. I know this has been difficult on you and your families. We are still working through the details, but we will bring back as many of our civilians as we can under the new guidance. And we will continue to press to bring back all our civilian family as soon as possible. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013 Commands battle it out at MWR Sports ChallengeMore than 550 Sailors from 16 commands aboard NAS Jacksonville competed in the 2013 Command Sports Challenge, hosted by the NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department Oct. 3-4. The event was sponsored by USAA. There were record numbers of participants in the team-building competition to take on defending champs VR-58. In addition to the participants, both CBMU-202 and VR-58 had quite the cheering section with almost their entire commands present. The Command Sports Challenge is a great avenue for boosting morale in commands at NAS Jacksonville as they engage in a friendly two-day, 10-event sports and fitness competition. It enables command person nel to get away from their workspace and spend time with their shipmates in a more casual and fun way, said Bill Bonser, sports coordinator for NAS Jax. It is really fantastic to see our Sailors having a blast play ing together and competing against one another in a non-work environment. The competition began Oct. 3 with a 1500-meter relay at the outdoor track. Other events included 3-on3 basketball, ultimate Frisbee, a swim relay and dodge ball. The events on Oct. 4 included 3-on-3 sand volley ball, bean bag toss, tug-o-war, the fitness challenge and the most popular event the COs canoe race. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander said, Its great to see all these com mands come together and build camaraderie. Theres a lot of healthy competition going on. Thanks go out to all the people who worked so hard to make this event happen. Its a privilege and an honor to be a part of the greatest command in NAS Jacksonville history, said Cmdr. Tony Scarpino, commanding officer of VR-62, the overall winner. Im so glad that we were a part of it and congrats to all the participants. Its great to be a winner! VR-62 took first place with 1,075 points and defend ing champs, VR-58, finished in second with 1,025 points. Rounding out the top three was FACSFAC Jax with 925 points. Other finishers included CBMU-202 (850), NRSE RCC (825), NCTS (800), TPU (750), FLCJ (475), VP-30 (300), VP-5 (200), CV-TSC (200), FRCSE (75), NAS Jax (50), Naval Hospital Jax (25) and VP-16 (25).Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013 7

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Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service mem bers and their families. Pre registration is required at 5425745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2013: Nov. 12-15 (5:30-10 p.m.) Program (TAP) Separation Workshop (7:30 a.m.4:15 p.m.) Program (TAP) Retirement Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) p.m.) July 2. a.m.) Nov. 25. Workshop (9:40 a.m.-noon) Nov. 25. Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Nov. 13-14. Specialist Training (7:30 a.m.Workshop (1:30-4 p.m.) Nov. 14. p.m.) Workshop (9-10:30 a.m.) Nov. p.m.) (11 a.m.-1 p.m.) Nov. 19. Logic (1-3 p.m.) Nov. 5, 12, 19, Support Group (9:30-11 a.m.) Every Wednesday Nov. 7. To register for any of the above workshops call 542-5745.Fleet and Family Support Center offers life skills workshops held superiority at sea, from which they threatened to stop wreak destruction on seaside settlements. In response, a few of the states had commissioned small fleets of their own for defense of local waters. Congress had not yet authorized privateer ing. Some in Congress wor ried about pushing the armed struggle too far, hoping that reconciliation with the mother country was still possible. Yet, a small coterie of men in Congress had been advo cating a Continental Navy from the outset of armed hostilities. Foremost among these men was John Adams of For months, he and a few others had been agitating in Congress for the establish ment of an American fleet. They argued that a fleet would defend the seacoast towns, protect vital trade, retaliate make it possible to seek out the arms and stores that would make resistance possible. egates laid before Congress a bold resolution for the building and equipping of an American fleet, as soon as possible. attacked it, saying it was the maddest idea in the World to think of building an American Fleet. Gen. George Washington was read in Congress in which he reported that he had taken under his command, at Continental expense, three armed schooners to cruise off enemy supply ships. Henceforth, Congress estab lished a Naval Committee charged with equipping a fleet. This committee directed the purchasing, outfitting, man ning, and operations of the first ships of the new navy, drafted subsequent naval legislation, and prepared rules and regula tions to govern the Continental administration. Almost one month later, on Nov. 10, as an extension of that naval legislation, Congress resolved that two battalions raised. The legislation also estab lished a Naval Committee to supervise the work. All togeth er, the Continental Navy num bered some 50 ships over the course of the war. They took Isles themselves, contributing to the demoralization of the to divert warships to protect convoys and trade routes. After the American War for Independence, Congress sold the surviving ships of the Continental Navy and released the seamen and officers. The Constitution of the United ered Congress to provide and maintain a navy. Acting on this authority, Congress ordered the construction and manning of six frigates in administered naval affairs from that year until Congress The Navy had no official ly recognized birthday until 1972, when Admiral Elmo Zumwalt, chief of naval opera tions, with the advice of Vice Admiral Edwin Hooper, director of naval history, authorized Navy celebrates 238 years of service Oct. 13 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013

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Cmdr. Timothy Kinsella Jr. will assume command of Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 11 from Cmdr. Ryan Keys on Oct. 11 at 11:11 a.m., in Hanger 117 aboard NAS Jacksonville. Keys served as HS-11 com manding officer since July 2012. Kinsella was raised in Dublin, Ireland and enlisted in the U.S. Navy in 1989, earning his Silver Dolphins as a plank owner on board USS Kentucky (SSBN 737) in 1991. He is a 1996 graduate of the United States Naval Academy and was desig nated as a naval aviator in 1998. His first operational assignment was with the Gunbearers of HC-11 in San Diego, where he flew the HH-46D Sea Knight and deployed to the Western Pacific and Middle East on board the USS Peleliu (LHA 5) and USS Boxer (LHD 4). From 2004-2006, Kinsella served as the assistant navigator on board USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). In 2007, Kinsella joined the Dragonslayers of HS-11 as a depart ment head where he flew the H-60F/H Seahawk and deployed on board the USS Enterprise (CVN 65) in sup port of Operation Enduring Freedom. Ashore, Kinsella served as White House Liaison to the Secretary of the Navy, and was hand selected to serve as the Secretarys Protocol Aide from 2002-2003. He also served as Flag Aide to the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Air Warfare (OPNAV N98) from 20032004. Most recently, he served in the Joint Operations Directorate (J-33) on the Joint Chiefs of Staff from 2009-2011. Kinsella has served as HS-11 Executive Officer since July 2012. Keys led the Dragonslayers through the end of their second back-to-back deployment on board USS Enterprise, for the aircraft carriers final cruise. He will now be going to Washington, D.C. to serve at the U.S. Strategic Command Center for Combating Weapons of Mass Destruction. As the new CO, Kinsella will lead the Dragonslayers through a complete workup cycle prior to deploying with Carrier Air Wing One (CVW-1) on their new ship, USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). As VP-5 continues its busy schedule operating and maintaining the P8-A Poseidon, the squad ron is highlighting one outstanding Mad Fox each week. This weeks Mad Fox of the Week is AO3(AW) Mallory Burton. Burton was born in Grantville, Kansas and joined the Navy in January 2009. After boot camp she attended A-school in Pensacola, and then received orders to USS Harry S. Truman at Naval Station Norfolk, Va. where she was trained in ammunition build-up. She reported to VP-5 in June 2010 and has since deployed to NAS Sigonella, Italy and Kadena, Japan, with her fellow Mad Foxes. As an aviation ordnanceman, Burton is charged with handling, loading, and main taining sonobuoys and ordnance that the P8-A Poseidon employs. She is also tasked with main taining the weapon systems on the aircraft. Ordnancemen ensure that the aircraft and its crew are able to accomplish their tasking using the necessary weapon systems on all missions daily. As all Mad Foxes can attest, the transition from the P3-C Orion to the P8-A Poseidon has drastically changed the way Burton accom plishes her job. It was a major change from hands on trou ble shooting and analog weapon systems. With the P8-A Poseidon, we now take a more hands off approach and allow the planes fault codes to determine what actions we need to take to fix any malfunction the weapon systems may have, explained Burton. However, working alongside my fellow Mad Foxes each day is the best part of my job and pushes me to continue to learn our new plat form. Burtons current goals are to make petty offi cer 2nd class and continue to work towards her veterinarian technician degree. When she is away from the squadron, Burton enjoys pursu ing her own photography business, where she focuses on personal and landscape photogra phy. She also enjoys hunting with friends during deer and duck seasons. VP-5 is currently in the inter-deployment readiness cycle aboard NAS Jacksonville. Kinsella takes Dragonslayers helm on Friday VP-5 Mad Fox of the Week JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013 9

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Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles American Red Cross Volunteer Program Chairperson, Helen Donahoe, retires after 40 years 38 at NH Jacksonville of assistance to active-duty military, retirees and their families. Donahoe, born in Detroit, Mich. and raised in New York City and Long Island, N.Y., became a Red Cross volunteer at NH Jacksonville in 1975. She began her illustrious career of volunteerism at Red Cross as a caseworker at Naval Hospital Key West, in 1961, where her husband, retired Navy Cmdr. Norman Donahoe, was assigned. Back in 1961, the Red Cross had a program that assisted military families with child care, which afforded me time to become a volunteer, said Donahoe. Little did I know that 40 years later I would still be involved with Red Cross volun teer service. Throughout each of her husbands duty assignments, Donahoe continued to vol unteer for Red Cross along side fellow Army, Navy and Marine Corps spouses and in 1975 she returned to NAS Jacksonville and applied to become a Red Cross volunteer at NH Jacksonville. At NH Jacksonville, she began her volunteer career in recreation and later became a caseworker. Donahoe was eventually chosen as chairman of volunteer programs, and for the past 38 years has super vised and coordinated the placement and training of all volunteers within the hospital. There are currently 55 Red Cross volunteers who assist military members and their families at the hospital. Donahoe continued to be involved with casework. Even as chairman of vol unteer programs, I continued to be a caseworker, something that I truly enjoyed, said Donahoe. My most rewarding moments were when I could sit down and help someone who is in need. She expanded her realm of influence in the volunteer community and was instru mental in the establishment of volunteer programs at Naval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Key West in 2001 and NBHC Mayport in 2003. I cannot think of another individual who has dedicated more time and energy to the mission of assisting military members and their families than Helen, said Jack Morgan, former Red Cross Regional Chief Executive Officer. For the past 10 years, that we worked together, she was the heart and soul of the Red Cross Volunteer Program at Naval Hospital Jacksonville. Through the numerous leader ship changes over time, Helen was the glue that kept the pro gram together. Donahoe, 88, was instru mental in getting NH Jacksonvilles volunteer project off the ground. She retired Oct. 9 with more than 23,500 hours of volunteer service. It comes as no surprise that she has received both the Presidential and Clara Barton awards for her devotion to strengthening the nation and for making a difference through her volun teer services. I plan to spend more time with family and continue my hobby of oil painting, some thing I have been doing since 1969 when my husband was stationed at Fort Ritchie, Md., said Donahoe. Helen is truly one of those extraordinary people who you are so proud to have on your team, said NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer. On behalf of Naval Hospital Jacksonville and the communi ty, I want to thank Helen for her service to our military mem bers our nations heroes and their families. Her dependability and reli ability has stood the test of time for volunteer retention. She will be truly missed. Mary Miciano, a native of Morgantown, W.Va., assumed the duties as Red Cross volun teer program chairperson Oct. 9 and is eager to continue the standards set by Donahoe. Miciano, a retired NH Jacksonville nurse (20 years) joined the Red Cross staff in 2010. American Red Cross support of military members and their families enhances morale and contributes to the increased operational capabilities of link ing military families during emergencies, connecting fami lies with local resources (infor mation and referral services), providing resiliency training (deployment services) and sup porting wounded warriors at military hospitals. The American Red Cross unwavering commitment to members of the U.S. military, its veterans and their families continues to grow and develop more than a century after Clara Barton first recruited nurses to support the U.S. Army in 1881. NH Jacksonvilles priority since its founding in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. The command is comprised of the Navys third-largest hos pital and five branch health clinics across Florida and Georgia. Of its patient popu lation about 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their families more than 57,000 are enrolled with a pri mary care manager at one of its facilities. To find out more, visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax. Red Cross volunteer Donahoe retires after 40 years at Naval Hospital 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013

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Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert spoke at the annual Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) International Conference Banquet at Ben Franklin Hall Oct. 2, in Potomac, Md. The theme of this years event was, Ready, Relevant and Capable. You are a key indicator of how we can get ahead of issues our Sailors are having. said Greenert. Through the analysis of NMCRS counseling trends, Navy leaders are able to anticipate issues before they become critical. He thanked the society for the year-round assistance to Sailors, Marines and their families, as well as the societys recent assistance in pro viding counselors for victims of the Washington Navy Yard shootings. He also discussed the societys availability of financial support during the government shut down. Its hard to put into words what it means to us, for Sailors to know theyll be taken care of, said Greenert. We need to continue to support and make sure we are providing support for our troops overseas. Throughout the government shutdown NMCRS offices are open during their regularly scheduled business hours. In the event of indi vidual or family difficulty during the govern ment shutdown, the NMCRS is ready to provide assistance to Marines, Sailors, military spouses and retirees with interest-free loans and grants to meet emerging needs. Over the first half of 2013, the NMCRS has served 31,922 clients with $21.5 million in inter est-free loans and grants. The society has also presented 3,000 gift bags to expectant military families and made 24,617 home visits to those in need. The NMCRS International Conference brings together its leadership from 51 offices around the world every three years. Attendees traveled from all around the world to take part in the event. I think everyone in the room will agree that the last few days have been spent well, said Executive Vice President and Chief Operations Officer Carl Jensen. Were ready to go out there and serve Sailors, Marines and retirees in an even more enthusi astic manner, ever more efficient...this year and every year after. Attendees include the directors of 44 world wide offices and 36 Chair of Volunteers, 52 tra ditional and combat casualty assistance visit ing nurses, headquarters staff, and spouses. However, due to financial situation, 2010 event was cancelled; last event was in 2007. The military must look at the entire package of compensation, health care and retirement, Army Gen. Martin Dempsey told a U.S. Forces Korea Town Hall meeting in Seoul, South Korea Oct 1. The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and his wife, Deanie, spent an hour answering questions from the joint service audience. Budget issues were a main concern of the service members. Personnel costs have to be brought under control, the chairman said. He assured the service members that any changes to military retirement would be grandfathered. So the question is what do we do with retirement for the next generation of Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines, he said. But compensation and health care costs are growing at rates that are unsustain able to the all-volunteer force. This does not mean cuts, the chairman said, we may not actually have to reduce pay and benefits, but we have to slow the growth. Last year, for example, DOD recom mended a 1 percent pay raise for mil itary personnel. Congress upped the total to 1.8 percent. Slowing the rate by just that much would have saved DOD $13 billion. Instead, the money to pay for the raise came out of readiness accounts, the chairman said. In an interview with reporters travel ing with him, Dempsey noted he has been through three drawdowns in his career that began in 1974 the postVietnam drawdown, the post-Cold War drawdown and the current one. This one is alarming to him because it is the steepest drawdown he has seen. The steepness of it puts us in a posi tion to not exert enough control on bal ancing our requirements across all the accounts, whether they are manpow er accounts, modernization, mainte nance, training, family care, he said. Its extraordinarily challenging to try to balance the budget because of the steepness of this drawdown. He is worried about the long-term effects of the drawdown. Under seques ter, DOD must cut an additional $52 bil lion from the budget in fiscal 2014. If I were able to shrink the force, close some unnecessary infrastructure, potentially cancel some weapons sys tems that we dont think are as impor tant as others, I think I can probably balance it and not affect readiness to the extent we are, he said. But Congress will not allow anoth er base realignment and closure pro cess, and Congress has continued some weapons systems the department has specifically said it does not need. Because there are parts of the bud get that are untouchable to me at this point, he said. Unless I can touch some of those things, it all comes out of readiness, which means the next group to deploy will be less ready than they should be. Thats not a position that our armed forces should be in as the greatest mili tary on the planet serving the greatest nation on the planet. And sequestration could continue to be a year-by-year process, and that is dangerous because we are asking the force to live with uncertainty and do it a year at a time, he said. Eventually I think they are going to lose faith if we do it a year at a time. CNO addresses Ready, Relevant and Capable NMCRS Dempsey: Military must slow growth for military pay, health care JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013 11

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Mess Lords perform at Flight Line Caf Three notable chefs who care about Americas military, cooked up an irresistible lun cheon Oct. 1 for Sailors at the NAS Jacksonville Flight Line Caf. Think gooey cheeseburg ers, blackened chicken breasts and smokey ribs. The celebrity chefs included Sarah Simington, owner of the Blue Moon Cafe in Baltimore, Md.; Brian Duffy, a classical ly trained chef and culinary consultant; and Mike Hardin, owner of Hodads in San Diego thats rated as one of Americas top-5 burger joints. Hardin and Simington previ ously entertained at the Flight Line Caf in 2011. The Navy Entertainmentsponsored Mess Lords event, in coordination with Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) at NAS Jacksonville, was the groups second stop on a tour of galleys in the Navys southeast region. They want to show their support for our Sailors by shar ing some of their favorite reci pes and cooking techniques with our kitchen crew, said CSCS(SW) Wendell Heyward, NAS Jax Supply Department LCPO. Were just about ready to light up the smoker out back to finish off the ribs and chick en. We have a crew of 18 culi nary specialists here today who are eager to work with and learn from this talented trio of celeb rity chefs. Hardin declared, Were the Mess Lords a fork full of free dom, one fork at a time! Being from San Diego, I really appre ciate the sacrifices made by our men and women in the Navy and Marines. Our job is to bring some home cooking, teaching and to have a good time as we feed the troops. The Mess Lords have enter tained at bases and on ships around the world, most recent ly on board the aircraft carri er USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), as well as military bases in Bahrain, Dubai and Djibouti. When not touring with the Mess Lords, Duffy appears on the SpikeTV reality show Bar Rescue that helps owners of failing bars and grilles to regain customers and profitability. As a chef, I trained on clas sic cuisines, beginning with French and followed by Japanese, Greek and Italian. When I got tired of hearing people complaining about Irish food I set out to change that by developing a new Celtic cuisine based on traditional ingredients in contemporary presentations. So far, its been lots of fun, said Duffy. For our Sailors today, Im keeping it simple by going allAmerican with Gorillas St. Louis style pork ribs recipe. It begins with Gorillas original rib rub, and after smoking, fin ishes with a flavorful madefrom-scratch barbecue sauce. He added, Being a Mess Lord is an honor because our service men and women are laying it on the line. For every person that comes through our line, I say, thank you even though I know thats not enough. I want to talk to every person. I want to serve every person. This isnt about me standing around. I want to cook and talk and share some laughs. Its a lot of fun Simington, a restaurant owner for 17 years, is in her third year as a Mess Lord. Its hard to say no to Navy Entertainment because our Sailors and Marines never say no when it comes to the security of our country, said Simington. Her restaurants breakfast and lunch menu includes her now-famous Captain Crunch French Toast. Today, Im cooking up a new dish composed of fresh fruit salsa and candied sweet potatoes served with a blacked chicken breast. Its sweet, salty, spicy, savory, gooey and crunchy all together and peo ple tend to like that flavor sen sation. She added, When we get the list of ingredients each galley is working with we try to cook from their inventory and put a fresh spin on it to show them creative alternatives to cooking the same old Navy chow. Simington will appear this fall on the new NBC cook ing/game show called Food Fighters, where amateur cooks go head-to-head against profes sional chefs to test their homestyle culinary skills with a blind judges panel. Check your local listings. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013 13

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The fleet logistics support commu nity is unique to Navy Reserve aviation. There is no active duty equivalent flying the C-130T or C-40A transport aircraft. Comprised of active duty and Selected Reserve personnel, VR-62 provides around-the-clock, world wide logistics support. The squadron is assigned four C-130T Hercules aircraft. For FY13, the Nomads moved priority cargo in every geographic combatant command. We detached to EUCOM, PACOM and CENTCOM but have also flown missions in AFRICOM, NORTHCOM and SOUTHCOM, said VR-62 Operations Master Chief Karen Quinn. The squadron supported a variety of customers, from carrier air wings and Seabee battalions, to special operations forces. Scarpino added, We achieved a number of special events that deserve mention. VR-62 accumulated 28 years and 77,000 hours of mishap-free opera tions. We won the Battle E, the Golden Wrench and the Golden Anchor awards. And our Operations Officer, Lt. Cmdr. Todd Nichols, was awarded the Full Time Support Junior Officer of the Year by the Association of the United States Navy. He also noted that VR-62 locat ed five lost mariners off the coast of Micronesia. The Nomads also pinned five new chiefs, and surged aircraft for logistics events on opposite sides of the planet. Quinn went on to say, VR-62 has proven over time that the Nomads can answer all lift requests with respon siveness, adaptability and flexibility to serve our customers around the globe when and where missions dictate. VR-62 is one of five Navy Reserve C-130T squadrons working around the clock to support the logistics needs of Navy and Marine Corps units anytime, anywhere. Based at NAS Jacksonville, the Nomads operate four of the Navys 19 C-130T Hercules transport aircraft. Air logistics missions may include high-priority passengers, equipment, special parts and supplies. VR-62 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013 Dempsey gives hints on future prioritiesIn his first two-year term as chair man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Army Gen. Martin Dempsey hasnt blinked when facing challenges that would make some men quit the Iraq with drawal, the Afghan surge, the sexual assault epidemic, green-on-blue kill ings in Afghanistan, sequestration, Benghazi, the Arab Spring, the Syrian War, a colder relationship with the Russians. And it goes on day after day after day. The chairman began his second two-year term Oct.1. He, and his wife, Deanie, look for ward to the future. He was in South Korea discussing the 31-year-old communist dictator who rules North Korea. And the challenges elsewhere will pile up the arguments over the East and South China Sea, trying to cajole allies to see the wisdom of your ways. Some challenges he will expect, but other will crop up and he will have to deal with them along with all the things he has to do. And now the money that was there when he first took office is gone. In fact, instead of finding just $487 bil lion in savings in the defense budget, he needs to find an additional $500 billion forcing a $1 trillion cut to defense. And add that to the fact that the U.S. government recently shut down. When he started his first term as chairman he issued four priorities. The first was to achieve the national objectives that the military forces had Iraq and Afghanistan, deterrence in the Persian Gulf and so on. Second was to build Joint Force 2020 which was a look to the future to build the capabilities we will need in the future and not just today. The other two priorities dealt with the profession of arms. It occurred to me that after 10 years we needed to take a look at the values to which we claim to live to determine whether the personnel policies, training, deploy ment, all of that was contributing to our sense of professionalism or wheth er we had some points of friction, he said. His final priority was keeping faith with the military family. Dempsey is an armor officer by trade, and an English professor by heart and he is choosy about his words. I chose fam ily not families, because its not just spouses and children its about vet erans and its about the many, many young men and women who will tran sition out of the military under my watch, he said. These priorities will remain the same, he told reporters. But what Ive learned over the past two years is where I have to establish some initiatives, some milestones, some programs and processes to achieve progress in those areas over the time remaining to me. He notes it is a much different bud getary and fiscal environment than when he started. In fact, its twice as bad. It was $487 billion when I start ed, and now its a trillion-dollar chal lenge, Dempsey said. Expectations about levels of support, the pace of training the pace of deployments are all going to change in the next couple of years, and I have to make sure the force adapts to that, he said. Were going to transition 100,000plus out of the military, and I have to make sure those young men and women are ready for that change, Dempsey said. I have to slow the growth of pay and health care I dont have to reduce it I have to slow the growth [and] make it sustainable. And Ive got to reshape the force both in size and capability, and weve got [to] renew our sense of profes sionalism, because it is through that, that well get through this incred ible uncertainty, he said. Dempsey is most worried about uncertainty in the force and what that is doing to the military family. Now, we are far more adaptable than we are given credit for, he said. Theres this notion of the cumbersome military bureau cracy. Some is true, but there is also underneath the Pentagon an incred ible group of young men and women leaders who change as they need to change to address the challenges as they find them. And they will continue to do that. How smart are you when it comes to your knowledge of Navy aircraft? Check out these six aircraft and write down their designations. Check your answers on Page 20. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil 1 2 3 4 5 6

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Friday at 7 p.m. Oct. 11 Holliday & Ken Oct. 18 Karaoke with Randy Oct. 25 Second Tyme Around Band Deweys Family Night 3rd Friday of the Month Deweys will be open for dinner & bev erages Oct. 18 Balloon Artist Nov. 15 Karaoke with Tom Turner Dec. 20 Childrens Holiday Bingo Childrens Holiday Bingo will start at 1830 and has a cost of $10 per per son and includes soft drinks, hot dog, dauber, bingo card and gift bag for each child. DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Youth Bowling League: Every Mon. & Wed., 10:30 am noon $17 annually or $8 per week. Includes shoes, awards will be given at the end of the season! Rising Stars Youth League: Every Sat., 10:30 am 12:30 pm. Pee Wee Division (6 years & under) 2 games, $6 per week. Juniors Division (7 years & older) 3 games, $8 per week. Special Stars Bowling League for fami lies with special needs children. All ages welcome! Ramps available for the non-ambulatory as well as bumpers for beginners. Runs for 10 weeks at a cost of $7 per week, shoes are included. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4 6 pm. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4 10 pm. Thursdays: Free bowling for Active Duty 11 am 1 pm. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4 6 pm, Party Extreme $10, 8 pm midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Oct. 19, 1 4 pm. $20 per person, regis tration begins at noon. Scratch Sweeper: Oct. 26, 1 4 pm. $30 entry fee, check in starts at noon. *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6 8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Learn to Swim Fall Sessions At the Indoor Pool Session 1 Oct. 14 24 Session 2 Oct 28 Nov 7 $40 military, $45 DOD Monster Dash 5K October 31 at 11:30 a.m. Perimeter Rd. / Antenna Farm Pre-register by October 18 Fourth Annual Zumba Party October 23, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Fitness Center Outdoor Pavilion Barktoberfest October 26, 9 a.m. Vet Treatment Facility Bldg. 537 Free 2 mile walk/run with the dogs!I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil Jacksonville Zoo Spooktacular $9. Universal Halloween Horror Nights: Sunday Thrusday $42.25, Friday $53, Saturday $74.25 Pandemic Haunted Attractions San Jose Blvd in Mandarin, tickets on sale at ITT! Haunting of School House 4 $18 Waves of Honor Special: Seaworld Orlando Adult $46.50, Child $42.25. Busch Gardens Tampa Adult $45, Child $40.50. Monster Jam: Club seating (includes pit pass) $42, regular seating (includes pit pass) $22. Jacksonville Jaguars: Section 147 Bud Zone, $70. Jags shuttle bus $12. Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2013 2014 Season: Tickets now available! MOSH: $7 $12. The Artist Series Broadway in Jax 2013 2014 Season: Tickets available now! Mamma Mia!: Oct. 19, 2013, 8 pm, $60.50. Celtic Thunder: Nov. 10, 2013, 7 pm, $80. Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus: Jan. 17 & 18, 2014, $51. War Horse: Feb. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $68.50. Memphis: Mar. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $65. Million Dollar Quartet: Apr. 26, 2014, 8 pm, $65. The D* Word: Oct. 4 Oct. 25, 2014, $43.75 $46. Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27,2014) 4 day Hopper ticket$166 4 day 1 park per day and water park ticket-$166 4 day Hopper and Water park combo ticket$194 Gatorbowl $35 Capital One Bowl $98 Russell Athletic Bowl $78 Soul Food Festival Special $20 General Admission $32 Preferred $42 VIP $65 Legoland Free admission for active duty at park Tickets for family members available at ITTThe Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Navy Birthday 5K October 11 at 11:30 a.m. Perimeter Rd./Antenna Farm HabiJax ReStore Volunteer Trip October 12 at 8 a.m. Pumpkin Carving Contest October 15 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Oct. 22 for active duty Oct. 10 & 24 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Movie Under the Stars October 25 at 7 p.m. Featuring Monsters University Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Oct. 7 Nov. 20 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013 17

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Work is almost complete to rehabili tate three storm water outfalls where the NAS Jax shoreline property meets the St. Johns River. Fabric form concrete is a big part of the cost-effective, low-maintenance erosion control systems were using at NAS Jax for improved stability and durability in storm water management. It also aids in wildlife control by providing a clean habitat that is not attractive to birds, reptiles and small mammals an important factor in air field management, explained Deputy Airfield Facilities Manager Winston Rogers. Where the fabric form concrete out fall meets the river, two sizes of gran ite riprap were installed. Riprap is rock or other material that is used to for tify shorelines against wave erosion. It works by absorbing and deflecting the energy of waves, to lessen the waters ability to erode soil or structures on the shoreline, said Rogers. It starts with laying down a stabili zation mat, followed by a layer of small (12 in diameter) granite riprap. Thats topped with a layer of larger granite that breaks the surface of the river without any vegetation being affected. Shoreline grasses on the St. Johns River are considered living shoreline that protect waterfront property and may not be disturbed. Each of the three improved outfalls will have water levels that ebb and flow with the river tides. Primarily, this improvement project keeps the storm water outfalls clean and clear to make them unattractive to wildlife. It also provides solutions to other storm drainage issues that the base has been fighting over the years, such as relining drainpipes under the airfield tarmac. Our next improvement will be grad ing the slope inside the triangle area of grass between the two runways. Overgrowth and erosion have taken their toll over the years, so our goal is to eliminate standing water on the air field after torrential downpours, said Rogers. Airfield storm water management improvements nearly finished 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013 19 When a woman hears the words breast cancer the world narrows dramati cally. Though not the leading cause of death in women, it is one that can affect her qual ity of life and her relationships with family and community. Treatments include remov ing both breasts (mastectomy) with immediate reconstruc tion, simple biopsy or lumpec tomy (just removing the affect ed breast tissue). According to the American Cancer Society and CDC, this year more than 200,000 people will be diagnosed with breast cancer but only 40,000 will die from breast cancer. One percent (approx 1,000) of breast cancers diagnosed will be men. Interestingly, in the last five years the death rate has decreased even as the rate of diagnosis has remained steady due in large part to the tre mendous effort made over the last decade encouraging women to have annual mam mograms. I am a strong advocate of breast self exam/awareness (BSE) and mammography. Despite the controversy over when, who and how often mammograms are done, women continue to vote with their breasts and have one annually. Since cancer has been in your breast at least five to seven years before it can be identified on a mammogram, a monthly BSE can be life saving. Some cancers are found on mammograms as tiny grains of salt or sand. Termed ductal carcinoma in situ (DClS) and often called pre-cancerous, this form of cancer has a great er than 95 percent cure rate and may be treated with simple surgery and radiation. While the majority of breast cancers start in the ducts of the breasts, some begin in the breast lobules the glands that produce milk. Lobular cancer is very dif ficult to detect with traditional mammography as it is less like ly than other forms of breast cancer to cause a firm breast lump. Because of this, lobular can cer often appears as a thicken ing of the tissue, a new area of fullness, swelling or change in the texture of the skin, such as a dimpling or peau dorange, that suddenly appears. I hope you understand why many consider BSE an impor tant component of a healthy lifestyle. Treatment for most breast cancer is surgery, pos sible x-ray treatment and hor mone or chemotherapy. Advances in technology have allowed operations that require less axilla lymph nodes, medi cal oncology to further identify tumor components and treat ments. No longer is everyone getting toxic medications. Some may take a hormone blocking medication for five to seven years while others have chemotherapy that is less physically taxing. Even radia tion has changed to create a more targeted therapy with less disruption to underlying body parts such as the heart and lungs. It used to be a celebration when breast cancer patients reached the five-year mark. While we know that some breast cancers can reoc cur within two years, we are now looking to the 10-, 15or 20-year mark. So whats next? Lets cele brate the research and technol ogy that have allowed women and men diagnosed with breast cancer to live longer, with less problems and side effects. Lets continue to advocate for annual mammograms and monthly BSE. Lets grow closer to our fami lies that have supported us, as well as the community that has fought for us. Lets continue to be the best we can possibly be and achieve that dream of a cure some thing Im passionate about as a survivor of my mothers breast cancer. Known for pumpkin pie and crisp nights, fall is undoubt edly a favorite season among many. With lower temperatures, longer nights, and flu-sea son right around the corner, a change in season calls for a change in safety awareness. Below are tips to fight the flu and keep our community safe so everyone can enjoy a festive autumn. Stop the Spread: Fall Cold & Flu Prevention Cold and flu season gener ally lasts between October and May. Follow these healthy habits to avoid obtaining the unpleasant symptoms associ ated with the cold and flu. Avoid contact with people exhibiting flu-like symptoms. If you are the germy culprit expe riencing symptoms, do yourself and those around you a favor rest up and keep to yourself until symptoms are gone. Cant help the coughs and sneezes? Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue and wash your hands regularly to keep the germs at bay. Use disin fectant to clean contaminated surfaces. Give your immune system the support it needs by sleeping well and checking your stress at the door. Seven to nine hours of sleep every night is sug gested to maintain a healthy schedule. Physical activity and a diet complete with healthy foods and plenty of fluids have been known to boost the immune system. Car & School Bus Safety Colder morning tempera tures can create fog and frost for morning drivers. Be sure to add a few extra minutes to your schedule in the morning to ensure all windows are clear before driving. In addition to fog and frost, fall brings with it bright sunsets and longer nights. To combat sun glare, keep a pair of sunglasses in your car. During darker hours, keep a close eye out for pedes trians and be sure to maintain headlights that are not auto matic. Now that the kiddos are back in class, it is important for everyone to familiarize themselves with School Bus safety. To view the BBC guide lines for school bus safety as well as other helpful safety tips, visit our safety page at: www. nasjacksonvillehomes.com Children, parents, and drivers can all benefit from reviewing these guidelines. Heater Preparation Rather than wait until the weather requires the use of a heater, now is the perfect time to test your heater to make sure that it is working properly. If you are concerned about the effectiveness of your heat ing system, please contact the Balfour Beatty Communities Maintenance Department directly at 779-1060. New MILITARY STAR Card Account holders receive 20 percent off purchases From Oct. 18 20, cus tomers who open a new MILITARY STAR Card account will receive 20 percent off their first days purchases (up to the customers credit limit). The 20 percent will be taken off the customers first months MILITARY STAR Card statement. This offer can be combined with other MILITARY STAR Card free interest promotions as well as with a scratchoff discount. The MILITARY STAR Card has no annual fee, a low interest rate and 24-hour customer service including online access. MILITARY STAR Card applications are available at any NEX. The applica tion can be processed the same day at the NEX cus tomer service desk. Become a Facebook fan and follow the NEX on Twitter. Lets keep advocating for mammography, breast self exam Changes in seasons calls for a change in safety awareness The Greater Jax Area USO has tickets available at the NAS Jax and NS Mayport USO for $15 each, cash transactions only. Guidelines active duty including Florida National Guard and Reservists on current active duty orders and dependents are eligible to purchase/use these tickets. dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equals four. If you have less than four you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but dependent children are not authorized to represent the service member/spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO director. a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest. No exceptions. for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the season.Requests, with justification, must be sent to Mike OBrien at mobrien@usojax.com Anyone caught purchasing excess tick ets or reselling tickets will be prohibited from buying any more tickets for the entire season. No over the phone transactions, tickets are first come, first served.For more information, call 778-2821.Jaguars tickets available at USOTickets are available the following days and times Dateof Game Opponent Time Sale Begins Sept. 29 Indianapolis Colts 1 p.m. Now Oct. 20 San Diego Chargers 1 p.m. Oct. 7 Nov. 17 Arizona Cardinals 1 p.m. Nov. 4 Dec. 5 Houston Texans 8:25 p.m. Nov. 25 Dec. 15 Buffalo Bills 1 p.m. Dec. 2 Dec. 22 Tennessee Titans 1 p.m. Dec. 9 It is an unfortunate fact of the modern housing world that homes across the coun try are going into foreclosure every day. Many of those homes are rental properties, and in many cases the tenant is the last one to know about it. If you rent your home and have come home to a Notice of Sale on your front door, or if youve started receiv ing court documents in the mail about your home going into foreclosure, this article is for you. Luckily, there are steps you can take to make sure youre protected against your landlords foreclosure, and resources avail able to assist you and your family. How can I prevent this situation? There are simple steps you can take to make sure the home youre about to rent is not going into foreclosure. Having this information up-front is one of the things youll want to consider, along with location, price, and whether theres plenty of run ning space for your pet hedgehog, when you determine which house to rent. The first and easiest is to ask your land lord whether his home is in foreclosure. Its a simple step to take, but there is no guarantee that your landlord will be hon est with you. Many homeowners will avoid giving out that information to their tenants for fear that they (a) wont sign a lease, or (b) will stop paying rent on a lease they already have. Still, it doesnt cost anything to ask, and its an easy early warning system for upcoming foreclosure issues. If your landlord refuses to answer, or if you are still suspicious, you can always check your local newspapers. Foreclosure sales will be listed daily. The downside is that you have to check every listing regu larly, and it will only list homes that are just about to be put up for sale. It still wont give you any notice that your landlord might be headed for trouble down the road. The best way to find out if foreclosure proceedings have been filed against your landlord is to call your local Clerk of Court. Foreclosure proceedings are public record, and you will be able to get all the informa tion you need from your local courthouse. Different states have different procedures for getting access to those files, so make sure you give the courthouse a call. Too late Ive already gotten the notice! If you start getting notifications of a pend ing foreclosure in the mail or on your door, you will have to decide whether you want to terminate your lease early or stick around to the end. Many families want to avoid moving in the middle of a tour, but having a bank as a landlord can be a huge has sle. The bank probably wont care that your plumbing is broken or there are roaches in the home. They may not fix the heating, and they probably wont return your calls about the water heater. Many families decide that its better to just find a new place to live. Fortunately, the decision is yours to make. Ive decided I want to stay Until recently, a foreclosure nearly always meant that the tenants were about to be evicted. That all changed in 2009, when Congress passed the Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act (PTFA). If you dont have a lease, the new homeowner is required to give you 90 days notice before you have to move out. If you do have a lease, the PTFA requires the new homeowner to stick to the terms of that lease, unless the new owner wants to move into the home as their pri mary residence. Even then, though, the new owner is required to give you 90 days notice before you are required to leave. In order to get the benefit of the PTFA, you should file a Notice of Tenancy in the court thats hearing the foreclosure case. This lets the judge know that there is someone living in the property. If you are wondering whether to pay rent to the bank or to your old landlord, you can also file a Motion to Deposit Rent into the Court Registry, which will let you pay rent to the court, who will then figure out where it goes. For assistance in drafting either one of these documents, you should make an appointment with your local Legal Assistance office. Ive decided I want to move The Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act does not automatically give you the right to terminate your lease if the property is fore closed. The good news is that most banks dont want to act as landlords. Some will even offer Cash for Keys programs that will pay you money in exchange for you moving out. The best way to get out of your lease if the home is being foreclosed is to talk to your landlord and the bank. If you do decide to move, the Navy is here to help. In 2008, the Department of the Navy began authorizing funded local moves for military members who are break ing their leases as a result of their landlords foreclosure. You will need to bring a copy of the Notice of Foreclosure and a Notice of Lease Termination to either your com mands staff judge advocate or your local legal assistance office. They will be able to help you get the authorization you need. Being a tenant in a home thats being fore closed can be a stressful and confusing situ ation. If you find yourself over your head, always feel free to make an appointment with your local legal assistance office. Protecting tenants at foreclosure: What you need to know if you rent your home

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013 The most common car purchase issue reported to legal assistance providers by Sailors and dependents is the spot delivery or yo-yo car sale. Typical complaints include but are not lim ited to violations of State Unfair and Deceptive Trade Practice Acts and Federal consumer law violations under the Truth in Lending Act (TILA) and the Federal Odometer Act. In a spot delivery or yo-yo car sale, a Sailor/Marine agrees to buy a new or used vehicle. They sign a purchase contract and a retail installment sales contract (RISC) and the dealer lets them leave the car lot with the vehicle before the RISC is actually approved and pur chased by a bank. The Sailor/Marine mistakenly believes that they already own the vehicle despite the fact that in many states the sale is not complete until the bank approves the vehicle loan. Some Sailors/Marines, once informed that their loan has not been approved and they do not own the vehicle, sadly opt to sign a costly and dealer-friendly new RISC with higher interest rates and higher monthly payments. The deal er and the financing company benefit from the servicemembers affection for their new car and calculate the Sailor/ Marine wont balk at paying more than they bargained for to keep it! So how can you avoid the trap of spot delivery or yo-yo car sales? Fully research the vehicle you want to buy and make sure it meets your transportation and per sonal needs. Avoid any impulse buying and arrive at the car lot youve selected with confidence in the car you want and what price you think you should pay. Multiple web-based resources exist to give you a good idea how much you should pay for any car and any accom panying options and how many deal ers in your area have the car you want. Negotiate with them and be prepared to walk away for a better deal! Unless you are able to pay for your car outright, you will need somebody to finance a loan. That might be a bank, credit union, or even the dealer themselves. You should be particularly careful when the dealer is the financier! It is rec ommended you seek financing from a bank or credit union independent of the dealer, if possible, as they gener ally offer better, more reliable terms for your loan. This does not mean that a dealer will never offer you a competitive rate. It just means that you must shop multiple financing sources to ensure you get the best deal. The terms of the loan offered to you by the bank or credit union will be based on your credit his tory and ability to pay. (Another reason a good credit history of not assuming too much debt and always paying your bills on time pays off!) Many banks and credit unions will even pre-approve you for a car loan making your nego tiations with the car dealer that much easier. Do not reveal the maximum amount of financing for which you have been pre-approved because that would reveal to the dealer how much they can charge you and it hurts your bargain ing position. Discuss your car-buying strategy with your bank or credit union lender or military legal assistance attor ney for tips on negotiating with dealers. If for whatever reason you are unable to secure a bank or credit union loan, you should still be aware of the general interest rates they charge for loans in your area. You should use these rates as your basis for any negotiation with a dealer financier and be wary of pay ing rates in excess of typical bank rates! Todays rates are at historic lows, and even Sailors/Marines with poor credit history should be able to avoid exces sive interest rates. Bring a copy of your RISC to Base Legal for review before you sign it! As an adult, you are generally liable for any contact you sign. Any honest car dealer should have no problem with providing you a copy of your RISC for review by Navy Legal. Take advantage of this free service, make an appoint ment, and talk to a Navy lawyer before you sign on the dotted line! Navy law yers and your local Fleet and Family Service Center can also provide guid ance regarding measures to improve your personal finances and perhaps a better deal, for a better car, sometime down the road. Finally, be wary of additional scams attempted by unscrupulous car dealers: If youve provided a trade-in as part of your deal, a questionable dealer might advise you need to sign a new RISC at a higher interest rate because your trade-in has been sold but your loan wont be approved without that higher rate. Now you have no car & have to sign? Not True! Most states outlaw the transfer of ownership of your trade-in until the financing on your new car has been approved. If a dealer makes such a claim, ask them to put it in writing and immediately contact a Navy lawyer! Some dealers may also claim, and even write in their contracts, that if your financing isnt approved by a lender and you must return your car, you will owe them a rental fee for the time you drove it. This is not true and do not agree to this provision. Bottom Line nobody can force you to sign a contract and with some effort you can set yourself for success with a fair deal for a vehicle you want. For fur ther assistance on legal issues involv ing car purchases and other consumer issues, please consult your local legal assistance office. The Region Legal Service Office Southeast has legal assistance offices at Jacksonville (904)-542-2565 ext. 3006, Mayport (904)-270-5445 ext. 3017), and Kings Bay (912)-573-3935). This article is not a substitute for individual legal advice and readers are advised that they should consult a lawyer to obtain proper advice for any legal issue.Be aware of details with spot delivery car sales In the market for a new or used car? Purchasing a vehicle is an exciting time, but also involves a major decision. Follow these guidelines, and youll walk into the car-buying situation more informed about how to protect yourself. People typically buy cars from either a dealership or private individual. If the seller is a private individual, the car is sole as is and without any warranty unless your contract specifies cover age. When the seller is a dealership, its important to know about the implied warranty of merchantability a term that describes the promises made by the dealership about the cars condi tion. The implied warranty of merchant ability is a contract law concept of the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC). The UCC provides guidance to states and parties to a contract, but in order for the UCC to apply to a contract, either a state must codify the UCC into its state laws (which many states have done) or parties must include it as a governing authority to a contract. The warranty of merchantability means that the seller promises the vehi cle will do what it is supposed to do, and that the cars basic functions are opera tional. However, the warranty of merchant ability does not cover everything that could go wrong with a car, so its still very important that you fully inspect a car before buying it from a dealership. The warranty of merchantability is also implied, meaning that it can be modified or excluded whenever a deal ership includes its own warranties in a vehicle sale. In order for a dealership to modify or exclude the implied warranty of merchantability, it must expressly use the term merchantability and, if the modification/exclusion is in writing, the writing must be conspicuous to the potential buyer. When a dealership provides its own written warranty and any other war ranty is expressly disclaimed, those terms and conditions govern the sales contract and any implied warranty does not apply. Therefore, its essential to read a deal erships warranty so that you under stand what repairs are covered, what promises are made, and whether pur chasing a dealerships extended service contract is worthwhile. Purchasing an extended service con tract is generally a cost-effective deci sion if the extension contract costs less than the anticipated repair costs for that vehicle. On a used car, the best place to look for information about whether the vehicle is being offered with a warranty included is the Buyers Guide, which must be posted in every used car sold by a dealership in every state except Maine and Wisconsin. The Buyers Guide must state: whether the vehicle is being sold as is or with a warranty; what percentage of the repair costs a dealer will pay under the war ranty; that spoken promises are diffi cult to enforce; that the buyer should get all promises in writing; to keep the Buyers Guide for reference after the sale; the major mechanical and electrical systems on the car; and to ask to have the car inspected by an inde pendent mechanic before purchasing. The Buyers Guide becomes part of the contract at the time of the sale and any guarantees within it override any of the contracts restrictions. If you see the terms as is, with all faults, or other words clearly stating that there are no implied warranties, then the warranty of merchantabil ity does not apply, and buyer beware! A vehicle sold as is means that all war ranties are disclaimed and the vehi cle is being sold in whatever its current condition may be. There are no prom ises about its quality or durability and the duty is completely on the buyer to inspect the car and know of its condi tion. The UCC also includes an implied warranty of fitness. This means that statements made by a dealership about a vehicles suitability for a particular purpose represent warranties. If a deal ership advertises that a car can haul a trailer, a customer buys it for that pur pose, and the car cannot actually haul a trailer, the dealership has breached the implied warranty of fitness. This is only implied and can be excluded or modi fied by a dealerships own warranties. Many states have incorporated the UCC into state laws on vehicle sales, and some states have even built upon the consumer protections in the UCC. Here is a survey of several states: Florida : Unless a dealership affirma tively disclaims all warranties in writ ing, a vehicle (whether new or used) is at least covered by the implied warranty of merchantability, the warranty of fit ness, and a good title. Florida does not have a used car lemon law if you pur chase a used car that turns out to be a lemon, you have no legal protections. Georgia : Has incorporated the war ranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose into its state laws, unless expressly excluded. Parties can broaden or narrow the implied war ranties of merchantability or fitness, but any waiver or disclaimer of the warran ties must be clear, to the point, and con spicuous. A dealership can also limit the implied warranty of merchantabil ity to the repair or replacement of defec tive goods. Mississippi : Has incorporated the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose into its state laws. In order for an implied warranty to be modified or excluded, the modifi cation/exclusion must be in writing, mention merchantability, and be con spicuous. Further, the modification/ exclusion must be separately acknowl edged by the buyer through a signature. Mississippi does not have a used car lemon law. It is important to understand your rights as a buyer when purchasing a vehicle, and it is essential to understand the problems that could arise if you do not carefully consider your purchase. Knowing your states laws regard ing warranties will help you make an informed decision and avoid legal has sles in the future. Buyer beware! What every new or used car buyer needs to know

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013 21 NAS Pensacola, Fla. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast awarded a $7.3 million task order under a multiple award construc tion contract Sept. 30 to Asset Group, Inc., a small busi ness based in Oklahoma City, Okla. Renovations planned for Building 600, the Navy Gateway Inn and Suites, at NAS Pensacola, Fla. Building 600 is on the State Historical Register and will be a challenging project incorporating elevators, new windows and doors through out with all the upgrades of a mid-grade hotel with old style charm, stated Theresa Withee, Director of Lodging in the Pensacola area. The work will include reno vation of the main entry draw ing room, kitchen areas, bed rooms and some bathrooms in each suite. It will also include front desk work areas, break rooms and offices. Our primary customers are those students and travelers that are on temporary travel orders for school or some busi ness event. We have a wide variety of civilian and military folks staying with us. We want to provide a fine value for our guests, said Withee. Visitors staying at the NGIS will notice the improvements as soon as they walk in, said NAS Pensacola Public Works Officer Cmdr. Jeff Deviney. The reception area and staff offices will be updated and a new door and ramp will be installed for ADA compliance. This is another project that was awarded through NAVFACs Small Business Program. Working to continuous ly build our Small Business program is important, said Nelson Smith, NAVFAC Southeast small business dep uty. Every contract awarded to a small business helps to keep our nations economy rolling. The work is scheduled for completion in January 2015. NAS Meridian, Miss. NAVFAC Southeast awarded a contract with a maximum amount of $30 million Sept. 27 to Gulf Coast Architectural Group Inc., a small business based in Pensacola, Fla., for indefinite-delivery/indefinitequantity architect and engi neering services throughout the NAVFAC Southeast area of responsibility. The initial task order for $117,879 was awarded for the full design specification for the demolition of four buildings at NAS Meridian, Miss. Work for this task order is expected to be completed by March 2014. The four buildings include the Enlisted Transient Barracks Buildling 203, American Federation of Government Employees Office Building 210, the picnic shelter Building 315, and Building 336. Additional work will be per formed at various Navy and Marine Corps facilities and other government facilities within the NAVFAC Southeast AOR including, but not limited to Texas (50 percent), Louisiana (25 percent), and Mississippi (25 percent). The contract will run through September 2018. NAS Corpus Christi, Texas NAVFAC Southeast awarded a $15.3 million contract Sept. 27 to Anthony and Gordon Construction Company, a small business based in Knoxville, Tenn., for construc tion of the Aircraft Corrosion Control Facility at NAS Corpus Christi, Texas. This new facility is required to support the Depots mis sion, said Cmdr. Amanda Brooks, NAS Corpus Christi Public Works Officer. Brooks explained that the request for work defined requirements that include larg er booths in the facility to sup port production schedules and increased flexibility in painting aircraft due to their increased workloads. The existing small er booths cannot keep pace with production needs. The project provides for the design and construction of a main facility that will include energy monitoring and con trol systems connection, fire protection, alarm systems and building information systems. Supporting facilities will include site development, utili ties and connections, lighting, paving, parking, walks, curbs and gutters, storm drainage, information systems and land scaping. Work is expected to be com pleted by February 2016.Navy Region Southeast: Small business construction awards announced

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2013 STORE S REOPEN SPORTS EVENT HS-11 COC Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VR) 62 completed a record-breaking year in FY13. The aptly named Nomads were poised to put more than 3,100 flight hours in the squadron logbook when the fiscal year ended Sept. 30. This is our highest fiscalyear flight-hour record since moving to NAS Jacksonville in 2009 and the second-high est in squadron history, said VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Tony Scarpino. In the course of flying those 3,100 hours, the Nomads com pleted 207 missions and lifted in excess of 2.7 million pounds of cargo. The Nomads moved cargo for the Navy, Army, Air Force, Marines, Royal Navy and Australian Defense Force. Thats an average of 17 missions, 260 flight hours and 314,801 pounds of cargo lifted per month for our four-aircraft squadron, said Scarpino. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel announced Oct. 5 he was recalling most of the Defense Department civilians who were placed on furlough as a result of the government shutdown that began Oct. 1. Today, I am announcing that most DOD civilians placed on emergency furlough dur ing the government shutdown will be asked to return to work beginning Oct. 7, he said. Immediately after President [Barack] Obama signed the Pay Our Military Act into law, I directed DODs acting general counsel to determine whether we could reduce the number of civilian personnel furloughed due to the shutdown, Hagel said. The Defense Department, he said, consulted closely with the Department of Justice, which expressed its view that the law does not permit a blanket recall of all civilians. However, DOD and DOJ attorneys concluded that the law does allow the Department of Defense to eliminate fur loughs for employees whose responsibilities contribute to the morale, well-being, capa bilities and readiness of service members, Hagel said. Consequently, I am now directing the military depart ments and other DOD compo nents to move expeditiously to identify all employees whose activities fall under these cat egories, he said. Hagel noted he expects the military departments to be able to significantly reduce but not eliminate civilian furloughs under this process. The defense secretary said the department has tried to exempt as many DOD civil ian personnel as possible from furloughs, and will continue to try to bring all civilian employees back to work as soon as possible. Ultimately, the surest way to end these damaging and irresponsible furloughs, and to enable us to fulfill our mis sion as a department, is for Congress to pass a budget and restore funds for the entire federal government, Hagel said. This has been a very dis ruptive year for our people including active duty, National Guard and reserve person nel, and DOD civilians and contractors, he said. Many important activities remain curtailed while the shutdown goes on. Civilians under furlough face the uncertainty of not know ing when they will receive their next paycheck. I strongly support efforts in Congress to enact legislation to retroactively compensate all furloughed employees, he said. And I will continue to urge Congress to fulfill its basic responsibilities to pass a bud get and restore full funding for the Department of Defense and the rest of the government, Hagel said. Commander, Navy Region Southeast Chief of Staff Capt. Steven Blaisdell signed a proclamation declaring October Domestic Violence Awareness Month at NAS Jacksonville, Sept 24, emphasizing the Navys role in the community and calling upon Navy leaders, service members and fam ily members to increase their efforts to prevent domestic violence. We in the Navy community have an obligation to become actively involved in prevention by supporting our Sailors and their families to live and raise children in a safe, nurturing environment, Blaisdell said. According to Jeannette Werby, Navy Region Southeast counseling and advocacy coordinator, said raising domestic violence awareness is vital to the Navys prevention efforts. It can happen to everybody. Its not particular to any race, ethnic group, social status, income or rank. It can happen anywhere, and it happens a lot more than most people think. Its also important for people to understand what resources the Navy provides to combat domestic violence, whether they are the victim or suspect someone else may be, Werby said. The fastest and most direct way of reporting domestic violence is through the Navys Family Advocacy Program (FAP), which provides victim protection and counseling for those affected by domestic violence. FAP representatives can be found at installation Fleet and Family Support Centers (FFSCs). The FAP looks into each report and takes the appropriate actions to protect victims should the report be substantiated. Its important for people to take action and report any situation where they suspect abuse, Werby said. The goal is to protect victims and provide them with the safety and security they need. Anyone who suspects domestic vio lence can file a report by contacting their installations FFSC. Additional support is also available through the Domestic Abuse Hotline at 1-800-799SAFE. Region Southeast focus on prevention during Domestic Violence Awareness Month Hagel recalls most defense department civilians VR-62 is truly world famous

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Oct. 10 1845 Naval School, later the U.S. Naval Academy, opens in Annapolis, Md. with 50 midshipmen and seven faculty. 1923 First American-built rigid air ship, Shenandoah (ZR-1), is christened. It used helium gas instead of hydrogen. 1944 Opening of Leyte campaign begins with attack of four Carrier Task Groups of Task Force 38 on Okinawa and Ryukyus. 1960 Navy assigned responsibility for program management and technical direction of Project SPASUR, the first U.S. universal satellite detection and tracking network. 1985 Fighter aircraft from USS Saratoga (CV-60) force Egyptian airliner carrying the hijackers of the cruise ship Achille Lauro to land in Italy, where the hijackers were taken into custody. Oct. 11 1776 Battle of Valcour Island on Lake Champlain, New York. Although defeat ed, the American flotilla delayed the British advance and caused it to fall back into winter quarters. 1824 Marquis de Lafayette visits the Washington Navy Yard during his year long tour of America. He returned to the yard the next day, Oct. 12, to continue his visit. 1942 Battle of Cape Esperance begins: In two-day battle, American task force stops Japanese attack on Guadalcanal and sinks two Japanese ships while losing only USS Duncan (DD-485). 1950 Task Force 77 aircraft destroy North Korean vessels off Songjin and Wonsan. 1963 Navy medical team from Norfolk, Va., begins massive inoculation program to safeguard against outbreak of typhoid in the wake of Hurricane Flora. 1967 Operation Coronado VI began in Rung Sat Zone. 1968 Launch of Apollo 7, the first U.S. three-man space mission, commanded by Cmdr. Walter Schirra Jr. USMC Maj. Ronnie Cunningham served as Lunar Module pilot. The mission lasted 10 days and 20 hours. Recovery was by HS-5 helicopters from USS Essex (CVS-9). Oct. 12 1914 USS Jupiter (AC-3) is first Navy ship to complete transit of Panama Canal. 1944 Aircraft from Carrier Task Force 38 attack Formosa. 1957 Rear Adm. Dufek arrives at McMurdo Sound, Antarctica to com mand Operation Deep Freeze III during the International Geophysical Year of 1957-58. 1965 End of Project Sealab II where teams of naval divers and scientists spent 15 days in Sealab moored 205 feet below surface near La Jolla, Calif. 1980 USS Guadalcanal and other ships of Amphibious Forces, 6th Fleet begin assistance to earthquake victims in Al Asnam, Algeria. 2000 Terrorists in a boat make sui cide attack on USS Cole (DDG-67) while the ship refuels in the port of Aden, Yemen. Seventeen Sailors are killed. Oct. 13 1775 Birthday of U.S. Navy. The Continental Congress establishes Continental Navy, later the U.S. Navy. 1954 USS Saipan begins relief and humanitarian aid to Haitians who were victims of Hurricane Hazel. Oct. 14 1918 Naval aviators of Marine Day Squadron 9 make first raid-in-force for the Northern Bombing Group in World War I when they bombed German rail road at Thielt Rivy, Belgium. Oct. 15 1917 USS Cassin (DD-43) torpedoed by German submarine U-61 off coast of Ireland. In trying to save the ship, Gunners Mate Osmond Kelly Ingram becomes first American sailor killed in World War I and later is awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroism. He becomes the first enlisted man to have a ship named for him, in 1919. 1948 First women officers on active duty sworn in as commissioned offi cers in regular Navy under Womens Service Integration Act of June 1948, by Secretary of the Navy John Sullivan. 1960 USS Patrick Henry (SSBN-599) successfully fires four Polaris test vehi cles under operational, rather than test, conditions. 1965 U.S. Naval Support Activity Danang, Vietnam, established. Oct. 16 1885 Capt. Alfred Thayer Mahan becomes Superintendent of the Naval War College. 1891 Baltimore Incident, Valparaiso, Chile. 1940 Fifth group of 10 destroyers from the Destroyers for Bases agree ment is turned over to British at Halifax, Canada. 1942 Carrier aircraft from USS Hornet (CV-8) attack Japanese troops on Guadalcanal. 1943 Navy accepts its first helicopter, a Sikorsky YR-4B (HNS-1) at Bridgeport, Conn. These are the times when its difficult to write a column. After Theresas pow erful message last week, I have nothing more to add. And yet Ive thought of little else, except what she and her boys are going through. I dont have any funny anecdotes about my own sons behavior, and I dont have specific feelings about the shutdown. Every train of thought leads back to Theresa and Landon and their children. In the 13 years Ive been writing my newspaper column, there have been plenty of weeks similar to this, weeks when it was hard to write. There have been times when I had the flu and couldnt bare to think. There have been times when we were in the middle of a move, and I couldnt find my computer. There have been times when I felt sad or depressed, and the last thing I wanted to do was come up with something to say. In 2007, I even wrote a column as I was about to walk out the door and deliver Lindell. In all those times, however, I only missed one week, and that was when Lindell was in the hospital six years ago. Today is the first week I felt like being absent again. Because, where do we go from here? How do we complain about the shutdown or the mud the kids tracked through the house when a Navy wife with a brand new baby just lost her husband? History shows us that we will move on. Think of all the warm and neighborly feelings after 9/11. Think about how quickly we regressed back to honking at people on the interstate, going to the store to buy new shoes we dont really need, or worrying about what color to paint our living room, or whether or not we need a new couch. Life goes on. And thats because sad and tragic things happen all the time. Theresas loss isnt novel. Indeed, her husbands helicopter accident didnt even make it onto the mainstream medias radar. Had Landon died a week later, his death might have been tied to a larger story like the government shut down. But as it was, Landon was just another Navy pilot doing his job. Yet theres nothing just about this for Theresa. And so, because Im at a loss for what to say next Ill tell you how Dustin and I knew Theresa and Landon. We met the Jones in Pensacola, where both Landon and Dustin were Navy flight instructors. I remember Dustin talking about how laid back and genuine Landon was. I met Theresa at a military spouse club meeting. She is tall, with long dark hair and not one single blemish on her face. Like me with Dustin, Theresa was the polar opposite of Landon. She is chatty and funny. We got along smashingly. When I had spouse club meetings at my house, Dustin would take our boys to Landons house and hang out. We, of course, eventually moved to Maine, and the Jones were transferred as well. Thanks to Facebook and the Internet, however, Theresa and I were able to stay in contact. Her status updates always made me laugh, and her relationship with Landon continued to remind me of mine with Dustin. So when I woke up that day a few weeks ago and saw that Theresa had posted, I could really use a miracle right now, I thought she was being funny. Then I heard there was a crash in the Red Sea. Could it be? Could Theresa be talking about that? Was Landon involved? Its weird to watch a friend go through something like this on Facebook, where you can scroll back and see how ordi nary their life was before that day. Then you scroll forward and see all the prayers coming in. Dustin was home from his job at the Pentagon the weekend after Landon died. We thought of the Joneses the whole time. The news colored every thing. Monday morning, while the kids were at school, we sat and talked for a long time about how it could have always been anyone. All those times I sent Dustin off to work or on deployment, and I never really thought anything would happen. But at times like this, the risks become hor ribly clear. Next week, Ill move on to writing about new things, but I will not forget. None of us will. Time and life go on, but Theresas story, especially as she bravely wrote last week, will leave a mark on all of us. Things that are hard to move beyond

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Military commissaries worldwide returned to normal operating schedules Oct. 7, said the director and CEO of the Defense Commissary Agency. This is certainly good news for our patrons and our employees, said Joseph Jeu. All our stateside stores are now returning to their regular sched ules as of Oct. 7. The DeCA announcement comes in the wake of the Department of Defenses Oct. 5 decision that most Department civilians will be recalled to work beginning Monday. As part of DoDs guidance, commissary opera tions were deemed necessary support to service members and their families. Most stateside stores closed Oct. 2 as part of the government shutdown. Overseas commissaries had been allowed to remain open. Returning to regular schedules on Monday means stores normally open on that day will serve customers. Those stores that are normally closed on Mondays will be open on their nor mal operating schedule. Customers are advised to check www.commissaries. com for their stores operating schedule. We recognize the disruption that the shutdown presented to our stateside patrons as far as access to their com missary benefit, Jeu added. Since the shutdown began, about 11,000 of DeCAs more than 16,000 employees were furloughed. The path to stateside commissaries reopening began upon President Obamas sign ing of the Pay Our Military Act into law. DoD subsequently determined legisla tion allows the DoD to eliminate fur loughs for employees whose responsi bilities contribute to the morale, wellbeing, capabilities and readiness of service members. We will do everything possible to ensure that our shelves are stocked with the products our customers want when they shop, he said. However, there will be a short adjustment period as our stores settle back into their pre-shut down operating and delivery routines.All commissaries return to normal hours JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013 3

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We must not operate any faster than safe In a message released Oct. 4, U.S. Fleet Forces (USFF) com mander, Adm. Bill Gortney, directed that the Fleet will continue to provide ready forces to safeguard national security during the government shut down, but limit activities to only those that are absolutely necessary to safely accomplish currently assigned excepted missions. His guidance referenced instructions provided in a memo from the Deputy Secretary of Defense that stat ed, The Department will, of course, continue to prosecute the war in Afghanistan, including preparation of forces for deployment into that conflict. The Department must, as well, continue many other opera tions necessary for the safety of human life and protection of property, including operations essential for the security of our Nation. In the message, Gortney directed his commanders to avoid or delay expenditures unless it is absolutely neces sary. This is not business as usual. He emphasized the quality of training and safety of forc es will not be compromised, but acknowledged the pace of training may need to slow to maintain standards. We must not operate any faster than safe, said Gortney. He focused on commanders responsibility to continually assess their commands and be aware when they are approaching the limits of safe operation. The admiral directed com manders to report any opera tions or events that are can celed or delayed because they are not considered essential or due to safety concerns as a result of the government shutdown. Commanders will also report the impacts of these decisions. Gortney closed the message by commending his commanders for their professionalism and dedication, and further charging them by saying, You are commanders and I expect you to command. I will con tinue to trust you to make the hard, fiscally responsible deci sions. We will provide leader ship with the best informa tion we have during this very dynamic situation. Commander, Navy Region Europe, Africa, Southwest Asia (EURAFSWA) held a change of command ceremony at Naval Support Activity Naples in the Capodichino district, Oct. 4. Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. relieved Rear Adm. Anthony Gaiani as the regions commander. I couldnt be more proud than to have this opportunity to lead and serve with the outstanding team here, said Scorby. To the men and women of Navy Region Europe, Africa, Southwest Asia, its my privilege to take command here today. I look forward to building on the amazing successes of Rear Adm. Gaiani. Scorby, a 1981 graduate of the State University of New York at Cortland, was commissioned an Ensign after completing Aviation Officer Candidate School in March 1983. His early operational assignments include Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron Two (VQ 2) and Patrol Squadron Special Projects Unit One (VPU 1). Scorby, subsequently, served as the officer in charge of VPU-1 and commanding officer of VQ-2. His most recent assignments were Commanding Officer NAS Jacksonville and Commander, Navy Region Southeast. Scorby holds a Master of Science in financial management from the Naval Postgraduate School, a Master of Arts in national security and strategic studies from the College of Command and Staff, U.S. Naval War College, and a Master of Arts in national resource strategy from the Industrial College of the Armed Forces. Gaiani commanded Navy Region EURAFSWA since August 2010. Under his leadership, he managed an annual budget of more than $400 million dur ing fiscally challenging times lead ing environmental stewardship projects that resulted in significantly improved resource management, while actively engaging families, government officials and community leaders and strength ening key relationships in the Navys critically important Europe, Africa, Southwest Asia operating environment. It has been an honor and a privi lege to serve with the men and women, military and civilians, of Navy Region Europe, Africa, Southwest Asia, said Gaiani. For the past three years, we have worked together to effectively provide world-class shore service and support for our maritime strategy, for four Combatant Commanders and forces both ashore and at sea in some of the most challenging areas of the world. I am very proud of what we have accomplished as a team. Gaiani was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal during the cer emony, for his exceptional leadership and for 30 years faithful military ser vice. Gaiani will retire from Naval ser vice. Scorby will oversee a workforce of more than 4,000 host nation employees, U.S. employees and military members responsible for providing efficient and effective shore service support to U.S. and allied forces in the Europe, Africa and Southwest Asia area of responsibility. USFF guidance for operations during shutdown Scorby relieves Gaiani as commander of Navy Region EURAFSWA 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013

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Hagel praises U.S. troops for capture of terrorist in AfricaDefense Secretary Chuck Hagel commended U.S. troops here Oct. 6 for the capture of what he described as one of the worlds most sought after terrorists. Over the weekend, U.S. military personnel con ducted targeted operations in Libya and Somalia to bring international terrorists to justice, he said. I want to commend all of the service members who were involved in the planning and execution of these two operations, which demonstrate the unparalleled precision, global reach, and capabilities of the United States military, Hagel said. As a result of the Libya operation, the defense secretary said, one of the worlds most wanted terrorists was captured and is now in U.S. custody. Abu Anas al Libi was designated as a global ter rorist by Executive Order, was a subject of the U.S. Rewards for Justice Program, and is on the U.N. al-Qaida sanctions list, Hagel said. He was also indicted for his alleged role in the 1998 U.S. embassy bombings in Africa, and other plots to conduct attacks against U.S. interests. The defense secretary noted these operations in Libya and Somalia send a strong message to the world that the U.S. will spare no effort to hold terrorists accountable, no matter where they hide or how long they evade justice. We will continue to maintain relentless pressure on terrorist groups that threaten our people or our interests, Hagel said. We will conduct direct action against them, if necessary, that is consistent with our laws and our val ues. Secretary Mabus on shutdownWe are grateful for the recent decision about our civilian workforce. I know this has been difficult on you and your families. We are still working through the details, but we will bring back as many of our civilians as we can under the new guidance. And we will continue to press to bring back all our civilian family as soon as possible. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013 Commands battle it out at MWR Sports ChallengeMore than 550 Sailors from 16 commands aboard NAS Jacksonville competed in the 2013 Command Sports Challenge, hosted by the NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department Oct. 3-4. The event was sponsored by USAA. There were record numbers of participants in the team-building competition to take on defending champs VR-58. In addition to the participants, both CBMU-202 and VR-58 had quite the cheering section with almost their entire commands present. The Command Sports Challenge is a great avenue for boosting morale in commands at NAS Jacksonville as they engage in a friendly two-day, 10-event sports and fitness competition. It enables command personnel to get away from their workspace and spend time with their shipmates in a more casual and fun way, said Bill Bonser, sports coordinator for NAS Jax. It is really fantastic to see our Sailors having a blast play ing together and competing against one another in a non-work environment. The competition began Oct. 3 with a 1500-meter relay at the outdoor track. Other events included 3-on3 basketball, ultimate Frisbee, a swim relay and dodge ball. The events on Oct. 4 included 3-on-3 sand volley ball, bean bag toss, tug-o-war, the fitness challenge and the most popular event the COs canoe race. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander said, Its great to see all these com mands come together and build camaraderie. Theres a lot of healthy competition going on. Thanks go out to all the people who worked so hard to make this event happen. Its a privilege and an honor to be a part of the greatest command in NAS Jacksonville history, said Cmdr. Tony Scarpino, commanding officer of VR-62, the overall winner. Im so glad that we were a part of it and congrats to all the participants. Its great to be a winner! VR-62 took first place with 1,075 points and defending champs, VR-58, finished in second with 1,025 points. Rounding out the top three was FACSFAC Jax with 925 points. Other finishers included CBMU-202 (850), NRSE RCC (825), NCTS (800), TPU (750), FLCJ (475), VP-30 (300), VP-5 (200), CV-TSC (200), FRCSE (75), NAS Jax (50), Naval Hospital Jax (25) and VP-16 (25).Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013 7

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Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service mem bers and their families. Pre registration is required at 5425745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2013: Nov. 12-15 (5:30-10 p.m.) Program (TAP) Separation Workshop (7:30 a.m.4:15 p.m.) Program (TAP) Retirement Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) p.m.) July 2. a.m.) Nov. 25. Workshop (9:40 a.m.-noon) Nov. 25. Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Nov. 13-14. Specialist Training (7:30 a.m.Workshop (1:30-4 p.m.) Nov. 14. p.m.) Workshop (9-10:30 a.m.) Nov. p.m.) (11 a.m.-1 p.m.) Nov. 19. Logic (1-3 p.m.) Nov. 5, 12, 19, Support Group (9:30-11 a.m.) Every Wednesday Nov. 7. To register for any of the above workshops call 542-5745.Fleet and Family Support Center offers life skills workshops held superiority at sea, from which they threatened to stop wreak destruction on seaside settlements. In response, a few of the states had commissioned small fleets of their own for defense of local waters. Congress had not yet authorized privateer ing. Some in Congress wor ried about pushing the armed struggle too far, hoping that reconciliation with the mother country was still possible. Yet, a small coterie of men in Congress had been advo cating a Continental Navy from the outset of armed hostilities. Foremost among these men was John Adams of For months, he and a few others had been agitating in Congress for the establish ment of an American fleet. They argued that a fleet would defend the seacoast towns, protect vital trade, retaliate make it possible to seek out the arms and stores that would make resistance possible. egates laid before Congress a bold resolution for the building and equipping of an American fleet, as soon as possible. attacked it, saying it was the maddest idea in the World to think of building an American Fleet. Gen. George Washington was read in Congress in which he reported that he had taken under his command, at Continental expense, three armed schooners to cruise off enemy supply ships. Henceforth, Congress established a Naval Committee charged with equipping a fleet. This committee directed the purchasing, outfitting, man ning, and operations of the first ships of the new navy, drafted subsequent naval legislation, and prepared rules and regulations to govern the Continental administration. Almost one month later, on Nov. 10, as an extension of that naval legislation, Congress resolved that two battalions raised. The legislation also estab lished a Naval Committee to supervise the work. All togeth er, the Continental Navy num bered some 50 ships over the course of the war. They took Isles themselves, contributing to the demoralization of the to divert warships to protect convoys and trade routes. After the American War for Independence, Congress sold the surviving ships of the Continental Navy and released the seamen and officers. The Constitution of the United ered Congress to provide and maintain a navy. Acting on this authority, Congress ordered the construction and manning of six frigates in administered naval affairs from that year until Congress The Navy had no official ly recognized birthday until 1972, when Admiral Elmo Zumwalt, chief of naval opera tions, with the advice of Vice Admiral Edwin Hooper, director of naval history, authorized Navy celebrates 238 years of service Oct. 13 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013

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Cmdr. Timothy Kinsella Jr. will assume command of Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 11 from Cmdr. Ryan Keys on Oct. 11 at 11:11 a.m., in Hanger 117 aboard NAS Jacksonville. Keys served as HS-11 commanding officer since July 2012. Kinsella was raised in Dublin, Ireland and enlisted in the U.S. Navy in 1989, earning his Silver Dolphins as a plank owner on board USS Kentucky (SSBN 737) in 1991. He is a 1996 graduate of the United States Naval Academy and was desig nated as a naval aviator in 1998. His first operational assignment was with the Gunbearers of HC-11 in San Diego, where he flew the HH-46D Sea Knight and deployed to the Western Pacific and Middle East on board the USS Peleliu (LHA 5) and USS Boxer (LHD 4). From 2004-2006, Kinsella served as the assistant navigator on board USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75). In 2007, Kinsella joined the Dragonslayers of HS-11 as a depart ment head where he flew the H-60F/H Seahawk and deployed on board the USS Enterprise (CVN 65) in sup port of Operation Enduring Freedom. Ashore, Kinsella served as White House Liaison to the Secretary of the Navy, and was hand selected to serve as the Secretarys Protocol Aide from 2002-2003. He also served as Flag Aide to the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Air Warfare (OPNAV N98) from 20032004. Most recently, he served in the Joint Operations Directorate (J-33) on the Joint Chiefs of Staff from 2009-2011. Kinsella has served as HS-11 Executive Officer since July 2012. Keys led the Dragonslayers through the end of their second back-to-back deployment on board USS Enterprise, for the aircraft carriers final cruise. He will now be going to Washington, D.C. to serve at the U.S. Strategic Command Center for Combating Weapons of Mass Destruction. As the new CO, Kinsella will lead the Dragonslayers through a complete workup cycle prior to deploying with Carrier Air Wing One (CVW-1) on their new ship, USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71). As VP-5 continues its busy schedule operating and maintaining the P8-A Poseidon, the squadron is highlighting one outstanding Mad Fox each week. This weeks Mad Fox of the Week is AO3(AW) Mallory Burton. Burton was born in Grantville, Kansas and joined the Navy in January 2009. After boot camp she attended A-school in Pensacola, and then received orders to USS Harry S. Truman at Naval Station Norfolk, Va. where she was trained in ammunition build-up. She reported to VP-5 in June 2010 and has since deployed to NAS Sigonella, Italy and Kadena, Japan, with her fellow Mad Foxes. As an aviation ordnanceman, Burton is charged with handling, loading, and main taining sonobuoys and ordnance that the P8-A Poseidon employs. She is also tasked with maintaining the weapon systems on the aircraft. Ordnancemen ensure that the aircraft and its crew are able to accomplish their tasking using the necessary weapon systems on all missions daily. As all Mad Foxes can attest, the transition from the P3-C Orion to the P8-A Poseidon has drastically changed the way Burton accom plishes her job. It was a major change from hands on trou ble shooting and analog weapon systems. With the P8-A Poseidon, we now take a more hands off approach and allow the planes fault codes to determine what actions we need to take to fix any malfunction the weapon systems may have, explained Burton. However, working alongside my fellow Mad Foxes each day is the best part of my job and pushes me to continue to learn our new plat form. Burtons current goals are to make petty officer 2nd class and continue to work towards her veterinarian technician degree. When she is away from the squadron, Burton enjoys pursuing her own photography business, where she focuses on personal and landscape photogra phy. She also enjoys hunting with friends during deer and duck seasons. VP-5 is currently in the inter-deployment readiness cycle aboard NAS Jacksonville. Kinsella takes Dragonslayers helm on Friday VP-5 Mad Fox of the Week JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013 9

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Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles American Red Cross Volunteer Program Chairperson, Helen Donahoe, retires after 40 years 38 at NH Jacksonville of assistance to active-duty military, retirees and their families. Donahoe, born in Detroit, Mich. and raised in New York City and Long Island, N.Y., became a Red Cross volunteer at NH Jacksonville in 1975. She began her illustrious career of volunteerism at Red Cross as a caseworker at Naval Hospital Key West, in 1961, where her husband, retired Navy Cmdr. Norman Donahoe, was assigned. Back in 1961, the Red Cross had a program that assisted military families with child care, which afforded me time to become a volunteer, said Donahoe. Little did I know that 40 years later I would still be involved with Red Cross volunteer service. Throughout each of her husbands duty assignments, Donahoe continued to vol unteer for Red Cross along side fellow Army, Navy and Marine Corps spouses and in 1975 she returned to NAS Jacksonville and applied to become a Red Cross volunteer at NH Jacksonville. At NH Jacksonville, she began her volunteer career in recreation and later became a caseworker. Donahoe was eventually chosen as chairman of volunteer programs, and for the past 38 years has super vised and coordinated the placement and training of all volunteers within the hospital. There are currently 55 Red Cross volunteers who assist military members and their families at the hospital. Donahoe continued to be involved with casework. Even as chairman of vol unteer programs, I continued to be a caseworker, something that I truly enjoyed, said Donahoe. My most rewarding moments were when I could sit down and help someone who is in need. She expanded her realm of influence in the volunteer community and was instru mental in the establishment of volunteer programs at Naval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Key West in 2001 and NBHC Mayport in 2003. I cannot think of another individual who has dedicated more time and energy to the mission of assisting military members and their families than Helen, said Jack Morgan, former Red Cross Regional Chief Executive Officer. For the past 10 years, that we worked together, she was the heart and soul of the Red Cross Volunteer Program at Naval Hospital Jacksonville. Through the numerous leadership changes over time, Helen was the glue that kept the program together. Donahoe, 88, was instru mental in getting NH Jacksonvilles volunteer project off the ground. She retired Oct. 9 with more than 23,500 hours of volunteer service. It comes as no surprise that she has received both the Presidential and Clara Barton awards for her devotion to strengthening the nation and for making a difference through her volun teer services. I plan to spend more time with family and continue my hobby of oil painting, some thing I have been doing since 1969 when my husband was stationed at Fort Ritchie, Md., said Donahoe. Helen is truly one of those extraordinary people who you are so proud to have on your team, said NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer. On behalf of Naval Hospital Jacksonville and the community, I want to thank Helen for her service to our military mem bers our nations heroes and their families. Her dependability and reli ability has stood the test of time for volunteer retention. She will be truly missed. Mary Miciano, a native of Morgantown, W.Va., assumed the duties as Red Cross volun teer program chairperson Oct. 9 and is eager to continue the standards set by Donahoe. Miciano, a retired NH Jacksonville nurse (20 years) joined the Red Cross staff in 2010. American Red Cross support of military members and their families enhances morale and contributes to the increased operational capabilities of link ing military families during emergencies, connecting fami lies with local resources (information and referral services), providing resiliency training (deployment services) and supporting wounded warriors at military hospitals. The American Red Cross unwavering commitment to members of the U.S. military, its veterans and their families continues to grow and develop more than a century after Clara Barton first recruited nurses to support the U.S. Army in 1881. NH Jacksonvilles priority since its founding in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. The command is comprised of the Navys third-largest hospital and five branch health clinics across Florida and Georgia. Of its patient popu lation about 163,000 active and retired sailors, soldiers, Marines, airmen, guardsmen and their families more than 57,000 are enrolled with a pri mary care manager at one of its facilities. To find out more, visit the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ NavalHospitalJax. Red Cross volunteer Donahoe retires after 40 years at Naval Hospital 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013

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Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert spoke at the annual Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) International Conference Banquet at Ben Franklin Hall Oct. 2, in Potomac, Md. The theme of this years event was, Ready, Relevant and Capable. You are a key indicator of how we can get ahead of issues our Sailors are having. said Greenert. Through the analysis of NMCRS counseling trends, Navy leaders are able to anticipate issues before they become critical. He thanked the society for the year-round assistance to Sailors, Marines and their families, as well as the societys recent assistance in providing counselors for victims of the Washington Navy Yard shootings. He also discussed the societys availability of financial support during the government shut down. Its hard to put into words what it means to us, for Sailors to know theyll be taken care of, said Greenert. We need to continue to support and make sure we are providing support for our troops overseas. Throughout the government shutdown NMCRS offices are open during their regularly scheduled business hours. In the event of individual or family difficulty during the govern ment shutdown, the NMCRS is ready to provide assistance to Marines, Sailors, military spouses and retirees with interest-free loans and grants to meet emerging needs. Over the first half of 2013, the NMCRS has served 31,922 clients with $21.5 million in interest-free loans and grants. The society has also presented 3,000 gift bags to expectant military families and made 24,617 home visits to those in need. The NMCRS International Conference brings together its leadership from 51 offices around the world every three years. Attendees traveled from all around the world to take part in the event. I think everyone in the room will agree that the last few days have been spent well, said Executive Vice President and Chief Operations Officer Carl Jensen. Were ready to go out there and serve Sailors, Marines and retirees in an even more enthusiastic manner, ever more efficient...this year and every year after. Attendees include the directors of 44 world wide offices and 36 Chair of Volunteers, 52 tra ditional and combat casualty assistance visit ing nurses, headquarters staff, and spouses. However, due to financial situation, 2010 event was cancelled; last event was in 2007. The military must look at the entire package of compensation, health care and retirement, Army Gen. Martin Dempsey told a U.S. Forces Korea Town Hall meeting in Seoul, South Korea Oct 1. The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and his wife, Deanie, spent an hour answering questions from the joint service audience. Budget issues were a main concern of the service members. Personnel costs have to be brought under control, the chairman said. He assured the service members that any changes to military retirement would be grandfathered. So the question is what do we do with retirement for the next generation of Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines, he said. But compensation and health care costs are growing at rates that are unsustainable to the all-volunteer force. This does not mean cuts, the chairman said, we may not actually have to reduce pay and benefits, but we have to slow the growth. Last year, for example, DOD recom mended a 1 percent pay raise for mil itary personnel. Congress upped the total to 1.8 percent. Slowing the rate by just that much would have saved DOD $13 billion. Instead, the money to pay for the raise came out of readiness accounts, the chairman said. In an interview with reporters traveling with him, Dempsey noted he has been through three drawdowns in his career that began in 1974 the postVietnam drawdown, the post-Cold War drawdown and the current one. This one is alarming to him because it is the steepest drawdown he has seen. The steepness of it puts us in a position to not exert enough control on balancing our requirements across all the accounts, whether they are manpow er accounts, modernization, mainte nance, training, family care, he said. Its extraordinarily challenging to try to balance the budget because of the steepness of this drawdown. He is worried about the long-term effects of the drawdown. Under sequester, DOD must cut an additional $52 billion from the budget in fiscal 2014. If I were able to shrink the force, close some unnecessary infrastructure, potentially cancel some weapons sys tems that we dont think are as impor tant as others, I think I can probably balance it and not affect readiness to the extent we are, he said. But Congress will not allow anoth er base realignment and closure pro cess, and Congress has continued some weapons systems the department has specifically said it does not need. Because there are parts of the bud get that are untouchable to me at this point, he said. Unless I can touch some of those things, it all comes out of readiness, which means the next group to deploy will be less ready than they should be. Thats not a position that our armed forces should be in as the greatest military on the planet serving the greatest nation on the planet. And sequestration could continue to be a year-by-year process, and that is dangerous because we are asking the force to live with uncertainty and do it a year at a time, he said. Eventually I think they are going to lose faith if we do it a year at a time. CNO addresses Ready, Relevant and Capable NMCRS Dempsey: Military must slow growth for military pay, health care JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013 11

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Mess Lords perform at Flight Line Caf Three notable chefs who care about Americas military, cooked up an irresistible lun cheon Oct. 1 for Sailors at the NAS Jacksonville Flight Line Caf. Think gooey cheeseburg ers, blackened chicken breasts and smokey ribs. The celebrity chefs included Sarah Simington, owner of the Blue Moon Cafe in Baltimore, Md.; Brian Duffy, a classical ly trained chef and culinary consultant; and Mike Hardin, owner of Hodads in San Diego thats rated as one of Americas top-5 burger joints. Hardin and Simington previ ously entertained at the Flight Line Caf in 2011. The Navy Entertainmentsponsored Mess Lords event, in coordination with Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) at NAS Jacksonville, was the groups second stop on a tour of galleys in the Navys southeast region. They want to show their support for our Sailors by shar ing some of their favorite reci pes and cooking techniques with our kitchen crew, said CSCS(SW) Wendell Heyward, NAS Jax Supply Department LCPO. Were just about ready to light up the smoker out back to finish off the ribs and chick en. We have a crew of 18 culi nary specialists here today who are eager to work with and learn from this talented trio of celebrity chefs. Hardin declared, Were the Mess Lords a fork full of free dom, one fork at a time! Being from San Diego, I really appre ciate the sacrifices made by our men and women in the Navy and Marines. Our job is to bring some home cooking, teaching and to have a good time as we feed the troops. The Mess Lords have enter tained at bases and on ships around the world, most recent ly on board the aircraft carri er USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75), as well as military bases in Bahrain, Dubai and Djibouti. When not touring with the Mess Lords, Duffy appears on the SpikeTV reality show Bar Rescue that helps owners of failing bars and grilles to regain customers and profitability. As a chef, I trained on clas sic cuisines, beginning with French and followed by Japanese, Greek and Italian. When I got tired of hearing people complaining about Irish food I set out to change that by developing a new Celtic cuisine based on traditional ingredients in contemporary presentations. So far, its been lots of fun, said Duffy. For our Sailors today, Im keeping it simple by going allAmerican with Gorillas St. Louis style pork ribs recipe. It begins with Gorillas original rib rub, and after smoking, fin ishes with a flavorful madefrom-scratch barbecue sauce. He added, Being a Mess Lord is an honor because our service men and women are laying it on the line. For every person that comes through our line, I say, thank you even though I know thats not enough. I want to talk to every person. I want to serve every person. This isnt about me standing around. I want to cook and talk and share some laughs. Its a lot of fun Simington, a restaurant owner for 17 years, is in her third year as a Mess Lord. Its hard to say no to Navy Entertainment because our Sailors and Marines never say no when it comes to the security of our country, said Simington. Her restaurants breakfast and lunch menu includes her now-famous Captain Crunch French Toast. Today, Im cooking up a new dish composed of fresh fruit salsa and candied sweet potatoes served with a blacked chicken breast. Its sweet, salty, spicy, savory, gooey and crunchy all together and peo ple tend to like that flavor sen sation. She added, When we get the list of ingredients each galley is working with we try to cook from their inventory and put a fresh spin on it to show them creative alternatives to cooking the same old Navy chow. Simington will appear this fall on the new NBC cook ing/game show called Food Fighters, where amateur cooks go head-to-head against professional chefs to test their homestyle culinary skills with a blind judges panel. Check your local listings. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013 13

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The fleet logistics support commu nity is unique to Navy Reserve aviation. There is no active duty equivalent flying the C-130T or C-40A transport aircraft. Comprised of active duty and Selected Reserve personnel, VR-62 provides around-the-clock, world wide logistics support. The squadron is assigned four C-130T Hercules aircraft. For FY13, the Nomads moved priority cargo in every geographic combatant command. We detached to EUCOM, PACOM and CENTCOM but have also flown missions in AFRICOM, NORTHCOM and SOUTHCOM, said VR-62 Operations Master Chief Karen Quinn. The squadron supported a variety of customers, from carrier air wings and Seabee battalions, to special operations forces. Scarpino added, We achieved a number of special events that deserve mention. VR-62 accumulated 28 years and 77,000 hours of mishap-free operations. We won the Battle E, the Golden Wrench and the Golden Anchor awards. And our Operations Officer, Lt. Cmdr. Todd Nichols, was awarded the Full Time Support Junior Officer of the Year by the Association of the United States Navy. He also noted that VR-62 locat ed five lost mariners off the coast of Micronesia. The Nomads also pinned five new chiefs, and surged aircraft for logistics events on opposite sides of the planet. Quinn went on to say, VR-62 has proven over time that the Nomads can answer all lift requests with respon siveness, adaptability and flexibility to serve our customers around the globe when and where missions dictate. VR-62 is one of five Navy Reserve C-130T squadrons working around the clock to support the logistics needs of Navy and Marine Corps units anytime, anywhere. Based at NAS Jacksonville, the Nomads operate four of the Navys 19 C-130T Hercules transport aircraft. Air logistics missions may include high-priority passengers, equipment, special parts and supplies. VR-62 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013 Dempsey gives hints on future prioritiesIn his first two-year term as chair man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Army Gen. Martin Dempsey hasnt blinked when facing challenges that would make some men quit the Iraq with drawal, the Afghan surge, the sexual assault epidemic, green-on-blue kill ings in Afghanistan, sequestration, Benghazi, the Arab Spring, the Syrian War, a colder relationship with the Russians. And it goes on day after day after day. The chairman began his second two-year term Oct.1. He, and his wife, Deanie, look for ward to the future. He was in South Korea discussing the 31-year-old communist dictator who rules North Korea. And the challenges elsewhere will pile up the arguments over the East and South China Sea, trying to cajole allies to see the wisdom of your ways. Some challenges he will expect, but other will crop up and he will have to deal with them along with all the things he has to do. And now the money that was there when he first took office is gone. In fact, instead of finding just $487 bil lion in savings in the defense budget, he needs to find an additional $500 billion forcing a $1 trillion cut to defense. And add that to the fact that the U.S. government recently shut down. When he started his first term as chairman he issued four priorities. The first was to achieve the national objectives that the military forces had Iraq and Afghanistan, deterrence in the Persian Gulf and so on. Second was to build Joint Force 2020 which was a look to the future to build the capabilities we will need in the future and not just today. The other two priorities dealt with the profession of arms. It occurred to me that after 10 years we needed to take a look at the values to which we claim to live to determine whether the personnel policies, training, deploy ment, all of that was contributing to our sense of professionalism or wheth er we had some points of friction, he said. His final priority was keeping faith with the military family. Dempsey is an armor officer by trade, and an English professor by heart and he is choosy about his words. I chose family not families, because its not just spouses and children its about vet erans and its about the many, many young men and women who will transition out of the military under my watch, he said. These priorities will remain the same, he told reporters. But what Ive learned over the past two years is where I have to establish some initiatives, some milestones, some programs and processes to achieve progress in those areas over the time remaining to me. He notes it is a much different budgetary and fiscal environment than when he started. In fact, its twice as bad. It was $487 billion when I start ed, and now its a trillion-dollar chal lenge, Dempsey said. Expectations about levels of support, the pace of training the pace of deployments are all going to change in the next couple of years, and I have to make sure the force adapts to that, he said. Were going to transition 100,000plus out of the military, and I have to make sure those young men and women are ready for that change, Dempsey said. I have to slow the growth of pay and health care I dont have to reduce it I have to slow the growth [and] make it sustainable. And Ive got to reshape the force both in size and capability, and weve got [to] renew our sense of profes sionalism, because it is through that, that well get through this incred ible uncertainty, he said. Dempsey is most worried about uncertainty in the force and what that is doing to the military family. Now, we are far more adaptable than we are given credit for, he said. Theres this notion of the cumbersome military bureau cracy. Some is true, but there is also underneath the Pentagon an incred ible group of young men and women leaders who change as they need to change to address the challenges as they find them. And they will continue to do that. How smart are you when it comes to your knowledge of Navy aircraft? Check out these six aircraft and write down their designations. Check your answers on Page 20. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil 1 2 3 4 5 6

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Friday at 7 p.m. Oct. 11 Holliday & Ken Oct. 18 Karaoke with Randy Oct. 25 Second Tyme Around Band Deweys Family Night 3rd Friday of the Month Deweys will be open for dinner & beverages Oct. 18 Balloon Artist Nov. 15 Karaoke with Tom Turner Dec. 20 Childrens Holiday Bingo Childrens Holiday Bingo will start at 1830 and has a cost of $10 per person and includes soft drinks, hot dog, dauber, bingo card and gift bag for each child. DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Youth Bowling League: Every Mon. & Wed., 10:30 am noon $17 annually or $8 per week. Includes shoes, awards will be given at the end of the season! Rising Stars Youth League: Every Sat., 10:30 am 12:30 pm. Pee Wee Division (6 years & under) 2 games, $6 per week. Juniors Division (7 years & older) 3 games, $8 per week. Special Stars Bowling League for families with special needs children. All ages welcome! Ramps available for the non-ambulatory as well as bumpers for beginners. Runs for 10 weeks at a cost of $7 per week, shoes are included. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4 6 pm. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4 10 pm. Thursdays: Free bowling for Active Duty 11 am 1 pm. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4 6 pm, Party Extreme $10, 8 pm midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Oct. 19, 1 4 pm. $20 per person, registration begins at noon. Scratch Sweeper: Oct. 26, 1 4 pm. $30 entry fee, check in starts at noon. *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6 8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Learn to Swim Fall Sessions At the Indoor Pool Session 1 Oct. 14 24 Session 2 Oct 28 Nov 7 $40 military, $45 DOD Monster Dash 5K October 31 at 11:30 a.m. Perimeter Rd. / Antenna Farm Pre-register by October 18 Fourth Annual Zumba Party October 23, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Fitness Center Outdoor Pavilion Barktoberfest October 26, 9 a.m. Vet Treatment Facility Bldg. 537 Free 2 mile walk/run with the dogs!I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil Jacksonville Zoo Spooktacular $9. Universal Halloween Horror Nights: Sunday Thrusday $42.25, Friday $53, Saturday $74.25 Pandemic Haunted Attractions San Jose Blvd in Mandarin, tickets on sale at ITT! Haunting of School House 4 $18 Waves of Honor Special: Seaworld Orlando Adult $46.50, Child $42.25. Busch Gardens Tampa Adult $45, Child $40.50. Monster Jam: Club seating (includes pit pass) $42, regular seating (includes pit pass) $22. Jacksonville Jaguars: Section 147 Bud Zone, $70. Jags shuttle bus $12. Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2013 2014 Season: Tickets now available! MOSH: $7 $12. The Artist Series Broadway in Jax 2013 2014 Season: Tickets available now! Mamma Mia!: Oct. 19, 2013, 8 pm, $60.50. Celtic Thunder: Nov. 10, 2013, 7 pm, $80. Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus: Jan. 17 & 18, 2014, $51. War Horse: Feb. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $68.50. Memphis: Mar. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $65. Million Dollar Quartet: Apr. 26, 2014, 8 pm, $65. The D* Word: Oct. 4 Oct. 25, 2014, $43.75 $46. Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27,2014) 4 day Hopper ticket$166 4 day 1 park per day and water park ticket-$166 4 day Hopper and Water park combo ticket$194 Gatorbowl $35 Capital One Bowl $98 Russell Athletic Bowl $78 Soul Food Festival Special $20 General Admission $32 Preferred $42 VIP $65 Legoland Free admission for active duty at park Tickets for family members available at ITTThe Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Navy Birthday 5K October 11 at 11:30 a.m. Perimeter Rd./Antenna Farm HabiJax ReStore Volunteer Trip October 12 at 8 a.m. Pumpkin Carving Contest October 15 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Oct. 22 for active duty Oct. 10 & 24 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Movie Under the Stars October 25 at 7 p.m. Featuring Monsters University Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Oct. 7 Nov. 20 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013 17

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Work is almost complete to rehabili tate three storm water outfalls where the NAS Jax shoreline property meets the St. Johns River. Fabric form concrete is a big part of the cost-effective, low-maintenance erosion control systems were using at NAS Jax for improved stability and durability in storm water management. It also aids in wildlife control by providing a clean habitat that is not attractive to birds, reptiles and small mammals an important factor in air field management, explained Deputy Airfield Facilities Manager Winston Rogers. Where the fabric form concrete out fall meets the river, two sizes of gran ite riprap were installed. Riprap is rock or other material that is used to for tify shorelines against wave erosion. It works by absorbing and deflecting the energy of waves, to lessen the waters ability to erode soil or structures on the shoreline, said Rogers. It starts with laying down a stabili zation mat, followed by a layer of small (12 in diameter) granite riprap. Thats topped with a layer of larger granite that breaks the surface of the river without any vegetation being affected. Shoreline grasses on the St. Johns River are considered living shoreline that protect waterfront property and may not be disturbed. Each of the three improved outfalls will have water levels that ebb and flow with the river tides. Primarily, this improvement project keeps the storm water outfalls clean and clear to make them unattractive to wildlife. It also provides solutions to other storm drainage issues that the base has been fighting over the years, such as relining drainpipes under the airfield tarmac. Our next improvement will be grad ing the slope inside the triangle area of grass between the two runways. Overgrowth and erosion have taken their toll over the years, so our goal is to eliminate standing water on the airfield after torrential downpours, said Rogers. Airfield storm water management improvements nearly finished 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013 19 When a woman hears the words breast cancer the world narrows dramati cally. Though not the leading cause of death in women, it is one that can affect her qual ity of life and her relationships with family and community. Treatments include remov ing both breasts (mastectomy) with immediate reconstruc tion, simple biopsy or lumpec tomy (just removing the affected breast tissue). According to the American Cancer Society and CDC, this year more than 200,000 people will be diagnosed with breast cancer but only 40,000 will die from breast cancer. One percent (approx 1,000) of breast cancers diagnosed will be men. Interestingly, in the last five years the death rate has decreased even as the rate of diagnosis has remained steady due in large part to the tre mendous effort made over the last decade encouraging women to have annual mam mograms. I am a strong advocate of breast self exam/awareness (BSE) and mammography. Despite the controversy over when, who and how often mammograms are done, women continue to vote with their breasts and have one annually. Since cancer has been in your breast at least five to seven years before it can be identified on a mammogram, a monthly BSE can be life saving. Some cancers are found on mammograms as tiny grains of salt or sand. Termed ductal carcinoma in situ (DClS) and often called pre-cancerous, this form of cancer has a greater than 95 percent cure rate and may be treated with simple surgery and radiation. While the majority of breast cancers start in the ducts of the breasts, some begin in the breast lobules the glands that produce milk. Lobular cancer is very dif ficult to detect with traditional mammography as it is less likely than other forms of breast cancer to cause a firm breast lump. Because of this, lobular can cer often appears as a thickening of the tissue, a new area of fullness, swelling or change in the texture of the skin, such as a dimpling or peau dorange, that suddenly appears. I hope you understand why many consider BSE an impor tant component of a healthy lifestyle. Treatment for most breast cancer is surgery, pos sible x-ray treatment and hor mone or chemotherapy. Advances in technology have allowed operations that require less axilla lymph nodes, medical oncology to further identify tumor components and treat ments. No longer is everyone getting toxic medications. Some may take a hormone blocking medication for five to seven years while others have chemotherapy that is less physically taxing. Even radia tion has changed to create a more targeted therapy with less disruption to underlying body parts such as the heart and lungs. It used to be a celebration when breast cancer patients reached the five-year mark. While we know that some breast cancers can reoc cur within two years, we are now looking to the 10-, 15or 20-year mark. So whats next? Lets cele brate the research and technology that have allowed women and men diagnosed with breast cancer to live longer, with less problems and side effects. Lets continue to advocate for annual mammograms and monthly BSE. Lets grow closer to our families that have supported us, as well as the community that has fought for us. Lets continue to be the best we can possibly be and achieve that dream of a cure some thing Im passionate about as a survivor of my mothers breast cancer. Known for pumpkin pie and crisp nights, fall is undoubt edly a favorite season among many. With lower temperatures, longer nights, and flu-sea son right around the corner, a change in season calls for a change in safety awareness. Below are tips to fight the flu and keep our community safe so everyone can enjoy a festive autumn. Stop the Spread: Fall Cold & Flu Prevention Cold and flu season gener ally lasts between October and May. Follow these healthy habits to avoid obtaining the unpleasant symptoms associ ated with the cold and flu. Avoid contact with people exhibiting flu-like symptoms. If you are the germy culprit experiencing symptoms, do yourself and those around you a favor rest up and keep to yourself until symptoms are gone. Cant help the coughs and sneezes? Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue and wash your hands regularly to keep the germs at bay. Use disin fectant to clean contaminated surfaces. Give your immune system the support it needs by sleeping well and checking your stress at the door. Seven to nine hours of sleep every night is sug gested to maintain a healthy schedule. Physical activity and a diet complete with healthy foods and plenty of fluids have been known to boost the immune system. Car & School Bus Safety Colder morning tempera tures can create fog and frost for morning drivers. Be sure to add a few extra minutes to your schedule in the morning to ensure all windows are clear before driving. In addition to fog and frost, fall brings with it bright sunsets and longer nights. To combat sun glare, keep a pair of sunglasses in your car. During darker hours, keep a close eye out for pedestrians and be sure to maintain headlights that are not auto matic. Now that the kiddos are back in class, it is important for everyone to familiarize themselves with School Bus safety. To view the BBC guidelines for school bus safety as well as other helpful safety tips, visit our safety page at: www. nasjacksonvillehomes.com Children, parents, and drivers can all benefit from reviewing these guidelines. Heater Preparation Rather than wait until the weather requires the use of a heater, now is the perfect time to test your heater to make sure that it is working properly. If you are concerned about the effectiveness of your heat ing system, please contact the Balfour Beatty Communities Maintenance Department directly at 779-1060. New MILITARY STAR Card Account holders receive 20 percent off purchases From Oct. 18 20, cus tomers who open a new MILITARY STAR Card account will receive 20 percent off their first days purchases (up to the customers credit limit). The 20 percent will be taken off the customers first months MILITARY STAR Card statement. This offer can be combined with other MILITARY STAR Card free interest promotions as well as with a scratchoff discount. The MILITARY STAR Card has no annual fee, a low interest rate and 24-hour customer service including online access. MILITARY STAR Card applications are available at any NEX. The application can be processed the same day at the NEX customer service desk. Become a Facebook fan and follow the NEX on Twitter. Lets keep advocating for mammography, breast self exam Changes in seasons calls for a change in safety awareness The Greater Jax Area USO has tickets available at the NAS Jax and NS Mayport USO for $15 each, cash transactions only. Guidelines active duty including Florida National Guard and Reservists on current active duty orders and dependents are eligible to purchase/use these tickets. dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equals four. If you have less than four you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but dependent children are not authorized to represent the service member/spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO director. a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest. No exceptions. for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the season.Requests, with justification, must be sent to Mike OBrien at mobrien@usojax.com Anyone caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets will be prohibited from buying any more tickets for the entire season. No over the phone transactions, tickets are first come, first served.For more information, call 778-2821.Jaguars tickets available at USOTickets are available the following days and times Dateof Game Opponent Time Sale Begins Sept. 29 Indianapolis Colts 1 p.m. Now Oct. 20 San Diego Chargers 1 p.m. Oct. 7 Nov. 17 Arizona Cardinals 1 p.m. Nov. 4 Dec. 5 Houston Texans 8:25 p.m. Nov. 25 Dec. 15 Buffalo Bills 1 p.m. Dec. 2 Dec. 22 Tennessee Titans 1 p.m. Dec. 9 It is an unfortunate fact of the modern housing world that homes across the coun try are going into foreclosure every day. Many of those homes are rental properties, and in many cases the tenant is the last one to know about it. If you rent your home and have come home to a Notice of Sale on your front door, or if youve started receiv ing court documents in the mail about your home going into foreclosure, this article is for you. Luckily, there are steps you can take to make sure youre protected against your landlords foreclosure, and resources avail able to assist you and your family. How can I prevent this situation? There are simple steps you can take to make sure the home youre about to rent is not going into foreclosure. Having this information up-front is one of the things youll want to consider, along with location, price, and whether theres plenty of run ning space for your pet hedgehog, when you determine which house to rent. The first and easiest is to ask your land lord whether his home is in foreclosure. Its a simple step to take, but there is no guarantee that your landlord will be hon est with you. Many homeowners will avoid giving out that information to their tenants for fear that they (a) wont sign a lease, or (b) will stop paying rent on a lease they already have. Still, it doesnt cost anything to ask, and its an easy early warning system for upcoming foreclosure issues. If your landlord refuses to answer, or if you are still suspicious, you can always check your local newspapers. Foreclosure sales will be listed daily. The downside is that you have to check every listing regu larly, and it will only list homes that are just about to be put up for sale. It still wont give you any notice that your landlord might be headed for trouble down the road. The best way to find out if foreclosure proceedings have been filed against your landlord is to call your local Clerk of Court. Foreclosure proceedings are public record, and you will be able to get all the informa tion you need from your local courthouse. Different states have different procedures for getting access to those files, so make sure you give the courthouse a call. Too late Ive already gotten the notice! If you start getting notifications of a pending foreclosure in the mail or on your door, you will have to decide whether you want to terminate your lease early or stick around to the end. Many families want to avoid moving in the middle of a tour, but having a bank as a landlord can be a huge has sle. The bank probably wont care that your plumbing is broken or there are roaches in the home. They may not fix the heating, and they probably wont return your calls about the water heater. Many families decide that its better to just find a new place to live. Fortunately, the decision is yours to make. Ive decided I want to stay Until recently, a foreclosure nearly always meant that the tenants were about to be evicted. That all changed in 2009, when Congress passed the Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act (PTFA). If you dont have a lease, the new homeowner is required to give you 90 days notice before you have to move out. If you do have a lease, the PTFA requires the new homeowner to stick to the terms of that lease, unless the new owner wants to move into the home as their pri mary residence. Even then, though, the new owner is required to give you 90 days notice before you are required to leave. In order to get the benefit of the PTFA, you should file a Notice of Tenancy in the court thats hearing the foreclosure case. This lets the judge know that there is someone living in the property. If you are wondering whether to pay rent to the bank or to your old landlord, you can also file a Motion to Deposit Rent into the Court Registry, which will let you pay rent to the court, who will then figure out where it goes. For assistance in drafting either one of these documents, you should make an appointment with your local Legal Assistance office. Ive decided I want to move The Protecting Tenants at Foreclosure Act does not automatically give you the right to terminate your lease if the property is fore closed. The good news is that most banks dont want to act as landlords. Some will even offer Cash for Keys programs that will pay you money in exchange for you moving out. The best way to get out of your lease if the home is being foreclosed is to talk to your landlord and the bank. If you do decide to move, the Navy is here to help. In 2008, the Department of the Navy began authorizing funded local moves for military members who are breaking their leases as a result of their landlords foreclosure. You will need to bring a copy of the Notice of Foreclosure and a Notice of Lease Termination to either your com mands staff judge advocate or your local legal assistance office. They will be able to help you get the authorization you need. Being a tenant in a home thats being foreclosed can be a stressful and confusing situation. If you find yourself over your head, always feel free to make an appointment with your local legal assistance office. Protecting tenants at foreclosure: What you need to know if you rent your home

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013 The most common car purchase issue reported to legal assistance providers by Sailors and dependents is the spot delivery or yo-yo car sale. Typical complaints include but are not lim ited to violations of State Unfair and Deceptive Trade Practice Acts and Federal consumer law violations under the Truth in Lending Act (TILA) and the Federal Odometer Act. In a spot delivery or yo-yo car sale, a Sailor/Marine agrees to buy a new or used vehicle. They sign a purchase contract and a retail installment sales contract (RISC) and the dealer lets them leave the car lot with the vehicle before the RISC is actually approved and purchased by a bank. The Sailor/Marine mistakenly believes that they already own the vehicle despite the fact that in many states the sale is not complete until the bank approves the vehicle loan. Some Sailors/Marines, once informed that their loan has not been approved and they do not own the vehicle, sadly opt to sign a costly and dealer-friendly new RISC with higher interest rates and higher monthly payments. The deal er and the financing company benefit from the servicemembers affection for their new car and calculate the Sailor/ Marine wont balk at paying more than they bargained for to keep it! So how can you avoid the trap of spot delivery or yo-yo car sales? Fully research the vehicle you want to buy and make sure it meets your transportation and per sonal needs. Avoid any impulse buying and arrive at the car lot youve selected with confidence in the car you want and what price you think you should pay. Multiple web-based resources exist to give you a good idea how much you should pay for any car and any accom panying options and how many deal ers in your area have the car you want. Negotiate with them and be prepared to walk away for a better deal! Unless you are able to pay for your car outright, you will need somebody to finance a loan. That might be a bank, credit union, or even the dealer themselves. You should be particularly careful when the dealer is the financier! It is rec ommended you seek financing from a bank or credit union independent of the dealer, if possible, as they gener ally offer better, more reliable terms for your loan. This does not mean that a dealer will never offer you a competitive rate. It just means that you must shop multiple financing sources to ensure you get the best deal. The terms of the loan offered to you by the bank or credit union will be based on your credit his tory and ability to pay. (Another reason a good credit history of not assuming too much debt and always paying your bills on time pays off!) Many banks and credit unions will even pre-approve you for a car loan making your nego tiations with the car dealer that much easier. Do not reveal the maximum amount of financing for which you have been pre-approved because that would reveal to the dealer how much they can charge you and it hurts your bargain ing position. Discuss your car-buying strategy with your bank or credit union lender or military legal assistance attorney for tips on negotiating with dealers. If for whatever reason you are unable to secure a bank or credit union loan, you should still be aware of the general interest rates they charge for loans in your area. You should use these rates as your basis for any negotiation with a dealer financier and be wary of pay ing rates in excess of typical bank rates! Todays rates are at historic lows, and even Sailors/Marines with poor credit history should be able to avoid exces sive interest rates. Bring a copy of your RISC to Base Legal for review before you sign it! As an adult, you are generally liable for any contact you sign. Any honest car dealer should have no problem with providing you a copy of your RISC for review by Navy Legal. Take advantage of this free service, make an appoint ment, and talk to a Navy lawyer before you sign on the dotted line! Navy lawyers and your local Fleet and Family Service Center can also provide guid ance regarding measures to improve your personal finances and perhaps a better deal, for a better car, sometime down the road. Finally, be wary of additional scams attempted by unscrupulous car dealers: If youve provided a trade-in as part of your deal, a questionable dealer might advise you need to sign a new RISC at a higher interest rate because your trade-in has been sold but your loan wont be approved without that higher rate. Now you have no car & have to sign? Not True! Most states outlaw the transfer of ownership of your trade-in until the financing on your new car has been approved. If a dealer makes such a claim, ask them to put it in writing and immediately contact a Navy lawyer! Some dealers may also claim, and even write in their contracts, that if your financing isnt approved by a lender and you must return your car, you will owe them a rental fee for the time you drove it. This is not true and do not agree to this provision. Bottom Line nobody can force you to sign a contract and with some effort you can set yourself for success with a fair deal for a vehicle you want. For further assistance on legal issues involv ing car purchases and other consumer issues, please consult your local legal assistance office. The Region Legal Service Office Southeast has legal assistance offices at Jacksonville (904)-542-2565 ext. 3006, Mayport (904)-270-5445 ext. 3017), and Kings Bay (912)-573-3935). This article is not a substitute for individual legal advice and readers are advised that they should consult a lawyer to obtain proper advice for any legal issue.Be aware of details with spot delivery car sales In the market for a new or used car? Purchasing a vehicle is an exciting time, but also involves a major decision. Follow these guidelines, and youll walk into the car-buying situation more informed about how to protect yourself. People typically buy cars from either a dealership or private individual. If the seller is a private individual, the car is sole as is and without any warranty unless your contract specifies cover age. When the seller is a dealership, its important to know about the implied warranty of merchantability a term that describes the promises made by the dealership about the cars condi tion. The implied warranty of merchant ability is a contract law concept of the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC). The UCC provides guidance to states and parties to a contract, but in order for the UCC to apply to a contract, either a state must codify the UCC into its state laws (which many states have done) or parties must include it as a governing authority to a contract. The warranty of merchantability means that the seller promises the vehicle will do what it is supposed to do, and that the cars basic functions are operational. However, the warranty of merchantability does not cover everything that could go wrong with a car, so its still very important that you fully inspect a car before buying it from a dealership. The warranty of merchantability is also implied, meaning that it can be modified or excluded whenever a dealership includes its own warranties in a vehicle sale. In order for a dealership to modify or exclude the implied warranty of merchantability, it must expressly use the term merchantability and, if the modification/exclusion is in writing, the writing must be conspicuous to the potential buyer. When a dealership provides its own written warranty and any other war ranty is expressly disclaimed, those terms and conditions govern the sales contract and any implied warranty does not apply. Therefore, its essential to read a dealerships warranty so that you under stand what repairs are covered, what promises are made, and whether pur chasing a dealerships extended service contract is worthwhile. Purchasing an extended service con tract is generally a cost-effective deci sion if the extension contract costs less than the anticipated repair costs for that vehicle. On a used car, the best place to look for information about whether the vehicle is being offered with a warranty included is the Buyers Guide, which must be posted in every used car sold by a dealership in every state except Maine and Wisconsin. The Buyers Guide must state: whether the vehicle is being sold as is or with a warranty; what percentage of the repair costs a dealer will pay under the war ranty; that spoken promises are diffi cult to enforce; that the buyer should get all promises in writing; to keep the Buyers Guide for reference after the sale; the major mechanical and electrical systems on the car; and to ask to have the car inspected by an inde pendent mechanic before purchasing. The Buyers Guide becomes part of the contract at the time of the sale and any guarantees within it override any of the contracts restrictions. If you see the terms as is, with all faults, or other words clearly stating that there are no implied warranties, then the warranty of merchantabil ity does not apply, and buyer beware! A vehicle sold as is means that all war ranties are disclaimed and the vehi cle is being sold in whatever its current condition may be. There are no promises about its quality or durability and the duty is completely on the buyer to inspect the car and know of its condi tion. The UCC also includes an implied warranty of fitness. This means that statements made by a dealership about a vehicles suitability for a particular purpose represent warranties. If a dealership advertises that a car can haul a trailer, a customer buys it for that pur pose, and the car cannot actually haul a trailer, the dealership has breached the implied warranty of fitness. This is only implied and can be excluded or modi fied by a dealerships own warranties. Many states have incorporated the UCC into state laws on vehicle sales, and some states have even built upon the consumer protections in the UCC. Here is a survey of several states: Florida: Unless a dealership affirmatively disclaims all warranties in writ ing, a vehicle (whether new or used) is at least covered by the implied warranty of merchantability, the warranty of fit ness, and a good title. Florida does not have a used car lemon law if you purchase a used car that turns out to be a lemon, you have no legal protections. Georgia : Has incorporated the war ranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose into its state laws, unless expressly excluded. Parties can broaden or narrow the implied warranties of merchantability or fitness, but any waiver or disclaimer of the warranties must be clear, to the point, and conspicuous. A dealership can also limit the implied warranty of merchantabil ity to the repair or replacement of defective goods. Mississippi : Has incorporated the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose into its state laws. In order for an implied warranty to be modified or excluded, the modifi cation/exclusion must be in writing, mention merchantability, and be conspicuous. Further, the modification/ exclusion must be separately acknowl edged by the buyer through a signature. Mississippi does not have a used car lemon law. It is important to understand your rights as a buyer when purchasing a vehicle, and it is essential to understand the problems that could arise if you do not carefully consider your purchase. Knowing your states laws regard ing warranties will help you make an informed decision and avoid legal has sles in the future. Buyer beware! What every new or used car buyer needs to know

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013 21 NAS Pensacola, Fla. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast awarded a $7.3 million task order under a multiple award construc tion contract Sept. 30 to Asset Group, Inc., a small busi ness based in Oklahoma City, Okla. Renovations planned for Building 600, the Navy Gateway Inn and Suites, at NAS Pensacola, Fla. Building 600 is on the State Historical Register and will be a challenging project incorporating elevators, new windows and doors through out with all the upgrades of a mid-grade hotel with old style charm, stated Theresa Withee, Director of Lodging in the Pensacola area. The work will include reno vation of the main entry drawing room, kitchen areas, bed rooms and some bathrooms in each suite. It will also include front desk work areas, break rooms and offices. Our primary customers are those students and travelers that are on temporary travel orders for school or some business event. We have a wide variety of civilian and military folks staying with us. We want to provide a fine value for our guests, said Withee. Visitors staying at the NGIS will notice the improvements as soon as they walk in, said NAS Pensacola Public Works Officer Cmdr. Jeff Deviney. The reception area and staff offices will be updated and a new door and ramp will be installed for ADA compliance. This is another project that was awarded through NAVFACs Small Business Program. Working to continuous ly build our Small Business program is important, said Nelson Smith, NAVFAC Southeast small business dep uty. Every contract awarded to a small business helps to keep our nations economy rolling. The work is scheduled for completion in January 2015. NAS Meridian, Miss. NAVFAC Southeast awarded a contract with a maximum amount of $30 million Sept. 27 to Gulf Coast Architectural Group Inc., a small business based in Pensacola, Fla., for indefinite-delivery/indefinitequantity architect and engi neering services throughout the NAVFAC Southeast area of responsibility. The initial task order for $117,879 was awarded for the full design specification for the demolition of four buildings at NAS Meridian, Miss. Work for this task order is expected to be completed by March 2014. The four buildings include the Enlisted Transient Barracks Buildling 203, American Federation of Government Employees Office Building 210, the picnic shelter Building 315, and Building 336. Additional work will be per formed at various Navy and Marine Corps facilities and other government facilities within the NAVFAC Southeast AOR including, but not limited to Texas (50 percent), Louisiana (25 percent), and Mississippi (25 percent). The contract will run through September 2018. NAS Corpus Christi, Texas NAVFAC Southeast awarded a $15.3 million contract Sept. 27 to Anthony and Gordon Construction Company, a small business based in Knoxville, Tenn., for construc tion of the Aircraft Corrosion Control Facility at NAS Corpus Christi, Texas. This new facility is required to support the Depots mis sion, said Cmdr. Amanda Brooks, NAS Corpus Christi Public Works Officer. Brooks explained that the request for work defined requirements that include larger booths in the facility to support production schedules and increased flexibility in painting aircraft due to their increased workloads. The existing small er booths cannot keep pace with production needs. The project provides for the design and construction of a main facility that will include energy monitoring and con trol systems connection, fire protection, alarm systems and building information systems. Supporting facilities will include site development, utilities and connections, lighting, paving, parking, walks, curbs and gutters, storm drainage, information systems and land scaping. Work is expected to be completed by February 2016.Navy Region Southeast: Small business construction awards announced

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24 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 10, 2013