Jax air news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Jax air news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note:
Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID:
UF00028307:02061


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2013 VP-16 REUNION SAILOR FUN CHARITY RIDE Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The Navys first F-35C Lightning II carrier vari ant aircraft squadron, the Grim Reapers of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 101, hosted a rollout cer emony for their new air craft at the squadrons home at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., on Oct. 1. The rollout ceremony will commemorate the long, storied history of the Grim Reapers and the establishment of VFA101 as the Navys first F-35C Fleet Replacement Squadron. The F-35C is a fifth generation fighter, com bining advanced stealth with fighter speed and agility, fully fused sensor information, networkenabled operations and advanced sustainment. Navy leaders, includ ing Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command Adm. Bill Gortney and Commander, Naval Air Forces Vice Adm. David Buss, spoke at the ceremony, along with Lockheed Martin Executive Vice President and General Manager, F-35 Lightning II Program, Lorraine Martin. VFA-101 received the Navys first F-35C June 22, becoming the Navys first F-35C squadron, and completed its first check flight in the squadrons The NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center introduced Domestic Violence Awareness month (October), with a con ference for those working with domestic violence victims, at the Orange Park Holiday Inn Sept. 26. We host this conference annually to offer domestic violence awareness training for our staff members and the many outside agencies we partner with to provide updated information and share ideas on how to better serve our clients, said NAS Jax Erica Schneider. The event began with NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker welcoming the group. I want to thank you for tak ing the time out of your busy schedules to attend this very important conference. Our Fleet and Family Support Center partners with various stakeholders to provide ser vice and aid to our community and also outside the fenceline. Some of the agencies, we part ner with are the Department of Children and Families, state attorneys office, Hubbard House and Quigley House. This outreach is very important to us to combat domestic violence. Wanamaker then introduced guest speakers Bill Rousseau and Rod Reder of the National Institute of Crime Prevention (NICP). Both are retired police officers from Tampa, Fla. after nearly 30 years on the job, and are experts in the field of domestic violence. They cre ated NICP in 1999 to help pro vide domestic abuse and sexual assault training to those who work with victims of these crimes. We truly believe in provid ing quality domestic abuse and sexual assault training to build a safer community for all. Our mission is to pro vide law enforcement, victim advocates, judges, prosecutors, military personnel, and public health workers quality train ing regarding domestic vio lence and sexual assault issues that affect victims day-to-day lives, said Rousseau. Domestic violence is a com munity problem. Very often the mindset is that domestic vio lence only involves a woman and its often kept within the four walls of a house, Reder told the audience. There may be children involved but we tend to have a very narrow scope of the effects of domestic violence, therefore we dont understand the grav ity of it. What we want to stress today is that a single domestic VFA-101 hosts F-35C rollout ceremony NAS Jacksonville cele brated Hispanic Heritage Month during a special luncheon Sept. 24. The event was held at the NAS Jax River Cove Catering and Conference Center and was sponsored by the base Multi-Cultural Awareness Committee. This years theme is Hispanics: Serving and Leading Our Nation with Pride and Honor. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander kicked off the event with the opening remarks. We are here today to take time to observe the Hispanic Heritage, for many great reasons. Hispanic Sailors have played a vital role in our Navys traditions and the execution of the Navys NAS Jax celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month FFSC kicks off Domestic Violence Awareness month A message from the commander in chiefTo the dedicated and hard-working employees of the United States government: The federal government is Americas largest employer, with more than 2 million civilian work ers and 1.4 million active duty military who serve in all 50 States and around the world. But Congress has failed to meet its responsibility to pass a budget before the fiscal year that begins today. And that means much of our government must shut down effective today. I want you to know that I will keep working to get Congress to reopen the government, restart vital services that the American people depend on, and allow public servants who have been sent home to return to work. At my direction, your agencies should have reached out to you by now about what a shutdown means for our and your families. Today, I wanted to take a moment to tell you what you mean to me and to our country. That begins by saying thank you for the work you do every day work that is vitally important to our national security and to American families eco nomic security. You defend our country overseas and ensure that our troops receive the benefits they deserve when they come home. You guard our borders and protect our civil rights. You help small businesses expand and gain new footholds in overseas markets. You guide hundreds of thousands of people each day through the glory of Americas national parks and monuments, from Yosemite to the Statue of Liberty. And much more. You do all this in a political climate that, too often in recent years, has treated you like a punching bag. You have endured three years of a fed eral pay freeze, harmful sequester cuts, and now, a shutdown of our government. And yet, you perse vere, continuing to serve the American people with passion, professionalism, and skill. None of this is fair to you. And should it continue, it will make it more difficult to keep attracting the kind of driven, patriotic, idealistic Americans to public service that our citizens deserve and that our system of self-government demands. Public service is noble. Public service is impor tant. And by choosing public service, you carry on a proud tradition at the heart of some of this countrys greatest and most lasting achievements. In fact, more than 50 current or former federal employees have received the Nobel Prize for their efforts. It was grants from the Department of Energy that helped businesses unlock new sourc es of renewable energy, and from the National Science Foundation that helped entrepreneurs like the founders of Google change the world. It is your efforts that will help this country meet the great challenge of our time-rebuilding an economy

PAGE 2

2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013 Oct. 3 1921 USS Olympia sails for France to bring home the Unknown Soldier from World War I. 1955 USS Saipan (CVL48) begins disaster relief at Tampico, Mexico rescuing people and delivering supplies. 1962 Launch of Mercury 8, piloted by Cmdr. Walter Schirra Jr., orbited Earth in a mission lasting 9 hours and 13 minutes. He made six orbits at an altitude up to 175.8 statute miles at 17,558 mph. Recovery by USS Kearsarge (CVS-33). Oct. 4 1821 Lt. Robert Stockton sails from Boston for Africa to carry out his orders to help stop the international slave trade. 1943 Aircraft from USS Ranger sink five German ships and damage three in Operation Leader, the only U.S. Navy carrier operation in northern European waters during World War II. 1952 Task Force 77 aircraft encounter MIG-15 aircraft for the first time. 1976 USS Jonas Ingram (DD-938) rescues seven survi vors of a Finnish motor craft that sank in the Baltic Sea. 1991 USS Arkansas, USS Sioux, USS Aubrey Fitch and HS-6 rescue personnel on merchant ships in three dif ferent rescue operations in the Arabian Sea. 1998 U.S. and Algerian navies conduct first bilateral exercise since Algerian inde pendence in 1962. It was a search and rescue operation involving USS Mitscher. Oct. 5 1863 Confederate subma rine David seriously damages USS New Ironsides with a spar torpedo off Charleston, S.C. 1913 Trial of OWL, Navys first amphibian flying boat. 1957 Minitrack, a satellite tracking net developed by the Naval Research Laboratory, becomes operational. This net work, with stations from Maine to Chile, tracked the Vangard satellite. Oct. 6 1884 Navy establishes the Naval War College at Newport, R.I. (General Order 325). 1940 Fourth group of eight U.S. destroyers involved in Destroyers for Bases agree ment are turned over to British authorities at Halifax, Canada. 1943 In night Battle of Vella Lavella, three U.S. destroy ers attack nine Japanese destroyers to stop evacuation of Japanese troops from Vella Lavella., Solomon Islands. 1958 USS Seawolf (SSN575) completes record sub merged run of 60 days, logging over 13,700 nautical miles. 1962 Commissioning of USS Bainbridge (DLGN-25), first nuclear-powered frigate. 1987 Destruction of three Iranian small boats. 1997 NASA Astronaut Cmdr. Wendy Lawrence, returns from mission of STS-86: Shuttle -Mir 7 when Atlantis docked with Mir Space Station. Oct. 7 1864 USS Washusett cap tures Confederate raider CSS Florida in harbor of Bahia, Brazil. 1924 Rigid airship Shenandoah commences transcontinental flight. 1975 President Gerald Ford signs law allowing admission of women into service acade mies. 2001 Operation Enduring Freedom begins with carrier air strikes, and ship and sub marine Tomahamk strikes. Oct. 8 1812 Boat party under Lt. Jesse Elliott captures HMS Detroit and Caledonia in Niagara River. 1842 Commodore Lawrence Kearny in USS Constitution addresses a letter to the Viceroy of China, urging that American merchants in China be granted the same treaty privileges as the British. His negotiations were successful. 1950 1st Marine Division embarks at Inchon for landings at Wonsan, Korea. Oct. 9 1942 First three schools for enlisted WAVES open at Stillwater, Okla. (Yeoman), Bloomington, Ind. (Storekeepers), and Madison, Wisc. (Radiomen). 1945 Parade in New York City honors Fleet Adm. Chester Nimitz along with 13 other Navy and Marine Corps Medal of Honor awardees. 1945 Typhoon hits Okinawa, damaging many Navy ships. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS The VP-16 Alumni Reunion Association hosted its 16th annual reunion Sept. 6, celebrating the squadrons past in a city steeped in historical tradition. Past and present War Eagles gath ered in Savannah, Ga. to swap sea sto ries and reminisce on their memories of the nest. During a reception dinner, VP-16 Commanding Officer Cmdr. William Pennington, Jr. entertained questions the veterans had regarding the squad rons transition from the P-3C Orion to the P-8A Poseidon and subsequent inter-deployment readiness cycle. Other guest speakers included Lt.j.g. Alexandra Miller and Lt. Adam Miller, Coast Guard officers assigned to sector Jacksonville. They gave a joint presentation high lighting the role of the Coast Guard in enforcing domestic and international regulations on U.S and foreign flag vessels and the Coast Guards role in sub marine escort duties at NSB Kings Bay, Ga. Cmdr. Robert Aguilar, nephew of a prior VP-16 aviation ordnanceman, and prospective executive officer on board USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) was the keynote speaker. The VP-16 Alumni Reunion Association boasts a roster of 409 members from the 1950s to present day, consisting of both enlisted Sailors and officers. Approximately 100 former War Eagles and family members attended this years reunion, the senior attend ee being Mr. C.W. Bill Creel, a Sailor assigned to and in attendance at the designation of VP-16 from VP-741 in February 1953. VP-16 sensor operator, AWO1 Robert Pillars, attended the dinner along with several of his squadron mates. The reunion dinner was an enlight ening experience, a glimpse into the past of previous VP-16 Sailors, Pillars remarked. I feel that every current VP-16 Sailor in attendance truly gained an appre ciation for the past experiences, events, and stories that the reunion members were willing to share. I enjoyed the evening and look forward to the oppor tunity to participate in similar future events. We are your history, but we would like to continue to be involved in your future, William Sherman, president of the VP-16 Reunion Association, remarked to Pennington. Pennington agreed, stating, Its important to foster this close relation ship with our past. These gentlemen set the standard that all VP-16 War Eagles aspire to, and we are proud to carry on their tradition of excellence. Next years reunion will take place Oct. 1-5, 2014 in San Antonio, Texas.Connecting with the past: VP-16 War Eagles attend reunion I regretted last weeks col umn as soon as it was pub lished. In particular, I regret ted that I wrote this: [O]ur spouses jobs dont become significantly more dangerous just because the U.S. is taking action [in a conflict]. I regret ted it because Monday morn ing, my Navy-wife friend, Theresa, lost her husband, Landon, in a helicopter crash in the Red Sea. Theresa has a new baby boy, Hunter, born in July, as well as a 6-year-old son, Anthony. Landon was supposed to be home one month ago, but his deployment was extended due to the situation in Syria. In other words, Theresas hus band should have been home on Monday with his new son. Instead, he was dead. Ive changed my mind about how these conflicts affect military families, and I set out to share that with you today. Then I realized its not my story to tell. So I offered Theresa the opportunity to share her thoughts with you. What fol lows are her words, written three days after her husbands death: My sweet boys, Anthony and Hunter, I hope you didnt feel my worry as I walked aimlessly around the house after being notified last Sunday morning that there had been a mishap in your dads squadron. I hope you didnt hear my whispers to your visiting grandparents as I told them there had been a crash in their sons squadron, but I did not yet know who was involved. Anthony, I am glad you were off with a friend as I sat at the kitchen counter and checked the time stamp on your fathers last e-mail to me. Over and over again I checked, trying to figure out what time it was on that side of the world and how that related to the time of the incident. Hunter, I am relieved you were napping when the doorbell rang. You didnt hear my shriek. Why is my doorbell ringing? Neither of you saw me look out the peephole at the three men standing there in their Navy Service Dress Blues. You didnt hear me wailing No! No! No! while my body gave way and crumpled to the floor. Only your grandparents witnessed my guttural screams and sobs as these men told me that your father and his aircraft were missing. Anthony, you slept at your friends house while a group of adults sat for hours and stared at each other in silence. Hunter, you were comforted by people wanting to hold you when you were fussy because I just couldnt do it. Neither of you saw me stare at the ceiling for hours as the dark night turned into morning and I held hope that your father would be found. Hunter, you were nursing when those three men came back into our house and I told them they would have to wait until I was done. Neither of you heard one of these men say The Navy regrets to inform you . . I barely heard them either. Anthony, Im sorry you were confused about being picked up early from school. You won dered aloud why there were so many flowers and people at home. I want you to know how awful it was to say yes when you asked, Dad is dead isnt he? To hear your screams of I want him alive! I want him alive! was almost more than I could bear. However, I do hope that out of all of this sadness, you got to witness true friendship and love. I hope you saw the strain our friends were under as they did everything in their power to bear our burdens for us. I hope you saw them on the phone, creating lists and orga nizing the logistical nightmare that ensued, just so I could sit with you and comfort you. I hope you saw the relief on my face when military friends took our car to get new brakes because your dad had asked me to do that in one of his last e-mails. I hope you saw my gratitude when I learned those friends had also put on four new tires for us. My boys, one of you lost your best friend, and one of you never even had the chance to meet him. But please know that your father loves you. His love is coming through all these people who have helped us. No, we will never hear his voice again, but his loving words are coming from those who have called and written. And when all of the help and calls and e-mails go away (because life goes on), you will start to feel his love from me. Because I have enough for all four of us.You can find more informa tion, including ways to help military families who lost loved ones, at www.Facebook.com/Sarah. is.Smiley. Words from a grieving widow

PAGE 3

where all who work hard can get ahead. So while the budget fights in Washington are too often partisan, your service to the country must never be. As one of my predecessors, President George H.W. Bush, once said, There is nothing more fulfilling than to serve your country and your fellow citi zens and to do it well. And that is what our system of self-government depends on. This shutdown was completely prevent able. It should not have happened. And the House of Representatives can end it as soon as it follows the Senates lead, and funds your work in the United States government without trying to attach highly controver sial and partisan measures in the process. Hopefully, we will resolve this quickly. In the meantime, I want you to know whether you are a young person who just joined public service because you want to make a difference, or a career employee who has dedicated your life to that pursuit-you and your families remain at the front of my mind. Your agency leaders and I will con tinue to defend your work at a time when that work has rarely been more important. We will continue to work with your agencies to keep you and your families apprised and informed of what is happening. And I will continue to do everything in my power to get the House of Representatives to allow our government to reopen as quickly as possible, and make sure you receive the pay that you have earned. Thank you, again, for your service, your sacrifice, and everything you do every day for this country we love so much.Furlough guidance resources If you are in shutdown furlough status, please ensure that your supervisors have good contact information so you can be reached as information becomes available. You can also take advantage of the fol lowing information resources: for most up to date information on the furlough status MESSAGE JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013 3

PAGE 4

4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013 NAS Jax Barracks Bash attracts hundredsHundreds of Sailors and Marines enjoyed a fall afternoon Sept. 26 at the Barracks Bash presented by NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department and the Liberty Program. The free event featured picnic-style food, T-shirts and prizes that included a gift card to the Navy Exchange, Deweys gift certificates, a Kota longboard, area restaurant gift certificates, HP Tablet and much more! The reason we put on the Barracks Bash is to provide a fun event for our single or unaccompanied active duty military personnel. The two Barracks Bashes we put on each year is the only large event that is specifically for this group of individuals, said Liberty Program Manager Tom Kubalewski. We know most of them are new to the Navy, away from their families for the first time and are still trying to adjust to life in the military. This is a great opportunity for them to get their minds off of work and to have a good time with their fellow Sailors he added. Entertainment included music by DJ OJ, a Liberty staff member, who kept the music playing non-stop. Barracks Bashers looking for competitive enter tainment could choose from the climbing wall, Velcro wall, rock wall, volleyball, mechani cal bull, bag toss and jousting. Mulberry Cove Marina Manager Phil Collins also offered free paddleboard lessons during the event. MWR thanks everyone who participated in or volun teered for this event. Sponsors, GEICO, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, University of Phoenix, VyStar Credit Union and USA Discounters were generous in their support of the Barracks Bash.Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services.

PAGE 5

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013 5 Cloudy skies and brisk winds did not prevent enthusias tic patrons from enjoying the annual Mulberry Cove Marina RiverFest on Sept. 28. The event, held on the St. Johns River, was open to all active duty members, reserv ists, retirees and Department of Defense civilians. The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary provided safe boat ing information and free inspections to attendees. The St. Johns Bass Anglers Club returned for another year offering free casting clinics to patrons of all ages. Children enjoyed free face painting. Fort George Surf Shop spent the day providing information on surfing lessons, surfboards and gear. Purcells Motorcycle and Marine World provided an opportunity to checkout two of their recreational vessels. Additional activities included volleyball, bag toss, music, bounce house, door prizes and a cookout. Phil Collins, MWR marina manger, said, We wanted to show appreciation to our patrons and showcase what the marina has to offer, this is a great way to get families involved in some of the outdoor activities that the marina has to offer . NAS Jacksonville MWR thanks the many volunteers and sponsors who made this event a success: VyStar Credit Union, Fort George Island Surf Shop, Purcells Motorcycle and Marine World and St. Johns Bass Anglers Club.Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government offi cially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. MWR RiverFest at Mulberry Cove Marina a fun day

PAGE 6

The Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) welcomed aboard Maj. Peter Nunn from the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR), Aug. 15. For the next two years, Nunn, a U.S. Army entomologist, is serving as NECEs liaison with WRAIR to increase jointness and readiness for future operations. Having Maj. Nunn on-site facilitates project development and coordination providing the opportunity to develop joint solutions to control and surveillance capa bility gaps and shortfalls, said Capt. Eric Hoffman, officer-incharge, NECE. Maj. Nunns knowledge and background provide an outstand ing opportunity for all of us to gain experience in service specif ic culture, procedures, language and requirements. As a result, our entomologists will be prepared to effectively function during joint contingency and humanitarian/ disaster relief operations. Nunn sees the significance of this collaboration beyond the bil let. Throughout my career I have seen the Navy and Army work jointly and perform numerous missions together, he said. This collaboration helps to ensure that the true recipient of our work, the warfighter, is effec tively protected from vector-borne diseases and commanders are given vital information to shape a battlefield. NECE collaborates with many different organizations, but they all share the common goal of protecting the deployed warfighter. NECE belongs to a consortium of Navy, Army, Air Force, govern ment, university and industry sci entists serving as the military testing and evaluation hub for novel insecticide dispersal equipment, compounds and control tech niques reducing the incidence of human disease transmitted by blood feeding insects on the battlefield, said Hoffman. The standardization of train ing and assets between Army and Navy along with ensuring the coordination of research needs and goals will be an added benefit of the Army presence here at NECE, explained Nunn. My goal here at NECE is to use my professional expertise as well as Army connections to improve communications, streamline operations, and integrate equip ment in a way that adds increased value to the both Navy and Army Entomology alike. As military operations become increasingly joint, opportunities to work closely with our sister services ensures the command is ready to respond to the ever-changing demands required to protect the warfighter. The United States Navy traces its ori gins to the Continental Navy, which the Continental Congress established on Oct. 13, 1775, by authorizing the pro curement, fitting out, manning and dispatch of two armed vessels to cruise in search of munitions ships supplying the British Army in America. The legislation also established a naval committee to supervise the work. All together, the Continental Navy num bered some fifty ships over the course of the war, with approximately 20 warships active at its maximum strength. After the American War for Independence, Congress sold the sur viving ships of the Continental Navy and released the seamen and officers. The Constitution of the United States, ratified in 1789, empowered Congress to provide and maintain a navy. Acting on this authority, Congress ordered the construction and man ning of six frigates in 1794, and the War Department administered naval affairs from that year until Congress estab lished the Department of the Navy on April 30, 1798. Not to be confused with the Navy Birthday or the founding of the Navy Department is Navy Day. The Navy League sponsored the first national observance of Navy Day in 1922 designed to give recognition to the naval service. The Navy League of New York proposed that the official observance be on Oct. 27 in honor of President Theodore Roosevelt, who had been born on that day. In 1972 Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Elmo Zumwalt authorized recognition of Oct. 13 as the Navys birthday. In contrast to Navy Day, the Navy Birthday is intended as an internal activity for members of the active forces and reserves, as well as retirees, and dependents. Since 1972 each CNO has encouraged a Navy wide celebration of this occasion to enhance a greater appreciation of our Navy heritage, and to provide a positive influence toward pride and profes sionalism in the naval service. Precedence of the U.S. Navy and the Marine Corps The Continental Navy was created before the Continental Marines. On Oct. 13, 1775 Congress enacted the first naval legislation providing for the outfitting of two warships. This marked the beginning of the Continental Navy, the forerunner of the United States Navy. Almost one month later, Nov. 10, 1775 and as an exten sion of that naval legislation Congress resolved that two battalions of Marines be raised. Following the Revolutionary War, both services went into abeyance. When they were reestablished in the 1790s, the reestablishment of the United States Navy preceded the reestablishment of the Marine Corps. An order by the Marine Corps Commandant in 1921 designated Nov. 10, 1775 as the birthday of the Marine Corps. In 1972, CNO Adm. Elmo Zumwalt, with the advice of Director of Naval History Vice Adm. Edwin Hooper, authorized observance of Oct. 13, 1775 as the Navy Birthday. NECE supports Department of Defense238th Navy Birthday celebration Oct. 13Defending America with pride since 1775 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013

PAGE 7

Four Sailors shared their personal stories on video recently of how alcohol incidents impacted their careers and the importance of drinking responsi bly, a Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention (NADAP) official said Sept. 27. The first video testimonial was released Aug. 29 and features ET2 Michael Palfrey from Naval Base San Diego answering the question, What does the phrase Keep What Youve Earned mean to you? Palfrey reveals the poor decision he made while drinking that adversely impacted his career. He provides advice for others on how to drink responsibly. Someone pushed a beer in my face and I said, Why not? The nights over, said Palfrey, and the rest was a blur. That moment when the cuffs went on, I just kind of sobered up and went This is not real. This did not just happen. Palfrey decided to participate in the Keep What Youve Earned campaign and share his story so other Sailors can learn from his mistakes. He reminds Sailors that although it may be a onetime thing, irresponsible decisions regarding alcohol can lead to severe career consequences. I had all of these things going for me a year ago, and now theyre all gone, Palfrey said. Its not just the financial costs and where they hit you in the wallet. Palfrey wound up seeking the help he needed and received tremendous support from his command leadership, including James Queen, command Drug and Alcohol Program Advisor (DAPA), Training Center San Diego. Queen supported Palfrey throughout treatment, including referring him to the Substance Abuse Rehabilitation Program. In the video, Queen says the Keep What Youve Earned campaign underscores how hard Sailors work to make rank and make their family and their community proud, and that its not worth it to throw it away for a couple drinks. Palfreys story is one of four being released as part of the Keep What Youve Earned campaign. Each testi monial reminds Sailors of the impor tance of drinking responsibly and keeping what theyve earned. Watch the video on NADAPs YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/user/ NavyNADAP. For more information, materials and resources from NADAPs Keep What Youve Earned campaign, visit www. nadap.navy.mil. Destructive drinking can kill what youve earned JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013 7

PAGE 8

violence event can have a devastating effect on a community. Well also discuss effective intervention. Remember you may be the only ones who have the opportu nity to prevent a domestic violence incident. The door to assist a victim may close rather quickly especially for those first responders on the scene. They have to do a good job and provide effective intervention because it may be the only chance they get, he continued. Reder then recalled an incident that occurred in Tampa, Fla. when he worked for the Hillsborough County Sheriffs Office. Several years in Tampa, we had such an event that brought great attention that domestic violence is a community problem. I got a call on my radio stating there were two dead bodies found in a car on the side of the road. We learned that they were two Tampa homicide detectives. This event affected many people and resulted in changes to policies within the police departments nationwide, he said. The audience then watched a video about a convicted criminal named Hank Carr who shot his girlfriends 4-year-old son, was arrested and escaped by unlocking his handcuffs while in the backseat of a police car. He had shot the two Tampa detectives transport ing him and later killed a Florida State Trooper who attempted to stop the vehicle he had carjacked. After a hostage standoff in a convenience store, Carr committed suicide. His girlfriend, Bernice Bowen was later convicted of child neglect and is currently serving a prison sentence. She was also charged with aiding and abetting a criminal after lying to police about the true identity of Carr who had a fake drivers license in the name of Bowens former husband. This is an unfortunate story that affected the Tampa community four people died that day. So this is why it is so important to intervene in domestic violence cases in the early stages, said Reder. Other topics discussed during the training included: understanding the victim and abusers behavior, cyber stalking, intimate partner rape, what domestic vio lence does to kids and injunctions for protection. Domestic Violence Awareness Month is recognized every October to remember those who have died at the hands of a loved one, honor those who have survived domestic violence, recognize the progress made in reducing domestic violence and recommit to end the abuse. If you or someone you know are in an abusive rela tionship, call (904) 354-3114. The hotline is manned 24/7. You never know, you just might save someones life.missions since the founding of our nation, said Undersander. There are nearly 50,000 active duty Sailors and 8,500 reservists who identify themselves as Hispanic, including five flag officers and 216 master chiefs, said Undersander. Hispanics have been involved in every aspect of naval operations and they provide unique experiences and perspectives that enhance the cultural under standing of their commands, which leads to greater mission readiness. The guest speaker for this years event was MACM(SW) Edward Santiago of the NAS Jax Security Department. My three brothers and I were raised in the urban neighborhoods of Brooklyn, N.Y. by our single mother. Money was tight and we never had the luxuries that other more fortunate families had. However, we did have the love that was necessary to flour ish values and commitment to family and success, said Santiago. My mother always said, He is not richer who the most has, but who the least needs. This means someone who is satisfied with a small amount is richer than someone who is always craving more. I remember going to Puerto Rico every summer to visit my father. My family values were also based on hard work and commitment for success. Nothing was ever just given to us. We had to work for it and I always thrived from that. I used to look forward to getting up at dawn and going with my grandfather to the countryside to pick coffee beans and mangos. We would stay there sometimes for days, Santiago recalled. We often just enjoyed spending time visiting and conversing with family members. This is how many Hispanics get their values through their experiences with family. Santiago continued, My advice that I give to each and everyone of you is to always maintain the values that your culture has instilled in you and use that to better yourself the best you can. Never stop bettering yourself and pass that on to others. A person who is motivated and hard-working and has honor, courage and commitment to serve, can achieve his or her dreams in the U.S. Navy, regardless of race, creed, color, or ethnic origin. The guests were then treated to a Latin-style buffet that included a variety of traditional dishes from various featured Hispanic nationalities and a short folk lore dance program by Viva Panama-USA. new aircraft Aug. 14, a milestone that reinforced the Navy-industry partnership and represented a step forward in the development of the Navys next-generation fighter. As the F-35C Fleet Replacement Squadron, VFA-101 trains Navy aircrew and maintenance personnel to fly and repair the F-35C. The F-35 Lightning II brings a broad range of force packages to the fleet capitalizing on the integration of advanced mission systems, stealth technology and supersonic capability across three F-35 variants. The F-35C will enhance the flexibility, power projection, and strike capabilities of carrier air wings and joint task forces and will complement the capabilities of the F/A-18E/F, which currently serves as the Navys premier strike fighter. By 2025, the Navys aircraft carrier-based air wings will consist of a mix of the F-35C, F/A-18E/F Super Hornets, EA-18G Growler, E-2D Hawkeye, Unmanned Carrier Launched Airborne Surveillance and Strike air vehicles, MH-60R/S helicopters and Carrier Onboard Delivery logistics aircraft. Since June 1942, Grim Reapers has served as the nickname for three different squadrons Fighter Squadron (VF) 10, VF-101 and now Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 101 flying various aircraft, including the F4F Wildcat, the FG1-D Corsair, the F-4 Phantom, the F-14 Tomcat and currently the F-35C. The Grim Reapers flew combat missions in the Battle of Guadalcanal and the Korean War and at various times since World War II, served as trainers for future naval aviators joining the fleet. HISPANIC F-35C DOMESTIC VIOLENCE 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013

PAGE 9

In MemoriamVP-5 is deeply saddened by the tragic passing of one of our finest Mad Foxes, AT2 Thomas Michael Moore, 30, on Sept. 19. He is survived by his wife, Tara; son, Zachary; and his parents, Dwight Moore and Anna Gribensk. Moore joined the Navy in 2007 and after Recruit Training and A-School served with VP-30 where became an aviation electronics technician. He also traveled the world with the All U.S. Military Baseball Team in 2008 earning a Joint Service Achievement Medal from the Secretary of Defense. Moore became a VP-5 Mad Fox in 2010 and deployed to El Salvador in support of Operation Unified Response, where he provided support after the earthquake in Haiti. He deployed to Kadena, Japan in May 2012, returning home in December 2012. Moore possessed the most exceptional abilities and traits leadership, optimism, strong sense of humor, intelligence, drive, passion for his family and the will to win learned on the baseball fields growing up and carried through to his Navy career. He is deeply missed by his Mad Fox family. The funeral service for Moore was held on Sept. 30 at Duke Memorial United Methodist Church in Durham, N.C. Following the service, he was laid to rest in Maple Wood Cemetery. A memorial service was held on Oct. 2 at the NAS Jacksonville Base Chapel. Anyone who would like to send condolences to the family can send them to: Patrol Squadron FIVE, Unit 60163, FPO AA 340995902 and they will be forwarded to the family. The Seabees of Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU-202) Detachment Jacksonville joined Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) personnel Sept. 27 to place more than 250 purple ribbons on vari ous thoroughfares around the base to help commemorate Domestic Violence Awareness Month at NAS Jacksonville. The purple ribbon also cele brates that the silence that previ ously facilitated domestic abuse and violence has been broken, said FFSC Victim Advocate Earl Godoy. For more than two decades, the purple ribbon has been the symbol that highlights the issue of domestic abuse and the commitment of survivors, family mem bers and other concerned per sons determined to end domestic abuse, said FAP Educator Erica Schneider. She appreciated the time and equipment that CBMU-202 Seabees contribute to the annu al project. We simply couldnt accomplish this every year with out their help. The Seabees do great work that always exceeds our expectations. Godoy was supported by FFSC Counselor Ryan ODonnell, FFSC Family Advocacy Program Educator Erica Schneider, FFSC Counselor Jackie Viola and FFSC Counselor Kevin Montgomery. Seabees and FFSC plant purple ribbons JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013 9

PAGE 10

It was a windy, rainy Saturday morning Sept. 28 as 28 members of Team Navy Jax gathered with hundreds of other riders at the St. Augustine Airport to participate in the 27th Bike MS PGA Tour Cycle to the Shore. This is the ninth consecutive year the team has supported the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society, a Combined Federal Campaign-supported charity. We have a great team who are dedicated to helping orga nizations make a difference. We get together monthly for team rides to prepare for this event and participate in several other charity rides throughout the year, said team captain Jerry Dryden. This year, we raised nearly $11,000 to benefit the MS Society. We continue to ride for causes that help those in need. Dryden also praised the teams sponsor for their con tinuing support. We greatly appreciate VyStar Credit Union sponsoring us and providing us with these great jerseys and shorts, he said. Team Navy Jax members arrived before dawn to prep their bicycles, check in and prepare themselves for the challenging but scenic 83-mile ride on day one. The Saturday portion of the ride, which began at the St. Augustine Airport, took the riders through the back roads of North Florida, across rivers, along the ocean, up bridges and through winding roads to their final destination in Daytona Beach. While some only chose to ride one leg of the race, many spent the night in Daytona and got up the next morning to pedal back to the finish line. I am out to ride my bicycle and support finding a cure for MS. I really enjoy being part of this team they are great about getting out there and support ing causes, said AE1(AW) Dan Flynn of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, who was participating in the ride for the first time. This is my first MS ride with Team Navy Jax as well, said Lt. Cmdr. Kris Sanchez of Naval Hospital Jax. When I moved to Jacksonville recently, I decided to take up cycling. My first ride with the team was the Tour de Cure in May. I really enjoy the camaraderie of the team. After hours of pedaling through extremely strong winds and bouts of rainshow ers, team members arrived in Daytona to rest and enjoy a special dinner with the other riders. Day two had them head ed back to the St. Augustine Airport to the finish line. We are so thrilled to have Team Navy Jax and all the teams to come out and ride 150 or more miles to create a world free of MS. Its all about the fundraisers and the riders who make this event possible for more than 18,000 people affected by this disease in North Florida, said North Florida MS Chapter President Corrina Steiger. We ride rain or shine and the riders train and con duct fundraising year-round. For more information on Team Navy Jax and the charity rides they participate in, con tact Terry Yamin at Their next big ride will be the Ride 2 Recovery with wounded warriors in November and the American Diabetes Associations Tour de Cure in May 2014. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal govern ment officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. Team Navy Jax rides the wind for charity 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013

PAGE 11

Fire Prevention Week commemorates the Great Chicago Fire when a two-day blaze killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless and destroyed more than 17,000 buildings Oct. 8-9, 1871. That tragedy inspired reform across America, spurring new fire safety codes and public awareness campaigns. In October, the National Fire Protection Association highlights the impor tance of fire safety education. This years theme, Prevent Kitchen Fires, focuses on proper cooking techniques and safety concerns in the kitchen. The following is the NAS Jax Fire Prevention Week schedule of events: Oct. 5 13, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Daily open house at base fire stations. Oct. 5, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Fire Prevention table display with fire safety materials, red fire hats, fire apparatus, Pluggie the talking fire hydrant at the Navy Exchange Courtyard. Oct. 7-12 Unannounced fire evacuation drills. Oct. 8, 4 p.m. Fire inspectors, Pluggie the talking fire hydrant and fire apparatus at the NAS Jax Youth Center, Building 2069. Oct. 9, 10-11 a.m. Fire inspectors and Pluggie the talking fire hydrant visit the Childrens Ward and Pediatrics Clinic at the Naval Hospital, Building H2080. Oct. 10, 9:30 a.m. Fire Inspectors and Pluggie the talking fire hydrant at the Child Development Center, Building 2070. Many fatalities, injuries, and property losses can be prevented by planning ahead and integrating fire safe behaviors into your daily activities. Dont be a statistic . be smart. Put a smoke alarm on every level of the home outside each sleeping area, and in every bedroom. Smoke alarms can be bat tery-operated or electrically hardwired in your home and are available at a variety of price points. If you have hearing prob lems, use alarms with flashing strobe lights and vibration. Test smoke alarms every month. Replace batteries once a year, even if alarms are hardwired. Test your smoke alarms at night to see if your child will wake up and respond to the alarm. Children sleep more deeply and may not wake up. If your child does not wake up to the alarm, try an alarm where you can program your voice to alert them. Mount smoke alarms high on the walls or ceilings since smoke rises. Ceiling-mounted alarms should be installed at least 4 inches away from the nearest wall. Wall-mounted alarms should be installed 4 to 12 inches away from the ceil ing. Replace all smoke alarms every 10 years, or sooner if they dont respond properly. Consider installing both ionization alarms, which are bet ter at sensing flaming fires, and photoelectric alarms, which are better at sensing slow, smoky fires, or dual sensor alarms. Cooking is the number one cause of home fires and inju ries. Unattended cooking is by far the leading cause of cook ing fires. Keep anything that can catch fire away from the stovetop. Dont use the oven or stovetop if you are sleepy or have consumed alcohol. Stay in the kitchen when frying, grilling or boiling food. If you have to leave, even for a short time, turn off the stove. Fire prevention facts NAS Jax recognizes Fire Prevention Week JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013 11

PAGE 12

Navy Lodge celebrates hospitality weekNavy Lodge Jacksonville celebrat ed National Hospitality Week, Sept. 23 27, to show appreciation for the work that housekeeping, front desk and maintenance teams do every day to exceed guest expectations. We are excited to celebrate this years National Hospitality Week, said Melanie Peters, Navy Lodge Jacksonville general manager. Our team works so hard throughout the year to make sure our guests have a clean and comfortable stay here. She is a 16-year associate of Navy Lodge with five of those years at NAS Jacksonville. Our team is dedicated to providing premier service for our guests. Every single team member has taken professional courses to attain the highest certifications for their job and thats reflected in everything they provide our guests, said Peters. This years celebration included a potluck awards luncheon that also featured a Lamp Shade Art Contest that was judged by our base CO, added Peters. We also had friendly, hospital ity style competitions that tested our housekeeping and guest service skills and to keep each day fun. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander told the 25-member team, You know that hospitality is much more than just an attractive facility it also takes a team-oriented staff like yours to operate the property at its true potential. And everything that I hear about our Navy Lodge is overwhelmingly posi tive and complementary. So, theres really nothing more for me to say than keep up the good work and keep delighting your guests. Undersander was impressed by the art contest. There are some very tal ented and creative people who work here. The lamp shade artists came up with a number of unexpected, but interesting subject matter. Thanks for inviting me to be part of hospitality week. The Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) announced Sept. 27 that it has made some changes to its second Navy Blue Holiday celebra tion. The Navy Blue Holiday is a time to celebrate the NEXs unique connection to the Navy and Navy families, emphasize Navy values and to give back to deserving NEX customers. This year, our Navy Blue Holiday is going to be even bigger and better, said retired Rear Adm. Robert Bianchi, chief executive officer, NEXCOM. We are very excited to bring our customers more savings, quality and value, and most importantly, say thank you for being a loyal NEX customer. The Navy Blue Holiday season will kick off on the Navys 238th birthday, Oct. 13. The kick off includes one of the largest single customer giveaways ever. NEXCOM has partnered with its ven dor community to give away 1,000 NEX $100 gift cards. Customers can enter for the drawing beginning Oct. 9 at their local NEX or online at www.myNavyExchange.com. We are excited to be able to give away $100,000 in NEX gift cards to our customers, said Bianchi. I know there are many other shopping options available. We are thrilled to be able to thank our customers for their support throughout the years. It is our honor to give back, because our mission is our customers. One thing that hasnt changed is that customers will continue to find a great selection of items in all price ranges including prestige brands, nation al mass brands and private brands at excellent savings plus, no sales tax on NEX purchases. Throughout the hol iday season, the NEX will offer even more savings and promotions so cus tomers can save even more. NEXCOM will once again offer spe cial pricing on the most popular gifts, through its web store for Sailors and Marines at sea prior to Thanksgiving. From Nov. 24 27, afloat personnel will be able to take advantage of a sale designed just for them. Once again, we tailored the items for sale to be those that appeal most to Sailors and Marines at sea, said Bianchi. They will find electronics, video games, outerwear and holiday gifts that can be sent home to loved ones. Afloat Sailors and Marines can also sign up to win one of the $100 NEX gift cards to be given away. NEX gives back to customers 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013

PAGE 13

Capt. Alan Watt, a Naval Reserve Civil Engineer Corps and Seabees Combat Warfare Officer, celebrated his retire ment with family, friends and former shipmates in a formal ceremony Sept. 13 at NAS Jacksonville. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus served as host and guest speaker. Kiwus said he first met Watt at a small Marine Corps base in Djibouti, Africa more than ten years ago. He said he has talked with many people who served with Watt over the years and they all say similar things that Watt is a very smart man of defining integrity. You stand out as a very capable officer, said Kiwus. You have a very deep knowledge of many subjects including, of course, engineering, construction, equipment, contracting and all things, a Seabee! Kiwus told everyone that Watt is known as a straight shooter and for not being shy. People do not have to wonder where they stand with him nor do they have to question where he stands on an issue; people know Watt will tell it like it is. Watt graduated from Oklahoma State University in 1975 but did not enter service with the Naval Reserve Civil Engineer Corps until May 1988. His first duty assignment was as the Assistant Administration Officer for the Ninth Reserve Naval Construction Regiment in Dallas, Texas. Watts career took him to many plac es. After serving in Dallas, tours fol lowed in Jacksonville, Atlanta, Tampa, Djibouti, Baghdad, Qatar and sever al other locations, ever increasing in responsibilities before he finished his career serving as Vice Commander for the Twenty-fifth Naval Construction Regiment in Gulfport, Miss. Ive had a wonderful career, even though I got a very late start, said Watt. I wouldnt trade my career or deploy ments for anything, I had a blast! I got to travel the world and see countries I never dreamed I would see. Watt also paid tribute to his wife of 38 years and his two grown sons during the ceremony. He reminded everyone that the toughest job in the Navy is that of Navy wife. He commented that he had opportu nities to do things no other officer had the opportunity to do during his career. He was able to be a part of the team building a new nation in Iraq. He was excited to share that he was in the room working issues with General Abizade and Ambassador Bremers staff. Early in his Navy career, Watt was gathered in an auditorium with the other members of the command wait ing on the comments to come from a new skipper. The new commander walked into the room, wrote the fol lowing words on the blackboard and walked out. Do the right thing and take care of your people. Watt said the words struck him and have stuck with him and he has tried to live by them his whole career. Pretty good advice, dont you think? said Watt. If youre mourning the end of sum mer and with it, the annual vacation season take heart that military lodg ing facilities remain open for business, offering year-round escapes at a frac tion of the cost of commercial hotels. The Army Morale, Welfare and Recreation program features comfort able cabins as well as camping hours at Torii Station Army Base on Okinawas Yomitan Peninsula. U.S. Army photo Now might be the perfect time for qualified fun seekers to use their mil itary, retiree or Defense Department identification cards to book lodging at one of hundreds of military-owned accommodations all over the world. The facilities range from standard hotel rooms on military installations to campgrounds and recreational vehi cle parks to luxury armed forces recre ation centers in Garmisch, Germany; Honolulu; Seoul, South Korea; and Walt Disney World in Orlando, Fla. Generally speaking, each service, including the Coast Guard, runs its own lodging program for official travelers and offers up empty rooms on a spaceavailable basis to leisure travelers from every branch. They also operate facili ties geared specifically for recreational guests. Every service runs its own reservation system, and rules about who can stay in the facilities vary slightly among them. But for those willing to do a little homework, military lodging can open doors to affordable year-round getaways. Susan Langless, who oversees the Navys lodging facilities, said they typically save guests about 40 percent compared to civilian hotels. Those looking for big city vacations can check into Navy Lodge hotels in the Seattle and San Francisco areas, as well as San Diego and New York, she said. However, travelers longing for a relaxing beach getaway can visit one of Navy Lodges beach destinations. For a Gulf Coast vacation, for exam ple, they can check out a Navy Lodge in Gulfport, Miss., or Pensacola, Fla. Meanwhile, the Navy Getaways pro gram features accommodations at 49 sites around the globe. That includes more than 2,600 recreational vehicle spots, tent sites, cottages, cabins, townhomes and resort-style vacation rentals. Among them is Navy Getaways Pacific Beach Resort and Conference Center in Washington, offering three-, fourand five-bedroom cottages, hotel suites, an RV spot and campground. Not only are these facilities afford able, Langless said, but they also are great places to stay and relax. Many of the military accommoda tions are considered best-kept secrets by their guests For example, the Army morale, wel fare and recreation program features the popular Seward Military Resort on Alaskas Kenai Peninsula, reported Debbie Martin, the Armys chief of hospitality programs. Guests can choose from a variety of accommodations as they enjoy worldclass fishing, spectacular glaciers, and abundance of wildlife and recreational opportunities galore. Also, in addition to the luxurious Hale Koa Armed Forces Recreation Center in Honolulu, the Army operates the Pililaau Army Recreation Center on Oahus Leeward Coast and the Kilauea Military Camp mountain resort on Hawaiis Big Island. Bob Vogt, division director for Army Installation and Management Commands soldier and community recreation division, said he is partic ularly fond of the cabins Army MWR operates on Torii Station Army Base in Okinawa. He described the Torii Beach location as one of the most beautiful beachfront locations anywhere in the world. Within the continental United States, the Army MWR program manages Lake of the Ozarks Recreation Area in Missouri, which features lakefront cabins and motel rooms, along with boat and jet ski rentals. Americas Army and other eligible patrons should use Army Lodging, because it provides them with conve niently located, high-quality lodging and hospitality services at an affordable price, Vogt said. The Marines Corps network of recreational facilities includes vil Civil Engineer Corps officer retires at 25 years Military lodging opens door to year-round getaways JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013 13

PAGE 14

las, cabanas and cot tages at Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. The Del Mar Beach Resort, near Camp Pendleton, Calif., is a luxury oceanfront resort spanning pristine beaches and spectacular views of the Pacific, and a host of other amenities. Travelers also might want to check out the Big Bear Recreational Facility, a hidden retreat in the heart of the San Bernardino Mountains. Run by the Marine Corps, it offers affordable camping and lodging facilities for active duty, retired military personnel, reservists, DOD employ ees and their authorized family members. In addition to hotels on many Air Force bases, Air Force Personnel Centers services directorate fea tures more than two dozen recreational areas worldwide. Ramstein Inns on Ramstein Air Base in Germany is directly across the street from the passenger terminal, and at the front door to many of Germanys most popular destinations. The Nellis Inn on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., is convenient gateway to the Las Vegas attractions. Peterson Air Force Bases inn provides easy access to Colorado Springs, Colo., and the Rocky Mountains. Members interested in visiting the mid-Atlantic coast can check out the Fort Fisher Air Force Recreational Area in Kure Beach, N.C., which pro vides visitors easy access to the Cape Fear River and the Atlantic Ocean, Paige Hughes of the Air Force services directorate reported. Those who prefer the mountains and canyons of the western United States can visit Farish Air Force Recreation Area outside Colorado Springs, Colo., or Fort Tuthill Air Force Recreation Area near Flagstaff, Ariz., with easy access to the Grand Canyon. Those stationed in the Pacific can enjoy recreational areas in Hawaii, Okuma Air Force Recreation Area on Okinawa, Japan, and Tama Air Force Recreation Area on the main island north of Tokyo. Visitors traveling with a recreational vehicle have even more options available, Hughes said. With more than 60 fam ily camps to choose from, they can find facilities near San Antonio, Charleston, S.C., and other popular cit ies, or close to Florida Panhandle beaches. Even travelers famil iar with the Defense Departments vast net work of accommodations might forget to explore those offered by the Coast Guard. Those facilities include the Petaluma Lake RV Park, on a small lake in Californias Sonoma County. U.S. Coast Guard Station Marathon offers four cottages in the heart of the Florida Keys. And to the northeast, the Coast Guard offers summertime lodging at a former lifeboat station on Cuttyhunk Island, Mass., now converted into a house with two apart ments. Look at MWR recre ational lodging oppor tunities when planning your vacation, Vogt advises military travelers. All services offer lowcost options from camp sites, cabins to small lodges. Its a poten tial cost saving to you and your family and it allows MWR to continue to offer reduced rates on programs and services at locations across the U.S. and in overseas loca tions. For more details about recreational lodging options, visit the service morale, welfare and rec reation websites or the Defense Departments lodging website. Related Sites Department of Defense Lodging http://www.dod lodging.net/info.aspx. Armed Forces Recreation Centers http://www.armymwr. com/travel/recreation centers/. LODGING Center for Service Support (CSS) and Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) conducted insider threat and workplace violence training Sept. 26. According to SECNAVINST 5510.37 insider threats are people with authorized access, who use that access, wittingly or unwittingly, to harm national security interests or national security through unauthorized disclosure, data modification, espionage, terrorism, or kinetic actions resulting in loss or degradation of resources or capa bilities. Special Agent Michael Szabunia, assigned to Naval Station Newport (NWPT) said understanding insider threats and workplace violence is important and that everyone should be trained to spot the warning signs of potential offenders. With insider threats and workplace violence there is lot of planning and behavior indicators, said Szabunia. Its important to learn from incidents like the recent Washington Navy Yard shoot ing and the Ft. Hood shooting involving former Army Maj. Nidal Hasan. Hasan, a former U.S. Army medical corps officer fatal ly shot 13 people and injured more than 30 others in the Fort Hood mass shooting Nov. 5, 2009. A jury convicted him of 13 counts of premeditated murder and 32 counts of attempt ed murder. Hasan was subse quently sentenced to death. Szabunia said some of the warning signs of potential offenders include: a pattern of intimidating, harassment, signs of substance abuse, sud den or marked changes in behavior or appearance, fre quent disputes over disci plinary actions, termination, uncharacteristic isolation from co-workers and obsessive fascination with incidents of work place violence. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics an estimated 1.7 million workers are victims of workplace violence. Our goal is to help prevent these horrific crimes, said Szubania. Its important that everyone recognize these paths to violence. We must under stand the indicators of poten tial offenders and be willing to report it. This behavior is sometimes very apparent and should not be ignored. Pat Mclean, CSS executive director said the NCIS training was helpful and relevant in the wake of the recent attacks in this country and abroad. If you look at all the inci dents that have happened over the past few weeks, its impor tant to understand and iden tify potential threats posed to our Sailors and Department of Defense (DoD) employ ees, said McLean. We must be aware of these indicators whether at work or in our per sonal lives. Our team must be engaged with events taking place around them. CSS and its learning sites provide Sailors with the knowledge and skills needed to sup port the Fleets warfighting mission. More than 300 staff and faculty work hand-in-hand with the fleet and are dedicated to ensure training is current and well executed on behalf of 10,000 Sailors who graduate from CSS courses annually in the administration, logistics and media communities. CSS conducts insider threat, workplace violence training 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013

PAGE 15

Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville hosted the annu al Duval County Medical Society (DCMS) and Navy dinner meeting at the NAS Jacksonville Officers Club Sept. 26. During her keynote address to more than 100 DCMS phy sicians and healthcare pro fessionals, NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer explained the importance of caring for our service members our nations heroes and their families. We must ensure the medi cal readiness of our sailors and Marines 24/7 and 365 so they can return to their ships, their planes and helicopters, their submarines and battle fields around the world. At the same time, we exist to ease the minds of those Sailors and Marines by taking care of their families while they are out doing their jobs. Shaffer also discussed how Medical Home Port is reduc ing illness, injury and hospi talization of military person nel and their families through a coordinated, whole-person approach to preventive, routine and urgent care. During the event, NH Jacksonville Family Practice Clinic Manager Dalia Cavazos was awarded the NH Jacksonville Circle of Excellence Award for outstanding service to the medical staff. Civilian staff members, from various NH Jacksonville departments, were nominated for the award and were voted on by the commands medical staff. Cavazos, a six-year family practice manager, was recog nized for her hard work, dedi cation and willingness to help others. NH Jacksonville is a part of a $6 billion global network with a team of 64,000 active duty, reserve and civilian per sons worldwide who directly care for 1 million people. That number increases to 10 million when the care by providers in the TRICARE network is added that included many of the DCMS physicians at the annual event. The DCMS and Navy dinner meeting underscores the role of community collaborations in ensuring the best patient care to active duty, retir ees and families. Along with partnering with DCMS, NH Jacksonville collaborates with the University of North Florida Center for Global Health & Medical Diplomacy, Northeast Florida Quality Collaborative, First Coast Worksite Wellness as well as maintains more than 100 medical training, research and support agreements with universities and medical orga nizations. Founded in 1853, the Duval County Medical Society Floridas oldest and most prestigious medical society was the first medical society in Florida, and serves as the voice for organized medicine in Duval County. It is a non-profit, voluntary professional associa tion of more than 2,000 physi cians dedicated to the health of Jacksonville and the surrounding community. Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville and its branch health clinics are now providing annual influenza (flu) vaccine to service members, retirees and families. The flu vaccine is required for all active duty military personnel, selected reserves and healthcare workers, and is recommended by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for everyone age six months and older. Its the first and most important step in protect ing against flu viruses. According to CDC, seasonal epi demics of influenza occur every year in the U.S., usually between October and April. Everyone age six months and older should get an annual influ enza vaccine, said NH Jacksonville Director of Public Health Capt. Joseph McQuade. Immunization is the primary means of reducing sea sonal influenza illness and its com plications. Vaccine protects both the individual and the community as a whole, by reducing and preventing the spread of the disease. Influenza is a virus that infects the nose, throat, windpipe and lungs. It is highly contagious, spreading from person to person by coughing, shaking hands, sneezing or talking close ly with another person. Typical flu symptoms include fever, chills, muscle aches, conges tion, cough, runny nose and diffi culty breathing. Flu can lead to more severe infections like pneumonia especially in the elderly and those who may have an impaired immune system. H1N1 flu virus has similar symptoms, sometimes also includ ing vomiting and diarrhea, and can cause severe infections in younger patients, pregnant women and chil dren. NH Jacksonville offers two kinds of flu vaccine. Flu mist an intra nasal vaccine that is squirted into the nose can be given to healthy patients ages two to 49. The inject able vaccine (flu shot) is given to pregnant moms, diabetic patients, asthmatics and anyone with a chronic medical condition such as emphysema. The shot is safe for pregnant women at any time during preg nancy. Since babies arent able to get the vaccine until age six months, mom is babys best protection. Breastfeeding also helps protect babies, thanks to the protective flu antibodies that appear in moms milk about two weeks after immu nization. At the hospital, patients can walkin for flu vaccine Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Thursday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Naval Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville is conducting shot exer cises for tenant commands. Patients can walk-in for flu vaccine after Oct. 21, Monday through Friday from 7:15 a.m. to 4 p.m. Other important immunizations include human papillomavirus (HPV), pneumococcal and the entire spectrum of childhood vaccines. For more information, visit www. cdc.gov. E-mail access to health care teams: Medical Home Port OnlineNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville its hospital and branch health clinics offers multiple ways for patients and their care teams to connect. Patients with a primary care manager (PCM) at the hospital or any of the branch health clinics can use a secure e-mail service called Medical Home Port Online (also known as RelayHealth). Patients can use this system to e-mail their care team for non-urgent issues, request lab results and medication refills, and request appointments. Because Medical Home Port Online is for nonurgent issues, it can take up to three business days for the team to reply to patient e-mails. The system is secure and confidential, with no cost. To sign up for Medical Home Port Online, go to www.relayhealth.com or the command web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/NavalHospitalJax Patients need to know the name of their PCM to sign up. For technical help, call RelayHealth at 866-RELAY-ME (866-735-2963). Patients can also sign up at their care teams front desk. And, as always, hospital and branch health clinic care teams are available by telephone during clinic hours, and nurse advice is available after-hours. At the hospital, patients call the appointment line at 542-4677 or 800-529-4677, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Patients with a referral from their PCM to a specialty clinic at the hospital can call the Naval Hospital and Floridas oldest medical society hold annual meeting Flu vaccine now available at Naval Hospital Jacksonville and branch health clinics JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013 15

PAGE 16

DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Friday at 7 p.m. Oct. 4 Karaoke with Randy Oct. 11 Holliday & Ken Oct. 18 Karaoke with Randy Oct. 25 Second Tyme Around Band Deweys Family Night third Friday of the Month Deweys will be open for dinner & beverages Oct. 18 Balloon Artist Nov. 15 Karaoke with Tom Turner Dec. 20 Childrens Holiday Bingo Childrens Holiday Bingo will start at 6:30 p.m. and has a cost of $10 per person and includes soft drinks, hot dog, dauber, bingo card and gift bag for each child.DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Youth Bowling League: Every Monday & Wednesday, 10:30 am noon $17 annually or $8 per week. Includes shoes, awards will be given at the end of the season! Rising Stars Youth League: Every Saturday, 10:30 am 12:30 pm. Pee Wee Division (6 years & under) 2 games, $6 per week. Juniors Division (7 years & older) 3 games, $8 per week. Special Stars Bowling League for families with special needs children. All ages welcome! Ramps available for the non-ambulatory as well as bumpers for beginners. Runs for 10 weeks at a cost of $7 per week, shoes are included. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4 6 pm. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4 10 pm. Thursdays: Free bowling for Active Duty 11 am 1 pm. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4 6 pm, Party Extreme $10, 8 pm midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Oct. 19, 1 4 pm. $20 per person, registration begins at noon. Scratch Sweeper: Oct. 26, 1-4 pm. $30 entry fee, check in starts at noon. *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Learn to Swim Fall Sessions At the Indoor Pool Session 1 Oct. 1424 Session 2 Oct 28 Nov 7 $40 military, $45 DoD Monster Dash 5K Oct. 31 at 11:30 a.m. Perimeter Rd. / Antenna Farm Pre-register by Oct. 18 Fourth Annual Zumba Party Oct. 23, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Fitness Center Outdoor Pavilion Barktoberfest Oct. 26, 9 a.m. Veterinary Treatment Facility Bldg. 537 Free 2-mile walk/run with the dogs!I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil. Jacksonville Zoo Spooktacular $9. Universal Halloween Horror Nights: Sunday Thursday $42.25, Friday $53, Saturday $74.25 Halloween Horror Nights visits ITT on Oct. 2, 10 a.m. 2 p.m. Stop by to win great prizes! Pandemic Haunted Attractions San Jose Blvd in Mandarin, tickets on sale at ITT! Haunting of School House 4 $18 Waves of Honor Special: Seaworld Orlando Adult $46.50, Child $42.25. Busch Gardens Tampa Adult $45, Child $40.50. Jacksonville Jaguars: Section 147 Bud Zone, $70. Jags shuttle bus $12. Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2013 2014 Season: Tickets now available! The Artist Series Broadway in Jax 2013 2014 Season: Tickets available now! Mamma Mia!: Oct. 19, 2013, 8 pm, $60.50. Celtic Thunder: Nov. 10, 2013, 7 pm, $80. Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus: Jan. 17 & 18, 2014, $51. War Horse: Feb. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $68.50. Memphis: Mar. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $65. Million Dollar Quartet: Apr. 26, 2014, 8 pm, $65. The D* Word: Oct. 4 Oct. 25, 2014, $43.75 $46. Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27,2014) 4 day Hopper ticket$166 4 day 1 park per day and water park ticket-$166 4 day Hopper and Water park combo ticket$194 Gatorbowl $35 Capital One Bowl $98 Russell Athletic Bowl $78 Soul Food Festival Special $20 General Admission $32 Preferred $42 VIP $65The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Paintball Trip Oct. 5 at 9 a.m. GTF in Yulee Navy Birthday 5K Oct. 11 at 11:30 a.m. Perimeter Rd./Antenna Farm HabiJax ReStore Volunteer Trip Oct. 12 at 8 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Oct. 8 & 22 for active duty Oct. 10 & 24 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27 Auto Skills Center Call 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Movie Under the Stars Oct. 25 at 7 p.m. Featuring Monsters University Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Oct. 7 Nov. 20 $500 per person For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or email bill.bonser@navy.mil Same-sex medical benefits explainedMarriage Spouses, including same-sex spouses, of service members (active duty, retired or Guard/Reserve) are eligible for TRICARE. When you getmarried, bring your new spouse to auniformed service identification (ID) card office to register him or her in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System (DEERS). Youll need the following documents to add your spouse to DEERS. All documents must be originals or certified copies. In the following scenarios, getting married will cause TRICARE benefits to end: married Depending on where you live, and who you are, your Check Us Out Online: www.jaxairnews.com 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013

PAGE 17

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013 17 appointment line, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.) After-hours nurse advice is available via the appointment line on evenings, weekends and holidays. At Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville, patients call 546-7094/7095, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. For after-hours nurse advice, call the command appointment line at 542-4677 or 800-5294677 on evenings, weekends and holidays. These communication options are a few of the features of Medical Home Port the Navys approach to the nationwide medical home model of quality care. Medical Home Port places the patient at the center of a collaborative team of caregivers from doctors to nurses and case managers led by the PCM. The patient and teamwork together for a coordinated, wholeperson approach to health to meet the patients preventive, routine and urgent care needs. Were strengthening the patient-provider relationship in an environment where both staff and patients PCS and deploy with teambased care, said Capt. Troy Borema, a family medicine physician. Patients secure e-mail access to their team is one aspect of that care. The hospital has six teams: Family Medicine (green, red, white and yellow teams), Internal Medicine blue team and Pediatrics pur ple team. Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville (Primary Care) has one team: silver team. To meet the PCMs on each team, click on Medical Home Port on the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/navalhospitaljax HOME PORT spouses options will vary. TRICARE Prime TRICARE Standard and Extra U.S. Family Health Plan TRICARE Standard Overseas TRICARE For Life Active duty spouses may also qualify to enroll in one of these Prime options with their active duty sponsors: TRICARE Prime Remote TRICARE Prime Overseas TRICARE Prime Remote Overseas Some of these health plan options require you to enroll by submitting an enrollment application. Dental Coverage Yes, you can enroll in one of two dental insurance plans. These dental plans are separate from TRICAREs health benefit and do require a separate enrollment. TRICARE Dental Program: Available to all active duty and National Guard/Reserve family members. TRICARE Retiree Dental Program: Available for family members of retired service members. Prescriptions TRICARE provides a robust pharmacy benefit. Costs Yourhealth care costs are based on who you are and which health plan option you are using. Retroactive Coverage for Same-Sex Spouses Same-sex spouses may be added to existing coverage to begin on June 26, 2013 or their eligibility date in DEERS, whichever is later. To enroll in a Prime Option TRICARE Prime, TRICARE Prime Remote, TRICARE Prime Overseas or TRICARE Prime Remote Overseas, applications must be received no later than Dec. 31, 2013. After that, regular enrollment deadlines will apply. Retroactive enrollment for a Prime Option is limited to same-sex spouses of active duty service members rank E-4 and below. All others may enroll using the existing 20th of the month rule. If your spouse does not enroll in a Prime Option, he or she can file a claim under TRICARE Standard if eligibility is established for care received: On or after June 26, 2013 if married before June 26, 2013, orback to the date of eligibility in DEERSif married after June 26, 2013. To purchase TRICARE Reserve Select or TRICARE Retired Reserve retroac tively, applications must be received no later than Dec. 31, 2013. After that date, regular enrollment rules will apply. Monthly premiums for TRICARE Reserve Select or TRICARE Retired Reserve will be prorated back to the effective date of coverage (no earlier than June 26, 2013). To purchase the TRICARE Dental Program or TRICARE Retiree Dental Program retroactively, applications must be received no later than Dec. 31, 2013. After that date, regular enrollment rules will apply. Monthly premiums will be prorated back to the effective date of coverage (no earlier than June 26, 2013). SAME SEX BENEFITS DOD officials issued guidance to the force Sept. 27 in the event appropriations lapse Oct. 1 and a government shutdown results. Officials emphasize they still hope Congress can avoid that but say it is prudent to take such steps. The eight-page document gives basic guidance to commanders and directors on how to handle every thing from personnel matters to contracts to medical concerns. Even if the government runs out of money, military personnel will report to work as normal. This includes active duty personnel and reserve component personnel on active Guard or reserve status. DOD can also maintain police, fire and emergency medical protection. These activities and some others are labeled as excepted and protected from stoppage. Non-excepted activities must generally stop. In the event of a funding lapse, DOD civilians who support excepted activities military operations, emergency services, or other designated activities would be directed to continue working. For pay purposes, military personnel will be paid retroactively once the appropriation is passed or the continuing resolution signed. DOD-excepted service personnel will also receive retroactive pay. Non-excepted DOD civilians will be placed on emergency, no-notice, non-pay furloughs. They would be required to report to work on Oct. 1 to receive their furlough notice. Civilians on emergency furloughs would be paid retroactively only if a law is enacted providing authority to pay them. Training and travel of military and civilian employees would be disrupted unless it was connected to an excepted activity, officials said. Those on travel would have to return to their duty stations in an orderly fashion. The Pentagon and the Navy are reviewing security proce dures worldwide in the wake of last weeks tragic shootings at the Washington Navy Yard, Deputy Defense Secretary Ash Carter said Sept. 26, with the aim of enhancing prevention of and response to any future such incidents. Carter offered his sympa thies to everyone affected by this deplorable act of violence. The Department of Defense is a family. And when a fam ily members taken from us, it affects us all, he said in a briefing to Pentagon reporters. So to those who are griev ing, on behalf of the entire department family, please know that our thoughts and our prayers and our strength are with you. The deputy secretary said the department is determined to learn from this tragedy and to take decisive action to pre vent such a tragedy from hap pening again. Carter continued, The bot tom line is, we need to know how an employee was able to bring a weapon and ammuni tion onto a DOD installation, and how warning flags were either missed, ignored, or not addressed in a timely manner. The deputy secretary briefed reporters on the two reviews, along with a third examina tion that will be conducted by an independent panel. Carter said former assistant secretary of defense for homeland secu rity Paul Stockton and former commander of U.S. Special Operations Command, retired Navy Adm. Eric Olson, have agreed to lead the independent review. Together, Carter said, the efforts will analyze physi cal security measures at U.S. military installations, security clearance processing proce dures and emergency response plans. Navy Secretary Ray Mabus has approved two recom mendations tightening secu rity management within Navy chains of command. Carter noted the Navy, DOD and independent reviews will all feed into a larger, White-House-led look at physical security and emergency response across government. We want to look at the whole system and the whole family of incidents that occur, Carter said. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel ordered the three department reviews, Carter said. Hagels guidance was clear, Carter said. The independent panel is to arrive at its own conclusions and make its own recommendations. Stockton and Olson are uniquely suited to identifying security shortcomings, Carter said. Stockton, he said, brings knowledge from his work leading the departments internal review and response to the Fort Hood shootings in 2009. And, Carter said, Olsons deep knowledge of special opera tions and intelligence commu nities, [and] his personal experience evaluating and developing physical security plans, will all be invaluable. Together, the efforts are intended to be comprehensive, complementary and mutually reinforcing, Carter said. The departments internal review will be led by Mike Vickers, undersecretary of defense for intelligence, Carter said. The departments synthe sized findings will be in Hagels hands by Dec. 20, Carter said. Then at Hagels direction, he added, the department will take appropriate actions after carefully considering all of the recommendations put for ward. In examining security clear ance procedures, the depart ments internal review will seek to point out what steps we can take to tighten the standards and procedures for granting and renewing security clear ances for DOD employees and contract personnel, Carter said. Millions of Americans in this and other departments hold clearances, he said, and over all government-wide handling of security clearances will be one focus of the White Houses study. There are many contractors who are central to the accom plishment of the mission of this department, Carter said. And they, like our govern ment employees, both civilian and military, all three of those populations contribute to the defense mission, and theyre all part of the review. Carter echoed Hagels remarks last week: Where there are gaps, well close them. Where there are inad equacies, we will address them. And where there are failures, we will correct them. That process is underway. We owe nothing less to the vic tims, their families, and every member of the Department of Defense community. In response to a question, Carter noted that the alleged shooters previous record of firearms incidents was some thing that jumped out at me in reports following last weeks incident in which a Navy con tractor shot dead 12 civilians working at the Washington Navy Yard. Carter said he and Hagel are concerned at the existence of such evidence that there was behavior well before the Washington Navy Yard inci dent, which had it been spotted and understood to be indica tive of this possibility might have led to an intervention that would have prevented [the shootings]. Carter added, Thats exactly the kind of thing that we need to look at in the review exactly. As a reminder, the Emergency Family Assistance Center (EFAC) continues to pro vide services to those affect ed by the shooting military, civilians, contractors, and their families at Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling (JBAB) and the Washington Navy Yard (WNY). Call 1-855-677-1755. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast awarded three contracts totaling $16.4 mil lion to three separate Jacksonville area contractors for work at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay (NS GTMO), Cuba. The majority of the work will provide repairs from Hurricane Sandy. After suffering significant damage to the base, I am glad to see some of the money coming in to repair some of the infrastructure damaged by Hurricane Sandy last year, said NS GTMO Commanding Officer Capt. John Nettleton. The planned marina repairs and refurbishment will greatly benefit the service members and residents who serve in this isolated duty station. The largest of the three awards is a $10.3 million task order for water front repairs that are necessary due to damage caused by Hurricane Sandy. This contract was awarded Sept. 25 to Harry Pepper & Associates Inc., of Jacksonville. Work to be performed provides for repairs to the Guantanamo Bay public marina, public beaches, and restoration of the recreational dive park. Work also includes floating fuel pier replacement, repair/replacement of the boat ramp, repairs to damaged walls and roofs, demolition of old and construction of new cabanas. The dive area work includes a twoway ramp access with wave protec tion and a new elevated paved training area. Work also includes a new elevated training area, vehicle access and park ing with wave run up and erosion pro tection. Work for the waterfront projects are expected to be completed by January 2015. These projects are a huge win in improving the quality of life for all community members residing in this remote location, said NS GTMO Public Works Officer Cmdr. Ron Jenkins. Many of these waterfront areas have been closed due to Hurricane Sandy damage for nearly one year. Base resi dents will be excited to see these areas repaired and open for use once again. A second task order in the amount of $2.5 million was awarded Sept. 22 to Islands Mechanical Contractor, of Middleburg. Work for this task order includes replacement of the chiller in Building 2504, installation of backup power generators to Buildings 2509 and 1445, and replacement of the guard tower windows. The third task order was awarded Sept. 19 to Ratcliff Construction, Inc., of Orange Park, in the amount of $3.5 DOD spells out closure contingency plan guidanceCarter details security reviews in Navy Yard aftermathThree Jacksonville area contractors awarded $16.4 million for work at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay

PAGE 18

18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013 million. This project will provide for the repair of damage to roofs and building envelopes caused by Hurricane Sandy. The following five buildings will be repaired by this task order: Building AV-640, Building 260, Building 776, Building 1662 Gold Hill Galley, Building 717. Building 1678 will have the windows and flashing repaired and East Caravella will have soffits repaired. GITMO CONTRACTS Cutlass Express, one of four major U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa/U.S. 6th Fleet exercises in Africa, is designed to improve maritime safety and security in East Africa while building maritime relation ships. The exercise is scheduled for Nov. 11-18 in operating areas surrounding Seychelles, Djibouti, Tanzania and Kenya. Participating African coun tries in this planning con ference included Djibouti, Kenya, Uganda, South Africa, Seychelles, Mauritius, Mozambique and Tanzania Yemen. This exercise is a great opportunity to build camaraderie, improve communication systems and to improve mari time safety and security within the East African nations, said Capt. Guy Jackson, exercise director for Cutlass Express. I would like this exercise to achieve individual goals of each East African nation and continue to strengthen the partnerships we share in Africa. Events during Cutlass Express include a variety of scenarios to improve the abilities of the African nation to deter piracy, counter illicit trafficking and environmental issues such as illegal fishing. The common goal of Cutlass Express from my perspec tive is to foster relationships between countries in order to stop any economical and environmental problems that a lot of African nations face, said Djibouti navy Lt. Gouled Osman Moussa. During the conference, par ticipating African nations prac ticed using maritime domain awareness software, to better monitor vessels and potential suspicious activities. The technology we are working with will now give our country the opportunity to communicate and share information to other nations in order for us, as a nation, to fight a common threat such as piracy, said Moussa. Cutlass Express is a U.S. Africa Command-sponsored exercise focusing on address ing common maritime issues through the sharing of infor mation and the coordination among East African nations. Jaguars tickets available at USOThe Greater Jax Area USO has tickets available at the NAS Jax and NS Mayport USO for $15 each, cash transactions only. Tickets are available the follow ing days and times: Guidelines: duty including Florida National Guard and Reservists on current active duty orders and dependents are eligible to purchase/use these tickets. may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equals four. If you have less than four you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but dependent children are not authorized to represent the service member/spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO director. mum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest. No exceptions. a block of game day tickets may be request ed by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the sea son.Requests, with justification, must be sent to Mike OBrien at mobrien@usojax.com reselling tickets will be prohibited from buying any more tickets for the entire season. come, first served. For more information, call 7782821.Plans finalized for Cutlass Express 2013 Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registra tion. The following is the schedule for 2013: 21-25, Nov. 4-8, Dec. 2-6. Nov. 18-22, Dec. 16-20. Nov. 25. 25. Oct. 15. Nov. 5, Dec. 10. Extended Stress Management Dec. 17. Personal Anger Control Group 10, 17. Exceptional Family Member EFMP Command POC Training To register for any of the above workshops call 542-5745. Fleet and Family Support Center offers life skills workshops

PAGE 19

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013 19

PAGE 20

20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013



PAGE 1

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2013 VP-16 REUNION SAILOR FUN CHARITY RIDE Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The Navys first F-35C Lightning II carrier vari ant aircraft squadron, the Grim Reapers of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 101, hosted a rollout cer emony for their new air craft at the squadrons home at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., on Oct. 1. The rollout ceremony will commemorate the long, storied history of the Grim Reapers and the establishment of VFA101 as the Navys first F-35C Fleet Replacement Squadron. The F-35C is a fifth generation fighter, com bining advanced stealth with fighter speed and agility, fully fused sensor information, networkenabled operations and advanced sustainment. Navy leaders, includ ing Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command Adm. Bill Gortney and Commander, Naval Air Forces Vice Adm. David Buss, spoke at the ceremony, along with Lockheed Martin Executive Vice President and General Manager, F-35 Lightning II Program, Lorraine Martin. VFA-101 received the Navys first F-35C June 22, becoming the Navys first F-35C squadron, and completed its first check flight in the squadrons The NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center introduced Domestic Violence Awareness month (October), with a con ference for those working with domestic violence victims, at the Orange Park Holiday Inn Sept. 26. We host this conference annually to offer domestic violence awareness training for our staff members and the many outside agencies we part ner with to provide updated information and share ideas on how to better serve our clients, said NAS Jax Erica Schneider. The event began with NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker welcom ing the group. I want to thank you for tak ing the time out of your busy schedules to attend this very important conference. Our Fleet and Family Support Center partners with various stakeholders to provide ser vice and aid to our community and also outside the fenceline. Some of the agencies, we part ner with are the Department of Children and Families, state attorneys office, Hubbard House and Quigley House. This outreach is very important to us to combat domestic violence. Wanamaker then introduced guest speakers Bill Rousseau and Rod Reder of the National Institute of Crime Prevention (NICP). Both are retired police officers from Tampa, Fla. after nearly 30 years on the job, and are experts in the field of domestic violence. They cre ated NICP in 1999 to help pro vide domestic abuse and sexual assault training to those who work with victims of these crimes. We truly believe in provid ing quality domestic abuse and sexual assault training to build a safer community for all. Our mission is to pro vide law enforcement, victim advocates, judges, prosecutors, military personnel, and public health workers quality train ing regarding domestic vio lence and sexual assault issues that affect victims day-to-day lives, said Rousseau. Domestic violence is a com munity problem. Very often the mindset is that domestic vio lence only involves a woman and its often kept within the four walls of a house, Reder told the audience. There may be children involved but we tend to have a very narrow scope of the effects of domestic violence, therefore we dont understand the grav ity of it. What we want to stress today is that a single domestic VFA-101 hosts F-35C rollout ceremony NAS Jacksonville cele brated Hispanic Heritage Month during a special luncheon Sept. 24. The event was held at the NAS Jax River Cove Catering and Conference Center and was sponsored by the base Multi-Cultural Awareness Committee. This years theme is Hispanics: Serving and Leading Our Nation with Pride and Honor. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander kicked off the event with the opening remarks. We are here today to take time to observe the Hispanic Heritage, for many great reasons. Hispanic Sailors have played a vital role in our Navys traditions and the execution of the Navys NAS Jax celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month FFSC kicks off Domestic Violence Awareness month A message from the commander in chiefTo the dedicated and hard-working employees of the United States government: The federal government is Americas largest employer, with more than 2 million civilian work ers and 1.4 million active duty military who serve in all 50 States and around the world. But Congress has failed to meet its responsibility to pass a budget before the fiscal year that begins today. And that means much of our government must shut down effective today. I want you to know that I will keep working to get Congress to reopen the government, restart vital services that the American people depend on, and allow public servants who have been sent home to return to work. At my direction, your agencies should have reached out to you by now about what a shutdown means for our and your families. Today, I wanted to take a moment to tell you what you mean to me and to our country. That begins by saying thank you for the work you do every day work that is vitally important to our national security and to American families eco nomic security. You defend our country overseas and ensure that our troops receive the benefits they deserve when they come home. You guard our borders and protect our civil rights. You help small businesses expand and gain new footholds in over seas markets. You guide hundreds of thousands of people each day through the glory of Americas national parks and monuments, from Yosemite to the Statue of Liberty. And much more. You do all this in a political climate that, too often in recent years, has treated you like a punch ing bag. You have endured three years of a fed eral pay freeze, harmful sequester cuts, and now, a shutdown of our government. And yet, you perse vere, continuing to serve the American people with passion, professionalism, and skill. None of this is fair to you. And should it continue, it will make it more difficult to keep attracting the kind of driven, patriotic, idealistic Americans to public service that our citizens deserve and that our system of self-government demands. Public service is noble. Public service is impor tant. And by choosing public service, you carry on a proud tradition at the heart of some of this countrys greatest and most lasting achievements. In fact, more than 50 current or former federal employees have received the Nobel Prize for their efforts. It was grants from the Department of Energy that helped businesses unlock new sourc es of renewable energy, and from the National Science Foundation that helped entrepreneurs like the founders of Google change the world. It is your efforts that will help this country meet the great challenge of our time-rebuilding an economy

PAGE 2

2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013 Oct. 3 1921 USS Olympia sails for France to bring home the Unknown Soldier from World War I. 1955 USS Saipan (CVL48) begins disaster relief at Tampico, Mexico rescuing peo ple and delivering supplies. 1962 Launch of Mercury 8, piloted by Cmdr. Walter Schirra Jr., orbited Earth in a mission lasting 9 hours and 13 minutes. He made six orbits at an altitude up to 175.8 statute miles at 17,558 mph. Recovery by USS Kearsarge (CVS-33). Oct. 4 1821 Lt. Robert Stockton sails from Boston for Africa to carry out his orders to help stop the international slave trade. 1943 Aircraft from USS Ranger sink five German ships and damage three in Operation Leader, the only U.S. Navy carrier operation in northern European waters during World War II. 1952 Task Force 77 aircraft encounter MIG-15 aircraft for the first time. 1976 USS Jonas Ingram (DD-938) rescues seven survi vors of a Finnish motor craft that sank in the Baltic Sea. 1991 USS Arkansas, USS Sioux, USS Aubrey Fitch and HS-6 rescue personnel on merchant ships in three dif ferent rescue operations in the Arabian Sea. 1998 U.S. and Algerian navies conduct first bilateral exercise since Algerian inde pendence in 1962. It was a search and rescue operation involving USS Mitscher. Oct. 5 1863 Confederate subma rine David seriously damages USS New Ironsides with a spar torpedo off Charleston, S.C. 1913 Trial of OWL, Navys first amphibian flying boat. 1957 Minitrack, a satellite tracking net developed by the Naval Research Laboratory, becomes operational. This net work, with stations from Maine to Chile, tracked the Vangard satellite. Oct. 6 1884 Navy establishes the Naval War College at Newport, R.I. (General Order 325). 1940 Fourth group of eight U.S. destroyers involved in Destroyers for Bases agree ment are turned over to British authorities at Halifax, Canada. 1943 In night Battle of Vella Lavella, three U.S. destroy ers attack nine Japanese destroyers to stop evacuation of Japanese troops from Vella Lavella., Solomon Islands. 1958 USS Seawolf (SSN575) completes record sub merged run of 60 days, logging over 13,700 nautical miles. 1962 Commissioning of USS Bainbridge (DLGN-25), first nuclear-powered frigate. 1987 Destruction of three Iranian small boats. 1997 NASA Astronaut Cmdr. Wendy Lawrence, returns from mission of STS-86: Shuttle -Mir 7 when Atlantis docked with Mir Space Station. Oct. 7 1864 USS Washusett cap tures Confederate raider CSS Florida in harbor of Bahia, Brazil. 1924 Rigid airship Shenandoah commences transcontinental flight. 1975 President Gerald Ford signs law allowing admission of women into service acade mies. 2001 Operation Enduring Freedom begins with carrier air strikes, and ship and sub marine Tomahamk strikes. Oct. 8 1812 Boat party under Lt. Jesse Elliott captures HMS Detroit and Caledonia in Niagara River. 1842 Commodore Lawrence Kearny in USS Constitution addresses a letter to the Viceroy of China, urging that American merchants in China be granted the same treaty privileges as the British. His negotiations were successful. 1950 1st Marine Division embarks at Inchon for landings at Wonsan, Korea. Oct. 9 1942 First three schools for enlisted WAVES open at Stillwater, Okla. (Yeoman), Bloomington, Ind. (Storekeepers), and Madison, Wisc. (Radiomen). 1945 Parade in New York City honors Fleet Adm. Chester Nimitz along with 13 other Navy and Marine Corps Medal of Honor awardees. 1945 Typhoon hits Okinawa, damaging many Navy ships. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS The VP-16 Alumni Reunion Association hosted its 16th annual reunion Sept. 6, celebrating the squadrons past in a city steeped in historical tradition. Past and present War Eagles gath ered in Savannah, Ga. to swap sea sto ries and reminisce on their memories of the nest. During a reception dinner, VP-16 Commanding Officer Cmdr. William Pennington, Jr. entertained questions the veterans had regarding the squad rons transition from the P-3C Orion to the P-8A Poseidon and subsequent inter-deployment readiness cycle. Other guest speakers included Lt.j.g. Alexandra Miller and Lt. Adam Miller, Coast Guard officers assigned to sector Jacksonville. They gave a joint presentation high lighting the role of the Coast Guard in enforcing domestic and international regulations on U.S and foreign flag ves sels and the Coast Guards role in sub marine escort duties at NSB Kings Bay, Ga. Cmdr. Robert Aguilar, nephew of a prior VP-16 aviation ordnanceman, and prospective executive officer on board USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) was the keynote speaker. The VP-16 Alumni Reunion Association boasts a roster of 409 mem bers from the 1950s to present day, con sisting of both enlisted Sailors and offi cers. Approximately 100 former War Eagles and family members attended this years reunion, the senior attend ee being Mr. C.W. Bill Creel, a Sailor assigned to and in attendance at the designation of VP-16 from VP-741 in February 1953. VP-16 sensor operator, AWO1 Robert Pillars, attended the dinner along with several of his squadron mates. The reunion dinner was an enlight ening experience, a glimpse into the past of previous VP-16 Sailors, Pillars remarked. I feel that every current VP-16 Sailor in attendance truly gained an appre ciation for the past experiences, events, and stories that the reunion members were willing to share. I enjoyed the eve ning and look forward to the oppor tunity to participate in similar future events. We are your history, but we would like to continue to be involved in your future, William Sherman, president of the VP-16 Reunion Association, remarked to Pennington. Pennington agreed, stating, Its important to foster this close relation ship with our past. These gentlemen set the standard that all VP-16 War Eagles aspire to, and we are proud to carry on their tradition of excellence. Next years reunion will take place Oct. 1-5, 2014 in San Antonio, Texas.Connecting with the past: VP-16 War Eagles attend reunion I regretted last weeks col umn as soon as it was pub lished. In particular, I regret ted that I wrote this: [O]ur spouses jobs dont become significantly more dangerous just because the U.S. is taking action [in a conflict]. I regret ted it because Monday morn ing, my Navy-wife friend, Theresa, lost her husband, Landon, in a helicopter crash in the Red Sea. Theresa has a new baby boy, Hunter, born in July, as well as a 6-year-old son, Anthony. Landon was supposed to be home one month ago, but his deployment was extended due to the situation in Syria. In other words, Theresas hus band should have been home on Monday with his new son. Instead, he was dead. Ive changed my mind about how these conflicts affect mili tary families, and I set out to share that with you today. Then I realized its not my story to tell. So I offered Theresa the opportunity to share her thoughts with you. What fol lows are her words, written three days after her husbands death: My sweet boys, Anthony and Hunter, I hope you didnt feel my worry as I walked aimlessly around the house after being notified last Sunday morning that there had been a mishap in your dads squadron. I hope you didnt hear my whispers to your visiting grandparents as I told them there had been a crash in their sons squadron, but I did not yet know who was involved. Anthony, I am glad you were off with a friend as I sat at the kitchen counter and checked the time stamp on your fathers last e-mail to me. Over and over again I checked, trying to figure out what time it was on that side of the world and how that relat ed to the time of the incident. Hunter, I am relieved you were napping when the doorbell rang. You didnt hear my shriek. Why is my doorbell ringing? Neither of you saw me look out the peephole at the three men standing there in their Navy Service Dress Blues. You didnt hear me wailing No! No! No! while my body gave way and crumpled to the floor. Only your grandparents witnessed my guttural screams and sobs as these men told me that your father and his aircraft were missing. Anthony, you slept at your friends house while a group of adults sat for hours and stared at each other in silence. Hunter, you were comforted by people wanting to hold you when you were fussy because I just couldnt do it. Neither of you saw me stare at the ceiling for hours as the dark night turned into morning and I held hope that your father would be found. Hunter, you were nursing when those three men came back into our house and I told them they would have to wait until I was done. Neither of you heard one of these men say The Navy regrets to inform you . . I barely heard them either. Anthony, Im sorry you were confused about being picked up early from school. You won dered aloud why there were so many flowers and people at home. I want you to know how awful it was to say yes when you asked, Dad is dead isnt he? To hear your screams of I want him alive! I want him alive! was almost more than I could bear. However, I do hope that out of all of this sadness, you got to witness true friendship and love. I hope you saw the strain our friends were under as they did everything in their power to bear our burdens for us. I hope you saw them on the phone, creating lists and orga nizing the logistical nightmare that ensued, just so I could sit with you and comfort you. I hope you saw the relief on my face when military friends took our car to get new brakes because your dad had asked me to do that in one of his last e-mails. I hope you saw my gratitude when I learned those friends had also put on four new tires for us. My boys, one of you lost your best friend, and one of you never even had the chance to meet him. But please know that your father loves you. His love is coming through all these people who have helped us. No, we will never hear his voice again, but his loving words are coming from those who have called and written. And when all of the help and calls and e-mails go away (because life goes on), you will start to feel his love from me. Because I have enough for all four of us.You can find more informa tion, including ways to help mili tary families who lost loved ones, at www.Facebook.com/Sarah. is.Smiley. Words from a grieving widow

PAGE 3

where all who work hard can get ahead. So while the budget fights in Washington are too often partisan, your service to the country must never be. As one of my prede cessors, President George H.W. Bush, once said, There is nothing more fulfilling than to serve your country and your fellow citi zens and to do it well. And that is what our system of self-government depends on. This shutdown was completely prevent able. It should not have happened. And the House of Representatives can end it as soon as it follows the Senates lead, and funds your work in the United States government without trying to attach highly controver sial and partisan measures in the process. Hopefully, we will resolve this quickly. In the meantime, I want you to know wheth er you are a young person who just joined public service because you want to make a difference, or a career employee who has dedicated your life to that pursuit-you and your families remain at the front of my mind. Your agency leaders and I will con tinue to defend your work at a time when that work has rarely been more important. We will continue to work with your agen cies to keep you and your families apprised and informed of what is happening. And I will continue to do everything in my power to get the House of Representatives to allow our government to reopen as quickly as possible, and make sure you receive the pay that you have earned. Thank you, again, for your service, your sacrifice, and everything you do every day for this country we love so much.Furlough guidance resources If you are in shutdown furlough status, please ensure that your supervisors have good contact information so you can be reached as information becomes available. You can also take advantage of the fol lowing information resources: for most up to date information on the fur lough status MESSAGE JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013 3

PAGE 4

4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013 NAS Jax Barracks Bash attracts hundredsHundreds of Sailors and Marines enjoyed a fall afternoon Sept. 26 at the Barracks Bash presented by NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department and the Liberty Program. The free event featured picnic-style food, T-shirts and prizes that included a gift card to the Navy Exchange, Deweys gift certificates, a Kota longboard, area restaurant gift certificates, HP Tablet and much more! The reason we put on the Barracks Bash is to pro vide a fun event for our single or unaccompanied active duty military personnel. The two Barracks Bashes we put on each year is the only large event that is specifically for this group of individuals, said Liberty Program Manager Tom Kubalewski. We know most of them are new to the Navy, away from their families for the first time and are still trying to adjust to life in the military. This is a great opportu nity for them to get their minds off of work and to have a good time with their fellow Sailors he added. Entertainment included music by DJ OJ, a Liberty staff member, who kept the music playing non-stop. Barracks Bashers looking for competitive enter tainment could choose from the climbing wall, Velcro wall, rock wall, volleyball, mechani cal bull, bag toss and jousting. Mulberry Cove Marina Manager Phil Collins also offered free paddleboard lessons during the event. MWR thanks everyone who participated in or volun teered for this event. Sponsors, GEICO, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, University of Phoenix, VyStar Credit Union and USA Discounters were generous in their support of the Barracks Bash.Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services.

PAGE 5

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013 5 Cloudy skies and brisk winds did not prevent enthusias tic patrons from enjoying the annual Mulberry Cove Marina RiverFest on Sept. 28. The event, held on the St. Johns River, was open to all active duty members, reserv ists, retirees and Department of Defense civilians. The U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary provided safe boat ing information and free inspections to attendees. The St. Johns Bass Anglers Club returned for another year offering free casting clinics to patrons of all ages. Children enjoyed free face painting. Fort George Surf Shop spent the day providing information on surfing lessons, surfboards and gear. Purcells Motorcycle and Marine World provided an opportunity to checkout two of their recreational vessels. Additional activities included volleyball, bag toss, music, bounce house, door prizes and a cookout. Phil Collins, MWR marina manger, said, We wanted to show appreciation to our patrons and showcase what the marina has to offer, this is a great way to get families involved in some of the outdoor activities that the marina has to offer . NAS Jacksonville MWR thanks the many volunteers and sponsors who made this event a success: VyStar Credit Union, Fort George Island Surf Shop, Purcells Motorcycle and Marine World and St. Johns Bass Anglers Club.Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal gov ernment offi cially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. MWR RiverFest at Mulberry Cove Marina a fun day

PAGE 6

The Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) welcomed aboard Maj. Peter Nunn from the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR), Aug. 15. For the next two years, Nunn, a U.S. Army entomologist, is serving as NECEs liaison with WRAIR to increase jointness and readiness for future operations. Having Maj. Nunn on-site facili tates project development and coordination providing the oppor tunity to develop joint solutions to control and surveillance capa bility gaps and shortfalls, said Capt. Eric Hoffman, officer-incharge, NECE. Maj. Nunns knowledge and background provide an outstand ing opportunity for all of us to gain experience in service specif ic culture, procedures, language and requirements. As a result, our entomologists will be prepared to effectively function during joint contingency and humanitarian/ disaster relief operations. Nunn sees the significance of this collaboration beyond the bil let. Throughout my career I have seen the Navy and Army work jointly and perform numerous mis sions together, he said. This collaboration helps to ensure that the true recipient of our work, the warfighter, is effec tively protected from vector-borne diseases and commanders are given vital information to shape a battlefield. NECE collaborates with many different organizations, but they all share the common goal of protect ing the deployed warfighter. NECE belongs to a consortium of Navy, Army, Air Force, govern ment, university and industry sci entists serving as the military test ing and evaluation hub for novel insecticide dispersal equipment, compounds and control tech niques reducing the incidence of human disease transmitted by blood feeding insects on the battle field, said Hoffman. The standardization of train ing and assets between Army and Navy along with ensuring the coor dination of research needs and goals will be an added benefit of the Army presence here at NECE, explained Nunn. My goal here at NECE is to use my professional expertise as well as Army connections to improve communications, streamline operations, and integrate equip ment in a way that adds increased value to the both Navy and Army Entomology alike. As military operations become increasingly joint, opportunities to work closely with our sister servic es ensures the command is ready to respond to the ever-changing demands required to protect the warfighter. The United States Navy traces its ori gins to the Continental Navy, which the Continental Congress established on Oct. 13, 1775, by authorizing the pro curement, fitting out, manning and dis patch of two armed vessels to cruise in search of munitions ships supplying the British Army in America. The legislation also established a naval committee to supervise the work. All together, the Continental Navy num bered some fifty ships over the course of the war, with approximately 20 warships active at its maximum strength. After the American War for Independence, Congress sold the sur viving ships of the Continental Navy and released the seamen and officers. The Constitution of the United States, ratified in 1789, empowered Congress to provide and maintain a navy. Acting on this authority, Congress ordered the construction and man ning of six frigates in 1794, and the War Department administered naval affairs from that year until Congress estab lished the Department of the Navy on April 30, 1798. Not to be confused with the Navy Birthday or the founding of the Navy Department is Navy Day. The Navy League sponsored the first national observance of Navy Day in 1922 designed to give recognition to the naval service. The Navy League of New York proposed that the official observance be on Oct. 27 in honor of President Theodore Roosevelt, who had been born on that day. In 1972 Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Elmo Zumwalt authorized recognition of Oct. 13 as the Navys birthday. In contrast to Navy Day, the Navy Birthday is intended as an internal activity for members of the active forces and reserves, as well as retirees, and dependents. Since 1972 each CNO has encouraged a Navy wide celebration of this occasion to enhance a greater appreciation of our Navy heritage, and to provide a posi tive influence toward pride and profes sionalism in the naval service. Precedence of the U.S. Navy and the Marine Corps The Continental Navy was created before the Continental Marines. On Oct. 13, 1775 Congress enacted the first naval legislation providing for the outfitting of two warships. This marked the beginning of the Continental Navy, the forerunner of the United States Navy. Almost one month later, Nov. 10, 1775 and as an exten sion of that naval legislation Congress resolved that two battalions of Marines be raised. Following the Revolutionary War, both services went into abeyance. When they were reestablished in the 1790s, the reestablishment of the United States Navy preceded the reestablishment of the Marine Corps. An order by the Marine Corps Commandant in 1921 designated Nov. 10, 1775 as the birthday of the Marine Corps. In 1972, CNO Adm. Elmo Zumwalt, with the advice of Director of Naval History Vice Adm. Edwin Hooper, authorized observance of Oct. 13, 1775 as the Navy Birthday. NECE supports Department of Defense238th Navy Birthday celebration Oct. 13Defending America with pride since 1775 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013

PAGE 7

Four Sailors shared their personal stories on video recently of how alcohol incidents impacted their careers and the importance of drinking responsi bly, a Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention (NADAP) official said Sept. 27. The first video testimonial was released Aug. 29 and features ET2 Michael Palfrey from Naval Base San Diego answering the question, What does the phrase Keep What Youve Earned mean to you? Palfrey reveals the poor decision he made while drinking that adversely impacted his career. He provides advice for others on how to drink responsibly. Someone pushed a beer in my face and I said, Why not? The nights over, said Palfrey, and the rest was a blur. That moment when the cuffs went on, I just kind of sobered up and went This is not real. This did not just happen. Palfrey decided to participate in the Keep What Youve Earned campaign and share his story so other Sailors can learn from his mistakes. He reminds Sailors that although it may be a onetime thing, irresponsible decisions regarding alcohol can lead to severe career consequences. I had all of these things going for me a year ago, and now theyre all gone, Palfrey said. Its not just the financial costs and where they hit you in the wal let. Palfrey wound up seeking the help he needed and received tremendous support from his command leadership, including James Queen, command Drug and Alcohol Program Advisor (DAPA), Training Center San Diego. Queen supported Palfrey throughout treatment, including referring him to the Substance Abuse Rehabilitation Program. In the video, Queen says the Keep What Youve Earned campaign underscores how hard Sailors work to make rank and make their family and their community proud, and that its not worth it to throw it away for a couple drinks. Palfreys story is one of four being released as part of the Keep What Youve Earned campaign. Each testi monial reminds Sailors of the impor tance of drinking responsibly and keep ing what theyve earned. Watch the video on NADAPs YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/user/ NavyNADAP. For more information, materials and resources from NADAPs Keep What Youve Earned campaign, visit www. nadap.navy.mil. Destructive drinking can kill what youve earned JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013 7

PAGE 8

violence event can have a devastating effect on a com munity. Well also discuss effective intervention. Remember you may be the only ones who have the opportu nity to prevent a domestic violence incident. The door to assist a victim may close rather quickly especially for those first responders on the scene. They have to do a good job and provide effective intervention because it may be the only chance they get, he continued. Reder then recalled an incident that occurred in Tampa, Fla. when he worked for the Hillsborough County Sheriffs Office. Several years in Tampa, we had such an event that brought great attention that domestic violence is a community problem. I got a call on my radio stating there were two dead bodies found in a car on the side of the road. We learned that they were two Tampa homicide detectives. This event affected many people and resulted in changes to policies within the police departments nationwide, he said. The audience then watched a video about a convict ed criminal named Hank Carr who shot his girlfriends 4-year-old son, was arrested and escaped by unlocking his handcuffs while in the backseat of a police car. He had shot the two Tampa detectives transport ing him and later killed a Florida State Trooper who attempted to stop the vehicle he had carjacked. After a hostage standoff in a convenience store, Carr commit ted suicide. His girlfriend, Bernice Bowen was later convicted of child neglect and is currently serving a prison sen tence. She was also charged with aiding and abetting a criminal after lying to police about the true identity of Carr who had a fake drivers license in the name of Bowens former husband. This is an unfortunate story that affected the Tampa community four people died that day. So this is why it is so important to intervene in domestic vio lence cases in the early stages, said Reder. Other topics discussed during the training included: understanding the victim and abusers behavior, cyber stalking, intimate partner rape, what domestic vio lence does to kids and injunctions for protection. Domestic Violence Awareness Month is recognized every October to remember those who have died at the hands of a loved one, honor those who have survived domestic violence, recognize the progress made in reducing domestic violence and recommit to end the abuse. If you or someone you know are in an abusive rela tionship, call (904) 354-3114. The hotline is manned 24/7. You never know, you just might save someones life.missions since the founding of our nation, said Undersander. There are nearly 50,000 active duty Sailors and 8,500 reservists who identify themselves as Hispanic, including five flag officers and 216 master chiefs, said Undersander. Hispanics have been involved in every aspect of naval operations and they provide unique experiences and perspectives that enhance the cultural under standing of their commands, which leads to greater mission readiness. The guest speaker for this years event was MACM(SW) Edward Santiago of the NAS Jax Security Department. My three brothers and I were raised in the urban neighborhoods of Brooklyn, N.Y. by our single moth er. Money was tight and we never had the luxuries that other more fortunate families had. However, we did have the love that was necessary to flour ish values and commitment to family and success, said Santiago. My mother always said, He is not richer who the most has, but who the least needs. This means someone who is satisfied with a small amount is richer than someone who is always craving more. I remember going to Puerto Rico every summer to visit my father. My family values were also based on hard work and commitment for success. Nothing was ever just given to us. We had to work for it and I always thrived from that. I used to look forward to getting up at dawn and going with my grandfather to the coun tryside to pick coffee beans and mangos. We would stay there sometimes for days, Santiago recalled. We often just enjoyed spending time visiting and conversing with family members. This is how many Hispanics get their values through their experiences with family. Santiago continued, My advice that I give to each and everyone of you is to always maintain the values that your culture has instilled in you and use that to better yourself the best you can. Never stop bettering yourself and pass that on to others. A person who is motivated and hard-working and has honor, courage and commitment to serve, can achieve his or her dreams in the U.S. Navy, regardless of race, creed, color, or ethnic origin. The guests were then treated to a Latin-style buffet that included a variety of traditional dishes from vari ous featured Hispanic nationalities and a short folk lore dance program by Viva Panama-USA. new aircraft Aug. 14, a milestone that reinforced the Navy-industry partnership and represented a step forward in the development of the Navys next-gener ation fighter. As the F-35C Fleet Replacement Squadron, VFA-101 trains Navy aircrew and maintenance personnel to fly and repair the F-35C. The F-35 Lightning II brings a broad range of force packages to the fleet capitalizing on the integration of advanced mission systems, stealth technology and supersonic capability across three F-35 variants. The F-35C will enhance the flexibility, power pro jection, and strike capabilities of carrier air wings and joint task forces and will complement the capabilities of the F/A-18E/F, which currently serves as the Navys premier strike fighter. By 2025, the Navys aircraft carrier-based air wings will consist of a mix of the F-35C, F/A-18E/F Super Hornets, EA-18G Growler, E-2D Hawkeye, Unmanned Carrier Launched Airborne Surveillance and Strike air vehicles, MH-60R/S helicopters and Carrier Onboard Delivery logistics aircraft. Since June 1942, Grim Reapers has served as the nickname for three different squadrons Fighter Squadron (VF) 10, VF-101 and now Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 101 flying various aircraft, including the F4F Wildcat, the FG1-D Corsair, the F-4 Phantom, the F-14 Tomcat and currently the F-35C. The Grim Reapers flew combat missions in the Battle of Guadalcanal and the Korean War and at various times since World War II, served as trainers for future naval aviators joining the fleet. HISPANIC F-35C DOMESTIC VIOLENCE 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013

PAGE 9

In MemoriamVP-5 is deeply saddened by the tragic passing of one of our finest Mad Foxes, AT2 Thomas Michael Moore, 30, on Sept. 19. He is survived by his wife, Tara; son, Zachary; and his parents, Dwight Moore and Anna Gribensk. Moore joined the Navy in 2007 and after Recruit Training and A-School served with VP-30 where became an aviation electronics technician. He also traveled the world with the All U.S. Military Baseball Team in 2008 earning a Joint Service Achievement Medal from the Secretary of Defense. Moore became a VP-5 Mad Fox in 2010 and deployed to El Salvador in support of Operation Unified Response, where he provided support after the earthquake in Haiti. He deployed to Kadena, Japan in May 2012, return ing home in December 2012. Moore possessed the most exceptional abilities and traits leadership, optimism, strong sense of humor, intelligence, drive, passion for his family and the will to win learned on the baseball fields growing up and carried through to his Navy career. He is deeply missed by his Mad Fox family. The funeral service for Moore was held on Sept. 30 at Duke Memorial United Methodist Church in Durham, N.C. Following the service, he was laid to rest in Maple Wood Cemetery. A memorial service was held on Oct. 2 at the NAS Jacksonville Base Chapel. Anyone who would like to send condolences to the family can send them to: Patrol Squadron FIVE, Unit 60163, FPO AA 340995902 and they will be forwarded to the family. The Seabees of Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU-202) Detachment Jacksonville joined Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) personnel Sept. 27 to place more than 250 purple ribbons on vari ous thoroughfares around the base to help commemorate Domestic Violence Awareness Month at NAS Jacksonville. The purple ribbon also cele brates that the silence that previ ously facilitated domestic abuse and violence has been broken, said FFSC Victim Advocate Earl Godoy. For more than two decades, the purple ribbon has been the symbol that highlights the issue of domestic abuse and the commit ment of survivors, family mem bers and other concerned per sons determined to end domestic abuse, said FAP Educator Erica Schneider. She appreciated the time and equipment that CBMU-202 Seabees contribute to the annu al project. We simply couldnt accomplish this every year with out their help. The Seabees do great work that always exceeds our expectations. Godoy was supported by FFSC Counselor Ryan ODonnell, FFSC Family Advocacy Program Educator Erica Schneider, FFSC Counselor Jackie Viola and FFSC Counselor Kevin Montgomery. Seabees and FFSC plant purple ribbons JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013 9

PAGE 10

It was a windy, rainy Saturday morning Sept. 28 as 28 members of Team Navy Jax gathered with hundreds of other riders at the St. Augustine Airport to participate in the 27th Bike MS PGA Tour Cycle to the Shore. This is the ninth consecutive year the team has supported the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society, a Combined Federal Campaign-supported charity. We have a great team who are dedicated to helping orga nizations make a difference. We get together monthly for team rides to prepare for this event and participate in several other charity rides throughout the year, said team captain Jerry Dryden. This year, we raised nearly $11,000 to benefit the MS Society. We continue to ride for causes that help those in need. Dryden also praised the teams sponsor for their con tinuing support. We greatly appreciate VyStar Credit Union sponsoring us and providing us with these great jerseys and shorts, he said. Team Navy Jax members arrived before dawn to prep their bicycles, check in and prepare themselves for the challenging but scenic 83-mile ride on day one. The Saturday portion of the ride, which began at the St. Augustine Airport, took the riders through the back roads of North Florida, across rivers, along the ocean, up bridges and through winding roads to their final destination in Daytona Beach. While some only chose to ride one leg of the race, many spent the night in Daytona and got up the next morning to pedal back to the finish line. I am out to ride my bicycle and support finding a cure for MS. I really enjoy being part of this team they are great about getting out there and support ing causes, said AE1(AW) Dan Flynn of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, who was participating in the ride for the first time. This is my first MS ride with Team Navy Jax as well, said Lt. Cmdr. Kris Sanchez of Naval Hospital Jax. When I moved to Jacksonville recently, I decided to take up cycling. My first ride with the team was the Tour de Cure in May. I really enjoy the cama raderie of the team. After hours of pedaling through extremely strong winds and bouts of rainshow ers, team members arrived in Daytona to rest and enjoy a special dinner with the other riders. Day two had them head ed back to the St. Augustine Airport to the finish line. We are so thrilled to have Team Navy Jax and all the teams to come out and ride 150 or more miles to create a world free of MS. Its all about the fundraisers and the riders who make this event possible for more than 18,000 people affect ed by this disease in North Florida, said North Florida MS Chapter President Corrina Steiger. We ride rain or shine and the riders train and con duct fundraising year-round. For more information on Team Navy Jax and the charity rides they participate in, con tact Terry Yamin at Their next big ride will be the Ride 2 Recovery with wounded warriors in November and the American Diabetes Associations Tour de Cure in May 2014. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal govern ment officially endorses any com pany, sponsor or its products or services. Team Navy Jax rides the wind for charity 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013

PAGE 11

Fire Prevention Week commemorates the Great Chicago Fire when a two-day blaze killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 home less and destroyed more than 17,000 buildings Oct. 8-9, 1871. That tragedy inspired reform across America, spurring new fire safety codes and public aware ness campaigns. In October, the National Fire Protection Association highlights the impor tance of fire safety education. This years theme, Prevent Kitchen Fires, focuses on proper cooking techniques and safety concerns in the kitchen. The following is the NAS Jax Fire Prevention Week schedule of events: Oct. 5 13, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Daily open house at base fire stations. Oct. 5, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Fire Prevention table display with fire safety materials, red fire hats, fire apparatus, Pluggie the talking fire hydrant at the Navy Exchange Courtyard. Oct. 7-12 Unannounced fire evacuation drills. Oct. 8, 4 p.m. Fire inspectors, Pluggie the talking fire hydrant and fire apparatus at the NAS Jax Youth Center, Building 2069. Oct. 9, 10-11 a.m. Fire inspectors and Pluggie the talking fire hydrant visit the Childrens Ward and Pediatrics Clinic at the Naval Hospital, Building H2080. Oct. 10, 9:30 a.m. Fire Inspectors and Pluggie the talking fire hydrant at the Child Development Center, Building 2070. Many fatalities, injuries, and property losses can be prevent ed by planning ahead and inte grating fire safe behaviors into your daily activities. Dont be a statistic . be smart. Put a smoke alarm on every level of the home outside each sleeping area, and in every bedroom. Smoke alarms can be bat tery-operated or electrically hardwired in your home and are available at a variety of price points. If you have hearing prob lems, use alarms with flashing strobe lights and vibration. Test smoke alarms every month. Replace batteries once a year, even if alarms are hard wired. Test your smoke alarms at night to see if your child will wake up and respond to the alarm. Children sleep more deeply and may not wake up. If your child does not wake up to the alarm, try an alarm where you can program your voice to alert them. Mount smoke alarms high on the walls or ceilings since smoke rises. Ceiling-mounted alarms should be installed at least 4 inches away from the nearest wall. Wall-mounted alarms should be installed 4 to 12 inches away from the ceil ing. Replace all smoke alarms every 10 years, or sooner if they dont respond properly. Consider installing both ion ization alarms, which are bet ter at sensing flaming fires, and photoelectric alarms, which are better at sensing slow, smoky fires, or dual sensor alarms. Cooking is the number one cause of home fires and inju ries. Unattended cooking is by far the leading cause of cook ing fires. Keep anything that can catch fire away from the stovetop. Dont use the oven or stovetop if you are sleepy or have consumed alcohol. Stay in the kitchen when fry ing, grilling or boiling food. If you have to leave, even for a short time, turn off the stove. Fire prevention facts NAS Jax recognizes Fire Prevention Week JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013 11

PAGE 12

Navy Lodge celebrates hospitality weekNavy Lodge Jacksonville celebrat ed National Hospitality Week, Sept. 23 27, to show appreciation for the work that housekeeping, front desk and maintenance teams do every day to exceed guest expectations. We are excited to celebrate this years National Hospitality Week, said Melanie Peters, Navy Lodge Jacksonville general manager. Our team works so hard throughout the year to make sure our guests have a clean and comfortable stay here. She is a 16-year associate of Navy Lodge with five of those years at NAS Jacksonville. Our team is dedicated to providing premier service for our guests. Every single team member has taken profes sional courses to attain the highest certifications for their job and thats reflected in everything they provide our guests, said Peters. This years celebration included a potluck awards luncheon that also fea tured a Lamp Shade Art Contest that was judged by our base CO, added Peters. We also had friendly, hospital ity style competitions that tested our housekeeping and guest service skills and to keep each day fun. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander told the 25-member team, You know that hospitality is much more than just an attractive facility it also takes a team-oriented staff like yours to oper ate the property at its true potential. And everything that I hear about our Navy Lodge is overwhelmingly posi tive and complementary. So, theres really nothing more for me to say than keep up the good work and keep delighting your guests. Undersander was impressed by the art contest. There are some very tal ented and creative people who work here. The lamp shade artists came up with a number of unexpected, but interesting subject matter. Thanks for inviting me to be part of hospitality week. The Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) announced Sept. 27 that it has made some changes to its second Navy Blue Holiday celebra tion. The Navy Blue Holiday is a time to celebrate the NEXs unique connection to the Navy and Navy families, empha size Navy values and to give back to deserving NEX customers. This year, our Navy Blue Holiday is going to be even bigger and better, said retired Rear Adm. Robert Bianchi, chief executive officer, NEXCOM. We are very excited to bring our customers more savings, quality and value, and most importantly, say thank you for being a loyal NEX customer. The Navy Blue Holiday season will kick off on the Navys 238th birthday, Oct. 13. The kick off includes one of the largest single customer giveaways ever. NEXCOM has partnered with its ven dor community to give away 1,000 NEX $100 gift cards. Customers can enter for the drawing beginning Oct. 9 at their local NEX or online at www.myNavyEx change.com. We are excited to be able to give away $100,000 in NEX gift cards to our customers, said Bianchi. I know there are many other shopping options available. We are thrilled to be able to thank our customers for their support throughout the years. It is our honor to give back, because our mission is our customers. One thing that hasnt changed is that customers will continue to find a great selection of items in all price ranges including prestige brands, nation al mass brands and private brands at excellent savings plus, no sales tax on NEX purchases. Throughout the hol iday season, the NEX will offer even more savings and promotions so cus tomers can save even more. NEXCOM will once again offer spe cial pricing on the most popular gifts, through its web store for Sailors and Marines at sea prior to Thanksgiving. From Nov. 24 27, afloat personnel will be able to take advantage of a sale designed just for them. Once again, we tailored the items for sale to be those that appeal most to Sailors and Marines at sea, said Bianchi. They will find electronics, video games, outerwear and holiday gifts that can be sent home to loved ones. Afloat Sailors and Marines can also sign up to win one of the $100 NEX gift cards to be given away. NEX gives back to customers 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013

PAGE 13

Capt. Alan Watt, a Naval Reserve Civil Engineer Corps and Seabees Combat Warfare Officer, celebrated his retire ment with family, friends and former shipmates in a formal ceremony Sept. 13 at NAS Jacksonville. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus served as host and guest speaker. Kiwus said he first met Watt at a small Marine Corps base in Djibouti, Africa more than ten years ago. He said he has talk ed with many people who served with Watt over the years and they all say sim ilar things that Watt is a very smart man of defining integrity. You stand out as a very capable offi cer, said Kiwus. You have a very deep knowledge of many subjects including, of course, engineering, construction, equipment, contracting and all things, a Seabee! Kiwus told everyone that Watt is known as a straight shooter and for not being shy. People do not have to wonder where they stand with him nor do they have to question where he stands on an issue; people know Watt will tell it like it is. Watt graduated from Oklahoma State University in 1975 but did not enter service with the Naval Reserve Civil Engineer Corps until May 1988. His first duty assignment was as the Assistant Administration Officer for the Ninth Reserve Naval Construction Regiment in Dallas, Texas. Watts career took him to many plac es. After serving in Dallas, tours fol lowed in Jacksonville, Atlanta, Tampa, Djibouti, Baghdad, Qatar and sever al other locations, ever increasing in responsibilities before he finished his career serving as Vice Commander for the Twenty-fifth Naval Construction Regiment in Gulfport, Miss. Ive had a wonderful career, even though I got a very late start, said Watt. I wouldnt trade my career or deploy ments for anything, I had a blast! I got to travel the world and see countries I never dreamed I would see. Watt also paid tribute to his wife of 38 years and his two grown sons during the ceremony. He reminded everyone that the toughest job in the Navy is that of Navy wife. He commented that he had opportu nities to do things no other officer had the opportunity to do during his career. He was able to be a part of the team building a new nation in Iraq. He was excited to share that he was in the room working issues with General Abizade and Ambassador Bremers staff. Early in his Navy career, Watt was gathered in an auditorium with the other members of the command wait ing on the comments to come from a new skipper. The new commander walked into the room, wrote the fol lowing words on the blackboard and walked out. Do the right thing and take care of your people. Watt said the words struck him and have stuck with him and he has tried to live by them his whole career. Pretty good advice, dont you think? said Watt. If youre mourning the end of sum mer and with it, the annual vacation season take heart that military lodg ing facilities remain open for business, offering year-round escapes at a frac tion of the cost of commercial hotels. The Army Morale, Welfare and Recreation program features comfort able cabins as well as camping hours at Torii Station Army Base on Okinawas Yomitan Peninsula. U.S. Army photo Now might be the perfect time for qualified fun seekers to use their mil itary, retiree or Defense Department identification cards to book lodging at one of hundreds of military-owned accommodations all over the world. The facilities range from standard hotel rooms on military installations to campgrounds and recreational vehi cle parks to luxury armed forces recre ation centers in Garmisch, Germany; Honolulu; Seoul, South Korea; and Walt Disney World in Orlando, Fla. Generally speaking, each service, including the Coast Guard, runs its own lodging program for official travelers and offers up empty rooms on a spaceavailable basis to leisure travelers from every branch. They also operate facili ties geared specifically for recreational guests. Every service runs its own reservation system, and rules about who can stay in the facilities vary slightly among them. But for those willing to do a little home work, military lodging can open doors to affordable year-round getaways. Susan Langless, who oversees the Navys lodging facilities, said they typi cally save guests about 40 percent com pared to civilian hotels. Those looking for big city vacations can check into Navy Lodge hotels in the Seattle and San Francisco areas, as well as San Diego and New York, she said. However, travelers longing for a relax ing beach getaway can visit one of Navy Lodges beach destinations. For a Gulf Coast vacation, for exam ple, they can check out a Navy Lodge in Gulfport, Miss., or Pensacola, Fla. Meanwhile, the Navy Getaways pro gram features accommodations at 49 sites around the globe. That includes more than 2,600 recreational vehicle spots, tent sites, cottages, cabins, town homes and resort-style vacation rentals. Among them is Navy Getaways Pacific Beach Resort and Conference Center in Washington, offering three-, fourand five-bedroom cottages, hotel suites, an RV spot and campground. Not only are these facilities afford able, Langless said, but they also are great places to stay and relax. Many of the military accommoda tions are considered best-kept secrets by their guests For example, the Army morale, wel fare and recreation program features the popular Seward Military Resort on Alaskas Kenai Peninsula, reported Debbie Martin, the Armys chief of hos pitality programs. Guests can choose from a variety of accommodations as they enjoy worldclass fishing, spectacular glaciers, and abundance of wildlife and recreational opportunities galore. Also, in addition to the luxurious Hale Koa Armed Forces Recreation Center in Honolulu, the Army operates the Pililaau Army Recreation Center on Oahus Leeward Coast and the Kilauea Military Camp mountain resort on Hawaiis Big Island. Bob Vogt, division director for Army Installation and Management Commands soldier and community recreation division, said he is partic ularly fond of the cabins Army MWR operates on Torii Station Army Base in Okinawa. He described the Torii Beach location as one of the most beautiful beachfront locations anywhere in the world. Within the continental United States, the Army MWR program manages Lake of the Ozarks Recreation Area in Missouri, which features lakefront cab ins and motel rooms, along with boat and jet ski rentals. Americas Army and other eligible patrons should use Army Lodging, because it provides them with conve niently located, high-quality lodging and hospitality services at an affordable price, Vogt said. The Marines Corps network of recreational facilities includes vil Civil Engineer Corps officer retires at 25 years Military lodging opens door to year-round getaways JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013 13

PAGE 14

las, cabanas and cot tages at Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. The Del Mar Beach Resort, near Camp Pendleton, Calif., is a luxury oceanfront resort spanning pristine beach es and spectacular views of the Pacific, and a host of other amenities. Travelers also might want to check out the Big Bear Recreational Facility, a hidden retreat in the heart of the San Bernardino Mountains. Run by the Marine Corps, it offers affordable camp ing and lodging facilities for active duty, retired military personnel, reservists, DOD employ ees and their authorized family members. In addition to hotels on many Air Force bases, Air Force Personnel Centers services directorate fea tures more than two dozen recreational areas worldwide. Ramstein Inns on Ramstein Air Base in Germany is directly across the street from the passenger terminal, and at the front door to many of Germanys most popu lar destinations. The Nellis Inn on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., is convenient gateway to the Las Vegas attractions. Peterson Air Force Bases inn provides easy access to Colorado Springs, Colo., and the Rocky Mountains. Members interested in visiting the mid-Atlantic coast can check out the Fort Fisher Air Force Recreational Area in Kure Beach, N.C., which pro vides visitors easy access to the Cape Fear River and the Atlantic Ocean, Paige Hughes of the Air Force services directorate reported. Those who prefer the mountains and canyons of the western United States can visit Farish Air Force Recreation Area outside Colorado Springs, Colo., or Fort Tuthill Air Force Recreation Area near Flagstaff, Ariz., with easy access to the Grand Canyon. Those stationed in the Pacific can enjoy recreational areas in Hawaii, Okuma Air Force Recreation Area on Okinawa, Japan, and Tama Air Force Recreation Area on the main island north of Tokyo. Visitors traveling with a recreational vehicle have even more options available, Hughes said. With more than 60 fam ily camps to choose from, they can find facili ties near San Antonio, Charleston, S.C., and other popular cit ies, or close to Florida Panhandle beaches. Even travelers famil iar with the Defense Departments vast net work of accommodations might forget to explore those offered by the Coast Guard. Those facilities include the Petaluma Lake RV Park, on a small lake in Californias Sonoma County. U.S. Coast Guard Station Marathon offers four cottages in the heart of the Florida Keys. And to the northeast, the Coast Guard offers summertime lodging at a former lifeboat station on Cuttyhunk Island, Mass., now converted into a house with two apart ments. Look at MWR recre ational lodging oppor tunities when planning your vacation, Vogt advises military travelers. All services offer lowcost options from camp sites, cabins to small lodges. Its a poten tial cost saving to you and your family and it allows MWR to continue to offer reduced rates on programs and services at locations across the U.S. and in overseas loca tions. For more details about recreational lodging options, visit the service morale, welfare and rec reation websites or the Defense Departments lodging website. Related Sites Department of Defense Lodging http://www.dod lodging.net/info.aspx. Armed Forces Recreation Centers http://www.armymwr. com/travel/recreation centers/. LODGING Center for Service Support (CSS) and Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) conducted insider threat and workplace violence training Sept. 26. According to SECNAVINST 5510.37 insider threats are people with authorized access, who use that access, wittingly or unwittingly, to harm nation al security interests or national security through unauthorized disclosure, data modification, espionage, terrorism, or kinetic actions resulting in loss or deg radation of resources or capa bilities. Special Agent Michael Szabunia, assigned to Naval Station Newport (NWPT) said understanding insider threats and workplace violence is important and that everyone should be trained to spot the warning signs of potential offenders. With insider threats and workplace violence there is lot of planning and behavior indicators, said Szabunia. Its important to learn from incidents like the recent Washington Navy Yard shoot ing and the Ft. Hood shooting involving former Army Maj. Nidal Hasan. Hasan, a former U.S. Army medical corps officer fatal ly shot 13 people and injured more than 30 others in the Fort Hood mass shooting Nov. 5, 2009. A jury convicted him of 13 counts of premeditated mur der and 32 counts of attempt ed murder. Hasan was subse quently sentenced to death. Szabunia said some of the warning signs of potential offenders include: a pattern of intimidating, harassment, signs of substance abuse, sud den or marked changes in behavior or appearance, fre quent disputes over disci plinary actions, termination, uncharacteristic isolation from co-workers and obsessive fasci nation with incidents of work place violence. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics an estimated 1.7 million workers are victims of workplace violence. Our goal is to help prevent these horrific crimes, said Szubania. Its important that everyone recognize these paths to violence. We must under stand the indicators of poten tial offenders and be willing to report it. This behavior is sometimes very apparent and should not be ignored. Pat Mclean, CSS executive director said the NCIS training was helpful and relevant in the wake of the recent attacks in this country and abroad. If you look at all the inci dents that have happened over the past few weeks, its impor tant to understand and iden tify potential threats posed to our Sailors and Department of Defense (DoD) employ ees, said McLean. We must be aware of these indicators whether at work or in our per sonal lives. Our team must be engaged with events taking place around them. CSS and its learning sites provide Sailors with the knowl edge and skills needed to sup port the Fleets warfighting mission. More than 300 staff and faculty work hand-in-hand with the fleet and are dedicat ed to ensure training is current and well executed on behalf of 10,000 Sailors who graduate from CSS courses annually in the administration, logistics and media communities. CSS conducts insider threat, workplace violence training 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013

PAGE 15

Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville hosted the annu al Duval County Medical Society (DCMS) and Navy dinner meeting at the NAS Jacksonville Officers Club Sept. 26. During her keynote address to more than 100 DCMS phy sicians and healthcare pro fessionals, NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer explained the importance of caring for our service members our nations heroes and their families. We must ensure the medi cal readiness of our sailors and Marines 24/7 and 365 so they can return to their ships, their planes and helicopters, their submarines and battle fields around the world. At the same time, we exist to ease the minds of those Sailors and Marines by taking care of their families while they are out doing their jobs. Shaffer also discussed how Medical Home Port is reduc ing illness, injury and hospi talization of military person nel and their families through a coordinated, whole-person approach to preventive, routine and urgent care. During the event, NH Jacksonville Family Practice Clinic Manager Dalia Cavazos was awarded the NH Jacksonville Circle of Excellence Award for outstand ing service to the medical staff. Civilian staff members, from various NH Jacksonville departments, were nominated for the award and were voted on by the commands medical staff. Cavazos, a six-year family practice manager, was recog nized for her hard work, dedi cation and willingness to help others. NH Jacksonville is a part of a $6 billion global network with a team of 64,000 active duty, reserve and civilian per sons worldwide who directly care for 1 million people. That number increases to 10 million when the care by providers in the TRICARE network is added that included many of the DCMS physicians at the annual event. The DCMS and Navy dinner meeting underscores the role of community collaborations in ensuring the best patient care to active duty, retir ees and families. Along with partnering with DCMS, NH Jacksonville collaborates with the University of North Florida Center for Global Health & Medical Diplomacy, Northeast Florida Quality Collaborative, First Coast Worksite Wellness as well as maintains more than 100 medical training, research and support agreements with universities and medical orga nizations. Founded in 1853, the Duval County Medical Society Floridas oldest and most pres tigious medical society was the first medical society in Florida, and serves as the voice for organized medicine in Duval County. It is a non-profit, voluntary professional associa tion of more than 2,000 physi cians dedicated to the health of Jacksonville and the surround ing community. Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville and its branch health clinics are now providing annual influenza (flu) vaccine to service members, retirees and families. The flu vaccine is required for all active duty military personnel, selected reserves and healthcare workers, and is recommended by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for everyone age six months and older. Its the first and most important step in protect ing against flu viruses. According to CDC, seasonal epi demics of influenza occur every year in the U.S., usually between October and April. Everyone age six months and older should get an annual influ enza vaccine, said NH Jacksonville Director of Public Health Capt. Joseph McQuade. Immunization is the primary means of reducing sea sonal influenza illness and its com plications. Vaccine protects both the individual and the community as a whole, by reducing and preventing the spread of the disease. Influenza is a virus that infects the nose, throat, windpipe and lungs. It is highly contagious, spreading from person to person by coughing, shak ing hands, sneezing or talking close ly with another person. Typical flu symptoms include fever, chills, muscle aches, conges tion, cough, runny nose and diffi culty breathing. Flu can lead to more severe infections like pneumonia especially in the elderly and those who may have an impaired immune system. H1N1 flu virus has similar symptoms, sometimes also includ ing vomiting and diarrhea, and can cause severe infections in younger patients, pregnant women and chil dren. NH Jacksonville offers two kinds of flu vaccine. Flu mist an intra nasal vaccine that is squirted into the nose can be given to healthy patients ages two to 49. The inject able vaccine (flu shot) is given to pregnant moms, diabetic patients, asthmatics and anyone with a chronic medical condition such as emphysema. The shot is safe for pregnant women at any time during preg nancy. Since babies arent able to get the vaccine until age six months, mom is babys best protection. Breastfeeding also helps protect babies, thanks to the protective flu antibodies that appear in moms milk about two weeks after immu nization. At the hospital, patients can walkin for flu vaccine Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Thursday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Naval Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville is conducting shot exer cises for tenant commands. Patients can walk-in for flu vaccine after Oct. 21, Monday through Friday from 7:15 a.m. to 4 p.m. Other important immunizations include human papillomavirus (HPV), pneumococcal and the entire spectrum of childhood vaccines. For more information, visit www. cdc.gov. E-mail access to health care teams: Medical Home Port OnlineNaval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville its hospital and branch health clinics offers multiple ways for patients and their care teams to connect. Patients with a primary care manager (PCM) at the hospital or any of the branch health clinics can use a secure e-mail service called Medical Home Port Online (also known as RelayHealth). Patients can use this system to e-mail their care team for non-urgent issues, request lab results and medication refills, and request appointments. Because Medical Home Port Online is for nonurgent issues, it can take up to three business days for the team to reply to patient e-mails. The system is secure and confidential, with no cost. To sign up for Medical Home Port Online, go to www.relayhealth.com or the command web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/NavalHospitalJax Patients need to know the name of their PCM to sign up. For technical help, call RelayHealth at 866-RELAY-ME (866-735-2963). Patients can also sign up at their care teams front desk. And, as always, hospital and branch health clinic care teams are available by telephone during clinic hours, and nurse advice is available after-hours. At the hospital, patients call the appointment line at 542-4677 or 800-529-4677, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Patients with a referral from their PCM to a specialty clinic at the hospital can call the Naval Hospital and Floridas oldest medical society hold annual meeting Flu vaccine now available at Naval Hospital Jacksonville and branch health clinics JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013 15

PAGE 16

DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Friday at 7 p.m. Oct. 4 Karaoke with Randy Oct. 11 Holliday & Ken Oct. 18 Karaoke with Randy Oct. 25 Second Tyme Around Band Deweys Family Night third Friday of the Month Deweys will be open for dinner & bev erages Oct. 18 Balloon Artist Nov. 15 Karaoke with Tom Turner Dec. 20 Childrens Holiday Bingo Childrens Holiday Bingo will start at 6:30 p.m. and has a cost of $10 per person and includes soft drinks, hot dog, daub er, bingo card and gift bag for each child.DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Youth Bowling League: Every Monday & Wednesday, 10:30 am noon $17 annually or $8 per week. Includes shoes, awards will be given at the end of the season! Rising Stars Youth League: Every Saturday, 10:30 am 12:30 pm. Pee Wee Division (6 years & under) 2 games, $6 per week. Juniors Division (7 years & older) 3 games, $8 per week. Special Stars Bowling League for fami lies with special needs children. All ages welcome! Ramps available for the non-ambulatory as well as bumpers for beginners. Runs for 10 weeks at a cost of $7 per week, shoes are included. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4 6 pm. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4 10 pm. Thursdays: Free bowling for Active Duty 11 am 1 pm. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4 6 pm, Party Extreme $10, 8 pm midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes Included. Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Oct. 19, 1 4 pm. $20 per person, regis tration begins at noon. Scratch Sweeper: Oct. 26, 1-4 pm. $30 entry fee, check in starts at noon. *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Indoor Swimming Pool Lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Learn to Swim Fall Sessions At the Indoor Pool Session 1 Oct. 1424 Session 2 Oct 28 Nov 7 $40 military, $45 DoD Monster Dash 5K Oct. 31 at 11:30 a.m. Perimeter Rd. / Antenna Farm Pre-register by Oct. 18 Fourth Annual Zumba Party Oct. 23, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Fitness Center Outdoor Pavilion Barktoberfest Oct. 26, 9 a.m. Veterinary Treatment Facility Bldg. 537 Free 2-mile walk/run with the dogs!I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil. Jacksonville Zoo Spooktacular $9. Universal Halloween Horror Nights: Sunday Thursday $42.25, Friday $53, Saturday $74.25 Halloween Horror Nights visits ITT on Oct. 2, 10 a.m. 2 p.m. Stop by to win great prizes! Pandemic Haunted Attractions San Jose Blvd in Mandarin, tickets on sale at ITT! Haunting of School House 4 $18 Waves of Honor Special: Seaworld Orlando Adult $46.50, Child $42.25. Busch Gardens Tampa Adult $45, Child $40.50. Jacksonville Jaguars: Section 147 Bud Zone, $70. Jags shuttle bus $12. Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2013 2014 Season: Tickets now available! The Artist Series Broadway in Jax 2013 2014 Season: Tickets available now! Mamma Mia!: Oct. 19, 2013, 8 pm, $60.50. Celtic Thunder: Nov. 10, 2013, 7 pm, $80. Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus: Jan. 17 & 18, 2014, $51. War Horse: Feb. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $68.50. Memphis: Mar. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $65. Million Dollar Quartet: Apr. 26, 2014, 8 pm, $65. The D* Word: Oct. 4 Oct. 25, 2014, $43.75 $46. Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute ticket FL (Expires Sept.27,2014) 4 day Hopper ticket$166 4 day 1 park per day and water park ticket-$166 4 day Hopper and Water park combo ticket$194 Gatorbowl $35 Capital One Bowl $98 Russell Athletic Bowl $78 Soul Food Festival Special $20 General Admission $32 Preferred $42 VIP $65The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Paintball Trip Oct. 5 at 9 a.m. GTF in Yulee Navy Birthday 5K Oct. 11 at 11:30 a.m. Perimeter Rd./Antenna Farm HabiJax ReStore Volunteer Trip Oct. 12 at 8 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Oct. 8 & 22 for active duty Oct. 10 & 24 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27 Auto Skills Center Call 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Movie Under the Stars Oct. 25 at 7 p.m. Featuring Monsters University Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Oct. 7 Nov. 20 $500 per person For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or email bill.bonser@navy.mil Same-sex medical benefits explainedMarriage Spouses, including same-sex spouses, of service members (active duty, retired or Guard/Reserve) are eligible for TRICARE. When you getmarried, bring your new spouse to auniformed service identification (ID) card office to register him or her in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System (DEERS). Youll need the following documents to add your spouse to DEERS. All documents must be originals or certified copies. In the following scenarios, getting married will cause TRICARE benefits to end: married Depending on where you live, and who you are, your Check Us Out Online: www.jaxairnews.com 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013

PAGE 17

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013 17 appointment line, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.) After-hours nurse advice is available via the appointment line on evenings, weekends and holidays. At Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville, patients call 546-7094/7095, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. For after-hours nurse advice, call the com mand appointment line at 542-4677 or 800-5294677 on evenings, weekends and holidays. These communication options are a few of the features of Medical Home Port the Navys approach to the nationwide medical home model of quality care. Medical Home Port plac es the patient at the center of a collaborative team of caregivers from doctors to nurses and case managers led by the PCM. The patient and teamwork together for a coordinat ed, wholeperson approach to health to meet the patients preventive, routine and urgent care needs. Were strengthening the patient-provider relationship in an environment where both staff and patients PCS and deploy with teambased care, said Capt. Troy Borema, a family medicine physician. Patients secure e-mail access to their team is one aspect of that care. The hospital has six teams: Family Medicine (green, red, white and yellow teams), Internal Medicine blue team and Pediatrics pur ple team. Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville (Primary Care) has one team: silver team. To meet the PCMs on each team, click on Medical Home Port on the command website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/navalhospitaljax HOME PORT spouses options will vary. TRICARE Prime TRICARE Standard and Extra U.S. Family Health Plan TRICARE Standard Overseas TRICARE For Life Active duty spouses may also qualify to enroll in one of these Prime options with their active duty sponsors: TRICARE Prime Remote TRICARE Prime Overseas TRICARE Prime Remote Overseas Some of these health plan options require you to enroll by submitting an enrollment application. Dental Coverage Yes, you can enroll in one of two den tal insurance plans. These dental plans are separate from TRICAREs health benefit and do require a separate enrollment. TRICARE Dental Program: Available to all active duty and National Guard/Reserve family members. TRICARE Retiree Dental Program: Available for family members of retired service members. Prescriptions TRICARE provides a robust pharmacy benefit. Costs Yourhealth care costs are based on who you are and which health plan option you are using. Retroactive Coverage for Same-Sex Spouses Same-sex spouses may be added to existing coverage to begin on June 26, 2013 or their eligibility date in DEERS, whichever is later. To enroll in a Prime Option TRICARE Prime, TRICARE Prime Remote, TRICARE Prime Overseas or TRICARE Prime Remote Overseas, applications must be received no later than Dec. 31, 2013. After that, regular enrollment deadlines will apply. Retroactive enroll ment for a Prime Option is limited to same-sex spouses of active duty service members rank E-4 and below. All others may enroll using the existing 20th of the month rule. If your spouse does not enroll in a Prime Option, he or she can file a claim under TRICARE Standard if eligibility is established for care received: On or after June 26, 2013 if married before June 26, 2013, orback to the date of eli gibility in DEERSif married after June 26, 2013. To purchase TRICARE Reserve Select or TRICARE Retired Reserve retroac tively, applications must be received no later than Dec. 31, 2013. After that date, regular enrollment rules will apply. Monthly premiums for TRICARE Reserve Select or TRICARE Retired Reserve will be prorated back to the effective date of coverage (no earlier than June 26, 2013). To purchase the TRICARE Dental Program or TRICARE Retiree Dental Program retroactively, applications must be received no later than Dec. 31, 2013. After that date, regular enrollment rules will apply. Monthly premiums will be prorated back to the effective date of coverage (no earlier than June 26, 2013). SAME SEX BENEFITS DOD officials issued guidance to the force Sept. 27 in the event appropriations lapse Oct. 1 and a govern ment shutdown results. Officials emphasize they still hope Congress can avoid that but say it is prudent to take such steps. The eight-page document gives basic guidance to commanders and directors on how to handle every thing from personnel matters to contracts to medical concerns. Even if the government runs out of money, military personnel will report to work as normal. This includes active duty personnel and reserve component person nel on active Guard or reserve status. DOD can also maintain police, fire and emergency medical protection. These activities and some oth ers are labeled as excepted and protected from stop page. Non-excepted activities must generally stop. In the event of a funding lapse, DOD civilians who support excepted activities military operations, emergency services, or other designated activities would be directed to continue working. For pay purposes, military personnel will be paid retroactively once the appropriation is passed or the continuing resolution signed. DOD-excepted service personnel will also receive retroactive pay. Non-excepted DOD civilians will be placed on emergency, no-notice, non-pay furloughs. They would be required to report to work on Oct. 1 to receive their furlough notice. Civilians on emergency furloughs would be paid retroactively only if a law is enacted providing authority to pay them. Training and travel of military and civilian employ ees would be disrupted unless it was connected to an excepted activity, officials said. Those on travel would have to return to their duty stations in an orderly fashion. The Pentagon and the Navy are reviewing security proce dures worldwide in the wake of last weeks tragic shootings at the Washington Navy Yard, Deputy Defense Secretary Ash Carter said Sept. 26, with the aim of enhancing prevention of and response to any future such incidents. Carter offered his sympa thies to everyone affected by this deplorable act of violence. The Department of Defense is a family. And when a fam ily members taken from us, it affects us all, he said in a briefing to Pentagon reporters. So to those who are griev ing, on behalf of the entire department family, please know that our thoughts and our prayers and our strength are with you. The deputy secretary said the department is determined to learn from this tragedy and to take decisive action to pre vent such a tragedy from hap pening again. Carter continued, The bot tom line is, we need to know how an employee was able to bring a weapon and ammuni tion onto a DOD installation, and how warning flags were either missed, ignored, or not addressed in a timely manner. The deputy secretary briefed reporters on the two reviews, along with a third examina tion that will be conducted by an independent panel. Carter said former assistant secretary of defense for homeland secu rity Paul Stockton and former commander of U.S. Special Operations Command, retired Navy Adm. Eric Olson, have agreed to lead the independent review. Together, Carter said, the efforts will analyze physi cal security measures at U.S. military installations, security clearance processing proce dures and emergency response plans. Navy Secretary Ray Mabus has approved two recom mendations tightening secu rity management within Navy chains of command. Carter noted the Navy, DOD and inde pendent reviews will all feed into a larger, White-House-led look at physical security and emergency response across government. We want to look at the whole system and the whole family of incidents that occur, Carter said. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel ordered the three department reviews, Carter said. Hagels guidance was clear, Carter said. The independent panel is to arrive at its own conclusions and make its own recommendations. Stockton and Olson are uniquely suited to identifying security shortcomings, Carter said. Stockton, he said, brings knowledge from his work lead ing the departments internal review and response to the Fort Hood shootings in 2009. And, Carter said, Olsons deep knowledge of special opera tions and intelligence commu nities, [and] his personal expe rience evaluating and develop ing physical security plans, will all be invaluable. Together, the efforts are intended to be comprehensive, complementary and mutually reinforcing, Carter said. The departments internal review will be led by Mike Vickers, undersecretary of defense for intelligence, Carter said. The departments synthe sized findings will be in Hagels hands by Dec. 20, Carter said. Then at Hagels direction, he added, the department will take appropriate actions after carefully considering all of the recommendations put for ward. In examining security clear ance procedures, the depart ments internal review will seek to point out what steps we can take to tighten the standards and procedures for granting and renewing security clear ances for DOD employees and contract personnel, Carter said. Millions of Americans in this and other departments hold clearances, he said, and over all government-wide handling of security clearances will be one focus of the White Houses study. There are many contractors who are central to the accom plishment of the mission of this department, Carter said. And they, like our govern ment employees, both civilian and military, all three of those populations contribute to the defense mission, and theyre all part of the review. Carter echoed Hagels remarks last week: Where there are gaps, well close them. Where there are inad equacies, we will address them. And where there are failures, we will correct them. That process is underway. We owe nothing less to the vic tims, their families, and every member of the Department of Defense community. In response to a question, Carter noted that the alleged shooters previous record of firearms incidents was some thing that jumped out at me in reports following last weeks incident in which a Navy con tractor shot dead 12 civilians working at the Washington Navy Yard. Carter said he and Hagel are concerned at the existence of such evidence that there was behavior well before the Washington Navy Yard inci dent, which had it been spotted and understood to be indica tive of this possibility might have led to an intervention that would have prevented [the shootings]. Carter added, Thats exactly the kind of thing that we need to look at in the review exact ly. As a reminder, the Emergency Family Assistance Center (EFAC) continues to pro vide services to those affect ed by the shooting military, civilians, contractors, and their families at Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling (JBAB) and the Washington Navy Yard (WNY). Call 1-855-677-1755. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast award ed three contracts totaling $16.4 mil lion to three separate Jacksonville area contractors for work at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay (NS GTMO), Cuba. The majority of the work will provide repairs from Hurricane Sandy. After suffering significant damage to the base, I am glad to see some of the money coming in to repair some of the infrastructure damaged by Hurricane Sandy last year, said NS GTMO Commanding Officer Capt. John Nettleton. The planned marina repairs and refurbishment will greatly benefit the service members and residents who serve in this isolated duty station. The largest of the three awards is a $10.3 million task order for water front repairs that are necessary due to damage caused by Hurricane Sandy. This contract was awarded Sept. 25 to Harry Pepper & Associates Inc., of Jacksonville. Work to be performed provides for repairs to the Guantanamo Bay public marina, public beaches, and restoration of the recreational dive park. Work also includes floating fuel pier replacement, repair/replacement of the boat ramp, repairs to damaged walls and roofs, demolition of old and construction of new cabanas. The dive area work includes a twoway ramp access with wave protec tion and a new elevated paved training area. Work also includes a new elevated training area, vehicle access and park ing with wave run up and erosion pro tection. Work for the waterfront projects are expected to be completed by January 2015. These projects are a huge win in improving the quality of life for all community members residing in this remote location, said NS GTMO Public Works Officer Cmdr. Ron Jenkins. Many of these waterfront areas have been closed due to Hurricane Sandy damage for nearly one year. Base resi dents will be excited to see these areas repaired and open for use once again. A second task order in the amount of $2.5 million was awarded Sept. 22 to Islands Mechanical Contractor, of Middleburg. Work for this task order includes replacement of the chiller in Building 2504, installation of backup power generators to Buildings 2509 and 1445, and replacement of the guard tower windows. The third task order was awarded Sept. 19 to Ratcliff Construction, Inc., of Orange Park, in the amount of $3.5 DOD spells out closure contingency plan guidanceCarter details security reviews in Navy Yard aftermathThree Jacksonville area contractors awarded $16.4 million for work at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay

PAGE 18

18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013 million. This project will provide for the repair of damage to roofs and building envelopes caused by Hurricane Sandy. The following five buildings will be repaired by this task order: Building AV-640, Building 260, Building 776, Building 1662 Gold Hill Galley, Building 717. Building 1678 will have the windows and flashing repaired and East Caravella will have soffits repaired. GITMO CONTRACTS Cutlass Express, one of four major U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa/U.S. 6th Fleet exercises in Africa, is designed to improve maritime safety and security in East Africa while building maritime relation ships. The exercise is scheduled for Nov. 11-18 in operating areas surrounding Seychelles, Djibouti, Tanzania and Kenya. Participating African coun tries in this planning con ference included Djibouti, Kenya, Uganda, South Africa, Seychelles, Mauritius, Mozambique and Tanzania Yemen. This exercise is a great opportunity to build camaraderie, improve communication systems and to improve mari time safety and security within the East African nations, said Capt. Guy Jackson, exercise director for Cutlass Express. I would like this exercise to achieve individual goals of each East African nation and continue to strengthen the partnerships we share in Africa. Events during Cutlass Express include a variety of scenarios to improve the abili ties of the African nation to deter piracy, counter illicit trafficking and environmental issues such as illegal fishing. The common goal of Cutlass Express from my perspec tive is to foster relationships between countries in order to stop any economical and environmental problems that a lot of African nations face, said Djibouti navy Lt. Gouled Osman Moussa. During the conference, par ticipating African nations prac ticed using maritime domain awareness software, to better monitor vessels and potential suspicious activities. The technology we are working with will now give our country the opportunity to communicate and share information to other nations in order for us, as a nation, to fight a common threat such as piracy, said Moussa. Cutlass Express is a U.S. Africa Command-sponsored exercise focusing on address ing common maritime issues through the sharing of infor mation and the coordination among East African nations. Jaguars tickets available at USOThe Greater Jax Area USO has tickets available at the NAS Jax and NS Mayport USO for $15 each, cash transactions only. Tickets are available the follow ing days and times: Guidelines: duty including Florida National Guard and Reservists on current active duty orders and depen dents are eligible to purchase/use these tickets. may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equals four. If you have less than four you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but dependent children are not authorized to represent the service member/spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO director. mum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest. No exceptions. a block of game day tickets may be request ed by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the sea son.Requests, with justification, must be sent to Mike OBrien at mobrien@usojax.com reselling tickets will be prohibited from buying any more tickets for the entire season. come, first served. For more information, call 7782821.Plans finalized for Cutlass Express 2013 Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registra tion. The following is the schedule for 2013: 21-25, Nov. 4-8, Dec. 2-6. Nov. 18-22, Dec. 16-20. Nov. 25. 25. Oct. 15. Nov. 5, Dec. 10. Extended Stress Management Dec. 17. Personal Anger Control Group 10, 17. Exceptional Family Member EFMP Command POC Training To register for any of the above workshops call 542-5745. Fleet and Family Support Center offers life skills workshops

PAGE 19

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013 19

PAGE 20

20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, October 3, 2013