Jax air news

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Material Information

Title:
Jax air news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note:
Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID:
UF00028307:02060


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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 VP-10 UNITAS TUNE-UP DA Y AUSSIE LEADER Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Rick Williamson visited NAS Jacksonville for a familiariza tion tour of base facilities Sept. 19. The admiral, escorted by NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander, NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker, NAS Jax Public Works Officer Cmdr. Anant Patel and NAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM) Brad Shepherd began the tour at the water treatment plant where the group viewed the pumps and chlorination process that pro vides potable water to the sta tion. At the new MQ-4C Triton Unmanned Aerial System and P-8A Maintenance Training Facility, which is currently under construction, Patel con ducted a walk-through of the spaces in the future school house. The group also toured the NAS Jax flight line, air opera tions tower, Black Point Interpretive Center, unac companied housing, Fleet and Family Support Center and several Morale, Welfare and Recreation facilities including the base gym, Fitness Source, The Honorable Kim Beazley, Australian ambassador to the United States, visited NAS Jacksonville Sept. 16 to get a first-hand look at the progress being made by Royal Australian Navy (RAN) 725 Squadron as it trains to oper ate and maintain the MH-60R Romeo helicopter. The MH-60 Romeo anti-subma rine warfare helicopter is an important new capability for our defense force. I thought this is a good time to stop by and see the progress that our men and women of 725 Squadron are making and Im very impressed with what Ive seen so far. It looks like the squadron will be well prepared for the delivery of their first two Romeo helicopters in December, said Beazley. The pilots, aircrew and maintain ers training is part of a foreign military sales agreement with the U.S. Navy for 24 MH-60R helicopters. The agreement includes a comprehensive total pack age of training, technical and logistics support. The 725 Squadron is working with HSM-40 at NS Mayport for pilot train ing, as well as training maintainers at their new home of Hangar 1122 aboard NAS Jacksonville. Im told that our growing pres ence in northeast Florida is the larg est concentration of Australian defense forces outside of Washington, D.C. For Australia, this is an exciting new path way to the future by making sure that the defense materials we acquire fit into the interoperability that we seek with the U.S. armed services, explained Beazley. Its very important to give our people a common training experience, both for operators and maintainers, in addition to communicating well with our American counterparts. He added that the highly capable MH-60 Romeo will be patrolling oceans in a part of the world that has seen, a massively growing submarine environ ment. As a result, our multi-mission Family, friends and co-workers of the 12 people killed in the Sept. 16 shooting at the Washington Navy Yard (WNY) gathered with President Barrack Obama and other officials for a memorial ceremony at Marine Barracks Washington Sept. 22. The memorial honored the ser vice and sacrifice those killed in the incident: Washington, D.C. Derwood, Md. Md. Waldorf, Md. of North Potomac, Md. Westminster, Md. The president joined Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel, Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus and Chief of Naval Operations Adm. speak and reflect on the tragedy that unfolded nearly a week ear lier. You and your family, this Navy family, are still in the early hour of your grief, said Obama. And, I am here today to say that there is nothing routine about this tragedy, nothing routine about your loss. Your loved ones will not be forgotten. They will endure in the hearts of the American people and the hearts of the Navy that they helped to keep strong, and the hearts of their co-workers and friends and their neighbors. WNY victims honored by Obama, Mabus, Greenert Australian ambassador reviews Romeo acquisition progressCNRSE tours NAS Jax facilities

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Sept. 26 1781 French fleet defeats British at Yorktown, Va. 1910 First recorded reference to pro vision for aviation in Navy Department. 1931 Keel laying at Newport News, Va. of USS Ranger (CV-4), first ship designed and constructed as an aircraft carrier. 1963 First steam-eject launch of Polaris missile at sea off Cape Canaveral, Fla. from USS Observation Island (EAG-154). Sept. 27 1941 Launch of first Liberty ship, SS Patrick Henry, in Baltimore, Md. 1942 Armed Guard on SS Stephen Hopkins engages German auxil iary cruiser Stier and supply ship Tannenfels. Stephen Hopkins and Stier both sink. 1944 Special Air Task Force (STAG1) commences operations with drones, controlled by TBM aircraft, against Japanese in Southwestern Pacific. 1950 First Marine Division captures Seoul, South Korea. Sept. 28 1822 Sloop-of-war Peacock captures five pirate vessels. 1850 Congress outlaws flogging on U.S. Navy ships. 1923 Navy aircraft take first and sec ond places in international Schneider Cup Race. 1944 Marines occupy islands in Palaus under cover of naval aircraft and gunfire support. 1964 First deployment of Polaris A-3 missile on board USS Daniel Webster (SSBN 626) from Charleston, S.C. Sept. 29 1946 -Lockheed P2V Neptune, Truculent Turtle, leaves Perth, Australia on long distance, non-stop, non-refueling flight that ends October 1. 1959 USS Kearsarge (CVS-33) with Helicopter Squadron 6 and other 7th Fleet units begin six days of disaster relief to Nagoya, Japan, after Typhoon Vera. Sept. 30 1944 USS Nautilus (SS-168) lands supplies and evacuates some people from Panay, Philippine Islands. 1946 U.S. Government announces that U.S. Navy units would be perma nently stationed in the Mediterranean to carry out American policy and diplo macy. 1954 Commissioning at Groton, Conn., of USS Nautilus (SSN-571), the worlds first nuclear-powered vessel. 1958 Marines leave Lebanon. 1959 Last flight of airshps assigned to the Naval Air Reserve at Lakehurst, N.J. 1968 Battleship New Jersey arrives off Vietnam. Oct. 1 1800 U.S. schooner Experiment cap tures French schooner Diana. 1874 Supply Corps purser, Lt. J. Q. Barton, given leave to enter service of new Japanese Navy to organize a Pay Department and instruct Japanese about accounts. He served until 1877 when he again became a purser in the U.S. Navy. 1880 John Phillip Sousa becomes leader of Marine Corps Band. 1928 First class at school for enlisted Navy and Marine Corps radio intercept operators (The On the roof gang) 1937 Patrol aviation transferred to Aircraft Scouting Force, a reestablished type command. With the change, five patrol wings were established as sep arate administrative command over their squadrons. 1946 Truculent Turtle lands at Columbus, Ohio, breaking world record for distance without refueling a flight of 11,235 miles. 1949 Military Sea Transportation Service activated. 1955 Commissioning of USS Forrestal (CVA-59), first of post-war supercarriers. 1979 President Jimmy Carter awards the Congressional Space Medal of Honor to former naval aviators Neil Armstrong, Ret. Capt. Charles Conrad Jr., Ret. USMC Col. John Glenn and Ret. Rear Adm. Alan Shepard, Jr. 1980 USS Cochrane (DDG-21) res cues 104 Vietnamese refugees 620 miles east of Saigon. 1990 USS Independence (CV-62) enters Persian Gulf (first carrier in Persian Gulf since 1974). Oct. 2 1799 Establishment of Washington Navy Yard. 1939 Foreign ministers of countries of the Western Hemisphere agree to establish a neutrality zone around the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of North and South America to be enforced by the U. S. Navy. When things like the situation in Syria pop up, people always want to know how military families feel. Do you agree with the president? They ask. Are you prepared for your hus band to possibly deploy? Are you wor ried? Whats surprising to military fami lies, however, is that any of this should be, well, a surprise. Its kind of like asking a doctor if she is nervous about the increase in heart disease in America. While the doctor isnt happy about more frequent heart disease, she also wouldnt be sitting on her duff otherwise. She tends to patients in either case. Her whole career, she has thought about heart disease, even if the media and the public are just now recogniz ing the problem. Thats because its her job. Its the same way for the military. But I will answer each question any way. Do you agree with the president and his plan for Syria? While military families have their own varied political beliefs (yes, there are liberals in the military), when it comes to matters of military action, we are skilled at having divided attention. Personally, the civilian part of me thinks our government blundered the whole thing in Syria. We are the par ent who threatened Time Out then turned a blind eye while the child continues to misbehave. Worse, weve made a media spectacle of ships movements and tactics. Leaders from wars past are surely turning over in their graves. But from a military-spouse point-ofview, none of this really matters. When your spouse is assigned a job, no one asks if you agree or disagree with the mission. There is no opt out. Trust me, I would have used it at times if there were! Just as the doctor still cares for someone whos wrecked their body with cigarettes, cholesterol and obesity, the military still serves even when they disagree. The unofficial motto is, Were defending democracy, not practicing it. In the end, my husband took an oath, and it doesnt matter if I agree or disagree. To believe that it matters only invites frustration and helpless ness. So I dont go there. Are you prepared for your husband to deploy? Military families are always ready for their loved ones to deploy. Deployments didnt begin on September 11, 2001. Ive been a mili tary dependent since the day I was born, which was in the middle of my Navy dads first deployment. Twentytwo years later, he had accumulated 11 years of sea duty. He had been deployed half my life, and all of it was during relative peace. Having said that, deployments defi nitely changed after 9/11. While my dad was always predictably gone for six months at a time, my husband, whose first deployment was in 2001, has never had a full, normal deploy ment. In fact, he was on what would be the last normal deployment when 9/11 happened. The aircraft carrier had made many port calls, the kind that used to make spouses green with envy Spain, Portugal, Italy, Greece and it was headed back to the U.S. when the World Trade Center was attacked. Homecoming was in less than a month. That morning, however, the aircraft carrier turned around and went to the Persian Gulf. Homecoming was delayed indefinite ly. Every deployment since then has not been routine. But service mem bers still deploy. They still train and practice. And so something like Syria never comes as a shock or surprise. Are you worried? I was mostly worried when CNN and Fox News were reporting on ship loca tions and plans because I know that we have friends on those ships. But I was also worried for military friends when tsunamis hit overseas, and when the nuclear plant in Japan melted down. In a very general way, our spouses job doesnt become significantly more dangerous just because the U.S. is taking action. My husbands job has always had risks. For almost five years, he trained young Navy pilots in a single-engine airplane. No one asked me if I was worried then (Note: I was). And, indeed, most of our friends who have died in uniform died in training accidents. The gunman who walked into the Navy Yard last week and killed 12 people makes this point disturb ingly clear. Unlike in wars past, today it seems equally dangerous to be in the U.S. According to Dustin, that September morning in 2001 was the first time he was concerned for my safety here. There he was on an air craft carrier in the middle of ocean, and the war was happening here at home. And so, sadly, I think an increasing ly relevant question in the future will be, Are the deployed service members worried about leaving behind their loved ones? Military spouses view of Syria CFPB watching for Military Lending Act violations in its exams of payday lenders Today, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) released guide lines to its examiners on how to iden tify consumer harm and risks related to Military Lending Act (MLA) violations when supervising payday lenders. The CFPB is committed to ensuring that pay day lenders comply with the Act, which provides greater protections for military families, including capping annual per centage rates at 36 percent. The new guidelines are included in an updated exam manual that the CFPB released today for the short-term, smalldollar lending industry. Protecting service members is a priority for the CFPB, said CFPB Director Richard Cordray. We will use the authority Congress gave us to enforce the Military Lending Act and to safeguard our men and women in uni form from illegal payday loans. Payday loans are typically designed as a way to bridge a cash shortage between pay or benefits checks. Such loans are gener ally for small-dollar amounts and borrow ers must repay them quickly. The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act specifically tasked the CFPB with supervising pay day lenders for the first time at the fed eral level. The CFPB began that work in January 2012. In 2006, the Department of Defense issued a report concluding that predatory lending practices by payday lenders and other creditors near military bases were a

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013 3

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The VP-10 Red Lancers completed three missions with partner nation forces during UNITAS 2013, Sept. 8-15. The Red Lancers, based at NAS Jacksonville and assigned to U.S. 4th Fleet for UNITAS, also flew a P-3C Orion maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft out of Barranquilla for the first time in recent history. UNITAS, an annual multi national maritime exercise sponsored by U.S. Southern Command and hosted by the Colombian navy this year, included naval forc es from Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Honduras, Peru, Chile, the United Kingdom and the United States, as well as observers from Belize, Ecuador, El Salvador, Germany, Jamaica, Panama and Mexico. VP-10 members flew in a coordinated operations envi ronment for a total of 15 hours of anti-surface and anti-sub marine warfare. They coordinated antisubmarine missions with Canadian SH-3 Sea King heli copters and tracked a Peruvian submarine, among other tar gets. Prosecutions of target objectives were textbook, said Lt. Jamie Tilden, the weap ons tactics officer with Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11, which has oversight of VP-10 and six other squadrons at NAS Jacksonville. Tilden described the antisurface and anti-submarine operations as some of the best he has seen. Proving that our tactics and techniques work in a real time environment is a thrilling and rewarding experience, said Lt. Matthew Stubbs, a mainte nance administration officer with VP-10. In addition to meeting prac tical exercise objective, the Red Lancers were able to improve their understanding of how the Colombian air force and navy work, and to share their experi ences with others. VP-10s operations out of Barranquilla were supported by Comando Aero Combato No. 3 of the Colombian air force. During the exercise, two Colombian officers rode along with the Red Lancers on antisubmarine events to experi ence what it is like to be down low in an aircraft as nimble as the P-3. Meanwhile, VP-10s main tainers were given tours of the flight line and hangar spaces at Barranquilla, interacting with their foreign counterparts and examining the engines and weaponry of the Colombians A-37 Dragonfly, a light attack jet, and A-29 Super Tucano, a turboprop aircraft designed for light attack, close-air support and reconnaissance missions. VP-10 detaches to locations worldwide to build multilat eral security cooperation and to promote tactical interoper ability. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet employ maritime forces in cooperative maritime security operations to maintain access, enhance interoperability, and build enduring partnerships that foster regional security in the U.S. Southern Command area of responsibility. Red Lancers complete missions, fly from Colombia during UNITAS 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013

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Tridents join ASW exercise with RAAF 92 WingVP-26 Combat Aircrew Eight (CAC-8) and their team of maintenance professionals recently returned from a detachment representing Commander, Task Group (CTG) 72.2 at Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) Base Pearce near Perth, Australia. The 11-day exercise included coordinated anti-submarine warfare training and operations to enhance interoperability between Australian and U.S. P-3 aircrews. Departing Kadena Air Base on the Japanese island of Okinawa, the detachment traveled via P-3C Orion and C-130 Hercules to Darwin, Australia. After a brief stop for fuel, they proceeded to RAAF Pearce on Australias west coast, where they were warmly welcomed by the RAAF 10 and 11 Squadrons of the RAAF 92 Wing. In preparation for flight operations, the crew attended a day of orientation briefs to familiarize themselves with local operating and flight planning procedures. The air crew also discussed safety and contingencies for opera tional flights. Pilots, tactical coordinators (TACCOs), and navigators conducted mission planning and discussed aircraft ASW turnover procedures with the Aussies. Concurrently, maintenance personnel unloaded tools, support equipment and replacement parts, establishing an expeditionary maintenance control detachment. During the first flight of the detachment, CAC-8 was able to locate and track the target Royal Australian Navy (RAN) Collins-class submarine. In spite of the initial success, hazardous weather forced the crew to return to base. Fortunately, weather improved before the next event, enabling the crew to execute the remain der of their scheduled sorties. During those sorties, the Australian and American aircrews worked together to gain and maintain submarine contact. Aircrews focused on the interoperability of commu nications and data-link systems. Although both nations fly the same basic aircraft, equipment and configuration differences between the USN P-3C and the RAAF AP-3C often create challenges during coordinated operations. These flights have been an outstanding opportunity to strengthen our multinational ASW interoperability, said detachment Officer in Charge, Lt. Cmdr. Patrick Acker, They allowed us to exchange operational exper tise and compare best practices. After all flights were completed, the participants con ducted a hot wash to review successes and items for improvement and to record lessons learned for future exercise planners and participants. Following the hot wash, a social was held where gifts and comments from leadership were exchanged to mark the successful com pletion of the exercise. This exercise marked the third detachment to Australia for CTG 72.2 since VP-26 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mark Sohaney assumed command of Task Groups 72.2 and 72.4 in June. It is critical that we continue to strengthen our rela tionships with partners in the region and hone our ASW skills. This detachment was a great opportunity to do both, and our aircrew and maintainers knocked this one out of the park! stated Sohaney. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013 Sailors assigned to NAS Jacksonville Port Operations recently broke out their manuals, diagnostic equipment and toolboxes to ensure their river patrol and SAR (search and rescue) vessels are maintained in top operational condi tion. The Boathouse, as it is known, is located on the St. Johns River seawall near NAS Jax Hangar 1122 and the air operations control tower. Boathouse Leading Petty Officer EN1(SW) Chad Burnett explained that primary missions of the boat division are SAR training and oil spill response (OSR). SAR training is supported by our two 40-ft., twin-diesel rescue craft. They are part of man-overboard drills in the river, as well as SAR jump proficiency exercises for aviation rescue swimmers assigned to HSM squadrons at NAS Jax and NS Mayport,said Burnett. Maintenance on the SAR boat includ ed installation of a new electrical dis tribution system for enhanced perfor mance of the battery chargers. They also checked and adjusted the steering system pressure and angle indicator that displays the position of the boats rudder to the helmsman. Boathouse Work Center Supervisor EM2(SW) Jeffrey Adkins is a certified OSR leader. One of our patrol boats is also dedicated to pollution response. We work with the base OSR contractor to support the deployment of contain ment booms and skimming systems when needed. For todays maintenance, well be working on the lower units of the patrol boat outboard engines inspecting, cleaning, lubricating as well as chang ing out all of the water pump impellers. Were also replacing an alternator that was not operating up to specifications. All three boats were back in service by the end of the day. Maintenance days at NAS Jax Boathouse

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commander of Naval Sea Systems Command, gave the opening remarks at the ceremony. It has been an honor for all of us to serve with the 12 great Americans we mourn here today. They loved their country. They loved their Navy. They loved the fleet the fleet they helped build and sustain said Hilarides. These patriots designed and built our ships. They sustained and set the standards for our ships. They connected us to each other and to the fleet. And, they protected and sustained our headquarters. For that service we honor them. For that service we will never forget them. In his remarks, Mabus noted the strong sense of family he has seen as he met with the victims and their families. We are a family, uniformed and civilian, we work together, serve together, overcome together. As a fam ily we grieve together. Together we will assure that they, like those that have gone before them, will be remembered and honored as heroes, Mabus said. Because that is what they are, heroes. Ordinary people facing extraordinary circumstances. An ordi nary Monday became a day of extraordinary horror, but also extraordinary heroism. Those sentiments were echoed by Greenert who said the Navy lost part of its family. The Navy lost shipmates. These shipmates dedicated their careers to build ing and maintaining the finest Navy in the world. They worked alongside one another for a purpose greater than themselves, Greenert said. The nature of our Navy family is that we serve together and we depend on each other in times of need. We celebrate each others successes and tri umphs. And, we grieve together in times of sorrow. In the wake of the shooting, the Navy responded with support for those affected by the shooting mili tary, civilians, contractors and their families by establishing Emergency Family Assistance Centers (EFAC). The EFACs continue to provide services at Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling (JBAB) and WNY. Those needing information about the services offered by the EFACs should call 1-855-677-1755 for more information. There has been an outpouring of support for the Navy and those affected by the shooting. The support is noted and appreciated by the men and women of the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) which released the following statement Sept. 20. The employees and families of NAVSEA are grate ful for the outpouring of help and support in recent days. Weve received many inquiries from those wish ing to offer support by making donations. Due to federal regulations, the Navy and NAVSEA cannot solicit or officially endorse non-federal organizations. Information on organizations offering support may be found at www.ourmilitary.mil. NAVY YARD Responding to an active shooterPROFILE of an active shooter: An active shooter is an individual actively engaged in killing or attempting to kill people in a confined and populated area, typically through the use of firearms. CHARACTERISTICS of an active shooter situa tion: active shooter situation. COPING with an active shooter situation: dangers. you visit. door. a last resort. HOW TO RESPOND to an active shooter in your vicinity: doors. to incapacitate the shooter. the shooter. HOW TO RESPOND when law enforcement arrives: CALL 911 ONLY WHEN IT IS SAFE TO DO SO. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013

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Child Development Center, Youth Activities Center and Liberty Center. Following the tour, Williamson shared his vision for NAS Jax. NAS Jacksonville is a very large and complex station that operates very well, said Williamson. I think that where we are right now within the Navy, par ticularly the CNIC (Commander, Navy Installations Command) world, with all the budget cuts and sequestration, we have to look at how we are best expend ing our resources and build better lines of communication. If there are opportunities to collabo rate to meet certain requirements and share resources, then we have to do that. I think thats important not only to CNIC shore installations, but I believe its also important to CNIC shores abil ity to support the fleet with their opera tions, he continued.` ` One of the most pleasant surpris es for me to learn about has been the great energy conservation efforts in the southeast region. Not only here at NAS Jacksonville, but across the region. The bases are showing tremendous perfor mance in saving energy by reducing fossil fuels and maintaining a culture of doing whats right, not only for our Navy, but our country and world, said Williamson. I think we are on target across the region and Id love to grow that visibility by sharing new energy conservation ideas throughout the bases, he added. The admiral also commented on the future of NAS Jax. Jacksonville is a Navy town thats growing and I see continued expansion at NAS Jacksonville, however there is always the issue of capacity, he stat ed. We need to look at the different platforms and opportunities that would allow us to share between NAS Jax and NS Mayport. I think we are well ahead in our vision. As these platforms roll out, I see us satisfying all the require ments for the fleet and doing an effec tive and efficient job of energy utiliza tion, land use and environmental use. I see a bright future for Jacksonville. According to Undersander, the visit was productive. We provided Rear Adm. Williamson with familiarization of many of the key facilities that sup port the fleet, fighters and families. The admiral gave us some insight into his goals and we look forward to helping make that a reality, said Undersander. The NAS Jax team is committed to exe cuting our mission in the most efficient way possible. It was a privilege to show case our facilities and personnel. As part of the visit, Williamson also met with key government and civic leaders for lunch at Deweys. Romeos will give us a more formidable capability to track contacts beneath the sea or on the surface. As he showed off the Romeos glass cockpit (all digital), 725 Squadron Executive Officer Lt. Cmdr. Todd Glynn informed the ambassador that by the end of 2014, the squadron will return home with seven Romeos to HMAS Albatross, Australias sole naval air station. Their training syllabus is patterned after the U.S. Navys MH-60R NATOPS manual in order to deliver a compre hensive understanding of the rotary aircrafts systems. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander said, Its an honor to have Ambassador Beazley visit our installation and observe firsthand this outstanding partnership between our navies. Im confident that our Australian ally will meet every milestone of this excit ing new program centered on the MH-60 Romeo. And we will be richer for having the opportunity to engage with our friends from the Southern Hemisphere. AMBASSADOR ADMIRAL JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013 9

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RAN Sailors meet with top enlisted leader Royal Australian Navy (RAN) Warrant Officer of the Navy (WO-N) Martin Holzberger visited NAS Jacksonville Sept. 20 to meet with Sailors of RAN 725 Squadron currently undergoing flight and mainte nance training on the MH-60R Seahawk anti-subma rine warfare helicopter. The RAN training is part of a foreign military sales agreement with the U.S. Department of Defense for 24 MH-60R helicopters. The program includes a total package of training, technical and logistics sup port from the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jacksonville and Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing Atlantic. Everybodys enthusiastic about the new, incredibly capable Romeo platform, and rightly so. With more than 20 years in the RAN submarine force, Im sure that Romeo is spurring the development of submarine countermeasures to its sophisticated detection tech nology, said Holzberger. You must appreciate that theres a healthy rivalry between submariners and aviators as it should be with one result being a common bond forged through technical and tactical savvy, as well as strict devotion to safety. With 26 years of service in RAN and about 16 months on the job as WO-N, Holzberger said he was favorably impressed by this dynamic partnership between the two navies. Interoperability the ability of forces from differ ent nations to work effectively together to achieve a common goal is greatly enhanced by the MH-60R program. It supports higher levels of anti-submarine warfare standardization, integration and cooperation to create more win-win opportunities among allies, said Holzberger. This has been a very productive day. The training facilities are incredible, especially the high-fidelity flight and maintenance simulator systems. Our 725 Squadron is earmarked to receive a number of simula tors at our home base of HMAS Albatross in the near future. He added, A big part of my job is listening to the concerns of our Sailors and family members and advocating on their behalf. Overwhelmingly, they are pleased to be training with the U.S. Navy in Jacksonville. They enjoy learning how things get done on a day-to-day basis in the Big Navy both inside and outside the gates. One of the intangible benefits of this program is the many lifelong friendships that are being built. The squadron is scheduled to welcome its first pair of Romeos in December. By the end of 2014, RAN 725 Squadron will be flying seven HM-60R helicopters with kangaroos painted on the tails. The Greater Jax Area USO has tickets available at the NAS Jax and NS Mayport USO for $15 each, cash trans actions only. Game DateOpponent Time Sale Begins Sept. 29 Indianapolis Colts 1 p.m. Now Oct. 20 San Diego Chargers 1 p.m. Oct. 7 Nov. 17 Arizona Cardinals 1 p.m. Nov. 4 Dec. 5 Houston Texans 8:25 p.m. Nov. 25 Dec. 15 Buffalo Bills 1 p.m. Dec. 2 Dec. 22 Tennessee Titans 1 p.m. Dec. 9 All active duty including Florida National Guard and Reservists on current active duty orders and dependents are eligible to purchase/use these tickets. Military personnel with authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equals four. If you have less than four you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but dependent children are not authorized to represent the service member/spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO director. of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest. No exceptions. For deployable commands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director.These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the season.Send requests, with justification, to Mike OBrien at mobrien@usojax.com Anyone caught purchasing excess tickets or resell ing tickets will be prohibited from buying tickets for the entire season. No over the phone transactions, tickets are first come, first served. For more information, call 7782821.Jacksonville Jaguars tickets available at USO 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013

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NEX rewards students The Navy Exchange wants to help its custom ers finance their chil drens college education through its A-OK Student Reward Program. All qualified students will participate in a quar terly drawing for mon etary awards of $2,500, $1,500, $1,000 or $500 for a total of $5,500 per quar ter. Eligible full-time stu dents with a B-grade point average equiva lent or better may enter. Eligible students include dependent children of active duty military members, reservists and retirees enrolled in first through 12th grade. Dependent children without a Dependent Identification Card must be accompanied by their sponsor to submit their entry. Each student may enter only once each grading period. To enter, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have an NEX associate verify the minimum grade average and fill out an entry card. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013 11

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The NAS Jax Family Fitness Center is kicking fitness up a notch with the addition of new fitness instructor, Daunt Owens. Owens said, My expecta tions for my job are having the opportunity to work with dif ferent types of people. There are the Sailors and their spous es, there are individuals who are already in shape and just want to maintain their weight, and there are those who want to loose weight, etc. I want to help these people improve their fitness abilities. The expecta tion for myself is to help these patrons reach their personnel goals. Navy Spouse Amy Huggins said, I love the new fitness instructor. He is very encourag ing, motivating, easy to work with and keeps you going. Certified through the National Federation of Professional Trainers, Owens has worked as a person nal trainer for three years. Prior to his current profes sion, he played college foot ball for Florida International University. I love to work out, said Owens. After becoming a certified trainer and learning proper workout techniques, I wanted to instill this in other people. Influencing others to maintain a high level of fitness and training them in the proper exercise techniques is my goal and I believe individuals will take what they learn and share it with someone else, he added. Owens provides patrons with a variety of daily 30-minute cir cuit workouts that help empha size all the bodys muscle groups. He utilizes more than 100 various exercises, includ ing, squats, bench knee lifts, dead lifts, push-ups, step-ups, triceps kick backs, lateral rais es, etc. I like my workouts to be quick and efficient, said Owens. I try to keep the intensity up to a certain pace where you are getting cardio and a full body workout in, he added. Navy spouse Melissa Fay said, The new fitness assistant is awesome. He pushes us far more than we would ourselves. We get a better workout. In the near future, Owens will be teaching classes at the base gym and fitness center, including power lifting, TRX, Command PT, and max core. In addition, he intends to oversee the sports and fit ness programs during summer camps at the Youth Activity Center. New fitness instructor enhances workout programs at NAS Jax Family Fitness Center JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013 13

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Fifty Navy ombudsmen from NAS Jacksonville tenant commands were honored during the NAS Jax Navy Family Ombudsman Program 43rd Anniversary Appreciation Luncheon at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center Sept. 18.Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Rick Williamson was the guest speaker. The event kicked off with the national anthem performed by MU2 Laura Carey, of Navy Band Southeast, followed by the invocation by NAS Jax Command Chaplain (Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore. In his welcoming remarks, NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander said that recognizing the achievements of command ombuds men is significant. You are the unsung heroes who hold our Navy families togeth er. You are a crucial part of the Navy team and I want to personally thank-you for all that you do everyday, said Undersander. After lunch, Undersander introduced Williamson who said he was honored to recognized ombudsmen for their contri butions to military families. The Ombudsman Program is one of the most important programs of Navy commands. Going to sea can be a very dangerous job and I think that any com manding officer, executive officer or com mand master chief will tell you that if their Sailors are worried about their families back home, that danger increases, said Williamson. Ive been fortunate to work with some outstanding ombudsmen. They are great communicators and listeners. They bridge the gap between commands and families and are able to convince deploying Sailors that their families will be taken care of. Retention they get that better than anyone else. If a Sailor is not happy or worried, that Sailor is in a dangerous posi tion and they will go where they are need ed home to their family. If the ombuds man is there to help take care of those families; you have a Sailor for life, contin ued Williamson. I have moved 24 times in my 28-year naval career. Throughout these 28 years, Ive seen the dynamics of the Navy fam ily change. And the Ombudsman Program has changed right along with it by pro viding education to our Navy families and explaining that they are part of an organization that cares about them and their needs. The Navy family is not just spouses, its parents, siblings and grand parents and we help them as well, said Williamson. He concluded, I want to say thank-you and please do not ever take what you do lightly because your commands and fami lies need and appreciate you. The event concluded as each ombuds man was presented a certificate of appreciation by Williamson and a good ie bags courtesy of Navy Wives Club of America Jacksonville No. 86 and the Navy Exchange. I think this is a really nice event and Im glad to know that we are so appreci ated, said VR-62 Ombudsman Marcie Heard. I really enjoy my role as ombuds man and am here to support my com mands families by providing needed resources and to lend a helping hand. Its nice to know how much we are appreciated. We handle a lot of differ ent issues such as medical emergencies, helping families when the command is deployed and embracing new spouses coming to the command. Its so impor tant to have someone who is familiar with Navy issues that you can ask for help if you need it especially when are spouses are deployed overseas, explained Tiffany Googin, VP-10s ombudsman for the past two years. The Navy Family Ombudsman Program was created in 1970 by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Elmo Zumwalt as a way to communicate between commands and the families of Sailors who served in them. Ombudsmen are appointed by command ing officers and trained to disseminate Navy information, help resolve family issues and provide resource referrals. This event is to honor all the ombuds men who so diligently give their time, efforts and support to the troops. They are inspirational and a wealth of knowledge and resources. In a Navy families time of need, ombudsmen are always there, ready to help, ready to serve. They are the shining stars of the Navy, stated NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center Ombudsman Coordinator Wilhelmina Nash who organized the event. NAS Jax Command Ombudsmen Gi Teevan NAS Jax/Naval Engineering Command Southeast Marite Hoffman Navy Medicine Education Training Command/Aviation Survival Training Center, Navy Drug Screening Lab and Navy Entomology Center of Excellence Danielle Bryant Navy Recruiting District Jax Nanci Kornegay Navy Recruiting District Jax Kandi Debus Commander, Navy Region Southeast Irene Morrow Navy Region Southeast Reserve Component Command Michelle Sturgeon Southeast Regional Calibration Center Christina Wagner Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jax Casey Horgan Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jax Samantha Marcelon Fleet Logistics Center Jax Christine Vock Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Molly Croft Naval Hospital Jax Angelina Rennells Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven Jordyn Gamber Commander, Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing, Atlantic Det. Jax Melissa Hype HS-11 Mahalia Clemons HSM-70 Tara Shorley HSM-70 Jessica Fowler HSM-72 Juanita Harris HSM-74 Patricia Anderson HSM-74 Yvonne Gorham Coastal Riverine Squadron 10 Madelina Piper Coastal Riverine Squadron 10 Yvonne Gorham Information Dominance Corps Reserve Command Southeast Derrick Wilson Information Dominance Corps Reserve Command Southeast Amy Merchant Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Jax Maryann Eden Region Legal Service Office Southeast Debra Duke Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division Orlando Nikki Celso Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 14 Michelle Drennon Naval Ordnance Test Unit Melissa Slye Navy Operational Support Command Jax Selena Yearty VP-5 Lindy Robinson VP-8 Amy Purcell VP-8 Leah Hazelgrove VP-10 Tiffany Googin VP-10 Sherri Boyd VP-10 Ellen Berry VP-16 Kristen Hager VP-16 Christa Hanson VP-16 Tanya Morris VP-26 June Raghoo VP-26 Aris Fisher VP-26 Lauren Everly VP-30 Rachel Drummond VP-30 Kendra Jones VP-45 Amy Scott VP-45 Elvia McMahan VP-62 Erica Pearson VR-58 Marcie Heard VR-62Navy Ombudsmen: Theresa and I would like to take time to say thank you for your support and dedication that you provide to our Sailors, families and our great Navy. For the past 43 years, Ombudsmen have been an irreplace able resource for our Sailors, while serving as an information link between command leadership and command families. As an Ombudsman, you work collaboratively with the com mand to maintain and sustain the morale and welfare of the commands service members, their families and single Sailors on active duty. As we all know, family readiness is tied to mission readi ness and having a strong family support structure enables Sailors to excel at their jobs and the Navy to accomplish its missions. Your help successfully navigates the unique chal lenges of our lifestyle and know that the job you do is immea surable! Thank you, Ombudsmen, for your continued support and selfless dedication. Very Respectfully, MCPON Michael and Theresa Stevens Ombudsmen celebrate 43rd birthday Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy thanks Ombudsmen 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013

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Friends, family and fellow ship mates gathered at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville Sept. 20 to honor HM2 Martin Bediako with a memorial ser vice. He died Aug. 6 from an apparent drowning at his apartment complex. NH Jacksonville Chaplain (Lt.) Joseph Shubert began the service with the invocation. He was followed by NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer, who said the 36-year-old Bediako will always be remembered as a dedicated Sailor, friend, husband and father. Today we mourn the loss of Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Bediako, a sailor who inspired all of us with his positive attitude and integ rity, who moved us with his compas sion, and lifted us with his smile, said Shaffer. Bediako, a native of Accra, Republic of Ghana, earned his Bachelor of Arts degree from University of Legon in 2001, and in 2004, moved to America. He went on to earn his Masters degree in 2007 at Drake University in Iowa. He enlisted in the Navy in 2009 and completed boot camp at Recruit Training Command (RTC) Great Lakes, Ill. In 2010 Bediako completed Hospital Corpsman A School at RTC Great Lakes and Pharmacy Technician C School at Portsmouth, Va. Bediako transferred to NH Jacksonvilles inpatient pharmacy in 2010, where he proved himself as a top performer who sought out addi tional responsibilities at every oppor tunity. He was a member of the com mand soccer team, a devoted volun teer in his community and a mentor who always gave more than what was expected or required. He was scheduled to attend field medical technician school, and upon completion, transfer to Japan for duty. Several of Bediakos shipmates eulo gized him, remembering him for who he was and the lasting impression he left on his shipmates, patients and family. During the service, Shaffer posthu mously awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal to Bediako for his service as inpatient pharmacy technician at NH Jacksonville, where he processed and delivered on aver age 10,000 medication orders each month to hospital wards and outpa tient clinics. Bediako is survived by his wife, Gunetha, and 2-year-old son, Gabriel. Hospital honors corpsman with memorial service JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013 15

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Fridays at 7 p.m. Oct. 4 Karaoke with Randy Oct. 11 Holliday & Ken Oct. 18 Karaoke with Randy Oct. 25 Second Tyme Around Band Deweys Family Night third Friday of the Month Deweys will be open for dinner Oct. 18 Balloon Artist Nov. 15 Karaoke with Tom Turner Dec. 20 Childrens Holiday Bingo Childrens Holiday Bingo will start at 6:30 p.m. and has a cost of $10 per person and includes soft drinks, hot dog, dauber, bingo card and gift bag for each child. DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Youth Bowling League: Every Mon. & Wed., 10:30 a.m. noon $17 annually or $8 per week. Includes shoes, awards will be given at the end of the season! Rising Stars Youth League: Every Sat., 10:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m. Pee Wee Division (6 years & under) 2 games, $6 per week. Juniors Division (7 years & older) 3 games, $8 per week. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4 6 pm, Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. mid night (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes included. Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Oct. 19, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person, registra tion begins at noon. Scratch Sweeper: Oct. 26, 1-4 p.m. $30 entry fee, check in starts at noon. *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Open for lap swim only Mon-Fri 6-8 a.m.; 11 a.m. 1 p.m.; 4:30-7 p.m. Sat and Sun 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. During lap swim the con cessions, waterpark and slide are closed. Outdoor pool closes for season Sept. 30. The indoor swimming pool opens Oct. 1 for lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m.. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Learn to Swim Fall Sessions At the Indoor Pool Session 1 Oct. 1424 Session 2 Oct. 28 Nov. 7 $40 military, $45 DoD Monster Dash 5K Oct. 31 at 11:30 a.m. Perimeter Rd./Antenna Farm Pre-register by Oct. 18 Fourth Annual Zumba Party Oct. 23, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Fitness Center Outdoor Pavilion Barktoberfest Oct. 26, 9 a.m. Vet Treatment Facility Bldg. 537 Free 2-mile walk/run with the dogs!I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil Jacksonville Zoo Spooktacular $9. Universal Halloween Horror Nights: Sunday Thursday $42.25, Friday $53, Saturday $74.25 Halloween Horror Nights visits ITT on Oct. 2, 10 a.m. 2 p.m. Stop by to win great prizes! Pandemic Haunted Attractions San Jose Blvd. in Mandarin, tickets on sale at ITT! Haunting of School House 4 $18 Waves of Honor Special: Seaworld Orlando Adult $46.50, Child $42.25. Busch Gardens Tampa Adult $45, Child $40.50. Jacksonville Jaguars: Section 147 Bud Zone, $70. Jags shuttle bus $12. The Artist Series Broadway in Jax 2013 2014 Season: Tickets available now! Mamma Mia!: Oct. 19, 2013, 8 pm, $60.50. Celtic Thunder: Nov. 10, 2013, 7 pm, $80. Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus: Jan. 17 & 18, 2014, $51. War Horse: Feb. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $68.50. Memphis: Mar. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $65. Million Dollar Quartet: Apr. 26, 2014, 8 pm, $65. The D* Word: Oct. 4 Oct. 25, 2014, $43.75 $46. Gatorbowl $35 Capital One Bowl $98 Russell Athletic Bowl $78The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Barracks Bash Sept. 26, 4 p.m. 8 p.m. Located in the field next to the Barracks by the Gym. Jaguars vs. Colts Shuttle Sept. 29 at 11 a.m. Celebrity Chefs at the Galley Food Networks Dinners Drive Ins and Dives Oct. 1, 11a.m. 1 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Oct. 8 & 22 for active duty Oct. 10 & 24 for retirees, DoD personnel and guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27 3rd Annual Riverfest Sept. 28, 10:30 a.m. 3 p.m. Featuring music, food, free stand-up pad dle board lessons, kayak lessonsAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you!Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Oct. 7 Nov. 20 $500 per person The 2013 Intramural Summer Basketball League began in August when the gym opened back up after the seven-month renovation project. There were 19 teams competing in a double elimination tourna ment with 41 games played. The tournament came down to VP-10 against VP-8. VP-10 was undefeat ed and VP-8 had one loss so VP-8 had to defeat VP-10 twice in order to win the base championship. In the first game between VP-10 and VP-8, VP-10 was without their big man Melvin Foster and point guard Raul Gomez. This proved to be a major dif ference because VP-8 destroyed VP-10, 61-40. Since this was VP-10 s first loss, the two teams had to play again the following day to determine the base champion. VP-8 was playing their fourth game of the week because they won the greybeard basketball championship earlier in the week. VP-10 did get Foster back for the final game, howev er, Gomez was still missing from the line-up due to an injury. VP-8 led the game at halftime, 22-18. The game remained close throughout the second half and came down to the wire. Foster came up big for VP-10 scor ing a bucket in the last seconds and also got fouled while making the bucket. Foster made the free throw to give VP-10 a 50-49 lead with seconds remaining. Trillshun Bacon got off a last second shot and was fouled by VP-10s Foster. Bacon was distracted by VP-10s Mike Morrison and instead of shooting the free throw, he rolled the ball back to the referee forfeiting his first free throw attempt. Bacon had one more free throw attempt to tie the game, however, he was not able to convert the free throw and time ran out. VP-10 won the intramural summer basketball base championship by the score of 50-49. Foster led VP-10 with 20 points proving that he made the difference in the second game between VP-10 and VP-8 for the championship.VP-10 basketball champs 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013

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In recognition of Suicide Awareness Month, its important to underscore the wide scope of suicide which, according to the Centers for Disease Control, is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. Suicide is a complex behavioral response to stress, illness, isolation and substance abuse. A combina tion of individual, relational, com munity and societal factors con tribute to the risk of suicide. These can range from family and marital discord, financial issues, depression or other mental health concerns, suicidal ideation or prior suicide attempts, impulsive behav iors, substance abuse, lack of sleep or purposelessness in life. Risk is also associated with changes in brain chemicals that are frequently brought about by alcohol and drug abuse. Warning signs include thoughts or comments about suicide, sub stance abuse, lack of purpose, anx iety, feeling trapped or hopeless, withdrawal, anger, recklessness and mood changes. Suicidal behavior is not specific to gender, race or age, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. Statistics show that women attempt suicide two to three times more frequently than men, but that men fatally wound themselves at four times the rate of women. The 45to 54-year-old age group has the highest suicide rate of any other age group. Suicide is the sec ond leading cause of death among 25to 34-year olds and the third leading cause among 15to 24-year olds. In terms of ethnicity, suicide is twice as likely among non-Hispan ic whites and American Indians as among Hispanics, African Americans and Asian Americans. Effective treatments and inter ventions are available for depres sion, situational stressors and other health problems that are risk factors for suicide. Please see your primary care manager (PCM), chaplain, or mental health pro vider to find out what options are available to you. Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles Mental Health Department offers a full range of adult services (including evalua tion, medication, individual and group therapy) provided by psy chiatrists, psychologists and social workers. Active duty personnel can contact Mental Health at 904-5423473 or speak with their PCM for referral. Retirees and family members may call Value Options at 800700-8646 for care in the TRICARE network. Resources are also avail able at Veterans Crisis Line, which offers a hotline 800-273-TALK (8255), confidential online chat and text. Help is available 24/7. For someone in immediate dan ger, go to the nearest emergency room or call 911. Remember to ACT (ASK-CARE-TREAT): ASK if someone is depressed and if they are thinking about suicide. Let them know you CARE. Get them assistance (TREATment) as soon as possible. Suicide Prevention in the Navy is an all hands evolution, all the time. Silence kills. Speak out and save a life. VP-5 Mad Fox of the WeekAs VP-5 continues its busy schedule operating and maintaining the P8-A Poseidon, the squadron is highlighting one outstanding Mad Fox each week. This weeks Mad Fox of the Week is IT3 William Spencer. Spencer was born in New Bern, N.C. and cur rently resides in Jacksonville with his wife. Both of his grandfathers served in the military. His fathers father, Gordon Spencer, enlisted in the Navy dur ing World War II and served in the Philippines as a Seabee. His mothers father, Robert Rieske, enlisted in the Army and served in Operation Deep Freeze during the 1950s. Spencer joined the Navy and entered boot camp in January 2012. After boot camp, he attended A School at Corry Station in Pensacola, Fla. He reported to VP-5 in October 2012. As an information systems technician, Spencer is in charge of maintaining computers, their net works, and software that his fellow Mad Foxes use each day. He is in charge of setting up NMCI accounts and administering network permission. He is also tasked with delivering and disseminating all naval messages in and out of the command. Spencer is currently working on upgrading all of the computers within the command. Keeping up with the ever evolving nature of the Navys IT com munity is always challenging, explained Spencer. However, remembering my family and being able to provide for them and the chance to serve my country always puts any task into perspective. Spencers future goals are to earn his bachelors degree in petroleum engineering. When he is not working at VP-5, he enjoys spending time with his wife, going to the movies, and taking their two dogs to the park. He also enjoys paintballing with friends and researching cars. VP-5 is currently in the inter-deployment readi ness cycle aboard NAS Jacksonville. Take control: Increase suicide awareness October represents the unofficial start of the holi day season, and thats great for commissary custom ers who want to see store promotions, giveaways and more discounts beyond their usual 30 percent or more savings, said the Defense Commissary Agencys direc tor of sales. Whether it is celebrating Oktoberfest with friends or Thanksgiving with family and a big, plump, roast ed turkey, your commissary wants you to know we are here with extra savings and grand opportunities all part of your commissary benefit, said Randy Chandler, DeCA sales director. In October, we also recognize Breast Cancer Awareness Month, he added. Several of our industry partners are offering special in-store events that will be easily recognizable: Theyll be wrapped in pink rib bons! Throughout October, DeCAs industry partners vendors, suppliers and brokers are collaborating with commissaries to offer discounts beyond everyday savings. Overseas stores may have substitute events for certain promotional programs. Customers are asked to check their local commissary for dates and times on the following promotions: Commissary Rewards Card. There are more than 1 million Rewards Cards being used by commissary shoppers worldwide. The card lets authorized shop pers download digital coupons redeemable in your local commissary. For more information, visit https:// www.commissaries.com/rewards/index.cfm. Nestl Pure Life Pink Ribbon Pack Lets Find Celebrate October savings at your commissary JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013 17

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A training detachment from the Greyhawks of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 120 con cluded its field carrier landing practice (FCLP) at Outlying Landing Field (OLF) Whitehouse Sept. 26. The shore-based training supported by NAS Jacksonville was followed in short order by ship board training on an underway aircraft carrier in the Atlantic. VAW-120 is the Navys fleet replace ment squadron (FRS) for carrier air borne early warning squadrons flying the E-2C Hawkeye and fleet logistics support squadrons flying the C-2A Greyhound aircraft. Lt. Cmdr. Chris Swanson led the detachment of instructor pilots, student pilots and landing signal officers (LSO). For students, FCLP represents the near completion of their FRS training syllabi, explained Swanson. A major part of the training is ball flying that involves the Improved Fresnel Lens Optical Landing System (IFLOLS) at OLF Whitehouse. IFLOLS is a system consisting of 12 vertical light cells and 10 horizontal datum lights that a pilot can see from about 1.5 nautical miles out, giving them time to make the necessary final adjustments that will ensure their tail hook connects with the arresting gear on board the aircraft carriers flight deck. He added that their LSOs at Whitehouse are focused on one thing accurate landings without mishaps. LSOs grade each touch-and-go landing (a bounce) at Whitehouse. After flight ops, each student pilot is debriefed by their LSO. During their detachment to NAS Jacksonville, each student pilot aver aged 200 or more bounces at OLF Whitehouse. The FRS mission is to train pilots, naval flight officers and maintainers. Upon successful completion of their syl labi, they depart VAW-120 for assign ment to one of the Navys operational E-2 or C-2 squadrons based at Naval Station Norfolk, Va. or Naval Base Ventura County at Point Mugu, Calif. Warehouse district drainage and asphalt project on scheduleConstruction workers utilizing heavy equipment are tak ing advantage of good weather to keep a base road improve ment project on schedule. The project parallels Roosevelt Blvd. and includes improved parking, a new two-lane asphalt road, high-capaci ty storm drains and a 3-acre retention pond. For decades, this warehouse area of the base along U.S. Highway 17 (Roosevelt Blvd.) was prone to flooding during severe thunderstorms or tropical weather disturbances, said Celio Cedeno, the NAS Jax Public Works construction man ager for the project. The stations Perimeter Road (also known as Patrol Road) was also badly deteriorated in the warehouse district and had become a potential hazard to runners who is use Perimeter Road for aerobic exercise. The job is split into two phases in order to prevent disrup tion of Navy PT (physical training) activities in the ware house district along Perimeter Road. When complete in early November, the site will have plenty of parking space for Sailors and civilians who use the area for walking, running or other exercise-related activities. In phase one, the original corrugated steel storm water pipes were removed and replaced with larger reinforced concrete pipes with a higher capacity to effectively collect rainwater and direct it to a new retention pond south of the warehouse district. Due to the age of the original system, many of the pipes were clogged or collapsed, said Cedeno. This project will improve access to the warehouses, as well as providing a safer area for Navy PT groups to form up of their runs. Greyhawks wrap-up field carrier landing practice 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013

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The ID Card Operation at PSD Jacksonville was convert ed to a contract operation in 2010 and is managed by the SERCO contractor at Building 789 aboard NAS Jacksonville. The ID Card Lab is staffed with seven workstations to support the ID card mission. The Defense Manpower Data Center (DMDC) has mandat ed various changes and pro cedures for ID card issuance over the past four years, and, as a result, these changes have cause unintended confusion and frustration for customers especially since the process has changed dramatically from when many retirees served on active duty. The following information includes: acceptable forms of identification, any expired ID is not a valid form of ID, situ ational ID card needs, how to make an appointment online to avoid excessive wait times, and numbers to call in advance to clarify what documents are needed prior to visiting the ID card facility. Should you feel your visit to the ID Card Lab was unsatisfactory, speak with the ID card supervisor, PSD deputy direc tor or director prior to leaving the facility as our primary goal to deliver top-notch cus tomer service. Valid forms of identifica tion: ID card verifying officials must authenticate customer identity by reviewing and scan ning two matching forms of identification if over 21 years old, and one ID form that is original and unexpired for dependents under the age of 21, before issuing any DoD ID card. Scanning primary and secondary ID documents into their appropriate categories in RAPIDS is critical for identity validation and data storage. When ID cards are issued to customers, they are provided access to DoD facilities and applications. While this is a significant change from pre vious ID card processing that took place prior to 2010, it required by law to conform to these new rules. Thank you in advance for your understand ing, as we all must do our part to prevent errors and minimize opportunities for misrepresen tation or fraud. The following is a list of acceptable primary and sec ondary ID forms of identifica tion: Primary forms of identifica tion (must be unexpired): Drivers license or stateissued ID card US Passport Book or Passport Card Any ID card issued by a Federal, State or local govern ment agency or entity w/ photo Permanent Resident/Alien Registration Receipt Card (Form I-151, I-551) Unexpired foreign passport or foreign national IDs with photo Unexpired Temporary Resident Card (Form I-688), Employment Authorization Card (Form I-688A), or Employment Authorization Document with photo (Form I-688B) Secondary Form of Identification: An additional docu ment listed under Primary Documents Original or certified copy of a birth certificate (certified cop ies are color copies, front and back of form notarized by a notary). School ID card with a photo graph Voters registration card Certification of Birth Abroad issued by Department of State (Form FS-545 or Form DS-1350) Certificate of U.S. Citizenship (Form N-560, N-561) Certificate of U.S. Naturalization (Form N-550, N-570) Unexpired employment authorization document issued by DHS (e.g., Reentry Permit [Form I-327] U.S. Citizen ID Card (Form I-197) ID Cards for Resident Citizens in the United States (Form I-179) Social Security Card Note: In the event a mili tary, contractor, or civil service member requires a replace ment CAC Card they will be asked to present the same two forms of ID, in addition to a Special Request Authorization (NAVPERS 1336/3) signed by an E-6 or above, or by direction. For contractors, and civil service employees a memo signed by their employer will suffice. In the event a second form of ID is completely unattainable (i.e. traveling and wallet was stolen) a supervisor can override the second form of ID, but only in extremely rare situa tions. Retired and dependent cus tomers are required to present two identically (first, middle, and last names) matching forms of ID to receive their retired ID or dependents card. For many retirees and depen dents, this has become a source of contention, however, the new rules are binding and we regret any inconvenienc es when you are instructed to update your identification instruments to ensure IDs match prior to issuing a new card. Any ID card that has already expired is no longer considered a valid form of ID (regardless if it is a Common Access Card (CAC), active, retired, depen dent, or reserve ID card). This ruling is binding as well, per DMDC so dont let your cards expire. Change of last name for active/reserve military per sonnel: Active or reserve personnel who get married and change their last name will be required to request the name change through their command. Once the name change is reflected on the members LES via the Bureau of Naval Personnel, it will also be reflected in the DEERS Rapids ID System to allow a new ID with the new name to be issued. Check your LES for the name change to take effect and/or when you receive a letter from the Bureau of Naval Personnel approving your request prior to coming to the ID Lab. Service members must still present two forms of matching ID that reflect the new last name change along with their current CAC Card. Change of last name for retirees: Retirees who change their last name and require an ID, they must bring two forms of matching ID documents, per above, that reflect the new name change, along with a copy of the marriage certificate or divorce decree. If you legal ly change your name, ID Card personnel will also require the legal documents that reflect the name change at time of issuance. Adding a dependent child into DEERS: An original birth certificate or live birth document (signed and notarized) and a social security card are required. If the male sponsor is not mar ried to mother of child, they must go to the Vital Statistics Office where the child was born and register in that state as the father of the child and bring in a proof of paternity document (signed and nota rized) or results from a profes sional lab showing he is the father. Adding adopted children into DEERS: Adding an adopted child, from the U.S. or overseas, wards of the court, or foster children, please call the ID Office for detailed information at 542-1837. Adding a spouse into DEERS: If neither sponsor nor wife were married before, they will need all original documents marriage license (sealed and notarized), birth certificates, social security cards, and a photo ID that is current (either a drivers license or passport Essential information for utilizing DoD ID card services at PSD Jacksonville JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013 19

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013 will suffice.) If married before they will need the divorce decree or death certificate, (and former spouses Social Security num ber.) If dependent to be added was a dependent child prior to mar riage, they will need mother or fathers (sponsors) Social Security number so they can be removed them from that file prior to adding them to the new file. Removal of dependents from DEERS: For members who wish to remove dependents from DEERS, such as divorce or death, the sponsor must bring in a signed divorce decree or death certificate for the ID Card Office to scan into the system and remove dependent from DEERS. Dependents over the age of 21, who are enrolled in college or a higher learning accred ited institution: If you are applying for enroll ment or and ID card for a fulltime student over the age of 21, a completed DD Form 1172-2 is required, along with a writ ten statement following block #21, My child (name), remains dependent on me for at least 51 percent of his/her support and is attending an accredited institution of higher learning. Benefits can continue until the childs 23rd birthday, pro vided that the child is: Unmarried and between 21 and 23 years of age; Enrolled full-time in an accredited institution of higher learning; and Dependent on the sponsor for over 50 percent of his or her support (or was at the time of the sponsors death.) Students remain eligible until age 23 or the date of grad uation, whichever occurs first. A letter on the institutions letterhead, issued by the Registrars Office, must indi cate that the child is a full-time student. The letter should also state the expected date of grad uation. Note: Most colleges and uni versities contract with third parties, such as the National Student Clearinghouse, to verify student enrollment. Such documentation shall be accepted in lieu of a letter from the registrars office. There is a $2.50 fee for this service. If the student turns 21 dur ing the summer break, then the student must show that they were enrolled full-time in the previous term, and enrolled in the next term after the break. The DD 1172-2 form from RAPIDS Self-service cannot be used if extended benefits have not already been added to DEERS. This policy is very import to understand, as many cus tomers bring the letters to the ID Lab and desire a card to be issued prior to their dependent leaving for school, however, DMDC mandates the issuance date to be commensurate with the first day of classes or after the schools add/drop date. For those students who were attending college in a full-time capacity during the prior school year and require a new ID card, the process is a bit different. Because they were already enrolled as a fulltime student, they will require a similar college letter as stat ed above, with an additional statement in the letter that indicates they were enrolled in the prior school year as a fulltime student, and that they will be enrolled in the upcoming fall semester as a full-time stu dent, with expected graduation date. In this instance, an ID card will then be issued any time after the end of the prior school year, normally between May and September. The dif ference here is that if you were a full-time student the prior school year, you can get your card immediately or over the summer, providing you pres ent the details needed in the college letter as stated above, versus a new student who must wait until the actual start date of college. Preparation of 1172 ID card applications online: For military, civil service, and contractors who possess a CAC card, can now prepare an 1172 ID Card Application Online at https://www.dmdc. osd.mil/self_service for their dependents. You can use this service if you are a sponsor, have a CAC, and have access to a CAC-enabled personal com puter. This is especially helpful for personnel who are deployed or have family members dis persed around the globe and cannot accompany the depen dent at time of ID card issu ance. To do so, simply enter the data into the website, and any ID card facility can access the form to allow your depen dents to receive an ID card without your presence. Again, while this satisfies the 1172-2 ID Card Application piece, your dependents will still be required to present two matching forms of ID, see above at time of issuance. This can be frustrating when the IDs dont match for our cus tomers, so we strongly encour age members to check their ID documents to ensure that they match identically, or they will regrettably be turned away until they have identical docu mentation. Hours of operation: Hours of operation: 7:30 a.m. 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. The office is also open twice a month on Drill Saturdays from 7:30 a.m. 4 p.m. to coincide with reserve drill weekends. Please contact the ID Card Office to obtain the drill weekend dates at 5428346/1837. Note: While reserve person nel will have a priority for ID Card issuing (on Saturdays only), and there are no sched uled appointments used for Saturday services, feel free to use services if that is more con venient. Best tips : It is encouraged you to make an appointment at the ID Card Facility to avoid unnecessary wait times, at: https://rapidsappointments.dmdc.osd. mil The site will also provide some frequently asked ques tions and document require ments for your perusal. Once an appointment is made, you will receive an email confir mation of the date and time and upon arrival, simply notify the ID card reception desk of your scheduled appointment. Be sure to bring confirmation documentation with you. By using the pre-set appointment option, normal processing times average between 15-20 minutes. Fridays and holiday periods are often the busiest times. If you dont have a scheduled appointment, wait times can be excessive. If you dont have an appointment and need an ID card, come early! DMDC has mandated that dependent ID cards can be renewed not ear lier than 30 days prior to expi ration and CAC Cards 90 days prior to expiration. For more information, call 542-8346/1837.threat to military personnel and their families. In 2007, Congress passed the MLA to help address this problem and the Department of Defense issued rules to implement the law. In gen eral, the law shields active-duty military person nel, active National Guard or Reserve personnel, and their dependents from lending practices that Congress determined should not be tolerated in lending to service members. In 2012, Congress amended the law by, among other things, giving the CFPB the authority to enforce it. Through its enforcement and supervisory work, the CFPB will be scrutinizing lenders to make sure that they are following the MLA require ments when they make short-term, small-dollar loans to service members and their dependents. Specifically, payday lenders must follow the requirements of the law for all closed-end loans of $2,000 or less and with terms of 91 days or less. These requirements include: Because most payday loans are for several hundred dollars and have finance charges of $15 or $20 for each $100 borrowed, a typical two-week term can equate to an annual percentage rate (APR) ranging from 391 percent to 521 percent. Payday lenders must cap the APR which incorporates all fees and costs associated with the loan at 36 percent when lending to service members. not pay back the loan at the time it is due, bor rowers can often pay only the finance charges and renew the loan. This fee does not reduce the amount owed. If a payday loan is rolled over mul tiple times, its possible to pay several hundred dollars in fees and still owe the original amount borrowed. Payday lenders are banned from roll ing over loans for service members, unless the new transaction results in more favorable terms for the service member. MLA prohibits lenders from making service mem bers waive their rights under the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act or other state or federal laws that provide critical consumer protections. The MLA also prohibits lenders from requiring service mem bers to waive their right to seek resolution of any legal claims in court. military allotment system http://www.consumer finance.gov/blog/what-you-should-know-aboutmilitary-allotments/, military personnel can repay their loans by having payments directly deducted from their paycheck before their salary is deposited in their account. When service members pay by allotment, they lose certain consumer protections as well as their flexibility to adjust their budget if a financial emer gency comes up. The MLA bans lenders from requiring military members to pay by the allotment system and gives service members control over how their income is spent. LOANS For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil SPORTSa Cure! Nestl Pure Life water is promoting Breast Cancer Awareness month with special Pink Ribbon packaging. With a goal of $1 million, the company is donating a portion of its bottled water sales to be used to support breast cancer research. Help Build a Cure! Purchase $25 of Procter & Gamble products in one transaction and receive a pink tool set from Apollo Precision Tools by mail (a $30 value). Visit www.FamilyUnitPG.com for more details and to print your mail-in offer form. Offer available Sept. 26 Oct. 9. P&G is also offering more than $72 in additional sav ings through your Commissary Rewards Card. Digital coupons are good through Oct. 25. Look for P&Gs Pink Hot Buys in the October brandSAVER coupon booklet more than $97 in savings! Coupons good through Oct. 30. Crisco Cares. From Sept. 26 to Dec. 31, The J.M. Smucker Company will offer low prices on Criscos best-selling everyday items, along with many products featured in the commissarys Holiday Baking and Fall Club Pack promotions. Oktoberfest! Continuing through mid-October, commissary cus tomers will find in-store displays and coupons for imported items from Germany and other European countries. A full line of products will be available: chocolates, cook ies, sauerkraut, mustard, red cab bage, pickles, noodles, coffee and more. Thanksgiving holiday meal. Beginning Nov. 1 until supplies run out, Kraft Foods, General Mills, Rice A Roni, Heinz, P&G, Nabisco, Kelloggs, and Hefty/ Reynolds Wrap will provide shop pers in the United States (includ ing Alaska and Hawaii) with Thanksgiving holiday meal coupon booklets featuring more than $43 in savings. The booklet includes preparation tips and holiday reci pes. Check out their customized turkey websites at www.mymili tarysavings.com and http://www. militarywivessaving.com/ The U.S. booklets will be located in customized holders, and the over seas booklets will be handed out by store representatives. Supplies of these booklets worldwide will be limited. ConAgra Foods: Hungry for Football Every Day Event. Beginning Sept. 26 through Oct. 23, customers should watch for the Hungry for Football store displays featuring recipe books with cou pons. Also visit www.conagracom missarydeals.com for coupons and a list of all the items ConAgra has on sale. The fall season is a busy time for commissaries, Chandler said. Were offering daily scan-down specials and club packs at great savings. Our fresh produce sec tion has coupon bundles. And if you dont have your Commissary Rewards Card yet, go ahead and get it now at your commissary, because you dont want to miss out on any of the values commissary shopping brings. COMMISSARY PSD

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 VP-10 UNITAS TUNE-UP DAY AUSSIE LEADER Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Rick Williamson visited NAS Jacksonville for a familiariza tion tour of base facilities Sept. 19. The admiral, escorted by NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander, NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Howard Wanamaker, NAS Jax Public Works Officer Cmdr. Anant Patel and NAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM) Brad Shepherd began the tour at the water treatment plant where the group viewed the pumps and chlorination process that pro vides potable water to the sta tion. At the new MQ-4C Triton Unmanned Aerial System and P-8A Maintenance Training Facility, which is currently under construction, Patel con ducted a walk-through of the spaces in the future school house. The group also toured the NAS Jax flight line, air opera tions tower, Black Point Interpretive Center, unac companied housing, Fleet and Family Support Center and several Morale, Welfare and Recreation facilities including the base gym, Fitness Source, The Honorable Kim Beazley, Australian ambassador to the United States, visited NAS Jacksonville Sept. 16 to get a first-hand look at the progress being made by Royal Australian Navy (RAN) 725 Squadron as it trains to operate and maintain the MH-60R Romeo helicopter. The MH-60 Romeo anti-subma rine warfare helicopter is an important new capability for our defense force. I thought this is a good time to stop by and see the progress that our men and women of 725 Squadron are making and Im very impressed with what Ive seen so far. It looks like the squadron will be well prepared for the delivery of their first two Romeo helicopters in December, said Beazley. The pilots, aircrew and maintain ers training is part of a foreign military sales agreement with the U.S. Navy for 24 MH-60R helicopters. The agreement includes a comprehensive total pack age of training, technical and logistics support. The 725 Squadron is working with HSM-40 at NS Mayport for pilot train ing, as well as training maintainers at their new home of Hangar 1122 aboard NAS Jacksonville. Im told that our growing pres ence in northeast Florida is the larg est concentration of Australian defense forces outside of Washington, D.C. For Australia, this is an exciting new path way to the future by making sure that the defense materials we acquire fit into the interoperability that we seek with the U.S. armed services, explained Beazley. Its very important to give our people a common training experience, both for operators and maintainers, in addition to communicating well with our American counterparts. He added that the highly capable MH-60 Romeo will be patrolling oceans in a part of the world that has seen, a massively growing submarine environ ment. As a result, our multi-mission Family, friends and co-workers of the 12 people killed in the Sept. 16 shooting at the Washington Navy Yard (WNY) gathered with President Barrack Obama and other officials for a memorial ceremony at Marine Barracks Washington Sept. 22. The memorial honored the ser vice and sacrifice those killed in the incident: Washington, D.C. Derwood, Md. Md. Waldorf, Md. of North Potomac, Md. Westminster, Md. The president joined Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel, Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus and Chief of Naval Operations Adm. speak and reflect on the tragedy that unfolded nearly a week ear lier. You and your family, this Navy family, are still in the early hour of your grief, said Obama. And, I am here today to say that there is nothing routine about this tragedy, nothing routine about your loss. Your loved ones will not be forgotten. They will endure in the hearts of the American people and the hearts of the Navy that they helped to keep strong, and the hearts of their co-workers and friends and their neighbors. WNY victims honored by Obama, Mabus, Greenert Australian ambassador reviews Romeo acquisition progressCNRSE tours NAS Jax facilities

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Sept. 26 1781 French fleet defeats British at Yorktown, Va. 1910 First recorded reference to provision for aviation in Navy Department. 1931 Keel laying at Newport News, Va. of USS Ranger (CV-4), first ship designed and constructed as an aircraft carrier. 1963 First steam-eject launch of Polaris missile at sea off Cape Canaveral, Fla. from USS Observation Island (EAG-154). Sept. 27 1941 Launch of first Liberty ship, SS Patrick Henry, in Baltimore, Md. 1942 Armed Guard on SS Stephen Hopkins engages German auxil iary cruiser Stier and supply ship Tannenfels. Stephen Hopkins and Stier both sink. 1944 Special Air Task Force (STAG1) commences operations with drones, controlled by TBM aircraft, against Japanese in Southwestern Pacific. 1950 First Marine Division captures Seoul, South Korea. Sept. 28 1822 Sloop-of-war Peacock captures five pirate vessels. 1850 Congress outlaws flogging on U.S. Navy ships. 1923 Navy aircraft take first and second places in international Schneider Cup Race. 1944 Marines occupy islands in Palaus under cover of naval aircraft and gunfire support. 1964 First deployment of Polaris A-3 missile on board USS Daniel Webster (SSBN 626) from Charleston, S.C. Sept. 29 1946 -Lockheed P2V Neptune, Truculent Turtle, leaves Perth, Australia on long distance, non-stop, non-refueling flight that ends October 1. 1959 USS Kearsarge (CVS-33) with Helicopter Squadron 6 and other 7th Fleet units begin six days of disaster relief to Nagoya, Japan, after Typhoon Vera. Sept. 30 1944 USS Nautilus (SS-168) lands supplies and evacuates some people from Panay, Philippine Islands. 1946 U.S. Government announces that U.S. Navy units would be perma nently stationed in the Mediterranean to carry out American policy and diplomacy. 1954 Commissioning at Groton, Conn., of USS Nautilus (SSN-571), the worlds first nuclear-powered vessel. 1958 Marines leave Lebanon. 1959 Last flight of airshps assigned to the Naval Air Reserve at Lakehurst, N.J. 1968 Battleship New Jersey arrives off Vietnam. Oct. 1 1800 U.S. schooner Experiment captures French schooner Diana. 1874 Supply Corps purser, Lt. J. Q. Barton, given leave to enter service of new Japanese Navy to organize a Pay Department and instruct Japanese about accounts. He served until 1877 when he again became a purser in the U.S. Navy. 1880 John Phillip Sousa becomes leader of Marine Corps Band. 1928 First class at school for enlisted Navy and Marine Corps radio intercept operators (The On the roof gang) 1937 Patrol aviation transferred to Aircraft Scouting Force, a reestablished type command. With the change, five patrol wings were established as sep arate administrative command over their squadrons. 1946 Truculent Turtle lands at Columbus, Ohio, breaking world record for distance without refueling a flight of 11,235 miles. 1949 Military Sea Transportation Service activated. 1955 Commissioning of USS Forrestal (CVA-59), first of post-war supercarriers. 1979 President Jimmy Carter awards the Congressional Space Medal of Honor to former naval aviators Neil Armstrong, Ret. Capt. Charles Conrad Jr., Ret. USMC Col. John Glenn and Ret. Rear Adm. Alan Shepard, Jr. 1980 USS Cochrane (DDG-21) res cues 104 Vietnamese refugees 620 miles east of Saigon. 1990 USS Independence (CV-62) enters Persian Gulf (first carrier in Persian Gulf since 1974). Oct. 2 1799 Establishment of Washington Navy Yard. 1939 Foreign ministers of countries of the Western Hemisphere agree to establish a neutrality zone around the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of North and South America to be enforced by the U. S. Navy. When things like the situation in Syria pop up, people always want to know how military families feel. Do you agree with the president? They ask. Are you prepared for your hus band to possibly deploy? Are you worried? Whats surprising to military fami lies, however, is that any of this should be, well, a surprise. Its kind of like asking a doctor if she is nervous about the increase in heart disease in America. While the doctor isnt happy about more frequent heart disease, she also wouldnt be sitting on her duff otherwise. She tends to patients in either case. Her whole career, she has thought about heart disease, even if the media and the public are just now recogniz ing the problem. Thats because its her job. Its the same way for the military. But I will answer each question any way. Do you agree with the president and his plan for Syria? While military families have their own varied political beliefs (yes, there are liberals in the military), when it comes to matters of military action, we are skilled at having divided attention. Personally, the civilian part of me thinks our government blundered the whole thing in Syria. We are the par ent who threatened Time Out then turned a blind eye while the child continues to misbehave. Worse, weve made a media spectacle of ships movements and tactics. Leaders from wars past are surely turning over in their graves. But from a military-spouse point-ofview, none of this really matters. When your spouse is assigned a job, no one asks if you agree or disagree with the mission. There is no opt out. Trust me, I would have used it at times if there were! Just as the doctor still cares for someone whos wrecked their body with cigarettes, cholesterol and obesity, the military still serves even when they disagree. The unofficial motto is, Were defending democracy, not practicing it. In the end, my husband took an oath, and it doesnt matter if I agree or disagree. To believe that it matters only invites frustration and helpless ness. So I dont go there. Are you prepared for your husband to deploy? Military families are always ready for their loved ones to deploy. Deployments didnt begin on September 11, 2001. Ive been a mili tary dependent since the day I was born, which was in the middle of my Navy dads first deployment. Twentytwo years later, he had accumulated 11 years of sea duty. He had been deployed half my life, and all of it was during relative peace. Having said that, deployments defi nitely changed after 9/11. While my dad was always predictably gone for six months at a time, my husband, whose first deployment was in 2001, has never had a full, normal deployment. In fact, he was on what would be the last normal deployment when 9/11 happened. The aircraft carrier had made many port calls, the kind that used to make spouses green with envy Spain, Portugal, Italy, Greece and it was headed back to the U.S. when the World Trade Center was attacked. Homecoming was in less than a month. That morning, however, the aircraft carrier turned around and went to the Persian Gulf. Homecoming was delayed indefinite ly. Every deployment since then has not been routine. But service mem bers still deploy. They still train and practice. And so something like Syria never comes as a shock or surprise. Are you worried? I was mostly worried when CNN and Fox News were reporting on ship locations and plans because I know that we have friends on those ships. But I was also worried for military friends when tsunamis hit overseas, and when the nuclear plant in Japan melted down. In a very general way, our spouses job doesnt become significantly more dangerous just because the U.S. is taking action. My husbands job has always had risks. For almost five years, he trained young Navy pilots in a single-engine airplane. No one asked me if I was worried then (Note: I was). And, indeed, most of our friends who have died in uniform died in training accidents. The gunman who walked into the Navy Yard last week and killed 12 people makes this point disturb ingly clear. Unlike in wars past, today it seems equally dangerous to be in the U.S. According to Dustin, that September morning in 2001 was the first time he was concerned for my safety here. There he was on an air craft carrier in the middle of ocean, and the war was happening here at home. And so, sadly, I think an increasingly relevant question in the future will be, Are the deployed service members worried about leaving behind their loved ones? Military spouses view of Syria CFPB watching for Military Lending Act violations in its exams of payday lenders Today, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) released guide lines to its examiners on how to iden tify consumer harm and risks related to Military Lending Act (MLA) violations when supervising payday lenders. The CFPB is committed to ensuring that pay day lenders comply with the Act, which provides greater protections for military families, including capping annual per centage rates at 36 percent. The new guidelines are included in an updated exam manual that the CFPB released today for the short-term, smalldollar lending industry. Protecting service members is a priority for the CFPB, said CFPB Director Richard Cordray. We will use the authority Congress gave us to enforce the Military Lending Act and to safeguard our men and women in uni form from illegal payday loans. Payday loans are typically designed as a way to bridge a cash shortage between pay or benefits checks. Such loans are gener ally for small-dollar amounts and borrowers must repay them quickly. The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act specifically tasked the CFPB with supervising pay day lenders for the first time at the fed eral level. The CFPB began that work in January 2012. In 2006, the Department of Defense issued a report concluding that predatory lending practices by payday lenders and other creditors near military bases were a

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The VP-10 Red Lancers completed three missions with partner nation forces during UNITAS 2013, Sept. 8-15. The Red Lancers, based at NAS Jacksonville and assigned to U.S. 4th Fleet for UNITAS, also flew a P-3C Orion maritime patrol and reconnaissance aircraft out of Barranquilla for the first time in recent history. UNITAS, an annual multi national maritime exercise sponsored by U.S. Southern Command and hosted by the Colombian navy this year, included naval forc es from Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Honduras, Peru, Chile, the United Kingdom and the United States, as well as observers from Belize, Ecuador, El Salvador, Germany, Jamaica, Panama and Mexico. VP-10 members flew in a coordinated operations envi ronment for a total of 15 hours of anti-surface and anti-sub marine warfare. They coordinated antisubmarine missions with Canadian SH-3 Sea King heli copters and tracked a Peruvian submarine, among other tar gets. Prosecutions of target objectives were textbook, said Lt. Jamie Tilden, the weapons tactics officer with Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11, which has oversight of VP-10 and six other squadrons at NAS Jacksonville. Tilden described the antisurface and anti-submarine operations as some of the best he has seen. Proving that our tactics and techniques work in a real time environment is a thrilling and rewarding experience, said Lt. Matthew Stubbs, a mainte nance administration officer with VP-10. In addition to meeting prac tical exercise objective, the Red Lancers were able to improve their understanding of how the Colombian air force and navy work, and to share their experiences with others. VP-10s operations out of Barranquilla were supported by Comando Aero Combato No. 3 of the Colombian air force. During the exercise, two Colombian officers rode along with the Red Lancers on antisubmarine events to experi ence what it is like to be down low in an aircraft as nimble as the P-3. Meanwhile, VP-10s main tainers were given tours of the flight line and hangar spaces at Barranquilla, interacting with their foreign counterparts and examining the engines and weaponry of the Colombians A-37 Dragonfly, a light attack jet, and A-29 Super Tucano, a turboprop aircraft designed for light attack, close-air support and reconnaissance missions. VP-10 detaches to locations worldwide to build multilat eral security cooperation and to promote tactical interoper ability. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet employ maritime forces in cooperative maritime security operations to maintain access, enhance interoperability, and build enduring partnerships that foster regional security in the U.S. Southern Command area of responsibility. Red Lancers complete missions, fly from Colombia during UNITAS 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013

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Tridents join ASW exercise with RAAF 92 WingVP-26 Combat Aircrew Eight (CAC-8) and their team of maintenance professionals recently returned from a detachment representing Commander, Task Group (CTG) 72.2 at Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) Base Pearce near Perth, Australia. The 11-day exercise included coordinated anti-submarine warfare training and operations to enhance interoperability between Australian and U.S. P-3 aircrews. Departing Kadena Air Base on the Japanese island of Okinawa, the detachment traveled via P-3C Orion and C-130 Hercules to Darwin, Australia. After a brief stop for fuel, they proceeded to RAAF Pearce on Australias west coast, where they were warmly welcomed by the RAAF 10 and 11 Squadrons of the RAAF 92 Wing. In preparation for flight operations, the crew attended a day of orientation briefs to familiarize themselves with local operating and flight planning procedures. The aircrew also discussed safety and contingencies for operational flights. Pilots, tactical coordinators (TACCOs), and navigators conducted mission planning and discussed aircraft ASW turnover procedures with the Aussies. Concurrently, maintenance personnel unloaded tools, support equipment and replacement parts, establishing an expeditionary maintenance control detachment. During the first flight of the detachment, CAC-8 was able to locate and track the target Royal Australian Navy (RAN) Collins-class submarine. In spite of the initial success, hazardous weather forced the crew to return to base. Fortunately, weather improved before the next event, enabling the crew to execute the remainder of their scheduled sorties. During those sorties, the Australian and American aircrews worked together to gain and maintain submarine contact. Aircrews focused on the interoperability of commu nications and data-link systems. Although both nations fly the same basic aircraft, equipment and configuration differences between the USN P-3C and the RAAF AP-3C often create challenges during coordinated operations. These flights have been an outstanding opportunity to strengthen our multinational ASW interoperability, said detachment Officer in Charge, Lt. Cmdr. Patrick Acker, They allowed us to exchange operational expertise and compare best practices. After all flights were completed, the participants con ducted a hot wash to review successes and items for improvement and to record lessons learned for future exercise planners and participants. Following the hot wash, a social was held where gifts and comments from leadership were exchanged to mark the successful completion of the exercise. This exercise marked the third detachment to Australia for CTG 72.2 since VP-26 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mark Sohaney assumed command of Task Groups 72.2 and 72.4 in June. It is critical that we continue to strengthen our rela tionships with partners in the region and hone our ASW skills. This detachment was a great opportunity to do both, and our aircrew and maintainers knocked this one out of the park! stated Sohaney. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013 Sailors assigned to NAS Jacksonville Port Operations recently broke out their manuals, diagnostic equipment and toolboxes to ensure their river patrol and SAR (search and rescue) vessels are maintained in top operational condi tion. The Boathouse, as it is known, is located on the St. Johns River seawall near NAS Jax Hangar 1122 and the air operations control tower. Boathouse Leading Petty Officer EN1(SW) Chad Burnett explained that primary missions of the boat division are SAR training and oil spill response (OSR). SAR training is supported by our two 40-ft., twin-diesel rescue craft. They are part of man-overboard drills in the river, as well as SAR jump proficiency exercises for aviation rescue swimmers assigned to HSM squadrons at NAS Jax and NS Mayport,said Burnett. Maintenance on the SAR boat included installation of a new electrical dis tribution system for enhanced perfor mance of the battery chargers. They also checked and adjusted the steering system pressure and angle indicator that displays the position of the boats rudder to the helmsman. Boathouse Work Center Supervisor EM2(SW) Jeffrey Adkins is a certified OSR leader. One of our patrol boats is also dedicated to pollution response. We work with the base OSR contractor to support the deployment of contain ment booms and skimming systems when needed. For todays maintenance, well be working on the lower units of the patrol boat outboard engines inspecting, cleaning, lubricating as well as changing out all of the water pump impellers. Were also replacing an alternator that was not operating up to specifications. All three boats were back in service by the end of the day. Maintenance days at NAS Jax Boathouse

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commander of Naval Sea Systems Command, gave the opening remarks at the ceremony. It has been an honor for all of us to serve with the 12 great Americans we mourn here today. They loved their country. They loved their Navy. They loved the fleet the fleet they helped build and sustain said Hilarides. These patriots designed and built our ships. They sustained and set the standards for our ships. They connected us to each other and to the fleet. And, they protected and sustained our headquarters. For that service we honor them. For that service we will never forget them. In his remarks, Mabus noted the strong sense of family he has seen as he met with the victims and their families. We are a family, uniformed and civilian, we work together, serve together, overcome together. As a family we grieve together. Together we will assure that they, like those that have gone before them, will be remembered and honored as heroes, Mabus said. Because that is what they are, heroes. Ordinary people facing extraordinary circumstances. An ordi nary Monday became a day of extraordinary horror, but also extraordinary heroism. Those sentiments were echoed by Greenert who said the Navy lost part of its family. The Navy lost shipmates. These shipmates dedicated their careers to building and maintaining the finest Navy in the world. They worked alongside one another for a purpose greater than themselves, Greenert said. The nature of our Navy family is that we serve together and we depend on each other in times of need. We celebrate each others successes and tri umphs. And, we grieve together in times of sorrow. In the wake of the shooting, the Navy responded with support for those affected by the shooting military, civilians, contractors and their families by establishing Emergency Family Assistance Centers (EFAC). The EFACs continue to provide services at Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling (JBAB) and WNY. Those needing information about the services offered by the EFACs should call 1-855-677-1755 for more information. There has been an outpouring of support for the Navy and those affected by the shooting. The support is noted and appreciated by the men and women of the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) which released the following statement Sept. 20. The employees and families of NAVSEA are grate ful for the outpouring of help and support in recent days. Weve received many inquiries from those wishing to offer support by making donations. Due to federal regulations, the Navy and NAVSEA cannot solicit or officially endorse non-federal organizations. Information on organizations offering support may be found at www.ourmilitary.mil. NAVY YARD Responding to an active shooterPROFILE of an active shooter: An active shooter is an individual actively engaged in killing or attempting to kill people in a confined and populated area, typically through the use of firearms. CHARACTERISTICS of an active shooter situa tion: active shooter situation. COPING with an active shooter situation: dangers. you visit. door. a last resort. HOW TO RESPOND to an active shooter in your vicinity: doors. to incapacitate the shooter. the shooter. HOW TO RESPOND when law enforcement arrives: CALL 911 ONLY WHEN IT IS SAFE TO DO SO. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013

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Child Development Center, Youth Activities Center and Liberty Center. Following the tour, Williamson shared his vision for NAS Jax. NAS Jacksonville is a very large and complex station that operates very well, said Williamson. I think that where we are right now within the Navy, par ticularly the CNIC (Commander, Navy Installations Command) world, with all the budget cuts and sequestration, we have to look at how we are best expending our resources and build better lines of communication. If there are opportunities to collaborate to meet certain requirements and share resources, then we have to do that. I think thats important not only to CNIC shore installations, but I believe its also important to CNIC shores ability to support the fleet with their operations, he continued.` ` One of the most pleasant surpris es for me to learn about has been the great energy conservation efforts in the southeast region. Not only here at NAS Jacksonville, but across the region. The bases are showing tremendous perfor mance in saving energy by reducing fossil fuels and maintaining a culture of doing whats right, not only for our Navy, but our country and world, said Williamson. I think we are on target across the region and Id love to grow that visibility by sharing new energy conservation ideas throughout the bases, he added. The admiral also commented on the future of NAS Jax. Jacksonville is a Navy town thats growing and I see continued expansion at NAS Jacksonville, however there is always the issue of capacity, he stat ed. We need to look at the different platforms and opportunities that would allow us to share between NAS Jax and NS Mayport. I think we are well ahead in our vision. As these platforms roll out, I see us satisfying all the require ments for the fleet and doing an effec tive and efficient job of energy utiliza tion, land use and environmental use. I see a bright future for Jacksonville. According to Undersander, the visit was productive. We provided Rear Adm. Williamson with familiarization of many of the key facilities that sup port the fleet, fighters and families. The admiral gave us some insight into his goals and we look forward to helping make that a reality, said Undersander. The NAS Jax team is committed to executing our mission in the most efficient way possible. It was a privilege to showcase our facilities and personnel. As part of the visit, Williamson also met with key government and civic leaders for lunch at Deweys. Romeos will give us a more formidable capability to track contacts beneath the sea or on the surface. As he showed off the Romeos glass cockpit (all digital), 725 Squadron Executive Officer Lt. Cmdr. Todd Glynn informed the ambassador that by the end of 2014, the squadron will return home with seven Romeos to HMAS Albatross, Australias sole naval air station. Their training syllabus is patterned after the U.S. Navys MH-60R NATOPS manual in order to deliver a compre hensive understanding of the rotary aircrafts systems. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander said, Its an honor to have Ambassador Beazley visit our installation and observe firsthand this outstanding partnership between our navies. Im confident that our Australian ally will meet every milestone of this excit ing new program centered on the MH-60 Romeo. And we will be richer for having the opportunity to engage with our friends from the Southern Hemisphere. AMBASSADOR ADMIRAL JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013 9

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RAN Sailors meet with top enlisted leader Royal Australian Navy (RAN) Warrant Officer of the Navy (WO-N) Martin Holzberger visited NAS Jacksonville Sept. 20 to meet with Sailors of RAN 725 Squadron currently undergoing flight and mainte nance training on the MH-60R Seahawk anti-submarine warfare helicopter. The RAN training is part of a foreign military sales agreement with the U.S. Department of Defense for 24 MH-60R helicopters. The program includes a total package of training, technical and logistics sup port from the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jacksonville and Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing Atlantic. Everybodys enthusiastic about the new, incredibly capable Romeo platform, and rightly so. With more than 20 years in the RAN submarine force, Im sure that Romeo is spurring the development of submarine countermeasures to its sophisticated detection tech nology, said Holzberger. You must appreciate that theres a healthy rivalry between submariners and aviators as it should be with one result being a common bond forged through technical and tactical savvy, as well as strict devotion to safety. With 26 years of service in RAN and about 16 months on the job as WO-N, Holzberger said he was favorably impressed by this dynamic partnership between the two navies. Interoperability the ability of forces from differ ent nations to work effectively together to achieve a common goal is greatly enhanced by the MH-60R program. It supports higher levels of anti-submarine warfare standardization, integration and cooperation to create more win-win opportunities among allies, said Holzberger. This has been a very productive day. The training facilities are incredible, especially the high-fidelity flight and maintenance simulator systems. Our 725 Squadron is earmarked to receive a number of simulators at our home base of HMAS Albatross in the near future. He added, A big part of my job is listening to the concerns of our Sailors and family members and advocating on their behalf. Overwhelmingly, they are pleased to be training with the U.S. Navy in Jacksonville. They enjoy learning how things get done on a day-to-day basis in the Big Navy both inside and outside the gates. One of the intangible benefits of this program is the many lifelong friendships that are being built. The squadron is scheduled to welcome its first pair of Romeos in December. By the end of 2014, RAN 725 Squadron will be flying seven HM-60R helicopters with kangaroos painted on the tails. The Greater Jax Area USO has tickets available at the NAS Jax and NS Mayport USO for $15 each, cash transactions only. Game DateOpponent Time Sale Begins Sept. 29 Indianapolis Colts 1 p.m. Now Oct. 20 San Diego Chargers 1 p.m. Oct. 7 Nov. 17 Arizona Cardinals 1 p.m. Nov. 4 Dec. 5 Houston Texans 8:25 p.m. Nov. 25 Dec. 15 Buffalo Bills 1 p.m. Dec. 2 Dec. 22 Tennessee Titans 1 p.m. Dec. 9 All active duty including Florida National Guard and Reservists on current active duty orders and dependents are eligible to purchase/use these tickets. Military personnel with authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equals four. If you have less than four you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but dependent children are not authorized to represent the service member/spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO director. of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest. No exceptions. For deployable commands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director.These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the season.Send requests, with justification, to Mike OBrien at mobrien@usojax.com Anyone caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets will be prohibited from buying tickets for the entire season. No over the phone transactions, tickets are first come, first served. For more information, call 7782821.Jacksonville Jaguars tickets available at USO 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013

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NEX rewards students The Navy Exchange wants to help its customers finance their chil drens college education through its A-OK Student Reward Program. All qualified students will participate in a quarterly drawing for mon etary awards of $2,500, $1,500, $1,000 or $500 for a total of $5,500 per quarter. Eligible full-time stu dents with a B-grade point average equiva lent or better may enter. Eligible students include dependent children of active duty military members, reservists and retirees enrolled in first through 12th grade. Dependent children without a Dependent Identification Card must be accompanied by their sponsor to submit their entry. Each student may enter only once each grading period. To enter, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have an NEX associate verify the minimum grade average and fill out an entry card. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013 11

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The NAS Jax Family Fitness Center is kicking fitness up a notch with the addition of new fitness instructor, Daunt Owens. Owens said, My expecta tions for my job are having the opportunity to work with dif ferent types of people. There are the Sailors and their spouses, there are individuals who are already in shape and just want to maintain their weight, and there are those who want to loose weight, etc. I want to help these people improve their fitness abilities. The expecta tion for myself is to help these patrons reach their personnel goals. Navy Spouse Amy Huggins said, I love the new fitness instructor. He is very encouraging, motivating, easy to work with and keeps you going. Certified through the National Federation of Professional Trainers, Owens has worked as a person nal trainer for three years. Prior to his current profes sion, he played college foot ball for Florida International University. I love to work out, said Owens. After becoming a certified trainer and learning proper workout techniques, I wanted to instill this in other people. Influencing others to maintain a high level of fitness and training them in the proper exercise techniques is my goal and I believe individuals will take what they learn and share it with someone else, he added. Owens provides patrons with a variety of daily 30-minute circuit workouts that help emphasize all the bodys muscle groups. He utilizes more than 100 various exercises, includ ing, squats, bench knee lifts, dead lifts, push-ups, step-ups, triceps kick backs, lateral rais es, etc. I like my workouts to be quick and efficient, said Owens. I try to keep the intensity up to a certain pace where you are getting cardio and a full body workout in, he added. Navy spouse Melissa Fay said, The new fitness assistant is awesome. He pushes us far more than we would ourselves. We get a better workout. In the near future, Owens will be teaching classes at the base gym and fitness center, including power lifting, TRX, Command PT, and max core. In addition, he intends to oversee the sports and fit ness programs during summer camps at the Youth Activity Center. New fitness instructor enhances workout programs at NAS Jax Family Fitness Center JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013 13

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Fifty Navy ombudsmen from NAS Jacksonville tenant commands were honored during the NAS Jax Navy Family Ombudsman Program 43rd Anniversary Appreciation Luncheon at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center Sept. 18.Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Rick Williamson was the guest speaker. The event kicked off with the national anthem performed by MU2 Laura Carey, of Navy Band Southeast, followed by the invocation by NAS Jax Command Chaplain (Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore. In his welcoming remarks, NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander said that recognizing the achievements of command ombuds men is significant. You are the unsung heroes who hold our Navy families together. You are a crucial part of the Navy team and I want to personally thank-you for all that you do everyday, said Undersander. After lunch, Undersander introduced Williamson who said he was honored to recognized ombudsmen for their contri butions to military families. The Ombudsman Program is one of the most important programs of Navy commands. Going to sea can be a very dangerous job and I think that any com manding officer, executive officer or command master chief will tell you that if their Sailors are worried about their families back home, that danger increases, said Williamson. Ive been fortunate to work with some outstanding ombudsmen. They are great communicators and listeners. They bridge the gap between commands and families and are able to convince deploying Sailors that their families will be taken care of. Retention they get that better than anyone else. If a Sailor is not happy or worried, that Sailor is in a dangerous position and they will go where they are needed home to their family. If the ombuds man is there to help take care of those families; you have a Sailor for life, continued Williamson. I have moved 24 times in my 28-year naval career. Throughout these 28 years, Ive seen the dynamics of the Navy fam ily change. And the Ombudsman Program has changed right along with it by pro viding education to our Navy families and explaining that they are part of an organization that cares about them and their needs. The Navy family is not just spouses, its parents, siblings and grand parents and we help them as well, said Williamson. He concluded, I want to say thank-you and please do not ever take what you do lightly because your commands and fami lies need and appreciate you. The event concluded as each ombuds man was presented a certificate of appreciation by Williamson and a good ie bags courtesy of Navy Wives Club of America Jacksonville No. 86 and the Navy Exchange. I think this is a really nice event and Im glad to know that we are so appreci ated, said VR-62 Ombudsman Marcie Heard. I really enjoy my role as ombudsman and am here to support my com mands families by providing needed resources and to lend a helping hand. Its nice to know how much we are appreciated. We handle a lot of differ ent issues such as medical emergencies, helping families when the command is deployed and embracing new spouses coming to the command. Its so impor tant to have someone who is familiar with Navy issues that you can ask for help if you need it especially when are spouses are deployed overseas, explained Tiffany Googin, VP-10s ombudsman for the past two years. The Navy Family Ombudsman Program was created in 1970 by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Elmo Zumwalt as a way to communicate between commands and the families of Sailors who served in them. Ombudsmen are appointed by commanding officers and trained to disseminate Navy information, help resolve family issues and provide resource referrals. This event is to honor all the ombudsmen who so diligently give their time, efforts and support to the troops. They are inspirational and a wealth of knowledge and resources. In a Navy families time of need, ombudsmen are always there, ready to help, ready to serve. They are the shining stars of the Navy, stated NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center Ombudsman Coordinator Wilhelmina Nash who organized the event. NAS Jax Command Ombudsmen Gi Teevan NAS Jax/Naval Engineering Command Southeast Marite Hoffman Navy Medicine Education Training Command/Aviation Survival Training Center, Navy Drug Screening Lab and Navy Entomology Center of Excellence Danielle Bryant Navy Recruiting District Jax Nanci Kornegay Navy Recruiting District Jax Kandi Debus Commander, Navy Region Southeast Irene Morrow Navy Region Southeast Reserve Component Command Michelle Sturgeon Southeast Regional Calibration Center Christina Wagner Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jax Casey Horgan Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jax Samantha Marcelon Fleet Logistics Center Jax Christine Vock Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Molly Croft Naval Hospital Jax Angelina Rennells Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven Jordyn Gamber Commander, Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing, Atlantic Det. Jax Melissa Hype HS-11 Mahalia Clemons HSM-70 Tara Shorley HSM-70 Jessica Fowler HSM-72 Juanita Harris HSM-74 Patricia Anderson HSM-74 Yvonne Gorham Coastal Riverine Squadron 10 Madelina Piper Coastal Riverine Squadron 10 Yvonne Gorham Information Dominance Corps Reserve Command Southeast Derrick Wilson Information Dominance Corps Reserve Command Southeast Amy Merchant Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station Jax Maryann Eden Region Legal Service Office Southeast Debra Duke Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division Orlando Nikki Celso Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 14 Michelle Drennon Naval Ordnance Test Unit Melissa Slye Navy Operational Support Command Jax Selena Yearty VP-5 Lindy Robinson VP-8 Amy Purcell VP-8 Leah Hazelgrove VP-10 Tiffany Googin VP-10 Sherri Boyd VP-10 Ellen Berry VP-16 Kristen Hager VP-16 Christa Hanson VP-16 Tanya Morris VP-26 June Raghoo VP-26 Aris Fisher VP-26 Lauren Everly VP-30 Rachel Drummond VP-30 Kendra Jones VP-45 Amy Scott VP-45 Elvia McMahan VP-62 Erica Pearson VR-58 Marcie Heard VR-62Navy Ombudsmen: Theresa and I would like to take time to say thank you for your support and dedication that you provide to our Sailors, families and our great Navy. For the past 43 years, Ombudsmen have been an irreplaceable resource for our Sailors, while serving as an information link between command leadership and command families. As an Ombudsman, you work collaboratively with the command to maintain and sustain the morale and welfare of the commands service members, their families and single Sailors on active duty. As we all know, family readiness is tied to mission readi ness and having a strong family support structure enables Sailors to excel at their jobs and the Navy to accomplish its missions. Your help successfully navigates the unique challenges of our lifestyle and know that the job you do is immeasurable! Thank you, Ombudsmen, for your continued support and selfless dedication. Very Respectfully, MCPON Michael and Theresa Stevens Ombudsmen celebrate 43rd birthday Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy thanks Ombudsmen 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013

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Friends, family and fellow ship mates gathered at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville Sept. 20 to honor HM2 Martin Bediako with a memorial ser vice. He died Aug. 6 from an apparent drowning at his apartment complex. NH Jacksonville Chaplain (Lt.) Joseph Shubert began the service with the invocation. He was followed by NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer, who said the 36-year-old Bediako will always be remembered as a dedicated Sailor, friend, husband and father. Today we mourn the loss of Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Bediako, a sailor who inspired all of us with his positive attitude and integrity, who moved us with his compas sion, and lifted us with his smile, said Shaffer. Bediako, a native of Accra, Republic of Ghana, earned his Bachelor of Arts degree from University of Legon in 2001, and in 2004, moved to America. He went on to earn his Masters degree in 2007 at Drake University in Iowa. He enlisted in the Navy in 2009 and completed boot camp at Recruit Training Command (RTC) Great Lakes, Ill. In 2010 Bediako completed Hospital Corpsman A School at RTC Great Lakes and Pharmacy Technician C School at Portsmouth, Va. Bediako transferred to NH Jacksonvilles inpatient pharmacy in 2010, where he proved himself as a top performer who sought out addi tional responsibilities at every opportunity. He was a member of the com mand soccer team, a devoted volun teer in his community and a mentor who always gave more than what was expected or required. He was scheduled to attend field medical technician school, and upon completion, transfer to Japan for duty. Several of Bediakos shipmates eulo gized him, remembering him for who he was and the lasting impression he left on his shipmates, patients and family. During the service, Shaffer posthumously awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal to Bediako for his service as inpatient pharmacy technician at NH Jacksonville, where he processed and delivered on average 10,000 medication orders each month to hospital wards and outpa tient clinics. Bediako is survived by his wife, Gunetha, and 2-year-old son, Gabriel. Hospital honors corpsman with memorial service JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013 15

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Fridays at 7 p.m. Oct. 4 Karaoke with Randy Oct. 11 Holliday & Ken Oct. 18 Karaoke with Randy Oct. 25 Second Tyme Around Band Deweys Family Night third Friday of the Month Deweys will be open for dinner Oct. 18 Balloon Artist Nov. 15 Karaoke with Tom Turner Dec. 20 Childrens Holiday Bingo Childrens Holiday Bingo will start at 6:30 p.m. and has a cost of $10 per person and includes soft drinks, hot dog, dauber, bingo card and gift bag for each child. DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Youth Bowling League: Every Mon. & Wed., 10:30 a.m. noon $17 annually or $8 per week. Includes shoes, awards will be given at the end of the season! Rising Stars Youth League: Every Sat., 10:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m. Pee Wee Division (6 years & under) 2 games, $6 per week. Juniors Division (7 years & older) 3 games, $8 per week. Mondays: All you can bowl for $5, 4-6 p.m. Wednesdays: All you can bowl for $5.95, 4-10 p.m. Thursdays: Free bowling for active duty 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturdays: Family Extreme Bowling $8, 4 6 pm, Party Extreme $10, 8 p.m. midnight (up to 2 hours of play). Shoes included. Monthly Handicap Single Tournament: Oct. 19, 1-4 p.m. $20 per person, registration begins at noon. Scratch Sweeper: Oct. 26, 1-4 p.m. $30 entry fee, check in starts at noon. *Please note, the specials do not include shoes unless stated otherwise*Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Open for lap swim only Mon-Fri 6-8 a.m.; 11 a.m. 1 p.m.; 4:30-7 p.m. Sat and Sun 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. During lap swim the concessions, waterpark and slide are closed. Outdoor pool closes for season Sept. 30. The indoor swimming pool opens Oct. 1 for lap swim hours, Monday Friday 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m.. Saturday and Sunday 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. Learn to Swim Fall Sessions At the Indoor Pool Session 1 Oct. 1424 Session 2 Oct. 28 Nov. 7 $40 military, $45 DoD Monster Dash 5K Oct. 31 at 11:30 a.m. Perimeter Rd./Antenna Farm Pre-register by Oct. 18 Fourth Annual Zumba Party Oct. 23, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Fitness Center Outdoor Pavilion Barktoberfest Oct. 26, 9 a.m. Vet Treatment Facility Bldg. 537 Free 2-mile walk/run with the dogs!I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil Jacksonville Zoo Spooktacular $9. Universal Halloween Horror Nights: Sunday Thursday $42.25, Friday $53, Saturday $74.25 Halloween Horror Nights visits ITT on Oct. 2, 10 a.m. 2 p.m. Stop by to win great prizes! Pandemic Haunted Attractions San Jose Blvd. in Mandarin, tickets on sale at ITT! Haunting of School House 4 $18 Waves of Honor Special: Seaworld Orlando Adult $46.50, Child $42.25. Busch Gardens Tampa Adult $45, Child $40.50. Jacksonville Jaguars: Section 147 Bud Zone, $70. Jags shuttle bus $12. The Artist Series Broadway in Jax 2013 2014 Season: Tickets available now! Mamma Mia!: Oct. 19, 2013, 8 pm, $60.50. Celtic Thunder: Nov. 10, 2013, 7 pm, $80. Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus: Jan. 17 & 18, 2014, $51. War Horse: Feb. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $68.50. Memphis: Mar. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $65. Million Dollar Quartet: Apr. 26, 2014, 8 pm, $65. The D* Word: Oct. 4 Oct. 25, 2014, $43.75 $46. Gatorbowl $35 Capital One Bowl $98 Russell Athletic Bowl $78The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Barracks Bash Sept. 26, 4 p.m. 8 p.m. Located in the field next to the Barracks by the Gym. Jaguars vs. Colts Shuttle Sept. 29 at 11 a.m. Celebrity Chefs at the Galley Food Networks Dinners Drive Ins and Dives Oct. 1, 11a.m. 1 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Oct. 8 & 22 for active duty Oct. 10 & 24 for retirees, DoD personnel and guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27 3rd Annual Riverfest Sept. 28, 10:30 a.m. 3 p.m. Featuring music, food, free stand-up paddle board lessons, kayak lessonsAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you!Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Oct. 7 Nov. 20 $500 per person The 2013 Intramural Summer Basketball League began in August when the gym opened back up after the seven-month renovation project. There were 19 teams competing in a double elimination tourna ment with 41 games played. The tournament came down to VP-10 against VP-8. VP-10 was undefeat ed and VP-8 had one loss so VP-8 had to defeat VP-10 twice in order to win the base championship. In the first game between VP-10 and VP-8, VP-10 was without their big man Melvin Foster and point guard Raul Gomez. This proved to be a major dif ference because VP-8 destroyed VP-10, 61-40. Since this was VP-10 s first loss, the two teams had to play again the following day to determine the base champion. VP-8 was playing their fourth game of the week because they won the greybeard basketball championship earlier in the week. VP-10 did get Foster back for the final game, however, Gomez was still missing from the line-up due to an injury. VP-8 led the game at halftime, 22-18. The game remained close throughout the second half and came down to the wire. Foster came up big for VP-10 scoring a bucket in the last seconds and also got fouled while making the bucket. Foster made the free throw to give VP-10 a 50-49 lead with seconds remaining. Trillshun Bacon got off a last second shot and was fouled by VP-10s Foster. Bacon was distracted by VP-10s Mike Morrison and instead of shooting the free throw, he rolled the ball back to the referee forfeiting his first free throw attempt. Bacon had one more free throw attempt to tie the game, however, he was not able to convert the free throw and time ran out. VP-10 won the intramural summer basketball base championship by the score of 50-49. Foster led VP-10 with 20 points proving that he made the difference in the second game between VP-10 and VP-8 for the championship.VP-10 basketball champs 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013

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In recognition of Suicide Awareness Month, its important to underscore the wide scope of suicide which, according to the Centers for Disease Control, is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. Suicide is a complex behavioral response to stress, illness, isolation and substance abuse. A combina tion of individual, relational, community and societal factors con tribute to the risk of suicide. These can range from family and marital discord, financial issues, depression or other mental health concerns, suicidal ideation or prior suicide attempts, impulsive behaviors, substance abuse, lack of sleep or purposelessness in life. Risk is also associated with changes in brain chemicals that are frequently brought about by alcohol and drug abuse. Warning signs include thoughts or comments about suicide, sub stance abuse, lack of purpose, anxiety, feeling trapped or hopeless, withdrawal, anger, recklessness and mood changes. Suicidal behavior is not specific to gender, race or age, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. Statistics show that women attempt suicide two to three times more frequently than men, but that men fatally wound themselves at four times the rate of women. The 45to 54-year-old age group has the highest suicide rate of any other age group. Suicide is the second leading cause of death among 25to 34-year olds and the third leading cause among 15to 24-year olds. In terms of ethnicity, suicide is twice as likely among non-Hispanic whites and American Indians as among Hispanics, African Americans and Asian Americans. Effective treatments and inter ventions are available for depres sion, situational stressors and other health problems that are risk factors for suicide. Please see your primary care manager (PCM), chaplain, or mental health pro vider to find out what options are available to you. Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles Mental Health Department offers a full range of adult services (including evalua tion, medication, individual and group therapy) provided by psy chiatrists, psychologists and social workers. Active duty personnel can contact Mental Health at 904-5423473 or speak with their PCM for referral. Retirees and family members may call Value Options at 800700-8646 for care in the TRICARE network. Resources are also available at Veterans Crisis Line, which offers a hotline 800-273-TALK (8255), confidential online chat and text. Help is available 24/7. For someone in immediate danger, go to the nearest emergency room or call 911. Remember to ACT (ASK-CARE-TREAT): ASK if someone is depressed and if they are thinking about suicide. Let them know you CARE. Get them assistance (TREATment) as soon as possible. Suicide Prevention in the Navy is an all hands evolution, all the time. Silence kills. Speak out and save a life. VP-5 Mad Fox of the WeekAs VP-5 continues its busy schedule operating and maintaining the P8-A Poseidon, the squadron is highlighting one outstanding Mad Fox each week. This weeks Mad Fox of the Week is IT3 William Spencer. Spencer was born in New Bern, N.C. and cur rently resides in Jacksonville with his wife. Both of his grandfathers served in the military. His fathers father, Gordon Spencer, enlisted in the Navy dur ing World War II and served in the Philippines as a Seabee. His mothers father, Robert Rieske, enlisted in the Army and served in Operation Deep Freeze during the 1950s. Spencer joined the Navy and entered boot camp in January 2012. After boot camp, he attended A School at Corry Station in Pensacola, Fla. He reported to VP-5 in October 2012. As an information systems technician, Spencer is in charge of maintaining computers, their net works, and software that his fellow Mad Foxes use each day. He is in charge of setting up NMCI accounts and administering network permission. He is also tasked with delivering and disseminating all naval messages in and out of the command. Spencer is currently working on upgrading all of the computers within the command. Keeping up with the ever evolving nature of the Navys IT community is always challenging, explained Spencer. However, remembering my family and being able to provide for them and the chance to serve my country always puts any task into perspective. Spencers future goals are to earn his bachelors degree in petroleum engineering. When he is not working at VP-5, he enjoys spending time with his wife, going to the movies, and taking their two dogs to the park. He also enjoys paintballing with friends and researching cars. VP-5 is currently in the inter-deployment readi ness cycle aboard NAS Jacksonville. Take control: Increase suicide awareness October represents the unofficial start of the holi day season, and thats great for commissary customers who want to see store promotions, giveaways and more discounts beyond their usual 30 percent or more savings, said the Defense Commissary Agencys director of sales. Whether it is celebrating Oktoberfest with friends or Thanksgiving with family and a big, plump, roast ed turkey, your commissary wants you to know we are here with extra savings and grand opportunities all part of your commissary benefit, said Randy Chandler, DeCA sales director. In October, we also recognize Breast Cancer Awareness Month, he added. Several of our industry partners are offering special in-store events that will be easily recognizable: Theyll be wrapped in pink ribbons! Throughout October, DeCAs industry partners vendors, suppliers and brokers are collaborating with commissaries to offer discounts beyond everyday savings. Overseas stores may have substitute events for certain promotional programs. Customers are asked to check their local commissary for dates and times on the following promotions: Commissary Rewards Card. There are more than 1 million Rewards Cards being used by commissary shoppers worldwide. The card lets authorized shop pers download digital coupons redeemable in your local commissary. For more information, visit https:// www.commissaries.com/rewards/index.cfm. Nestl Pure Life Pink Ribbon Pack Lets Find Celebrate October savings at your commissary JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013 17

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A training detachment from the Greyhawks of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 120 con cluded its field carrier landing practice (FCLP) at Outlying Landing Field (OLF) Whitehouse Sept. 26. The shore-based training supported by NAS Jacksonville was followed in short order by ship board training on an underway aircraft carrier in the Atlantic. VAW-120 is the Navys fleet replace ment squadron (FRS) for carrier air borne early warning squadrons flying the E-2C Hawkeye and fleet logistics support squadrons flying the C-2A Greyhound aircraft. Lt. Cmdr. Chris Swanson led the detachment of instructor pilots, student pilots and landing signal officers (LSO). For students, FCLP represents the near completion of their FRS training syllabi, explained Swanson. A major part of the training is ball flying that involves the Improved Fresnel Lens Optical Landing System (IFLOLS) at OLF Whitehouse. IFLOLS is a system consisting of 12 vertical light cells and 10 horizontal datum lights that a pilot can see from about 1.5 nautical miles out, giving them time to make the necessary final adjustments that will ensure their tail hook connects with the arresting gear on board the aircraft carriers flight deck. He added that their LSOs at Whitehouse are focused on one thing accurate landings without mishaps. LSOs grade each touch-and-go landing (a bounce) at Whitehouse. After flight ops, each student pilot is debriefed by their LSO. During their detachment to NAS Jacksonville, each student pilot aver aged 200 or more bounces at OLF Whitehouse. The FRS mission is to train pilots, naval flight officers and maintainers. Upon successful completion of their syl labi, they depart VAW-120 for assign ment to one of the Navys operational E-2 or C-2 squadrons based at Naval Station Norfolk, Va. or Naval Base Ventura County at Point Mugu, Calif. Warehouse district drainage and asphalt project on scheduleConstruction workers utilizing heavy equipment are tak ing advantage of good weather to keep a base road improvement project on schedule. The project parallels Roosevelt Blvd. and includes improved parking, a new two-lane asphalt road, high-capaci ty storm drains and a 3-acre retention pond. For decades, this warehouse area of the base along U.S. Highway 17 (Roosevelt Blvd.) was prone to flooding during severe thunderstorms or tropical weather disturbances, said Celio Cedeno, the NAS Jax Public Works construction man ager for the project. The stations Perimeter Road (also known as Patrol Road) was also badly deteriorated in the warehouse district and had become a potential hazard to runners who is use Perimeter Road for aerobic exercise. The job is split into two phases in order to prevent disruption of Navy PT (physical training) activities in the ware house district along Perimeter Road. When complete in early November, the site will have plenty of parking space for Sailors and civilians who use the area for walking, running or other exercise-related activities. In phase one, the original corrugated steel storm water pipes were removed and replaced with larger reinforced concrete pipes with a higher capacity to effectively collect rainwater and direct it to a new retention pond south of the warehouse district. Due to the age of the original system, many of the pipes were clogged or collapsed, said Cedeno. This project will improve access to the warehouses, as well as providing a safer area for Navy PT groups to form up of their runs. Greyhawks wrap-up field carrier landing practice 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013

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The ID Card Operation at PSD Jacksonville was convert ed to a contract operation in 2010 and is managed by the SERCO contractor at Building 789 aboard NAS Jacksonville. The ID Card Lab is staffed with seven workstations to support the ID card mission. The Defense Manpower Data Center (DMDC) has mandat ed various changes and pro cedures for ID card issuance over the past four years, and, as a result, these changes have cause unintended confusion and frustration for customers especially since the process has changed dramatically from when many retirees served on active duty. The following information includes: acceptable forms of identification, any expired ID is not a valid form of ID, situ ational ID card needs, how to make an appointment online to avoid excessive wait times, and numbers to call in advance to clarify what documents are needed prior to visiting the ID card facility. Should you feel your visit to the ID Card Lab was unsatisfactory, speak with the ID card supervisor, PSD deputy direc tor or director prior to leaving the facility as our primary goal to deliver top-notch cus tomer service. Valid forms of identifica tion: ID card verifying officials must authenticate customer identity by reviewing and scanning two matching forms of identification if over 21 years old, and one ID form that is original and unexpired for dependents under the age of 21, before issuing any DoD ID card. Scanning primary and secondary ID documents into their appropriate categories in RAPIDS is critical for identity validation and data storage. When ID cards are issued to customers, they are provided access to DoD facilities and applications. While this is a significant change from pre vious ID card processing that took place prior to 2010, it required by law to conform to these new rules. Thank you in advance for your understand ing, as we all must do our part to prevent errors and minimize opportunities for misrepresen tation or fraud. The following is a list of acceptable primary and sec ondary ID forms of identifica tion: Primary forms of identification (must be unexpired): Drivers license or stateissued ID card US Passport Book or Passport Card Any ID card issued by a Federal, State or local govern ment agency or entity w/ photo Permanent Resident/Alien Registration Receipt Card (Form I-151, I-551) Unexpired foreign passport or foreign national IDs with photo Unexpired Temporary Resident Card (Form I-688), Employment Authorization Card (Form I-688A), or Employment Authorization Document with photo (Form I-688B) Secondary Form of Identification: An additional docu ment listed under Primary Documents Original or certified copy of a birth certificate (certified cop ies are color copies, front and back of form notarized by a notary). School ID card with a photograph Voters registration card Certification of Birth Abroad issued by Department of State (Form FS-545 or Form DS-1350) Certificate of U.S. Citizenship (Form N-560, N-561) Certificate of U.S. Naturalization (Form N-550, N-570) Unexpired employment authorization document issued by DHS (e.g., Reentry Permit [Form I-327] U.S. Citizen ID Card (Form I-197) ID Cards for Resident Citizens in the United States (Form I-179) Social Security Card Note: In the event a mili tary, contractor, or civil service member requires a replace ment CAC Card they will be asked to present the same two forms of ID, in addition to a Special Request Authorization (NAVPERS 1336/3) signed by an E-6 or above, or by direction. For contractors, and civil service employees a memo signed by their employer will suffice. In the event a second form of ID is completely unattainable (i.e. traveling and wallet was stolen) a supervisor can override the second form of ID, but only in extremely rare situa tions. Retired and dependent cus tomers are required to present two identically (first, middle, and last names) matching forms of ID to receive their retired ID or dependents card. For many retirees and depen dents, this has become a source of contention, however, the new rules are binding and we regret any inconvenienc es when you are instructed to update your identification instruments to ensure IDs match prior to issuing a new card. Any ID card that has already expired is no longer considered a valid form of ID (regardless if it is a Common Access Card (CAC), active, retired, depen dent, or reserve ID card). This ruling is binding as well, per DMDC so dont let your cards expire. Change of last name for active/reserve military per sonnel: Active or reserve personnel who get married and change their last name will be required to request the name change through their command. Once the name change is reflected on the members LES via the Bureau of Naval Personnel, it will also be reflected in the DEERS Rapids ID System to allow a new ID with the new name to be issued. Check your LES for the name change to take effect and/or when you receive a letter from the Bureau of Naval Personnel approving your request prior to coming to the ID Lab. Service members must still present two forms of matching ID that reflect the new last name change along with their current CAC Card. Change of last name for retirees: Retirees who change their last name and require an ID, they must bring two forms of matching ID documents, per above, that reflect the new name change, along with a copy of the marriage certificate or divorce decree. If you legal ly change your name, ID Card personnel will also require the legal documents that reflect the name change at time of issuance. Adding a dependent child into DEERS: An original birth certificate or live birth document (signed and notarized) and a social security card are required. If the male sponsor is not mar ried to mother of child, they must go to the Vital Statistics Office where the child was born and register in that state as the father of the child and bring in a proof of paternity document (signed and nota rized) or results from a profes sional lab showing he is the father. Adding adopted children into DEERS: Adding an adopted child, from the U.S. or overseas, wards of the court, or foster children, please call the ID Office for detailed information at 542-1837. Adding a spouse into DEERS: If neither sponsor nor wife were married before, they will need all original documents marriage license (sealed and notarized), birth certificates, social security cards, and a photo ID that is current (either a drivers license or passport Essential information for utilizing DoD ID card services at PSD Jacksonville JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013 19

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 26, 2013 will suffice.) If married before they will need the divorce decree or death certificate, (and former spouses Social Security num ber.) If dependent to be added was a dependent child prior to marriage, they will need mother or fathers (sponsors) Social Security number so they can be removed them from that file prior to adding them to the new file. Removal of dependents from DEERS: For members who wish to remove dependents from DEERS, such as divorce or death, the sponsor must bring in a signed divorce decree or death certificate for the ID Card Office to scan into the system and remove dependent from DEERS. Dependents over the age of 21, who are enrolled in college or a higher learning accred ited institution: If you are applying for enrollment or and ID card for a fulltime student over the age of 21, a completed DD Form 1172-2 is required, along with a writ ten statement following block #21, My child (name), remains dependent on me for at least 51 percent of his/her support and is attending an accredited institution of higher learning. Benefits can continue until the childs 23rd birthday, pro vided that the child is: Unmarried and between 21 and 23 years of age; Enrolled full-time in an accredited institution of higher learning; and Dependent on the sponsor for over 50 percent of his or her support (or was at the time of the sponsors death.) Students remain eligible until age 23 or the date of graduation, whichever occurs first. A letter on the institutions letterhead, issued by the Registrars Office, must indi cate that the child is a full-time student. The letter should also state the expected date of graduation. Note: Most colleges and uni versities contract with third parties, such as the National Student Clearinghouse, to verify student enrollment. Such documentation shall be accepted in lieu of a letter from the registrars office. There is a $2.50 fee for this service. If the student turns 21 dur ing the summer break, then the student must show that they were enrolled full-time in the previous term, and enrolled in the next term after the break. The DD 1172-2 form from RAPIDS Self-service cannot be used if extended benefits have not already been added to DEERS. This policy is very import to understand, as many cus tomers bring the letters to the ID Lab and desire a card to be issued prior to their dependent leaving for school, however, DMDC mandates the issuance date to be commensurate with the first day of classes or after the schools add/drop date. For those students who were attending college in a full-time capacity during the prior school year and require a new ID card, the process is a bit different. Because they were already enrolled as a fulltime student, they will require a similar college letter as stat ed above, with an additional statement in the letter that indicates they were enrolled in the prior school year as a fulltime student, and that they will be enrolled in the upcoming fall semester as a full-time student, with expected graduation date. In this instance, an ID card will then be issued any time after the end of the prior school year, normally between May and September. The dif ference here is that if you were a full-time student the prior school year, you can get your card immediately or over the summer, providing you pres ent the details needed in the college letter as stated above, versus a new student who must wait until the actual start date of college. Preparation of 1172 ID card applications online: For military, civil service, and contractors who possess a CAC card, can now prepare an 1172 ID Card Application Online at https://www.dmdc. osd.mil/self_service for their dependents. You can use this service if you are a sponsor, have a CAC, and have access to a CAC-enabled personal com puter. This is especially helpful for personnel who are deployed or have family members dis persed around the globe and cannot accompany the depen dent at time of ID card issu ance. To do so, simply enter the data into the website, and any ID card facility can access the form to allow your depen dents to receive an ID card without your presence. Again, while this satisfies the 1172-2 ID Card Application piece, your dependents will still be required to present two matching forms of ID, see above at time of issuance. This can be frustrating when the IDs dont match for our cus tomers, so we strongly encour age members to check their ID documents to ensure that they match identically, or they will regrettably be turned away until they have identical docu mentation. Hours of operation: Hours of operation: 7:30 a.m. 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. The office is also open twice a month on Drill Saturdays from 7:30 a.m. 4 p.m. to coincide with reserve drill weekends. Please contact the ID Card Office to obtain the drill weekend dates at 5428346/1837. Note: While reserve person nel will have a priority for ID Card issuing (on Saturdays only), and there are no sched uled appointments used for Saturday services, feel free to use services if that is more convenient. Best tips : It is encouraged you to make an appointment at the ID Card Facility to avoid unnecessary wait times, at: https://rapidsappointments.dmdc.osd. mil The site will also provide some frequently asked ques tions and document require ments for your perusal. Once an appointment is made, you will receive an email confir mation of the date and time and upon arrival, simply notify the ID card reception desk of your scheduled appointment. Be sure to bring confirmation documentation with you. By using the pre-set appointment option, normal processing times average between 15-20 minutes. Fridays and holiday periods are often the busiest times. If you dont have a scheduled appointment, wait times can be excessive. If you dont have an appointment and need an ID card, come early! DMDC has mandated that dependent ID cards can be renewed not ear lier than 30 days prior to expi ration and CAC Cards 90 days prior to expiration. For more information, call 542-8346/1837.threat to military personnel and their families. In 2007, Congress passed the MLA to help address this problem and the Department of Defense issued rules to implement the law. In general, the law shields active-duty military person nel, active National Guard or Reserve personnel, and their dependents from lending practices that Congress determined should not be tolerated in lending to service members. In 2012, Congress amended the law by, among other things, giving the CFPB the authority to enforce it. Through its enforcement and supervisory work, the CFPB will be scrutinizing lenders to make sure that they are following the MLA require ments when they make short-term, small-dollar loans to service members and their dependents. Specifically, payday lenders must follow the requirements of the law for all closed-end loans of $2,000 or less and with terms of 91 days or less. These requirements include: Because most payday loans are for several hundred dollars and have finance charges of $15 or $20 for each $100 borrowed, a typical two-week term can equate to an annual percentage rate (APR) ranging from 391 percent to 521 percent. Payday lenders must cap the APR which incorporates all fees and costs associated with the loan at 36 percent when lending to service members. not pay back the loan at the time it is due, bor rowers can often pay only the finance charges and renew the loan. This fee does not reduce the amount owed. If a payday loan is rolled over mul tiple times, its possible to pay several hundred dollars in fees and still owe the original amount borrowed. Payday lenders are banned from roll ing over loans for service members, unless the new transaction results in more favorable terms for the service member. MLA prohibits lenders from making service members waive their rights under the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act or other state or federal laws that provide critical consumer protections. The MLA also prohibits lenders from requiring service members to waive their right to seek resolution of any legal claims in court. military allotment system http://www.consumer finance.gov/blog/what-you-should-know-aboutmilitary-allotments/, military personnel can repay their loans by having payments directly deducted from their paycheck before their salary is deposited in their account. When service members pay by allotment, they lose certain consumer protections as well as their flexibility to adjust their budget if a financial emergency comes up. The MLA bans lenders from requiring military members to pay by the allotment system and gives service members control over how their income is spent. LOANS For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil SPORTSa Cure! Nestl Pure Life water is promoting Breast Cancer Awareness month with special Pink Ribbon packaging. With a goal of $1 million, the company is donating a portion of its bottled water sales to be used to support breast cancer research. Help Build a Cure! Purchase $25 of Procter & Gamble products in one transaction and receive a pink tool set from Apollo Precision Tools by mail (a $30 value). Visit www.FamilyUnitPG.com for more details and to print your mail-in offer form. Offer available Sept. 26 Oct. 9. P&G is also offering more than $72 in additional sav ings through your Commissary Rewards Card. Digital coupons are good through Oct. 25. Look for P&Gs Pink Hot Buys in the October brandSAVER coupon booklet more than $97 in savings! Coupons good through Oct. 30. Crisco Cares. From Sept. 26 to Dec. 31, The J.M. Smucker Company will offer low prices on Criscos best-selling everyday items, along with many products featured in the commissarys Holiday Baking and Fall Club Pack promotions. Oktoberfest! Continuing through mid-October, commissary cus tomers will find in-store displays and coupons for imported items from Germany and other European countries. A full line of products will be available: chocolates, cookies, sauerkraut, mustard, red cab bage, pickles, noodles, coffee and more. Thanksgiving holiday meal. Beginning Nov. 1 until supplies run out, Kraft Foods, General Mills, Rice A Roni, Heinz, P&G, Nabisco, Kelloggs, and Hefty/ Reynolds Wrap will provide shop pers in the United States (includ ing Alaska and Hawaii) with Thanksgiving holiday meal coupon booklets featuring more than $43 in savings. The booklet includes preparation tips and holiday reci pes. Check out their customized turkey websites at www.mymili tarysavings.com and http://www. militarywivessaving.com/ The U.S. booklets will be located in customized holders, and the over seas booklets will be handed out by store representatives. Supplies of these booklets worldwide will be limited. ConAgra Foods: Hungry for Football Every Day Event. Beginning Sept. 26 through Oct. 23, customers should watch for the Hungry for Football store displays featuring recipe books with cou pons. Also visit www.conagracommissarydeals.com for coupons and a list of all the items ConAgra has on sale. The fall season is a busy time for commissaries, Chandler said. Were offering daily scan-down specials and club packs at great savings. Our fresh produce sec tion has coupon bundles. And if you dont have your Commissary Rewards Card yet, go ahead and get it now at your commissary, because you dont want to miss out on any of the values commissary shopping brings. COMMISSARY PSD

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