Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
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Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
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Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
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Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID:
UF00028307:02059


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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 9/11 CPO 365 9/11CEREMONY Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com NAS Jacksonville CPO 365 Phase II came to a close Sept. 13 with several pinning cere monies for new chief petty offi cers (CPO) at Hangar 117, Naval Hospital Jacksonville, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast and VP-30. Ninety-five new chiefs were pinned by their family mem bers and sponsors at Hangar 117. The event began as VP-5 Command Master Chief (CMDCM)(AW/SW) Terrence Mitchell welcomed the guests and presented the 2013 CPO selectees who proudly stood in formation singing Anchors Aweigh. After the playing of the national anthem, an invoca tion was delivered by NAS Jax Chaplain (Lt.) Andrew Hayler. Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven Capt. Eric Wiese delivered the opening remarks, thanking the families for their support and stressed the importance of the role of a CPO. For us in the Navy, the anchor is a symbol of strength. Anchors are what keep ships from going adrift or running aground. Chiefs are what keep the Navy from drifting away from the ideals of the Navy: honor, courage and commit ment. When I think of chiefs petty officers who mentored me, including my dad, I think about honor, courage and com mitment, said Wiese. Wiese told the new CPOs, As long as you live, you can wake up every morning know ing you made a positive dif ference in the lives of the men and women you serve along HS-11 supports flight deck qualifications on USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71)The Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 11 Dragonslayers, based at NAS Jacksonville, arrived on board aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) Sept. 11. The squadron is part of Carrier Air Wing One (CVW-1) and is the first squadron of the air wing to come aboard Theodore Roosevelt to support flight operations. HS-11s capabilities include com bat search and rescue (CSAR), special warfare, anti-submarine warfare, ver tical replenishment, anti-ship mis sile defense and passenger and cargo transfer. The Dragonslayers operate two vari ations of the Seahawk helicopter to carry out their various missions the SH-60F (Foxtrot) and HH-60H (Hotel) helicopters. The Foxtrot has a dipping sonar system that is used to find subma rines and the Hotel can carry Hellfire missiles on it for force protection, said Lt. Daniel Foose, a pilot for the Dragonslayers. With their helicopters now aboard the Big Stick, HS-11 will focus on flight deck qualifications needed for CVW 1 to be fully operational. Each mission is different, said ADCS Charwin Carrington, acting command master chief of HS-11. We have to get all of our aircrew and aircraft on the same page as far as hav ing our systems up at all times. Carrington said that it takes every one, from the lowest ranking airman to the commanding officer, for the Dragonslayers to be operational. Im excited to be aboard the [Theodore] Roosevelt, said Carrington. Im looking forward to the challenges ahead. The Dragonslayers are just one squadron of the air wing to bring their aircraft aboard. Other aircraft may include F/A-18 Super Hornets, F/A-18 Hornets, E-2C Hawkeyes and E/A-18G Growlers. The future of MPRF The Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF) is transitioning into a new type/model/series (TMS) for the first time in 50 years. To make this transition a success, the Naval Aviation Enterprise (NAE) and indus try leaders are working to sus tain the legacy P-3C and EP-3E while the P-8A TMS is being introduced to the fleet. The last time the MPRF Community transitioned to a new TMS was in 1962 with the delivery of the first P-3A to Patrol Squadron (VP) 8. As in the past, the key to a success ful transition is constant com munication and cooperation across all levels of the NAE and industry. The following high lights are evidence of the suc cess of these efforts. The fleet transition to the P-8A Poseidon is progressing well and on schedule. At NAS Jacksonville, Fla., the Fleet Replacement Squadron, VP-30, MPRF Weapons School and P-8A Fleet Introduction Team have been busy facilitating the transition of the first three fleet squadrons from P-3C to P-8A. VP-16 War Eagles achieved Safe for Flight (SFF) in January 2013 and is progressing through the Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle (IDRC) in preparation for the first P-8A deployment in December. VP-5 Mad Foxes achieved SFF and began their IDRC in the beginning of August. VP-45 Pelicns just started transition upon returning from their final P-3 deployment in June. Over the last year, Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 1 successfully completed P-8A Initial Operational Test and Evaluation supported by mul tiple detachments, exercises and real-world operations. As expected, the aircraft (based on the Boeing 737) has been extremely reliable. The mission systems have performed well and the aircrews are rapidly becoming more adept at fly ing and employing the aircraft while the maintenance team is developing the skills required to repair and maintain this modern aircraft. The supply chain is expand ing to meet the demands of a new aircraft and the communi NAS Jax pins new chiefs From Orion to Poseidon

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Sept. 19 1915 SECNAV Josephus Daniels organizes the Naval Consulting Board to mobilize the scientific resources of U.S. for national defense. 1957 Bathyscaph Trieste, in a dive sponsored by the Office of Naval Research in the Mediterranean, reaches record depth of two miles. 1992 Joint Task Force Marianas stands down after providing assistance to Guam after Typhoon Omar. Sept. 20 1911 Navigational instruments first requested for naval aircraft. 1951 In Operation Summit, the first combat helicopter landing in history, U.S. Marines were landed in Korea. 1981 USS Mount Hood and Navy helicopters rescue 18 crew mem bers of Philippine Navy frigate, Datu Kalantiaw. Sept. 21 1858 Sloop Niagara departs Charleston, S.C., for Liberia with African slaves rescued from slave ship. 1923 Asiatic Fleet completes mission of aiding earthquake victims in Japan. 1939 President Franklin Roosevelt asks Congress to repeal the arms embargo provision of the Neutrality Act. 1944 Aircraft from 12 carriers com mence two-day attack against Japanese ships and airfields on Luzon, Philippine Islands. 1984 Mid East Force begins escort of U.S. flagged vessels in Persian Gulf. Sept. 22 1776 John Paul Jones in Providence sails into Canso Bay, Nova Scotia, and attacks British fishing fleet. 1943 U.S. destroyers and land ing craft land Australian troops at Finschhafen, New Guinea. 1989 After Hurricane Hugo, Sailors and Marines provide assistance to Charleston, S.C., through 10 Oct. Sept. 23 1779 Captain John Paul Jones in Continental Navy frigate Bonhomme Richard captures HMS Serapis. 1931 Lt. Alfred Pride pilots Navys first rotary wing aircraft, XOP-1 auto giro, in landings and take-offs on board USS Langley while underway. 1944 Naval Task Group lands Army troops on Ulithi Atoll, Caroline Islands. 1944 USS West Virginia (BB-48) reaches Pearl Harbor and rejoins the Pacific Fleet, marking the end of the salvage and reconstruction of 18 ships damaged at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. 1947 James Forrestal, former SECNAV, takes office as first Secretary of Defense. 1990 Two Hospital ships (USNS Mercy and USNS Comfort) steam together for first time in Arabian Gulf. Sept. 24 1918 Ensign David Ingalls, USNR, in a Sopwith Camel, shoots down his fifth enemy aircraft, becoming the first U.S. Navy ace while flying with the British Royal Air Force. 1944 5th Fleet carrier aircraft attack Japanese in Visayas, Philippines. 1960 First nuclear powered aircraft carrier, USS Enterprise (CVAN-65), launched at Newport News, Va. Sept. 25 1941 In first successful U.S. Navy escort of convoys during World War II, Navy escort turn over HX-150 to British escorts at the Mid-Ocean Meeting Point. All ships reach port safely. 1957 In project Stratoscope, Office of Naval Research obtains sharp pho tographs of suns corona from first bal loon-borne telescope camera. I hate to say that Im glad Im not the only one, because it means that others have suf fered from anxiety and phobias, too. But reactions to last weeks column about my failed attempt at flying in an airplane have made me feel somewhat normal. (Okay, maybe not normal, but not alone either.) Turns out there are a lot of fearful flyers out there. Theres even people like me, people who think they cant get on a plane at all. Although, honestly, very few people selfreported leaving the airplane just before taxi ing down the runway, as I did over Labor Day Weekend. Some readers wanted more information to make themselves feel better or to laugh at me, I dont know. Ill try to answer those questions below. What did security think? The security personnel at Reagan International Airport in Washington, D.C., were definitely startled, and perhaps on high alert, when I ran off the plane, but all of them were incredibly understanding as well. On the tarmac, when Dustin yelled over other planes engines for me to get back on the plane, a bag gage handler thought he was screaming at me. The man pulled me aside and asked, Do you feel safe going with this man? My husband? I said. Yes. I just dont feel safe in that airplane! Now the man had a clearer picture. I wasnt a hysterical wife; I was just hysterical in gen eral. I see this at least once a week, he told me. Really, its going to be okay. When you go back to the terminal, there will be people waiting there to help you. For a moment I wondered: Will they be peo ple in white coats? But, as it turned out, the man felt so sorry for us, he followed us back to the terminal himself to help us retrieve our luggage. We were too late. Both suitcases were already on their way back to Bangor. I hope they werent scared. How can you be afraid of flying if your husband is a pilot? I dont have a good answer for this. Remember, my dad was an F-14 pilot, too. Ive been around aviation my whole life. In fact, I love airplanes. I love to watch them land and take off. For one of our first dates, the one where I fell in love with Dustin, he took me to Gravelly Point, just across the water from Reagan International Airport, to watch jets screech seemingly just out of reach and land in front of us. But I never wanted to get in those airplanes. Maybe Ive heard too much about flying. Ive witnessed friends dying in training accidents while Dustin was in flight school. Ive heard all the stories. But then, a phobia is never really rational, is it? So even if everyone I knew was a pilot, it wouldnt have any effect. How mad was Dustin? To quote Dustin, me running off the air plane was the worst thing Ive ever done to him. If thats the worst thing Ive ever done to him, then I think Im doing pretty well, dont you think? Still, he didnt talk to me for at least an hour in the rental car. But Sarah, you would have been safer in the airplane than you were in the car. But the car doesnt fly suspended in mid-air. Have you tried any programs? I like to follow pilot Patrick Smiths columns, and Ive read his book Cockpit Confidential. Seven years ago, when I backed out of a fam ily wedding due to my fear, I even talked to Smith on the phone. By that point, unless it was Smith piloting the plane, I was still afraid. I also frequent Capt. Tom Bunns Fear of Flying Web site and online forum. These sites are helpful for making me feel less weird, less alone, but, again, unless Capt. Bunn is my pilot, its like starting at square one when I get to the airport. Is it turbulence, claustrophobia or a fear of crashing that scares you? All of the above. No, I take that back. Bunn and Smith have convinced me that turbulence can never hurt an airplane. Not really. And to be honest, I dont think Ive ever experienced turbulence. So, actually, my fear is mostly of the fear itself. Trust me, you do not want to sit next to me on an airplane. I cry and hyperventilate. I rock in my seat and startle at every sound. Its miserable. And probably my biggest fear of all is not being able to do anything about it. I just have to sit there and feel the fear until the pilot lands the plane. Actually, no; this is just what I tell myself. Im really afraid of crashing. Is anyone not? Will you ever fly again? With enough medication, I hope so. Financial readiness in ser vice members lives has a direct effect on mission readiness, the director of the Defense Departments office of family policy, children and youth said in a recent interview. Noting that financial insta bility can affect many aspects of service members lives, from relationships to concentration on the job, Barbara Thompson told American Forces Press Service and the Pentagon Channel that DoD provides edu cation and tools people can use to build their financial flexibil ity. Its really important for our service members and their fam ilies to live within their means, she said, and to do that, they have to have a budget, be dis ciplined and understand that having a debt load hurts their credit scores [and] their ability to afford [purchases]. Financial difficulties also can affect secu rity clearances, she added. Several resources are avail able to help service members and their families establish and maintain household budgets, in addition to learning how to save money, she said. We want to make sure peo ple know [their finances] are under their control with sup port, Thompson said. Available resources include financial counselors at installation fam ily centers who can help with reducing debt, managing credit card, and avoiding paying high interest rates, she added. Another option is the Military OneSource website, which offers financial advice, and where users can set up 12 sessions with a financial counsel or per financial issue on topics such as establishing a budget and reducing debt. Counselors are available face-to-face or online, Thompson said. Credit unions and banks on installa tions also offer financial educa tion through workshops and can help families work out budgets, she said. Thompson also warned that service members should be aware of fraudulent practices such as predatory lending. People would get into them with very high interest rates, spending [significant amounts] of money just to pay off a preda tory loan, she said. So thats where our on-installation banks and credit unions came up with some short-term, low-interest loans. Thompson also recommend ed the SaveAndInvest.org web site as a resource for self-initia tors. It offers tools and calcula tors to get started on establish ing and maintaining a house hold budget, she said. Handling credit wisely and keep spending under control are important aspects of personal financial readiness, Thompson said. If were living within our means, were not running credit limit up on that credit card to purchase things that are may be wants but not needs, she said. Paying off credit card debt every month avoids paying large amounts of interest, she noted. Having at least $500 in sav ings is another important aspect of budgeting, Thompson said, as emergency money that might be needed during a household move, or if a washing machine or car transmission fails. Its not . all about debt reduction, Thompson said. The idea is that you come up with a spending plan of whats important to you, and [put away money] for savings.Q&A about that failed flying attempt Finances affect service members readiness

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First Coast Navy Fire and Emergency Services Fire Chief Mark Brusoe and Lt. Cmdr. Mike Chan of the NAS Jax Air Operations Department were recognized for their service to their country during a Sept. 11 com memoration ceremony at Metro Park in downtown Jacksonville. It is a honor for us to hold this ceremony to remember those who lost their lives on Sept. 11, 2001 and to recognize those who serve us every day the first respond ers police, firefighters and military members, said Dr. Helen Jackson, president/CEO of the Women of Color Cultural Foundation, who coordi nated the event. The ceremony began with the invocation, parading of the col ors and musical selec tions by the Edward Waters College Choir and Jacksonville Fire Rescue Department Pipes and Drums, as well as remarks by several local officials. The keynote speaker was retired Navy Rear Adm. Vic Guillory, direc tor, City of Jacksonville Military Affairs, Veterans & Disabled Services Department. While the events of that horrific day, now 12 years past, will forever be etched in our minds, Id like to share how that Tuesday morning, Sept. 11, 2001 influenced our nation and the values we hold most dearly, said Guillory. We saw first respond ers race into the confu sion and chaos, health professionals work ing tirelessly and an overwhelming sense of patriotism grasp the American people. Young men and women enlisted in the services, citizens hung flags outside their homes, synagogues and churches were filled with people united in prayer for our nation. For a time, issues that seemed to divide our people just didnt seem important. Guillory continued, We are a stronger coun try, we are a more patri otic city and we are more informed citizens to our surroundings but let us never forget the day that changed our nation for ever. Jackson and Guillory then presented Sept. 11th commemoration plaques to Jacksonville Sheriff John Rutherford, Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Director Chief Marty Senterfitt, Brusoe, Chan, Col. Al Dodd of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Master Chief Kenneth Morris of the U.S. Coast Guard and Capt. Brandon Pruitt of the Florida Air National Guard. On behalf of the men and women serv ing at NAS Jacksonville, we thank you for this recognition today as we remember and pay tribute to all those who lost their lives Sept. 11, 2001 and honor the first responders of our city and nation, said Chan. The event concluded with a presentation of 250 care packages to Greater Jacksonville Area USO Director Mike OBrien that will be delivered to troops serving overseas. These care packages will be sent out to those men and women in harms way all over the world. Our mission at the USO is to lift the spirits of our military members who sacrifice so much for all of us so thank you for supporting us so we can support them, said OBrien. First responders recognized at 9/11 commemoration JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013 3

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This policy is designed to provide overarching guidance to NAS Jax Sailors and civilian personnel on how to conduct themselves to make the com mand and the individual as suc cessful as possible. This policy is designed to replace many of the stovepipe policies that are nor mally published by a command ing officer. The chief of naval operations (CNO) has put out a policy on many of the issues that are of concern to him; drug use, equal opportunity, safety and environ mental stewardship to name a few. Those policies are impor tant and I expect all personnel to be familiar with the various CNO policies that are published. Through a holistic approach this policy will address current issues of today as well as set per sonnel up for success to handle the issues of tomorrow. If you heed this one policy you cant go wrong. What is professional excel lence? Franklin Covey describes a Great Organization as one that possesses sustained supe rior performance, has engaged personnel, and makes a dis tinctive contribution. In order to have a great command we need to have effective Sailors and civilian work force. These are individuals who are focused and disciplined, trustworthy, possess good judgment, proac tive in attitude and actions, work well with others, and are good communicators. NAS Jax has set up an envi ronment that promotes open communication without fear of reprisal, encourages and values input, and makes avail able the resources and tools for each individual (and hence command) to succeed in their endeavors. Departmental lead ership will help facilitate that success at all levels by providing training, standardization and operational risk management tools. Finally, when personnel provide constant and timely feedback, we will continue to improve ourselves and the Navy. There is another aspect to pro fessional excellence and being an effective Sailor or civilian employee that most corpora tions wont talk about. Effective NAS Jax personnel need to be good citizens in the community as well. Our core values of honor, courage and commitment are the cornerstones that allow us to be trusted stewards of all assets given to us by the American public. There is no honor or trust when we stray from social norms and civil law. It can be just as damaging to our command goals as having an aviation mishap. DUIs, discrimination, sexual assault and family abuse are examples of these issues that not only affect the individuals life, but directly have an impact on the performance of this command as well. Therefore, apply the characteristics of an effective person, on and off duty. If you are the senior per son present in a given situation be responsible. I will hold you accountable. Extend it to your families and you will be success ful in every aspect of your life. What does this boil down to? 1. Be an effective Sailor or civilian employee and a good citizen be proactive and responsible. 2. The golden rule applies Do unto others as you would have others do unto you. 3. Be a good steward: Dont look at the world as yours to take, but to take care of. Professional excellence and service to the fleet are the hall marks of the NAS Jax team. Im counting on you to carry on that tradition.NAS Jax COs professional excellence policy 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013

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Meteorologist Angela Enyedi of National Weather Service (NWS) Jacksonville presented a two-hour NWS Storm Spotter class Sept. 12 to a group of interested military and civilian per sonnel. It was part of NAS Jacksonvilles quest to become recognized as a StormReady community. To become StormReady, NAS Jacksonville has multiple ways to receive weather service warning infor mation as well as disseminate that information to residents and ten ant commands. Today, were provid ing local weather hazard training in the form of spotter talk which covers everything from severe thunderstorms and flash flooding to high winds and funnel clouds, explained Enyedi. Attendees learned the differences between a severe thunderstorm watch or warning and a tornado watch or warning. We teach storm spotters to look at radar imagery and scan the sky to determine any imminent severe weath er threat and then take appropriate safety actions. Our goal is to empower people to recognize weather threats and communicate with our National Weather Service, said Enyedi. She added that cloud-to-ground light ning kills an average of 30 50 people each year, so lightning safety is another important weather issue. Ray Edmond, NAS Jax disaster pre paredness coordinator, worked with Enyedi to organize the class. No community is storm proof, but StormReady can help communities save lives by teaching volunteers to recog nize potentially destructive weather in their vicinity and report their informa tion to the nearest NWS office. StormReady provides communities both inside and outside our gates to master the communication and safety skills needed to save lives and prop erty before and during a severe weath er event. StormReady helps commu nity leaders and emergency managers strengthen our local safety programs, said Edmond He added, StormReady certification also helps create an infrastructure and communications system that can save lives and protect property. As a result, StormReady communities are usually better prepared when severe weather strikes. NWS is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which falls under the Department of Commerce. All NWS forecast and warning information including Doppler radar is free and available via the Internet. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus present ed the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (fourth award) to Lt. Cmdr. Shawn Rockwell, the newly assigned NAVFAC Southeast South Central Integrated Product Team (IPT) leader, in a brief ceremony Sept. 9. Rockwell was recognized for meri torious service while serving as Public Works Officer for NAVFAC Europe Africa Southwest Asia at Public Works Department Souda Bay from June 2011 through July 2013. Rockwell displayed exceptional leadership, initiative and resourceful ness in managing a full range of pub lic works and engineering functions, according to the award citation. He managed an annual business volume of $35 million despite sig nificant staffing and resource short falls, said Kiwus during the award presentation. He provided direct operational support to the warfighter with a superb commitment to mission accomplishment in a highly fluid and constantly shifting national security environment. During Operation Unified Protector (the NATO operation enforcing United Nations Security Council resolutions 1970 and 1973 concerning the Libyan civil war, and other regional contin gency operations following the Sept. 11, 2012 attacks on the U.S. Embassy in Benghazi, Libya) Rockwell success fully planned, designed and executed construction of $110 million in mili tary construction and special projects. It was one of the most reward ing assignments Ive had in the Civil Engineering Corps, said Rockwell. Supporting contingency operations, while at the same time, executing nor mal day-to-day business operations was very rewarding. The award truly defines our accomplishments as a team at Souda Bay. Plus, it was a beau tiful place to work the scenery, the culture and the people were fabulous. The awards final citation read, Rockwells superlative performance, steadfast perseverance and outstand ing devotion to duty reflect credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval service. Storm spotter class supports community safety NAVFAC Southeast commendation medal presented JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013 For the 134 chief selectees from NAS Jax and tenant com mands, Sept. 12 was a day of challenges and camaraderie and ultimately success as they completed their final day of CPO 365 Phase II before being frocked the next day. The morning began with an 8-mile run around the station, stopping at various buildings to sing traditional Navy songs and let co-workers know they are were on the final countdown to becoming khaki leaders. The selectees then headed to the Mulberry Cove Marina for a morning of challenging exercises to test their strength, endur ance and teamwork skills. This final phase has been going really well. We have not had any injuries and I think every challenge weve given the CPO selectees has had cause and effect. The selectees are ready for their final night, said NAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM)(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd. Before tackling the sevenstation course, the selectees were given a pep talk and safety brief. Its only going to get hard er from here. You have Sailors to take care of. Everyone had issues because we are all human beings but we take care of one another because the Navy is one big family. As a chiefs mess, you are the head of the family thats your job so you need to have the tools to be able to do this, AWOCS(NAC/ AW) Patrick Biddinger of VP-16 told the selectees. The training course, designed for teamwork and fun featured a rope exercise where they had to untangle them selves as a group, 10-ton truck pull, marching skills, an anchor chain pull, Navy history quiz station, coffee can tasking sta tion and probably the most challenging but exciting station the D-Day rescue. Team after team of selectees jumped out of their Navy ves sel into a simulated watery minefield while attempting to rescue a fallen shipmate. As they were cheered on by genuine chiefs, they were bombed with water balloons and sprayed with a fire hose. I think this training was really awesome and I really enjoyed it. I actually got chills waiting for the door to drop on the ship before we headed out because I was so excited to be doing this. Its been a great training lesson for us, said AWVC(Sel) James Everett of VP-30. It has been extremely chal lenging but its really taught us the concept of teamwork, added PSC(Sel) Cynthia Rivera of Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville. The selectees also spent much of the night at the base antenna farm where they con tinued to hone their skills on the obstacle course as the gen uine chiefs guided and cheered them on and guide them through the process. CPO 365 Phase II Final day of trainingA day of challenges and camaraderie

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013 7

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Joint Interagency Task Force, National Capital Region Deputy Commander Cmdr. Jason Lamb and VP-30 Executive Officer Cmdr. David Gardella awarded naval flight officer (NFO) wings to 13 offi cers Sept. 6. Those earning their NFO wings were: Ensign Erik Arstein, Ensign Michelle Austin, Ensign Mark Baden, Lt. j.g. John Bellezza, Ensign Mathew Bunting, Ensign Samuel Freeman, CWO2 Erik Gonzalez, Ensign Zachary Gorevin, Ensign Geoffrey Muller, Ensign Ethan Panal, Ensign Sophie Rassel, Lt. j.g. Bradley Stinehart and Ensign Jarrod Wilson. The recipients completed the Undergraduate Maritime Flight Officer (UMFO) syllabus at VP-30, earning their coveted wings of gold. These newly winged avia tors will now enroll in the CAT I Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) syllabus at VP-30. Upon completion of the CAT I syllabus, they will report to operational maritime patrol and reconnaissance squadrons to begin their initial sea tours in either Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii; NAS Whidbey Island, Wash.; or NAS Jacksonville. The NFO training pipeline begins with Aviation Preflight Introduction (API) instruction in Pensacola, where all avia tion officers undergo a class room syllabus and are taught the basics of naval aviation which includes aerodynamics, meteorology and principles of navigation. After completing API, all stu dent NFOs report for primary training at VT-10, co-located at NAS Pensacola. While assigned to VT-10 they transition from a classroom learning environment to initial airborne flight training in the T-6A Texan II. Upon completion of pri mary flight training at NAS Pensacola, officers who are selected for the P-3, EP-3 or P-8 training pipeline report to VP-30 for specific aircraft training. As VP-5 continues its busy schedule operating and maintaining the P-8A Poseidon, the squadron proudly salutes another outstanding Mad Fox PR2(AW) Jose Castillo. Castillo, who was born in Miami, is married with two children. He joined the Navy in February 2009 and was first assigned to VAW-120 in Norfolk, Va. where he worked with E-2C Hawkeye and C-2 Greyhound aircrew. He joined VP-5 in October 2011 and deployed to Kadena, Japan in 2012 with his fellow Mad Foxes. As an aircrew survival equipment man, Castillo is in charge of maintain ing and testing the survival gear that all aircrew are required to wear while in flight. He is also charged with the upkeep of the anti-exposure suits, life rafts, and the survival equipment inside the life rafts. Along with the requirements high lighted above that come with being a rigger, Castillos specialty within the squadron is designing custom graph ics that are placed on the helmets of aircrew. Being able to interact with the aircrew and use their input to create an original graphic that they can wear on their helmets is definitely a rewarding part of job, explained Castillo. It allows me to show to off my artistic abilities, and its gives the aircrew a sense of pride in showing off their custom Mad Fox helmet. Castillos short-term goals while in the Navy are to make first class petty officer and re-enlisting for six more years. His long-term goals are to make chief petty officer. When he is not on duty, Castillo spends time with his family. He also enjoys going to the firing range to sharpen his marksmanship skills. As VP-8 concludes a challenging InterDeployment Readiness Cycle, the squadron salutes IS3 Class Aaron Moorefield as VP-8 Fighting Tiger in the spotlight. Moorefield returned Sept. 2 from a threemonth Individual Augmentee deployment to 5th Fleet, supporting Commander, Task Group (CTG) 57.2 and VP-1. Knowing the Tigers are in final prep aration for a deployment to the same site, Moorefield jumped at the oppor tunity to fill a needed intelligence spe cialist position, and gained valuable experience. While deployed, Moorefield collect ed, processed and analyzed informa tion from VP-1 missions. He then disseminated the information to Fleet and Combat Commander (CC) staff, allowing Fleet and CCs to make deci sions based on near realtime, fused, and action able intelligence products. Moorefield hails from Summerville, S.C. Motivated by continuing a family legacy of patriotic service, he enlisted in the Navy on June 29, 2011. Following graduation from boot camp and Intelligence Specialist A school, he joined the Fighting Tigers in March 2012. VP-30 wings Navys newest naval flight officers VP-8 Fighting Tiger in the spotlightVP-5 Mad Fox of the week 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013

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side. You must be faithful to the prom ise youre about to make as a chief petty officer. My last piece of advice is sim ple, be the kind of leader your Sailors or Marines deserve. We can ask no more of you and your Sailors deserve nothing less. He then introduced guest speak er, NAS Jax CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd who commended the CPO selectees on their accomplishments over the past six weeks of CPO 365 Phase II training. These chief selectees have been test ed and it is an honor to be here to cel ebrate their accomplishments. Over the past six weeks, each selectee ran over 60 miles, did 1,172 push-ups, 660 sit-ups and they had a total weight loss of 603 pounds, declared Shepherd. This is a major milestone in your life, not just your careers, Shepherd told the selectees. For years to come, gen eration after generation will always talk about the Navy chiefs in their families so embrace this time of your lives. He went on to talk about several unknown heroes in history such as William Dawes and Samuel Prescott who rode with Paul Revere in 1775 to warn the patriots that the British were coming during the Revolutionary War and about a janitor at the Air Force Academy named William Bill Crawford, who was also a Medal of Honor recipient for heroism during WWII. Most people have never heard of these individuals because these are just a couple of the unspoken heroes of the past. Bill Crawford quietly went about his day cleaning up and no one ever really paid him any attention until a student discovered that he was a war hero and POW. He later taught cadets about leadership as he talked about his past, said Shepherd. One of his students wrote 10 unfor gettable leadership lessons. Be cautious of labels; everyone deserves respect; courtesy makes a difference; take time to know your people; anyone can be a hero; leaders should be humble; life wont always hand you what you think you deserve; dont pursue glory; pursue excellence; no job is beneath a lead er and life is a leadership laboratory, he continued. Remember, there are always heroes amongst us. I also want to tell our new chief selectees this: you are the backbone of the Navy. The Navy is on a fulcrum if you move that fulcrum to the right, either officer or enlisted, you will focus on the community more. Your jobs as chiefs is to bring it back to center and keep things balanced and make sure everyone stays focused on the mission, said Shepherd. This is a dream come true. Its been a long day coming and we all worked hard for it. Its just amazing to be here. We learned throughout the process that we are a team and we all need to come together to make things work. I think that was the biggest thing that weve learned over the past six weeks. These truly are my brothers and sis ters and I take that to heart with me. This is the best day ever! said ITC Latoya Brown of Navy Computers and Telecommunications Station Jax. This is one of the greatest days of my life. It was a long time coming and now I look forward to the opportunity to lead Sailors and do what Ive been chosen to do, added RPC Michael Hawthorne of Commander, Navy Region Southeast. I thought CPO 365 Phase II was chal lenging but in the end, everything was done for a purpose and were all better off for it. To close out the ceremony, the new chiefs were given a round of applause and then all current and former CPOs were asked to stand for the reading of the CPO Creed. A reception was held at Deweys following the event. CPO PINNING Photos by Kaylee LaRocque JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013 9

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Rear Adm. Rick Williamson, com mander, Navy Region Southeast, signed a suicide prevention awareness procla mation at NAS Jacksonville Sept. 9. The proclamation recogniz es September as National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month and is intended to raise suicide awareness prevention throughout the Southeast Region. This proclamation brings to light an issue of paramount importance in our military today, Williamson said. Each year, we lose shipmates, co-workers and family members to suicide and these losses can be prevented. It is our col lective responsibility to remain alert to the warning signs and to be prepared to take action with those in our lives who might be at risk. An actively engaged force, including everyone in the Navy family, is key to the successful preven tion of suicide. The proclamations theme highlights the importance of taking action as indi viduals and to recognize the impact of stressors in our day-to-day lives, as well how to develop protective factors against stress and suicide. According to Dianne Parker, Navy Region Southeast assistant suicide pre vention outreach coordinator, there is no better way to have a successful pro gram than ensuring suicide prevention information and indicators are avail able to all personnel. Suicide continues to be a major issue for all hands, she said. Our goal is to reduce the number of these tragedies through education and awareness cam paigns, and we hope this proclamation will go a long way in those efforts. One of the latest tools the Navy is using toward suicide prevention efforts is the NavyTHRIVE campaign, which encourages Sailors, commands, fami lies and civilians to empower them selves by taking personal responsibility for their health, wellness and growth. The program is a new approach to resilience and it really emphasizes selfempowerment and growth, Parker said. The goal is not for Sailors to merely overcome adversity, but to come back from it stronger than they were before. In addition to those efforts, the region implemented an aggressive suicide pre vention coordinator (SPC) training pro gram in September 2011 that utilizes Defense Connect Online. So far, it has resulted in more than 300 newly-quali fied coordinators throughout the region and more than 1,700 worldwide. Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) educational services and work and family life specialists assist com mand SPCs with training in the areas of stress management, conflict manage ment, parent education, anger manage ment and suicide prevention. So far this fiscal year, command SPCs and FFSC personnel have conducted more than 1,200 training sessions attended by more than 43,000 people. The program has been instrumen tal in raising awareness and getting the message out to leaders throughout the DoD. Leaders need to make Sailors understand that there is no shame in reaching out for help, Parker said. Each year, hundreds of DoD person nel commit suicide and many of these cases could be prevented if friends and co-workers only knew what to look for and took action, she added. The bottom line is if you suspect that someone may be thinking about sui cide, you need to act, care and treat, she said. The key is to take action. The worst thing that you can possibly do is nothing. For more information about NavyTHRIVE, visit http://www.public. navy.mil/bupers-npc/support/21st_ Century_Sailor/suicide_prevention/ spmonth/Pages/default.aspx Rear Adm. Rick Williamson, Commander, Navy Region Southeast, signed a proclamation in support of the Navy Family Ombudsman Program (NFOP) at NAS Jacksonville Sept. 9. The proclamation signing commemo rated the 43rd anniversary of the NFOP and declared Sept. 14 as Ombudsman Appreciation Day throughout the region. For more than four decades, the Navy ombudsman program has been an invaluable resource in our efforts to support our warfighters and their fami lies, Williamson said. I would like to take this opportunity to say thank you to all of our ombudsmen throughout the region for their continued support. Our Sailors and their families would face a much more difficult task without you. The NFOP was launched Sept. 14, 1970, by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Elmo Zumwalt to assist com mands in maintaining the morale, health and welfare of Navy families. Ombudsmen act as liaisons between commanding officers and the families of service members. They typically provide a variety of resources, such as providing family members with official information and emergency assistance. Commander, Navy Installations Command reports that ombudsmen volunteer efforts save the Navy more than $2 million annu ally. According to Dianne Parker, Navy Region Southeast deployment support program manager and ombudsman program coordinator, the proclamation is significant because it acknowledg es the efforts of ombudsmen not only throughout the region, but throughout the Navy. Its important to recognize the anni versary of the ombudsman program because our ombudsmen are a part of the command support team, they make sure families know what resources are available to them, and help them adjust to the military way of life, she said. If it werent for our Navy ombudsmen, our Sailors would carry a much heavier bur den in the face of their military duties. For more information about the Navy Ombudsman Program, includ ing how to contact your command ombudsman, visit http://www. cnic.navy.mil/CNIC_HQ_Site/ WhatWeDo/FleetandFamilyReadiness/ FamilyReadiness/ FleetAndFamilySupportProgram/ OmbudsmanProgram/index.htm Proclamation signing emphasizes National Suicide Prevention Awareness MonthProclamation recognizes importance, anniversary of Navy ombudsmen program JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013 11

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Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. FFSC work shops and classes are free to service members and their families. If spe cial accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2013: Training Nov. 12-15 (5:30-10 p.m.) Program (TAP) Separation Workshop (7:30 a.m.4:15 p.m.) Oct. 7-11, Oct. 21-25, Nov. 4-8, Dec. 2-6. Program (TAP) Retirement Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) Sept. 23-27, Oct. 28-Nov. 1, Nov. 18-22, Dec. 16-20. Workshop (9 a.m.-noon) Oct. 17, Nov. 27, Dec. 11. (Noon-3 p.m.) July 2. Interview Techniques Workshop (8-9:30 a.m.) Nov. 25. Letters Workshop (9:40 a.m.-noon) Nov. 25. Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Nov. 13-14. Specialist Training (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Sept. 30-Oct. 4, Dec. 9-13. Credit Management Workshop (8-11 a.m.) Oct. 15. Deals in Car Buying (9-10:30 a.m.) Nov. 26. (1:30-3 p.m.) Oct. 10, Dec. 12. Workshop (1:30-4 p.m.) Nov. 14. 101 Workshop Sept. 14 (1-2:30 p.m.) Nov. 21 Rain or shine!*Deweys will be open for dinner & beveragesOct. 18 Balloon Artist Nov. 15 Karaoke with Tom Turner Dec. 20 Childrens Holiday Bingo Childrens Holiday Bingo will start at 1830 and has a cost of $10 per person and includes soft drinks, hot dog, dauber, bingo card and gift bag for each child. For more information call (904) 542-3900 or www.facebook.com/nasjaxmwr 3rd Friday of the Month FFSC offers life skills workshops JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013 13

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(5-6:30 p.m.) 101 Workshop (9-10:30 a.m.) Oct. 8, Nov. 5, Dec. 10. Extended Stress Management Workshop (8 a.m.-noon) Oct. 15 & 29. Workshop (8 a.m.-noon) Sept. 24, Oct. 22, Nov. 26, Dec. 17. Personal Anger Control Group Oct. 8 Nov. 12 (2-4 p.m.) Individual Communication (11 a.m.1 p.m.) Nov. 19. Parenting with Love & Logic (1-3 p.m.) Sept. 24; Nov. 5, 12, 19, 26. Active Parenting of Teens (1-4 p.m.) Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23. Power 2 Change, Womens Support Group (9:30-11 a.m.) Every Wednesday Expectant Families (9 a.m.-3 p.m.) Dec. 3. Tiny Tots Play Group (10 a.m.-noon) Oct. 1, 15, 29; Nov. 12, 16; Dec. 10, 17. Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) Orientation (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) Nov. 7. EFMP Command POC Training (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) Oct. 3, Dec. 5.To register for any of the above workshops call 5425745. First West Nile case reported in Duval CountyAs of Sept. 3, the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) con firmed 497 cases of West Nile Virus resulting in 20 deaths across 45 states and the District of Columbia. The Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) is stressing the importance of maintaining vigilance against the spread of West Nile virus (WNV) as September is historically considered the peak month for reported cases of WNV. of WNV.intaining vigilance against the spread of West Nil The keys to reducing the risk of human disease carried by mosqui toes, including WNV, are preparation, prevention and communication, said Capt. Eric Hoffman, NECE officer-incharge. Accurate information regard ing disease threat and personal respon sibility leads to an informed customer resulting in reduced risk. Our entomologists and preventa tive medicine technicians are consis tently monitoring the distribution of human disease transmitted by blood feeding insects and other arthropods, said HM1 Paulo Torres of NECE. We provide recommendations for preven tion and control to Navy and Marine Corps facilities in the affected areas and if necessary, offer on-site assistance. According to the CDC, the average individual will not develop symptoms of any kind when infected with WNV. However, one in five infected individu als will develop fever, headache, body aches, joint pains, vomiting, diarrhea, or rash and approximately 1 percent of infected people will further develop serious neurological illness resulting in swelling of the brain and surrounding tissue that could result in paralysis or death. One of the best ways to prevent WNV infection is to avoid contact with mos quitoes as much as possible, said Lt. Marcus McDonough, NECE department head. Applying 25-30 percent DEET or picaradin on exposed skin and treat ing clothing with permethrin are two methods to prevent mosquito bites. Moreover, be sure to wear long sleeved light colored shirts and pants when ever outdoors or in places where mos quitoes may be present. Stay indoors at peak mosquito activity times such as dawn and dusk and be sure to check that screens on windows and doors are in good repair. More information can be found at the NECE home page at: http://www.med. navy.mil/sites/nmcphc/nece For questions concerning mosqui toes, ticks or other pests, please con tact the Navy Entomology Center of Excellence by emailing: FleetsupportNECE@med.navy.mil. 2013 CommandSports Challenge 10 Events1500 Meter Relay Dodge Ball 3-on-3 Basketball Swim Relay Ultimate Frisbee Fitness Challenge 3-on-3 Sand Volleyball Bag Toss Tug-O-WarCO/XO/CMC Canoe Race October 3 & 4 8 a.m. 2 p.m. Team Sign-up1. At the Fitness, Sports and Aquatics Center 2. Call (904) 542-2930 3. E-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil Sign-up by Sept. 30 Open to Active Duty Selective Reservists DOD Civilians DOD Contractors*Patrons must work in a command at NAS JAX FFSC 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013

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Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. Part of Clay Countys heritage is the countys strong ties to the military dating back to the early 1800s. Today, there are over 24,000 veterans who call Clay County home. These veterans represent service to our nation from World War II through the current con flicts as well as decades of service during peacetime. The Clay County Veterans Service Office is staffed with a full time veterans service officer and a part time veterans program assistant; both available and eager to assist veterans and/or family members with filing claims and/or other related needs. The office is now located on the second floor of the Clay County Administration Building at 477 Houston Street, Green Cove Springs, Fla. The office is open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. The for mer Veterans Service Office at 1565 CR 315 has been closed. To make an appointment, call (904) 269-6326.Clay County Veterans Services Office has relocated 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Mon. & Thurs. at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Friday at 7 p.m. Sept. 27 Pam Affronti Oct. 4 Karaoke with Randy Oct. 11 Holliday & Ken Oct. 18 Karaoke with Randy Oct. 25 Second Tyme Around Band Oct. 18 Balloon Artist Nov. 15 Karaoke with Tom Turner DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Free bowling-active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 510 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 12 6 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included Fall and winter leagues begin in Sept.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Movie Under the Stars Outdoor Pool Sept. 20 at 7:30 p.m. Despicable Me 2 Outdoor pool closed for recreational swimming. Lap swim only MonFri 6 8 a.m.; 11 a.m. 1 p.m.; 4:30 7 p.m. Sat and Sun 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Learn to Swim Indoor Pool Session 1 Oct. 14 24 Session 2 Oct 28 Nov 7 $40 military, $45 DoD Command Sports Challenge Oct. 3 & 4 10 events. Sign-up at the base gym or e-mail bill. bonser@navy.milI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_mwritt@navy. mil Jacksonville Zoo Spooktacular $9. Universal Halloween Horror Nights: Tickets coming soon! Stop by ITT to find out more about dates & pricing. Halloween Horror Nights visits ITT on Oct. 2, 10 a.m. 2 p.m. Stop by to win great prizes! TobyMac Tickets: Nov. 17, 7 pm at Veterans Memorial Arena, $26. Waves of Honor Special: Seaworld Orlando Adult $46.50, Child $42.25. Busch Gardens Tampa Adult $45, Child $40.50. ITT Trip to the Yahala Country Bakery: Sept. 28, 8 a.m. 3 p.m., $25. Mount Dora Craft Fair: Oct. 26, 8 a.m. 3 p.m., $20. Orlando Magic vs. New Orleans Pelicans Basketball: Oct. 9, Veterans Memorial Arena, section 102 at 7 p.m., $55. Monster Jam: Club seat ing (includes pit pass) $42, regular seating (includes pit pass) $22. LegoLand: Free tickets for Active Duty member at the park. Tickets for family members can be purchased at ITT: 1-day $45.50, 1-day with water park $52.50, 2-day $51.25, 2-day with waterpark $54.25. Jacksonville Jaguars: Section 147 Bud Zone, $70. Jags shuttle bus $12. Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2013 2014 Season: Tickets now available! MOSH: $7 $12. The Artist Series Broadway in Jax 2013 2014 Season: Tickets available now! Mamma Mia!: Oct. 19, 2013, 8 pm, $60.50. Celtic Thunder: Nov. 10, 2013, 7 pm, $80. Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus: Jan. 17 & 18, 2014, $51. War Horse: Feb. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $68.50. Memphis: Mar. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $65. Million Dollar Quartet: Apr. 26, 2014, 8 pm, $65. The D* Word: Oct. 4 Oct. 25, 2014, $43.75 $46.The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unac companied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. HabiJax Volunteer Opportunity Sept. 21 at 7 a.m. Barracks Bash Sept. 26, 4 p.m. 8 p.m. Located in the field next to the barracks by the Gym. Jaguars vs. Colts Shuttle Sept. 29 at 11 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Sept. 24 for active duty Sept. 26 for retirees, DoD personnel and guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not appli cable on holidays. Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27 3rd Annual Riverfest Sept. 28, 10:30 a.m. 3 p.m. Featuring music, food, free stand-up paddle board lessons, kayak les sons and more!Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel bal ancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Before and After School Registration going on now! Fees based on household income. Movie Under the Stars Outdoor Pool Sept. 20 at 7:30 p.m. Featuring Despicable Me 2Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Oct. 7 Nov. 20 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013 17

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18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013 The Naval Supply Systems Commands (NAVSUP) Postal Policy Division has released mail-by dates for pre-Dec. 25 delivery of holiday cards, letters, and packages. For mail addressed to: APO/FPO/DPO AE zips 090-098 (except 093); AA zips 340; AP zips 962966 Express Mail: Dec. 17 First-Class Mail (letters/cards and priority mail): Dec. 10 Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 Parcel Post: Nov. 12 APO/FPO/DPO AE ZIP 093 Express mail Military Service: N/A First-Class Mail (letters/cards and priority mail): Dec. 3 Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 Parcel Post: Nov. 12 For mail addressed from all shore FPOs (except 093) Express Mail Military Service: Dec. 17 First-Class Mail (letters/cards and priority mail): Dec. 10 Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 All classes of mail addressed to FPO/ APO addresses must use the nine-digit ZIP code to ensure delivery. Mail not addressed correctly will be returned to the sender as undeliverable. Express Mail Military Service (EMMS) is available from selected mili tary post offices. If mailing to an APO/ FPO address, check with your local post office to see if this service is available. Parcel Airlift Mail (PAL) is a service that provides air transportation for parcels on a space-available basis. It is available for Parcel Post items not exceeding 30 pounds in weight or 60 inches in length and girth combined. The applicable PAL fee must be paid in addition to the regular surface rate of postage for each addressed piece sent by PAL service. Space Available Mail (SAM) refers to parcels mailed to APO/FPO addresses at parcel post rates that are first trans ported domestically by surface and then to overseas destinations by air on a space available basis. The maximum weight and size limits are 15 pounds and 60 inches in length and girth com bined. From overseas locations, items mailed at Parcel Post rates are sent to CONUS by air on a space available basis. The maximum weight and size limit are 70 pounds and 130 inches in length and girth combined. It is recommended that custom ers check with their local civilian or military post office for information on size restrictions and possible need for customs declaration forms. Customers are advised that certain mail restric tions apply and some items cannot be mailed. Examples are: switchblade knives, pornography, controlled sub stances, and explosive or incendiary devices. If in doubt as to what can or cannot be sent, contact your local civil ian or military post office. Customers are cautioned that pack ages must not be mailed in boxes that have markings related to any type of hazardous material. Parcels found by the U.S. Postal Service with such mark ings or labels on the outside of the box will not be processed. NAVSUP announces 2013 holiday mailing deadlines NEX rewards students with its A-OK Student Reward Program The Navy Exchange wants to help its custom ers finance their chil drens college education through its A-OK Student Reward Program. All qualified students will participate in a quar terly drawing for mon etary awards of $2,500, $1,500, $1,000 or $500 for a total of $5,500 per quar ter. The next drawing will be held at the end of August 2013. Any eligible fulltime student that has a B-grade point aver age equivalent or better, as determined by their school system, may enter the drawing. Eligible students include dependent chil dren of active duty mili tary members, reserv ists and military retirees enrolled in first through 12th grade. Dependent children without an individual Dependent Identification Card must be accompanied by their sponsor to submit their entry. Each student may enter only once each grading period and must re-enter with each qualifying report card. To enter the drawing, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have a NEX associate ver ify the minimum grade average. Then fill out an entry card and obtain an A-OK ID, which entitles the student to discount coupons for NEX prod ucts and services. Since the program began in 1997, NEXCOM has awarded over $611,000 in Series EE U.S. savings bonds and mone tary awards with the help of its generous vendor partners. Jaguars tickets available at USO The Greater Jax Area USO has tick ets available at the NAS Jax and NS Mayport USO for $15 each, cash trans actions only. Guidelines: All active duty including Florida National Guard and Reservists on cur rent active duty orders and dependents are eligible to purchase/use these tick ets. dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equals four. If you have less than four you may only purchase total for fam ily. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but dependent chil dren are not authorized to represent the service member/spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to pur chase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO director. chase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest. No excep tions. request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the sea son.Requests, with justification, must be sent to Mike OBrien at mobrien@ usojax.com tickets or reselling tickets will be pro hibited from buying any more tickets for the entire season. tickets are first come, first served. For more information, call 778-2821. Tickets are available the following days and times: Dateof Game Opponent Time Sale Begins Sept. 29 Indianapolis Colts 1 p.m. Now Oct. 20 San Diego Chargers 1 p.m. Oct. 7 Nov. 17 Arizona Cardinals 1 p.m. Nov. 4 Dec. 5 Houston Texans 8:25 p.m. Nov. 25 Dec. 15 Buffalo Bills 1 p.m. Dec. 2 Dec. 22 Tennessee Titans 1 p.m. Dec. 9

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For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or email bill.bonser@navy.mil JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013 19

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ty is constantly learning to ensure that the P-8A is poised for success when it deploys this winter. While there have been many challenges as the P-8A executes test and fleet introduction simultaneously, the P-8A program continues to be a model of effective planning and execution. The airframe and mission sys tems are a significant techno logical leap forward and provide commanders with a reliable plat form hosting advanced technol ogy sensors. Legacy Platforms As the P-3C and EP-3E continue toward the end of their life cycle, many challenges need to be over come, including parts obsoles cence, increased levels of sup port for legacy components, and a shortage of flight line assets. In 2007, MPRF red stripe events, that grounded aircraft due to fatigue tracking metrics beyond acceptable limits, left the com munity with 49 mission aircraft to support the high operational demand across the globe and at home. More than 50 percent of the P-3 fleet was out of reporting (OOR) due to the red stripe. Massive sus tainment efforts have been made and we are beginning to see a real return on our investment as air craft are returned to service. In FY14, we plan on reducing the amount of our P-3C inven tory OOR for depot-level sustain ment events and technological modifications by more than 10 percent, and we plan to reach P-3s required number of Primary Aircraft Assigned by the end of FY15. We expect to have sufficient ready-for-tasking assets to meet deployment and training require ments until platform sundown, but P-8A delivery must proceed as planned to ensure there is no gap in coverage for Global Force Management. Our cost savings efforts have been effective and multiple cost reduction initiatives have allowed the aging force to oper ate efficiently and effectively. Recently, initiatives to improve Engine Driven Compressor main tenance and place our APS-137 Receiver Exciter Processor and Transmitter under a Performance Based Logistics contract with Raytheon have helped reduce cost by 11 percent. With more than 50 years of faithful and dedicated service complete, the mighty P-3C Orion is prepared to finish its service to the Navy at full speed. Manpower One of the most complicated pieces of the MPRF transition is manpower. When the transition is completed, the MPRF community will consist of the P-8A Poseidon teamed with the MQ-4C Triton unmanned air craft system. The P-8A/MQ-4C combination will be respon sible for all the missions cur rently covered by VP, Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadrons (VQ), and Patrol Squadron Special Projects Unit (VPU) today. The MPRF transition is a unique manpower story and a challenge the P-3C is being replaced by two new TMSs but all manpower is being sourced from within the legacy commu nity. The restructuring has already begun with the consolidation of the VQ and VPU last year, and the continued transition of P-8A squadrons in Jacksonville. Unmanned Patrol Squadron 19, the first MQ-4C squadron, is currently scheduled to begin its standup with an officer-in-charge in early FY14. Conclusion The MPRF Community has almost fully recovered from the 2007 red stripe and is quickly transitioning to the new P-8A Poseidon. The successful turnaround since 2007 can be directly attrib uted to the NAE and industry leaders working towards a com mon goal of recovery and even tual transition to the next genera tion of maritime patrol aircraft, both manned and unmanned. MPRF To be recognized as StormReady or TsunamiReady, communities must meet certain guidelines established by the National Weather Service in partnership with federal, state and local emergency management officials. While the emergency management teams at every Navy installation have emergen cy plans and protocol in place, those that have earned the official StormReady and TsunamiReady designation have gone one step further in their efforts to save lives and property in the face of natural disasters. The safety and emergency preparedness of Navy personnel and families is a high pri ority for us, says Margie Lutz, command er, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) Emergency Management Program Manager. In partnering with the National Weather Service (NWS) and receiving the StormReady and TsunamiReady designa tion, we continue to strengthen our hazard ous weather plans, monitoring and notifica tion systems, as well as training and pub lic awareness programs for a global Ready Navy community. She cautions that the buck doesnt stop there. According to Lutz, with an average of 100,000 thunderstorms (10,000 of which are severe), 5,000 floods, 1,000 tornadoes, and an average of two potential deadly hurri canes making landfall, winter storms, etc., each and every member of the Navy com munity has a part to play in storm readi ness. The Navys emergency preparedness pro gram, Ready Navy, provides information and tools to guide individuals to prepare themselves and their families before, dur ing, and after a disaster. Take time during Septembers National Preparedness Month to prepare and famil iarize yourself with the Ready Navy Web site, and ask your emergency manager if your installation is StormReady. The following list of installations have earned StormReady and, where indicated, TsunamiReady designations: TsunamiReady) Reserve Base newed) miReady) For more information on how to prepare for any disaster, visit http://www.ready.navy.mil. National Preparedness Month is time to be StormReady 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 9/11 CPO 365 9/11CEREMONY Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com NAS Jacksonville CPO 365 Phase II came to a close Sept. 13 with several pinning cere monies for new chief petty officers (CPO) at Hangar 117, Naval Hospital Jacksonville, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast and VP-30. Ninety-five new chiefs were pinned by their family mem bers and sponsors at Hangar 117. The event began as VP-5 Command Master Chief (CMDCM)(AW/SW) Terrence Mitchell welcomed the guests and presented the 2013 CPO selectees who proudly stood in formation singing Anchors Aweigh. After the playing of the national anthem, an invoca tion was delivered by NAS Jax Chaplain (Lt.) Andrew Hayler. Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven Capt. Eric Wiese delivered the opening remarks, thanking the families for their support and stressed the importance of the role of a CPO. For us in the Navy, the anchor is a symbol of strength. Anchors are what keep ships from going adrift or running aground. Chiefs are what keep the Navy from drifting away from the ideals of the Navy: honor, courage and commit ment. When I think of chiefs petty officers who mentored me, including my dad, I think about honor, courage and commitment, said Wiese. Wiese told the new CPOs, As long as you live, you can wake up every morning know ing you made a positive dif ference in the lives of the men and women you serve along HS-11 supports flight deck qualifications on USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71)The Helicopter Anti-submarine Squadron (HS) 11 Dragonslayers, based at NAS Jacksonville, arrived on board aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) Sept. 11. The squadron is part of Carrier Air Wing One (CVW-1) and is the first squadron of the air wing to come aboard Theodore Roosevelt to support flight operations. HS-11s capabilities include com bat search and rescue (CSAR), special warfare, anti-submarine warfare, vertical replenishment, anti-ship mis sile defense and passenger and cargo transfer. The Dragonslayers operate two vari ations of the Seahawk helicopter to carry out their various missions the SH-60F (Foxtrot) and HH-60H (Hotel) helicopters. The Foxtrot has a dipping sonar system that is used to find subma rines and the Hotel can carry Hellfire missiles on it for force protection, said Lt. Daniel Foose, a pilot for the Dragonslayers. With their helicopters now aboard the Big Stick, HS-11 will focus on flight deck qualifications needed for CVW 1 to be fully operational. Each mission is different, said ADCS Charwin Carrington, acting command master chief of HS-11. We have to get all of our aircrew and aircraft on the same page as far as having our systems up at all times. Carrington said that it takes every one, from the lowest ranking airman to the commanding officer, for the Dragonslayers to be operational. Im excited to be aboard the [Theodore] Roosevelt, said Carrington. Im looking forward to the challenges ahead. The Dragonslayers are just one squadron of the air wing to bring their aircraft aboard. Other aircraft may include F/A-18 Super Hornets, F/A-18 Hornets, E-2C Hawkeyes and E/A-18G Growlers. The future of MPRF The Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF) is transitioning into a new type/model/series (TMS) for the first time in 50 years. To make this transition a success, the Naval Aviation Enterprise (NAE) and indus try leaders are working to sus tain the legacy P-3C and EP-3E while the P-8A TMS is being introduced to the fleet. The last time the MPRF Community transitioned to a new TMS was in 1962 with the delivery of the first P-3A to Patrol Squadron (VP) 8. As in the past, the key to a success ful transition is constant com munication and cooperation across all levels of the NAE and industry. The following high lights are evidence of the suc cess of these efforts. The fleet transition to the P-8A Poseidon is progressing well and on schedule. At NAS Jacksonville, Fla., the Fleet Replacement Squadron, VP-30, MPRF Weapons School and P-8A Fleet Introduction Team have been busy facilitating the transition of the first three fleet squadrons from P-3C to P-8A. VP-16 War Eagles achieved Safe for Flight (SFF) in January 2013 and is progressing through the Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle (IDRC) in preparation for the first P-8A deployment in December. VP-5 Mad Foxes achieved SFF and began their IDRC in the beginning of August. VP-45 Pelicns just started transition upon returning from their final P-3 deployment in June. Over the last year, Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 1 successfully completed P-8A Initial Operational Test and Evaluation supported by mul tiple detachments, exercises and real-world operations. As expected, the aircraft (based on the Boeing 737) has been extremely reliable. The mission systems have performed well and the aircrews are rapidly becoming more adept at fly ing and employing the aircraft while the maintenance team is developing the skills required to repair and maintain this modern aircraft. The supply chain is expand ing to meet the demands of a new aircraft and the communiNAS Jax pins new chiefs From Orion to Poseidon

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Sept. 19 1915 SECNAV Josephus Daniels organizes the Naval Consulting Board to mobilize the scientific resources of U.S. for national defense. 1957 Bathyscaph Trieste, in a dive sponsored by the Office of Naval Research in the Mediterranean, reaches record depth of two miles. 1992 Joint Task Force Marianas stands down after providing assistance to Guam after Typhoon Omar. Sept. 20 1911 Navigational instruments first requested for naval aircraft. 1951 In Operation Summit, the first combat helicopter landing in history, U.S. Marines were landed in Korea. 1981 USS Mount Hood and Navy helicopters rescue 18 crew mem bers of Philippine Navy frigate, Datu Kalantiaw. Sept. 21 1858 Sloop Niagara departs Charleston, S.C., for Liberia with African slaves rescued from slave ship. 1923 Asiatic Fleet completes mission of aiding earthquake victims in Japan. 1939 President Franklin Roosevelt asks Congress to repeal the arms embargo provision of the Neutrality Act. 1944 Aircraft from 12 carriers commence two-day attack against Japanese ships and airfields on Luzon, Philippine Islands. 1984 Mid East Force begins escort of U.S. flagged vessels in Persian Gulf. Sept. 22 1776 John Paul Jones in Providence sails into Canso Bay, Nova Scotia, and attacks British fishing fleet. 1943 U.S. destroyers and land ing craft land Australian troops at Finschhafen, New Guinea. 1989 After Hurricane Hugo, Sailors and Marines provide assistance to Charleston, S.C., through 10 Oct. Sept. 23 1779 Captain John Paul Jones in Continental Navy frigate Bonhomme Richard captures HMS Serapis. 1931 Lt. Alfred Pride pilots Navys first rotary wing aircraft, XOP-1 auto giro, in landings and take-offs on board USS Langley while underway. 1944 Naval Task Group lands Army troops on Ulithi Atoll, Caroline Islands. 1944 USS West Virginia (BB-48) reaches Pearl Harbor and rejoins the Pacific Fleet, marking the end of the salvage and reconstruction of 18 ships damaged at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. 1947 James Forrestal, former SECNAV, takes office as first Secretary of Defense. 1990 Two Hospital ships (USNS Mercy and USNS Comfort) steam together for first time in Arabian Gulf. Sept. 24 1918 Ensign David Ingalls, USNR, in a Sopwith Camel, shoots down his fifth enemy aircraft, becoming the first U.S. Navy ace while flying with the British Royal Air Force. 1944 5th Fleet carrier aircraft attack Japanese in Visayas, Philippines. 1960 First nuclear powered aircraft carrier, USS Enterprise (CVAN-65), launched at Newport News, Va. Sept. 25 1941 In first successful U.S. Navy escort of convoys during World War II, Navy escort turn over HX-150 to British escorts at the Mid-Ocean Meeting Point. All ships reach port safely. 1957 In project Stratoscope, Office of Naval Research obtains sharp pho tographs of suns corona from first bal loon-borne telescope camera. I hate to say that Im glad Im not the only one, because it means that others have suf fered from anxiety and phobias, too. But reactions to last weeks column about my failed attempt at flying in an airplane have made me feel somewhat normal. (Okay, maybe not normal, but not alone either.) Turns out there are a lot of fearful flyers out there. Theres even people like me, people who think they cant get on a plane at all. Although, honestly, very few people selfreported leaving the airplane just before taxiing down the runway, as I did over Labor Day Weekend. Some readers wanted more information to make themselves feel better or to laugh at me, I dont know. Ill try to answer those questions below. What did security think? The security personnel at Reagan International Airport in Washington, D.C., were definitely startled, and perhaps on high alert, when I ran off the plane, but all of them were incredibly understanding as well. On the tarmac, when Dustin yelled over other planes engines for me to get back on the plane, a baggage handler thought he was screaming at me. The man pulled me aside and asked, Do you feel safe going with this man? My husband? I said. Yes. I just dont feel safe in that airplane! Now the man had a clearer picture. I wasnt a hysterical wife; I was just hysterical in gen eral. I see this at least once a week, he told me. Really, its going to be okay. When you go back to the terminal, there will be people waiting there to help you. For a moment I wondered: Will they be people in white coats? But, as it turned out, the man felt so sorry for us, he followed us back to the terminal himself to help us retrieve our luggage. We were too late. Both suitcases were already on their way back to Bangor. I hope they werent scared. How can you be afraid of flying if your husband is a pilot? I dont have a good answer for this. Remember, my dad was an F-14 pilot, too. Ive been around aviation my whole life. In fact, I love airplanes. I love to watch them land and take off. For one of our first dates, the one where I fell in love with Dustin, he took me to Gravelly Point, just across the water from Reagan International Airport, to watch jets screech seemingly just out of reach and land in front of us. But I never wanted to get in those airplanes. Maybe Ive heard too much about flying. Ive witnessed friends dying in training accidents while Dustin was in flight school. Ive heard all the stories. But then, a phobia is never really rational, is it? So even if everyone I knew was a pilot, it wouldnt have any effect. How mad was Dustin? To quote Dustin, me running off the air plane was the worst thing Ive ever done to him. If thats the worst thing Ive ever done to him, then I think Im doing pretty well, dont you think? Still, he didnt talk to me for at least an hour in the rental car. But Sarah, you would have been safer in the airplane than you were in the car. But the car doesnt fly suspended in mid-air. Have you tried any programs? I like to follow pilot Patrick Smiths columns, and Ive read his book Cockpit Confidential. Seven years ago, when I backed out of a family wedding due to my fear, I even talked to Smith on the phone. By that point, unless it was Smith piloting the plane, I was still afraid. I also frequent Capt. Tom Bunns Fear of Flying Web site and online forum. These sites are helpful for making me feel less weird, less alone, but, again, unless Capt. Bunn is my pilot, its like starting at square one when I get to the airport. Is it turbulence, claustrophobia or a fear of crashing that scares you? All of the above. No, I take that back. Bunn and Smith have convinced me that turbulence can never hurt an airplane. Not really. And to be honest, I dont think Ive ever experienced turbulence. So, actually, my fear is mostly of the fear itself. Trust me, you do not want to sit next to me on an airplane. I cry and hyperventilate. I rock in my seat and startle at every sound. Its miserable. And probably my biggest fear of all is not being able to do anything about it. I just have to sit there and feel the fear until the pilot lands the plane. Actually, no; this is just what I tell myself. Im really afraid of crashing. Is anyone not? Will you ever fly again? With enough medication, I hope so. Financial readiness in ser vice members lives has a direct effect on mission readiness, the director of the Defense Departments office of family policy, children and youth said in a recent interview. Noting that financial insta bility can affect many aspects of service members lives, from relationships to concentration on the job, Barbara Thompson told American Forces Press Service and the Pentagon Channel that DoD provides education and tools people can use to build their financial flexibil ity. Its really important for our service members and their families to live within their means, she said, and to do that, they have to have a budget, be dis ciplined and understand that having a debt load hurts their credit scores [and] their ability to afford [purchases]. Financial difficulties also can affect security clearances, she added. Several resources are avail able to help service members and their families establish and maintain household budgets, in addition to learning how to save money, she said. We want to make sure peo ple know [their finances] are under their control with sup port, Thompson said. Available resources include financial counselors at installation fam ily centers who can help with reducing debt, managing credit card, and avoiding paying high interest rates, she added. Another option is the Military OneSource website, which offers financial advice, and where users can set up 12 sessions with a financial counsel or per financial issue on topics such as establishing a budget and reducing debt. Counselors are available face-to-face or online, Thompson said. Credit unions and banks on installa tions also offer financial educa tion through workshops and can help families work out budgets, she said. Thompson also warned that service members should be aware of fraudulent practices such as predatory lending. People would get into them with very high interest rates, spending [significant amounts] of money just to pay off a predatory loan, she said. So thats where our on-installation banks and credit unions came up with some short-term, low-interest loans. Thompson also recommend ed the SaveAndInvest.org web site as a resource for self-initia tors. It offers tools and calcula tors to get started on establish ing and maintaining a house hold budget, she said. Handling credit wisely and keep spending under control are important aspects of personal financial readiness, Thompson said. If were living within our means, were not running credit limit up on that credit card to purchase things that are may be wants but not needs, she said. Paying off credit card debt every month avoids paying large amounts of interest, she noted. Having at least $500 in sav ings is another important aspect of budgeting, Thompson said, as emergency money that might be needed during a household move, or if a washing machine or car transmission fails. Its not . all about debt reduction, Thompson said. The idea is that you come up with a spending plan of whats important to you, and [put away money] for savings.Q&A about that failed flying attempt Finances affect service members readiness

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First Coast Navy Fire and Emergency Services Fire Chief Mark Brusoe and Lt. Cmdr. Mike Chan of the NAS Jax Air Operations Department were recognized for their service to their country during a Sept. 11 com memoration ceremony at Metro Park in downtown Jacksonville. It is a honor for us to hold this ceremony to remember those who lost their lives on Sept. 11, 2001 and to recognize those who serve us every day the first respond ers police, firefighters and military members, said Dr. Helen Jackson, president/CEO of the Women of Color Cultural Foundation, who coordi nated the event. The ceremony began with the invocation, parading of the col ors and musical selec tions by the Edward Waters College Choir and Jacksonville Fire Rescue Department Pipes and Drums, as well as remarks by several local officials. The keynote speaker was retired Navy Rear Adm. Vic Guillory, direc tor, City of Jacksonville Military Affairs, Veterans & Disabled Services Department. While the events of that horrific day, now 12 years past, will forever be etched in our minds, Id like to share how that Tuesday morning, Sept. 11, 2001 influenced our nation and the values we hold most dearly, said Guillory. We saw first respond ers race into the confu sion and chaos, health professionals work ing tirelessly and an overwhelming sense of patriotism grasp the American people. Young men and women enlisted in the services, citizens hung flags outside their homes, synagogues and churches were filled with people united in prayer for our nation. For a time, issues that seemed to divide our people just didnt seem important. Guillory continued, We are a stronger coun try, we are a more patri otic city and we are more informed citizens to our surroundings but let us never forget the day that changed our nation for ever. Jackson and Guillory then presented Sept. 11th commemoration plaques to Jacksonville Sheriff John Rutherford, Jacksonville Fire and Rescue Director Chief Marty Senterfitt, Brusoe, Chan, Col. Al Dodd of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Master Chief Kenneth Morris of the U.S. Coast Guard and Capt. Brandon Pruitt of the Florida Air National Guard. On behalf of the men and women serv ing at NAS Jacksonville, we thank you for this recognition today as we remember and pay tribute to all those who lost their lives Sept. 11, 2001 and honor the first responders of our city and nation, said Chan. The event concluded with a presentation of 250 care packages to Greater Jacksonville Area USO Director Mike OBrien that will be delivered to troops serving overseas. These care packages will be sent out to those men and women in harms way all over the world. Our mission at the USO is to lift the spirits of our military members who sacrifice so much for all of us so thank you for supporting us so we can support them, said OBrien. First responders recognized at 9/11 commemoration JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013 3

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This policy is designed to provide overarching guidance to NAS Jax Sailors and civilian personnel on how to conduct themselves to make the com mand and the individual as successful as possible. This policy is designed to replace many of the stovepipe policies that are nor mally published by a commanding officer. The chief of naval operations (CNO) has put out a policy on many of the issues that are of concern to him; drug use, equal opportunity, safety and environmental stewardship to name a few. Those policies are impor tant and I expect all personnel to be familiar with the various CNO policies that are published. Through a holistic approach this policy will address current issues of today as well as set personnel up for success to handle the issues of tomorrow. If you heed this one policy you cant go wrong. What is professional excel lence? Franklin Covey describes a Great Organization as one that possesses sustained supe rior performance, has engaged personnel, and makes a dis tinctive contribution. In order to have a great command we need to have effective Sailors and civilian work force. These are individuals who are focused and disciplined, trustworthy, possess good judgment, proac tive in attitude and actions, work well with others, and are good communicators. NAS Jax has set up an envi ronment that promotes open communication without fear of reprisal, encourages and values input, and makes avail able the resources and tools for each individual (and hence command) to succeed in their endeavors. Departmental lead ership will help facilitate that success at all levels by providing training, standardization and operational risk management tools. Finally, when personnel provide constant and timely feedback, we will continue to improve ourselves and the Navy. There is another aspect to professional excellence and being an effective Sailor or civilian employee that most corpora tions wont talk about. Effective NAS Jax personnel need to be good citizens in the community as well. Our core values of honor, courage and commitment are the cornerstones that allow us to be trusted stewards of all assets given to us by the American public. There is no honor or trust when we stray from social norms and civil law. It can be just as damaging to our command goals as having an aviation mishap. DUIs, discrimination, sexual assault and family abuse are examples of these issues that not only affect the individuals life, but directly have an impact on the performance of this command as well. Therefore, apply the characteristics of an effective person, on and off duty. If you are the senior per son present in a given situation be responsible. I will hold you accountable. Extend it to your families and you will be successful in every aspect of your life. What does this boil down to? 1. Be an effective Sailor or civilian employee and a good citizen be proactive and responsible. 2. The golden rule applies Do unto others as you would have others do unto you. 3. Be a good steward: Dont look at the world as yours to take, but to take care of. Professional excellence and service to the fleet are the hall marks of the NAS Jax team. Im counting on you to carry on that tradition.NAS Jax COs professional excellence policy 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013

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Meteorologist Angela Enyedi of National Weather Service (NWS) Jacksonville presented a two-hour NWS Storm Spotter class Sept. 12 to a group of interested military and civilian per sonnel. It was part of NAS Jacksonvilles quest to become recognized as a StormReady community. To become StormReady, NAS Jacksonville has multiple ways to receive weather service warning infor mation as well as disseminate that information to residents and ten ant commands. Today, were provid ing local weather hazard training in the form of spotter talk which covers everything from severe thunderstorms and flash flooding to high winds and funnel clouds, explained Enyedi. Attendees learned the differences between a severe thunderstorm watch or warning and a tornado watch or warning. We teach storm spotters to look at radar imagery and scan the sky to determine any imminent severe weather threat and then take appropriate safety actions. Our goal is to empower people to recognize weather threats and communicate with our National Weather Service, said Enyedi. She added that cloud-to-ground lightning kills an average of 30 50 people each year, so lightning safety is another important weather issue. Ray Edmond, NAS Jax disaster pre paredness coordinator, worked with Enyedi to organize the class. No community is storm proof, but StormReady can help communities save lives by teaching volunteers to recog nize potentially destructive weather in their vicinity and report their information to the nearest NWS office. StormReady provides communities both inside and outside our gates to master the communication and safety skills needed to save lives and prop erty before and during a severe weather event. StormReady helps commu nity leaders and emergency managers strengthen our local safety programs, said Edmond He added, StormReady certification also helps create an infrastructure and communications system that can save lives and protect property. As a result, StormReady communities are usually better prepared when severe weather strikes. NWS is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which falls under the Department of Commerce. All NWS forecast and warning information including Doppler radar is free and available via the Internet. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus present ed the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal (fourth award) to Lt. Cmdr. Shawn Rockwell, the newly assigned NAVFAC Southeast South Central Integrated Product Team (IPT) leader, in a brief ceremony Sept. 9. Rockwell was recognized for meri torious service while serving as Public Works Officer for NAVFAC Europe Africa Southwest Asia at Public Works Department Souda Bay from June 2011 through July 2013. Rockwell displayed exceptional leadership, initiative and resourcefulness in managing a full range of public works and engineering functions, according to the award citation. He managed an annual business volume of $35 million despite sig nificant staffing and resource short falls, said Kiwus during the award presentation. He provided direct operational support to the warfighter with a superb commitment to mission accomplishment in a highly fluid and constantly shifting national security environment. During Operation Unified Protector (the NATO operation enforcing United Nations Security Council resolutions 1970 and 1973 concerning the Libyan civil war, and other regional contin gency operations following the Sept. 11, 2012 attacks on the U.S. Embassy in Benghazi, Libya) Rockwell successfully planned, designed and executed construction of $110 million in mili tary construction and special projects. It was one of the most reward ing assignments Ive had in the Civil Engineering Corps, said Rockwell. Supporting contingency operations, while at the same time, executing normal day-to-day business operations was very rewarding. The award truly defines our accomplishments as a team at Souda Bay. Plus, it was a beautiful place to work the scenery, the culture and the people were fabulous. The awards final citation read, Rockwells superlative performance, steadfast perseverance and outstand ing devotion to duty reflect credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval service. Storm spotter class supports community safety NAVFAC Southeast commendation medal presented JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013 For the 134 chief selectees from NAS Jax and tenant com mands, Sept. 12 was a day of challenges and camaraderie and ultimately success as they completed their final day of CPO 365 Phase II before being frocked the next day. The morning began with an 8-mile run around the station, stopping at various buildings to sing traditional Navy songs and let co-workers know they are were on the final countdown to becoming khaki leaders. The selectees then headed to the Mulberry Cove Marina for a morning of challenging exercises to test their strength, endurance and teamwork skills. This final phase has been going really well. We have not had any injuries and I think every challenge weve given the CPO selectees has had cause and effect. The selectees are ready for their final night, said NAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM)(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd. Before tackling the sevenstation course, the selectees were given a pep talk and safety brief. Its only going to get hard er from here. You have Sailors to take care of. Everyone had issues because we are all human beings but we take care of one another because the Navy is one big family. As a chiefs mess, you are the head of the family thats your job so you need to have the tools to be able to do this, AWOCS(NAC/ AW) Patrick Biddinger of VP-16 told the selectees. The training course, designed for teamwork and fun featured a rope exercise where they had to untangle them selves as a group, 10-ton truck pull, marching skills, an anchor chain pull, Navy history quiz station, coffee can tasking sta tion and probably the most challenging but exciting station the D-Day rescue. Team after team of selectees jumped out of their Navy ves sel into a simulated watery minefield while attempting to rescue a fallen shipmate. As they were cheered on by genuine chiefs, they were bombed with water balloons and sprayed with a fire hose. I think this training was really awesome and I really enjoyed it. I actually got chills waiting for the door to drop on the ship before we headed out because I was so excited to be doing this. Its been a great training lesson for us, said AWVC(Sel) James Everett of VP-30. It has been extremely chal lenging but its really taught us the concept of teamwork, added PSC(Sel) Cynthia Rivera of Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonville. The selectees also spent much of the night at the base antenna farm where they con tinued to hone their skills on the obstacle course as the gen uine chiefs guided and cheered them on and guide them through the process. CPO 365 Phase II Final day of trainingA day of challenges and camaraderie

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Joint Interagency Task Force, National Capital Region Deputy Commander Cmdr. Jason Lamb and VP-30 Executive Officer Cmdr. David Gardella awarded naval flight officer (NFO) wings to 13 officers Sept. 6. Those earning their NFO wings were: Ensign Erik Arstein, Ensign Michelle Austin, Ensign Mark Baden, Lt. j.g. John Bellezza, Ensign Mathew Bunting, Ensign Samuel Freeman, CWO2 Erik Gonzalez, Ensign Zachary Gorevin, Ensign Geoffrey Muller, Ensign Ethan Panal, Ensign Sophie Rassel, Lt. j.g. Bradley Stinehart and Ensign Jarrod Wilson. The recipients completed the Undergraduate Maritime Flight Officer (UMFO) syllabus at VP-30, earning their coveted wings of gold. These newly winged avia tors will now enroll in the CAT I Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) syllabus at VP-30. Upon completion of the CAT I syllabus, they will report to operational maritime patrol and reconnaissance squadrons to begin their initial sea tours in either Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii; NAS Whidbey Island, Wash.; or NAS Jacksonville. The NFO training pipeline begins with Aviation Preflight Introduction (API) instruction in Pensacola, where all avia tion officers undergo a class room syllabus and are taught the basics of naval aviation which includes aerodynamics, meteorology and principles of navigation. After completing API, all student NFOs report for primary training at VT-10, co-located at NAS Pensacola. While assigned to VT-10 they transition from a classroom learning environment to initial airborne flight training in the T-6A Texan II. Upon completion of pri mary flight training at NAS Pensacola, officers who are selected for the P-3, EP-3 or P-8 training pipeline report to VP-30 for specific aircraft training. As VP-5 continues its busy schedule operating and maintaining the P-8A Poseidon, the squadron proudly salutes another outstanding Mad Fox PR2(AW) Jose Castillo. Castillo, who was born in Miami, is married with two children. He joined the Navy in February 2009 and was first assigned to VAW-120 in Norfolk, Va. where he worked with E-2C Hawkeye and C-2 Greyhound aircrew. He joined VP-5 in October 2011 and deployed to Kadena, Japan in 2012 with his fellow Mad Foxes. As an aircrew survival equipment man, Castillo is in charge of maintain ing and testing the survival gear that all aircrew are required to wear while in flight. He is also charged with the upkeep of the anti-exposure suits, life rafts, and the survival equipment inside the life rafts. Along with the requirements high lighted above that come with being a rigger, Castillos specialty within the squadron is designing custom graph ics that are placed on the helmets of aircrew. Being able to interact with the aircrew and use their input to create an original graphic that they can wear on their helmets is definitely a rewarding part of job, explained Castillo. It allows me to show to off my artistic abilities, and its gives the aircrew a sense of pride in showing off their custom Mad Fox helmet. Castillos short-term goals while in the Navy are to make first class petty officer and re-enlisting for six more years. His long-term goals are to make chief petty officer. When he is not on duty, Castillo spends time with his family. He also enjoys going to the firing range to sharpen his marksmanship skills. As VP-8 concludes a challenging InterDeployment Readiness Cycle, the squadron salutes IS3 Class Aaron Moorefield as VP-8 Fighting Tiger in the spotlight. Moorefield returned Sept. 2 from a threemonth Individual Augmentee deployment to 5th Fleet, supporting Commander, Task Group (CTG) 57.2 and VP-1. Knowing the Tigers are in final preparation for a deployment to the same site, Moorefield jumped at the oppor tunity to fill a needed intelligence specialist position, and gained valuable experience. While deployed, Moorefield collect ed, processed and analyzed informa tion from VP-1 missions. He then disseminated the information to Fleet and Combat Commander (CC) staff, allowing Fleet and CCs to make deci sions based on near realtime, fused, and action able intelligence products. Moorefield hails from Summerville, S.C. Motivated by continuing a family legacy of patriotic service, he enlisted in the Navy on June 29, 2011. Following graduation from boot camp and Intelligence Specialist A school, he joined the Fighting Tigers in March 2012. VP-30 wings Navys newest naval flight officers VP-8 Fighting Tiger in the spotlightVP-5 Mad Fox of the week 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013

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side. You must be faithful to the promise youre about to make as a chief petty officer. My last piece of advice is sim ple, be the kind of leader your Sailors or Marines deserve. We can ask no more of you and your Sailors deserve nothing less. He then introduced guest speak er, NAS Jax CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd who commended the CPO selectees on their accomplishments over the past six weeks of CPO 365 Phase II training. These chief selectees have been test ed and it is an honor to be here to cel ebrate their accomplishments. Over the past six weeks, each selectee ran over 60 miles, did 1,172 push-ups, 660 sit-ups and they had a total weight loss of 603 pounds, declared Shepherd. This is a major milestone in your life, not just your careers, Shepherd told the selectees. For years to come, gen eration after generation will always talk about the Navy chiefs in their families so embrace this time of your lives. He went on to talk about several unknown heroes in history such as William Dawes and Samuel Prescott who rode with Paul Revere in 1775 to warn the patriots that the British were coming during the Revolutionary War and about a janitor at the Air Force Academy named William Bill Crawford, who was also a Medal of Honor recipient for heroism during WWII. Most people have never heard of these individuals because these are just a couple of the unspoken heroes of the past. Bill Crawford quietly went about his day cleaning up and no one ever really paid him any attention until a student discovered that he was a war hero and POW. He later taught cadets about leadership as he talked about his past, said Shepherd. One of his students wrote 10 unfor gettable leadership lessons. Be cautious of labels; everyone deserves respect; courtesy makes a difference; take time to know your people; anyone can be a hero; leaders should be humble; life wont always hand you what you think you deserve; dont pursue glory; pursue excellence; no job is beneath a lead er and life is a leadership laboratory, he continued. Remember, there are always heroes amongst us. I also want to tell our new chief selectees this: you are the backbone of the Navy. The Navy is on a fulcrum if you move that fulcrum to the right, either officer or enlisted, you will focus on the community more. Your jobs as chiefs is to bring it back to center and keep things balanced and make sure everyone stays focused on the mission, said Shepherd. This is a dream come true. Its been a long day coming and we all worked hard for it. Its just amazing to be here. We learned throughout the process that we are a team and we all need to come together to make things work. I think that was the biggest thing that weve learned over the past six weeks. These truly are my brothers and sis ters and I take that to heart with me. This is the best day ever! said ITC Latoya Brown of Navy Computers and Telecommunications Station Jax. This is one of the greatest days of my life. It was a long time coming and now I look forward to the opportunity to lead Sailors and do what Ive been chosen to do, added RPC Michael Hawthorne of Commander, Navy Region Southeast. I thought CPO 365 Phase II was challenging but in the end, everything was done for a purpose and were all better off for it. To close out the ceremony, the new chiefs were given a round of applause and then all current and former CPOs were asked to stand for the reading of the CPO Creed. A reception was held at Deweys following the event. CPO PINNING Photos by Kaylee LaRocque JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013 9

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Rear Adm. Rick Williamson, com mander, Navy Region Southeast, signed a suicide prevention awareness proclamation at NAS Jacksonville Sept. 9. The proclamation recogniz es September as National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month and is intended to raise suicide awareness prevention throughout the Southeast Region. This proclamation brings to light an issue of paramount importance in our military today, Williamson said. Each year, we lose shipmates, co-workers and family members to suicide and these losses can be prevented. It is our col lective responsibility to remain alert to the warning signs and to be prepared to take action with those in our lives who might be at risk. An actively engaged force, including everyone in the Navy family, is key to the successful preven tion of suicide. The proclamations theme highlights the importance of taking action as individuals and to recognize the impact of stressors in our day-to-day lives, as well how to develop protective factors against stress and suicide. According to Dianne Parker, Navy Region Southeast assistant suicide prevention outreach coordinator, there is no better way to have a successful pro gram than ensuring suicide prevention information and indicators are avail able to all personnel. Suicide continues to be a major issue for all hands, she said. Our goal is to reduce the number of these tragedies through education and awareness campaigns, and we hope this proclamation will go a long way in those efforts. One of the latest tools the Navy is using toward suicide prevention efforts is the NavyTHRIVE campaign, which encourages Sailors, commands, fami lies and civilians to empower them selves by taking personal responsibility for their health, wellness and growth. The program is a new approach to resilience and it really emphasizes selfempowerment and growth, Parker said. The goal is not for Sailors to merely overcome adversity, but to come back from it stronger than they were before. In addition to those efforts, the region implemented an aggressive suicide prevention coordinator (SPC) training program in September 2011 that utilizes Defense Connect Online. So far, it has resulted in more than 300 newly-qualified coordinators throughout the region and more than 1,700 worldwide. Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) educational services and work and family life specialists assist com mand SPCs with training in the areas of stress management, conflict manage ment, parent education, anger management and suicide prevention. So far this fiscal year, command SPCs and FFSC personnel have conducted more than 1,200 training sessions attended by more than 43,000 people. The program has been instrumen tal in raising awareness and getting the message out to leaders throughout the DoD. Leaders need to make Sailors understand that there is no shame in reaching out for help, Parker said. Each year, hundreds of DoD person nel commit suicide and many of these cases could be prevented if friends and co-workers only knew what to look for and took action, she added. The bottom line is if you suspect that someone may be thinking about sui cide, you need to act, care and treat, she said. The key is to take action. The worst thing that you can possibly do is nothing. For more information about NavyTHRIVE, visit http://www.public. navy.mil/bupers-npc/support/21st_ Century_Sailor/suicide_prevention/ spmonth/Pages/default.aspx Rear Adm. Rick Williamson, Commander, Navy Region Southeast, signed a proclamation in support of the Navy Family Ombudsman Program (NFOP) at NAS Jacksonville Sept. 9. The proclamation signing commemorated the 43rd anniversary of the NFOP and declared Sept. 14 as Ombudsman Appreciation Day throughout the region. For more than four decades, the Navy ombudsman program has been an invaluable resource in our efforts to support our warfighters and their families, Williamson said. I would like to take this opportunity to say thank you to all of our ombudsmen throughout the region for their continued support. Our Sailors and their families would face a much more difficult task without you. The NFOP was launched Sept. 14, 1970, by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Elmo Zumwalt to assist com mands in maintaining the morale, health and welfare of Navy families. Ombudsmen act as liaisons between commanding officers and the families of service members. They typically provide a variety of resources, such as providing family members with official information and emergency assistance. Commander, Navy Installations Command reports that ombudsmen volunteer efforts save the Navy more than $2 million annu ally. According to Dianne Parker, Navy Region Southeast deployment support program manager and ombudsman program coordinator, the proclamation is significant because it acknowledg es the efforts of ombudsmen not only throughout the region, but throughout the Navy. Its important to recognize the anniversary of the ombudsman program because our ombudsmen are a part of the command support team, they make sure families know what resources are available to them, and help them adjust to the military way of life, she said. If it werent for our Navy ombudsmen, our Sailors would carry a much heavier burden in the face of their military duties. For more information about the Navy Ombudsman Program, includ ing how to contact your command ombudsman, visit http://www. cnic.navy.mil/CNIC_HQ_Site/ WhatWeDo/FleetandFamilyReadiness/ FamilyReadiness/ FleetAndFamilySupportProgram/ OmbudsmanProgram/index.htm Proclamation signing emphasizes National Suicide Prevention Awareness MonthProclamation recognizes importance, anniversary of Navy ombudsmen program JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013 11

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Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2013: Training Nov. 12-15 (5:30-10 p.m.) Program (TAP) Separation Workshop (7:30 a.m.4:15 p.m.) Oct. 7-11, Oct. 21-25, Nov. 4-8, Dec. 2-6. Program (TAP) Retirement Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) Sept. 23-27, Oct. 28-Nov. 1, Nov. 18-22, Dec. 16-20. Workshop (9 a.m.-noon) Oct. 17, Nov. 27, Dec. 11. (Noon-3 p.m.) July 2. Interview Techniques Workshop (8-9:30 a.m.) Nov. 25. Letters Workshop (9:40 a.m.-noon) Nov. 25. Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Nov. 13-14. Specialist Training (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Sept. 30-Oct. 4, Dec. 9-13. Credit Management Workshop (8-11 a.m.) Oct. 15. Deals in Car Buying (9-10:30 a.m.) Nov. 26. (1:30-3 p.m.) Oct. 10, Dec. 12. Workshop (1:30-4 p.m.) Nov. 14. 101 Workshop Sept. 14 (1-2:30 p.m.) Nov. 21 Rain or shine!*Deweys will be open for dinner & beveragesOct. 18 Balloon Artist Nov. 15 Karaoke with Tom Turner Dec. 20 Childrens Holiday Bingo Childrens Holiday Bingo will start at 1830 and has a cost of $10 per person and includes soft drinks, hot dog, dauber, bingo card and gift bag for each child. For more information call (904) 542-3900 or www.facebook.com/nasjaxmwr 3rd Friday of the Month FFSC offers life skills workshops JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013 13

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(5-6:30 p.m.) 101 Workshop (9-10:30 a.m.) Oct. 8, Nov. 5, Dec. 10. Extended Stress Management Workshop (8 a.m.-noon) Oct. 15 & 29. Workshop (8 a.m.-noon) Sept. 24, Oct. 22, Nov. 26, Dec. 17. Personal Anger Control Group Oct. 8 Nov. 12 (2-4 p.m.) Individual Communication (11 a.m.1 p.m.) Nov. 19. Parenting with Love & Logic (1-3 p.m.) Sept. 24; Nov. 5, 12, 19, 26. Active Parenting of Teens (1-4 p.m.) Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23. Power 2 Change, Womens Support Group (9:30-11 a.m.) Every Wednesday Expectant Families (9 a.m.-3 p.m.) Dec. 3. Tiny Tots Play Group (10 a.m.-noon) Oct. 1, 15, 29; Nov. 12, 16; Dec. 10, 17. Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) Orientation (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) Nov. 7. EFMP Command POC Training (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) Oct. 3, Dec. 5.To register for any of the above workshops call 5425745. First West Nile case reported in Duval CountyAs of Sept. 3, the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) con firmed 497 cases of West Nile Virus resulting in 20 deaths across 45 states and the District of Columbia. The Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) is stressing the importance of maintaining vigilance against the spread of West Nile virus (WNV) as September is historically considered the peak month for reported cases of WNV. of WNV.intaining vigilance against the spread of West Nil The keys to reducing the risk of human disease carried by mosqui toes, including WNV, are preparation, prevention and communication, said Capt. Eric Hoffman, NECE officer-incharge. Accurate information regarding disease threat and personal responsibility leads to an informed customer resulting in reduced risk. Our entomologists and preventa tive medicine technicians are consis tently monitoring the distribution of human disease transmitted by blood feeding insects and other arthropods, said HM1 Paulo Torres of NECE. We provide recommendations for preven tion and control to Navy and Marine Corps facilities in the affected areas and if necessary, offer on-site assistance. According to the CDC, the average individual will not develop symptoms of any kind when infected with WNV. However, one in five infected individu als will develop fever, headache, body aches, joint pains, vomiting, diarrhea, or rash and approximately 1 percent of infected people will further develop serious neurological illness resulting in swelling of the brain and surrounding tissue that could result in paralysis or death. One of the best ways to prevent WNV infection is to avoid contact with mos quitoes as much as possible, said Lt. Marcus McDonough, NECE department head. Applying 25-30 percent DEET or picaradin on exposed skin and treat ing clothing with permethrin are two methods to prevent mosquito bites. Moreover, be sure to wear long sleeved light colored shirts and pants when ever outdoors or in places where mos quitoes may be present. Stay indoors at peak mosquito activity times such as dawn and dusk and be sure to check that screens on windows and doors are in good repair. More information can be found at the NECE home page at: http://www.med. navy.mil/sites/nmcphc/nece For questions concerning mosqui toes, ticks or other pests, please con tact the Navy Entomology Center of Excellence by emailing: FleetsupportNECE@med.navy.mil. 2013 CommandSports Challenge 10 Events1500 Meter Relay Dodge Ball 3-on-3 Basketball Swim Relay Ultimate Frisbee Fitness Challenge 3-on-3 Sand Volleyball Bag Toss Tug-O-WarCO/XO/CMC Canoe Race October 3 & 4 8 a.m. 2 p.m. Team Sign-up1. At the Fitness, Sports and Aquatics Center 2. Call (904) 542-2930 3. E-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil Sign-up by Sept. 30 Open to Active Duty Selective Reservists DOD Civilians DOD Contractors*Patrons must work in a command at NAS JAX FFSC 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013

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Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. Part of Clay Countys heritage is the countys strong ties to the military dating back to the early 1800s. Today, there are over 24,000 veterans who call Clay County home. These veterans represent service to our nation from World War II through the current con flicts as well as decades of service during peacetime. The Clay County Veterans Service Office is staffed with a full time veterans service officer and a part time veterans program assistant; both available and eager to assist veterans and/or family members with filing claims and/or other related needs. The office is now located on the second floor of the Clay County Administration Building at 477 Houston Street, Green Cove Springs, Fla. The office is open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. The for mer Veterans Service Office at 1565 CR 315 has been closed. To make an appointment, call (904) 269-6326.Clay County Veterans Services Office has relocated 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Mon. & Thurs. at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Friday at 7 p.m. Sept. 27 Pam Affronti Oct. 4 Karaoke with Randy Oct. 11 Holliday & Ken Oct. 18 Karaoke with Randy Oct. 25 Second Tyme Around Band Oct. 18 Balloon Artist Nov. 15 Karaoke with Tom Turner DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Free bowling-active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 510 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 12 6 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included Fall and winter leagues begin in Sept.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Movie Under the Stars Outdoor Pool Sept. 20 at 7:30 p.m. Despicable Me 2 Outdoor pool closed for recreational swimming. Lap swim only MonFri 6 8 a.m.; 11 a.m. 1 p.m.; 4:30 7 p.m. Sat and Sun 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Learn to Swim Indoor Pool Session 1 Oct. 14 24 Session 2 Oct 28 Nov 7 $40 military, $45 DoD Command Sports Challenge Oct. 3 & 4 10 events. Sign-up at the base gym or e-mail bill. bonser@navy.milI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_mwritt@navy. mil Jacksonville Zoo Spooktacular $9. Universal Halloween Horror Nights: Tickets coming soon! Stop by ITT to find out more about dates & pricing. Halloween Horror Nights visits ITT on Oct. 2, 10 a.m. 2 p.m. Stop by to win great prizes! TobyMac Tickets: Nov. 17, 7 pm at Veterans Memorial Arena, $26. Waves of Honor Special: Seaworld Orlando Adult $46.50, Child $42.25. Busch Gardens Tampa Adult $45, Child $40.50. ITT Trip to the Yahala Country Bakery: Sept. 28, 8 a.m. 3 p.m., $25. Mount Dora Craft Fair: Oct. 26, 8 a.m. 3 p.m., $20. Orlando Magic vs. New Orleans Pelicans Basketball: Oct. 9, Veterans Memorial Arena, section 102 at 7 p.m., $55. Monster Jam: Club seating (includes pit pass) $42, regular seating (includes pit pass) $22. LegoLand: Free tickets for Active Duty member at the park. Tickets for family members can be purchased at ITT: 1-day $45.50, 1-day with waterpark $52.50, 2-day $51.25, 2-day with waterpark $54.25. Jacksonville Jaguars: Section 147 Bud Zone, $70. Jags shuttle bus $12. Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2013 2014 Season: Tickets now available! MOSH: $7 $12. The Artist Series Broadway in Jax 2013 2014 Season: Tickets available now! Mamma Mia!: Oct. 19, 2013, 8 pm, $60.50. Celtic Thunder: Nov. 10, 2013, 7 pm, $80. Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus: Jan. 17 & 18, 2014, $51. War Horse: Feb. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $68.50. Memphis: Mar. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $65. Million Dollar Quartet: Apr. 26, 2014, 8 pm, $65. The D* Word: Oct. 4 Oct. 25, 2014, $43.75 $46.The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. HabiJax Volunteer Opportunity Sept. 21 at 7 a.m. Barracks Bash Sept. 26, 4 p.m. 8 p.m. Located in the field next to the barracks by the Gym. Jaguars vs. Colts Shuttle Sept. 29 at 11 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Sept. 24 for active duty Sept. 26 for retirees, DoD personnel and guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27 3rd Annual Riverfest Sept. 28, 10:30 a.m. 3 p.m. Featuring music, food, free stand-up paddle board lessons, kayak lessons and more!Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Before and After School Registration going on now! Fees based on household income. Movie Under the Stars Outdoor Pool Sept. 20 at 7:30 p.m. Featuring Despicable Me 2Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Oct. 7 Nov. 20 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013 17

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18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013 The Naval Supply Systems Commands (NAVSUP) Postal Policy Division has released mail-by dates for pre-Dec. 25 delivery of holiday cards, letters, and packages. For mail addressed to: APO/FPO/DPO AE zips 090-098 (except 093); AA zips 340; AP zips 962966 Express Mail: Dec. 17 First-Class Mail (letters/cards and priority mail): Dec. 10 Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 Parcel Post: Nov. 12 APO/FPO/DPO AE ZIP 093 Express mail Military Service: N/A First-Class Mail (letters/cards and priority mail): Dec. 3 Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 Parcel Post: Nov. 12 For mail addressed from all shore FPOs (except 093) Express Mail Military Service: Dec. 17 First-Class Mail (letters/cards and priority mail): Dec. 10 Parcel Airlift Mail: Dec. 3 Space Available Mail: Nov. 26 All classes of mail addressed to FPO/ APO addresses must use the nine-digit ZIP code to ensure delivery. Mail not addressed correctly will be returned to the sender as undeliverable. Express Mail Military Service (EMMS) is available from selected military post offices. If mailing to an APO/ FPO address, check with your local post office to see if this service is available. Parcel Airlift Mail (PAL) is a service that provides air transportation for parcels on a space-available basis. It is available for Parcel Post items not exceeding 30 pounds in weight or 60 inches in length and girth combined. The applicable PAL fee must be paid in addition to the regular surface rate of postage for each addressed piece sent by PAL service. Space Available Mail (SAM) refers to parcels mailed to APO/FPO addresses at parcel post rates that are first trans ported domestically by surface and then to overseas destinations by air on a space available basis. The maximum weight and size limits are 15 pounds and 60 inches in length and girth combined. From overseas locations, items mailed at Parcel Post rates are sent to CONUS by air on a space available basis. The maximum weight and size limit are 70 pounds and 130 inches in length and girth combined. It is recommended that custom ers check with their local civilian or military post office for information on size restrictions and possible need for customs declaration forms. Customers are advised that certain mail restric tions apply and some items cannot be mailed. Examples are: switchblade knives, pornography, controlled sub stances, and explosive or incendiary devices. If in doubt as to what can or cannot be sent, contact your local civilian or military post office. Customers are cautioned that pack ages must not be mailed in boxes that have markings related to any type of hazardous material. Parcels found by the U.S. Postal Service with such markings or labels on the outside of the box will not be processed. NAVSUP announces 2013 holiday mailing deadlines NEX rewards students with its A-OK Student Reward Program The Navy Exchange wants to help its customers finance their chil drens college education through its A-OK Student Reward Program. All qualified students will participate in a quarterly drawing for mon etary awards of $2,500, $1,500, $1,000 or $500 for a total of $5,500 per quarter. The next drawing will be held at the end of August 2013. Any eligible fulltime student that has a B-grade point aver age equivalent or better, as determined by their school system, may enter the drawing. Eligible students include dependent chil dren of active duty mili tary members, reserv ists and military retirees enrolled in first through 12th grade. Dependent children without an individual Dependent Identification Card must be accompanied by their sponsor to submit their entry. Each student may enter only once each grading period and must re-enter with each qualifying report card. To enter the drawing, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have a NEX associate verify the minimum grade average. Then fill out an entry card and obtain an A-OK ID, which entitles the student to discount coupons for NEX prod ucts and services. Since the program began in 1997, NEXCOM has awarded over $611,000 in Series EE U.S. savings bonds and monetary awards with the help of its generous vendor partners. Jaguars tickets available at USO The Greater Jax Area USO has tick ets available at the NAS Jax and NS Mayport USO for $15 each, cash trans actions only. Guidelines: All active duty including Florida National Guard and Reservists on cur rent active duty orders and dependents are eligible to purchase/use these tick ets. dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equals four. If you have less than four you may only purchase total for fam ily. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but dependent children are not authorized to represent the service member/spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO director. chase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest. No exceptions. request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the sea son.Requests, with justification, must be sent to Mike OBrien at mobrien@ usojax.com tickets or reselling tickets will be pro hibited from buying any more tickets for the entire season. tickets are first come, first served. For more information, call 778-2821. Tickets are available the following days and times: Dateof Game Opponent Time Sale Begins Sept. 29 Indianapolis Colts 1 p.m. Now Oct. 20 San Diego Chargers 1 p.m. Oct. 7 Nov. 17 Arizona Cardinals 1 p.m. Nov. 4 Dec. 5 Houston Texans 8:25 p.m. Nov. 25 Dec. 15 Buffalo Bills 1 p.m. Dec. 2 Dec. 22 Tennessee Titans 1 p.m. Dec. 9

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For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or email bill.bonser@navy.mil JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013 19

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ty is constantly learning to ensure that the P-8A is poised for success when it deploys this winter. While there have been many challenges as the P-8A executes test and fleet introduction simultaneously, the P-8A program continues to be a model of effective planning and execution. The airframe and mission sys tems are a significant techno logical leap forward and provide commanders with a reliable platform hosting advanced technol ogy sensors. Legacy Platforms As the P-3C and EP-3E continue toward the end of their life cycle, many challenges need to be over come, including parts obsoles cence, increased levels of sup port for legacy components, and a shortage of flight line assets. In 2007, MPRF red stripe events, that grounded aircraft due to fatigue tracking metrics beyond acceptable limits, left the com munity with 49 mission aircraft to support the high operational demand across the globe and at home. More than 50 percent of the P-3 fleet was out of reporting (OOR) due to the red stripe. Massive sustainment efforts have been made and we are beginning to see a real return on our investment as air craft are returned to service. In FY14, we plan on reducing the amount of our P-3C inven tory OOR for depot-level sustain ment events and technological modifications by more than 10 percent, and we plan to reach P-3s required number of Primary Aircraft Assigned by the end of FY15. We expect to have sufficient ready-for-tasking assets to meet deployment and training requirements until platform sundown, but P-8A delivery must proceed as planned to ensure there is no gap in coverage for Global Force Management. Our cost savings efforts have been effective and multiple cost reduction initiatives have allowed the aging force to oper ate efficiently and effectively. Recently, initiatives to improve Engine Driven Compressor maintenance and place our APS-137 Receiver Exciter Processor and Transmitter under a Performance Based Logistics contract with Raytheon have helped reduce cost by 11 percent. With more than 50 years of faithful and dedicated service complete, the mighty P-3C Orion is prepared to finish its service to the Navy at full speed. Manpower One of the most complicated pieces of the MPRF transition is manpower. When the transition is completed, the MPRF community will consist of the P-8A Poseidon teamed with the MQ-4C Triton unmanned aircraft system. The P-8A/MQ-4C combination will be respon sible for all the missions cur rently covered by VP, Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadrons (VQ), and Patrol Squadron Special Projects Unit (VPU) today. The MPRF transition is a unique manpower story and a challenge the P-3C is being replaced by two new TMSs but all manpower is being sourced from within the legacy commu nity. The restructuring has already begun with the consolidation of the VQ and VPU last year, and the continued transition of P-8A squadrons in Jacksonville. Unmanned Patrol Squadron 19, the first MQ-4C squadron, is currently scheduled to begin its standup with an officer-in-charge in early FY14. Conclusion The MPRF Community has almost fully recovered from the 2007 red stripe and is quickly transitioning to the new P-8A Poseidon. The successful turnaround since 2007 can be directly attributed to the NAE and industry leaders working towards a com mon goal of recovery and even tual transition to the next generation of maritime patrol aircraft, both manned and unmanned. MPRF To be recognized as StormReady or TsunamiReady, communities must meet certain guidelines established by the National Weather Service in partnership with federal, state and local emergency management officials. While the emergency management teams at every Navy installation have emergen cy plans and protocol in place, those that have earned the official StormReady and TsunamiReady designation have gone one step further in their efforts to save lives and property in the face of natural disasters. The safety and emergency preparedness of Navy personnel and families is a high priority for us, says Margie Lutz, command er, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) Emergency Management Program Manager. In partnering with the National Weather Service (NWS) and receiving the StormReady and TsunamiReady designa tion, we continue to strengthen our hazardous weather plans, monitoring and notification systems, as well as training and pub lic awareness programs for a global Ready Navy community. She cautions that the buck doesnt stop there. According to Lutz, with an average of 100,000 thunderstorms (10,000 of which are severe), 5,000 floods, 1,000 tornadoes, and an average of two potential deadly hurri canes making landfall, winter storms, etc., each and every member of the Navy com munity has a part to play in storm readi ness. The Navys emergency preparedness program, Ready Navy, provides information and tools to guide individuals to prepare themselves and their families before, dur ing, and after a disaster. Take time during Septembers National Preparedness Month to prepare and familiarize yourself with the Ready Navy Web site, and ask your emergency manager if your installation is StormReady. The following list of installations have earned StormReady and, where indicated, TsunamiReady designations: TsunamiReady) Reserve Base newed) miReady) For more information on how to prepare for any disaster, visit http://www.ready.navy.mil. National Preparedness Month is time to be StormReady 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 19, 2013

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