Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note:
Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID:
UF00028307:02058


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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2013 COS RULES FIR E TRAINING IA HOMECOMING Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Remembering the tragic timeline of Sept. 11, 2001: The World Trade Center, North Tower At 8:46 a.m., American Airlines Flight 11 crashed with a speed of roughly 490 mph into the north side of the north tower of the World Trade Center, between floors 94 and 98. The World Trade Center, South Tower At 9:02 a.m., United Airlines Flight 175 crashed with a speed of about 590 mph into the south side of the south tower, banked between floors 78 and 84. Killed in both towers: 2,753 persons. The Pentagon, Washington, D.C. At 9:37 a.m., American Airlines Flight 77 crashed into the western side of the Pentagon. All 59 pas sengers were killed, as were 125 Pentagon personnel. Killed:184. Shanksville, Pennsylvania At 10:03 a.m., United Airlines Flight 93 crashed in a field southeast of Pittsburgh in Somerset County. Killed: 40. More than 100 Mad Fox Alumni and their fami lies came to NAS Jacksonville Aug. 23 to participate in VP-5s Gray Fox Heritage Day. The event was an opportunity for former Mad Foxes to see the chang es the squadron has gone through since its transition from the P-3C Orion to the P-8A Poseidon. It is our desire to properly honor our incredible past before we start a new chapter for our great squadron. Whether flying the P-V1 Ventura during World War II or the P-3C Orion offshore Libya during Operation Odyssey Dawn our heritage is rich and our legacy long-lasting. You honor us today with your presence, stated VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Matthew Pottenburgh. The day started with a meet-and-greet and a special re-enlistment at Deweys All Hands Club. AO2 Bryce Warde reaffirmed his commitment and dedication of faithful service to his country in front of Mad Foxes both young and old. After the re-enlistment ceremony, Pottenburgh introduced several esteemed guests in attendance two of whom participated in NASAs Project Mercury in 1961. AT3 Archie LaMontagne, while on board a specially outfitted P-2V Neptune, is credited with locating Astronaut Alan Shepards space capsule upon re-entry to Earth on May 5, 1961. Another Mad Fox alumni, AWC Roger Straley, locat ed the re-entry capsule of Astronaut Gus Grissom on July 21, 1961. These two astronauts were the first and second Americans in space. The importance of LaMontagne and Straleys efforts was summed up by Shepard 52 years ago, . . didnt really feel the flight was a success until the recovery had been completed. Its not the fall that hurts; its the sudden stop! Fighting Tigers earn record score on weapons proficiency Led by their gunner, CWO3 Chadwick Stephens, the VP-8 Fighting Tigers aviation ord nancemen completed their Conventional Weapons Technical Proficiency Inspection (CWTPI), by earning a record 770 out of 800 available points. Remembering the terror of Sept. 11 VP-5 hosts Gray Fox Heritage Day NAS Jax CO holds all hands callsNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander held a series of all hands calls last week for junior and senior Sailors, officers and civilians to discuss his command philosophy and professional excellence policy and getting feedback from the military and civilian personnel how to best support the fleet, family and fighter. Our military and civilian workforce perform vital work in support of our fleet, fighter and fam ily. I wanted to take the opportunity as the new commanding officer to thank them in person for their outstanding work and at the same time share my command philosophy, explained NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander. During the all hands calls, Undersander stressed the importance of the NAS Jax mission: Be ready, provide effective and efficient shore services to the fleet, fighter and family. We are successful when we make others successful. We will provide support and aid to our shipmates, all tenants, and the com munity of Jacksonville. Undersander praised the NAS Jax team for their continued accomplishments including winning the 2012 Presidential Excellence Award and 2013 Commander, Navy Installations Award as best naval station worldwide. He also discussed communication both up and down using the chain of command, the importance of respecting shipmates and the Navys core values of Honor, Courage and Commitment. AME2(AW) Ruby Gill of NAS Jax said, I believe a captains call is important because communication often gets lost up and down the ranks. For example, a Sailor might be upset that we didnt get a 72-hour liberty chit, but maybe he doesnt understand the

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Sept. 12 1944 5th Fleet carrier aircraft begin three-day attack on Japanese shipping and facilities in Visayas, Philippines. 1952 USS Coral Sea (CVB-43) took Marshall Josip Tito for a one-day cruise in the Adriatic Sea where he observed flight operations. 1961 Navy task force sails to aid the Galveston area after hurricane Carla hits Texas. 1966 Launch of Gemini 11, pilot ed by Cmdr. Charles Conrad Jr. and Lt. Cmdr. Richard Gordon Jr. The mis sion lasted two days and 23 hours and included 44 orbits at an altitude of 1368.9 km. Recovery was by HS-3 heli copter from USS Guam (LPH-9). 1967Operation Coronado V began in Mekong Delta. 1992 Joint Task Force Hawaii acti vated to provide humanitarian aid after Typhoon Iniki struck Hawaiian Islands. Sept. 13 1814 British bombardment of Fort McHenry inspires the Star Spangled Banner. 1847 Marine Brigade leads U.S. forc es that storm Chapultepec Castle near Mexico City, inspiring one line of the Marine Corps Hymn. 1906 Sailors and Marines from USS Denver land in Havana at the request of the Cuban government to preserve order during a revolution. 1939 Navy suspends transfers to the Fleet Reserve after 20 years service and retains men on active duty. 1985 Commander Middle East Force orders escort of Military Sealift Ships in Persian Gulf because of Iranian seizure of merchant vessels. Sept. 14 1899 Gunboat Concord and monitor Monterey capture two insurgent schoo ners at Aparri, Philippine Islands. 1939 Atlantic Squadron Neutrality Patrol squadron deploys. Sept. 15 1944 Amphibious invasion of Peleliu, Palau Islands, after several days of intense carrier aircraft land and ship bombardment. 1950 U.S. forces under Vice Adm. Arthur Struble achieve an amphibious landing at Inchon, Korea. 1967 Operation Crimson Tide in Mekong Delta. Sept. 16 1854 Cmdr. David Farragut takes possession of Mare Island, the first U.S. Navy Yard on the Pacific. 1917 Navy Department authorizes establishment of 16 Naval air stations abroad. 1922 Cmdr. Halsey Powell on board USS Edsall is senior officer directing the evacuation of 250,000 Greek refugees from Turkey after war between Greece and Turkey. 1940 President Roosevelt signs Selective Training and Service Act, the first peacetime draft. 1958 Submarine USS Grayback fires first operational launch of Regulus II surface to surface guided missile off California coast; the missile carries first U.S. mail sent by guided missile. 1966 USS Oriskany helicopters rescue 44 crewmen of British merchant ship August Moon near Hong Kong. Sept. 17 1861 Union landing party from USS Massachusetts takes possession of Ship Island south of New Orleans, La. This was the headquarters for Adm. David Farraguts Gulf Coast Blockading Squadron. Sept. 18 1926 Navy brings relief aid to Miami after a severe hurricane. 1936 Squadron 40-T, based in the Mediterranean, established to pro tect U.S. interests and citizens around Iberian peninsula throughout the Spanish Civil War. 1941 U.S. Navy ships escort east bound British trans-Atlantic convoy for first time (Convoy HX-150). After nearly 17 years with an all-consuming fear of flying that left me grounded, I got on a plane with my husband andflew to Washington, D.C. (I even flew back without Dustin.) I thought I was cured. So did Dustin. Nothing unusual had happened during either of the flights in July, besides the fact that Icried like a baby and gripped the arm rests until veins popped out on my hands. But I had taken the first step, and that was the mostimportant thing. So Dustin and I scheduled another trip to D.C. in August. I would be flying with my husband both ways this time, and itseemed I had little to fear anymore. I still cried on the flight down, and, like last time, I worried about the flight home the wholeweek. When I woke up the morning of our return flight, my heart was pounding in my chest. I ate breakfast with the familiar hum ofanxiety in the back of my mind. I felt sick to my stomach. The airport was busy because it was Labor Day weekend. I mentally sank into myself, the way I always do when Im nervousor afraid. Dustin made hopeful small talk that I was too consumed to hear, and he reminded me how in less than two hours, ourboys would be waiting for us. He never thought Id back out. We got on the tram that would take us to the CRJ-200 waiting on the tarmac. Two children, who were traveling alone, werecrying in the backseat. This got my heart rate going again. I thought about my own children crying, and my mind went to very darkplaces. Still, I thought Id fly. Once I was buckled in my seat on the airplane, I lowered my forehead to my knees, and Dustin rubbed my back. The flightattendant noticed us and came over to make sure everything was okay. The two children were still sniffling and crying behind us. My wife is afraid of flying, Dustin said. But shell be fine. Would you like to meet the pilots? the flight attendant asked. Sometimes that helps. I unbuckled and followed the flight attendant to the front of the small airplane. I really wanted this to help. But when the pilotsturned around, they looked like they were 20. I didnt see any grey hairs or tough skin from years of shaving. My throat wentinstantly dry. Its going to be a great flight, the captain said with a boyish grin. Theres some bad weather ahead, so it will probably bebumpy, but I turned around, pushed Dustin aside, and ran down the steps to the tarmac. I didnt care that my purse and computer werestill inside the aircraft. Nearby, airplanes were starting their engines. It was loud and windy on the ground. Dustin came down the steps, and Icould see that he was frus trated maybe even panicked. For the first time, both of us realized that I might not do it. Get on the plane, Dustin yelled over the noise of the engines. I cant. Just get on the plane and well be home in two hours. I was hysterical now, and other people on the plane were beginning to peer out their windows. If there were any other anxiousfliers that day, Im sure they were tempted to run, too. One of the pilots came out and asked if he could help. He wanted to explain the principles of flight to us. Im a pilot, Dustin said exasperated. And so is her dad. The pilot looked confused. I wanted to say, Get about 20 more yearsexperience and take back what you said about rough weather. When the pilot left us again, Dustin said, Were getting older, Sarah. Everyone is going to look younger to us our doctors,dentists, the chil drens teachers. But it didnt matter what he said. I couldnt get back on the plane. Dustin retrieved our bags and without saying another word (for about an hour), rented us a car and began driving me home.Our plane landed safely in Bangor before we had even gotten outside of DC traffic. Anxiety: Its a rotten thing to deal with and it never really goes away. Its hard to explain to any one who hasnt experienced it.I know that my fear is irrational and inconvenient. And this week, on the anniversary of 9/11, I also know what I eventu ally have todo: get back on a plane and reclaim my independence. So, about that fear of flying .

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Rear Adm. Sean Buck, head of the Navys 21st Century Sailor office and the Navys Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) officer, answered questions from All Hands Magazine about his new assignment including the Navy SAPR efforts. The 21st Century Sailor initiative pulls together objectives and policies to ensure that every Sailors total fitness needs including physical, mental, social and spiritual are met so that they can successfully meet the challenges that they face during their mili tary careers. The purpose of the office is to better integrate, bet ter synchronize and tighten up all of our programs that we had over the years that work toward affecting the resiliency of a Sailor, Buck said. Its a broad port folio. The 21st Century Sailor office ensures that Sailors have the tools to meet the CNOs three tenets Warfighting First, Operate Forward, and Be Ready They are responsible for: nity; The Navys 21st Century Sailor office is also in charge of the Navys Sexual Assault Prevention and Response program. Buck talked about how sexual assault awareness is every Sailors and civilians prob lem, and training is a way to raise awareness and ensure that Sailors have the tools to eliminate the problem. Be sure that you are a participant in creating a command climate that encourages dignity, respect, professionalism and has no tolerance for sexist behav ior, sexual harassment or sexual assault. Sailors should be completely intolerant of those things no matter what command you serve, Buck said. Buck promotes Navy SAPR effort Part of Clay Countys heritage is the countys strong ties to the military dating back to the early 1800s. Today, there are over 24,000 veterans who call Clay County home. These veterans rep resent service to our nation from World War II through the current con flicts as well as decades of service during peace time. The Clay County Veterans Service Office is staffed with a full time veterans service officer and a part time veterans program assistant; both available and eager to assist veterans and/or family members with fil ing claims and/or other related needs. The office is now located on the second floor of the Clay County Administration Building at 477 Houston Street, Green Cove Springs, Fla. The office is open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. The former Veterans Service Office at 1565 CR 315 has been closed. To make an appoint ment, call (904) 269-6326.Clay County Veterans Services Office has relocated JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013 Personnel from Jacksonville Navy Metro Fire & Emergency Services are using The Zone to provide real-world fire and rescue training Sept. 5-14 before the former Building 798 (MWR Brew House and Bingo Hall) located at Saratoga Ave. and Jason St. is demol ished. Training Chief David Rickel explained that the first exercise involved cutting ventilation holes in the roof to prevent back-draft conditions. After the safety brief, teams will climb onto the roof and use special gasolinepowered rotary rescue saws to cut holes that release combustible gases from inside the burning structure. Ideally, achieving vertical ventilation in a onestory structure like The Zone could take from 15 to 20 minutes. Above all, crew safety is our number one concern here. Rickel added that a variety of fire fighter-down and victim rescues will also be conducted over the nine-day training period. To add more realism in certain scenarios, a smoke generator may be employed. Today, a two-person crew from Orange Park Fire Department will join NAS Jax firefighters in the training exer cises, said Rickel. Lt. Mike Wallace of Orange Park Fire Department said it isnt often that they can use a vacant building such as The Zone for skills training. Classroom training is good but doing live scenarios in a large structure like The Zone is high-value training. Its a great way to put our skills and equip ment into hands-on training, said Wallace Assistant Fire Chief Jamie Sherer noted that The Zone fire suppression water system (sprinkler system) is still functional and adds realism to firefight ing teams entering the building. When a fires temperature reaches about 165 degrees, a water bulb in the sprinkler line explodes automatically sending an alarm to the regional dis patch center, as well as turning on the sprinklers that help knock down the fire until firefighters arrive and get lines into the building. Overall, were going to get a lot of high-quality training from this building. Assistant Fire Chief James Gray agreed, Its rare anymore that we get a building on base thats slated for demo lition so weve got a lot of training scheduled for the next week. Because of manpower and budgetary issues, we also invited some of our partners out side the gate in this case, the Orange Park and Clay County fire departments to join us and take advantage of this opportunity for improving our interop erability. Vertical ventilation is designed to take super-heated toxic smoke and gases out of a building so firefighters can more safely do their jobs as they search for victims. Gray explained that the stations ladder company carries all the tools required for creating vertical ventila tion, while an engine company fights the fire at ground level. F T Z

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013 5 Photos by Clark Pierce

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The 66 Naval Reserve units and roughly 2,000 Naval Reservists of Navy Operational Support Center (NOSC) Jacksonville welcomed a new commander on Sept. 6 during the change of command ceremony. Capt. Jerome Hamel turned over command to Capt. Kimberly Miller during a ceremony aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville. Hamel had one of the shortest com mand tours, serving just over 70 days after he vol unteered for the short tour to fill a gapped billet after the previous com manding officers retire ment. It was a privi lege to serve at NOSC Jacksonville, said Hamel. The drive and desire displayed by our Selected Reservists is inspiring to us all. Hamels relief arrives at NOSC Jacksonville after completing a tour as operational support officer for Commander, U.S. Naval Forces South/ Commander 4th Fleet. Helping Sailors is whats exciting about this job, said Miller. They mobilize to defend our freedom and meet the operational requirements of the Navy, and we are able to support and assist them and their families. A native of Cincinnati, Ohio, Miller received her commission in December 1992 from the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC) pro gram at the Ohio State University. She earned her Juris Doctor from University of Cincinnati and a Masters degree in National Security and Strategic Studies from the U.S. Naval War College. She served her initial sea tour on board USS Truett (FFT 1095), with follow on tours to USS Paul F. Foster (DD 964) and USS Ramage (DDG 61). Her shore tours include Afloat Training Group Pacific in San Diego, as a cruise mis sile instructor, Officer in Charge of Naval Reserve Mobile Inshore Communications Facility and Commanding Officer of Afloat Training Group Pacific Northwest. Hamel is transferring to Commander, Navy Region Southeast Reserve Component Command, which is co-located with NOSC Jacksonville. NOSC Jax welcomes new commander 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013

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In March 2012, OS2(SW/IDW) Danielle Ward volunteered to fill a forward deployed Individual Augmentee (IA) billet for eight months in Afghanistan. Ward, a native of San Diego, is currently assigned to Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jacksonville. Ward left Jacksonville in May 2012 and traveled to Camp Atterbury Joint Maneuver Training Center in Edinburgh, Ind., a training base for the Indiana National Guard. She was taught how to be a Soldier, and, in September, she was fully quali fied and ready to deploy. In October 2012, Ward was assigned to Regional Command South (RC-South), a Tactical Operations Center in Uruzgan, Afghanistan. The RC-South Team supports the government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan and Afghan National Security Forces. They conduct security operations and strengthen good gover nance to defeat the insurgency, retain and expand security in key terrain, ensure transition progress, and improve conditions for economic growth. The areas of responsibility include the provinces of Kandahar, Uruzgan, Zabul and Daykundi. The contrib uting NATO Nations are Albania, Bulgaria, Canada, France, Romania, Slovakia, U.K., U.S., and contrib uting Non-NATO Nations are Australia, Jordan, and Singapore. After reporting, Ward was assigned to the Provincial Reconstruction Team (PRT). This team is comprised of a mili tary component (civil affairs/force pro tection, etc.), civilian police advisors, and civilian representatives of United States and other national government foreign affairs agencies. The PRTs are the primary civil-mil itary relations tool in Afghanistan and Iraq and are described as a means to extend the reach and enhance the legitimacy of the central government into the provinces of Afghanistan. Ward was the only operations specialist for the PRT. Her responsibilities included con ducting communications equipment operability checks prior to missions and, during daily missions, monitoring chat, the high frequency radios, and the units Blue Force Tracker (BFT) system. The BFT system is a GPS-enabled system that provides military command ers and forces with location informa tion about friendly (and despite its name, also hostile) military forces. Aside from operational management, she stepped outside of her job require ments and participated in intelligence gathering operations outside of the base and in surrounding villages. Her role within the Intel team was to gather and log informa tion from the local community about the PRT construction projects and the impact it had on the village. This was an eye-opening life experi ence that tested my limits, physically and mentally. At times it was difficult, being away from family and friends during the holidays, but I feel that I have grown as a person, said Ward. It was a strange transition from the beginning of my IA until the day I left, she continued. When I first got there, it was very nerve-wracking. Alarms and sirens would sound at random times. By the time I left, it was second nature. Ward added, There were two instanc es that were more stressful than nor mal. The first was a threat of IEDs being planted around the base. We had to wear our full protective body gear at all times when outside of our connex box. It was extremely hot and the threat that something could blow up as youre walking to the mess hall made for a very stressful time. The second involved an IED blowing up at one of our construction sites, she said. The blast knocked out all communications with our unit, and we did not know the status of our teams. In the end, I lost three soldiers, I attended training with. Ward also recalled some positive memories of her IA tour. Even though there were some stressful times and some sad times, there were plenty of good times. I took charge of the MWR program for the base. I knew that most of the Soldiers there were deploying for the first time and I wanted to make the holidays special for them, she said. During Halloween, I coordinated a costume contest. On Thanksgiving, I made sure we had a full-blown dinner with all of the trimmings. To celebrate Christmas, I had all the Soldiers ask family members to send them decora tions. We had lights everywhere, and it was a very festive environment. And the secret Santa was a lot of fun too! During her eight months in Afghanistan, Ward made a positive impact on the Afghan people and the Soldiers of the RC-South. She was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal and the Army Commendation Medal. Her words sum it up best, I have made friends and have experienced moments that change your prospective on life all together. I know that my work over there helped a lot of people in a lot of different ways and I would absolutely do it again! FACSFAC Jax Sailor completes successful IA tour VP-8 CWTPI is conducted by Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Weapons School (MPRWS) instructors prior to a squadrons deployment. In this case, VP-8 was tested on preoperational tasks, weapon control and weapon loading procedures. We are here to ensure that every one operates the same, fleet-wide, said AOC Jason Worek, MPRWS ordnance leading chief petty officer. When it comes time for deployment, the stan dard will be set for all to adhere to. The inspection concluded with a suc cessful tactical employment exercise conducted by VP-8 Combat Aircrew Eight (CAC-8). Beginning more than a month prior to inspection, CAC-8 obtained the nec essary tactical publications, coordinat ed with the aviation ordnancemen, and conducted a dry-run event. On Aug. 29, they employed four MK-62 Quick-strike mines and 26 flares on the Lake George firing range in northeast Florida. The impressive score gained praise from the highest levels of the patrol and reconnaissance com munity. Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 Capt. Eric Weise reflected, I havent heard a more positive result from CWTPI during my tour here. On behalf of the MPRWS, Worek added, From the beginning of the CWTPI to the very end, VP-8 did excel lent. They are the best patrol squadron weve inspected in the last year and a half. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013 7

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The annual Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) adds a new feature for donors this year: an online pledge form option avail able through the Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS) MyPay website, that most service members and civilians already use to view their leave and earnings state ments. Anthony DeCristofaro is assistant director of the DoD Voluntary Campaign Management Office, which is within the Washington Headquarters Services human resources director ate. He told American Forces Press Service during a Sept. 6 telephone interview that the online pledge option offers several advantages over paper pledge forms: from any computer; Combined Federal Campaign adds online option for donors at MyPay ALL HANDS NAS Jax COs command philosophySailors Creed I am a United States Sailor. Jacksonville (NAS Jax). NAS Jax personnel and their families make up the NAS Jax family. I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States of America, : Be ready, provide effective and efficient shore services to the fleet, fighter, and family. We are successful when we make others success ful. We will provide support and aid to our shipmates, all tenants, and the com munity of Jacksonville. And I will obey the orders of those appointed over me. well as verbal. Respect shipmates. Every person has a critical role to fulfill in the command. Respect earns trust, and trust is the glue that makes teams stronger. Without teamwork, we will fail our family and fail in our task. Be sharp. Discipline in the job is an exten sion of personal discipline. Set, maintain, and enforce high standards. Be proud of your appear ance, your uniform, and your workplace. I represent the fighting spirit of the Navy, and those who have gone before me to defend freedom and democracy around the world. Gulf, U.S. naval air power has left its mark on the pages of history. Do it right! Do not bring shame upon yourself, this command, nor the mem ory of those who have gone before us. When mistakes are made, admit it quickly and learn from it. Then move on. I proudly serve my countrys Navy combat team with Honor, Courage, and Commitment. Stay positive. We will work hard and play hard, but not every day is going to be fun. A positive attitude, enthusiasm and good humor will get us through the rough times in good order. Communicate! Good communication is essential in all that we do. First, communicate early and often up and down the chain. The commanding offi cers door is always open if issues cannot be quickly resolved. Manage risk smartly. Naval aviation is a risky business, but the mission comes first. Accept only the lowest level of prudent risk. Our shipmates are too important to do otherwise. I am committed to excellence and the fair treatment of all. Goals. Personal goals are important. Every person at NAS Jax will be chal lenged and encouraged to develop as a person and professionally as quickly as possible. Choices. Every person has the right to make choices, choices have conse quences. People will be held responsible for their choices, so make the right ones. Time for family. Take time to develop the relationship with your immediate family and your extended NAS Jax family. Both are important to have a success ful career. entire mission. A captains call clari fies misunderstandings amongst junior Sailors and civilians and allows them to address concerns to the commanding officer, she added. In addition to operational issues, Undersander engaged the troops on quality of life issues affecting them and their families and the need to keep fam ilies informed and to realize the impor tant role they play as part of the NAS Jax team. I believe the all hands officer call is a great thing. As a newly reporting officer to NAS Jax, it gave me the opportunity to understand the true intent of the COs policies and I could infer by his voice inflection and tone what he truly cares about, said NAS Jax Security Officer Lt. Ryan Platt. Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their fami lies. Preregistration is required at 5425745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2013: To register for any of the above work shops call 542-5745.FFSC offers life skills workshops 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013

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Commander Task Group (CTG) 72.2 recently completed a month-long detachment to New Zealand and Australia, supporting Tactical Antisubmarine Warfare (ASW) Maritime Exercise 13 (TAMEX13) conducted out of Royal Australian Air Force Base Pearce, maritime partnership building at Royal New Zealand Air Force Base Whenuapai, New Zealand, and Talisman Saber 2013 (TS-13) out of Royal Australian Air Force Base Townsville, Australia. Detachment Officer in Charge, Lt. Cmdr. Brian Schneider led a diverse team of active duty and reserve aircrew and maintenance professionals from NAS Jacksonvilles VP-26 Tridents and VP-62 Broadarrows, and NAS Whidbey Islands VP-1 Screaming Eagles and VP-69 Totems. VP-26s Combat Aircrew One (CAC-1) and Mission Commander Lt. Zachary Sipes, represented CTG-72.2 at TAMEX-13, flying three ASW sorties in cooperation with the Royal Australian Air Forces 10 Squadron. TAMEX is a quarterly bilateral exercise series which aims to enhance regional cooperation, promote understanding, and build trust and cooperation in order to increase collective operational readiness. After TAMEX-13, CAC-1 flew their aircraft and maintenance crew across the Australian continent and Tasman Sea to Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) Base Whenuapai near Auckland, New Zealand. This was an historic event. The arrival marked the first time a U.S. P-3 has detached to Whenuapai since 1984. Military cooperation between the U.S. and New Zealand dete riorated in that year because of disputes about the visiting rights of nuclear-armed ships and aircraft. While in New Zealand, the detachment was joined by VP-26 Executive Officer Cmdr. Greg Smith, who engaged the Royal New Zealand air staff on topics such as maritime domain awareness, informa tion sharing, P-3 detachment operations, and interoper ability between United States Navy and RNZAF P-3s. CAC-1 conducted rider exchanges on cooperative ASW and area familiarization flights, com peted with the Kiwis in American football and rugby, and enjoyed first-rate hosting from their RNZAF counter parts. On July 15, Schneider relo cated the detachment to RAAF Base Townsville, Australia for TS-13. TS-13 is the fifth in a series of biannual, bilat eral exercises that focused on increasing cooperation and coordination capabilities between the United States and Australias sea, air and land forces. TS-13 was the largest in the series to date, featuring the involvement of 22,000 ser vice members, 15 U.S. naval vessels, 11 Australian vessels, as well as troops from Canada and observers from Vietnam, Japan, Indonesia and the United Kingdom. TS-13 exercised crisisaction planning and contin gency response, enhancing both nations capabilities to deal with regional contingen cies and terrorism. TS-13 joint exercises were performed by the Australian Defense Force and the United States Military across six locations in north ern and central Australia, but the bulk of the exercises were concentrated at the Shoalwater Bay Military Training Area and Australias territorial sea and exclusive economic zone. Schneider was joined by 22 maintainers and three combat aircrews from all four CTG 72.2 squadrons. Tridents, Totems, and Broadarrows, formed a superb integrated mainte nance team. VP-69 CAC-2, VP-26 CAC-5, and VP-26 CAC9, along with individual air crewmen from VP-1, flew 22 sorties of ASW, surface war fare and direct support mis sions in support of the George Washington Carrier Strike Group and the Bonhomme Richard Amphibious Ready Group. In all, CTG-72.2 flew 172 hours in only 13 days, executed an amazing on-station comple tion rate of 109 percent, and conducted 18 missions involv ing turnovers with RAAF air crews. The integration of and coordination between RAAF and USN active and reserve crews exceeded all expecta tions. The aircrew and main tenance professionals assigned to the detachment truly embodied the One Team, One Fight mantra CTG-72.2 has lived by since arriving in the area of responsibility in May. Tridents lead CTG 72.2 to Southern Hemisphere for international exercises VP-26 CAC 2 detaches to U-Tapao Thailand for SEASURVEX 13-4Combat Aircrew (CAC) 2 and maintenance pro fessionals of CTG 72.2 returned to Okinawa, Japan Aug. 17 after a six-day detachment to Thailand. The Royal Thai Navys 102 squadron hosted them for Sea Surveillance Exercise (SEASURVEX) 13-4 at U-Tapao Royal Thai Navy Airbase (RTNAB) to foster their rela tionship with the U.S. Navy. Arriving Aug. 11, CAC-2 was warmly greeted by hosting personnel and briefed for the weeks events. The crew had an opportunity to travel to the city of Pattaya to explore the local area and Thai culture. The entire nation of Thailand celebrated the birthday of Queen Sirikit Kittiyakara the next day, shutting down government business and providing a unique opportunity for cultural exploration. Detachment personnel visited the spaces of 102 Squadron to coordinate the upcoming flights and compare procedures and equipment. Patrol Plane Commander Lt. Ross Notz and Tactical Coordinator Lt. j.g. Troy Balding discussed the exercise with the Thai Navy crew and clarified guidance for safety and communication including altitude, airspace and flight time assignments. After planning was completed, the aircrew and maintainers of 102 Squadron toured the U.S. P-3C, and the American maintainers were given tours and tutorials of Thai Navy maintenance facilities and practices. SEASURVEX 13-4 then shifted to the flight phase. During the first event a P-3T of 102 Squadron joined CAC-2 in a designated exercise area over the Gulf of Thailand to conduct maritime domain awareness and demonstrate the capabilities of the automatic identification system which is used to identify surface vessels. After 90 minutes on station, the two aircraft safely executed an altitude swap before returning to U-Tapao. The next flight involved collaboration between CAC-2 and a Royal Thai Navy SH-60B Seahawk. The JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013 9

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Communications between the Navys CPO Messes and Wardrooms has never been more important. During a CPO 365 event Sept. 5 at NAS Jacksonville, eight command ing officers met with more than 100 CPO Selectees to discuss leadership expectations, as well as the CPO Mission, Vision and Guiding Principles. It all took place at the COs Round Table that was orga nized by NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander. These com manding officers are going to share their perspective on what were looking for in a chief petty officer. Theres a lot of knowledge and leader ship here today, so please listen closely and learn more about the importance of leadership and mentoring. Round table participants included: NRSE Chief of Staff Capt. Steven Blaisdell; FRCSE Commanding Officer Capt. John Kemna; NAVFAC Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Chris Kiwus; NAVSUP-FLC Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Duke Heinz; HSM-72 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Derek Fleck; NRSE-RCC Commanding Officer Capt. Gregory Smith; TPU/PCP Jax Commanding Officer Cmdr. Carol Schrader; and VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Matthew Pottenburgh. Blaisdell congratulated the selectees, saying that they worked hard and earned the right to be here. I cant explain leadership in five minutes, but its a lot more than painting by the numbers. The things that got you here will carry you onto the next level and make you successful. Its all about who you really are as a leader and how you apply yourself as a CPO. The most complex things we deal with are people and now its your job to get the most out of your people. With 30 years experience (many of them as an LDO), Schrader expressed her utmost respect for chief petty officers. The biggest thing I expect from a chief is honesty in every aspect of their job. By embrac ing CPO 365, I have no doubt you all will be welcome addi tions to the Chiefs Mess. Fleck told the audience, Mission accomplishment and taking care of our people Im a firm believer that the only place that actually happens is in the Chiefs Mess. As an E7, youve reached the point where you understand the command mission and your Sailors who will accomplish it. Yes, there will be times when you dont have all the answers so pre pare for a lot more learning after youre pinned with the respected fouled anchor. To help you along, find a mentor in the Chiefs Mess. Heinz said, The vitality of the Goat Locker and your par ticipation within it is the base of success for most Navy com mands. Thats even more important as we enter a chal lenging future of personnel and equipment cuts that will pro foundly affect the readiness of our Navy. Be ready to provide your deckplate perspective on needed technical skills and leadership expertise to your chain of command. Undersander welcomed the soon-to-be chiefs with three tips for success. One, as a chief you will be looked to for all the answers. Make sure you do what it takes to provide the cor rect answer rather than just a fast answer and your credibil ity will soar. Two, you have already prov en your technical expertise, and that is expected to contin ue. Your focus now should be on larger command priorities and Sailorization. Three, the CO counts on a chief to reinforce his/her pol icies. A chief must be able to look at a situation from the per spective of a CO, as well as that of a junior Sailor, and be able to discern when it is appropri ate to advocate for the individ ual Sailors exemption or to reinforce the command policy without exception. After the COs expressed their congratulations and expecta tions to the prospective CPOs, many took part in the questionand-answer session of the end of the meeting. What COs look for in a CPO JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013 11

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VP-5 Mad Fox of the WeekAs VP-5 continues its busy schedule operating and maintaining the P8-A Poseidon, the squadron is highlighting one outstanding Mad Fox each week. This weeks Mad Fox of the Week is AWO1 James Reisen. Reisen was born in Pensacola, and has one sister. His grandfather, retired Navy Lt. Rabren, enlisted in the Navy, earned a commission, and became a surface warfare officer. He retired after 24 years of faithful service to his country. As an aviation warfare operator, Reisen is trained in the acoustic track ing of subsurface targets. He is charged with analyzing acoustic data and pro viding the tactical operator on the plane with the position, course, and speed of the target the crew is tracking. It is criti cal that acoustic operators be as pre cise as possible in analyzing the data because every decision the tactical coor dinator makes is based on the informa tion he is receiving from his acoustic operator. Reisen checked into VP-5 in June. Before checking in, his previous com mand was VP-30. While there, he was deployed to Balad, Iraq on an Individual Augmentee assignment. While deployed he was assigned to the Joint Airborne Battle Staff where he qualified as mis sion commander aboard a C-130 and was tasked with providing top cover and communications relay for troops on the ground. While at VP-5, Reisen is tasked with instructing upgrading acoustic opera tors. Keeping up on the ever-changing missions of the maritime patrol commu nity is challenging, commented Reisen. However, there is nothing more satisfy ing than flying on top of a submarine and being able to classify and track him for a period of time. When Reisen is not busy training his fellow acoustic operators, he enjoys pho tographing nature and architectural scenes. He also owns a 33-foot sailboat and enjoys sailing it on the waters along the Florida and Georgia coast. VP-5 is currently in the inter-deploy ment readiness cycle aboard NAS Jacksonville. VP-5Mad Fox alumni attended from all over the country, even as far as Detroit. Retired Lt. Cmdr. Lawrence Beecher brought the very first Mad Fox logo painted by Ensign J.W. Judge Parker and presented it to VP-5 for display on their heritage hall. We held our very first reunion at my home in Michigan in 1976 and since then have held one every year for 31 years until we stopped in 2007, explained Beecher. We are extremely grateful to the current Mad Foxes who gave us the opportunity to meet once more and share our experi ences. Retired ADCM John Rosa, 91, also earned Silver Fox recognition. He served with the VB-135 Blind Foxes from 1941-43. He was shot down over Russia during World War II and remained a Prisoner of War until the war was over. He was selected as a chief petty officer and returned (after the squadron designation changed from VB-135 to VP-5) to the Mad Foxes from 1957-61. The squadron was proud to announce the creation of the VP-5 ADCM John W. Rosa Maintenance Chief Petty Officer of the Year award. ADC Rodwell Lloyd from Georgetown, Guyana was announced as the first award winner for 2013. After the meet-and-greet, all for mer Mad Foxes and their families were given a tour of the P-8A Integrated Training Facility. They were shown the classrooms where the squadron spent countless hours studying the intricate details of their new platform. They toured the Part Task and Weapons Tactics trainers where air crews employ the new aircraft in a sim ulated operational environment. The high point for most was the opportunity for former PV-1 and P-2V pilots to get their first stick time in the brand new P-8A Poseidon operational flight trainer. The activities then moved to Hangar 511 where the former Mad Foxes had the chance to see the VP-5 spaces and tour the P-8A Poseidon. Maintainers and aircrew eagerly escorted the former Mad Foxes and their families through the work centers and aircraft explaining the different jobs and responsibilities, capabilities of the aircraft, and show ing off what they had learned through seven months of hard work during the transition. The culminating event of the day was a luncheon back at Deweys All Hands Club. Both current and former Mad Foxes were treated to Retired Lt. Cmdr. Roger Clement recounting his mission in 1952 in which he and his crew were forced to bail out of their P-2V Neptune over Paris, France. Everyone was cap tivated as he explained how all 13 air crew members were able to make sound decisions under immense pressure and successfully bailout of their aircraft. The VP-5 Gray Fox Heritage Day afforded squadron alumni the oppor tunity to learn about the next chapter of maritime patrol with the squadrons transition to the P-8A Poseidon. It also allowed current squadron members the chance to learn about the proud and illustrious heritage estab lished by the actions of the Mad Foxes and the Blind Foxes who came before them. Kids First of Florida is looking for foster/adoptive parents Are you committed to loving and nurturing a child in your home? At least 21 years old? Married? Single? Divorced? Separated? Financially able to provide for your familys present needs Do you have enough space in your home to accommodate an addi tional child? Want to make a life time of difference in the life a child? Join us Sept. 17 at 6 p.m. to learn more about foster parenting and/ or adoption and find out what resources are avail able to you as a foster/ adoptive parent with our agency. homes are especially needed for teens, sibling groups and young adults (ages 18-21). Mentors are also needed. Call 2785644, Ext. 2066 or 2100. 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Sept. 13, 7 p.m. Nalani Quintello Sept. 27, 7 p.m. Pam Affronti DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 510 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 126 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not includedFitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Lap swim (no concessions, slide or waterpark will be open) Mon. Fri. 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m., 4:30-7 p.m. Recreational swim Sat. & Sun 11 a.m. 6 p.m.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_mwritt@navy.mil Jacksonville Zoo Spooktacular $9. Universal Halloween Horror Nights: Tickets coming soon! Stop by ITT to find out more about dates & pricing. Halloween Horror Nights visits ITT on Oct. 2, 10 a.m. 2 p.m. Stop by to win great prizes! TobyMac Tickets: Nov. 17, 7 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Arena, $26. Waves of Honor Special: Seaworld Orlando Adult $46.50, Child $42.25. Busch Gardens Tampa Adult $45, Child $40.50. ITT Trip to the Yahala Country Bakery: Sept. 28, 8 a.m. 3 p.m., $25. 29th Annual Mount Dora Craft Fair: Oct. 26, 8 a.m. 3 p.m., $20. Orlando Magic vs. New Orleans Pelicans Basketball: Oct. 9, Veterans Memorial Arena, section 102 at 7 pm, $55. Jacksonville Jaguars: Section 147 Bud Zone, $70. Jags shuttle bus $12. The Artist Series Broadway in Jax 2013 2014 Season: Tickets available now! Mamma Mia!: Oct. 19, 2013, 8 p.m., $60.50. Celtic Thunder: Nov. 10, 2013, 7 p.m., $80. Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus: Jan. 17 & 18, 2014, $51. War Horse: Feb. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $68.50. Memphis: Mar. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $65. Million Dollar Quartet: Apr. 26, 2014, 8 pm, $65. The D* Word: Oct. 4 Oct. 25, 2014, $43.75 $46.The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Paintball Trip Sept. 14 at 9 a.m. HabiJax Volunteer Opportunity Sept. 21 at 7 a.m. Barracks Bash Sept. 26, 48 p.m. Located in the field next to the barracks.NAS Jax Golf Club Golf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 NAS Jax Club Championship Sept. 14 & 15 at 8 a.m. $80, includes golf both days, lunch both days, trophies for the division winners and gift certificates for flight winners Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Sept. 10 & 24 for active duty Sept. 12 & 26 for retirees, DoD person nel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27 Third annual Riverfest Sept. 28, 10:30 a.m. 3 p.m. Featuring music, food, free stand-up paddleboard lessons, kayak lessons and more!Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Before and After School Registration going on now! Fees based on household income. Movie Under the Stars Patriots Grove Sept. 20 at 7:30 p.m. Featuring Despicable Me 2Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Oct. 7 Nov. 20 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013 13

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14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013 two aircraft practiced anti-submarine warfare (ASW) using a submerged target that simulated a submarine, allowing the Thai helicopter crew to make use of their dipping sonar. Aircrew from 102 Squadron flew with CAC-2 to experience ASW aboard the U.S. P-3C. After returning to U-Tapao, the Thai and American crews enjoyed a sports day. They played a spirited game of indoor soccer, presented gifts, and enjoyed a cultural exchange to commemorate the end of the exercise. SEASURVEX 13-4 has been an outstand ing success. Working with the Royal Thai Navy was a great opportunity to practice interoperability and to execute maritime domain awareness in the Gulf of Thailand, said Lt. Cmdr. James Dundon, officer in charge of the U.S. detachment. The last day the detachment was spent volunteering at the Khwm r Boys School outside of Pattaya. After a traditional Thai performance, the men and women of CTG 72.2 painted the entrance to the school, pro viding some necessary maintenance and promoting good will with the Thai people. The schools principal, teachers and students then gave a guided tour of the land, explaining that the school provides for the chil dren with food cultivated on site. The school produces a wide variety of fruits, veg etables, animals and fish. After the tour, another game of soccer ensued with the students defeating the American visitors 1-0. SEASURVEX 13-4 proved to be a great success in terms of building bilateral ties and cultural aware ness. The flights measurably increased interoperabili ty between the U.S. and Royal Thai navies. In six short days, CAC-2 and their team of maintenance profes sionals significantly improved U.S.-Thai collaboration in the airborne maritime patrol mission. VP-26 As the nation observes Suicide Prevention Month, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel issued a message Sept. 3 to the men and women of the Defense Department, emphasizing the departments collective resolve in its efforts to prevent military suicides. The Department of Defense has no more important respon sibility than supporting and protecting those who defend our country and that means we must do everything possible to prevent military suicide. As we observe Suicide Prevention Month, the entire DoD commu nity Service members, civil ians, members of our families and leaders at every level must demonstrate our collective resolve to prevent suicide, to promote greater knowledge of its causes and to encourage those in need to seek support. No one who serves this country in uni form should ever feel they have nowhere to turn. The Department of Defense has invested more than $100 million into research on the diagnosis and treatment of depression, bipolar disorder and substance abuse, as well as interventions for relation ship, financial and legal issues all of which can be associated with suicide. We are working to reduce drug and alcohol abuse and we are steadily increasing the number of mental health professionals and peer support counselors. Effective suicide prevention training is critical to all these efforts and we are instructing our leaders on how to recognize the signs and symptoms of cri sis and encourage service mem bers to seek support. We are also reaching out to military families and the broader community to enlist their support in this cause. Seeking behavioral health care is a choice that embod ies moral courage, honor and integrity. Those values are at the foundation of what that we stand for and what we defend. The Military Crisis Line is there for all who need it. I encourage any one in need to call 1-800-2738255 and press one to speak to a trained professional, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. This service is confidential and available to all service members and their families. Always remember that our most valuable resource is each other. When one of us faces a challenge, we all must stand together. By fighting as one team, we can and we will help prevent suicide. Thank you. Making sure people know where to turn for help during a time of crisis is the continuing goal of the Defense Departments suicide prevention pro gram, the Pentagon official in charge of the effort said Sept. 3 in Washington, D.C. In an interview with American Forces Press Service and the Pentagon Channel, Jacqueline Garrick said DoD has a plethora of resources that are specific to service members and their families who have thoughts of suicide. And while numbers are pending, Garrick said, DoD is seeing a decrease in the number of suicides in the depart ment overall. Senior Pentagon leaders have worked diligently for several years to erase the stigma of seeking help for mental health issues and it appears to be paying off, she added. Were seeing more people access help through the Military Crisis Line, and an increase in users for mental health [help] across the department, she said. Those are good signs that DoDs mes sages are reaching the people who need help, she added, and that theyre taking advantage of the resources the depart ment offers. The message that seeking help is a sign of strength has resonated from the top down throughout the Defense Department, Garrick said, noting that Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, chair man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, have sent that message repeatedly. President Barack Obama also made that point at Fort Hood, Texas, last year when he announced an executive order to improve access to mental health care for service members, veterans and military families, Garrick said. So that message is resonating throughout the services, in our civilian and military forces, she added. September is National Suicide Prevention Month, Garrick said. In keeping with the theme, Its Your Call, Garrick emphasized that all service members, their families and friends should be aware of the Military Crisis Line, an immediate source of help thats confidential and anonymous. Trained counselors are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week at 1-800-273-8255. In addition to the crisis phone line, she said, help also is available through the Military Crisis Lines website at http://www.militarycrisisline.net, with access to counselors in person and through online chats and text messag ing, she said. In addition, DoDs suicide outreach website at http://www.suicideoutreach. org/ has a family guide that offers steps to take when someone is in crisis. It also lists at-risk behaviors and other symp toms of a person who is potentially sui cidal, Garrick said. Family members also can use these resources to find help for themselves if they feel theyre feeling suicidal, Garrick said. Family members often dont think those resources are there for their needs, so we want to encourage them [to use the resources that are available], Garrick said. If family members are depressed, stressed or feeling suicidal, we want them to get help for themselves, as well as for their loved ones. Research shows that treatment is suc cessful when its given a chance, Garrick said. It does make a difference, and the resources are designed specifically to support service members who are deployed, those who have not deployed, those with [post-traumatic stress disor der and traumatic brain injury], depres sion, substance abuse, financial prob lems and relationship problems, she said. If you dont get help, problems get worse, which can impact your career and your life overall, she said. Its bet ter to get help early and identify prob lems that are small, rather than wait until they get bigger, and then have things blow up and become more unmanageable. People with suicidal tendencies might need a break to recap and recoup their personal resilience and return to their regular schedules when they are more mentally, physically, emotionally and spiritually fit to be more success ful, Garrick said. And fostering service members sense of personal resilience is paramount to DoD senior leaders and to those throughout the chain of com mand, she added. Resources for help dont end with DoD and the services, Garrick said, noting that the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) also offers help. Our service members dont stay with us forever, she noted, adding thatPentagon officials want them to have a successful transfer to VA as they leave the military and become veterans. We want them to embrace their vet eran status and get the help they need, she said. Hagel emphasizes DoDs resolve in suicide preventionOfficial notes progress in suicide prevention effort

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Life as a Navy spouse, whose husband is deployed more than five thousand miles away, can be tough and lonely. Add childbirth to the equa tion and times just got a little more trying. Navy spouse Brandie Conniff was going through this exact scenar io, until Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville and its Baby Friendly certified staff took action. Conniff, a native of Ellwood City, Pa. and first-time mom, has been a patient of NH Jacksonville since conceiving in late 2012. There was a good possibil ity for my husband and I to be together during the birth of our first child, said Conniff. But due to the rescheduling of my husbands deployment, the timing didnt work and left us with the reality that it would be more than six months before dad could see or hold our baby. At approximately 1:30 a.m. Aug, 29 Conniff gave birth to a healthy 8-pound, 3-ounce baby boy, Boaz Travis Conniff, and later that day was able to show their bundle of joy to her husband, Lt. Cmdr. Shawn (Fingers) Conniff via video teleconference direct from her room. As a helicopter pilot assigned to the HSM-74 Swamp Foxes at NAS Jacksonville, Conniff is currently deployed aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) as part of an ongoing rota tion of forward-deployed forces to support maritime security operations in the U.S. 6th and 5th Fleet areas of operations. But on this day, the new father laid eyes on his son for the first time. NH Jacksonville provides a variety of comfort features to its patients but connecting to a deployed U.S. warship with out Wi-Fi presented a unique challenge for the hospital staff. Because communication applications such as Skype were not available aboard the ship, I inquired about the pos sibilities of a video teleconfer ence to the hospital staff, said Conniff. The hospital staff deter mined that the main obstacle would be video bandwidth capabilities of the ship while at sea. The staff (hospital) went above and beyond to collab orate with the ship and make this happen for us, and I am truly thankful. Brandie praised the hospital staff for the job it has done with preparing her for motherhood and the care she has received since conception. It was a blessing to receive care from a Baby Friendly hospital, said Conniff. My experiences includ ed prepared childbirth and breastfeeding classes free of charge, which is nice com pared to friends who spent more than $300 hundred for similar classes. The teach ers were so caring, nurtur ing and informative, that they eased my fear of bearing my first child. The doctors have been great, and the hospital staff has been so considerate of my needs and concerns. This whole experience has been awesome. NH Jacksonville is currently one of only 166 Baby Friendly hospitals and birth centers in the U.S., certified by Baby Friendly USA a global ini tiative sponsored by WHO/ UNICEF. The Baby Friendly designa tion is awarded after a rigorous on-site survey is completed, and maintained by continuing to practice 10 crucial program elements. The comprehensive program includes initiating breastfeed ing in the first hour of life, rooming-in with moms and babies in the same room, edu cating staff and patients, and fostering breastfeeding support groups. Throughout the year, NH Jacksonville offers a wide range of classes free-of-charge to patients giving birth at its hospital including baby boot camp, new parent ori entation, prenatal exercise, Hypnobirthing, infant mas sage, breastfeeding and pre pared childbirth. Plus, the hospitals private labor/delivery and maternal/ infant suites offer couplet care (with mom and baby room ing together), breast pumps, breastfeeding counseling from lactation nurses, siesta for the fiesta daily quiet time to sup port feeding, newborn hearing screening, and an educational newborn channel on televi sion. Dads are welcome to stay the night and visiting hours are round-the-clock. NH Jacksonville patients can register for free classes by calling 904-542-2229 (BABY). To learn more about the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (administered in the U.S. by Baby Friendly USA), visit www. babyfriendlyusa.org. Hospital connects new mom and baby with dad at sea For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or email bill.bonser@navy.mil and secure, as no paper forms pass from hand to hand and its less prone to error. He explained that donors directly enter their input online only once, while the information on paper pledge forms is typed and retyped into the system -offering more chances for mistakes to creep in and also consum ing thousands of total work hours in processing. He said ease of use is much greater, since donors using the online pledge option can search local, national or interna tional charities. Here in Washington, we have 4,500 charities, he noted. But nationwide, there are about 20,000 different charities in this campaign. DeCristofaro added that donors also are encour aged to use local CFC web sites and other resources to research charities before giving DFAS their final instructions. I made my gift on Tuesday, [and] I was eas ily matched to my local cam paign, he said. DeCristofaro said the process took him 10 minutes, and the next morn ing he had an email con firming his donation and start date. He added that use of the system, like participation in CFC, is strictly voluntary. Many employees have asked for and will likely prefer electronic options, he said, although anyone who wants to make a one-time gift or use a paper CFC pledge form may still do so. The new option will be available to eligible donors outside of the Defense Department, he noted, as the departments of Health and Human Services, Veterans Affairs, and Energy, along with the Environmental Protection Agency, also are DFAS cli ents. CFC JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013 The U.S. Navy has pre pared and released to the public a Final Environmental Impact Statement/Overseas Environmental Impact Statement (EIS/OEIS) for train ing and testing activities con ducted in the Atlantic Fleet Training and Testing (AFTT) Study Area. The AFTT region covers approximately 2.6 mil lion square nautical miles and encompasses the at-sea portions of Navy training range complex es and research, development, testing and evaluation ranges along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States. The AFTT EIS/OEIS updates the science and analyses of environmental studies that were completed in 2009. This envi ronmental analysis will enable at-sea testing and training so the U.S. Navy can effectively prepare forces to meet national requirements. The results of this study, which incorporates the best available science, coupled with Navys demonstrated track record (60plus years) of similar training and testing with mini mal environmental impacts, indicate that the activities pro posed in this EIS/OEIS will con tinue to have minimal effects on marine mammal and other marine species populations. Monitoring of Navy activities over the past five years supports these conclusions. Computer modeling of Navy activities indicates that marine mam mals may be exposed to sonar sound during training and test ing, however scientific analy sis shows that the vast major ity of those marine mammals modeled exposures will not be injured in any way. The Navy proposes to con duct at-sea training and testing activities; which include: 1) The use of active sonar and explosives primarily within existing training range com plexes and testing ranges along the east coast of the United States, the Gulf of Mexico, pierside locations, port transit channels, lower Chesapeake Bay, Narragansett Bay and St. Andrew Bay. 2) Activities such as sonar maintenance and gunnery exer cises conducted concurrently with ship transits and which may occur outside the Navy training range complex and testing ranges. 3) Pierside sonar testing con ducted as part of ship and sub marine construction, mainte nance, repair, and moderniza tion activities at shipyards, Navy piers, and Navy-contracted shipbuilder locations. Public input was a valuable part of the EIS process, and the Navy accepted input through out a 60-day comment period, conducted from May 11, 2012 to July 10, 2012. The Final EIS/OEIS addresses comments received during this period. The Final EIS/OEIS is available for review at www.AFTTEIS.com. Hard copies of the document are available at the following local libraries: Library 1410 Hwy. 40 E. Kingsland, GA 31548 Main Library 303 N. Laura St. Jacksonville, FL 32202 A Record of Decision is expected to be issued by the Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Energy, Installations and Environment) in November 2013 and will be announced in the Federal Register. Free Breast Care Symposium provides answers to Northeast Florida womenThe sixth annual Pink Ribbon Symposium will be held at the Thrasher-Horne Conference Center (283 College Drive, Orange Park 32085) on Oct. 5 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Founded by Drs. Cynthia Anderson and Linda Sylvester, the event is presented by ICON Oncology at Orange Park Cancer Center and F.R.O.G. (Florida Radiation Oncology Group). Important up-to-date information about breast can cer prevention, early detection and treatment options, the side effects of treatment, and survivorship will be discussed. Plus, it will offer good health and wellness topics, along with a keynote presentation entitled, Laughter is the Best Medicine and an Meet the Experts ses sion, which will allow guests to ask questions of local doctors. More than 500 attend this free symposium annually. This years special guests are two regional female comedians, Gwen Templeton and Roz McCoy, who will headline the event and offer insight into how laughter can ease pain and help the cancer journey in an up-close and personal way. Guests will be treated to a healthy continental breakfast. Topics include an update on breast cancer research, genetics, caregivers, stress relief, caring for your body, health, nutrition and exercise. Everyone is invited to the expo, where up to 60 local and national businesses will showcase their services to help cancer patients and their families. Guests will learn how to care for their body, how sleep can affect cancer treatment, and how best to deal with relation ships. 89 a.m. Exhibits & Continental Breakfast 99:25 a.m. Opening Remarks 9:4010:30 a.m. Session 1 Meet the Experts (lat est updates on radiology, medical oncology, surgical oncology, reconstruction, etc.), Caring for Our Bodies (nutrition, exercise, family genetics, coping with emo tional stress, sexuality, etc.) 10:3011 a.m. Exhibits/Intermission (Silent Auction closes at 11 a.m.) 11 a.m. 12:05 p.m. Session 2 Meet the Experts, Caring for Our Bodies 12:0512:30 p.m. Guest Speakers: Laughter is the Best Medicine 12:3012:40 p.m. Closing Remarks For more information, call 838-2950 or email pinkribbonsymposium@gmail.com. As commissaries resume pre-furlough operations, patrons will see plenty of savings with sales events throughout the store promoting Labor Day promo tions, half-off sales, recipe contests, Oktoberfest cel ebrations and high-value coupons. We want our patrons to know all our stores are back to their normal hours, said Tracie Russ, the Defense Commissary Agencys deputy director of sales. As we head toward the cooler days of autumn, were offering plenty of events to help our custom ers save money and maximize their benefit. One event in particular is a series of scan-down days in September offering 50 percent off certain items in our stateside commissaries. Throughout September, DeCAs industry partners vendors, suppliers and brokers are collaborating with commissaries to offer discounts beyond every day savings. Overseas stores may have substitute events for certain promotional programs. Customers should check with their local store manager to verify when they will be offering the fol lowing sales events: Scan-down days. On Sept. 12, commissaries in the continental United States will offer managers spe cials at 50 percent off on Bartlett pears, Kraft may onnaise (regular and light), Ocean Spray Cranberry Juice, Kelloggs Fruit Loops Cereal and Healthy Choice Chicken Margherita Caf Steamers. Look for future 50 percent off scan-down days on Sept. 18 and 25. This event is not available for commissaries in Alaska, Hawaii, Europe and the Far East. Soup season begins. September is the start of the soup season. Look for commissary displays promot ing special savings on Progresso soups. Oceans Sprays Labor Day Sale. Through Sept. 15, stateside commissaries will display Ocean Spray products from cranberry, grapefruit, diet and light cranberry, sparkling multipacks and the new cran berry lemonade. Look for product demonstrations. The Great Eggo Waffle Off Contest. Throughout September, Eggo waffles and Breyers ice cream brands are sponsoring a recipe contest. To enter, find details on packages of six-, eight-, 10-count Eggo waffle containers that say, The Great Eggo Waffle Off Contest. Shoppers can also find contest infor mation on Eggo and Breyers Facebook sites. Look for the Eggo and Breyers display in your commissary along with store coupons for both brands and prod uct demonstrations. The Oktoberfest in Munich runs from late September until early October, and commis sary shoppers are encouraged to have their own celebrations if they cant make it to Deutschland. Commissaries have a full line of discounted German products available from chocolates, cookies, sauer kraut, mustard and red cabbage to rich German cof fee and more. We Are Family. Quaker and Tropicana present a family-focused promotion exclusively to military commissaries worldwide. Look for large displays to include banners, posters, entry forms and high-value coupons that will cross promote with the commis saries produce, offering $3 off fresh fruit. Twentyfive commissary shoppers will be chosen as a free breakfast winner to receive more than 10 products from Quaker and Tropicana brands. Unilever is offering its 17th Annual Italian & American Festival of Savings through Sept. 25. This years promotion will again feature Unilever brands such as Ragu, Hellmans, Lipton, Wishbone, Bertolli, Slimfast, Skippy and more. More than 125,000 highvalue in-store coupon flyers will be distributed worldwide. Gatorade will offer the Salute to Service pro motion exclusively to military commissaries. This unique continental-U.S.-only event will award com missary shoppers NFL tickets plus a VIP experience. Thirty-two winners (one winner and one guest per team) will be chosen. Look for the in-store display representing the NFL team of choice along with an entry box and entry forms. These displays are located at the 32 commissaries in close proximity to an NFL team. Other CONUS commissaries will be provided football and Gatorade prizes for giveaways. Russ reminded commissary customers they can quickly locate their commissary and participate in the savings theyve earned by going to www.com missaries.com clicking on the Locations tab, then Alphabetical Listing to locate their store and click ing on Local Store Information. Whenever you consistently use your commissary benefit youre saving more than 30 percent com pared to buying groceries in commercial stores, Russ said. We hope this months promotions will help keep even more money in your pocket. Fall savings highlight commissaries return to regular hours Navy releases Atlantic Fleet Testing and Training Final Environmental Impact Statement

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The Greater Jax Area USO has tickets available at the NAS Jax and NS Mayport USO for $15 each, cash transactions only. Guidelines: only) All active duty includ ing Florida National Guard and Reservists on current active duty orders and dependents are eligible to purchase/use these tickets. authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tick ets if member and dependents equals four. If you have less than four you may only pur chase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for mili tary personnel, but dependent children are not authorized to represent the service member/ spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to pur chase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO director. may purchase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest. No excep tions. mands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploy ing or returning during the season.Requests, with justi fication, must be sent to Mike OBrien at mobrien@usojax. com ing excess tickets or reselling tickets will be prohibited from buying any more tickets for the entire season. actions, tickets are first come, first served. For more informa tion, call 778-2821. Tickets are available the following days and timesDateof Game Opponent Time Sale Begins Sept. 29 Indianapolis Colts 1 p.m. Sept. 16 Oct. 20 San Diego Chargers 1 p.m. Oct. 7 Nov. 17 Arizona Cardinals 1 p.m. Nov. 4 Dec. 5 Houston Texans 8:25 p.m. Nov. 25 Dec. 15 Buffalo Bills 1 p.m. Dec. 2 Dec. 22 Tennessee Titans 1 p.m. Dec. 9 Jaguars tickets available at NAS Jax and Mayport USO JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013 17

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2013 COS RULES FIRE TRAINING IA HOMECOMING Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Remembering the tragic timeline of Sept. 11, 2001: The World Trade Center, North Tower At 8:46 a.m., American Airlines Flight 11 crashed with a speed of roughly 490 mph into the north side of the north tower of the World Trade Center, between floors 94 and 98. The World Trade Center, South Tower At 9:02 a.m., United Airlines Flight 175 crashed with a speed of about 590 mph into the south side of the south tower, banked between floors 78 and 84. Killed in both towers: 2,753 persons. The Pentagon, Washington, D.C. At 9:37 a.m., American Airlines Flight 77 crashed into the western side of the Pentagon. All 59 pas sengers were killed, as were 125 Pentagon personnel. Killed:184. Shanksville, Pennsylvania At 10:03 a.m., United Airlines Flight 93 crashed in a field southeast of Pittsburgh in Somerset County. Killed: 40. More than 100 Mad Fox Alumni and their fami lies came to NAS Jacksonville Aug. 23 to participate in VP-5s Gray Fox Heritage Day. The event was an opportunity for former Mad Foxes to see the changes the squadron has gone through since its transition from the P-3C Orion to the P-8A Poseidon. It is our desire to properly honor our incredible past before we start a new chapter for our great squadron. Whether flying the P-V1 Ventura during World War II or the P-3C Orion offshore Libya during Operation Odyssey Dawn our heritage is rich and our legacy long-lasting. You honor us today with your presence, stated VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Matthew Pottenburgh. The day started with a meet-and-greet and a special re-enlistment at Deweys All Hands Club. AO2 Bryce Warde reaffirmed his commitment and dedication of faithful service to his country in front of Mad Foxes both young and old. After the re-enlistment ceremony, Pottenburgh introduced several esteemed guests in attendance two of whom participated in NASAs Project Mercury in 1961. AT3 Archie LaMontagne, while on board a specially outfitted P-2V Neptune, is credited with locating Astronaut Alan Shepards space capsule upon re-entry to Earth on May 5, 1961. Another Mad Fox alumni, AWC Roger Straley, located the re-entry capsule of Astronaut Gus Grissom on July 21, 1961. These two astronauts were the first and second Americans in space. The importance of LaMontagne and Straleys efforts was summed up by Shepard 52 years ago, . . didnt really feel the flight was a success until the recovery had been completed. Its not the fall that hurts; its the sudden stop! Fighting Tigers earn record score on weapons proficiency Led by their gunner, CWO3 Chadwick Stephens, the VP-8 Fighting Tigers aviation ord nancemen completed their Conventional Weapons Technical Proficiency Inspection (CWTPI), by earning a record 770 out of 800 available points. Remembering the terror of Sept. 11 VP-5 hosts Gray Fox Heritage Day NAS Jax CO holds all hands callsNAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander held a series of all hands calls last week for junior and senior Sailors, officers and civilians to discuss his command philosophy and professional excellence policy and getting feedback from the military and civilian personnel how to best support the fleet, family and fighter. Our military and civilian workforce perform vital work in support of our fleet, fighter and family. I wanted to take the opportunity as the new commanding officer to thank them in person for their outstanding work and at the same time share my command philosophy, explained NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander. During the all hands calls, Undersander stressed the importance of the NAS Jax mission: Be ready, provide effective and efficient shore services to the fleet, fighter and family. We are successful when we make others successful. We will provide support and aid to our shipmates, all tenants, and the community of Jacksonville. Undersander praised the NAS Jax team for their continued accomplishments including winning the 2012 Presidential Excellence Award and 2013 Commander, Navy Installations Award as best naval station worldwide. He also discussed communication both up and down using the chain of command, the importance of respecting shipmates and the Navys core values of Honor, Courage and Commitment. AME2(AW) Ruby Gill of NAS Jax said, I believe a captains call is important because communication often gets lost up and down the ranks. For example, a Sailor might be upset that we didnt get a 72-hour liberty chit, but maybe he doesnt understand the

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Sept. 12 1944 5th Fleet carrier aircraft begin three-day attack on Japanese shipping and facilities in Visayas, Philippines. 1952 USS Coral Sea (CVB-43) took Marshall Josip Tito for a one-day cruise in the Adriatic Sea where he observed flight operations. 1961 Navy task force sails to aid the Galveston area after hurricane Carla hits Texas. 1966 Launch of Gemini 11, piloted by Cmdr. Charles Conrad Jr. and Lt. Cmdr. Richard Gordon Jr. The mis sion lasted two days and 23 hours and included 44 orbits at an altitude of 1368.9 km. Recovery was by HS-3 heli copter from USS Guam (LPH-9). 1967Operation Coronado V began in Mekong Delta. 1992 Joint Task Force Hawaii acti vated to provide humanitarian aid after Typhoon Iniki struck Hawaiian Islands. Sept. 13 1814 British bombardment of Fort McHenry inspires the Star Spangled Banner. 1847 Marine Brigade leads U.S. forces that storm Chapultepec Castle near Mexico City, inspiring one line of the Marine Corps Hymn. 1906 Sailors and Marines from USS Denver land in Havana at the request of the Cuban government to preserve order during a revolution. 1939 Navy suspends transfers to the Fleet Reserve after 20 years service and retains men on active duty. 1985 Commander Middle East Force orders escort of Military Sealift Ships in Persian Gulf because of Iranian seizure of merchant vessels. Sept. 14 1899 Gunboat Concord and monitor Monterey capture two insurgent schooners at Aparri, Philippine Islands. 1939 Atlantic Squadron Neutrality Patrol squadron deploys. Sept. 15 1944 Amphibious invasion of Peleliu, Palau Islands, after several days of intense carrier aircraft land and ship bombardment. 1950 U.S. forces under Vice Adm. Arthur Struble achieve an amphibious landing at Inchon, Korea. 1967 Operation Crimson Tide in Mekong Delta. Sept. 16 1854 Cmdr. David Farragut takes possession of Mare Island, the first U.S. Navy Yard on the Pacific. 1917 Navy Department authorizes establishment of 16 Naval air stations abroad. 1922 Cmdr. Halsey Powell on board USS Edsall is senior officer directing the evacuation of 250,000 Greek refugees from Turkey after war between Greece and Turkey. 1940 President Roosevelt signs Selective Training and Service Act, the first peacetime draft. 1958 Submarine USS Grayback fires first operational launch of Regulus II surface to surface guided missile off California coast; the missile carries first U.S. mail sent by guided missile. 1966 USS Oriskany helicopters rescue 44 crewmen of British merchant ship August Moon near Hong Kong. Sept. 17 1861 Union landing party from USS Massachusetts takes possession of Ship Island south of New Orleans, La. This was the headquarters for Adm. David Farraguts Gulf Coast Blockading Squadron. Sept. 18 1926 Navy brings relief aid to Miami after a severe hurricane. 1936 Squadron 40-T, based in the Mediterranean, established to pro tect U.S. interests and citizens around Iberian peninsula throughout the Spanish Civil War. 1941 U.S. Navy ships escort east bound British trans-Atlantic convoy for first time (Convoy HX-150). After nearly 17 years with an all-consuming fear of flying that left me grounded, I got on a plane with my husband andflew to Washington, D.C. (I even flew back without Dustin.) I thought I was cured. So did Dustin. Nothing unusual had happened during either of the flights in July, besides the fact that Icried like a baby and gripped the arm rests until veins popped out on my hands. But I had taken the first step, and that was the mostimportant thing. So Dustin and I scheduled another trip to D.C. in August. I would be flying with my husband both ways this time, and itseemed I had little to fear anymore. I still cried on the flight down, and, like last time, I worried about the flight home the wholeweek. When I woke up the morning of our return flight, my heart was pounding in my chest. I ate breakfast with the familiar hum ofanxiety in the back of my mind. I felt sick to my stomach. The airport was busy because it was Labor Day weekend. I mentally sank into myself, the way I always do when Im nervousor afraid. Dustin made hopeful small talk that I was too consumed to hear, and he reminded me how in less than two hours, ourboys would be waiting for us. He never thought Id back out. We got on the tram that would take us to the CRJ-200 waiting on the tarmac. Two children, who were traveling alone, werecrying in the backseat. This got my heart rate going again. I thought about my own children crying, and my mind went to very darkplaces. Still, I thought Id fly. Once I was buckled in my seat on the airplane, I lowered my forehead to my knees, and Dustin rubbed my back. The flightattendant noticed us and came over to make sure everything was okay. The two children were still sniffling and crying behind us. My wife is afraid of flying, Dustin said. But shell be fine. Would you like to meet the pilots? the flight attendant asked. Sometimes that helps. I unbuckled and followed the flight attendant to the front of the small airplane. I really wanted this to help. But when the pilotsturned around, they looked like they were 20. I didnt see any grey hairs or tough skin from years of shaving. My throat wentinstantly dry. Its going to be a great flight, the captain said with a boyish grin. Theres some bad weather ahead, so it will probably bebumpy, but I turned around, pushed Dustin aside, and ran down the steps to the tarmac. I didnt care that my purse and computer werestill inside the aircraft. Nearby, airplanes were starting their engines. It was loud and windy on the ground. Dustin came down the steps, and Icould see that he was frus trated maybe even panicked. For the first time, both of us realized that I might not do it. Get on the plane, Dustin yelled over the noise of the engines. I cant. Just get on the plane and well be home in two hours. I was hysterical now, and other people on the plane were beginning to peer out their windows. If there were any other anxiousfliers that day, Im sure they were tempted to run, too. One of the pilots came out and asked if he could help. He wanted to explain the principles of flight to us. Im a pilot, Dustin said exasperated. And so is her dad. The pilot looked confused. I wanted to say, Get about 20 more yearsexperience and take back what you said about rough weather. When the pilot left us again, Dustin said, Were getting older, Sarah. Everyone is going to look younger to us our doctors,dentists, the chil drens teachers. But it didnt matter what he said. I couldnt get back on the plane. Dustin retrieved our bags and without saying another word (for about an hour), rented us a car and began driving me home.Our plane landed safely in Bangor before we had even gotten outside of DC traffic. Anxiety: Its a rotten thing to deal with and it never really goes away. Its hard to explain to anyone who hasnt experienced it.I know that my fear is irrational and inconvenient. And this week, on the anniversary of 9/11, I also know what I eventually have todo: get back on a plane and reclaim my independence. So, about that fear of flying .

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Rear Adm. Sean Buck, head of the Navys 21st Century Sailor office and the Navys Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) officer, answered questions from All Hands Magazine about his new assignment including the Navy SAPR efforts. The 21st Century Sailor initiative pulls together objectives and policies to ensure that every Sailors total fitness needs including physical, mental, social and spiritual are met so that they can successfully meet the challenges that they face during their mili tary careers. The purpose of the office is to better integrate, better synchronize and tighten up all of our programs that we had over the years that work toward affecting the resiliency of a Sailor, Buck said. Its a broad portfolio. The 21st Century Sailor office ensures that Sailors have the tools to meet the CNOs three tenets Warfighting First, Operate Forward, and Be Ready They are responsible for: nity; The Navys 21st Century Sailor office is also in charge of the Navys Sexual Assault Prevention and Response program. Buck talked about how sexual assault awareness is every Sailors and civilians problem, and training is a way to raise awareness and ensure that Sailors have the tools to eliminate the problem. Be sure that you are a participant in creating a command climate that encourages dignity, respect, professionalism and has no tolerance for sexist behavior, sexual harassment or sexual assault. Sailors should be completely intolerant of those things no matter what command you serve, Buck said. Buck promotes Navy SAPR effort Part of Clay Countys heritage is the countys strong ties to the military dating back to the early 1800s. Today, there are over 24,000 veterans who call Clay County home. These veterans rep resent service to our nation from World War II through the current conflicts as well as decades of service during peace time. The Clay County Veterans Service Office is staffed with a full time veterans service officer and a part time veterans program assistant; both available and eager to assist veterans and/or family members with fil ing claims and/or other related needs. The office is now located on the second floor of the Clay County Administration Building at 477 Houston Street, Green Cove Springs, Fla. The office is open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. The former Veterans Service Office at 1565 CR 315 has been closed. To make an appoint ment, call (904) 269-6326.Clay County Veterans Services Office has relocated JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013 Personnel from Jacksonville Navy Metro Fire & Emergency Services are using The Zone to provide real-world fire and rescue training Sept. 5-14 before the former Building 798 (MWR Brew House and Bingo Hall) located at Saratoga Ave. and Jason St. is demolished. Training Chief David Rickel explained that the first exercise involved cutting ventilation holes in the roof to prevent back-draft conditions. After the safety brief, teams will climb onto the roof and use special gasolinepowered rotary rescue saws to cut holes that release combustible gases from inside the burning structure. Ideally, achieving vertical ventilation in a onestory structure like The Zone could take from 15 to 20 minutes. Above all, crew safety is our number one concern here. Rickel added that a variety of fire fighter-down and victim rescues will also be conducted over the nine-day training period. To add more realism in certain scenarios, a smoke generator may be employed. Today, a two-person crew from Orange Park Fire Department will join NAS Jax firefighters in the training exercises, said Rickel. Lt. Mike Wallace of Orange Park Fire Department said it isnt often that they can use a vacant building such as The Zone for skills training. Classroom training is good but doing live scenarios in a large structure like The Zone is high-value training. Its a great way to put our skills and equipment into hands-on training, said Wallace Assistant Fire Chief Jamie Sherer noted that The Zone fire suppression water system (sprinkler system) is still functional and adds realism to firefighting teams entering the building. When a fires temperature reaches about 165 degrees, a water bulb in the sprinkler line explodes automatically sending an alarm to the regional dis patch center, as well as turning on the sprinklers that help knock down the fire until firefighters arrive and get lines into the building. Overall, were going to get a lot of high-quality training from this building. Assistant Fire Chief James Gray agreed, Its rare anymore that we get a building on base thats slated for demolition so weve got a lot of training scheduled for the next week. Because of manpower and budgetary issues, we also invited some of our partners out side the gate in this case, the Orange Park and Clay County fire departments to join us and take advantage of this opportunity for improving our interop erability. Vertical ventilation is designed to take super-heated toxic smoke and gases out of a building so firefighters can more safely do their jobs as they search for victims. Gray explained that the stations ladder company carries all the tools required for creating vertical ventila tion, while an engine company fights the fire at ground level. F T Z

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013 5 Photos by Clark Pierce

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The 66 Naval Reserve units and roughly 2,000 Naval Reservists of Navy Operational Support Center (NOSC) Jacksonville welcomed a new commander on Sept. 6 during the change of command ceremony. Capt. Jerome Hamel turned over command to Capt. Kimberly Miller during a ceremony aboard Naval Air Station Jacksonville. Hamel had one of the shortest com mand tours, serving just over 70 days after he vol unteered for the short tour to fill a gapped billet after the previous com manding officers retire ment. It was a privi lege to serve at NOSC Jacksonville, said Hamel. The drive and desire displayed by our Selected Reservists is inspiring to us all. Hamels relief arrives at NOSC Jacksonville after completing a tour as operational support officer for Commander, U.S. Naval Forces South/ Commander 4th Fleet. Helping Sailors is whats exciting about this job, said Miller. They mobilize to defend our freedom and meet the operational requirements of the Navy, and we are able to support and assist them and their families. A native of Cincinnati, Ohio, Miller received her commission in December 1992 from the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (NROTC) pro gram at the Ohio State University. She earned her Juris Doctor from University of Cincinnati and a Masters degree in National Security and Strategic Studies from the U.S. Naval War College. She served her initial sea tour on board USS Truett (FFT 1095), with follow on tours to USS Paul F. Foster (DD 964) and USS Ramage (DDG 61). Her shore tours include Afloat Training Group Pacific in San Diego, as a cruise mis sile instructor, Officer in Charge of Naval Reserve Mobile Inshore Communications Facility and Commanding Officer of Afloat Training Group Pacific Northwest. Hamel is transferring to Commander, Navy Region Southeast Reserve Component Command, which is co-located with NOSC Jacksonville. NOSC Jax welcomes new commander 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013

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In March 2012, OS2(SW/IDW) Danielle Ward volunteered to fill a forward deployed Individual Augmentee (IA) billet for eight months in Afghanistan. Ward, a native of San Diego, is currently assigned to Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jacksonville. Ward left Jacksonville in May 2012 and traveled to Camp Atterbury Joint Maneuver Training Center in Edinburgh, Ind., a training base for the Indiana National Guard. She was taught how to be a Soldier, and, in September, she was fully qualified and ready to deploy. In October 2012, Ward was assigned to Regional Command South (RC-South), a Tactical Operations Center in Uruzgan, Afghanistan. The RC-South Team supports the government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan and Afghan National Security Forces. They conduct security operations and strengthen good governance to defeat the insurgency, retain and expand security in key terrain, ensure transition progress, and improve conditions for economic growth. The areas of responsibility include the provinces of Kandahar, Uruzgan, Zabul and Daykundi. The contrib uting NATO Nations are Albania, Bulgaria, Canada, France, Romania, Slovakia, U.K., U.S., and contrib uting Non-NATO Nations are Australia, Jordan, and Singapore. After reporting, Ward was assigned to the Provincial Reconstruction Team (PRT). This team is comprised of a military component (civil affairs/force pro tection, etc.), civilian police advisors, and civilian representatives of United States and other national government foreign affairs agencies. The PRTs are the primary civil-mil itary relations tool in Afghanistan and Iraq and are described as a means to extend the reach and enhance the legitimacy of the central government into the provinces of Afghanistan. Ward was the only operations specialist for the PRT. Her responsibilities included con ducting communications equipment operability checks prior to missions and, during daily missions, monitoring chat, the high frequency radios, and the units Blue Force Tracker (BFT) system. The BFT system is a GPS-enabled system that provides military command ers and forces with location informa tion about friendly (and despite its name, also hostile) military forces. Aside from operational management, she stepped outside of her job requirements and participated in intelligence gathering operations outside of the base and in surrounding villages. Her role within the Intel team was to gather and log informa tion from the local community about the PRT construction projects and the impact it had on the village. This was an eye-opening life experience that tested my limits, physically and mentally. At times it was difficult, being away from family and friends during the holidays, but I feel that I have grown as a person, said Ward. It was a strange transition from the beginning of my IA until the day I left, she continued. When I first got there, it was very nerve-wracking. Alarms and sirens would sound at random times. By the time I left, it was second nature. Ward added, There were two instances that were more stressful than nor mal. The first was a threat of IEDs being planted around the base. We had to wear our full protective body gear at all times when outside of our connex box. It was extremely hot and the threat that something could blow up as youre walking to the mess hall made for a very stressful time. The second involved an IED blowing up at one of our construction sites, she said. The blast knocked out all communications with our unit, and we did not know the status of our teams. In the end, I lost three soldiers, I attended training with. Ward also recalled some positive memories of her IA tour. Even though there were some stressful times and some sad times, there were plenty of good times. I took charge of the MWR program for the base. I knew that most of the Soldiers there were deploying for the first time and I wanted to make the holidays special for them, she said. During Halloween, I coordinated a costume contest. On Thanksgiving, I made sure we had a full-blown dinner with all of the trimmings. To celebrate Christmas, I had all the Soldiers ask family members to send them decora tions. We had lights everywhere, and it was a very festive environment. And the secret Santa was a lot of fun too! During her eight months in Afghanistan, Ward made a positive impact on the Afghan people and the Soldiers of the RC-South. She was awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal and the Army Commendation Medal. Her words sum it up best, I have made friends and have experienced moments that change your prospective on life all together. I know that my work over there helped a lot of people in a lot of different ways and I would absolutely do it again! FACSFAC Jax Sailor completes successful IA tour VP-8 CWTPI is conducted by Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Weapons School (MPRWS) instructors prior to a squadrons deployment. In this case, VP-8 was tested on preoperational tasks, weapon control and weapon loading procedures. We are here to ensure that every one operates the same, fleet-wide, said AOC Jason Worek, MPRWS ordnance leading chief petty officer. When it comes time for deployment, the stan dard will be set for all to adhere to. The inspection concluded with a successful tactical employment exercise conducted by VP-8 Combat Aircrew Eight (CAC-8). Beginning more than a month prior to inspection, CAC-8 obtained the necessary tactical publications, coordinated with the aviation ordnancemen, and conducted a dry-run event. On Aug. 29, they employed four MK-62 Quick-strike mines and 26 flares on the Lake George firing range in northeast Florida. The impressive score gained praise from the highest levels of the patrol and reconnaissance com munity. Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 Capt. Eric Weise reflected, I havent heard a more positive result from CWTPI during my tour here. On behalf of the MPRWS, Worek added, From the beginning of the CWTPI to the very end, VP-8 did excellent. They are the best patrol squadron weve inspected in the last year and a half. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013 7

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The annual Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) adds a new feature for donors this year: an online pledge form option avail able through the Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS) MyPay website, that most service members and civilians already use to view their leave and earnings state ments. Anthony DeCristofaro is assistant director of the DoD Voluntary Campaign Management Office, which is within the Washington Headquarters Services human resources director ate. He told American Forces Press Service during a Sept. 6 telephone interview that the online pledge option offers several advantages over paper pledge forms: from any computer; Combined Federal Campaign adds online option for donors at MyPay ALL HANDS NAS Jax COs command philosophySailors Creed I am a United States Sailor. Jacksonville (NAS Jax). NAS Jax personnel and their families make up the NAS Jax family. I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States of America, : Be ready, provide effective and efficient shore services to the fleet, fighter, and family. We are successful when we make others successful. We will provide support and aid to our shipmates, all tenants, and the community of Jacksonville. And I will obey the orders of those appointed over me. well as verbal. Respect shipmates. Every person has a critical role to fulfill in the command. Respect earns trust, and trust is the glue that makes teams stronger. Without teamwork, we will fail our family and fail in our task. Be sharp. Discipline in the job is an exten sion of personal discipline. Set, maintain, and enforce high standards. Be proud of your appear ance, your uniform, and your workplace. I represent the fighting spirit of the Navy, and those who have gone before me to defend freedom and democracy around the world. Gulf, U.S. naval air power has left its mark on the pages of history. Do it right! Do not bring shame upon yourself, this command, nor the memory of those who have gone before us. When mistakes are made, admit it quickly and learn from it. Then move on. I proudly serve my countrys Navy combat team with Honor, Courage, and Commitment. Stay positive. We will work hard and play hard, but not every day is going to be fun. A positive attitude, enthusiasm and good humor will get us through the rough times in good order. Communicate! Good communication is essential in all that we do. First, communicate early and often up and down the chain. The commanding offi cers door is always open if issues cannot be quickly resolved. Manage risk smartly. Naval aviation is a risky business, but the mission comes first. Accept only the lowest level of prudent risk. Our shipmates are too important to do otherwise. I am committed to excellence and the fair treatment of all. Goals. Personal goals are important. Every person at NAS Jax will be challenged and encouraged to develop as a person and professionally as quickly as possible. Choices. Every person has the right to make choices, choices have conse quences. People will be held responsible for their choices, so make the right ones. Time for family. Take time to develop the relationship with your immediate family and your extended NAS Jax family. Both are important to have a successful career. entire mission. A captains call clari fies misunderstandings amongst junior Sailors and civilians and allows them to address concerns to the commanding officer, she added. In addition to operational issues, Undersander engaged the troops on quality of life issues affecting them and their families and the need to keep families informed and to realize the important role they play as part of the NAS Jax team. I believe the all hands officer call is a great thing. As a newly reporting officer to NAS Jax, it gave me the opportunity to understand the true intent of the COs policies and I could infer by his voice inflection and tone what he truly cares about, said NAS Jax Security Officer Lt. Ryan Platt. Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregistration is required at 5425745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2013: To register for any of the above workshops call 542-5745.FFSC offers life skills workshops 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013

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Commander Task Group (CTG) 72.2 recently completed a month-long detachment to New Zealand and Australia, supporting Tactical Antisubmarine Warfare (ASW) Maritime Exercise 13 (TAMEX13) conducted out of Royal Australian Air Force Base Pearce, maritime partnership building at Royal New Zealand Air Force Base Whenuapai, New Zealand, and Talisman Saber 2013 (TS-13) out of Royal Australian Air Force Base Townsville, Australia. Detachment Officer in Charge, Lt. Cmdr. Brian Schneider led a diverse team of active duty and reserve aircrew and maintenance professionals from NAS Jacksonvilles VP-26 Tridents and VP-62 Broadarrows, and NAS Whidbey Islands VP-1 Screaming Eagles and VP-69 Totems. VP-26s Combat Aircrew One (CAC-1) and Mission Commander Lt. Zachary Sipes, represented CTG-72.2 at TAMEX-13, flying three ASW sorties in cooperation with the Royal Australian Air Forces 10 Squadron. TAMEX is a quarterly bilateral exercise series which aims to enhance regional cooperation, promote understanding, and build trust and cooperation in order to increase collective operational readiness. After TAMEX-13, CAC-1 flew their aircraft and maintenance crew across the Australian continent and Tasman Sea to Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) Base Whenuapai near Auckland, New Zealand. This was an historic event. The arrival marked the first time a U.S. P-3 has detached to Whenuapai since 1984. Military cooperation between the U.S. and New Zealand deteriorated in that year because of disputes about the visiting rights of nuclear-armed ships and aircraft. While in New Zealand, the detachment was joined by VP-26 Executive Officer Cmdr. Greg Smith, who engaged the Royal New Zealand air staff on topics such as maritime domain awareness, informa tion sharing, P-3 detachment operations, and interoper ability between United States Navy and RNZAF P-3s. CAC-1 conducted rider exchanges on cooperative ASW and area familiarization flights, com peted with the Kiwis in American football and rugby, and enjoyed first-rate hosting from their RNZAF counter parts. On July 15, Schneider relo cated the detachment to RAAF Base Townsville, Australia for TS-13. TS-13 is the fifth in a series of biannual, bilat eral exercises that focused on increasing cooperation and coordination capabilities between the United States and Australias sea, air and land forces. TS-13 was the largest in the series to date, featuring the involvement of 22,000 ser vice members, 15 U.S. naval vessels, 11 Australian vessels, as well as troops from Canada and observers from Vietnam, Japan, Indonesia and the United Kingdom. TS-13 exercised crisisaction planning and contin gency response, enhancing both nations capabilities to deal with regional contingen cies and terrorism. TS-13 joint exercises were performed by the Australian Defense Force and the United States Military across six locations in north ern and central Australia, but the bulk of the exercises were concentrated at the Shoalwater Bay Military Training Area and Australias territorial sea and exclusive economic zone. Schneider was joined by 22 maintainers and three combat aircrews from all four CTG 72.2 squadrons. Tridents, Totems, and Broadarrows, formed a superb integrated mainte nance team. VP-69 CAC-2, VP-26 CAC-5, and VP-26 CAC9, along with individual air crewmen from VP-1, flew 22 sorties of ASW, surface war fare and direct support mis sions in support of the George Washington Carrier Strike Group and the Bonhomme Richard Amphibious Ready Group. In all, CTG-72.2 flew 172 hours in only 13 days, executed an amazing on-station comple tion rate of 109 percent, and conducted 18 missions involv ing turnovers with RAAF air crews. The integration of and coordination between RAAF and USN active and reserve crews exceeded all expecta tions. The aircrew and main tenance professionals assigned to the detachment truly embodied the One Team, One Fight mantra CTG-72.2 has lived by since arriving in the area of responsibility in May. Tridents lead CTG 72.2 to Southern Hemisphere for international exercises VP-26 CAC 2 detaches to U-Tapao Thailand for SEASURVEX 13-4Combat Aircrew (CAC) 2 and maintenance pro fessionals of CTG 72.2 returned to Okinawa, Japan Aug. 17 after a six-day detachment to Thailand. The Royal Thai Navys 102 squadron hosted them for Sea Surveillance Exercise (SEASURVEX) 13-4 at U-Tapao Royal Thai Navy Airbase (RTNAB) to foster their relationship with the U.S. Navy. Arriving Aug. 11, CAC-2 was warmly greeted by hosting personnel and briefed for the weeks events. The crew had an opportunity to travel to the city of Pattaya to explore the local area and Thai culture. The entire nation of Thailand celebrated the birthday of Queen Sirikit Kittiyakara the next day, shutting down government business and providing a unique opportunity for cultural exploration. Detachment personnel visited the spaces of 102 Squadron to coordinate the upcoming flights and compare procedures and equipment. Patrol Plane Commander Lt. Ross Notz and Tactical Coordinator Lt. j.g. Troy Balding discussed the exercise with the Thai Navy crew and clarified guidance for safety and communication including altitude, airspace and flight time assignments. After planning was completed, the aircrew and maintainers of 102 Squadron toured the U.S. P-3C, and the American maintainers were given tours and tutorials of Thai Navy maintenance facilities and practices. SEASURVEX 13-4 then shifted to the flight phase. During the first event a P-3T of 102 Squadron joined CAC-2 in a designated exercise area over the Gulf of Thailand to conduct maritime domain awareness and demonstrate the capabilities of the automatic identification system which is used to identify surface vessels. After 90 minutes on station, the two aircraft safely executed an altitude swap before returning to U-Tapao. The next flight involved collaboration between CAC-2 and a Royal Thai Navy SH-60B Seahawk. The JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013 9

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Communications between the Navys CPO Messes and Wardrooms has never been more important. During a CPO 365 event Sept. 5 at NAS Jacksonville, eight command ing officers met with more than 100 CPO Selectees to discuss leadership expectations, as well as the CPO Mission, Vision and Guiding Principles. It all took place at the COs Round Table that was orga nized by NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander. These commanding officers are going to share their perspective on what were looking for in a chief petty officer. Theres a lot of knowledge and leader ship here today, so please listen closely and learn more about the importance of leadership and mentoring. Round table participants included: NRSE Chief of Staff Capt. Steven Blaisdell; FRCSE Commanding Officer Capt. John Kemna; NAVFAC Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Chris Kiwus; NAVSUP-FLC Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Duke Heinz; HSM-72 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Derek Fleck; NRSE-RCC Commanding Officer Capt. Gregory Smith; TPU/PCP Jax Commanding Officer Cmdr. Carol Schrader; and VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Matthew Pottenburgh. Blaisdell congratulated the selectees, saying that they worked hard and earned the right to be here. I cant explain leadership in five minutes, but its a lot more than painting by the numbers. The things that got you here will carry you onto the next level and make you successful. Its all about who you really are as a leader and how you apply yourself as a CPO. The most complex things we deal with are people and now its your job to get the most out of your people. With 30 years experience (many of them as an LDO), Schrader expressed her utmost respect for chief petty officers. The biggest thing I expect from a chief is honesty in every aspect of their job. By embrac ing CPO 365, I have no doubt you all will be welcome addi tions to the Chiefs Mess. Fleck told the audience, Mission accomplishment and taking care of our people Im a firm believer that the only place that actually happens is in the Chiefs Mess. As an E7, youve reached the point where you understand the command mission and your Sailors who will accomplish it. Yes, there will be times when you dont have all the answers so pre pare for a lot more learning after youre pinned with the respected fouled anchor. To help you along, find a mentor in the Chiefs Mess. Heinz said, The vitality of the Goat Locker and your par ticipation within it is the base of success for most Navy com mands. Thats even more important as we enter a chal lenging future of personnel and equipment cuts that will pro foundly affect the readiness of our Navy. Be ready to provide your deckplate perspective on needed technical skills and leadership expertise to your chain of command. Undersander welcomed the soon-to-be chiefs with three tips for success. One, as a chief you will be looked to for all the answers. Make sure you do what it takes to provide the correct answer rather than just a fast answer and your credibility will soar. Two, you have already proven your technical expertise, and that is expected to continue. Your focus now should be on larger command priorities and Sailorization. Three, the CO counts on a chief to reinforce his/her pol icies. A chief must be able to look at a situation from the perspective of a CO, as well as that of a junior Sailor, and be able to discern when it is appropri ate to advocate for the individual Sailors exemption or to reinforce the command policy without exception. After the COs expressed their congratulations and expecta tions to the prospective CPOs, many took part in the questionand-answer session of the end of the meeting. What COs look for in a CPO JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013 11

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VP-5 Mad Fox of the WeekAs VP-5 continues its busy schedule operating and maintaining the P8-A Poseidon, the squadron is highlighting one outstanding Mad Fox each week. This weeks Mad Fox of the Week is AWO1 James Reisen. Reisen was born in Pensacola, and has one sister. His grandfather, retired Navy Lt. Rabren, enlisted in the Navy, earned a commission, and became a surface warfare officer. He retired after 24 years of faithful service to his country. As an aviation warfare operator, Reisen is trained in the acoustic track ing of subsurface targets. He is charged with analyzing acoustic data and pro viding the tactical operator on the plane with the position, course, and speed of the target the crew is tracking. It is critical that acoustic operators be as pre cise as possible in analyzing the data because every decision the tactical coordinator makes is based on the information he is receiving from his acoustic operator. Reisen checked into VP-5 in June. Before checking in, his previous com mand was VP-30. While there, he was deployed to Balad, Iraq on an Individual Augmentee assignment. While deployed he was assigned to the Joint Airborne Battle Staff where he qualified as mis sion commander aboard a C-130 and was tasked with providing top cover and communications relay for troops on the ground. While at VP-5, Reisen is tasked with instructing upgrading acoustic opera tors. Keeping up on the ever-changing missions of the maritime patrol community is challenging, commented Reisen. However, there is nothing more satisfying than flying on top of a submarine and being able to classify and track him for a period of time. When Reisen is not busy training his fellow acoustic operators, he enjoys pho tographing nature and architectural scenes. He also owns a 33-foot sailboat and enjoys sailing it on the waters along the Florida and Georgia coast. VP-5 is currently in the inter-deploy ment readiness cycle aboard NAS Jacksonville. VP-5Mad Fox alumni attended from all over the country, even as far as Detroit. Retired Lt. Cmdr. Lawrence Beecher brought the very first Mad Fox logo painted by Ensign J.W. Judge Parker and presented it to VP-5 for display on their heritage hall. We held our very first reunion at my home in Michigan in 1976 and since then have held one every year for 31 years until we stopped in 2007, explained Beecher. We are extremely grateful to the current Mad Foxes who gave us the opportunity to meet once more and share our experi ences. Retired ADCM John Rosa, 91, also earned Silver Fox recognition. He served with the VB-135 Blind Foxes from 1941-43. He was shot down over Russia during World War II and remained a Prisoner of War until the war was over. He was selected as a chief petty officer and returned (after the squadron designation changed from VB-135 to VP-5) to the Mad Foxes from 1957-61. The squadron was proud to announce the creation of the VP-5 ADCM John W. Rosa Maintenance Chief Petty Officer of the Year award. ADC Rodwell Lloyd from Georgetown, Guyana was announced as the first award winner for 2013. After the meet-and-greet, all for mer Mad Foxes and their families were given a tour of the P-8A Integrated Training Facility. They were shown the classrooms where the squadron spent countless hours studying the intricate details of their new platform. They toured the Part Task and Weapons Tactics trainers where air crews employ the new aircraft in a simulated operational environment. The high point for most was the opportunity for former PV-1 and P-2V pilots to get their first stick time in the brand new P-8A Poseidon operational flight trainer. The activities then moved to Hangar 511 where the former Mad Foxes had the chance to see the VP-5 spaces and tour the P-8A Poseidon. Maintainers and aircrew eagerly escorted the former Mad Foxes and their families through the work centers and aircraft explaining the different jobs and responsibilities, capabilities of the aircraft, and show ing off what they had learned through seven months of hard work during the transition. The culminating event of the day was a luncheon back at Deweys All Hands Club. Both current and former Mad Foxes were treated to Retired Lt. Cmdr. Roger Clement recounting his mission in 1952 in which he and his crew were forced to bail out of their P-2V Neptune over Paris, France. Everyone was cap tivated as he explained how all 13 air crew members were able to make sound decisions under immense pressure and successfully bailout of their aircraft. The VP-5 Gray Fox Heritage Day afforded squadron alumni the oppor tunity to learn about the next chapter of maritime patrol with the squadrons transition to the P-8A Poseidon. It also allowed current squadron members the chance to learn about the proud and illustrious heritage estab lished by the actions of the Mad Foxes and the Blind Foxes who came before them. Kids First of Florida is looking for foster/adoptive parents Are you committed to loving and nurturing a child in your home? At least 21 years old? Married? Single? Divorced? Separated? Financially able to provide for your familys present needs Do you have enough space in your home to accommodate an addi tional child? Want to make a life time of difference in the life a child? Join us Sept. 17 at 6 p.m. to learn more about foster parenting and/ or adoption and find out what resources are avail able to you as a foster/ adoptive parent with our agency. homes are especially needed for teens, sibling groups and young adults (ages 18-21). Mentors are also needed. Call 2785644, Ext. 2066 or 2100. 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Sept. 13, 7 p.m. Nalani Quintello Sept. 27, 7 p.m. Pam Affronti DirectTV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL action on one of Deweys five big screens. Arrive early for your choice of game. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 510 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 126 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not includedFitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Lap swim (no concessions, slide or waterpark will be open) Mon. Fri. 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m., 4:30-7 p.m. Recreational swim Sat. & Sun 11 a.m. 6 p.m.I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_mwritt@navy.mil Jacksonville Zoo Spooktacular $9. Universal Halloween Horror Nights: Tickets coming soon! Stop by ITT to find out more about dates & pricing. Halloween Horror Nights visits ITT on Oct. 2, 10 a.m. 2 p.m. Stop by to win great prizes! TobyMac Tickets: Nov. 17, 7 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Arena, $26. Waves of Honor Special: Seaworld Orlando Adult $46.50, Child $42.25. Busch Gardens Tampa Adult $45, Child $40.50. ITT Trip to the Yahala Country Bakery: Sept. 28, 8 a.m. 3 p.m., $25. 29th Annual Mount Dora Craft Fair: Oct. 26, 8 a.m. 3 p.m., $20. Orlando Magic vs. New Orleans Pelicans Basketball: Oct. 9, Veterans Memorial Arena, section 102 at 7 pm, $55. Jacksonville Jaguars: Section 147 Bud Zone, $70. Jags shuttle bus $12. The Artist Series Broadway in Jax 2013 2014 Season: Tickets available now! Mamma Mia!: Oct. 19, 2013, 8 p.m., $60.50. Celtic Thunder: Nov. 10, 2013, 7 p.m., $80. Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus: Jan. 17 & 18, 2014, $51. War Horse: Feb. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $68.50. Memphis: Mar. 22, 2014, 8 pm, $65. Million Dollar Quartet: Apr. 26, 2014, 8 pm, $65. The D* Word: Oct. 4 Oct. 25, 2014, $43.75 $46.The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Paintball Trip Sept. 14 at 9 a.m. HabiJax Volunteer Opportunity Sept. 21 at 7 a.m. Barracks Bash Sept. 26, 48 p.m. Located in the field next to the barracks.NAS Jax Golf Club Golf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 NAS Jax Club Championship Sept. 14 & 15 at 8 a.m. $80, includes golf both days, lunch both days, trophies for the division winners and gift certificates for flight winners Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Sept. 10 & 24 for active duty Sept. 12 & 26 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20, Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27 Third annual Riverfest Sept. 28, 10:30 a.m. 3 p.m. Featuring music, food, free stand-up paddleboard lessons, kayak lessons and more!Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Before and After School Registration going on now! Fees based on household income. Movie Under the Stars Patriots Grove Sept. 20 at 7:30 p.m. Featuring Despicable Me 2Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Oct. 7 Nov. 20 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013 13

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14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013 two aircraft practiced anti-submarine warfare (ASW) using a submerged target that simulated a submarine, allowing the Thai helicopter crew to make use of their dipping sonar. Aircrew from 102 Squadron flew with CAC-2 to experience ASW aboard the U.S. P-3C. After returning to U-Tapao, the Thai and American crews enjoyed a sports day. They played a spirited game of indoor soccer, presented gifts, and enjoyed a cultural exchange to commemorate the end of the exercise. SEASURVEX 13-4 has been an outstand ing success. Working with the Royal Thai Navy was a great opportunity to practice interoperability and to execute maritime domain awareness in the Gulf of Thailand, said Lt. Cmdr. James Dundon, officer in charge of the U.S. detachment. The last day the detachment was spent volunteering at the Khwm r Boys School outside of Pattaya. After a traditional Thai performance, the men and women of CTG 72.2 painted the entrance to the school, pro viding some necessary maintenance and promoting good will with the Thai people. The schools principal, teachers and students then gave a guided tour of the land, explaining that the school provides for the children with food cultivated on site. The school produces a wide variety of fruits, veg etables, animals and fish. After the tour, another game of soccer ensued with the students defeating the American visitors 1-0. SEASURVEX 13-4 proved to be a great success in terms of building bilateral ties and cultural aware ness. The flights measurably increased interoperability between the U.S. and Royal Thai navies. In six short days, CAC-2 and their team of maintenance profes sionals significantly improved U.S.-Thai collaboration in the airborne maritime patrol mission. VP-26 As the nation observes Suicide Prevention Month, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel issued a message Sept. 3 to the men and women of the Defense Department, emphasizing the departments collective resolve in its efforts to prevent military suicides. The Department of Defense has no more important respon sibility than supporting and protecting those who defend our country and that means we must do everything possible to prevent military suicide. As we observe Suicide Prevention Month, the entire DoD commu nity Service members, civil ians, members of our families and leaders at every level must demonstrate our collective resolve to prevent suicide, to promote greater knowledge of its causes and to encourage those in need to seek support. No one who serves this country in uni form should ever feel they have nowhere to turn. The Department of Defense has invested more than $100 million into research on the diagnosis and treatment of depression, bipolar disorder and substance abuse, as well as interventions for relation ship, financial and legal issues all of which can be associated with suicide. We are working to reduce drug and alcohol abuse and we are steadily increasing the number of mental health professionals and peer support counselors. Effective suicide prevention training is critical to all these efforts and we are instructing our leaders on how to recognize the signs and symptoms of cri sis and encourage service members to seek support. We are also reaching out to military families and the broader community to enlist their support in this cause. Seeking behavioral health care is a choice that embod ies moral courage, honor and integrity. Those values are at the foundation of what that we stand for and what we defend. The Military Crisis Line is there for all who need it. I encourage any one in need to call 1-800-2738255 and press one to speak to a trained professional, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. This service is confidential and available to all service members and their families. Always remember that our most valuable resource is each other. When one of us faces a challenge, we all must stand together. By fighting as one team, we can and we will help prevent suicide. Thank you. Making sure people know where to turn for help during a time of crisis is the continuing goal of the Defense Departments suicide prevention pro gram, the Pentagon official in charge of the effort said Sept. 3 in Washington, D.C. In an interview with American Forces Press Service and the Pentagon Channel, Jacqueline Garrick said DoD has a plethora of resources that are specific to service members and their families who have thoughts of suicide. And while numbers are pending, Garrick said, DoD is seeing a decrease in the number of suicides in the department overall. Senior Pentagon leaders have worked diligently for several years to erase the stigma of seeking help for mental health issues and it appears to be paying off, she added. Were seeing more people access help through the Military Crisis Line, and an increase in users for mental health [help] across the department, she said. Those are good signs that DoDs mes sages are reaching the people who need help, she added, and that theyre taking advantage of the resources the depart ment offers. The message that seeking help is a sign of strength has resonated from the top down throughout the Defense Department, Garrick said, noting that Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, chair man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, have sent that message repeatedly. President Barack Obama also made that point at Fort Hood, Texas, last year when he announced an executive order to improve access to mental health care for service members, veterans and military families, Garrick said. So that message is resonating throughout the services, in our civilian and military forces, she added. September is National Suicide Prevention Month, Garrick said. In keeping with the theme, Its Your Call, Garrick emphasized that all service members, their families and friends should be aware of the Military Crisis Line, an immediate source of help thats confidential and anonymous. Trained counselors are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week at 1-800-273-8255. In addition to the crisis phone line, she said, help also is available through the Military Crisis Lines website at http://www.militarycrisisline.net, with access to counselors in person and through online chats and text messag ing, she said. In addition, DoDs suicide outreach website at http://www.suicideoutreach. org/ has a family guide that offers steps to take when someone is in crisis. It also lists at-risk behaviors and other symp toms of a person who is potentially suicidal, Garrick said. Family members also can use these resources to find help for themselves if they feel theyre feeling suicidal, Garrick said. Family members often dont think those resources are there for their needs, so we want to encourage them [to use the resources that are available], Garrick said. If family members are depressed, stressed or feeling suicidal, we want them to get help for themselves, as well as for their loved ones. Research shows that treatment is successful when its given a chance, Garrick said. It does make a difference, and the resources are designed specifically to support service members who are deployed, those who have not deployed, those with [post-traumatic stress disor der and traumatic brain injury], depression, substance abuse, financial prob lems and relationship problems, she said. If you dont get help, problems get worse, which can impact your career and your life overall, she said. Its better to get help early and identify prob lems that are small, rather than wait until they get bigger, and then have things blow up and become more unmanageable. People with suicidal tendencies might need a break to recap and recoup their personal resilience and return to their regular schedules when they are more mentally, physically, emotionally and spiritually fit to be more success ful, Garrick said. And fostering service members sense of personal resilience is paramount to DoD senior leaders and to those throughout the chain of com mand, she added. Resources for help dont end with DoD and the services, Garrick said, noting that the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) also offers help. Our service members dont stay with us forever, she noted, adding thatPentagon officials want them to have a successful transfer to VA as they leave the military and become veterans. We want them to embrace their vet eran status and get the help they need, she said. Hagel emphasizes DoDs resolve in suicide preventionOfficial notes progress in suicide prevention effort

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Life as a Navy spouse, whose husband is deployed more than five thousand miles away, can be tough and lonely. Add childbirth to the equa tion and times just got a little more trying. Navy spouse Brandie Conniff was going through this exact scenar io, until Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville and its Baby Friendly certified staff took action. Conniff, a native of Ellwood City, Pa. and first-time mom, has been a patient of NH Jacksonville since conceiving in late 2012. There was a good possibil ity for my husband and I to be together during the birth of our first child, said Conniff. But due to the rescheduling of my husbands deployment, the timing didnt work and left us with the reality that it would be more than six months before dad could see or hold our baby. At approximately 1:30 a.m. Aug, 29 Conniff gave birth to a healthy 8-pound, 3-ounce baby boy, Boaz Travis Conniff, and later that day was able to show their bundle of joy to her husband, Lt. Cmdr. Shawn (Fingers) Conniff via video teleconference direct from her room. As a helicopter pilot assigned to the HSM-74 Swamp Foxes at NAS Jacksonville, Conniff is currently deployed aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) as part of an ongoing rota tion of forward-deployed forces to support maritime security operations in the U.S. 6th and 5th Fleet areas of operations. But on this day, the new father laid eyes on his son for the first time. NH Jacksonville provides a variety of comfort features to its patients but connecting to a deployed U.S. warship with out Wi-Fi presented a unique challenge for the hospital staff. Because communication applications such as Skype were not available aboard the ship, I inquired about the pos sibilities of a video teleconfer ence to the hospital staff, said Conniff. The hospital staff deter mined that the main obstacle would be video bandwidth capabilities of the ship while at sea. The staff (hospital) went above and beyond to collab orate with the ship and make this happen for us, and I am truly thankful. Brandie praised the hospital staff for the job it has done with preparing her for motherhood and the care she has received since conception. It was a blessing to receive care from a Baby Friendly hospital, said Conniff. My experiences includ ed prepared childbirth and breastfeeding classes free of charge, which is nice com pared to friends who spent more than $300 hundred for similar classes. The teach ers were so caring, nurtur ing and informative, that they eased my fear of bearing my first child. The doctors have been great, and the hospital staff has been so considerate of my needs and concerns. This whole experience has been awesome. NH Jacksonville is currently one of only 166 Baby Friendly hospitals and birth centers in the U.S., certified by Baby Friendly USA a global ini tiative sponsored by WHO/ UNICEF. The Baby Friendly designa tion is awarded after a rigorous on-site survey is completed, and maintained by continuing to practice 10 crucial program elements. The comprehensive program includes initiating breastfeed ing in the first hour of life, rooming-in with moms and babies in the same room, educating staff and patients, and fostering breastfeeding support groups. Throughout the year, NH Jacksonville offers a wide range of classes free-of-charge to patients giving birth at its hospital including baby boot camp, new parent ori entation, prenatal exercise, Hypnobirthing, infant mas sage, breastfeeding and pre pared childbirth. Plus, the hospitals private labor/delivery and maternal/ infant suites offer couplet care (with mom and baby room ing together), breast pumps, breastfeeding counseling from lactation nurses, siesta for the fiesta daily quiet time to sup port feeding, newborn hearing screening, and an educational newborn channel on televi sion. Dads are welcome to stay the night and visiting hours are round-the-clock. NH Jacksonville patients can register for free classes by calling 904-542-2229 (BABY). To learn more about the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (administered in the U.S. by Baby Friendly USA), visit www. babyfriendlyusa.org. Hospital connects new mom and baby with dad at sea For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or email bill.bonser@navy.mil and secure, as no paper forms pass from hand to hand and its less prone to error. He explained that donors directly enter their input online only once, while the information on paper pledge forms is typed and retyped into the system -offering more chances for mistakes to creep in and also consuming thousands of total work hours in processing. He said ease of use is much greater, since donors using the online pledge option can search local, national or interna tional charities. Here in Washington, we have 4,500 charities, he noted. But nationwide, there are about 20,000 different charities in this campaign. DeCristofaro added that donors also are encour aged to use local CFC web sites and other resources to research charities before giving DFAS their final instructions. I made my gift on Tuesday, [and] I was eas ily matched to my local campaign, he said. DeCristofaro said the process took him 10 minutes, and the next morn ing he had an email con firming his donation and start date. He added that use of the system, like participation in CFC, is strictly voluntary. Many employees have asked for and will likely prefer electronic options, he said, although anyone who wants to make a one-time gift or use a paper CFC pledge form may still do so. The new option will be available to eligible donors outside of the Defense Department, he noted, as the departments of Health and Human Services, Veterans Affairs, and Energy, along with the Environmental Protection Agency, also are DFAS cli ents. CFC JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013 The U.S. Navy has pre pared and released to the public a Final Environmental Impact Statement/Overseas Environmental Impact Statement (EIS/OEIS) for train ing and testing activities con ducted in the Atlantic Fleet Training and Testing (AFTT) Study Area. The AFTT region covers approximately 2.6 mil lion square nautical miles and encompasses the at-sea portions of Navy training range complexes and research, development, testing and evaluation ranges along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States. The AFTT EIS/OEIS updates the science and analyses of environmental studies that were completed in 2009. This envi ronmental analysis will enable at-sea testing and training so the U.S. Navy can effectively prepare forces to meet national requirements. The results of this study, which incorporates the best available science, coupled with Navys demonstrated track record (60plus years) of similar training and testing with mini mal environmental impacts, indicate that the activities pro posed in this EIS/OEIS will continue to have minimal effects on marine mammal and other marine species populations. Monitoring of Navy activities over the past five years supports these conclusions. Computer modeling of Navy activities indicates that marine mam mals may be exposed to sonar sound during training and test ing, however scientific analy sis shows that the vast major ity of those marine mammals modeled exposures will not be injured in any way. The Navy proposes to con duct at-sea training and testing activities; which include: 1) The use of active sonar and explosives primarily within existing training range com plexes and testing ranges along the east coast of the United States, the Gulf of Mexico, pierside locations, port transit channels, lower Chesapeake Bay, Narragansett Bay and St. Andrew Bay. 2) Activities such as sonar maintenance and gunnery exer cises conducted concurrently with ship transits and which may occur outside the Navy training range complex and testing ranges. 3) Pierside sonar testing con ducted as part of ship and sub marine construction, mainte nance, repair, and moderniza tion activities at shipyards, Navy piers, and Navy-contracted shipbuilder locations. Public input was a valuable part of the EIS process, and the Navy accepted input through out a 60-day comment period, conducted from May 11, 2012 to July 10, 2012. The Final EIS/OEIS addresses comments received during this period. The Final EIS/OEIS is available for review at www.AFTTEIS.com. Hard copies of the document are available at the following local libraries: Library 1410 Hwy. 40 E. Kingsland, GA 31548 Main Library 303 N. Laura St. Jacksonville, FL 32202 A Record of Decision is expected to be issued by the Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Energy, Installations and Environment) in November 2013 and will be announced in the Federal Register. Free Breast Care Symposium provides answers to Northeast Florida womenThe sixth annual Pink Ribbon Symposium will be held at the Thrasher-Horne Conference Center (283 College Drive, Orange Park 32085) on Oct. 5 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Founded by Drs. Cynthia Anderson and Linda Sylvester, the event is presented by ICON Oncology at Orange Park Cancer Center and F.R.O.G. (Florida Radiation Oncology Group). Important up-to-date information about breast cancer prevention, early detection and treatment options, the side effects of treatment, and survivorship will be discussed. Plus, it will offer good health and wellness topics, along with a keynote presentation entitled, Laughter is the Best Medicine and an Meet the Experts ses sion, which will allow guests to ask questions of local doctors. More than 500 attend this free symposium annually. This years special guests are two regional female comedians, Gwen Templeton and Roz McCoy, who will headline the event and offer insight into how laughter can ease pain and help the cancer journey in an up-close and personal way. Guests will be treated to a healthy continental breakfast. Topics include an update on breast cancer research, genetics, caregivers, stress relief, caring for your body, health, nutrition and exercise. Everyone is invited to the expo, where up to 60 local and national businesses will showcase their services to help cancer patients and their families. Guests will learn how to care for their body, how sleep can affect cancer treatment, and how best to deal with relationships. 89 a.m. Exhibits & Continental Breakfast 99:25 a.m. Opening Remarks 9:4010:30 a.m. Session 1 Meet the Experts (latest updates on radiology, medical oncology, surgical oncology, reconstruction, etc.), Caring for Our Bodies (nutrition, exercise, family genetics, coping with emotional stress, sexuality, etc.) 10:3011 a.m. Exhibits/Intermission (Silent Auction closes at 11 a.m.) 11 a.m. 12:05 p.m. Session 2 Meet the Experts, Caring for Our Bodies 12:0512:30 p.m. Guest Speakers: Laughter is the Best Medicine 12:3012:40 p.m. Closing Remarks For more information, call 838-2950 or email pinkribbonsymposium@gmail.com. As commissaries resume pre-furlough operations, patrons will see plenty of savings with sales events throughout the store promoting Labor Day promo tions, half-off sales, recipe contests, Oktoberfest celebrations and high-value coupons. We want our patrons to know all our stores are back to their normal hours, said Tracie Russ, the Defense Commissary Agencys deputy director of sales. As we head toward the cooler days of autumn, were offering plenty of events to help our custom ers save money and maximize their benefit. One event in particular is a series of scan-down days in September offering 50 percent off certain items in our stateside commissaries. Throughout September, DeCAs industry partners vendors, suppliers and brokers are collaborating with commissaries to offer discounts beyond everyday savings. Overseas stores may have substitute events for certain promotional programs. Customers should check with their local store manager to verify when they will be offering the following sales events: Scan-down days. On Sept. 12, commissaries in the continental United States will offer managers spe cials at 50 percent off on Bartlett pears, Kraft may onnaise (regular and light), Ocean Spray Cranberry Juice, Kelloggs Fruit Loops Cereal and Healthy Choice Chicken Margherita Caf Steamers. Look for future 50 percent off scan-down days on Sept. 18 and 25. This event is not available for commissaries in Alaska, Hawaii, Europe and the Far East. Soup season begins. September is the start of the soup season. Look for commissary displays promoting special savings on Progresso soups. Oceans Sprays Labor Day Sale. Through Sept. 15, stateside commissaries will display Ocean Spray products from cranberry, grapefruit, diet and light cranberry, sparkling multipacks and the new cran berry lemonade. Look for product demonstrations. The Great Eggo Waffle Off Contest. Throughout September, Eggo waffles and Breyers ice cream brands are sponsoring a recipe contest. To enter, find details on packages of six-, eight-, 10-count Eggo waffle containers that say, The Great Eggo Waffle Off Contest. Shoppers can also find contest infor mation on Eggo and Breyers Facebook sites. Look for the Eggo and Breyers display in your commissary along with store coupons for both brands and product demonstrations. The Oktoberfest in Munich runs from late September until early October, and commis sary shoppers are encouraged to have their own celebrations if they cant make it to Deutschland. Commissaries have a full line of discounted German products available from chocolates, cookies, sauer kraut, mustard and red cabbage to rich German coffee and more. We Are Family. Quaker and Tropicana present a family-focused promotion exclusively to military commissaries worldwide. Look for large displays to include banners, posters, entry forms and high-value coupons that will cross promote with the commis saries produce, offering $3 off fresh fruit. Twentyfive commissary shoppers will be chosen as a free breakfast winner to receive more than 10 products from Quaker and Tropicana brands. Unilever is offering its 17th Annual Italian & American Festival of Savings through Sept. 25. This years promotion will again feature Unilever brands such as Ragu, Hellmans, Lipton, Wishbone, Bertolli, Slimfast, Skippy and more. More than 125,000 highvalue in-store coupon flyers will be distributed worldwide. Gatorade will offer the Salute to Service pro motion exclusively to military commissaries. This unique continental-U.S.-only event will award commissary shoppers NFL tickets plus a VIP experience. Thirty-two winners (one winner and one guest per team) will be chosen. Look for the in-store display representing the NFL team of choice along with an entry box and entry forms. These displays are located at the 32 commissaries in close proximity to an NFL team. Other CONUS commissaries will be provided football and Gatorade prizes for giveaways. Russ reminded commissary customers they can quickly locate their commissary and participate in the savings theyve earned by going to www.com missaries.com clicking on the Locations tab, then Alphabetical Listing to locate their store and clicking on Local Store Information. Whenever you consistently use your commissary benefit youre saving more than 30 percent com pared to buying groceries in commercial stores, Russ said. We hope this months promotions will help keep even more money in your pocket. Fall savings highlight commissaries return to regular hours Navy releases Atlantic Fleet Testing and Training Final Environmental Impact Statement

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The Greater Jax Area USO has tickets available at the NAS Jax and NS Mayport USO for $15 each, cash transactions only. Guidelines: only) All active duty includ ing Florida National Guard and Reservists on current active duty orders and dependents are eligible to purchase/use these tickets. authorized dependents may buy a maximum of four tick ets if member and dependents equals four. If you have less than four you may only pur chase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for mili tary personnel, but dependent children are not authorized to represent the service member/ spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO director. may purchase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest. No exceptions. mands, a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploy ing or returning during the season.Requests, with justi fication, must be sent to Mike OBrien at mobrien@usojax. com ing excess tickets or reselling tickets will be prohibited from buying any more tickets for the entire season. actions, tickets are first come, first served. For more information, call 778-2821. Tickets are available the following days and timesDateof Game Opponent Time Sale Begins Sept. 29 Indianapolis Colts 1 p.m. Sept. 16 Oct. 20 San Diego Chargers 1 p.m. Oct. 7 Nov. 17 Arizona Cardinals 1 p.m. Nov. 4 Dec. 5 Houston Texans 8:25 p.m. Nov. 25 Dec. 15 Buffalo Bills 1 p.m. Dec. 2 Dec. 22 Tennessee Titans 1 p.m. Dec. 9 Jaguars tickets available at NAS Jax and Mayport USO JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, September 12, 2013 17

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