Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note:
Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID:
UF00028307:02056


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THURSDAY, AUGUST 29, 2013 VP-30 COC DEFY CAMP CPO SELECT EES Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Last of the First Blues passes awayRetired Navy Cmdr. Alfred Al Taddeo, last surviving original Blue Angels team member, passed away Aug. 16 at a care facility in Newport Coast, Calif. at the age of 94. His wife, Joan, was by his side. Taddeo was born in Portland, Ore. in Dragonslayers provide lift to Army National GuardAircrew from the HS-11 Dragonslayers based at NAS Jacksonville flew two HH-60H Seahawk heli copters to support static-line paradrop training Aug. 16-17 for the 3rd Battalion, 20th Special Forces Group (Airborne) an Army National Guard unit headquar tered at Camp Blanding Joint Training Center. Keystone Airport, located 10 miles southeast of the city of Starke, was the drop zone (DZ) for the staticline paradrop exercise that involved two paratroop ers at a time jumping from the Navy helicopters fly ing at an altitude of about 1,200 feet. HS-11 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Ryan Keys said, Army paratroopers jump from a variety of air craft, including C-130 and C-17 transports. However, jumping from helicopters like the CH-47, CH-53 or our HH-60H, is not very common except with Special Forces, where they are utilized almost exclu sively to hit the DZ. Each of the Dragonslayer helicopters operated with two pilots and two aircrew, in addition to a National Guard Jumpmaster. Jumpmasters make sure every paratrooper is profi cient in airborne operational techniques. The static line is a fixed cord attached to the air craft that opens parachutes automatically. The two-day training exercise involved more than 60 paratroopers from the Camp Blanding-based bat talion. Australian Navy squadron moves into hangar space at NAS JaxRoyal Australian Navy (RAN) 725 Squadron achieved another milestone Aug. 22 as they celebrated moving into their official hangar spaces in Building 1122 at NAS Jacksonville. The squadron is currently undergoing training aboard the station and at HSM-40 based at NS Mayport to qualify maintainers and air crew on the new MH-60R Romeo helicopter. The training is part of a foreign military sales agree ment with the U.S. Navy for 24 MH-60R helicopters. It includes a total package of training, technical and logistics support. The first RAN 725 Squadron aircrew were certified to fly the MH-60R Romeo Aug. 16 after five months of training with HSM-40. When coupled with the list of accomplishments made by the maintainers at the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) since April, the squadron is now working side-by-side with their counterparts at HSM-70 and HSM-72 learning all aspects of the new helicopters. We continue to have a significant amount of train ing to do to meet our goals and be prepared for the delivery of our first two Romeo aircraft in December. We just qualified our first aircrew and will now con duct on-the-job (OJT) training with our counterparts at NAS Jacksonville, said 725 Squadron Executive Officer Lt. Cmdr. Todd Glynn, RAN. Today is a bit of a housewarming party. We recently moved into our hangar and the 70th anniversary of the commissioning of our squadron in the Royal Navy Navy Region Southeast Change of Command is today Rear Adm. Rick Williamson will relieve Rear Adm. John Jack Scorby Jr. as commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) during a ceremony aboard NAS Jacksonville at 9 a.m., Aug. 29. The ceremony will mark an end to Scorbys leadership of the command that supports and guides 17 installa tions throughout the Southeastern United States and the Caribbean. It has been an honor and a privi lege to serve with the men and women, military and civilians, who are heart of the Southeast Region, Scorby said. It is their dedication and professionalism which I will miss more than anything else. Scorby has commanded CNRSE since August 2011. Under his leader ship, Navy Region Southeast reduced energy consumption by 17 percent in the past two years. His commitment to meet the Navys energy efficiency goals was pivotal to more than 100 projects, valued at over $80 million, being launched within the Southeast Region. Under Scorbys leadership, Navy Region Southeast has solidified its position as a leader in energy con servation. Scorby also aggressively pursued compatible land use strategies, that included the Navys wind turbine impact analysis study that developed a nationally supported legislative out reach effort and ensured safer air oper ation areas and mutual co-existence with wind farm developers. His efforts resulted in the first-ever memorandum of agreement between the Navy and wind farm developers in Texas. In efforts to streamline processes and make the Region a more efficient organization, Scorby implemented the Contract Advisory Board that reviewed more than 1,000 contracts valued at more than $76 million, significantly

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 29, 2013 Aug. 29 1861 U.S. squadron captures forts at Hatteras Inlet, N.C. 1862 Union gunboat Pittsburgh supports Army troops in landing at Eunice, Ark. 1915 Navy salvage divers raise F-4, the first U.S. subma rine sunk by accident. 1916 Congress passes act for expansion of Navy but most ships not completed until after World War I. 1964 USS Boxer and two LSDs arrive off coast of Hispaniola to give medical aid to Haiti and Dominican Republic that were badly dam aged by Hurricane Cleo. Aug. 30 1913 Navy tests Sperry gyro scopic stabilizer (automatic pilot). 1929 Near New London, Conn., 26 officers and men test Momsen lung to exit submerged USS S-4 1961 Two Cuban frig ates fire on a Naval Reserve air craft on a training mission over international waters. Aug. 31 1842 Congress replaces the Board of Navy Commissioners (a group of senior officers who oversaw naval techni cal affairs) with the five tech nical Bureaus, ancestors of the Systems Commands. One of the 1842 bureaus, the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, contin ues to serve under its original name. 1943 Commissioning of USS Harmon (DE-678), first Navy ship named for an AfricanAmerican Sailor. 1944 Carrier task group begins three-day attack on Iwo Jima and Bonin Islands. 1962 Last flight of Navy airship takes place at NAS Lakehurst, N.J. Sept. 1 1781 French fleet traps British fleet at Yorktown, Va. 1814 USS Wasp captures HMS Avon. 1925 Cmdr. John Rodgers and crew of four flying PN-9 run out of fuel on first San Francisco to Hawaii flight. Landing at sea, they rigged a sail and set sail for Hawaii. 1941 U.S. assumes responsi bility for trans-Atlantic convoys from Argentina, Canada to the meridian of Iceland. 1942 First Seabee unit to serve in a combat area, 6th Naval Construction Battalion, arrives on Guadalcanal. 1945 USS Benevolence (AH13) evacuates civilian internees from two internment camps near Tokyo, Japan. Sept. 2 1918 Navy ships and crews assist earthquake victims of Yokohama and Tokyo, Japan. 1940 Destroyer-for-Bases agreement between U.S. and United Kingdom. 1944 USS Finback (SS-230) rescues Lt. j.g. George Bush (USNR) of VT-51, shot down while attacking Chichi Jima. 1945 Japan signs surren der documents on board USS Missouri (BB-63) at anchor in Tokyo Bay. Fleet Adm. Chester Nimitz signs for the U.S. In other ceremonies, Japanese forces on Palau Islands, Truk, and on Pagan Island and Rota in the Marianas surrender. Sept. 3 1782 As a token of grati tude for French aid during American Revolution, the U.S. gives America (first ship-ofthe-line built by U.S.) to France to replace a French ship lost in Boston. 1783 Signing of Treaty of Paris ends American Revolution. 1885 First classes at U.S. Naval War College begin. 1925 Crash of rigid airship Shenandoah near Byesville, Ohio. 1944 First combat employ ment of a missile guided by radio and television takes place when Navy drone Liberator, controlled by Ensign James Simpson in a PV, flew to attack German submarine pens on Helgoland Island. 1945 Japanese surrender Wake Island in ceremony on board USS Levy (DE-162). Sept. 4 1941 German submarine U-652 attacks USS Greer, which was tracking the submarine southeast of Iceland. Greer was not damaged, but drops depth charges, damaging U-652. 1954 Icebreakers, USS Burton Island (AGB-1) and USCG Northwind, complete first transit of Northwest passage through McClure Strait. 1954 P2V from VP-19 shot down by Soviet aircraft near Swatow, China. 1960 USS Bushnell and Penguin begin relief opera tions in Marathon, Fla., after Hurricane Donna. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Prevention of discrimination and sexual harassmentA message from NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy UndersanderAs the Commanding Officer of Naval Air Station Jacksonville, I am fully committed to Equal Opportunity for all Military and Civilian employees of this command, with out regard to race, color, religion, gender, age, dis ability, or national origin. All leaders, managers, and supervisors have an obligation to work towards an environment of mutual respect. My desires and goals are to provide a work place that promotes equal opportunity for every member of this command. Our success depends upon a genuine willingness to provide an environment responsive to the need for professional growth and acknowl edgement of an individuals dignity and self-worth. Discrimination in any form, including sexual harassment, erodes morale, unit cohesiveness and is detrimental to mission readiness. Integral to my goal of providing Equal Opportunity for all person nel is the requirement for leaders to take appropri ate action on any form of discrimination, including sexual harassment, that is brought to their atten tion. All personnel are encouraged to use the Informal Resolution System (IRS) to resolve discrimination complaints. Supervisors must ensure military and civilian personnel understand the importance of reporting such allegations. I will not tolerate any form of reprisal. Personnel engaging in discrimination/sexual harassment or reprisal will be subjected to NonI had a deal with the mother robin who made a nest outside our kitchen window for the last four years. It included things like, Ill stop judging your parenting if you stop judging mine, and Mind your own busi ness; Ive got three birds I mean, kids in here, okay? And they dont eat worms. It also included me rescuing baby birds from the jaws of Sparky, our 2-year-old Brittany Spaniel, who loves to hunt. I did this once, famously, while former MLB pinch-hitter, Matt Stairs, was visiting Dinner with the Smileys. While Stairs and the children watched, an MLB Bloopers DVD, I had a life-or-death situation on my hands in the backyard. No one in the living room ever knew anything was amiss. My agreement with the mother bird, however, never included anything about her brood being allowed inside our house. The robin, by the way, must be a fertile little thing, because she has several clutches in one summer. From June to late August she slaves over different sets of eggs. She always uses the same nest, in the same location, and I have a front-row seat from my kitchen table. At least three times a summer, I grieve as her fuzzy, greyheaded babies leave. (Oh, how she must hate me when she looks in the window and sees my brood still there!) This year, though, it seemed like it might be a dud. I never heard the familiar chirps of the chicks, nor did I see their spiky feathers sticking up over the edges of the nest. I didnt even see the mother going mania cally back and forth with worms hanging from her mouth. Last week, I found out why: the mother robin had herself an only child. One lonely little bird poked his head from the nest and then he stood up and took a look around. This is always my cue that the birds, or bird, will soon fledge. Usually, I lock Sparky inside the house so he wont nab the baby before its had a chance. But last week, my mother-in-law, named Robin, oddly enough, was visiting from Seattle and I forgot to give her the lowdown on my relationship with the birds. I told her that a baby was going to fly soon, but I forgot to mention that we should leave Sparky inside. Oops. When I was upstairs brushing my hair, I heard a horrible fuss outside. The mother bird was squawking and swooping between the trees. Sparkys dog tags jingled, and his claws gripped the wooden deck. I knew he had gotten a bird. Before I could even put down my brush, I heard Robin the person, not the bird screaming from downstairs, Sparky got a bird and brought it inside the house! Theres a bird inside the house! I ran downstairs and found Sparky standing over a teeny, shivering bird on our living room floor. He couldnt have been more proud. With an open-mouth grin and a tail that moved his entire backside, he seemed to be saying, Look, I got your dinner! I knew the bird wasnt hurt because Sparky holds them with a characteristic soft mouth. He never intends to eat them. They are gifts for me, his mom, if you will. But I had seen the mess these birds make on my back porch, and it was just a matter of time before this one pooped on the carpet. My mother-in-law was still screaming. She wanted Ford, 12, to catch the bird in a sheet and take it out side. Meanwhile, Ford and his younger brothers had locked themselves in my bedroom. It was just me, the baby bird, one happy dog, and a frantic Robin (the person, not the bird). I got a towel, scooped up the bird and walked to the back porch. Sparkys tail stopped wagging as he fol lowed. Um, you arent going to just let that one go, are you? he seemed to be saying. I put the bird in the grass and shooed Sparky back into the house. Then I stood on the deck and shook my finger at the mother. Did you have to let it fly while my door was open? I asked her. Your timing is lousy, you know. You nearly gave my mother-in-law a heart attack. And the children! Next time, wait until Im ready, okay? The mother swiveled her head in that pretentious, unblinking way birds do. I sighed and went back inside. When I looked out the door later, the mother and the baby were gone. Already, I couldnt wait to see her again next year. A bird in the house is worth two in the nest

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VP-30 began a new chapter in its long and storied history Aug. 15 with a change of command ceremony hon oring skipper Capt. Mark Stevens and welcoming new Commanding Officer Capt. Curtis Phillips. Rear Adm. Matthew Carter, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group, was in atten dance as a member of the official party to honor both men. Stevens tenure at the VP-30 Pros Nest coincided with exciting and sweeping change across the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF) with the transition from the Navys steadfast Lockheed P-3C Orion to the new Boeing P-8A Poseidon. His 25 months of leadership at the Pros Nest saw the arrival of the first P-8A to NAS Jacksonville and VP-30 in March of 2012, along with a grow ing cadre of highly qualified P-8A instructors as part of the Poseidon Fleet Integration Team, as well as the full transition of two operational VP squad rons from the P-3 to the P-8. All this activity took place while pro viding aircraft-specific training for naval aviators, naval flight officers and enlist ed aircrew on both P-3 and P-8 aircraft. As VP-30s role evolved to meet the dynamic needs of the MPRF it main tained its reputation for excellence in training and safety. In July 2013, under the command of Stevens, the Pros of VP-30 surpassed 466,000 Class A mis hap-free flight hours a naval aviation record and received its second con secutive Safety S Award. Phillips returns to VP-30 after serving as a Fleet Replacement and Weapons and Tactics Unit instructor pilot in 1997. His previous tour was as International Security Assistance Force, Force Generation Team chief, Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe, Casteau, Belgium. Phillips holds aircraft qualifications in both the Orion and Poseidon and assumes command of the Navys larg est Fleet Replacement Squadron at the height of the P-8 transition. The War Eagles of VP-16 and the Mad Foxes of VP-5 are now finished with their P-8 transition training at VP-30. Soon, VP-16 will be prepping for the Navys first Poseidon operational deployment. At the same time, VP-30 welcomes the Pelicans of VP-45 as the third opera tional fleet squadron to make the transi tion to the new aircraft. With the growing challenges associat ed with the transition of the MPRF to its first new aircraft in more than 50 years, the Pros Nest of VP-30 looks forward to sustaining their superb record of pro duction and safety under Phillips lead ership. VP-30 welcomes new commanding officer JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 29, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 29, 2013 More than 100 Department of Defense dependent children and 27 active duty personnel depart ed NAS Jacksonville on Aug. 4 and traveled to YMCA Camp McConnell in Micanopy, Fla. for a six-day, five-night, residential camp to complete phase one of the Drug Education for Youth (DEFY) program hosted by VP-30. The camp offered activities such as rock climbing, swim ming, horseback riding and team-building games. All were geared toward making smarter life decisions and build ing self-sufficiency. While at camp, the youth also gathered in the camp classroom to learn the importance of saying no to drugs, as well as learn ing the consequences and healthrelated side effects of using both illegal and legal drugs. Approximately 18 hours of classroom lessons were taught by the volunteer adult mentors who spent all week with the youth pro viding guidance and leadership. It was great to see the children so involved in the lessons, said YN3 Allan Trahan, an adult men tor assigned to VP-5. Teaching topics like these to the children can be quite a chal lenge, but the outcome was very inspiring. Outside of the classroom and in between free playtime, each of the ten teams worked on an antidrug themed skit or performance. All of the children and adult mentors came together to com pile a script and scenes to per form during parents night Aug. 8 at Camp DEFY. The excitement the kids show on their faces when they see all the parents there to watch the skits is just amazing to wit ness, said AE2 Chris Phillips, an adult mentor assigned to Fleet Readiness Center Southeast. I will definitely try to be a mentor at next years camp because this experience was like no other. To see the changes the kids make within themselves and the challenges they overcome is very humbling. VP-30 has sponsored the Jacksonville community DEFY program for 16 years and plans to remain an influential anchor to the program for years to come. Mentors will meet with the children over the course of the year to continue educating on illegal substances and provide guidance when needed. During my time in the Navy, I havent seen such an impact ful volunteer program for local youth and military communi ty, said AWOSC Ron Ramberg, Jacksonvilles local DEFY pro gram coordinator. Seeing the youth enrolled in DEFY mature and grow over the yearlong program, and even watching the adult mentors learn more about themselves as a lead er is extremely rewarding. DEFY program is to provide character development train ing, positive role model mentor ing and community outreach for youths ages 9 to 12. The goal is to provide youth with the character, leadership, and confidence needed to engage in positive, healthy lifestyles as drug-free citizens.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 29, 2013 5

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On July 11, a crew from the Fighting Tigers of VP-8 departed NAS Jacksonville for Atsugi, Japan. Led by Lt. Drew Gaston, the crew of nine was tasked with a seven-day mis sion involving three aircraft transfers they were to deliver an aircraft to VP-46 at NAS Whidbey Island, Wash. reposition a VP-46 aircraft to Nippon Hikouki (NIPPI) depot maintenance facility in Atsugi, and accept an air craft from NIPPI to be utilized by the Fighting Tigers. One might say that in standard P-3 fashion, the seven-day evolution took 29 days. Following an uneventful first two legs of the trip, Gaston and crew attempted a functional check flight on aircraft 158215. The crew discov ered a propeller malfunction, which ultimately necessitated replacement of the entire engine; after replacement of the engine, the crew discovered an oxygen leak. Despite their best effort, NIPPI did not have parts on hand for either fix, and the crew spent more than three weeks waiting in Japan. Although several maintenance issues plagued the crew and resulted in a stay that was longer than antici pated, the crew made good use of their time off by taking in the sights of Japan. They visited the historical island of Iwo To (formerly known as Iwo Jima); took in the Daibutsu, the most famous Buddha statue in Japan; shopped in the Tokyo area districts of Ginza and Shibuya; and took in breathtaking views from the top of the Tokyo Tower and Mount Fuji. At night they immersed themselves in the lights and sounds of the big city and explored new and exciting culi nary delights. The crew and aircraft 215 returned to NAS Jacksonville Aug. 10. Sixteen Sailors assigned to the Fighting Tigers of VP-8 assist ed the Bradford Parents Athletic Association (BPAA) in the renova tion of a little league baseball field and support equipment in Starke, Fla. During the event, VP-8 volun teers painted and renovated the dugouts, repaired two picnic tables, installed foul ball netting, hung bulletin boards and connect ed rain gutters onto a concession stand. Being a part of the Navy and specifically part of VP-8 its important for us to get out and become involved in the communi ty, said AWO1 Nathaniel Graham. Its important for us to be known not only for fighting spirit, but also our volunteer spirit, he added. BPAA operates three divisions of little league baseball, focused on the ideals of teamwork and sports manship. Continued parent, vol unteer and local donator support has allowed all interested youth to learn the game of baseball without Conversion programs allow Sailors from all walks of life to make a major job change and continue their Navy careers, officials said Aug. 21. Several Continuum of Service (CoS) conversion programs that apply to eligible offi cer and enlisted Sailors who are cur rently serving on active duty or in the Reserves are outlined in NAVADMIN 198/13. To date, thousands of Sailors have converted to different ratings, allowing the Navy to keep Sailors who are com mitted to a career in the Navy. According to a new conversion status report on the Active Duty Conversions web page at www.npc.navy.mil, more than half of active duty conversion requests in 2013 have already been approved. Applications for conversion can be submitted by detailers, command career counselors (CCCs) or anyone with prior access to Fleet-RIDE through the new Career Waypoint (C-WAY) information technology system. A NAVPERS 5239/8 (SAAR Addendum) is required to access C-WAY. Active-duty enlisted Sailors, in con junction with reenlistment applications submitted via the C-WAY-Reenlistment process, can voluntarily request to change their rating. Reserve Sailors, working with their CCC, can view and apply for a rating conversion through C-WAY-Conversion. Active-duty and Reserve officers interested in conversion can request a voluntary designator change. Requests for Reserve designator changes are con sidered continuously, while requests for AC designator changes are decided by a lateral transfer board twice a year. Per MILPERSMAN 1440-010, requests for conversion into ratings that are properly manned, will only be con sidered on a case-by-case basis and requests for conversion to overmanned ratings will not be considered. VP-8 assists VP-46 with aircraft transfer Fighting Tigers renovate Little League baseball field the concern of cost. The Navys contribution today will extend decades, said Tricia Cook, board treasurer for BPAA. I hope VP-8 realizes that what they did today will carry on for generations to come, and we couldnt have done it with out them, she added.Continue to serve through conversion 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 29, 2013

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From Sigonella to Sasebo, Whidbey Island to Jacksonville, and every where in between, Commander, Navy Installations Commands Navy Housing Office and its privatized housing part ners are gearing up for their annual res ident satisfaction survey (RSS). The annual survey, which is mailed to residents of military housing at the end of August, asks residents to provide feedback and thoughts regarding their Navy Housing experience. The RSS measures all aspects of cus tomer satisfaction with Navy Housing, including our staff services, the condi tion of the homes and barracks, and other provided amenities such as loan er furnishings and the use of housing community centers. A comment card accompanies the surveys, and residents are encour aged to mention particular issues and request follow-up as a way to seek reso lution of these issues. Navy Housing is a customer-focused organization, and hearing from our customers is critical for us to under stand and meet their needs, said Cindy Mogan, Navy Housing RSS project man ager. We encourage everyone who receives an RSS to take the time to com plete and send it in. Its an easy way to give us important and anonymous feed back on how were doing. The RSS is also used to target fund ing for facility and amenity improve ments. Our residents play a vital role in improving the services and facilities we provide, said William Pearson, acting Navy Housing program director. RSS results assist housing professionals to prioritize projects that best meet service members needs. Service members living in family housing will receive their surveys late August, early September depending on location. The survey must be returned by Oct. 21. The family housing survey can be filled out and returned by mail or elec tronically on the survey website. Service members living in unaccom panied housing (bachelor quarters) will receive their surveys by mail the second week of Sept. and must be returned by Nov. 12. This survey is available by mail only. Part of Clay Countys heritage is the countys strong ties to the military dat ing back to the early 1800s. Today, there are over 24,000 veterans who call Clay County home. These veterans represent service to our nation from World War II through the current conflicts as well as decades of service during peacetime. The Clay County Veterans Service Office is staffed with a full time veterans service officer and a part time veter ans program assistant; both available and eager to assist veterans and/or fam ily members with filing claims and/or other related needs. The office is now located on the second floor of the Clay County Administration Building at 477 Houston Street, Green Cove Springs, Fla. The office is open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. The for mer Veterans Service Office at 1565 CR 315 has been closed. To make an appointment, call (904) 269-6326.Clay County Veterans Services Office has relocatedNavy housing gears up for annual survey JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 29, 2013 7

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8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 29, 2013 June 1919 and grew up there. He joined the U.S. Navy in 1942 and went through flight training and received his wings at NAS Corpus Christi, Texas. His first assignment was to fly F4F Wildcats off the light carrier USS Nassau in the Aleutian Islands Campaign. Taddeo was then trans ferred to the VF-10 Grim Reapers, along with then Lt. Butch Voris. That assignment would eventually lead him to an initial spot with the Blue Angel team. He had been in the first Battle of the Philippine Sea and remembered a Japanese pilot who followed the American planes back in the confusion of night where he tried to land on an American carrier. He would go on to survive World War II, shooting down three Japanese aircraft -which earned him two Distinguished Flying Crosses along with numerous air medals. Following the war, Taddeo was assigned to Opa-locka (NAS Miami) with the Naval Air Operational Training Command as an instructor pilot. He was called up from there to join the Blue Angels and reported to NAS Jacksonville June 14, 1946. The next day, the Blue Angels gave their first public performance at the dedication of Craig Field in Jacksonville. Taddeo was initially assigned as a spare pilot for the team. But a pilot was removed from the team the very next day, so he was eventually assigned left pilot (No. 3 plane) with the team flying in every show for the rest of the 1946 season. Taddeo continued to fly with the team until June 1947. During his tour with the Blue Angels, Taddeo broke through the marriage barrier that Voris had established for any pilot to be a mem ber of the team. He was the first to ask for, and finally receive, permission to marry. When his tour ended, he took com mand of a fighter squadron on board USS Coral Sea, flying the F4U Corsair. He later returned to NAS Jacksonville as commanding officer of VF-43, served in the Pentagon and served as command ing officer of VA-52 and VF-144. The attack squadron command was strange for me said Taddeo. I had always been a fighter pilot. When he left the Navy after 21 years of service in 1963, he had 350 carrier land ings with about half on straight car rier flight decks versus the angled flight decks of the carriers today. When he retired, Taddeo became a successful businessman, starting as a salesman at a car dealership in San Diego. He and his brother bought sev eral car dealerships up and down the California coast. Taddeo and his wife, Joan, were invit ed to NAS Jacksonville as the 2008, 2010 and 2011 NAS Jax Air Show VIP guests. During the stations 2011 air show, a recognition ceremony was held to cel ebrate the Centennial of Naval Aviation, by honoring individuals who had received Distinguished Flying Crosses. Taddeo was honored for his two Distinguished Flying Crosses, one received on April 21, 1944 and the other on June 28, 1944. Plans were already in the works to have them as VIP guests for the 2012 air show, before the show was cancelled. Always gracious in his visits, he was also a favorite of the media for his inter views. As someone who would take the time to meet anyone who wanted a chance to talk with him, he especial ly enjoyed talking with the active duty Sailors and children. Not only was Taddeo a great Navy pilot and officer, he had a wonderful sense of humor and was a loving family man. He would tell anyone who would lis ten how much he learned and appreci ated his time with the U.S. Navy and particularly as one of the early founding pilots of the Blue Angels. Everyone knew the Blue Angels wherever I went and mentioned the team, he would say. When the Blue Angels season was cancelled because of sequestration in 2013, he was devas tated, said Joan recently. This was the first time in the history of the team that a season had been can celled. But that very first team is now finally back together, probably retell ing long forgotten stories. Taddeo loved NAS Jacksonville, promoted the station and the U.S. Navy as often as he could, and will be sorely missed. TADDEOis Aug. 27, so we are celebrating with a clear lower deck or as the U.S. Navy calls it, an all hands call, he continued. According to Glynn, 52 members of the squadron are currently stationed at NAS Jacksonville with the following 56 members arriving throughout next year. We expect to have four aircraft by February which will allow us to build our experience flying alongside our U.S. Navy brethren. They have more expe rience flying these aircraft and thats why our project office recommended we remain here to work through any issues and grow the organizations experience quickly, Glynn stated. By the end of 2014, 725 Squadron will be outfitted with seven MH-60R Romeo helicopters before returning home in December 2014 to HMAS Albatross, the only naval air station in Australia. They will then take on the role of training the RANs 816 Squadron members on the Romeo as they transition to the new aircraft from the S-70B-2, an interna tional variant of the SH-60 Seahawk. 816 Squadron will continue supporting the Australian fleet, serving on board RAN frigates and destroyers. We are currently building a new facility with the same equipment the U.S. Navy utilizes, however, we are combining the maintenance and air crew training facilities under one roof, said Glynn, who also highlighted what a great opportunity it is for squadron members to train here and experience life in another country. I think this is fantastic to be able to come here to train on helicopters next to another countrys defense force. I think it is fantastic to be able to come here to train on helicopters next to another countrys defense force. Weve completed three months of train ing at CNATTU and have another four months of OJT on the shop floor with the squadrons here. Theyve been very accommodating and helpful. This is something completely new for us and while challenging, its been great, said CPO Aviation Technician Aircraft Jamie Craig of 725 Squadron. I love Jacksonville and being able to come to Florida. This aircraft is similar to the one I was working on in Australia but there are a lot more modifications; its much newer and shinier. I cant wait until we get our new Romeos, added Able Seaman Celeste Bowie, a RAN airframe/mechanic for the past seven years. During the all hands call, 725 Squadron Commanding Officer Cmdr. David Frost, RAN, praised his troops for their accomplishments and stressed the importance of forging ahead to prepare for the arrival of their new aircraft. He also recognized several squadron mem bers by presenting service awards and letters of appreciation from the Greater Area Jacksonville USO for participating in a recent community service event. Frost and SN Clark Chancellor, the youngest member of the squadron, con cluded the ceremony by cutting a cake adorned with the squadrons emblem, a winged gauntlet. Originally commissioned in the Royal Navy in 1943, 725 Squadron became a RAN Fleet Air Arm Squadron in January 1958 operating fixed wing aircraft. De-commissioned in 1961, it was recommissioned again in 1962 as an antisubmarine warfare (ASW) helicopter training squadron serving until 1975. The squadron will be re-commis sioned in early 2015 and again assume the role of providing aircrew and main tainers trained in operating ASW heli copters. judicial punishment (NJP), Court Martial, Administrative Separation or Administrative action under the Civilian Systems. My policy is equitable treatment and opportunity for each and every indi vidual of this command. All personnel are members of our team. One team, one fight! Each mem ber plays an integral part in the success of NAS Jacksonville. Equal Opportunity is a readiness issue and is vital to the accomplishment of our mission. All members of this command will be regarded with dignity and respect as we successfully accomplish our mission. SAPR improving contract quality and reduc ing future funding requirements by more than $17 million. Scorbys next assignment will be as Commander, Navy Region Europe, Africa, and Southwest Asia, and as Commander, Maritime Air Forces, Naples, Italy. Williamson is reporting from his current position as Commander, Navy Region Midwest, a position he has held since June 2011. His early sea assignments included tours in USS Dewey (DDG 45), USS Briscoe (DD 977), USS Enterprise (CVN 65), and executive officer aboard USS Rodney M. Davis (FFG 60). He commanded USS Simpson (FFG 56) during NATOs Standing Naval Forces Atlantic 2004 deployment to the United States, the first such visit by NATO to the United States after 9/11. Under his command, Simpson won two Battle E awards. Ashore, his assignments includ ed tours in Washington, D.C., as the executive assistant to Commander Navy Installations Command (CNIC), and returning for a second CNIC tour as Deputy Director of Plans and Policy. Additionally, he served as a lead examiner of both the Steam and Gas Turbine Branches at the Propulsion Examination Board at Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet. In May 2006, Williamson served as the executive officer of the Command Leadership School in Newport, R.I. From 2008 to 2011, he served as the commanding officer of Naval Base San Diego. During this tour, Naval Base San Diego was selected as the 2010 Presidential Installation Excellence Award and the 2011 Presidential Green Government Award. A native of Jacksonville, Fla., Williamson is a 1985 graduate of the United States Naval Academy, where he received a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science. He earned a Master of Business Administration from the Naval Postgraduate School in 1990 and is a graduate of the Armed Forces Staff College in Norfolk, Va. CNRSE RAN The Navy Supply Corps FoundationJacksonville Chapter (NSCFJ) and the NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville command worked jointly to raise funds and orga nize a school supplies donation drive during July and early August. The combined efforts of these orga nizations raised approximately $450 worth of school supplies for donation to Hyde Grove Elementary School (HGES). HGES is a Title 1 school that receives special assistance through the fed eral government. The program works to assist schools with high numbers of children from low-income families to ensure they receive the necessary resources to meet state academic stan dards. Each of the students partici pate in the free lunch program and the Blessings in a Backpack program, that gives the children a backpack filled with food to take home on the week Supply corps community partners with local school

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Navy/Marine Corps team testing F-35B Lightning II aboard USS WaspTwo F-35B Lightning II jets (BF-01 and BF-05) touched down on board the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1) Aug. 12, kicking off week of Development Testing II (DT-II) where Wasp Sailors and Integrated Test Force (ITF) team members will test and further validate the F-35B. DT-II is the second of three test phases encom passing numerous milestone events including the first night operation at sea as well as the first launch and recovery of the F-35B at sea by a U.K. test pilot. The F-35 Lightning II is the next generation strike aircraft for the U.S. Marine Corps, Navy and Air Force, as well as eight international partners. The jet combines advanced stealth with fighter speed and agility, fully fused sensor information, networkenabled operations and advanced sustainment. Wasp is testing the F-35B, which has short takeoff/ vertical landing (STOVL) capability, enabling it to operate from a wider range of ships and in support of expeditionary operations. Its a significant milestone for the F-35 program, said Capt. Erik Etz, director, Test & Evaluation F-35 Naval Variants. The ability to operate at night is critical and so certainly the testing were doing here will provide a significant amount of data so we can clear the envelope and clear the aircraft to operate day and night, when the Marine Corps takes the F-35B to initial operating capability in 2015. Wasp and the ITF completed a major milestone when Lt. Col. C. R. Clift launched from the flight deck and landed safely, marking the first successful night launch and recovery of the F-35B at sea. The pilots were pleased with the progress that the first night landings at sea represent. It all went extremely well, said Clift. We conducted eight suc cessful launches and landings, so were on target and quickly gaining experience with F-35B night opera tions at sea. Launch and recoveries filled the first, second and third days at sea creating smooth, synchronized daytime operations. Wasp flight deck crew members were trained in advance of DT-II to prepare them for F-35B operations at sea, ensuring all those involved were ready to support DT-II. The crew itself has spent quite a bit of time up at Patuxent River working with the F-35B understand ing how the aircraft operates, said Capt. Brian Teets, Wasps commanding officer. What weve been able to bring is a consistent platform to the F-35B to sup port their testing. Its the same ship with the same capabilities, providing consistency and stability as a reliable test platform. Employing a consistent test platform allows the team to find ways to optimize this new aircraft in the Marine Air Combat Element. U.K. Squadron Leader Jim Schofield, a Royal Air Force pilot, became the first international pilot to conduct sea-based launch and landing in the F-35B. Its exciting to see the integration of this new plane with the amphibious assault ships, said Schofield. After a year leading up to this evolution, its awesome to get here and start. And the crew has been especially accommodating and efficient at run ning these tests smoothly. The historical milestones were not lost on Wasp crew members, but for most it was business as usual, focusing on safety and effectiveness during flight operations at sea. ABH1 Ashley Geary gave the signal to launch BF-05 for the first night flight opera tions. We worked with the test team at Pax River for a week, learning about the F-35B and its operations, said Geary. They took our suggestions on flight deck procedures, ensuring we were one team working together towards a successful mission. The F-35 Lightning II is scheduled to replace 13 different legacy aircraft in the current U.S. defense inventory. Sea trials for the Navys F-35C aircraft car rier variant are scheduled at the end of 2014. Naval museums and heritage sites return to normal hours Navy museums that cut their hours as a result of the federal furlough have returned to their normal operat ing hours. Additionally, the Navys archives and Navy Department Library, located on the Washington Navy Yard, reopened Aug. 26, Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) officials announced. The follow ing Navy museums were affected by closing Mondays and have resumed normal hours: D.C.); Nautilus (Groton, Conn.); Museum, Keyport, Wash.); Museum, Bremerton, Wash.) was closed on Fridays and is back to its normal hours. Before planning a visit, check the museums respective websites for hours of operation. NHHC, which operates the Navys museums, the Department of the Navy Library, and Navy Archives, has also returned to normal public access hours, although access to many of its holdings remain lim ited due to ongoing remediation efforts. In 2012, NHHC and Washington Navy Yard Public Works collaborated on a major archival storage facility renovation project for buildings 108 and 44. The ongo ing project will result in accommodating 12,000 cubic feet of paper, microform and digital media storage space with new environmental controls. Additionally, refurbishment of the archives spaces and mold decon tamination started earlier this year, and the work will continue into next year. To access the Navy museum websites, please go to http://www.history.navy.mil/museums/index.html. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 29, 2013 11

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Petty officer commissioned to EnsignAWO1(NAC/AW) Quincey Durham of Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven (CPRW-11) was commissioned as an ensign during a ceremony at VP-30, Aug. 2. Numerous family members, co-workers and friends attended the event. CPRW-11 Commodore Capt. Eric Wiese was the guest speaker. During the traditional ceremony, Durhams first class petty officer insignia was officially retired before he was given the administration of oath by Lt. Ron Williams, former officer in charge of Mobile Tactical Operations Center Three (MTOC-3). Durham was then presented his ensign shoulder boards and cover by his mother, Darlene Durham and his daughter, Madisyn Durham. Durham, a native of Lubbock, Texas, joined the Navy June 26, 2000. He then completed Aircrew Candidate School and AW A School in Pensacola, Fla. His duty assignments include Fleet Replacement Squadron training at VP-30, VP-46 at NAS Whidbey Island,Wash. and CPRW-11 as part of MTOC-3. His first assignment as an ensign is to USS George Washington (CVN-73). Im grateful to be a part of the Navy for all of the opportunities I have had. Taking care of Sailors is my number one priority and I am looking forward to keeping this tradition alive as a commissioned offi cer, he said. Im also eternally grateful to my family for support ing me along the way and for everything that Ive had to endure through my life because its made me who I am today. 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 29, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Friday at 7 p.m. Monday Night Football Kick-off Sept. 9 at 7 p.m. Complimentary food & give-a-ways Karaoke Sept. 6 at 7 p.m. Direct TV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL Action on one of Deweys five big-screen TVs. Arrive early for your choice of game. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 510 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 16 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer Now through Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 years and younger receive one free game of bowling every day until 5 p.m. Fall and winter bowling leagues now forming Leagues begin in September.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Lap swim (no concessions, slide or water park will be open) Mon. Fri. 6 8 am, 11 am 1 pm, 4:30 7 pm. Recreational swim Sat. & Sun 11 am 6 pm For more information call (904) 5423518 Dive-in Movie Friday, Sept. 6 & 7 10 p.m. Featuring EPIC 36 size restriction on floatsI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil. ITT is now selling tickets to the Daytona 500, Drive 4COPD 300, Budweiser Duels, Spirit Unlimited and Rolex 24. Call ITT for pricing information at (904) 542-3318 ext. 8 or email them directly at jaxs_nas_mwritt@navy.mil. Halloween Horror Nights Vendor Day Oct. 2, 10 a.m. 2 p.m. Prize drawing every 30 minutes NFL Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets on sale now $70 section 147 LegoLand Florida Free ticket for active duty military through Oct. 27 Wet n Wild Orlando $37 adult, $45 adult w/ meal, $40 child w/ meal Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Amelia Island Museum of History $10 family pass, Ghost tour $8 adult, $4 child Florida EcoSafaris in St. Cloud EcoPark $119, Coach safari adult $28, child $25, Zipline safari $75, Cypress canopy cycle $40 for one hour Gatorland Free admission for active duty and retired military until the end of the year. Family tickets can be pur chased at ITT. $19.95 adult, $12.50 child, zip line $54.25 Blue Man Group Orlando $49 adult, $29 child Monster Truck Jam club seating $42, regular seating $22 2013 2014 Artist Series featuring Mama Mia, Memphis, Celtic Thunder, War Horse, Men are From Mars, Women are from Venus, Million Dollar Quartet and The D* Word is a Musical are on sale now! Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2013 2014 season featuring Menopause, River North Dance Chicago, Hungarian State Folk Ensemble, Clay County Christmas, Godspell, Driving Miss Daisy, Bronx Wanderers, Celtic Fire and Swan Lake are on sale now!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restrict ed to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. St. Johns Town Center Shuttle Aug. 31 at 3 p.m. Disc Golf Trip Sept. 7 at 10 a.m. Paintball Trip Sept. 14 at 9 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 NAS Jax Golf Club Championship Sept. 14 & 15 at 8 a.m. $80, includes golf both days, lunch both days, trophies for the division winners and gift certificates for flight winners Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Sept. 10 & 24 for active duty Sept. 12 & 26 for retirees, DoD person nel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and greens fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite.Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Before and After School Registration going on now. Fees based on household income.Flying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Oct. 7 Nov. 20 $500 per person For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 29, 2013 13

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Friday, September 6 7 10 p.m. Movie begins at 8 p.m. at the Outdoor PoolFree admission & popcorn $1.50 food baskets Ring tube floats & chairs are allowed and encouraged.*36 size restriction on floatsfacebook.com/nasjaxmwr (904) 542-3518/2930 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 29, 2013

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 29, 2013 ends. School supply items raised from the donation drive included back packs, pencils, crayons, T-shirts, etc., and were delivered to an apprecia tive Principal Jeff Royal, and Assistant Principal Iviza Cruickschank-Greene in time to be distributed on the first day of school on August 19. Thank you so much for helping our children, said Cruickschank-Greene. We are very grateful and appreciate the community support! In addition to delivering the school supplies, NSCFJ Vice President Cmdr. Wade Rindy signed an agreement to become sponsorship partners in order to support the school in a variety of other forms. The NSCFJ is excited about our partnership with HGES, said Rindy. We look forward to giving back to the school, such as participating in the schools book of the month program, supplying treats or other forms of rec ognition to the schools students of the month, as well as participating in future school beautification projects and food drives. We will also be men toring and tutoring the students and acting as guest speakers at planned events. Our children need role models, said Royal. Something as simple as sitting to talk with them during lunch time makes a huge impact it is amazing to see how a single conver sation can change a childs life we are very excited about our future with NSCFJ. NAS Jacksonville School Liaison Dawn Mills was also in attendance and was instrumental in facilitating the partnership. She will encourage other commands on the base to assist in the volunteer opportunities avail able at the school. She also spoke of organizing field trips for the students to visit the base in order to be exposed to life outside of the school. NSCFJ is a non-profit professional and social organization made up of active duty, reserve and retired Navy Supply Corps officers whose purpose is to encourage members to partici pate in social interaction, charitable endeavors and professional develop ment. NAVSUP The sixth annual Pink Ribbon Symposium will be held at the Thrasher-Horne Conference Center (283 College Drive, Orange Park 32085) on Oct. 5 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Founded by Drs. Cynthia Anderson and Linda Sylvester, the event is presented by ICON Oncology at Orange Park Cancer Center and F.R.O.G. (Florida Radiation Oncology Group). Important up-to-date information about breast cancer prevention, early detection and treatment options, the side effects of treatment, and survivor ship will be discussed. Plus, it will offer good health and wellness topics, along with a keynote presentation entitled, Laughter is the Best Medicine and an Meet the Experts session, which will allow guests to ask questions of local doctors. More than 500 attend this free sympo sium annually. This years special guests are two regional female comedians, Gwen Templeton and Roz McCoy, who will headline the event and offer insight into how laughter can ease pain and help the cancer journey in an up-close and personal way. Guests will be treated to a healthy continental breakfast. Topics include an update on breast cancer research, genetics, caregivers, stress relief, car ing for your body, health, nutrition and exercise. Everyone is invited to the expo, where up to 60 local and national businesses will showcase their services to help can cer patients and their families. Guests will learn how to care for their body, how sleep can affect cancer treat ment, and how best to deal with rela tionships. The schedule is as follows: 89 a.m. Exhibits & Continental Breakfast 99:25 a.m. Opening Remarks 9:4010:30 a.m. Session 1 Meet the Experts (latest updates on radiol ogy, medical oncology, surgical oncol ogy, reconstruction, etc.), Caring for Our Bodies (nutrition, exercise, family genetics, coping with emotional stress, sexuality, etc.) 10:3011 a.m. Exhibits/Intermission (Silent Auction closes at 11 a.m.) 11 a.m. 12:05 p.m. Session 2 Meet the Experts, Caring for Our Bodies 12:0512:30 p.m. Guest Speakers: Laughter is the Best Medicine 12:3012:40 p.m. Closing Remarks For more information, call 838-2950 or e-mail pinkribbonsymposium@ gmail.com According to the World Health Organization, depression is the leading cause of disability worldwide with an estimated 350 million affected and is one of many symptoms that could indi cate a form of perinatal mood and anxi ety disorders (PMAD) in women. PMAD can occur during pregnancy and up to the first year postpartum. Other disorders associated with PMAD include panic, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disor der and postpartum psychosis. PMAD affects women of all ages, race, culture and financial status. Studies have shown that approxi mately 10-20 percent of women experi ence depression either during pregnan cy or in the first 12 months postpartum, yet less than 25 percent of Obstetrics (OB) and Gynecology (GYN) patients have had their diagnoses recognized. Despite the health risks and com plications associated with maternal depression, pregnant women and new mothers experiencing depression often do not get the treatment they need due to fear of discussing mental health con cerns with their primary care providers. Military families are often faced with increased stressors and challenges due to frequent deployments, career deci sions and family migration due to new duty assignments. To an expectant mother, it can be extremely overwhelming and may have a direct impact on her partner as well presenting the feelings of being over whelmed, confused, angry and afraid. Screening and early intervention can protect the well being of the mother, baby and entire family. If left untreated, PMAD can affect the mother-child bond, the childs physical and emotional health, and long-term behavior. Common symptoms of PMAD can include feelings of loneliness, sadness and helplessness; difficulty bonding with baby; anxiety, panic or excessive worry; fear of being left alone with baby; thoughts of hurting yourself or those around you; frequent mood swings or crying; lack of interest in life or a previ ous history of depression, postpartum depression or anxiety. Delays in treat ment can relate to a significantly longer duration of PMAD. Many military moms, and some dads, are accustomed to being the sole care giver and are not used to asking for help. It is vital for parents to know that resources are available to them at any time. Social support is essential to assure the mental health of women, children and their families during pregnancy and postpartum. Social support net works include family, friends, peer groups and faith communities. Active-duty service members should contact their primary health care pro vider for assistance with counseling services and or treatment for depression or anxiety disorders. Dependent family members should call the Naval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) appointment line at 904-5424677 or 800-529-4677, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. After-hours nurse advice is available via the appointment line on evenings, weekends and holidays.Free breast care symposium provides answers to Northeast Florida womenPerinatal mood and anxiety disorder more common than you may realize

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 29, 2013 17 DOD facilities are gearing up to issue identification cards to same-sex spous es beginning Sept. 3, Pentagon officials said Aug. 20. All spousal and family benefits, including ID cards, will be made avail able no later than Sept. 3, 2013, said Navy Lt. Cmdr. Nate Christensen. The Supreme Court decision to overturn portions of the Defense of Marriage Act made it possible for the department to recognize same-sex marriages. The department will make the same benefits available to all military spous es, regardless of sexual orientation, as long as service member-sponsors pro vide a valid marriage certificate from a jurisdiction including those overseas that recognizes same-sex marriage, Christensen said. Entitlements such as basic allow ance for housing and family separation allowance are retroactive to the date of the Supreme Courts decision June 26, 2013. For service members married after that date, the entitlements will be paid from the date of the marriage. TRICARE the military health care program is tied to the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System. TRICARE will be available to same-sex spouses beginning Sept. 3, 2013. There are 15 countries that recog nize same-sex marriage. In the United States, 13 states and the District of Columbia recognize same-sex marriag es. Many U.S. service members live in jurisdictions that do not recognize same-sex marriages. As operational requirements permit, commanders may allow military per sonnel in same-sex relationships up to 10 days of non-chargeable leave for the purpose of traveling to a jurisdiction that allows same-sex couples to be mar ried if they are stationed more than 100 miles from one of those areas. Personnel stationed within the con tinental United States may receive up to seven days non-chargeable leave and those stationed at overseas assignments may receive up to 10 days non-charge able leave, Christensen said. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) announced Aug. 21, the second round of HUD-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (VASH) funding to local public housing agencies across the U.S. and Puerto Rico. The $7.8 million in added funding will provide housing and clinical ser vices for 1,120 currently homeless vet erans. In May of this year, the two agencies announced $60 million in HUD-VASH vouchers. The supportive housing assistance announced Aug. 21 is provided through the HUD-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) program that combines rental assistance from HUD with case management and clinical ser vices provided by VA. Since 2008, a total of 58,140 vouchers have been awarded and 43,371 formerly homeless veterans are currently in homes of their own because of HUD-VASH. Our nations veterans have sacrificed and given up so much for our freedom, said HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan. These vouchers are help ing America end veterans homelessness one veteran at a time until we see not one veteran living on the street. I look forward to continue working with Secretary Shinseki and the Department of Veterans Affairs to target assistance to our homeless veterans. These HUD-VASH vouchers are a vital tool in our effort to provide these brave men and women with the earned care and benefits that help them live productive, meaningful lives, said Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric Shinseki. So long as a single veteran lives on our streets, we have work to do. But with the continued support of President Obama, Congress and our communi ty partners, we will end homelessness among veterans. HUD-VASH is a critical part of the Obama Administrations commitment to end Veteran and long-term chronic homelessness by 2015. Opening Doors: Federal Strategic Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness, serves as a road map for how the federal government will work with state and local com munities to confront the root causes of homelessness, especially among former servicemen and women. HUDs annual point in time estimate of the num ber of homeless persons and families for 2012 found that veteran homeless ness fell by 7.2 percent, or 4,876 people, since January 2011, and by 17.2 percent since January 2009. On a single night in January 2012, 62,619 veterans were homeless. The grants announced today are part of $75 million appropriated this year to support the housing needs of homeless veterans. Local public housing authori ties provide rental assistance to home less veterans while nearby VA medical centers offer supportive services and case management. This is the second round of the 2013 HUD-VASH funding. HUD expects to announce more HUDVASH funding this year. VA medical centers work closely with homeless veterans then refer them to public housing agencies for these vouchers, based upon a variety of fac tors, most importantly the duration of the homelessness and the need for longer-term, more-intensive support to obtain and maintain permanent hous ing. The HUD-VASH program includes both the rental assistance the voucher provides and the comprehensive case management that VA medical center staff provides. Veterans participating in the HUDVASH program rent privately owned housing and generally contribute no more than 30 percent of their income toward rent. VA offers eligible homeless veterans clinical and supportive ser vices through its medical centers across the U.S., Guam and Puerto Rico.HUD, VA announce more funds to help homeless veteransDOD facilities gear up to issue ID cards to same-sex spouses one who asks to see Privacy Act infor mation that you are responsible for. than permitted under records dispos al. posal requirements are met. ments in Privacy Act record systems. about different individuals in the same file. without ensuring it is properly marked. Use FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY PRIVACY SENSITIVE. mail privacy data. shared drives, multi-access calendars, the Intranet or Internet that can be accessed by individuals who do not have an official need to know. records without first consulting your privacy office or CNO (DNS-36). dations on how to better effectively manage privacy data. The bottom line is: if you collect it, you must protect it. If in doubt, leave it out. Just because youve always han dled personal information one way, doesnt mean that is the best way. Ten rules to protect personal information

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 29, 2013 VP-30 COC DEFY CAMP CPO SELECTEES Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Last of the First Blues passes awayRetired Navy Cmdr. Alfred Al Taddeo, last surviving original Blue Angels team member, passed away Aug. 16 at a care facility in Newport Coast, Calif. at the age of 94. His wife, Joan, was by his side. Taddeo was born in Portland, Ore. in Dragonslayers provide lift to Army National GuardAircrew from the HS-11 Dragonslayers based at NAS Jacksonville flew two HH-60H Seahawk heli copters to support static-line paradrop training Aug. 16-17 for the 3rd Battalion, 20th Special Forces Group (Airborne) an Army National Guard unit headquartered at Camp Blanding Joint Training Center. Keystone Airport, located 10 miles southeast of the city of Starke, was the drop zone (DZ) for the staticline paradrop exercise that involved two paratroopers at a time jumping from the Navy helicopters flying at an altitude of about 1,200 feet. HS-11 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Ryan Keys said, Army paratroopers jump from a variety of aircraft, including C-130 and C-17 transports. However, jumping from helicopters like the CH-47, CH-53 or our HH-60H, is not very common except with Special Forces, where they are utilized almost exclusively to hit the DZ. Each of the Dragonslayer helicopters operated with two pilots and two aircrew, in addition to a National Guard Jumpmaster. Jumpmasters make sure every paratrooper is profi cient in airborne operational techniques. The static line is a fixed cord attached to the air craft that opens parachutes automatically. The two-day training exercise involved more than 60 paratroopers from the Camp Blanding-based battalion. Australian Navy squadron moves into hangar space at NAS JaxRoyal Australian Navy (RAN) 725 Squadron achieved another milestone Aug. 22 as they celebrated moving into their official hangar spaces in Building 1122 at NAS Jacksonville. The squadron is currently undergoing training aboard the station and at HSM-40 based at NS Mayport to qualify maintainers and aircrew on the new MH-60R Romeo helicopter. The training is part of a foreign military sales agreement with the U.S. Navy for 24 MH-60R helicopters. It includes a total package of training, technical and logistics support. The first RAN 725 Squadron aircrew were certified to fly the MH-60R Romeo Aug. 16 after five months of training with HSM-40. When coupled with the list of accomplishments made by the maintainers at the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) since April, the squadron is now working side-by-side with their counterparts at HSM-70 and HSM-72 learning all aspects of the new helicopters. We continue to have a significant amount of training to do to meet our goals and be prepared for the delivery of our first two Romeo aircraft in December. We just qualified our first aircrew and will now conduct on-the-job (OJT) training with our counterparts at NAS Jacksonville, said 725 Squadron Executive Officer Lt. Cmdr. Todd Glynn, RAN. Today is a bit of a housewarming party. We recently moved into our hangar and the 70th anniversary of the commissioning of our squadron in the Royal Navy Navy Region Southeast Change of Command is today Rear Adm. Rick Williamson will relieve Rear Adm. John Jack Scorby Jr. as commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) during a ceremony aboard NAS Jacksonville at 9 a.m., Aug. 29. The ceremony will mark an end to Scorbys leadership of the command that supports and guides 17 installa tions throughout the Southeastern United States and the Caribbean. It has been an honor and a privi lege to serve with the men and women, military and civilians, who are heart of the Southeast Region, Scorby said. It is their dedication and professionalism which I will miss more than anything else. Scorby has commanded CNRSE since August 2011. Under his leader ship, Navy Region Southeast reduced energy consumption by 17 percent in the past two years. His commitment to meet the Navys energy efficiency goals was pivotal to more than 100 projects, valued at over $80 million, being launched within the Southeast Region. Under Scorbys leadership, Navy Region Southeast has solidified its position as a leader in energy con servation. Scorby also aggressively pursued compatible land use strategies, that included the Navys wind turbine impact analysis study that developed a nationally supported legislative out reach effort and ensured safer air operation areas and mutual co-existence with wind farm developers. His efforts resulted in the first-ever memorandum of agreement between the Navy and wind farm developers in Texas. In efforts to streamline processes and make the Region a more efficient organization, Scorby implemented the Contract Advisory Board that reviewed more than 1,000 contracts valued at more than $76 million, significantly

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 29, 2013 Aug. 29 1861 U.S. squadron captures forts at Hatteras Inlet, N.C. 1862 Union gunboat Pittsburgh supports Army troops in landing at Eunice, Ark. 1915 Navy salvage divers raise F-4, the first U.S. subma rine sunk by accident. 1916 Congress passes act for expansion of Navy but most ships not completed until after World War I. 1964 USS Boxer and two LSDs arrive off coast of Hispaniola to give medical aid to Haiti and Dominican Republic that were badly dam aged by Hurricane Cleo. Aug. 30 1913 Navy tests Sperry gyroscopic stabilizer (automatic pilot). 1929 Near New London, Conn., 26 officers and men test Momsen lung to exit submerged USS S-4 1961 Two Cuban frig ates fire on a Naval Reserve aircraft on a training mission over international waters. Aug. 31 1842 Congress replaces the Board of Navy Commissioners (a group of senior officers who oversaw naval techni cal affairs) with the five tech nical Bureaus, ancestors of the Systems Commands. One of the 1842 bureaus, the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, contin ues to serve under its original name. 1943 Commissioning of USS Harmon (DE-678), first Navy ship named for an AfricanAmerican Sailor. 1944 Carrier task group begins three-day attack on Iwo Jima and Bonin Islands. 1962 Last flight of Navy airship takes place at NAS Lakehurst, N.J. Sept. 1 1781 French fleet traps British fleet at Yorktown, Va. 1814 USS Wasp captures HMS Avon. 1925 Cmdr. John Rodgers and crew of four flying PN-9 run out of fuel on first San Francisco to Hawaii flight. Landing at sea, they rigged a sail and set sail for Hawaii. 1941 U.S. assumes responsi bility for trans-Atlantic convoys from Argentina, Canada to the meridian of Iceland. 1942 First Seabee unit to serve in a combat area, 6th Naval Construction Battalion, arrives on Guadalcanal. 1945 USS Benevolence (AH13) evacuates civilian internees from two internment camps near Tokyo, Japan. Sept. 2 1918 Navy ships and crews assist earthquake victims of Yokohama and Tokyo, Japan. 1940 Destroyer-for-Bases agreement between U.S. and United Kingdom. 1944 USS Finback (SS-230) rescues Lt. j.g. George Bush (USNR) of VT-51, shot down while attacking Chichi Jima. 1945 Japan signs surren der documents on board USS Missouri (BB-63) at anchor in Tokyo Bay. Fleet Adm. Chester Nimitz signs for the U.S. In other ceremonies, Japanese forces on Palau Islands, Truk, and on Pagan Island and Rota in the Marianas surrender. Sept. 3 1782 As a token of grati tude for French aid during American Revolution, the U.S. gives America (first ship-ofthe-line built by U.S.) to France to replace a French ship lost in Boston. 1783 Signing of Treaty of Paris ends American Revolution. 1885 First classes at U.S. Naval War College begin. 1925 Crash of rigid airship Shenandoah near Byesville, Ohio. 1944 First combat employ ment of a missile guided by radio and television takes place when Navy drone Liberator, controlled by Ensign James Simpson in a PV, flew to attack German submarine pens on Helgoland Island. 1945 Japanese surrender Wake Island in ceremony on board USS Levy (DE-162). Sept. 4 1941 German submarine U-652 attacks USS Greer, which was tracking the submarine southeast of Iceland. Greer was not damaged, but drops depth charges, damaging U-652. 1954 Icebreakers, USS Burton Island (AGB-1) and USCG Northwind, complete first transit of Northwest passage through McClure Strait. 1954 P2V from VP-19 shot down by Soviet aircraft near Swatow, China. 1960 USS Bushnell and Penguin begin relief opera tions in Marathon, Fla., after Hurricane Donna. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Prevention of discrimination and sexual harassmentA message from NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Roy UndersanderAs the Commanding Officer of Naval Air Station Jacksonville, I am fully committed to Equal Opportunity for all Military and Civilian employees of this command, with out regard to race, color, religion, gender, age, dis ability, or national origin. All leaders, managers, and supervisors have an obligation to work towards an environment of mutual respect. My desires and goals are to provide a work place that promotes equal opportunity for every member of this command. Our success depends upon a genuine willingness to provide an environment responsive to the need for professional growth and acknowl edgement of an individuals dignity and self-worth. Discrimination in any form, including sexual harassment, erodes morale, unit cohesiveness and is detrimental to mission readiness. Integral to my goal of providing Equal Opportunity for all personnel is the requirement for leaders to take appropriate action on any form of discrimination, including sexual harassment, that is brought to their atten tion. All personnel are encouraged to use the Informal Resolution System (IRS) to resolve discrimination complaints. Supervisors must ensure military and civilian personnel understand the importance of reporting such allegations. I will not tolerate any form of reprisal. Personnel engaging in discrimination/sexual harassment or reprisal will be subjected to NonI had a deal with the mother robin who made a nest outside our kitchen window for the last four years. It included things like, Ill stop judging your parenting if you stop judging mine, and Mind your own business; Ive got three birds I mean, kids in here, okay? And they dont eat worms. It also included me rescuing baby birds from the jaws of Sparky, our 2-year-old Brittany Spaniel, who loves to hunt. I did this once, famously, while former MLB pinch-hitter, Matt Stairs, was visiting Dinner with the Smileys. While Stairs and the children watched, an MLB Bloopers DVD, I had a life-or-death situation on my hands in the backyard. No one in the living room ever knew anything was amiss. My agreement with the mother bird, however, never included anything about her brood being allowed inside our house. The robin, by the way, must be a fertile little thing, because she has several clutches in one summer. From June to late August she slaves over different sets of eggs. She always uses the same nest, in the same location, and I have a front-row seat from my kitchen table. At least three times a summer, I grieve as her fuzzy, greyheaded babies leave. (Oh, how she must hate me when she looks in the window and sees my brood still there!) This year, though, it seemed like it might be a dud. I never heard the familiar chirps of the chicks, nor did I see their spiky feathers sticking up over the edges of the nest. I didnt even see the mother going mania cally back and forth with worms hanging from her mouth. Last week, I found out why: the mother robin had herself an only child. One lonely little bird poked his head from the nest and then he stood up and took a look around. This is always my cue that the birds, or bird, will soon fledge. Usually, I lock Sparky inside the house so he wont nab the baby before its had a chance. But last week, my mother-in-law, named Robin, oddly enough, was visiting from Seattle and I forgot to give her the lowdown on my relationship with the birds. I told her that a baby was going to fly soon, but I forgot to mention that we should leave Sparky inside. Oops. When I was upstairs brushing my hair, I heard a horrible fuss outside. The mother bird was squawking and swooping between the trees. Sparkys dog tags jingled, and his claws gripped the wooden deck. I knew he had gotten a bird. Before I could even put down my brush, I heard Robin the person, not the bird screaming from downstairs, Sparky got a bird and brought it inside the house! Theres a bird inside the house! I ran downstairs and found Sparky standing over a teeny, shivering bird on our living room floor. He couldnt have been more proud. With an open-mouth grin and a tail that moved his entire backside, he seemed to be saying, Look, I got your dinner! I knew the bird wasnt hurt because Sparky holds them with a characteristic soft mouth. He never intends to eat them. They are gifts for me, his mom, if you will. But I had seen the mess these birds make on my back porch, and it was just a matter of time before this one pooped on the carpet. My mother-in-law was still screaming. She wanted Ford, 12, to catch the bird in a sheet and take it outside. Meanwhile, Ford and his younger brothers had locked themselves in my bedroom. It was just me, the baby bird, one happy dog, and a frantic Robin (the person, not the bird). I got a towel, scooped up the bird and walked to the back porch. Sparkys tail stopped wagging as he fol lowed. Um, you arent going to just let that one go, are you? he seemed to be saying. I put the bird in the grass and shooed Sparky back into the house. Then I stood on the deck and shook my finger at the mother. Did you have to let it fly while my door was open? I asked her. Your timing is lousy, you know. You nearly gave my mother-in-law a heart attack. And the children! Next time, wait until Im ready, okay? The mother swiveled her head in that pretentious, unblinking way birds do. I sighed and went back inside. When I looked out the door later, the mother and the baby were gone. Already, I couldnt wait to see her again next year. A bird in the house is worth two in the nest

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VP-30 began a new chapter in its long and storied history Aug. 15 with a change of command ceremony hon oring skipper Capt. Mark Stevens and welcoming new Commanding Officer Capt. Curtis Phillips. Rear Adm. Matthew Carter, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group, was in atten dance as a member of the official party to honor both men. Stevens tenure at the VP-30 Pros Nest coincided with exciting and sweeping change across the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF) with the transition from the Navys steadfast Lockheed P-3C Orion to the new Boeing P-8A Poseidon. His 25 months of leadership at the Pros Nest saw the arrival of the first P-8A to NAS Jacksonville and VP-30 in March of 2012, along with a grow ing cadre of highly qualified P-8A instructors as part of the Poseidon Fleet Integration Team, as well as the full transition of two operational VP squad rons from the P-3 to the P-8. All this activity took place while pro viding aircraft-specific training for naval aviators, naval flight officers and enlist ed aircrew on both P-3 and P-8 aircraft. As VP-30s role evolved to meet the dynamic needs of the MPRF it main tained its reputation for excellence in training and safety. In July 2013, under the command of Stevens, the Pros of VP-30 surpassed 466,000 Class A mis hap-free flight hours a naval aviation record and received its second con secutive Safety S Award. Phillips returns to VP-30 after serving as a Fleet Replacement and Weapons and Tactics Unit instructor pilot in 1997. His previous tour was as International Security Assistance Force, Force Generation Team chief, Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe, Casteau, Belgium. Phillips holds aircraft qualifications in both the Orion and Poseidon and assumes command of the Navys larg est Fleet Replacement Squadron at the height of the P-8 transition. The War Eagles of VP-16 and the Mad Foxes of VP-5 are now finished with their P-8 transition training at VP-30. Soon, VP-16 will be prepping for the Navys first Poseidon operational deployment. At the same time, VP-30 welcomes the Pelicans of VP-45 as the third opera tional fleet squadron to make the transition to the new aircraft. With the growing challenges associated with the transition of the MPRF to its first new aircraft in more than 50 years, the Pros Nest of VP-30 looks forward to sustaining their superb record of pro duction and safety under Phillips lead ership. VP-30 welcomes new commanding officer JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 29, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 29, 2013 More than 100 Department of Defense dependent children and 27 active duty personnel depart ed NAS Jacksonville on Aug. 4 and traveled to YMCA Camp McConnell in Micanopy, Fla. for a six-day, five-night, residential camp to complete phase one of the Drug Education for Youth (DEFY) program hosted by VP-30. The camp offered activities such as rock climbing, swim ming, horseback riding and team-building games. All were geared toward making smarter life decisions and build ing self-sufficiency. While at camp, the youth also gathered in the camp classroom to learn the importance of saying no to drugs, as well as learn ing the consequences and healthrelated side effects of using both illegal and legal drugs. Approximately 18 hours of classroom lessons were taught by the volunteer adult mentors who spent all week with the youth providing guidance and leadership. It was great to see the children so involved in the lessons, said YN3 Allan Trahan, an adult mentor assigned to VP-5. Teaching topics like these to the children can be quite a chal lenge, but the outcome was very inspiring. Outside of the classroom and in between free playtime, each of the ten teams worked on an antidrug themed skit or performance. All of the children and adult mentors came together to com pile a script and scenes to per form during parents night Aug. 8 at Camp DEFY. The excitement the kids show on their faces when they see all the parents there to watch the skits is just amazing to wit ness, said AE2 Chris Phillips, an adult mentor assigned to Fleet Readiness Center Southeast. I will definitely try to be a mentor at next years camp because this experience was like no other. To see the changes the kids make within themselves and the challenges they overcome is very humbling. VP-30 has sponsored the Jacksonville community DEFY program for 16 years and plans to remain an influential anchor to the program for years to come. Mentors will meet with the children over the course of the year to continue educating on illegal substances and provide guidance when needed. During my time in the Navy, I havent seen such an impact ful volunteer program for local youth and military communi ty, said AWOSC Ron Ramberg, Jacksonvilles local DEFY pro gram coordinator. Seeing the youth enrolled in DEFY mature and grow over the yearlong program, and even watching the adult mentors learn more about themselves as a leader is extremely rewarding. DEFY program is to provide character development train ing, positive role model mentor ing and community outreach for youths ages 9 to 12. The goal is to provide youth with the character, leadership, and confidence needed to engage in positive, healthy lifestyles as drug-free citizens.

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On July 11, a crew from the Fighting Tigers of VP-8 departed NAS Jacksonville for Atsugi, Japan. Led by Lt. Drew Gaston, the crew of nine was tasked with a seven-day mis sion involving three aircraft transfers they were to deliver an aircraft to VP-46 at NAS Whidbey Island, Wash. reposition a VP-46 aircraft to Nippon Hikouki (NIPPI) depot maintenance facility in Atsugi, and accept an air craft from NIPPI to be utilized by the Fighting Tigers. One might say that in standard P-3 fashion, the seven-day evolution took 29 days. Following an uneventful first two legs of the trip, Gaston and crew attempted a functional check flight on aircraft 158215. The crew discov ered a propeller malfunction, which ultimately necessitated replacement of the entire engine; after replacement of the engine, the crew discovered an oxygen leak. Despite their best effort, NIPPI did not have parts on hand for either fix, and the crew spent more than three weeks waiting in Japan. Although several maintenance issues plagued the crew and resulted in a stay that was longer than antici pated, the crew made good use of their time off by taking in the sights of Japan. They visited the historical island of Iwo To (formerly known as Iwo Jima); took in the Daibutsu, the most famous Buddha statue in Japan; shopped in the Tokyo area districts of Ginza and Shibuya; and took in breathtaking views from the top of the Tokyo Tower and Mount Fuji. At night they immersed themselves in the lights and sounds of the big city and explored new and exciting culi nary delights. The crew and aircraft 215 returned to NAS Jacksonville Aug. 10. Sixteen Sailors assigned to the Fighting Tigers of VP-8 assist ed the Bradford Parents Athletic Association (BPAA) in the renova tion of a little league baseball field and support equipment in Starke, Fla. During the event, VP-8 volun teers painted and renovated the dugouts, repaired two picnic tables, installed foul ball netting, hung bulletin boards and connected rain gutters onto a concession stand. Being a part of the Navy and specifically part of VP-8 its important for us to get out and become involved in the community, said AWO1 Nathaniel Graham. Its important for us to be known not only for fighting spirit, but also our volunteer spirit, he added. BPAA operates three divisions of little league baseball, focused on the ideals of teamwork and sportsmanship. Continued parent, vol unteer and local donator support has allowed all interested youth to learn the game of baseball without Conversion programs allow Sailors from all walks of life to make a major job change and continue their Navy careers, officials said Aug. 21. Several Continuum of Service (CoS) conversion programs that apply to eligible offi cer and enlisted Sailors who are cur rently serving on active duty or in the Reserves are outlined in NAVADMIN 198/13. To date, thousands of Sailors have converted to different ratings, allowing the Navy to keep Sailors who are committed to a career in the Navy. According to a new conversion status report on the Active Duty Conversions web page at www.npc.navy.mil, more than half of active duty conversion requests in 2013 have already been approved. Applications for conversion can be submitted by detailers, command career counselors (CCCs) or anyone with prior access to Fleet-RIDE through the new Career Waypoint (C-WAY) information technology system. A NAVPERS 5239/8 (SAAR Addendum) is required to access C-WAY. Active-duty enlisted Sailors, in con junction with reenlistment applications submitted via the C-WAY-Reenlistment process, can voluntarily request to change their rating. Reserve Sailors, working with their CCC, can view and apply for a rating conversion through C-WAY-Conversion. Active-duty and Reserve officers interested in conversion can request a voluntary designator change. Requests for Reserve designator changes are con sidered continuously, while requests for AC designator changes are decided by a lateral transfer board twice a year. Per MILPERSMAN 1440-010, requests for conversion into ratings that are properly manned, will only be con sidered on a case-by-case basis and requests for conversion to overmanned ratings will not be considered. VP-8 assists VP-46 with aircraft transfer Fighting Tigers renovate Little League baseball field the concern of cost. The Navys contribution today will extend decades, said Tricia Cook, board treasurer for BPAA. I hope VP-8 realizes that what they did today will carry on for generations to come, and we couldnt have done it without them, she added.Continue to serve through conversion 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 29, 2013

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From Sigonella to Sasebo, Whidbey Island to Jacksonville, and every where in between, Commander, Navy Installations Commands Navy Housing Office and its privatized housing part ners are gearing up for their annual resident satisfaction survey (RSS). The annual survey, which is mailed to residents of military housing at the end of August, asks residents to provide feedback and thoughts regarding their Navy Housing experience. The RSS measures all aspects of cus tomer satisfaction with Navy Housing, including our staff services, the condition of the homes and barracks, and other provided amenities such as loan er furnishings and the use of housing community centers. A comment card accompanies the surveys, and residents are encour aged to mention particular issues and request follow-up as a way to seek resolution of these issues. Navy Housing is a customer-focused organization, and hearing from our customers is critical for us to under stand and meet their needs, said Cindy Mogan, Navy Housing RSS project manager. We encourage everyone who receives an RSS to take the time to complete and send it in. Its an easy way to give us important and anonymous feedback on how were doing. The RSS is also used to target fund ing for facility and amenity improve ments. Our residents play a vital role in improving the services and facilities we provide, said William Pearson, acting Navy Housing program director. RSS results assist housing professionals to prioritize projects that best meet service members needs. Service members living in family housing will receive their surveys late August, early September depending on location. The survey must be returned by Oct. 21. The family housing survey can be filled out and returned by mail or electronically on the survey website. Service members living in unaccompanied housing (bachelor quarters) will receive their surveys by mail the second week of Sept. and must be returned by Nov. 12. This survey is available by mail only. Part of Clay Countys heritage is the countys strong ties to the military dat ing back to the early 1800s. Today, there are over 24,000 veterans who call Clay County home. These veterans represent service to our nation from World War II through the current conflicts as well as decades of service during peacetime. The Clay County Veterans Service Office is staffed with a full time veterans service officer and a part time veter ans program assistant; both available and eager to assist veterans and/or family members with filing claims and/or other related needs. The office is now located on the second floor of the Clay County Administration Building at 477 Houston Street, Green Cove Springs, Fla. The office is open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. The for mer Veterans Service Office at 1565 CR 315 has been closed. To make an appointment, call (904) 269-6326.Clay County Veterans Services Office has relocatedNavy housing gears up for annual survey JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 29, 2013 7

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8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 29, 2013 June 1919 and grew up there. He joined the U.S. Navy in 1942 and went through flight training and received his wings at NAS Corpus Christi, Texas. His first assignment was to fly F4F Wildcats off the light carrier USS Nassau in the Aleutian Islands Campaign. Taddeo was then trans ferred to the VF-10 Grim Reapers, along with then Lt. Butch Voris. That assignment would eventually lead him to an initial spot with the Blue Angel team. He had been in the first Battle of the Philippine Sea and remembered a Japanese pilot who followed the American planes back in the confusion of night where he tried to land on an American carrier. He would go on to survive World War II, shooting down three Japanese aircraft -which earned him two Distinguished Flying Crosses along with numerous air medals. Following the war, Taddeo was assigned to Opa-locka (NAS Miami) with the Naval Air Operational Training Command as an instructor pilot. He was called up from there to join the Blue Angels and reported to NAS Jacksonville June 14, 1946. The next day, the Blue Angels gave their first public performance at the dedication of Craig Field in Jacksonville. Taddeo was initially assigned as a spare pilot for the team. But a pilot was removed from the team the very next day, so he was eventually assigned left pilot (No. 3 plane) with the team flying in every show for the rest of the 1946 season. Taddeo continued to fly with the team until June 1947. During his tour with the Blue Angels, Taddeo broke through the marriage barrier that Voris had established for any pilot to be a mem ber of the team. He was the first to ask for, and finally receive, permission to marry. When his tour ended, he took com mand of a fighter squadron on board USS Coral Sea, flying the F4U Corsair. He later returned to NAS Jacksonville as commanding officer of VF-43, served in the Pentagon and served as command ing officer of VA-52 and VF-144. The attack squadron command was strange for me said Taddeo. I had always been a fighter pilot. When he left the Navy after 21 years of service in 1963, he had 350 carrier landings with about half on straight car rier flight decks versus the angled flight decks of the carriers today. When he retired, Taddeo became a successful businessman, starting as a salesman at a car dealership in San Diego. He and his brother bought several car dealerships up and down the California coast. Taddeo and his wife, Joan, were invited to NAS Jacksonville as the 2008, 2010 and 2011 NAS Jax Air Show VIP guests. During the stations 2011 air show, a recognition ceremony was held to cel ebrate the Centennial of Naval Aviation, by honoring individuals who had received Distinguished Flying Crosses. Taddeo was honored for his two Distinguished Flying Crosses, one received on April 21, 1944 and the other on June 28, 1944. Plans were already in the works to have them as VIP guests for the 2012 air show, before the show was cancelled. Always gracious in his visits, he was also a favorite of the media for his interviews. As someone who would take the time to meet anyone who wanted a chance to talk with him, he especial ly enjoyed talking with the active duty Sailors and children. Not only was Taddeo a great Navy pilot and officer, he had a wonderful sense of humor and was a loving family man. He would tell anyone who would listen how much he learned and appreciated his time with the U.S. Navy and particularly as one of the early founding pilots of the Blue Angels. Everyone knew the Blue Angels wherever I went and mentioned the team, he would say. When the Blue Angels season was cancelled because of sequestration in 2013, he was devastated, said Joan recently. This was the first time in the history of the team that a season had been cancelled. But that very first team is now finally back together, probably retell ing long forgotten stories. Taddeo loved NAS Jacksonville, promoted the station and the U.S. Navy as often as he could, and will be sorely missed. TADDEOis Aug. 27, so we are celebrating with a clear lower deck or as the U.S. Navy calls it, an all hands call, he continued. According to Glynn, 52 members of the squadron are currently stationed at NAS Jacksonville with the following 56 members arriving throughout next year. We expect to have four aircraft by February which will allow us to build our experience flying alongside our U.S. Navy brethren. They have more expe rience flying these aircraft and thats why our project office recommended we remain here to work through any issues and grow the organizations experience quickly, Glynn stated. By the end of 2014, 725 Squadron will be outfitted with seven MH-60R Romeo helicopters before returning home in December 2014 to HMAS Albatross, the only naval air station in Australia. They will then take on the role of training the RANs 816 Squadron members on the Romeo as they transition to the new aircraft from the S-70B-2, an interna tional variant of the SH-60 Seahawk. 816 Squadron will continue supporting the Australian fleet, serving on board RAN frigates and destroyers. We are currently building a new facility with the same equipment the U.S. Navy utilizes, however, we are combining the maintenance and air crew training facilities under one roof, said Glynn, who also highlighted what a great opportunity it is for squadron members to train here and experience life in another country. I think this is fantastic to be able to come here to train on helicopters next to another countrys defense force. I think it is fantastic to be able to come here to train on helicopters next to another countrys defense force. Weve completed three months of training at CNATTU and have another four months of OJT on the shop floor with the squadrons here. Theyve been very accommodating and helpful. This is something completely new for us and while challenging, its been great, said CPO Aviation Technician Aircraft Jamie Craig of 725 Squadron. I love Jacksonville and being able to come to Florida. This aircraft is similar to the one I was working on in Australia but there are a lot more modifications; its much newer and shinier. I cant wait until we get our new Romeos, added Able Seaman Celeste Bowie, a RAN airframe/mechanic for the past seven years. During the all hands call, 725 Squadron Commanding Officer Cmdr. David Frost, RAN, praised his troops for their accomplishments and stressed the importance of forging ahead to prepare for the arrival of their new aircraft. He also recognized several squadron members by presenting service awards and letters of appreciation from the Greater Area Jacksonville USO for participating in a recent community service event. Frost and SN Clark Chancellor, the youngest member of the squadron, concluded the ceremony by cutting a cake adorned with the squadrons emblem, a winged gauntlet. Originally commissioned in the Royal Navy in 1943, 725 Squadron became a RAN Fleet Air Arm Squadron in January 1958 operating fixed wing aircraft. De-commissioned in 1961, it was recommissioned again in 1962 as an antisubmarine warfare (ASW) helicopter training squadron serving until 1975. The squadron will be re-commis sioned in early 2015 and again assume the role of providing aircrew and maintainers trained in operating ASW heli copters. judicial punishment (NJP), Court Martial, Administrative Separation or Administrative action under the Civilian Systems. My policy is equitable treatment and opportunity for each and every indi vidual of this command. All personnel are members of our team. One team, one fight! Each member plays an integral part in the success of NAS Jacksonville. Equal Opportunity is a readiness issue and is vital to the accomplishment of our mission. All members of this command will be regarded with dignity and respect as we successfully accomplish our mission. SAPR improving contract quality and reduc ing future funding requirements by more than $17 million. Scorbys next assignment will be as Commander, Navy Region Europe, Africa, and Southwest Asia, and as Commander, Maritime Air Forces, Naples, Italy. Williamson is reporting from his current position as Commander, Navy Region Midwest, a position he has held since June 2011. His early sea assignments included tours in USS Dewey (DDG 45), USS Briscoe (DD 977), USS Enterprise (CVN 65), and executive officer aboard USS Rodney M. Davis (FFG 60). He commanded USS Simpson (FFG 56) during NATOs Standing Naval Forces Atlantic 2004 deployment to the United States, the first such visit by NATO to the United States after 9/11. Under his command, Simpson won two Battle E awards. Ashore, his assignments includ ed tours in Washington, D.C., as the executive assistant to Commander Navy Installations Command (CNIC), and returning for a second CNIC tour as Deputy Director of Plans and Policy. Additionally, he served as a lead examiner of both the Steam and Gas Turbine Branches at the Propulsion Examination Board at Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Fleet. In May 2006, Williamson served as the executive officer of the Command Leadership School in Newport, R.I. From 2008 to 2011, he served as the commanding officer of Naval Base San Diego. During this tour, Naval Base San Diego was selected as the 2010 Presidential Installation Excellence Award and the 2011 Presidential Green Government Award. A native of Jacksonville, Fla., Williamson is a 1985 graduate of the United States Naval Academy, where he received a Bachelor of Science degree in Computer Science. He earned a Master of Business Administration from the Naval Postgraduate School in 1990 and is a graduate of the Armed Forces Staff College in Norfolk, Va. CNRSE RAN The Navy Supply Corps FoundationJacksonville Chapter (NSCFJ) and the NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville command worked jointly to raise funds and organize a school supplies donation drive during July and early August. The combined efforts of these orga nizations raised approximately $450 worth of school supplies for donation to Hyde Grove Elementary School (HGES). HGES is a Title 1 school that receives special assistance through the fed eral government. The program works to assist schools with high numbers of children from low-income families to ensure they receive the necessary resources to meet state academic standards. Each of the students partici pate in the free lunch program and the Blessings in a Backpack program, that gives the children a backpack filled with food to take home on the week Supply corps community partners with local school

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Navy/Marine Corps team testing F-35B Lightning II aboard USS WaspTwo F-35B Lightning II jets (BF-01 and BF-05) touched down on board the amphibious assault ship USS Wasp (LHD 1) Aug. 12, kicking off week of Development Testing II (DT-II) where Wasp Sailors and Integrated Test Force (ITF) team members will test and further validate the F-35B. DT-II is the second of three test phases encom passing numerous milestone events including the first night operation at sea as well as the first launch and recovery of the F-35B at sea by a U.K. test pilot. The F-35 Lightning II is the next generation strike aircraft for the U.S. Marine Corps, Navy and Air Force, as well as eight international partners. The jet combines advanced stealth with fighter speed and agility, fully fused sensor information, networkenabled operations and advanced sustainment. Wasp is testing the F-35B, which has short takeoff/ vertical landing (STOVL) capability, enabling it to operate from a wider range of ships and in support of expeditionary operations. Its a significant milestone for the F-35 program, said Capt. Erik Etz, director, Test & Evaluation F-35 Naval Variants. The ability to operate at night is critical and so certainly the testing were doing here will provide a significant amount of data so we can clear the envelope and clear the aircraft to operate day and night, when the Marine Corps takes the F-35B to initial operating capability in 2015. Wasp and the ITF completed a major milestone when Lt. Col. C. R. Clift launched from the flight deck and landed safely, marking the first successful night launch and recovery of the F-35B at sea. The pilots were pleased with the progress that the first night landings at sea represent. It all went extremely well, said Clift. We conducted eight successful launches and landings, so were on target and quickly gaining experience with F-35B night operations at sea. Launch and recoveries filled the first, second and third days at sea creating smooth, synchronized daytime operations. Wasp flight deck crew members were trained in advance of DT-II to prepare them for F-35B operations at sea, ensuring all those involved were ready to support DT-II. The crew itself has spent quite a bit of time up at Patuxent River working with the F-35B understand ing how the aircraft operates, said Capt. Brian Teets, Wasps commanding officer. What weve been able to bring is a consistent platform to the F-35B to support their testing. Its the same ship with the same capabilities, providing consistency and stability as a reliable test platform. Employing a consistent test platform allows the team to find ways to optimize this new aircraft in the Marine Air Combat Element. U.K. Squadron Leader Jim Schofield, a Royal Air Force pilot, became the first international pilot to conduct sea-based launch and landing in the F-35B. Its exciting to see the integration of this new plane with the amphibious assault ships, said Schofield. After a year leading up to this evolution, its awesome to get here and start. And the crew has been especially accommodating and efficient at running these tests smoothly. The historical milestones were not lost on Wasp crew members, but for most it was business as usual, focusing on safety and effectiveness during flight operations at sea. ABH1 Ashley Geary gave the signal to launch BF-05 for the first night flight operations. We worked with the test team at Pax River for a week, learning about the F-35B and its operations, said Geary. They took our suggestions on flight deck procedures, ensuring we were one team working together towards a successful mission. The F-35 Lightning II is scheduled to replace 13 different legacy aircraft in the current U.S. defense inventory. Sea trials for the Navys F-35C aircraft carrier variant are scheduled at the end of 2014. Naval museums and heritage sites return to normal hours Navy museums that cut their hours as a result of the federal furlough have returned to their normal operating hours. Additionally, the Navys archives and Navy Department Library, located on the Washington Navy Yard, reopened Aug. 26, Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) officials announced. The follow ing Navy museums were affected by closing Mondays and have resumed normal hours: D.C.); Nautilus (Groton, Conn.); Museum, Keyport, Wash.); Museum, Bremerton, Wash.) was closed on Fridays and is back to its normal hours. Before planning a visit, check the museums respective websites for hours of operation. NHHC, which operates the Navys museums, the Department of the Navy Library, and Navy Archives, has also returned to normal public access hours, although access to many of its holdings remain lim ited due to ongoing remediation efforts. In 2012, NHHC and Washington Navy Yard Public Works collaborated on a major archival storage facility renovation project for buildings 108 and 44. The ongoing project will result in accommodating 12,000 cubic feet of paper, microform and digital media storage space with new environmental controls. Additionally, refurbishment of the archives spaces and mold decontamination started earlier this year, and the work will continue into next year. To access the Navy museum websites, please go to http://www.history.navy.mil/museums/index.html. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 29, 2013 11

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Petty officer commissioned to EnsignAWO1(NAC/AW) Quincey Durham of Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven (CPRW-11) was commissioned as an ensign during a ceremony at VP-30, Aug. 2. Numerous family members, co-workers and friends attended the event. CPRW-11 Commodore Capt. Eric Wiese was the guest speaker. During the traditional ceremony, Durhams first class petty officer insignia was officially retired before he was given the administration of oath by Lt. Ron Williams, former officer in charge of Mobile Tactical Operations Center Three (MTOC-3). Durham was then presented his ensign shoulder boards and cover by his mother, Darlene Durham and his daughter, Madisyn Durham. Durham, a native of Lubbock, Texas, joined the Navy June 26, 2000. He then completed Aircrew Candidate School and AW A School in Pensacola, Fla. His duty assignments include Fleet Replacement Squadron training at VP-30, VP-46 at NAS Whidbey Island,Wash. and CPRW-11 as part of MTOC-3. His first assignment as an ensign is to USS George Washington (CVN-73). Im grateful to be a part of the Navy for all of the opportunities I have had. Taking care of Sailors is my number one priority and I am looking forward to keeping this tradition alive as a commissioned offi cer, he said. Im also eternally grateful to my family for supporting me along the way and for everything that Ive had to endure through my life because its made me who I am today. 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 29, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Friday at 7 p.m. Monday Night Football Kick-off Sept. 9 at 7 p.m. Complimentary food & give-a-ways Karaoke Sept. 6 at 7 p.m. Direct TV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys. Watch the exciting NFL Action on one of Deweys five big-screen TVs. Arrive early for your choice of game. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 510 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 16 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer Now through Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 years and younger receive one free game of bowling every day until 5 p.m. Fall and winter bowling leagues now forming Leagues begin in September.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Lap swim (no concessions, slide or water park will be open) Mon. Fri. 6 8 am, 11 am 1 pm, 4:30 7 pm. Recreational swim Sat. & Sun 11 am 6 pm For more information call (904) 5423518 Dive-in Movie Friday, Sept. 6 & 7 10 p.m. Featuring EPIC 36 size restriction on floatsI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil. ITT is now selling tickets to the Daytona 500, Drive 4COPD 300, Budweiser Duels, Spirit Unlimited and Rolex 24. Call ITT for pricing information at (904) 542-3318 ext. 8 or email them directly at jaxs_nas_mwritt@navy.mil. Halloween Horror Nights Vendor Day Oct. 2, 10 a.m. 2 p.m. Prize drawing every 30 minutes NFL Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets on sale now $70 section 147 LegoLand Florida Free ticket for active duty military through Oct. 27 Wet n Wild Orlando $37 adult, $45 adult w/ meal, $40 child w/ meal Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Amelia Island Museum of History $10 family pass, Ghost tour $8 adult, $4 child Florida EcoSafaris in St. Cloud EcoPark $119, Coach safari adult $28, child $25, Zipline safari $75, Cypress canopy cycle $40 for one hour Gatorland Free admission for active duty and retired military until the end of the year. Family tickets can be purchased at ITT. $19.95 adult, $12.50 child, zip line $54.25 Blue Man Group Orlando $49 adult, $29 child Monster Truck Jam club seating $42, regular seating $22 2013 2014 Artist Series featuring Mama Mia, Memphis, Celtic Thunder, War Horse, Men are From Mars, Women are from Venus, Million Dollar Quartet and The D* Word is a Musical are on sale now! Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 2013 2014 season featuring Menopause, River North Dance Chicago, Hungarian State Folk Ensemble, Clay County Christmas, Godspell, Driving Miss Daisy, Bronx Wanderers, Celtic Fire and Swan Lake are on sale now!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. St. Johns Town Center Shuttle Aug. 31 at 3 p.m. Disc Golf Trip Sept. 7 at 10 a.m. Paintball Trip Sept. 14 at 9 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 NAS Jax Golf Club Championship Sept. 14 & 15 at 8 a.m. $80, includes golf both days, lunch both days, trophies for the division winners and gift certificates for flight winners Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Sept. 10 & 24 for active duty Sept. 12 & 26 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and greens fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite.Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Before and After School Registration going on now. Fees based on household income.Flying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Oct. 7 Nov. 20 $500 per person For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 29, 2013 13

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Friday, September 6 7 10 p.m. Movie begins at 8 p.m. at the Outdoor PoolFree admission & popcorn $1.50 food baskets Ring tube floats & chairs are allowed and encouraged.*36 size restriction on floatsfacebook.com/nasjaxmwr (904) 542-3518/2930 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 29, 2013

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 29, 2013 ends. School supply items raised from the donation drive included back packs, pencils, crayons, T-shirts, etc., and were delivered to an apprecia tive Principal Jeff Royal, and Assistant Principal Iviza Cruickschank-Greene in time to be distributed on the first day of school on August 19. Thank you so much for helping our children, said Cruickschank-Greene. We are very grateful and appreciate the community support! In addition to delivering the school supplies, NSCFJ Vice President Cmdr. Wade Rindy signed an agreement to become sponsorship partners in order to support the school in a variety of other forms. The NSCFJ is excited about our partnership with HGES, said Rindy. We look forward to giving back to the school, such as participating in the schools book of the month program, supplying treats or other forms of recognition to the schools students of the month, as well as participating in future school beautification projects and food drives. We will also be mentoring and tutoring the students and acting as guest speakers at planned events. Our children need role models, said Royal. Something as simple as sitting to talk with them during lunch time makes a huge impact it is amazing to see how a single conver sation can change a childs life we are very excited about our future with NSCFJ. NAS Jacksonville School Liaison Dawn Mills was also in attendance and was instrumental in facilitating the partnership. She will encourage other commands on the base to assist in the volunteer opportunities avail able at the school. She also spoke of organizing field trips for the students to visit the base in order to be exposed to life outside of the school. NSCFJ is a non-profit professional and social organization made up of active duty, reserve and retired Navy Supply Corps officers whose purpose is to encourage members to partici pate in social interaction, charitable endeavors and professional develop ment. NAVSUP The sixth annual Pink Ribbon Symposium will be held at the Thrasher-Horne Conference Center (283 College Drive, Orange Park 32085) on Oct. 5 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Founded by Drs. Cynthia Anderson and Linda Sylvester, the event is presented by ICON Oncology at Orange Park Cancer Center and F.R.O.G. (Florida Radiation Oncology Group). Important up-to-date information about breast cancer prevention, early detection and treatment options, the side effects of treatment, and survivorship will be discussed. Plus, it will offer good health and wellness topics, along with a keynote presentation entitled, Laughter is the Best Medicine and an Meet the Experts session, which will allow guests to ask questions of local doctors. More than 500 attend this free symposium annually. This years special guests are two regional female comedians, Gwen Templeton and Roz McCoy, who will headline the event and offer insight into how laughter can ease pain and help the cancer journey in an up-close and personal way. Guests will be treated to a healthy continental breakfast. Topics include an update on breast cancer research, genetics, caregivers, stress relief, car ing for your body, health, nutrition and exercise. Everyone is invited to the expo, where up to 60 local and national businesses will showcase their services to help cancer patients and their families. Guests will learn how to care for their body, how sleep can affect cancer treatment, and how best to deal with rela tionships. The schedule is as follows: 89 a.m. Exhibits & Continental Breakfast 99:25 a.m. Opening Remarks 9:4010:30 a.m. Session 1 Meet the Experts (latest updates on radiol ogy, medical oncology, surgical oncol ogy, reconstruction, etc.), Caring for Our Bodies (nutrition, exercise, family genetics, coping with emotional stress, sexuality, etc.) 10:3011 a.m. Exhibits/Intermission (Silent Auction closes at 11 a.m.) 11 a.m. 12:05 p.m. Session 2 Meet the Experts, Caring for Our Bodies 12:0512:30 p.m. Guest Speakers: Laughter is the Best Medicine 12:3012:40 p.m. Closing Remarks For more information, call 838-2950 or e-mail pinkribbonsymposium@ gmail.com According to the World Health Organization, depression is the leading cause of disability worldwide with an estimated 350 million affected and is one of many symptoms that could indicate a form of perinatal mood and anxiety disorders (PMAD) in women. PMAD can occur during pregnancy and up to the first year postpartum. Other disorders associated with PMAD include panic, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disor der and postpartum psychosis. PMAD affects women of all ages, race, culture and financial status. Studies have shown that approxi mately 10-20 percent of women experience depression either during pregnancy or in the first 12 months postpartum, yet less than 25 percent of Obstetrics (OB) and Gynecology (GYN) patients have had their diagnoses recognized. Despite the health risks and com plications associated with maternal depression, pregnant women and new mothers experiencing depression often do not get the treatment they need due to fear of discussing mental health concerns with their primary care providers. Military families are often faced with increased stressors and challenges due to frequent deployments, career deci sions and family migration due to new duty assignments. To an expectant mother, it can be extremely overwhelming and may have a direct impact on her partner as well presenting the feelings of being overwhelmed, confused, angry and afraid. Screening and early intervention can protect the well being of the mother, baby and entire family. If left untreated, PMAD can affect the mother-child bond, the childs physical and emotional health, and long-term behavior. Common symptoms of PMAD can include feelings of loneliness, sadness and helplessness; difficulty bonding with baby; anxiety, panic or excessive worry; fear of being left alone with baby; thoughts of hurting yourself or those around you; frequent mood swings or crying; lack of interest in life or a previous history of depression, postpartum depression or anxiety. Delays in treat ment can relate to a significantly longer duration of PMAD. Many military moms, and some dads, are accustomed to being the sole caregiver and are not used to asking for help. It is vital for parents to know that resources are available to them at any time. Social support is essential to assure the mental health of women, children and their families during pregnancy and postpartum. Social support net works include family, friends, peer groups and faith communities. Active-duty service members should contact their primary health care pro vider for assistance with counseling services and or treatment for depression or anxiety disorders. Dependent family members should call the Naval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) appointment line at 904-5424677 or 800-529-4677, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. After-hours nurse advice is available via the appointment line on evenings, weekends and holidays.Free breast care symposium provides answers to Northeast Florida womenPerinatal mood and anxiety disorder more common than you may realize

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 29, 2013 17 DOD facilities are gearing up to issue identification cards to same-sex spous es beginning Sept. 3, Pentagon officials said Aug. 20. All spousal and family benefits, including ID cards, will be made avail able no later than Sept. 3, 2013, said Navy Lt. Cmdr. Nate Christensen. The Supreme Court decision to overturn portions of the Defense of Marriage Act made it possible for the department to recognize same-sex marriages. The department will make the same benefits available to all military spous es, regardless of sexual orientation, as long as service member-sponsors pro vide a valid marriage certificate from a jurisdiction including those overseas that recognizes same-sex marriage, Christensen said. Entitlements such as basic allow ance for housing and family separation allowance are retroactive to the date of the Supreme Courts decision June 26, 2013. For service members married after that date, the entitlements will be paid from the date of the marriage. TRICARE the military health care program is tied to the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System. TRICARE will be available to same-sex spouses beginning Sept. 3, 2013. There are 15 countries that recog nize same-sex marriage. In the United States, 13 states and the District of Columbia recognize same-sex marriages. Many U.S. service members live in jurisdictions that do not recognize same-sex marriages. As operational requirements permit, commanders may allow military per sonnel in same-sex relationships up to 10 days of non-chargeable leave for the purpose of traveling to a jurisdiction that allows same-sex couples to be married if they are stationed more than 100 miles from one of those areas. Personnel stationed within the continental United States may receive up to seven days non-chargeable leave and those stationed at overseas assignments may receive up to 10 days non-charge able leave, Christensen said. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) announced Aug. 21, the second round of HUD-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (VASH) funding to local public housing agencies across the U.S. and Puerto Rico. The $7.8 million in added funding will provide housing and clinical ser vices for 1,120 currently homeless vet erans. In May of this year, the two agencies announced $60 million in HUD-VASH vouchers. The supportive housing assistance announced Aug. 21 is provided through the HUD-Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing (HUD-VASH) program that combines rental assistance from HUD with case management and clinical services provided by VA. Since 2008, a total of 58,140 vouchers have been awarded and 43,371 formerly homeless veterans are currently in homes of their own because of HUD-VASH. Our nations veterans have sacrificed and given up so much for our freedom, said HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan. These vouchers are help ing America end veterans homelessness one veteran at a time until we see not one veteran living on the street. I look forward to continue working with Secretary Shinseki and the Department of Veterans Affairs to target assistance to our homeless veterans. These HUD-VASH vouchers are a vital tool in our effort to provide these brave men and women with the earned care and benefits that help them live productive, meaningful lives, said Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric Shinseki. So long as a single veteran lives on our streets, we have work to do. But with the continued support of President Obama, Congress and our communi ty partners, we will end homelessness among veterans. HUD-VASH is a critical part of the Obama Administrations commitment to end Veteran and long-term chronic homelessness by 2015. Opening Doors: Federal Strategic Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness, serves as a road map for how the federal government will work with state and local com munities to confront the root causes of homelessness, especially among former servicemen and women. HUDs annual point in time estimate of the num ber of homeless persons and families for 2012 found that veteran homeless ness fell by 7.2 percent, or 4,876 people, since January 2011, and by 17.2 percent since January 2009. On a single night in January 2012, 62,619 veterans were homeless. The grants announced today are part of $75 million appropriated this year to support the housing needs of homeless veterans. Local public housing authorities provide rental assistance to home less veterans while nearby VA medical centers offer supportive services and case management. This is the second round of the 2013 HUD-VASH funding. HUD expects to announce more HUDVASH funding this year. VA medical centers work closely with homeless veterans then refer them to public housing agencies for these vouchers, based upon a variety of fac tors, most importantly the duration of the homelessness and the need for longer-term, more-intensive support to obtain and maintain permanent hous ing. The HUD-VASH program includes both the rental assistance the voucher provides and the comprehensive case management that VA medical center staff provides. Veterans participating in the HUDVASH program rent privately owned housing and generally contribute no more than 30 percent of their income toward rent. VA offers eligible homeless veterans clinical and supportive ser vices through its medical centers across the U.S., Guam and Puerto Rico.HUD, VA announce more funds to help homeless veteransDOD facilities gear up to issue ID cards to same-sex spouses one who asks to see Privacy Act information that you are responsible for. than permitted under records dispos al. posal requirements are met. ments in Privacy Act record systems. about different individuals in the same file. without ensuring it is properly marked. Use FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY PRIVACY SENSITIVE. mail privacy data. shared drives, multi-access calendars, the Intranet or Internet that can be accessed by individuals who do not have an official need to know. records without first consulting your privacy office or CNO (DNS-36). dations on how to better effectively manage privacy data. The bottom line is: if you collect it, you must protect it. If in doubt, leave it out. Just because youve always handled personal information one way, doesnt mean that is the best way. Ten rules to protect personal information

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