Jax air news

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Material Information

Title:
Jax air news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note:
Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID:
UF00028307:02055


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NAS Jax Public Affairs professionals recognized among best in NavyNaval Air Station Jacksonville (NAS Jax) Public Affairs Office was recently recognized for outstanding work in the sound, goal-oriented preparation and execu tion of a communica tion program that drew the publics attention and let everyone know the importance of the new P-8A Poseidon aircraft. The new air craft will have a posi tive impact on NAS Jax, naval aviation and its ability to operate for ward through effective timely modernization. THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2013 SAPR PRIORITY T -LINE HAITI EOC Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Phase II of Chief Petty Officer (CPO) 365 is well underway at NAS Jacksonville as 75 chief selectees are currently being tested as deckplate leaders. CPO 365 Phase I started Sept. 17, 2012 with two segments that define the journey from first class petty officer (FCPO) to CPO. Phase I concludes when CPO selection results are released. The MCPONs guidance sets forth a program that blends 120 years of tradition with the com mitment of CPO mess leader ship providing those selected with required guidance. Participation is mandatory for all FCPOs throughout dura tion of Phase I, regardless of whether they are board-eligi ble. Phase II begins when the chief selectees are announced and concludes with the pin ning ceremony on Sept. 13. All FCPOs must remain engaged in periodic train ing held at the chapel every Thursday from 9-10 a.m., and Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert released his Navigation Plan for the Navy for 2014 to 2018 to the fleet last week. Drawing from the Sailing Directions and the three tenets of Warfighting First, Operate Forward and Be Ready, the Navigation Plan defines the course and speed the Navy will follow to organize, train and equip over the next several years. Greenert also addresses budgetary concerns about Continuing Resolutions, Sequestration and prepara tions for the FY2014 budget in the document. Our first consideration is the ability to fight and win today, while building the abil ity to win tomorrow, said Greenert. Regardless of reductions, we will continue to operate for ward with ready forces, where it matters, when it matters. Greenert stated that despite future reduction to Navys bud get that may impact the ability to maintain the overall size of the fleet, the Navy will ensure that the deployable force is pro ficient and ready. This will include fielding and improving kill chains, utilizing the electromagnetic spectrum and maintaining the Navys undersea dominance. The document also address es the rebalance toward the Asia-Pacific region, a strat egy that will compel the Navy to add ships to the Forward Deployed Naval Force, and increase the number of ships which are Forward Stationed or Forward Operating. The Navy and Marine Corps are our nations away team, said Greenert. History demonstrates the Navy is at its best when we are forward and ready to respond. Lastly, the Navigation Plan stresses the importance of hav ing Sailors and Civilians that are ready to tackle tomorrows challenges by being personally prepared, confident and profi cient. We will sustain our forces warfighting capability and ability to operate forward through effective maintenance and timely modernization, said Greenert. Ready Sailors and Civilians remain the source of the Navys warfight ing capability. To view the CNOs Navigation Plan, visit www. navy.mil/cno/130813_CNO_ Navigation_Plan.pdf Adm. Greenert releases CNO Navigation Plan for 2014-2018 CPO 365 Phase II is underway

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Aug. 22 1912 U.S. Navy Dental Corps estab lished. 1945 First surrender of Japanese garrison at end of World War II. USS Levy receives surrender of Mille Atoll in Marshall Islands. 1980 USS Passumpsic (AO-107) res cues 28 Vietnamese refugees. Aug. 23 1864 Rear Adm. David Farraguts squadron captures Fort Morgan at Mobile Bay. 1958 Massive concentration of Pacific Fleet in Quemoy-Matsu area prevents invasion of islands by China. 1958 In Taiwan Straits Crisis, units of 7th Fleet move into Taiwan area to support Taiwan against Chinese Communists. 1963 The first satellite communica tions ship, USNS Kingsport (T-AG-164) in Lagos, Nigeria, connected President John F. Kennedy with Nigerian Prime Minister Balewa who was aboard for the first satellite (Syncom II) relayed telephone conversation between heads of state. Aug. 24 1814 British invasion of Maryland and Washington, D.C. Washington Navy Yard and ships burned to prevent capture by the British. 1912 Launch of USS Jupiter, first electrically propelled Navy ship. 1942 U.S. carrier aircraft begin twoday Battle of Eastern Solomon Islands where Japanese task force is defeat ed and one Japanese carrier sunk. Japanese recall expedition to recapture Guadalcanal. Aug. 25 1843 Steam frigate Missouri arrives at Gibralter, completing first TransAtlantic crossing by U.S. steam powered ship. 1942 Five Navy nurses captured on Guam are repatriated 1951 Twenty-three fighter aircraft from USS Essex (CV-9) escort Air Force heavy bombers attacking Najin, Korea since target was beyond range of landbased fighters. Aug. 26 1775 Rhode Island Resolve: state del egates to Continental Congress press for creation of Continental Navy to protect the colonies. 1839 Brig Washington seizes Spanish slaver, Amistad near Montauk Point, N.Y. 1861 Union amphibious force lands near Hatteras, N.C. 1865 Civil War ends with Naval strength of more than 58,500 men and 600 ships. Aug. 27 1917 Squadron of minesweep ers departs U.S. for service off coast of France. 1944 USS Stingray (SS-186) lands men and supplies on Luzon, Philippines to support guerilla operations against the Japanese. 1945 Pacific Fleet ships enter Sagami Bay, near Tokyo, Japan. 1959 Off Cape Canaveral, Fla., USS Observation Island (EAG-154) makes first shipboard launching of a Polaris missile. Aug. 28 1867 Capt. William Reynolds raises U.S. flag over Midway Island and takes formal possession of the islands. 1952 Units on USS Boxer (CV-21) launch an explosive-filled drone that explodes against railroad bridge near Hungnam, Korea. First guided-mis sile launch from a ship during Korean Conflict. 1965 Cmdr. Scott Carpenter and nine aquanauts enter SeaLab II, 205 ft. below Southern California waters to conduct underwater living and working tests. 1991 A helicopter from USS America (CV-66) rescues three civilian sailors who spent 10 days in a lifeboat 80 miles off Capt May, N.J. after their sailboat capsized. 1992 Navy and Marine forces begin providing disaster relief after Typhoon Omar hit Guam. 1992 Marine and Army forces begin providing disaster relief in Florida after Hurricane Andrew. The story Im about to tell you is hard for some people to believe. After hear ing it, they ask a series of predictable questions: You hired these people, right? (Answer: No.) You knew them ahead of time?(Also, no.) Are you joking me? (No.) First, a little background. I met my husband, Dustin, when I was a baby. In fact, because my dad was deployed when I was born, I met Dustin before I met my dad seven months later. Our lives inter sected multiple times throughout our childhood, but for 10 years, we didnt see each other at all. Then, when I was 20, Dustin and I went out on a date. We got married less than two years later. On July 17, 1999, I gave Dustin a practi cal, inexpensive wedding band. He wore the ring every day for 12 years through two cross-country moves, flight school, three children and two deployments until July 30, 2011. That was the day we took the kids to Mt. Katahdin in northern Maine to visit our favorite swimming hole, an offshoot of the Penobscot River, where the water churns and a rope swing hangs from a tree. In three months, Dustin would leave for a yearlong deployment. Dustin was swimming with the boys in the rapids when his wedding band slipped off his finger and disappeared into the foaming water. A wedding ring is just a piece of metal until that moment when its gone. As I cried on the banks of the river, Dustin rubbed my back and whispered into my hair, Well buy a new ring before I leave, and someday, Ill come back here and find the real one. But in my heart I knew: the ring was gone. I wrote about the lost wedding band in a column a week later, and when Dustin left for his deployment that November, he had a new, shiny wedding band on his finger. It wasnt the worn and scratched one that had represented our love for more than a decade. Over time, I moved on and forgot about the ring. Thirteen months later, in September 2012, I received a cryptic message in my Inbox. Hi Mrs. Smiley My dad, Greg Canders, read your article about losing your husbands ring last year. My dad showed me the article this morning and we decided to attempt to find it. Could you please give me a call as we have found a wedding band and would like you to identify it. Zac Canders I hate to admit that at first I was skep tical. I had dark thoughts about Greg and Zac, whom I didnt know. Were they tricking me? Did they have some kind of motive? Did they want something from me? Because it didnt seem possible they could find the ring. And why would they look for it anyway? I agreed to meet Greg and Zac at a local parking lot. Greg, a professional diver, told me that my column had touched him. In fact, he had saved the clipping and had it in his shirt pocket. That morning, he and his son had decided to drive 80 miles out of their way, with all of their gear, to find the swim ming hole I had hastily described and look for the ring. Greg reached into his other pocket and pulled out a small plastic bag. While my husband was still eight time zones away, my hand trembled. Greg opened the bag and put Dustins ring, tarnished and spotted from 13 months under water, in my palm. I slipped the ring onto my right hand. Greg and Zac wanted nothing in return, though we had them to Dinner with the Smileys, and when Dustin came home from deployment three months later, he could hardly wait to shake their hand. When Dustin held his ring again, it was with the same amount of awe that I had in the parking lot that day. But when I asked him, It hardly seems real, does it? Dustin said without hesitation, I always knew wed find it. The sixth annual Pink Ribbon Symposium will be held at the Thrasher-Horne Conference Center (283 College Drive, Orange Park 32085) on Oct. 5 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Founded by Drs. Cynthia Anderson and Linda Sylvester, the event is pre sented by ICON Oncology at Orange Park Cancer Center and F.R.O.G. (Florida Radiation Oncology Group). Important up-to-date information about breast cancer prevention, early detection and treatment options, the side effects of treatment, and survi vorship will be discussed. Plus, it will offer good health and wellness topics, along with a keynote presentation entitled, Laughter is the Best Medicine and an Meet the Experts session, which will allow guests to ask questions of local doc tors. More than 500 attend this free symposium annually. This years special guests are two regional female comedians, Gwen Templeton and Roz McCoy, who will headline the event and offer insight into how laughter can ease pain and help the cancer journey in an upclose and personal way. Guests will be treated to a healthy continental breakfast. Topics include an update on breast cancer research, genetics, caregivers, stress relief, caring for your body, health, nutrition and exercise. Everyone is invited to the expo, where up to 60 local and national businesses will showcase their ser vices to help cancer patients and their families. Guests will learn how to care for their body, how sleep can affect can cer treatment, and how best to deal with relationships. The schedule is as follows: 89 a.m. Exhibits & Continental Breakfast 99:25 a.m. Opening Remarks 9:4010:30 a.m. Session 1 Meet the Experts (latest updates on radi ology, medical oncology, surgi cal oncology, reconstruction, etc.), Caring for Our Bodies (nutrition, exercise, family genetics, coping with emotional stress, sexuality, etc.) 10:3011 a.m. Exhibits/ Intermission (Silent Auction closes at 11 a.m.) 11 a.m. 12:05 p.m. Session 2 Meet the Experts, Caring for Our Bodies 12:0512:30 p.m. Guest Speakers: Laughter is the Best Medicine 12:3012:40 p.m. Closing Remarks For more information, call 8382950 or email pinkribbonsympo sium@gmail.com Lost wedding band returned by strangers Free Breast Care Symposium provides answers to Northeast Florida women

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Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel announced seven new initiatives Aug. 15 to strengthen and stan dardize the departments sexual assault prevention and response effort. In a memo, Hagel called elimination of sexual assault in the military one of the departments top priorities. This effort requires our absolute and sustained commitment to provid ing a safe environment in which every service member and DoD civil ian is free from the threat of sexual harassment and assault, he wrote in a statement. Our success depends on a dynamic and respon sive approach. We, therefore, must continu ally assess and strive to improve our prevention and response programs. On May 6, the secre tary directed the services and defense agencies to strengthen the program in commander account ability, command climate, victim advocacy and safe ty. The secretarys initia tives include: victim legal support by directing service secretar ies to create a legal advo cacy program providing legal representation to sexual assault victims throughout the judicial process. He set Nov. 1, 2013, as an initial operat ing capacity and for it to be fully functional by Jan. 1, 2014. al investigative hearings of sexual assault-related charges be conducted by Judge Advocate General officers. service secretaries to enhance protections call ing on them to develop and implement policies allowing for the reas signment or transfer of members accused of committing sexual assault or related offense. Hagel wants this done to eliminate contact while respecting the rights of both victims and the accused. timely follow-up reports on sexual assault inci dents and responses to be given to the first general or flag officer within the chain of command. DoD inspector general to evaluate closed sexual assault investigations. vice secretaries to stan dardize prohibitions on inappropriate behavior between recruiters and trainers and their recruits and trainees. the DoD general council to develop and propose changes to the Manual for Courts-Martial allow ing victims to give input dur ing the sentencing phase of courts-martial. The new measures should strengthen the departments sexual assault prevention and response programs, the secretary said. Remember, we are all accountable and respon sible for eliminating this crime from our ranks, Hagel said in the memo.Hagel announces new anti-sexual assault initiatives JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013 Aircraft passing through NAS Jacksonville, both helicopters or fixed wing, can count on the professional Sailors working at the Transient Line (T-Line) in Hangar 117 to guide, tow and park their aircraft. The T-Line is an essential component in day-to-day air operations at NAS Jax, providing a myriad of services that help support fleet operations in the south east region. The T-Line Sailors here are high ly qualified individuals, and support the needs of the base in many differ ent ways, commented T-Line Division Officer Lt. Matthew Malmkar. We provide aircraft towing, parking, and fueling operations to all types of planes and helicopters for all branches of the service. One of the most helpful things we do is escort pilots who are unfamiliar with our taxiways to their designated parking spots with a follow me truck. Malmkar explained that the T-Line Sailors handle all types of aircraft, pro viding specific ground carts to them as needed, and must be knowledgeable in servicing each one. In addition, Sailors also perform regular maintenance on the runway arresting gear and constantly rove the airfield for debris that could damage an aircraft. Speaking on the challenges of work ing in the T-Line, ABH2 Edward Davis commented, You have to maintain an extreme level of focus when guid ing and parking an aircraft. Safety and communication are absolutely essen tial, especially since so many things can be going on at once. An additional service that the T-Line gladly engages in is setting up aircraft on the flight line for an air show. Our busiest and most challenging time is definitely when we have an air show, Malmkar continued. Towing static display aircraft into position, especially when they are from the World War II era, can be difficult because we dont want to do anything to potentially damage these relics. But the rewards of providing such a fun event to the public are definitely worth it. Malmkar praised his Sailors for their continued hard work and devotion to supporting fleet operations. These are a great group of extremely skilled Sailors, and their professional ism and abilities continue to impress me everyday. I couldnt ask for a better crew.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013 5

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The public affairs team won the coveted 2012 Chief of Naval Information (CHINFO) Thompson-Ravitz Award for Excellence in Navy Public Affairs (PA) for Special Events/Projects, Observances and Special Publics, Shore, Small P-8A Poseidon multi-mission aircraft roll out and P-8A Integrated Training Center. Capt. Roy Undersander, NAS Jax com manding officer, said earning the award highlights the commitment and outstand ing efforts of his public affairs team. Our PAO team, led by Miriam Gallet, constant ly delivers and always strive for the best, he stated. In the Navy PA community, everyone strives to one day win a Thompson-Ravitz Award. Gallet was truly humbled by the rec ognition and very proud of her team for competing alongside the Navys very best. The NAS Jacksonville PAO team is small, only three members (Kaylee LaRocque, Clark Pierce, and Miriam Gallet), who accomplish so much on a daily basis. Gallet said that they are all very proud of the award and thanked Navy Region Southeast Protocol Officer Denice Gonzalez, VP-30, PMA-290 PAO LaToya Graddy, and others who were part of the project team. She explained that conceptualizing, writing and executing hundreds of mov ing parts in a communication plan for the roll out of a new aircraft in the Navys arse nal and the simultaneous grand open ing of the Navys largest integrated train ing center with more than 2,100 guests in attendance was a big challenge. Winning this award on the heels of their win of the Chief of Information Merit Award for the newspaper solidifies their commitment to public affairs excellence and information synchronization aboard the installation. Im very proud of their accomplishments, stated Undersander. The Thompson-Ravitz Award recog nizes the most exceptional performance by individuals and units in public affairs throughout the Navy. The awards bear the names of Rear Adm. William Thompson, the first desig nated Public Affairs Officer (PAO) selected for flag rank and the first PAO to be the CHINFO, and Rear Adm. Robert Ravitz, a former Director of the Naval Reserve Public Affairs Program and Special Assistant to the CHINFO. The award promotes professional com munication expertise, excellence and highlights the superb work by public affairs professionals and other Navy per sonnel who produce public affairs pro grams. Categories included special events and projects, community relations, public information and internal communication. Congratulations to all commands and individuals who participated in the Thompson-Ravitz Awards Program. Your hard work and superb efforts have made your public affairs programs outstanding examples to emulate. Well done, wrote Navy Chief of Information Rear Adm. J. F. Kirby in a message. AWARD Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast awarded a $16 million contract Aug. 14 to Whitesell-Green, Inc., a small business out of Pensacola, for construction of a Broad Area Maritime Surveillance Mission Control Complex at NAS Jacksonville. The work to be performed includes construction of a new freestanding two-story structure with two electro magnetic interference shield ed mission control systems, a tactical operations center with sensitive compartment ed information facility spac es, and numerous roof-top mounted antennas. The project will renovate some interior spaces; the ren ovations include a reconfig ured command suite, systems reconfiguration, and in some cases finish upgrades. Also, a new antenna infrastructure will be built at a remote site south of the new facility. NAVFAC Southeast contin ues to build on its success by providing contract opportu nities to small businesses. We continue to review all projects for potential small business opportunities, said Nelson Smith, NAVFAC Southeast small business manager. Each year NAVFAC estab lishes target goals are estab lished for Small Business, Small Disadvantaged Business, Historically Underutilized Business Zone Small Business, ServiceDisabled Veteran-Owned Small Business, and WomenOwned Small Business cat egories. Smith explained that the maximum practicable utilization of small busi ness concerns is a matter of national interest with both social and economic benefits. Work for this project is expected to be completed by December 2014. VP-5 Mad Fox of the WeekVP-5 has finalized its tran sition from the P3-C Orion to the P8-A Poseidon with the completion of Safe for Flight on Aug. 1. Mad Fox One land ed Aug. 5 at 4:45 p.m. marking the completion of VP-5s first independent flight of the P8-A Poseidon. Mad Fox of the Week is a weekly spotlight on those Mad Foxes that help make these historic events happen. This weeks Mad Fox of the Week is AM2 Shawn Batchelor. Batchelor was born in Jamaica and moved to the United States in December 2005. He joined the Navy in June 2010 and became a nat uralized citizen in November of the same year. As an avia tion structural mechanic, he is responsible for the gen eral upkeep of the airframe, hydraulic controls, flight con trol surfaces, and landing gear. He is also responsible for the corrosion control on the air craft, which is extremely important as VP-5 begins to employ their new airframe operationally. Bachelor explained that the diligence and ordered struc ture that goes into maintain ing military airframes are the most challenging part of his job. However, despite the chal lenges that go along with being an aviation structural mechan ic, he said, my job gives me an opportunity to pursue my goals and dreams. When Batchelor first moved to the United States, he and his wifes goal was to own their own house. Through hard work and dedication, he is proud that he is on his way to meeting that goal. While in the Navy, he ultimately strives to prog ress through the ranks, earn a commission, and retire as a captain. To help facilitate these aspi rations, he attends Full Sail University where he studies mobile development. Outside of the Navy, he has interests in becoming a business entre preneur. He hopes to one day be able to design and develop apps for mobile phones. VP-5 is currently in the interdeployment readiness cycle aboard NAS Jacksonville.NAVFAC Southeast awards $16 million contract for new mission control complex at NAS Jacksonville 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013 7

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A celebration was held Aug. 9 for the newly-constructed emergency opera tions center (EOC), disaster relief ware house (DRW) and fire station in Cap Haitian, Haiti. The new facilities, located within the Nord Department of Haiti, were built as part of U.S. Southern Commands Humanitarian Assistance Program (HAP) in Haiti. The 4,000 square-foot EOC will pro vide a central hub for the local govern ment to coordinate response following catastrophic events and report vital information to the Haitian govern ment for rapid decision making, said Lt. j.g. Blaine Henning, Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast (NAVFAC Southeast) resident officer in charge of construction (ROICC), Haiti. The ceremony was held in the outdoor vehicle bay of the fire station and was well attended by community members, local fire fighters, Directorate of Civil Protection volunteers, Haitian National Police, and local officials. The local fire department displayed hundreds of pieces of life saving equipment donated to the department by the United States since the 2010 earthquake. The 4,800 square-foot DRW should provide ample storage for items need ed to respond immediately following a major disaster. The warehouse also cre ates a place for supplies to be redistrib uted from a central area outside of the Haitian capital to help alleviate major supply chain issues discovered follow ing the 2010 earthquake, explained Henning. The EOC, DRW, and fire station are part of 12 similar projects in Haiti that were awarded by NAVFAC Southeast in Jacksonville. The lead contractor on the EOC and DRW was GDG Beton of Port Au Prince, Haiti. The lead contractor on the fire station was CSS International Holdings, Ada, Mich. The EOC and DRW will be managed and staffed by members of the local Directorate of Civil Protection (DPC). That is the equivalent of FEMA in the United States, said Henning. The 3,400 square foot fire station will provide first responder capabilities to the Cap Haitian area and life saving equipment to the local fire fighters. Participants in the inauguration cer emony included U.S. Ambassador to Haiti, The Honorable Pamela White; Daniel Basile, minister of the interior; and Madame Jean Baptiste, director of civil protection. Both the U.S. ambassador and minis ter of interior remarked in their speech es that the success of these projects could only conclude with the contin ued cooperation between the United States of America and the Government of Haiti. Henning, along with Greg Marcellus, NAVFAC Southeast construction manager for the project, and Sgt. 1st Class Roland Laforest, U.S. Southern Command HAP program manager also attended. The project is part of 62 humanitaran assistance projects NAVFAC Southeast is administering the design and con struction of for U.S. Southern Command on behalf of the government of Haiti and the Haitian people. The $33 million program is being executed, with ROICC Haiti oversight, through 20 contracts at 22 sites and will provide EOCs, DRWs, fire stations, medical clinics, commu nity centers, and schools for the Haitian people. U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson (D-FL), Haitian President His Excellency Michel Martelly, and U.S. Ambassador to Haiti The Honorable Pamela White toured the newly constructed emergency operations center (EOC), disas ter readiness warehouse (DRW), school, clinic, and community center in Les Cayes, Haiti Aug. 6. The five facilities, located in the Sud Department of Haiti, were constructed by Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast (NAVFAC SE) through designbuild contracts as part of the U.S. Southern Commands Humanitarian Assistance Program in Haiti. No one should have to go through what Haitians went through three years ago, said Nelson. Our humanitarian assistance programs there are showing real signs of progress, but there is still much work to be done and our naval command there has and will continue to be critical to the countrys overall recovery efforts. The clinic, school, and community center, referred to as community clusters, were turned over to the Haitian government in December 2012. A ribbon cut ting to celebrate their inauguration was conducted Jan. 10. Clinic personnel treated more than 100 patients the first month it was open. Each community cluster consists of an eight-class room school, a community center building, a medical clinic, and water well, said Lt. j.g. Blaine Henning, resident officer in charge of construction Haiti with NAVFAC SE. These facilities provide an immediate positive impact to the local population. The 4,000 square foot EOC provides a central hub in the Sud Department for the local government to coor dinate disaster response. The 4,800 square foot DRW provides storage for supplies needed to immediately respond to a major disaster. The warehouse is also used to de-centralize supply redistribution outside of the Haitian capital to allevi ate major supply chain issues discovered following the 2010 earthquake. These projects are part of 62 similar building efforts throughout Haiti that were awarded by NAVFAC SE in Jacksonville. New disaster relief, emergency facilities celebrated in Cap Haitian, Haiti Haiti leaders, Florida senator tour newly completed projects in Haiti 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013

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Naval Supply Systems Command Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonvilles (NAVSUP FLCJs) Commanding Officer Capt. Duke Heinz was a featured guest speaker at the 2013 Jacksonville Defense Logistics Business Development Conference & Technology Exposition at the University of North Florida July 30. Accompanying Heinz to the conference was NAVSUP FLCJs Executive Director Mitch Palmquist, and Director of Office of Small Business Programs Caretha Brown-Griffin. The event is a logistics moderniza tion conference and speaker forum for local military, government and busi ness leaders. Senior commanders and leaders from Jacksonvilles military installations, organizations, and gov ernment agencies (to include the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Army, and the Jacksonville Port Authority) acted as guest speakers to discuss their business organizations as well as cur rent and future logistics and infrastruc ture expansion projects. The main objective of the confer ence is to highlight and promote Jacksonvilles defense logistics support operations and infrastructure, advo cate the continued modernization and improvement of Northeast Floridas transportation and logistics infrastruc ture, and most importantly, to promote job growth and provide opportunities for Jacksonvilles business leaders to meet with logistics professionals from across the United States. During NAVSUP FLCJs presentation, Heinz highlighted new business pros pects and contracting opportunities for defense activities located in Northeast Florida. Keeping in line with the con ferences objectives of advocating the improvement and modernization of Jacksonvilles logistics infrastructure, he also spoke about NAVSUPs imple mentation of the Navy Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) program. Navy ERP allows for more proactive supply chain solutions, better anticipa tion of the fleets needs, availability of accurate information anywhere in the Navy to support decisions, financial auditability and compliance regula tions, and a more efficient and traceable global distribution of material in the Navy supply chain, said Heinz. He then went on to explain that through the implementation of Navy ERP, the Navy has already seen a reduc tion in the number and cost of older legacy information technology systems as well as increased productivity. In addition to sharing the technologi cal innovation of Navy ERP, Heinz was also able to advocate NAVSUP FLCJs Office of Small Business programs. At NAVSUP FLCJ, we are dedicated to partnering with small businesses in the Jacksonville area and beyond to include women-owned, veteran-owned, small disadvantaged, and service disabled veteran-owned and more. In fact, small business contract actions accounted for approximately 20 percent of all con tracts awarded in fiscal year 2012 by NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, said Heinz. Following his presentation, Heinz and the rest of NAVSUP FLCJs repre sentatives manned a table providing opportunities for each of the guests and other presenters to gather contact infor mation and to hold one-on one question and answer sessions. NAVSUP FLCJ, one of seven Fleet Logistics Centers under NAVSUP Global Logistics Support, provides operation al logistics, business and support ser vices to the fleet, shore, and industrial commands of the Navy, Coast Guard, Military Sealift command, and other joint allied forces. Services include contracting, region al transportation, fuel, material man agement, household goods movement support, postal and consolidated mail, warehousing, global logistics and hus banding, hazardous material manage ment, and integrated logistics support. NAVSUP advocates partnering opportunities at Exposition JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013 9

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physical training held at the Reserve Center every Friday from 6-7 a.m. dur ing Phase II. There will be specific instances where chief selectees conduct separate sessions for fundraising. During this training they will learn the importance of the chiefs mess, how to work as a team, and what is expected of a CPO. The chief selectees are guided by senior enlisted leaders through positive, chal lenging events to test their mental and physical mettle on both a personal and professional level. It also provides the opportunity to emphasize CPO history, heritage and naval traditions. Physical fitness is a top priority, so chief selectees spend many hours run ning, swimming and doing calisthenics to build camaraderie and confidence. They also participate in community service and fundraising events, class room training and historical produc tions, explained AWOCS Shane Haney of VP-30, who is coordinating CPO 365 Phase II. I like what Ive seen so far in their development of teamwork and learn ing the difference between lead ership as a first class and as a chief. Haney said failure is not an option for chiefs. Being selected for chief is a lifechanging event; you only go through the process once. We watch each others backs, stick together, take care of our Sailors and ensure that our missions are accomplished. Selectees are divided into training teams named after U.S. Navy ships that were involved in a significant tragedy such as USS Cole (DDG-67) which was attacked while refueling in the Yemen port of Aden on Oct. 12, 2000 and USS Stark (FFG-31) which was accidentally fired upon by an Iraqi jet on May 18, 1987 in the Arabian Gulf. On Aug. 14, the chief selectees par ticipated in the annual plane wash ing event at Heritage Park. They spent much of the day scrubbing the aircraft and hosting a barbeque for active duty and retired chiefs. I think this is a great event and that the planes out here needed a little bit of love so we are able to provide that and do a little base beautification. This is the first thing people see when they drive in the main gate and I take pride in that. I think the other chief selectees take pride in this park as well and its definitely one of the most fun events that weve done so far, said ETC(Select) David Couch of Mobile Tactical Operations Center 9. Other events include car washes, gas & glass at the Navy Exchange (NEX) Service Station, the Tijuana Flats Beach Run (Aug. 24), NEX CPO Night (Aug. 27 at 5 p.m.), chili cook-off (Aug. 29 at 11 a.m. at the NEX) and the Wounded Warrior Run (Aug. 7). At the end of the training, when the chief selectees have earned their anchors, they will be pinned during a special ceremony and welcomed to the chiefs mess Sept. 13. CPO CPO 365 is a year-round training initiative that chief messes throughout the Navy take on to prepare first class petty officers to become chiefs. Phase II of CPO 365 begins when the chief petty officer selection board results are released, which occurred Aug. 1 this year. Many commands have truly embraced CPO 365 and have viewed this year as really being the first year that the program has found its legs. What do you think of the program as a whole? I am very pleased with the process. I am not taking anything away from the training we have used in the past because it worked well for during its time. Society has changed and evolved, and if we want to continue to have the ability to train our reliefs, we must change and evolve as well. I think if you ask any CPO mess that has been and is fully engaged in CPO 365, youll find that each mess is brainstorming new and innova tive ways to train our first class petty officers to take their place. Many of the Sailors participating in CPO 365 are not even eligible for chief. Some wont be eligible for three years. What do you want those Sailors to take away from the program each year? Theres enough change that occurs within our Navy every year that CPO 365 should never get old and stag nant. Think about our Navy programs, procedures and policies. They are constantly evolving. CPO 365 is first and foremost about helping a first class petty offi cer be the best work center supervisor or leading petty officer that they can be because the Navy is forever evolving. The training will always change, day after day, week after week, month after month, and year after year. If MCPON talks CPO 365: Phase I, Phase II and stand down JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013 11

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DoD announces new same-sex spouse benefitsThe Department of Defense (DoD) announced its plan to extend benefits to same-sex spouses of uniformed service members and DoD civilian employees Aug. 14. After a review of the departments benefit policies follow ing the Supreme Courts ruling that Section Three of the Defense of Marriage Act is unconstitutional, and in consul tation with the Department of Justice and other executive branch agencies, the Defense Department will make spou sal and family benefits available no later than Sept. 3, 2013, regardless of sexual orientation, as long as service membersponsors provide a valid marriage certificate. The Department of Defense remains committed to ensuring that all men and women who serve in the U.S. military, and their families, are treated fairly and equally as the law directs. Entitlements such as TRICARE enrollment, basic allow ance for housing (BAH) and family separation allowance are retroactive to the date of the Supreme Courts decision. Any claims to entitlements before that date will not be granted. For those members married after June 26, 2013, entitlements begin at the date of marriage. We recognize that same-sex military couples who are not stationed in a jurisdiction that permits same-sex marriage would have to travel to another jurisdiction to marry. That is why the department will implement policies to allow mil itary personnel in such a relationship non-chargeable leave for the purpose of traveling to a jurisdiction where such a marriage may occur. This will provide accelerated access to the full range of benefits offered to married military couples throughout the department, and help level the playing field between opposite-sex and same-sex couples seeking to be married. For civilian benefits administered government-wide to federal employees, the Department of Defense will follow the Office of Personnel Management and the Department of Labors guidance to ensure that the same benefits cur rently available to heterosexual spouses are also available to legally married same-sex spouses. Sunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 10 a.m. Catholic Mass (Mass will be at 9:15 a.m. July 14) 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 11 a.m. Protestant Worship 11:15 a.m. Catholic CCD Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study Wednesdays, 7 p.m. at Chapel Complex Building 749 and Thursdays at 7 p.m. in the bar racks The chapel is located at the corner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road. Call 542-3051 for more information. 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013

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Jaguars tickets available at USOThe Greater Jax Area USO has opened ticket sales for the pre-season Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Philadelphia Eagles game Aug. 24 at 7:30 p.m. to all active duty, retirees, veterans with ID cards, National Guard, Reservists, DoD civilians and their families. Tickets are available at the NAS Jax and NS Mayport USO for $15 each, cash transactions only. Regular season tickets are available the following days and times: Guidelines: including Florida National Guard and Reservists on current active duty orders and dependents are eligible to purchase/use these tickets. may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equals four. If you have less than four you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but dependent children are not authorized to represent the service member/spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO director. of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest. No exceptions. of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/ CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the season.Requests, with justifica tion, must be sent to Mike OBrien at mobrien@usojax. com ing tickets will be prohibited from buying any more tickets for the entire season. come, first served. For more information, call 7782821. August is usually a time when military families are wrapping up duty station moves, squeezing in summer vacations, and getting the kids enrolled in school. Its not the time when people are thinking about December holiday wish lists. But, believe it or not, the holiday shopping season will be upon us in just three short months. You may not be ready to see Halloween candy, let alone think about December holiday celebrations. But, preparing for your holiday spending now can help you avoid being seasonal debt. So, here are a few ways you can start your December in August. Set reasonable expectations Last year, it was reported that the average American expected to spend $854 on gifts during the holiday season. While many people wont spend that much, any spending that strains your financ es with post-holiday debt is bad for your financial future period. Take the time now to talk with fami ly and friends about realistic holiday spending limits. Consider less expensive gift options like homemade gifts. If you have a large family, maybe its time to start a new tradition of picking one person out of a hat to buy a gift for, rather than everybody buying a gift for every single other person in the family. Plan, budget, and save Figuring out whos on your gift list, creating a holi day budget, and gradually setting money aside can help you avoid overspending, unwanted debt, and financial stress. You can find helpful budgeting tools on mymoney.gov. Also, check with your bank or credit union to see if they offer a Christmas club or holiday savings accounts that you can use to save for your holiday goals. Old-fashioned layaway is another option. Keep the big picture in mind It can be easy to forget that we spend a lot of money on other things besides gifts during the holidays. Big holiday dinners, travel to see family and friends, and even increased electricity costs to run that massive holiday light display can drain your bank account. Make sure you plan for the cost of all of your extra holiday activities. Look for ways to save Doing things like catching early sales, comparison shopping, ordering from sites or stores that offer free shipping, shopping at discount stores, and buying items that offer rebates can help save you money on holiday purchases. Saving money for your shopping and saving money while youre shopping should be a dual goal. Watch out for costly surprises Make sure you fully understand the term and con ditions if youre using gift cards or layaway plans. For instance, expiration dates, inactivity rules, and hidden fees on gift cards can eat away at their value if youre not careful. Take the same cautious approach with store credit cards that youre offered at check out. They might save you a few bucks at the register today, but stick you with very high interest rates later. Avoid holiday debt traps Not all deals are a bargain, so dont get sucked in by holiday super sales. If you rush to a store sale because you can get a $3,000 TV for $2,000, youve still spent $2,000 on a TV. Was that really something you had planned to do? Also, dont be enticed by pay day lenders who want to help you get your hands on holiday cash. Proper planning and saving long before the holiday can help you avoid a cycle of highinterest debt that can last for weeks or even months after the holidays are over. Keep in mind that holiday spending is short-term spending. Once the unwrapping frenzy is over, how long does the excitement last? Saving your money for long-term goals like home ownership, college or a comfortable retirement may be the very best gift you can give yourself and your loved ones.December in August JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013 13

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Friday at 7 p.m. Monday Night Football Kick-off Sept. 9 at 7 p.m. Complimentary food & give-a-ways Direct TV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys Come watch the exciting NFL Action on one of Deweys five TVs. Get there early for your choice of game. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 510 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 1 6 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer Going on now through Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 years and younger receive one free game of bowling every day until 5 p.m. Win prizes all summer long! Fall and winter bowling leagues are now forming! Leagues begin in September.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Lap Swim (no concessions, slide or water park will be open) Mon. Fri. 6 8 am, 11 am 1 pm, 4:30 7 pm. Recreational swim Sat. & Sun 11 am 6 pm For more information call (904) 5423518 Dive-in Movie Sept. 6, 710 p.m. Featuring Epic 36 size restriction on floatsI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil. ITT is now selling tickets to the Daytona 500, Drive 4COPD 300, Budweiser Duels, Spirit Unlimited and Rolex 24! Please call ITT for pricing information at (904) 542-3318 ext. 8 or email them directly at jaxs_nas_mwritt@navy.mil. Halloween Horror Nights Vendor Day Oct 2, 10 a.m. 2 p.m. Prize drawing every 30 minutes Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets on sale now $70 section 147 Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 201314 Artist Series featuring Mama Mia, Memphis, Celtic Thunder, War Horse, Men are From Mars, Women are from Venus, Million Dollar Quartet and The D* Word is a Musical are on sale now! Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 201314 season featuring Menopause, River North Dance Chicago, Hungarian State Folk Ensemble, Clay County Christmas, Godspell, Driving Miss Daisy, Bronx Wanderers, Celtic Fire and Swan Lake are on sale now!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Fantasy Football Live Draft Aug. 22 at 7 p.m. Jags vs Eagles Shuttle Aug. 21 at 6 p.m. St. Johns Town Center Shuttle Aug. 31 at 3 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 NAS Jax Club Championship Sept.14 & 15 at 8 a.m. $80, includes golf both days, lunch both days, trophies for the division winners and gift certificates for flight winners Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Sept. 10 & 24 for active duty Aug. 22, Sept. 12 & 26 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Movie Under the Stars Aug. 23 at 8 p.m. featuring Monsters University Patriots Grove Before and After School Registration going on now! Fees based on household income.Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Oct. 7 Nov. 20 $500 per person For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil. 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013

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Heartworm disease in dogs and cats is caused by a parasitic worm called Dirofilaria immitis. The adult worm lives in the pulmonary artery, the ves sel that transports blood from the heart to the lungs. Mosquitoes are the vectors for heartworm disease, which means they are carriers of the organism and transmit the disease to dogs and cats. Other animals susceptible to developing heartworm disease include wolves, coyotes, foxes, and sea lions. Humans are a dead-end host, which means the organism is unable to survive and develop in our bodies. When an animal is infected with adult male and female heartworms, they produce microfilariae (baby larvae), which circulate in the bloodstream. The mosquito ingests the microfilariae when it takes a bloodmeal from the infected animal. Over the next 10-14 days, the microfilariae will develop into an L3 larval stage. At this stage the L3 larvae are able to infect an animal when the mosquito takes its next meal. The L3 larvae migrate through the body while developing through the larval stages until they become L5 larvae. At the L5 larval stage, the larvae preferentially migrate to the pulmonary artery to develop into an adult heartworm. It takes about six and a half months from initial infection to the pres ence of reproductively mature heartworms. An adult heartworm is approximately 1-foot long when it is liv ing in the pulmonary artery! Adult heartworms cause disease by irritating the pulmonary artery, leading to arterial plaque forma tion. These arterial plaques prevent normal blood flow by decreasing the diameter of the blood ves sel. In addition, the worms themselves can cause obstruction of normal blood flow. When pulmonary hypertension (elevated blood pressure in the lungs) develops, the heart must work harder to pump blood through the blood vessels in the lungs. The heart is eventually unable to keep up with the demand to pump blood throughout the body and a blood traffic jam occurs. More blood is returning to the heart compared to the amount that the heart is trying to pump through the lungs and out into the body. This is called right sided heart failure. When the heart cant keep up with the demands of the body, the animal will show signs of exercise intolerance, such as tiring easily, reluctance to play, and fainting when running or playing too much. The blood traffic jam also leads to fluid leaking out of the blood vessels and into other spaces, such as the spaces meant for air in the lungs. Fluid in the lungs will cause persistent coughing. All of these signs could be due to other con ditions therefore a thorough physical exam and diag nostic testing is necessary to determine the problem. Diagnosis of heartworm disease starts with a heartworm test. This test detects the presence of adult reproductive female heartworms in the body. Unfortunately, it is more difficult to diagnose heart worm disease in cats, which is why we dont regularly screen them. Additional testing may be necessary to determine if a cat is infected with adult heartworms. Radiographs (X-rays) and/or an echocardiogram are also performed to assess the severity of the disease. Treatment for heartworm disease involves killing the adult worms with an injectable medication given by a veterinarian. The dog must be hospitalized for treatment because the dead worms can cause lifethreatening side effects. The microfilariae (baby larvae) must also be cleared from the body with the appropriate treatment. This will prevent the develop ment of new heartworms and break the cycle of trans mission to other mosquitoes. In general, cats are less susceptible to developing heartworm disease, but when they are infected the disease is more severe and the treatment options are limited. It is unlikely that an indoor cat will develop heartworm disease, which is why we dont strongly encourage owners to use preventatives for their cats. When a cat is infected with heartworm disease it is best to allow the worms to die off on their own. This is due to the fact that cats are extremely sensitive to the effects of dying worms and may have a better chance of surviving a gradual worm die-off over a period of one to two years. In the meantime, the cat is closely monitored and treated for any side effects. Heartworm disease in dogs and cats is a horrible disease, which can be easily prevented. It is as simple as giving a treat or applying a topical spot-on once a month, along with a quick blood test given annually. It may seem expensive when purchasing the preventa tives, but it is worth every penny. Many animals dont survive when they become infected with heartworm disease, and the treatment can cost thousands of dol lars.For further information on the wellness of your ani mals, call 542-3786. Friday, September 6 7 10 p.m. Movie begins at 8 p.m. at the Outdoor PoolFree admission & popcorn $1.50 food baskets Ring tube floats & chairs are allowed and encouraged.*36 size restriction on floatsfacebook.com/nasjaxmwr (904) 542-3518/2930 Heartworm disease in dogs and cats can be easily prevented JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013 15

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first class petty officers and chief petty officers find themselves re-hashing the same old information time and time again, they must look within them selves to determine where the updates need to take place and effectively make the change. For those Sailors who saw their names on the list, what do you think CPO 365 has done to prepare them for their anchors? I think that CPO 365 has provided professional and solid training that these future leaders need in order to be effective chiefs. CPO 365 Phase II is an opportunity for our first class petty officers to display to the CPO mess the skill-sets that they learned during Phase I. Talk about the CPO 365 stand down. I received two letters alleging that inappropriate conduct is taking place during CPO 365 Phase II. Upon initial look, I think that we have a few CPO messes operating outside of CPO 365 Guidance. I directed all CPO messes to stop training from Aug.12 and resume Aug. 14. This gave commands and all CPO messes a chance to review CPO 365 Guidance and the Navys policy on hazing. We should never think that we are above the law. If we think that CPO selectee training cannot be shut down, we are wrong. If we want to be respon sible for training our future chiefs, then we must do it in a professional manner. I want to re-emphasize I believe that the large majority of the mess is doing the right thing and for that I want to thank you. However, know that any formal complaints will be fully investigated. What is the ultimate goal with CPO 365? The ultimate goal of CPO 365 is to train our relief to the best of their abil ity. To have meaningful and practical training that reflects the times of our society and that will make our future leaders capable under pressure and able to successfully complete any mission they are called to do. Our leaders are held accountable as they should, and being a chief petty officer isnt for the weak of heart nor lazy of mind and body. It requires us to be all in, all the time. We are called upon at all levels of our chain of com mand and again, a few short weeks isnt enough time to cram all of the wisdom within the CPO mess into a CPO select ee. It should be happening throughout the year. What do you say to the negative feed back youve received about CPO 365? Anytime you change something, there will be rumblings. Make no mis take about it. Some folks can think back to when we de-segregated the military, the nay-sayers said that was the end of the Navy as we knew it! Our Navy thrived. Remember when we put women on ships. The nay-sayers hollered that was the end of the Navy! Women are now lead ing our Navy and have been become solidified members on the battlefield. It comes with the territory of being the Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy. Not everyone will agree with your deci sions. Do you see any more changes to the program or to the final few weeks of the program for selectees? Are you content with setting guidelines and letting com mands determine the final chapter in the process? I have no intentions of making any significant changes to CPO 365 and want to provide every CPO mess an opportunity to become experts at what we currently have in place. I place a great deal of faith and confidence in each CPO mess to ensure the training that we are conducting rests within the guidelines provided. In your opinion, is CPO 365 the best way to train the Navys future leader ship and why? At this particular point of time in our history, I believe CPO 365 provides us with the best training opportunity. However, I am also confident that in time CPO 365 will also change because thats what we do, we constantly evolve. Ill be a retired MCPON years from now and there will be a new name, a new process and new way of doing business to train our chiefs. Ill trust that it was put in place because the times that our future Sailors will serve necessitate that. CPO 365 is about our moment in his tory more than it is about my belief that this is the absolute right way to do it. I believe its the right way to do it today, but I certainly cant speak for the future. MCPON 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013

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Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC work shops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2013: To register for any of the above workshops call 5425745.FFSC offers life skills workshops throughout the year M i l i t a r y A p p r e c i a t i o n D a y Saturday, September 21st: JACKSONVILLE DOLPHINS vs. Warner University Royals Kickoff is at 1pm! ALL ACTIVE AND RETIRED MILITARY PERSONAL GET IN FREE WITH ID! D.B.MILNE FIELD AT JU Follow us at @JUDolphins @JU_Football and @DunkinDolphin JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013 17

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NAS Jax Public Affairs professionals recognized among best in NavyNaval Air Station Jacksonville (NAS Jax) Public Affairs Office was recently recognized for outstanding work in the sound, goal-oriented preparation and execu tion of a communica tion program that drew the publics attention and let everyone know the importance of the new P-8A Poseidon aircraft. The new air craft will have a posi tive impact on NAS Jax, naval aviation and its ability to operate for ward through effective timely modernization. THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2013 SAPR PRIORITY T-LINE HAITI EOC Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Phase II of Chief Petty Officer (CPO) 365 is well underway at NAS Jacksonville as 75 chief selectees are currently being tested as deckplate leaders. CPO 365 Phase I started Sept. 17, 2012 with two segments that define the journey from first class petty officer (FCPO) to CPO. Phase I concludes when CPO selection results are released. The MCPONs guidance sets forth a program that blends 120 years of tradition with the commitment of CPO mess leader ship providing those selected with required guidance. Participation is mandatory for all FCPOs throughout duration of Phase I, regardless of whether they are board-eligi ble. Phase II begins when the chief selectees are announced and concludes with the pin ning ceremony on Sept. 13. All FCPOs must remain engaged in periodic train ing held at the chapel every Thursday from 9-10 a.m., and Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert released his Navigation Plan for the Navy for 2014 to 2018 to the fleet last week. Drawing from the Sailing Directions and the three tenets of Warfighting First, Operate Forward and Be Ready, the Navigation Plan defines the course and speed the Navy will follow to organize, train and equip over the next several years. Greenert also addresses budgetary concerns about Continuing Resolutions, Sequestration and prepara tions for the FY2014 budget in the document. Our first consideration is the ability to fight and win today, while building the abil ity to win tomorrow, said Greenert. Regardless of reductions, we will continue to operate forward with ready forces, where it matters, when it matters. Greenert stated that despite future reduction to Navys budget that may impact the ability to maintain the overall size of the fleet, the Navy will ensure that the deployable force is proficient and ready. This will include fielding and improving kill chains, utilizing the electromagnetic spectrum and maintaining the Navys undersea dominance. The document also address es the rebalance toward the Asia-Pacific region, a strat egy that will compel the Navy to add ships to the Forward Deployed Naval Force, and increase the number of ships which are Forward Stationed or Forward Operating. The Navy and Marine Corps are our nations away team, said Greenert. History demonstrates the Navy is at its best when we are forward and ready to respond. Lastly, the Navigation Plan stresses the importance of having Sailors and Civilians that are ready to tackle tomorrows challenges by being personally prepared, confident and profi cient. We will sustain our forces warfighting capability and ability to operate forward through effective maintenance and timely modernization, said Greenert. Ready Sailors and Civilians remain the source of the Navys warfight ing capability. To view the CNOs Navigation Plan, visit www. navy.mil/cno/130813_CNO_ Navigation_Plan.pdf Adm. Greenert releases CNO Navigation Plan for 2014-2018 CPO 365 Phase II is underway

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Aug. 22 1912 U.S. Navy Dental Corps estab lished. 1945 First surrender of Japanese garrison at end of World War II. USS Levy receives surrender of Mille Atoll in Marshall Islands. 1980 USS Passumpsic (AO-107) res cues 28 Vietnamese refugees. Aug. 23 1864 Rear Adm. David Farraguts squadron captures Fort Morgan at Mobile Bay. 1958 Massive concentration of Pacific Fleet in Quemoy-Matsu area prevents invasion of islands by China. 1958 In Taiwan Straits Crisis, units of 7th Fleet move into Taiwan area to support Taiwan against Chinese Communists. 1963 The first satellite communica tions ship, USNS Kingsport (T-AG-164) in Lagos, Nigeria, connected President John F. Kennedy with Nigerian Prime Minister Balewa who was aboard for the first satellite (Syncom II) relayed telephone conversation between heads of state. Aug. 24 1814 British invasion of Maryland and Washington, D.C. Washington Navy Yard and ships burned to prevent capture by the British. 1912 Launch of USS Jupiter, first electrically propelled Navy ship. 1942 U.S. carrier aircraft begin twoday Battle of Eastern Solomon Islands where Japanese task force is defeat ed and one Japanese carrier sunk. Japanese recall expedition to recapture Guadalcanal. Aug. 25 1843 Steam frigate Missouri arrives at Gibralter, completing first TransAtlantic crossing by U.S. steam powered ship. 1942 Five Navy nurses captured on Guam are repatriated 1951 Twenty-three fighter aircraft from USS Essex (CV-9) escort Air Force heavy bombers attacking Najin, Korea since target was beyond range of landbased fighters. Aug. 26 1775 Rhode Island Resolve: state delegates to Continental Congress press for creation of Continental Navy to protect the colonies. 1839 Brig Washington seizes Spanish slaver, Amistad near Montauk Point, N.Y. 1861 Union amphibious force lands near Hatteras, N.C. 1865 Civil War ends with Naval strength of more than 58,500 men and 600 ships. Aug. 27 1917 Squadron of minesweep ers departs U.S. for service off coast of France. 1944 USS Stingray (SS-186) lands men and supplies on Luzon, Philippines to support guerilla operations against the Japanese. 1945 Pacific Fleet ships enter Sagami Bay, near Tokyo, Japan. 1959 Off Cape Canaveral, Fla., USS Observation Island (EAG-154) makes first shipboard launching of a Polaris missile. Aug. 28 1867 Capt. William Reynolds raises U.S. flag over Midway Island and takes formal possession of the islands. 1952 Units on USS Boxer (CV-21) launch an explosive-filled drone that explodes against railroad bridge near Hungnam, Korea. First guided-mis sile launch from a ship during Korean Conflict. 1965 Cmdr. Scott Carpenter and nine aquanauts enter SeaLab II, 205 ft. below Southern California waters to conduct underwater living and working tests. 1991 A helicopter from USS America (CV-66) rescues three civilian sailors who spent 10 days in a lifeboat 80 miles off Capt May, N.J. after their sailboat capsized. 1992 Navy and Marine forces begin providing disaster relief after Typhoon Omar hit Guam. 1992 Marine and Army forces begin providing disaster relief in Florida after Hurricane Andrew. The story Im about to tell you is hard for some people to believe. After hear ing it, they ask a series of predictable questions: You hired these people, right? (Answer: No.) You knew them ahead of time?(Also, no.) Are you joking me? (No.) First, a little background. I met my husband, Dustin, when I was a baby. In fact, because my dad was deployed when I was born, I met Dustin before I met my dad seven months later. Our lives inter sected multiple times throughout our childhood, but for 10 years, we didnt see each other at all. Then, when I was 20, Dustin and I went out on a date. We got married less than two years later. On July 17, 1999, I gave Dustin a practical, inexpensive wedding band. He wore the ring every day for 12 years through two cross-country moves, flight school, three children and two deployments until July 30, 2011. That was the day we took the kids to Mt. Katahdin in northern Maine to visit our favorite swimming hole, an offshoot of the Penobscot River, where the water churns and a rope swing hangs from a tree. In three months, Dustin would leave for a yearlong deployment. Dustin was swimming with the boys in the rapids when his wedding band slipped off his finger and disappeared into the foaming water. A wedding ring is just a piece of metal until that moment when its gone. As I cried on the banks of the river, Dustin rubbed my back and whispered into my hair, Well buy a new ring before I leave, and someday, Ill come back here and find the real one. But in my heart I knew: the ring was gone. I wrote about the lost wedding band in a column a week later, and when Dustin left for his deployment that November, he had a new, shiny wedding band on his finger. It wasnt the worn and scratched one that had represented our love for more than a decade. Over time, I moved on and forgot about the ring. Thirteen months later, in September 2012, I received a cryptic message in my Inbox. Hi Mrs. Smiley My dad, Greg Canders, read your article about losing your husbands ring last year. My dad showed me the article this morning and we decided to attempt to find it. Could you please give me a call as we have found a wedding band and would like you to identify it. Zac Canders I hate to admit that at first I was skeptical. I had dark thoughts about Greg and Zac, whom I didnt know. Were they tricking me? Did they have some kind of motive? Did they want something from me? Because it didnt seem possible they could find the ring. And why would they look for it anyway? I agreed to meet Greg and Zac at a local parking lot. Greg, a professional diver, told me that my column had touched him. In fact, he had saved the clipping and had it in his shirt pocket. That morning, he and his son had decided to drive 80 miles out of their way, with all of their gear, to find the swim ming hole I had hastily described and look for the ring. Greg reached into his other pocket and pulled out a small plastic bag. While my husband was still eight time zones away, my hand trembled. Greg opened the bag and put Dustins ring, tarnished and spotted from 13 months under water, in my palm. I slipped the ring onto my right hand. Greg and Zac wanted nothing in return, though we had them to Dinner with the Smileys, and when Dustin came home from deployment three months later, he could hardly wait to shake their hand. When Dustin held his ring again, it was with the same amount of awe that I had in the parking lot that day. But when I asked him, It hardly seems real, does it? Dustin said without hesitation, I always knew wed find it. The sixth annual Pink Ribbon Symposium will be held at the Thrasher-Horne Conference Center (283 College Drive, Orange Park 32085) on Oct. 5 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Founded by Drs. Cynthia Anderson and Linda Sylvester, the event is presented by ICON Oncology at Orange Park Cancer Center and F.R.O.G. (Florida Radiation Oncology Group). Important up-to-date information about breast cancer prevention, early detection and treatment options, the side effects of treatment, and survi vorship will be discussed. Plus, it will offer good health and wellness topics, along with a keynote presentation entitled, Laughter is the Best Medicine and an Meet the Experts session, which will allow guests to ask questions of local doctors. More than 500 attend this free symposium annually. This years special guests are two regional female comedians, Gwen Templeton and Roz McCoy, who will headline the event and offer insight into how laughter can ease pain and help the cancer journey in an upclose and personal way. Guests will be treated to a healthy continental breakfast. Topics include an update on breast cancer research, genetics, caregivers, stress relief, caring for your body, health, nutrition and exercise. Everyone is invited to the expo, where up to 60 local and national businesses will showcase their ser vices to help cancer patients and their families. Guests will learn how to care for their body, how sleep can affect cancer treatment, and how best to deal with relationships. The schedule is as follows: 89 a.m. Exhibits & Continental Breakfast 99:25 a.m. Opening Remarks 9:4010:30 a.m. Session 1 Meet the Experts (latest updates on radi ology, medical oncology, surgi cal oncology, reconstruction, etc.), Caring for Our Bodies (nutrition, exercise, family genetics, coping with emotional stress, sexuality, etc.) 10:3011 a.m. Exhibits/ Intermission (Silent Auction closes at 11 a.m.) 11 a.m. 12:05 p.m. Session 2 Meet the Experts, Caring for Our Bodies 12:0512:30 p.m. Guest Speakers: Laughter is the Best Medicine 12:3012:40 p.m. Closing Remarks For more information, call 8382950 or email pinkribbonsympo sium@gmail.com Lost wedding band returned by strangers Free Breast Care Symposium provides answers to Northeast Florida women

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Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel announced seven new initiatives Aug. 15 to strengthen and standardize the departments sexual assault prevention and response effort. In a memo, Hagel called elimination of sexual assault in the military one of the departments top priorities. This effort requires our absolute and sustained commitment to provid ing a safe environment in which every service member and DoD civil ian is free from the threat of sexual harassment and assault, he wrote in a statement. Our success depends on a dynamic and responsive approach. We, therefore, must continu ally assess and strive to improve our prevention and response programs. On May 6, the secre tary directed the services and defense agencies to strengthen the program in commander account ability, command climate, victim advocacy and safety. The secretarys initia tives include: victim legal support by directing service secretaries to create a legal advo cacy program providing legal representation to sexual assault victims throughout the judicial process. He set Nov. 1, 2013, as an initial operat ing capacity and for it to be fully functional by Jan. 1, 2014. al investigative hearings of sexual assault-related charges be conducted by Judge Advocate General officers. service secretaries to enhance protections call ing on them to develop and implement policies allowing for the reas signment or transfer of members accused of committing sexual assault or related offense. Hagel wants this done to eliminate contact while respecting the rights of both victims and the accused. timely follow-up reports on sexual assault inci dents and responses to be given to the first general or flag officer within the chain of command. DoD inspector general to evaluate closed sexual assault investigations. vice secretaries to stan dardize prohibitions on inappropriate behavior between recruiters and trainers and their recruits and trainees. the DoD general council to develop and propose changes to the Manual for Courts-Martial allow ing victims to give input dur ing the sentencing phase of courts-martial. The new measures should strengthen the departments sexual assault prevention and response programs, the secretary said. Remember, we are all accountable and respon sible for eliminating this crime from our ranks, Hagel said in the memo.Hagel announces new anti-sexual assault initiatives JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013 Aircraft passing through NAS Jacksonville, both helicopters or fixed wing, can count on the professional Sailors working at the Transient Line (T-Line) in Hangar 117 to guide, tow and park their aircraft. The T-Line is an essential component in day-to-day air operations at NAS Jax, providing a myriad of services that help support fleet operations in the south east region. The T-Line Sailors here are high ly qualified individuals, and support the needs of the base in many differ ent ways, commented T-Line Division Officer Lt. Matthew Malmkar. We provide aircraft towing, parking, and fueling operations to all types of planes and helicopters for all branches of the service. One of the most helpful things we do is escort pilots who are unfamiliar with our taxiways to their designated parking spots with a follow me truck. Malmkar explained that the T-Line Sailors handle all types of aircraft, providing specific ground carts to them as needed, and must be knowledgeable in servicing each one. In addition, Sailors also perform regular maintenance on the runway arresting gear and constantly rove the airfield for debris that could damage an aircraft. Speaking on the challenges of work ing in the T-Line, ABH2 Edward Davis commented, You have to maintain an extreme level of focus when guid ing and parking an aircraft. Safety and communication are absolutely essen tial, especially since so many things can be going on at once. An additional service that the T-Line gladly engages in is setting up aircraft on the flight line for an air show. Our busiest and most challenging time is definitely when we have an air show, Malmkar continued. Towing static display aircraft into position, especially when they are from the World War II era, can be difficult because we dont want to do anything to potentially damage these relics. But the rewards of providing such a fun event to the public are definitely worth it. Malmkar praised his Sailors for their continued hard work and devotion to supporting fleet operations. These are a great group of extremely skilled Sailors, and their professional ism and abilities continue to impress me everyday. I couldnt ask for a better crew.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013 5

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The public affairs team won the coveted 2012 Chief of Naval Information (CHINFO) Thompson-Ravitz Award for Excellence in Navy Public Affairs (PA) for Special Events/Projects, Observances and Special Publics, Shore, Small P-8A Poseidon multi-mission aircraft roll out and P-8A Integrated Training Center. Capt. Roy Undersander, NAS Jax com manding officer, said earning the award highlights the commitment and outstand ing efforts of his public affairs team. Our PAO team, led by Miriam Gallet, constantly delivers and always strive for the best, he stated. In the Navy PA community, everyone strives to one day win a Thompson-Ravitz Award. Gallet was truly humbled by the rec ognition and very proud of her team for competing alongside the Navys very best. The NAS Jacksonville PAO team is small, only three members (Kaylee LaRocque, Clark Pierce, and Miriam Gallet), who accomplish so much on a daily basis. Gallet said that they are all very proud of the award and thanked Navy Region Southeast Protocol Officer Denice Gonzalez, VP-30, PMA-290 PAO LaToya Graddy, and others who were part of the project team. She explained that conceptualizing, writing and executing hundreds of mov ing parts in a communication plan for the roll out of a new aircraft in the Navys arsenal and the simultaneous grand open ing of the Navys largest integrated train ing center with more than 2,100 guests in attendance was a big challenge. Winning this award on the heels of their win of the Chief of Information Merit Award for the newspaper solidifies their commitment to public affairs excellence and information synchronization aboard the installation. Im very proud of their accomplishments, stated Undersander. The Thompson-Ravitz Award recog nizes the most exceptional performance by individuals and units in public affairs throughout the Navy. The awards bear the names of Rear Adm. William Thompson, the first desig nated Public Affairs Officer (PAO) selected for flag rank and the first PAO to be the CHINFO, and Rear Adm. Robert Ravitz, a former Director of the Naval Reserve Public Affairs Program and Special Assistant to the CHINFO. The award promotes professional com munication expertise, excellence and highlights the superb work by public affairs professionals and other Navy per sonnel who produce public affairs pro grams. Categories included special events and projects, community relations, public information and internal communication. Congratulations to all commands and individuals who participated in the Thompson-Ravitz Awards Program. Your hard work and superb efforts have made your public affairs programs outstanding examples to emulate. Well done, wrote Navy Chief of Information Rear Adm. J. F. Kirby in a message. AWARD Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast awarded a $16 million contract Aug. 14 to Whitesell-Green, Inc., a small business out of Pensacola, for construction of a Broad Area Maritime Surveillance Mission Control Complex at NAS Jacksonville. The work to be performed includes construction of a new freestanding two-story structure with two electro magnetic interference shield ed mission control systems, a tactical operations center with sensitive compartment ed information facility spac es, and numerous roof-top mounted antennas. The project will renovate some interior spaces; the renovations include a reconfig ured command suite, systems reconfiguration, and in some cases finish upgrades. Also, a new antenna infrastructure will be built at a remote site south of the new facility. NAVFAC Southeast contin ues to build on its success by providing contract opportu nities to small businesses. We continue to review all projects for potential small business opportunities, said Nelson Smith, NAVFAC Southeast small business manager. Each year NAVFAC estab lishes target goals are estab lished for Small Business, Small Disadvantaged Business, Historically Underutilized Business Zone Small Business, ServiceDisabled Veteran-Owned Small Business, and WomenOwned Small Business cat egories. Smith explained that the maximum practicable utilization of small busi ness concerns is a matter of national interest with both social and economic benefits. Work for this project is expected to be completed by December 2014. VP-5 Mad Fox of the WeekVP-5 has finalized its tran sition from the P3-C Orion to the P8-A Poseidon with the completion of Safe for Flight on Aug. 1. Mad Fox One land ed Aug. 5 at 4:45 p.m. marking the completion of VP-5s first independent flight of the P8-A Poseidon. Mad Fox of the Week is a weekly spotlight on those Mad Foxes that help make these historic events happen. This weeks Mad Fox of the Week is AM2 Shawn Batchelor. Batchelor was born in Jamaica and moved to the United States in December 2005. He joined the Navy in June 2010 and became a nat uralized citizen in November of the same year. As an avia tion structural mechanic, he is responsible for the gen eral upkeep of the airframe, hydraulic controls, flight con trol surfaces, and landing gear. He is also responsible for the corrosion control on the air craft, which is extremely important as VP-5 begins to employ their new airframe operationally. Bachelor explained that the diligence and ordered struc ture that goes into maintain ing military airframes are the most challenging part of his job. However, despite the challenges that go along with being an aviation structural mechanic, he said, my job gives me an opportunity to pursue my goals and dreams. When Batchelor first moved to the United States, he and his wifes goal was to own their own house. Through hard work and dedication, he is proud that he is on his way to meeting that goal. While in the Navy, he ultimately strives to prog ress through the ranks, earn a commission, and retire as a captain. To help facilitate these aspi rations, he attends Full Sail University where he studies mobile development. Outside of the Navy, he has interests in becoming a business entre preneur. He hopes to one day be able to design and develop apps for mobile phones. VP-5 is currently in the interdeployment readiness cycle aboard NAS Jacksonville.NAVFAC Southeast awards $16 million contract for new mission control complex at NAS Jacksonville 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013 7

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A celebration was held Aug. 9 for the newly-constructed emergency opera tions center (EOC), disaster relief ware house (DRW) and fire station in Cap Haitian, Haiti. The new facilities, located within the Nord Department of Haiti, were built as part of U.S. Southern Commands Humanitarian Assistance Program (HAP) in Haiti. The 4,000 square-foot EOC will pro vide a central hub for the local govern ment to coordinate response following catastrophic events and report vital information to the Haitian govern ment for rapid decision making, said Lt. j.g. Blaine Henning, Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast (NAVFAC Southeast) resident officer in charge of construction (ROICC), Haiti. The ceremony was held in the outdoor vehicle bay of the fire station and was well attended by community members, local fire fighters, Directorate of Civil Protection volunteers, Haitian National Police, and local officials. The local fire department displayed hundreds of pieces of life saving equipment donated to the department by the United States since the 2010 earthquake. The 4,800 square-foot DRW should provide ample storage for items need ed to respond immediately following a major disaster. The warehouse also creates a place for supplies to be redistributed from a central area outside of the Haitian capital to help alleviate major supply chain issues discovered follow ing the 2010 earthquake, explained Henning. The EOC, DRW, and fire station are part of 12 similar projects in Haiti that were awarded by NAVFAC Southeast in Jacksonville. The lead contractor on the EOC and DRW was GDG Beton of Port Au Prince, Haiti. The lead contractor on the fire station was CSS International Holdings, Ada, Mich. The EOC and DRW will be managed and staffed by members of the local Directorate of Civil Protection (DPC). That is the equivalent of FEMA in the United States, said Henning. The 3,400 square foot fire station will provide first responder capabilities to the Cap Haitian area and life saving equipment to the local fire fighters. Participants in the inauguration cer emony included U.S. Ambassador to Haiti, The Honorable Pamela White; Daniel Basile, minister of the interior; and Madame Jean Baptiste, director of civil protection. Both the U.S. ambassador and minis ter of interior remarked in their speeches that the success of these projects could only conclude with the contin ued cooperation between the United States of America and the Government of Haiti. Henning, along with Greg Marcellus, NAVFAC Southeast construction manager for the project, and Sgt. 1st Class Roland Laforest, U.S. Southern Command HAP program manager also attended. The project is part of 62 humanitaran assistance projects NAVFAC Southeast is administering the design and con struction of for U.S. Southern Command on behalf of the government of Haiti and the Haitian people. The $33 million program is being executed, with ROICC Haiti oversight, through 20 contracts at 22 sites and will provide EOCs, DRWs, fire stations, medical clinics, commu nity centers, and schools for the Haitian people. U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson (D-FL), Haitian President His Excellency Michel Martelly, and U.S. Ambassador to Haiti The Honorable Pamela White toured the newly constructed emergency operations center (EOC), disaster readiness warehouse (DRW), school, clinic, and community center in Les Cayes, Haiti Aug. 6. The five facilities, located in the Sud Department of Haiti, were constructed by Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast (NAVFAC SE) through designbuild contracts as part of the U.S. Southern Commands Humanitarian Assistance Program in Haiti. No one should have to go through what Haitians went through three years ago, said Nelson. Our humanitarian assistance programs there are showing real signs of progress, but there is still much work to be done and our naval command there has and will continue to be critical to the countrys overall recovery efforts. The clinic, school, and community center, referred to as community clusters, were turned over to the Haitian government in December 2012. A ribbon cut ting to celebrate their inauguration was conducted Jan. 10. Clinic personnel treated more than 100 patients the first month it was open. Each community cluster consists of an eight-class room school, a community center building, a medical clinic, and water well, said Lt. j.g. Blaine Henning, resident officer in charge of construction Haiti with NAVFAC SE. These facilities provide an immediate positive impact to the local population. The 4,000 square foot EOC provides a central hub in the Sud Department for the local government to coor dinate disaster response. The 4,800 square foot DRW provides storage for supplies needed to immediately respond to a major disaster. The warehouse is also used to de-centralize supply redistribution outside of the Haitian capital to allevi ate major supply chain issues discovered following the 2010 earthquake. These projects are part of 62 similar building efforts throughout Haiti that were awarded by NAVFAC SE in Jacksonville. New disaster relief, emergency facilities celebrated in Cap Haitian, Haiti Haiti leaders, Florida senator tour newly completed projects in Haiti 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013

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Naval Supply Systems Command Fleet Logistics Center Jacksonvilles (NAVSUP FLCJs) Commanding Officer Capt. Duke Heinz was a featured guest speaker at the 2013 Jacksonville Defense Logistics Business Development Conference & Technology Exposition at the University of North Florida July 30. Accompanying Heinz to the conference was NAVSUP FLCJs Executive Director Mitch Palmquist, and Director of Office of Small Business Programs Caretha Brown-Griffin. The event is a logistics moderniza tion conference and speaker forum for local military, government and busi ness leaders. Senior commanders and leaders from Jacksonvilles military installations, organizations, and gov ernment agencies (to include the U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Army, and the Jacksonville Port Authority) acted as guest speakers to discuss their business organizations as well as cur rent and future logistics and infrastructure expansion projects. The main objective of the confer ence is to highlight and promote Jacksonvilles defense logistics support operations and infrastructure, advo cate the continued modernization and improvement of Northeast Floridas transportation and logistics infrastructure, and most importantly, to promote job growth and provide opportunities for Jacksonvilles business leaders to meet with logistics professionals from across the United States. During NAVSUP FLCJs presentation, Heinz highlighted new business pros pects and contracting opportunities for defense activities located in Northeast Florida. Keeping in line with the con ferences objectives of advocating the improvement and modernization of Jacksonvilles logistics infrastructure, he also spoke about NAVSUPs imple mentation of the Navy Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) program. Navy ERP allows for more proactive supply chain solutions, better anticipa tion of the fleets needs, availability of accurate information anywhere in the Navy to support decisions, financial auditability and compliance regula tions, and a more efficient and traceable global distribution of material in the Navy supply chain, said Heinz. He then went on to explain that through the implementation of Navy ERP, the Navy has already seen a reduction in the number and cost of older legacy information technology systems as well as increased productivity. In addition to sharing the technological innovation of Navy ERP, Heinz was also able to advocate NAVSUP FLCJs Office of Small Business programs. At NAVSUP FLCJ, we are dedicated to partnering with small businesses in the Jacksonville area and beyond to include women-owned, veteran-owned, small disadvantaged, and service disabled veteran-owned and more. In fact, small business contract actions accounted for approximately 20 percent of all contracts awarded in fiscal year 2012 by NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, said Heinz. Following his presentation, Heinz and the rest of NAVSUP FLCJs repre sentatives manned a table providing opportunities for each of the guests and other presenters to gather contact information and to hold one-on one question and answer sessions. NAVSUP FLCJ, one of seven Fleet Logistics Centers under NAVSUP Global Logistics Support, provides operation al logistics, business and support ser vices to the fleet, shore, and industrial commands of the Navy, Coast Guard, Military Sealift command, and other joint allied forces. Services include contracting, regional transportation, fuel, material man agement, household goods movement support, postal and consolidated mail, warehousing, global logistics and hus banding, hazardous material manage ment, and integrated logistics support. NAVSUP advocates partnering opportunities at Exposition JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013 9

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physical training held at the Reserve Center every Friday from 6-7 a.m. dur ing Phase II. There will be specific instances where chief selectees conduct separate sessions for fundraising. During this training they will learn the importance of the chiefs mess, how to work as a team, and what is expected of a CPO. The chief selectees are guided by senior enlisted leaders through positive, challenging events to test their mental and physical mettle on both a personal and professional level. It also provides the opportunity to emphasize CPO history, heritage and naval traditions. Physical fitness is a top priority, so chief selectees spend many hours running, swimming and doing calisthenics to build camaraderie and confidence. They also participate in community service and fundraising events, class room training and historical produc tions, explained AWOCS Shane Haney of VP-30, who is coordinating CPO 365 Phase II. I like what Ive seen so far in their development of teamwork and learn ing the difference between lead ership as a first class and as a chief. Haney said failure is not an option for chiefs. Being selected for chief is a lifechanging event; you only go through the process once. We watch each others backs, stick together, take care of our Sailors and ensure that our missions are accomplished. Selectees are divided into training teams named after U.S. Navy ships that were involved in a significant tragedy such as USS Cole (DDG-67) which was attacked while refueling in the Yemen port of Aden on Oct. 12, 2000 and USS Stark (FFG-31) which was accidentally fired upon by an Iraqi jet on May 18, 1987 in the Arabian Gulf. On Aug. 14, the chief selectees par ticipated in the annual plane wash ing event at Heritage Park. They spent much of the day scrubbing the aircraft and hosting a barbeque for active duty and retired chiefs. I think this is a great event and that the planes out here needed a little bit of love so we are able to provide that and do a little base beautification. This is the first thing people see when they drive in the main gate and I take pride in that. I think the other chief selectees take pride in this park as well and its definitely one of the most fun events that weve done so far, said ETC(Select) David Couch of Mobile Tactical Operations Center 9. Other events include car washes, gas & glass at the Navy Exchange (NEX) Service Station, the Tijuana Flats Beach Run (Aug. 24), NEX CPO Night (Aug. 27 at 5 p.m.), chili cook-off (Aug. 29 at 11 a.m. at the NEX) and the Wounded Warrior Run (Aug. 7). At the end of the training, when the chief selectees have earned their anchors, they will be pinned during a special ceremony and welcomed to the chiefs mess Sept. 13. CPO CPO 365 is a year-round training initiative that chief messes throughout the Navy take on to prepare first class petty officers to become chiefs. Phase II of CPO 365 begins when the chief petty officer selection board results are released, which occurred Aug. 1 this year. Many commands have truly embraced CPO 365 and have viewed this year as really being the first year that the program has found its legs. What do you think of the program as a whole? I am very pleased with the process. I am not taking anything away from the training we have used in the past because it worked well for during its time. Society has changed and evolved, and if we want to continue to have the ability to train our reliefs, we must change and evolve as well. I think if you ask any CPO mess that has been and is fully engaged in CPO 365, youll find that each mess is brainstorming new and innovative ways to train our first class petty officers to take their place. Many of the Sailors participating in CPO 365 are not even eligible for chief. Some wont be eligible for three years. What do you want those Sailors to take away from the program each year? Theres enough change that occurs within our Navy every year that CPO 365 should never get old and stagnant. Think about our Navy programs, procedures and policies. They are constantly evolving. CPO 365 is first and foremost about helping a first class petty officer be the best work center supervisor or leading petty officer that they can be because the Navy is forever evolving. The training will always change, day after day, week after week, month after month, and year after year. If MCPON talks CPO 365: Phase I, Phase II and stand down JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013 11

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DoD announces new same-sex spouse benefitsThe Department of Defense (DoD) announced its plan to extend benefits to same-sex spouses of uniformed service members and DoD civilian employees Aug. 14. After a review of the departments benefit policies following the Supreme Courts ruling that Section Three of the Defense of Marriage Act is unconstitutional, and in consultation with the Department of Justice and other executive branch agencies, the Defense Department will make spousal and family benefits available no later than Sept. 3, 2013, regardless of sexual orientation, as long as service membersponsors provide a valid marriage certificate. The Department of Defense remains committed to ensuring that all men and women who serve in the U.S. military, and their families, are treated fairly and equally as the law directs. Entitlements such as TRICARE enrollment, basic allow ance for housing (BAH) and family separation allowance are retroactive to the date of the Supreme Courts decision. Any claims to entitlements before that date will not be granted. For those members married after June 26, 2013, entitlements begin at the date of marriage. We recognize that same-sex military couples who are not stationed in a jurisdiction that permits same-sex marriage would have to travel to another jurisdiction to marry. That is why the department will implement policies to allow military personnel in such a relationship non-chargeable leave for the purpose of traveling to a jurisdiction where such a marriage may occur. This will provide accelerated access to the full range of benefits offered to married military couples throughout the department, and help level the playing field between opposite-sex and same-sex couples seeking to be married. For civilian benefits administered government-wide to federal employees, the Department of Defense will follow the Office of Personnel Management and the Department of Labors guidance to ensure that the same benefits cur rently available to heterosexual spouses are also available to legally married same-sex spouses. Sunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 10 a.m. Catholic Mass (Mass will be at 9:15 a.m. July 14) 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 11 a.m. Protestant Worship 11:15 a.m. Catholic CCD Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study Wednesdays, 7 p.m. at Chapel Complex Building 749 and Thursdays at 7 p.m. in the barracks The chapel is located at the corner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road. Call 542-3051 for more information. 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013

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Jaguars tickets available at USOThe Greater Jax Area USO has opened ticket sales for the pre-season Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Philadelphia Eagles game Aug. 24 at 7:30 p.m. to all active duty, retirees, veterans with ID cards, National Guard, Reservists, DoD civilians and their families. Tickets are available at the NAS Jax and NS Mayport USO for $15 each, cash transactions only. Regular season tickets are available the following days and times: Guidelines: including Florida National Guard and Reservists on current active duty orders and dependents are eligible to purchase/use these tickets. may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equals four. If you have less than four you may only purchase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but dependent children are not authorized to represent the service member/spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO director. of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest. No exceptions. of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/ CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the season.Requests, with justification, must be sent to Mike OBrien at mobrien@usojax. com ing tickets will be prohibited from buying any more tickets for the entire season. come, first served. For more information, call 7782821. August is usually a time when military families are wrapping up duty station moves, squeezing in summer vacations, and getting the kids enrolled in school. Its not the time when people are thinking about December holiday wish lists. But, believe it or not, the holiday shopping season will be upon us in just three short months. You may not be ready to see Halloween candy, let alone think about December holiday celebrations. But, preparing for your holiday spending now can help you avoid being seasonal debt. So, here are a few ways you can start your December in August. Set reasonable expectations Last year, it was reported that the average American expected to spend $854 on gifts during the holiday season. While many people wont spend that much, any spending that strains your financ es with post-holiday debt is bad for your financial future period. Take the time now to talk with family and friends about realistic holiday spending limits. Consider less expensive gift options like homemade gifts. If you have a large family, maybe its time to start a new tradition of picking one person out of a hat to buy a gift for, rather than everybody buying a gift for every single other person in the family. Plan, budget, and save Figuring out whos on your gift list, creating a holiday budget, and gradually setting money aside can help you avoid overspending, unwanted debt, and financial stress. You can find helpful budgeting tools on mymoney.gov. Also, check with your bank or credit union to see if they offer a Christmas club or holiday savings accounts that you can use to save for your holiday goals. Old-fashioned layaway is another option. Keep the big picture in mind It can be easy to forget that we spend a lot of money on other things besides gifts during the holidays. Big holiday dinners, travel to see family and friends, and even increased electricity costs to run that massive holiday light display can drain your bank account. Make sure you plan for the cost of all of your extra holiday activities. Look for ways to save Doing things like catching early sales, comparison shopping, ordering from sites or stores that offer free shipping, shopping at discount stores, and buying items that offer rebates can help save you money on holiday purchases. Saving money for your shopping and saving money while youre shopping should be a dual goal. Watch out for costly surprises Make sure you fully understand the term and conditions if youre using gift cards or layaway plans. For instance, expiration dates, inactivity rules, and hidden fees on gift cards can eat away at their value if youre not careful. Take the same cautious approach with store credit cards that youre offered at checkout. They might save you a few bucks at the register today, but stick you with very high interest rates later. Avoid holiday debt traps Not all deals are a bargain, so dont get sucked in by holiday super sales. If you rush to a store sale because you can get a $3,000 TV for $2,000, youve still spent $2,000 on a TV. Was that really something you had planned to do? Also, dont be enticed by payday lenders who want to help you get your hands on holiday cash. Proper planning and saving long before the holiday can help you avoid a cycle of highinterest debt that can last for weeks or even months after the holidays are over. Keep in mind that holiday spending is short-term spending. Once the unwrapping frenzy is over, how long does the excitement last? Saving your money for long-term goals like home ownership, college or a comfortable retirement may be the very best gift you can give yourself and your loved ones.December in August JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013 13

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Friday at 7 p.m. Monday Night Football Kick-off Sept. 9 at 7 p.m. Complimentary food & give-a-ways Direct TV NFL Sunday Ticket at Deweys Come watch the exciting NFL Action on one of Deweys five TVs. Get there early for your choice of game. Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 510 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 1 6 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer Going on now through Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 years and younger receive one free game of bowling every day until 5 p.m. Win prizes all summer long! Fall and winter bowling leagues are now forming! Leagues begin in September.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Lap Swim (no concessions, slide or water park will be open) Mon. Fri. 6 8 am, 11 am 1 pm, 4:30 7 pm. Recreational swim Sat. & Sun 11 am 6 pm For more information call (904) 5423518 Dive-in Movie Sept. 6, 710 p.m. Featuring Epic 36 size restriction on floatsI.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318 E-mail them directly at jaxs_nas_ mwritt@navy.mil. ITT is now selling tickets to the Daytona 500, Drive 4COPD 300, Budweiser Duels, Spirit Unlimited and Rolex 24! Please call ITT for pricing information at (904) 542-3318 ext. 8 or email them directly at jaxs_nas_mwritt@navy.mil. Halloween Horror Nights Vendor Day Oct 2, 10 a.m. 2 p.m. Prize drawing every 30 minutes Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets on sale now $70 section 147 Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 201314 Artist Series featuring Mama Mia, Memphis, Celtic Thunder, War Horse, Men are From Mars, Women are from Venus, Million Dollar Quartet and The D* Word is a Musical are on sale now! Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 201314 season featuring Menopause, River North Dance Chicago, Hungarian State Folk Ensemble, Clay County Christmas, Godspell, Driving Miss Daisy, Bronx Wanderers, Celtic Fire and Swan Lake are on sale now!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Fantasy Football Live Draft Aug. 22 at 7 p.m. Jags vs Eagles Shuttle Aug. 21 at 6 p.m. St. Johns Town Center Shuttle Aug. 31 at 3 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 NAS Jax Club Championship Sept.14 & 15 at 8 a.m. $80, includes golf both days, lunch both days, trophies for the division winners and gift certificates for flight winners Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Sept. 10 & 24 for active duty Aug. 22, Sept. 12 & 26 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Movie Under the Stars Aug. 23 at 8 p.m. featuring Monsters University Patriots Grove Before and After School Registration going on now! Fees based on household income.Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Oct. 7 Nov. 20 $500 per person For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil. 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013

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Heartworm disease in dogs and cats is caused by a parasitic worm called Dirofilaria immitis. The adult worm lives in the pulmonary artery, the ves sel that transports blood from the heart to the lungs. Mosquitoes are the vectors for heartworm disease, which means they are carriers of the organism and transmit the disease to dogs and cats. Other animals susceptible to developing heartworm disease include wolves, coyotes, foxes, and sea lions. Humans are a dead-end host, which means the organism is unable to survive and develop in our bodies. When an animal is infected with adult male and female heartworms, they produce microfilariae (baby larvae), which circulate in the bloodstream. The mosquito ingests the microfilariae when it takes a bloodmeal from the infected animal. Over the next 10-14 days, the microfilariae will develop into an L3 larval stage. At this stage the L3 larvae are able to infect an animal when the mosquito takes its next meal. The L3 larvae migrate through the body while developing through the larval stages until they become L5 larvae. At the L5 larval stage, the larvae preferentially migrate to the pulmonary artery to develop into an adult heartworm. It takes about six and a half months from initial infection to the pres ence of reproductively mature heartworms. An adult heartworm is approximately 1-foot long when it is living in the pulmonary artery! Adult heartworms cause disease by irritating the pulmonary artery, leading to arterial plaque forma tion. These arterial plaques prevent normal blood flow by decreasing the diameter of the blood ves sel. In addition, the worms themselves can cause obstruction of normal blood flow. When pulmonary hypertension (elevated blood pressure in the lungs) develops, the heart must work harder to pump blood through the blood vessels in the lungs. The heart is eventually unable to keep up with the demand to pump blood throughout the body and a blood traffic jam occurs. More blood is returning to the heart compared to the amount that the heart is trying to pump through the lungs and out into the body. This is called right sided heart failure. When the heart cant keep up with the demands of the body, the animal will show signs of exercise intolerance, such as tiring easily, reluctance to play, and fainting when running or playing too much. The blood traffic jam also leads to fluid leaking out of the blood vessels and into other spaces, such as the spaces meant for air in the lungs. Fluid in the lungs will cause persistent coughing. All of these signs could be due to other conditions therefore a thorough physical exam and diagnostic testing is necessary to determine the problem. Diagnosis of heartworm disease starts with a heartworm test. This test detects the presence of adult reproductive female heartworms in the body. Unfortunately, it is more difficult to diagnose heart worm disease in cats, which is why we dont regularly screen them. Additional testing may be necessary to determine if a cat is infected with adult heartworms. Radiographs (X-rays) and/or an echocardiogram are also performed to assess the severity of the disease. Treatment for heartworm disease involves killing the adult worms with an injectable medication given by a veterinarian. The dog must be hospitalized for treatment because the dead worms can cause lifethreatening side effects. The microfilariae (baby larvae) must also be cleared from the body with the appropriate treatment. This will prevent the development of new heartworms and break the cycle of transmission to other mosquitoes. In general, cats are less susceptible to developing heartworm disease, but when they are infected the disease is more severe and the treatment options are limited. It is unlikely that an indoor cat will develop heartworm disease, which is why we dont strongly encourage owners to use preventatives for their cats. When a cat is infected with heartworm disease it is best to allow the worms to die off on their own. This is due to the fact that cats are extremely sensitive to the effects of dying worms and may have a better chance of surviving a gradual worm die-off over a period of one to two years. In the meantime, the cat is closely monitored and treated for any side effects. Heartworm disease in dogs and cats is a horrible disease, which can be easily prevented. It is as simple as giving a treat or applying a topical spot-on once a month, along with a quick blood test given annually. It may seem expensive when purchasing the preventatives, but it is worth every penny. Many animals dont survive when they become infected with heartworm disease, and the treatment can cost thousands of dollars.For further information on the wellness of your ani mals, call 542-3786. Friday, September 6 7 10 p.m. Movie begins at 8 p.m. at the Outdoor PoolFree admission & popcorn $1.50 food baskets Ring tube floats & chairs are allowed and encouraged.*36 size restriction on floatsfacebook.com/nasjaxmwr (904) 542-3518/2930 Heartworm disease in dogs and cats can be easily prevented JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013 15

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first class petty officers and chief petty officers find themselves re-hashing the same old information time and time again, they must look within them selves to determine where the updates need to take place and effectively make the change. For those Sailors who saw their names on the list, what do you think CPO 365 has done to prepare them for their anchors? I think that CPO 365 has provided professional and solid training that these future leaders need in order to be effective chiefs. CPO 365 Phase II is an opportunity for our first class petty officers to display to the CPO mess the skill-sets that they learned during Phase I. Talk about the CPO 365 stand down. I received two letters alleging that inappropriate conduct is taking place during CPO 365 Phase II. Upon initial look, I think that we have a few CPO messes operating outside of CPO 365 Guidance. I directed all CPO messes to stop training from Aug.12 and resume Aug. 14. This gave commands and all CPO messes a chance to review CPO 365 Guidance and the Navys policy on hazing. We should never think that we are above the law. If we think that CPO selectee training cannot be shut down, we are wrong. If we want to be responsible for training our future chiefs, then we must do it in a professional manner. I want to re-emphasize I believe that the large majority of the mess is doing the right thing and for that I want to thank you. However, know that any formal complaints will be fully investigated. What is the ultimate goal with CPO 365? The ultimate goal of CPO 365 is to train our relief to the best of their abil ity. To have meaningful and practical training that reflects the times of our society and that will make our future leaders capable under pressure and able to successfully complete any mission they are called to do. Our leaders are held accountable as they should, and being a chief petty officer isnt for the weak of heart nor lazy of mind and body. It requires us to be all in, all the time. We are called upon at all levels of our chain of com mand and again, a few short weeks isnt enough time to cram all of the wisdom within the CPO mess into a CPO selectee. It should be happening throughout the year. What do you say to the negative feedback youve received about CPO 365? Anytime you change something, there will be rumblings. Make no mis take about it. Some folks can think back to when we de-segregated the military, the nay-sayers said that was the end of the Navy as we knew it! Our Navy thrived. Remember when we put women on ships. The nay-sayers hollered that was the end of the Navy! Women are now lead ing our Navy and have been become solidified members on the battlefield. It comes with the territory of being the Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy. Not everyone will agree with your decisions. Do you see any more changes to the program or to the final few weeks of the program for selectees? Are you content with setting guidelines and letting commands determine the final chapter in the process? I have no intentions of making any significant changes to CPO 365 and want to provide every CPO mess an opportunity to become experts at what we currently have in place. I place a great deal of faith and confidence in each CPO mess to ensure the training that we are conducting rests within the guidelines provided. In your opinion, is CPO 365 the best way to train the Navys future leader ship and why? At this particular point of time in our history, I believe CPO 365 provides us with the best training opportunity. However, I am also confident that in time CPO 365 will also change because thats what we do, we constantly evolve. Ill be a retired MCPON years from now and there will be a new name, a new process and new way of doing business to train our chiefs. Ill trust that it was put in place because the times that our future Sailors will serve necessitate that. CPO 365 is about our moment in history more than it is about my belief that this is the absolute right way to do it. I believe its the right way to do it today, but I certainly cant speak for the future. MCPON 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013

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Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2013: To register for any of the above workshops call 5425745.FFSC offers life skills workshops throughout the year M i l i t a r y A p p r e c i a t i o n D a y Saturday, September 21st: JACKSONVILLE DOLPHINS vs. Warner University Royals Kickoff is at 1pm! ALL ACTIVE AND RETIRED MILITARY PERSONAL GET IN FREE WITH ID! D.B.MILNE FIELD AT JU Follow us at @JUDolphins @JU_Football and @DunkinDolphin JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 22, 2013 17

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