Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note:
Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID:
UF00028307:02054


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THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 2013 RX DELIVER Y CDH PR OGRAM CHIEF SELECT S Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The VP-5 Mad Foxes received their certification from Patrol and Reconnais-sance Group Aug. 2 as Safe for Flight in operating the P-8A Poseidon. This concludes nearly seven months of incredibly hard work by every Mad Fox that began on Jan. 4 with their transition pro cess from the P-3C Orion to the P-8A. VP-5 has flown the P-3C since 1974. The Mad Foxes history of excellence in the P-3C includes locating pieces of the tragic Space Shuttle Challenger explo sion, remaining on top of a sink ing Soviet Yankee Class sub marine, support of Operations Desert Shield, Desert Storm, Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom and the first employ ment of an AGM-65F Maverick Missile from a maritime patrol aircraft during Operation Odyssey Dawn. This memorable P-3C history came to an end Dec. 4, 2012 as then VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Erin Osborne landed the squadrons final Orion flight at NAS Jacksonville after a suc cessful 7th Fleet deployment. Safe for Flight was a Herculean accomplishment for 240 Mad Foxes, VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Matthew Pottenburgh told squadron personnel during the Aug. 1 command quarters. The work that began the day when Skipper Osborne landed our last P-3C Orion could not have been possible without the total effort of each and every Mad Fox. VP-5s Safe for Flight inspection was conducted by Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) -11 and began June 3 when the ordnance shop was inspected through a conventional weap ons training proficiency inspec tion (CWTPI). Mad Fox ordnance men and women demonstrated proficien The NAS Jax Security and Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Departments hosted the annual National Night Out at the Allegheny softball fields and outdoor pool on Aug. 6. The event is held each year to height en crime and drug prevention aware ness, generate support for local anticrime programs, strengthen neighbor hood and police partnerships and let criminals know that neighborhoods are fighting back against crime. This years event was sponsored by First Command Financial Planning. The base is our community and National Night Out is a way to bring the community together in an effort to fight crime. Our security depart ment strives to keep NAS Jax a safe place to live and work, but we need the employees and residents assistance in remaining vigilant to criminal activi ties, said NAS Jax Physical Security Its simple corrosion affects readi ness, said NAS Jax Airfield Facilities Manager Doug Chaney at the new rinse rack for P-8A, P-3C, C-40A and C-130T aircraft based at the station. Corrosion prevention and control affects both the cost and availability of naval aircraft. This new top-of-the-line rinse rack is more efficient and envi ronmentally sensitive than the original. For aircraft that fulfill unique maritime operational requirements in a harsh, corrosive environment this is a valu able resource. Keshia Torruella, QC site superinten dent and site safety manager for Cape Design Engineering Company said, A new 8-inch water main keeps the 5,000-gallon fresh-water tank filled to the proper level. Two pumps work in tandem to spray the fuselage and the tail of P-3s and P-8s. Depending on the aircraft, the rinse process takes two to three minutes. All used water is collected through the drain system and pumped through an oil/water separator that directs most of the cleaned water back to the freshwater tank. In the underground pump house, a control system designed by Enviremedial Services Inc. (ESI) uses Internet telemetry to monitor every component 24/7 through an off-base monitoring station. The War Eagles of VP-16 have recently begun training to add the AGM-84D Harpoon missile to the cur rent armament of their P-8A Poseidon aircraft. The Harpoon is an all-weather, over the horizon, anti-ship missile currently being utilized by numerous platforms including the P-3C Orion, surface ships, and submarines. Over half of our aircrews have already undergone the initial Harpoon training in preparation for our first live firing. This training is an important step in preparing our team to operate at full readiness during our deployment later this year, VP-16 Commanding Officer Cmdr. William Pennington remarked. The feedback from the crews in training has been overwhelmingly posi tive, and we are looking forward to the day when we will put our knowledge to the test. Current Harpoon training consists of ground school classes taught by the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Weapons School. Crews then travel to NAS Patuxent River in Patuxent River, MD where instructors walk them through the pro cedures and steps, culminating in the practice firing of a Harpoon in the sim ulator. Lt. Zack Sutton, a VP-16 patrol plane commander who has already under gone the initial training remarked of his VP-5 certified Safe for Flight Navys second P-8A Poseidon squadron begins IDRC VP-16 War Eagles train for Harpoon firing New rinse rack fights aircraft corrosionNational Night Out raises crime prevention awareness

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 15, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Aug. 15 1845 U.S. Naval Academy established at Annapolis, Md. on former site of Fort Severn. 1895 Commissioning of USS Texas, the first American steel-hulled battle ship. Texas served off Cuba during the Spanish-American War and took part in the naval battle of Santiago. Under the name of San Marcos, she was sunk in weapon-effects tests in Chesapeake Bay in 1911. Her hulk continued in use as a gunnery target through World War II. 1908 First Navy post offices estab lished in Navy ships. 1944 Operation Dragoon, Allied invasion of Southern France 1953 First naval officer appointed Chairman, Joints Chiefs of Staff, Adm. William Radford. 1958 USS Lexington (CVA-16) arrives in vicinity of Taiwan. Aug. 16 1812 Frigate USS Constitution recap tures American merchant brig Adeline. 1954 Beginning of Operation Passage to Freedom, transport of refugees from Haiphong to Saigon, Vietnam. Aug. 17 1812 Frigate President captures British schooner LAdeline in North Atlantic. 1942 Submarines USS Nautilus (SS168) and USS Argonaut (SM-1) land 222 Marines on Makin Island. It was the first amphibious attack made from subma rines. 1959 Adm. Arleigh Burke reappoint ed CNO for third, two-year term, serving longest term as CNO. 1962 Navys first hydrofoil patrol craft, USS High Point (PCH-1) launched at Seattle, Wash. Aug. 18 1838 Expedition under Lt. Charles Wilkes embarks on world cruise. 1911 First Navy Nurse Corps super intendent, Esther Voorhees Hasson, appointed. 1965 First major amphibious assault in Vietnam, Operation Starlight cap tures 2,000 Viet Cong. 1966 First ship-to-shore satellite radio message sent from USS Annapolis (AGMR-1) in South China Sea to Pacific Fleet Headquarters at Pearl Harbor. 1974 After flooding in Philippines, Navy helicopters begin six days of oper ations to rescue people and bring sup plies (244 flights) Aug. 19 1812 Frigate USS Constitution cap tures HMS Guerriere. 1812Devastating hurricane struck the Navys New Orleans station, delay ing military preparations in the War of 1812. 1818 Capt. James Biddle takes pos session of Oregon Territory for U.S. 1967 Operation Coronado IV begins in Mekong Delta. 1981 Two VF-41 aircraft from USS Nimitz (CVN 68) shoot down two Libyan aircraft that fired on them over interna tional waters. Aug. 20 1952 Inter-service air operation (U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force) at Chang Pyong-ni, Korea destroys 80 per cent of assigned area. 1959 USS Thetis Bay (LPH-6) com pletes six-day humanitarian operation after floods in Taiwan. 1969 Navy Seabees and sailors from Helicopter Training Squadron Eight (HT-8) evacuate 820 people from Pass Christian, Miss. after Hurricane Camille. Aug. 21 1800 U.S. Marine Corps Band per forms its first concert in Washington, D.C. 1883 Installation of the first electric lighting on a U.S. Navy Ship completed on USS Trenton. 1920 Radio station built by U.S. Navy and French Government transmits first wireless message heard around the world. At the time it was the most pow erful radio station in the world. 1951 First contract for nuclear-pow ered submarine awarded. 1965 Launch of Gemini 5, piloted by Lt. Cmdr. Charles Conrad Jr., who com pleted 120 orbits in almost eight days at an altitude of 349.8 km. Recovery was by helicopter from USS Lake Champlain (CVS-39). 1980 USS Truxtun (CGN 35) res cues 42 Vietnamese refugees and USS Merrill (DD 976) rescues 62 Vietnamese refugees, about 200 miles southeast of Saigon. You have thoughts about what the military is like. All of us do. Yes, even those of us who are affiliated with the military. Even those of us who have been with it, in one way or another, for more than 36 years. Typical stereotypes include the following: The military isnt into shar ing feelings. The military thinks counsel ing is for sissies. The military encourages bra vado. The military is filled with people who love a good fight. For most of my life, Ive shared some of these thoughts. Then, last month, I attended a Returning Warrior Workshop, and my beliefs were shat tered. RWWs are run by the Navy Reserve and designed for Sailors who have recently returned from an overseas deployment. When Dustin asked me to be his guest at the workshop which was out-of-state and would involve arranging travel and childcare I wasnt enthu siastic. Ive been to military work shops before. Most of them are incredibly bland and reminis cent of the worlds most boring college lecture. They are run by people whose hands are tied by regulations and whose pay is not necessarily affected by per formance. There usually is no incentive, nor room, for mean ingful conversation and defi nitely not entertainment in standard military briefings. This will be different, Dustin said. Trust me. Each attendee and their guest is put up in a nice hotel for the weekend. Our RWW was in Baltimore, Md., and held at the citys inner harbor. If nothing else, I was excited about a week end away with my husband. When we checked-in, we received the usual confer ence handouts: pamphlets with things like The Phases of Reintergration printed on them. Snore, I thought. More of the same. What the mili tary promotes is historically at odds with its reality. How many times have I received a book let informing me of the stress of deployments, then been met with the unspoken directive to soldier on? I was skeptical and preemp tively annoyed when we arrived for the first dinner. You can take the military off base, but can you ever take the military out of the military? That was before Eric Harris came onto the stage. Harris is a family support administra tor with Navy Region MidAtlantic Reserve Component Command. He is energetic and funny, and perhaps most importantly, not military. He didnt have on a uniform. He didnt speak in acronyms. His hands werent tied by the same formalities. The weekend opened with National Geographic photogra pher Dewitt Joness motivation al film Celebrate Whats Right with the World, a truly beau tiful and moving presentation that gave me goosebumps. For 22 minutes, I forgot that I was at a military workshop. Later, we broke into small groups to share our story. Small groups? In the military? What? Service members in their civilians clothes talked about what its like to come home from deployment. Some of them even got emotional. Others did not. But everyone seemed to be relaxed and, well, not military. Senior officers in civilian clothes mingled with junior members in civilian clothes. It was all so very . normal. There were breakout sessions with focused presentations of particular concern to individ ual service members and their guests. Dustin and I attended one session about dealing with childrens reactions to deploy ments and another one by Linda MacNeal, a humorist, about using humor to deal with stress. Dustin, who has been schooled in service etiquette since the day he entered the Naval Academy when he was 17-years-old, actually raised his hand and asked personal questions. I wanted to take a picture of it. Never before, in my 14 years of knowing Dustin as a commissioned officer, have I seen him break character in a military setting. At the RWW, he was Dustin the father and husband, not Dustin the service member. After hours, we made great friends at the hotel bar and shared more stories of deploy ments. And, of course, we had a weekend in a nice hotel without children, so besides the work shop, it was like a honeymoon for me and Dustin. I cant share the workshops ending with you, because it is a great surprise for attend ees. What I can tell you is that after 36 years of feeling at the mercy of the military, for that one night, the military cele brated me and every other fam ily member in attendance. We even got a standing ovation. The military is evolving. RWWs prove it. If you or a loved one has recently returned from a deployment, dont be fooled by the sound of workshop. This is unlike anything youre experienced in the military before, and I cant recommend it enough. You can find a listing of upcoming Returning Warrior Workshops at: http://www. public.navy.mil/ia/Pages/rww. aspx. TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery offers a safe, affordable and convenient method of getting prescriptions deliv ered to patients doors, by way of the U.S. Postal Service. Home Delivery includes generics at no-cost; a 90-day supply for most medi cations; refills by mail, phone or online; and an automatic refill option. Active duty have no co-pays, while other patients have no co-pay for gener ics, $13 for brand-name formulary and $43 for non-formulary. For brand-name and non-formulary medications, the co-pays for a 90-day supply are about the same as a 30-day supply from a retail pharmacya sav ings of up to 65 percent. TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery offers patients the opportunity to save time and money on prescription medi cations, said Capt. Gayle Shaffer, Naval Hospital (NH) commanding officer. For our patients, this means no wait ing in line, no extra driving, and the assurance of safe, reliable and confi dential receipt of medications. It also reduces DoD retail pharmacy costs and places hard-earned money back into the pockets of our nations heroes and their families. According to TRICARE, more than one million prescriptions are filled each month through Home Delivery, which is administered by Express Scripts, Inc. Home Delivery is best suited for maintenance medicationsthose taken on a regular basis. Benefits of Home Delivery include free generic medica tions, refill reminders, help with renew ing expired prescriptions, and a review of prescription history to help prevent harmful drug interactions. One of the most popular features is the automatic refill option, which ensures that patients dont run out of Navys Returning Warrior Workshop breaking moldTRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery: The convenient way to fill prescriptions

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The Navys new chief of naval person nel held all hands calls with his staff in Washington, D.C., to introduce him self, discuss his priorities and listen to Sailors and Navy civilians thoughts and concerns. Vice Adm. Bill Moran assumed the duties as the 57th chief of naval per sonnel Aug. 2. He is responsible for the overwhelming majority of policies and programs that directly affect Sailors and their families. We will proactively communicate with Sailors and families, and strive to be transparent in all our dealings, Said Moran. He added that he wanted Sailors and their families to feel comfortable sharing ideas and concerns with him, whether at all hands calls or through social media opportunities. Im honored to be here, said Moran during an interview with All Hands Magazine. I look forward to working on behalf of Sailors and families to earn their trust. Moran takes the helm of a command that has an operating budget of $29 billion and a staff of more than 26,000 Sailors and civilians that perform a wide variety of missions, including managing Navy manpower, readiness, education and training, and profession al development of Sailors. Moran did not shy away from addressing a concern foremost on the minds of many Sailors and civilians the budget. He said managing the force will be driven by fiscal realities, which will dictate force structure decisions and ultimately the total number of Sailors Navy wide. We understand todays fiscal and operational challenges, he said. We must reach a balance thats in the best interest of the Navy and the nation, as well as Sailors and their families. Despite the uncertain fiscal environ ment, Moran said one of his main prior ities remains getting Sailors to the fleet with the right skill sets and training. We will continue to provide trained and ready Sailors to meet fleet manning demands, he said. Moran also wanted Sailors and their families to know his staff will seek ways to bring stability and certainty to the work force. New Chief of Naval Personnel holds all hands calls with staff JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 15, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 15, 2013 NAS Jax in need of Child Development Home providersSince 1994, NAS Jacksonville Child Development Home (CDH) program has provided military families quality childcare with flexible hours in a home setting environment. CDH Monitor Lisa Williams said, The advantage of a CDH is the home away from home environment. The childcare ratio is smaller so theres more one-on-one time. The CDH provides a more indepth communication with one provider, verses the NAS Jax Child Development Center (CDC) where there are different teachers throughout the day. Parent Besa Pira-Romero said, My son loves going to his CDH providers home. Its less traumatic because of the smaller number of children. According to Williams, the CDH monitor inspects the home on an unan nounced monthly visit to ensure that providers are in compliance with Navy standards. Other inspections, conducted by the CDH monitor, CDC director and CDC assistant director are for quality con trol purposes. The U.S. Department of Agriculture inspec tions are conducted to ensure providers are serving wellbalanced meals and snacks that are in accordance with the Child Care Food Program policies and procedures. The providers home includes an initial inspection by the local fire department, safety and preventive medi cine to make sure the home is free of hazards and up to par with Navy standards. We need more quality CDH providers. We are always looking for people who want to make the com mitment to childcare and families. The sacrifice is huge but well worth it when the families and spouses are committed to supporting the dependent in his and her career choice. We would like to see at least 25 to 30 active CDH providers in the near future, said Williams. CDH providers are trained professional who follow specific guidelines and regulations mandated by the Department of Defense and the State of Florida, when they are located off base. The CDH program is regulated by the Navy Child and Youth Programs and offers free training and support for providers. Active military member spouses or retired military members, who have a high school diploma or GED equivalent, may apply to become a certified provider. The applicant must complete the five-day orientation class, the family members must pass a back-ground

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 15, 2013 5 check such as a health screen ing, Fleet and Family Support checks, security, substance abuse, home inspections, etc. The process may take up to 60 days. The benefits of being a home childcare provider include, but are not limited to, free monthly and on-going train ing, unlimited use of the free lending library, the ability to transfer to another base where there is a CDH program and receive a transfer bonus, added Williams. There are also finan cial incentives for providers when working flexible hours, extended hours or weekends for the military families. Ask about the opportunity to receive the highest standard a provider can earn, the National Association for Family Child Care accreditation, that is fully paid for by the Navy, she con tinued. A home childcare provider can watch up to six children, between the ages of six weeks to 12 years old, however, space is taken into consideration when determining how many chil dren a provider can take care of. CDH provider Samantha Martin said, I have always loved kids and always knew I would open up a day care after my 20-year Navy career. I knew when I retired from the Navy; I would take care of children. I feel I have a strong connection with them and spend eight to 10 hours a day with them. It hurts when they have to leave, either moving away or graduating. My husband always tells me not to get too attached, but how can you not? These are like my chil dren. My daughter has practically grown up in a CDH home and I really like the closeness you develop with the CDH provid er, said Sabrina Chipanov. Providing childcare takes a special kind of person to make this sacrifice, said Williams. Providers are turning their private homes into a daycare which takes discipline and flex ibility. They have to really listen to the military families needs not just to meet those needs but to ensure the children are growing in a healthy atmo sphere. Because we focus so much on quality verses quantity, our numbers of providers have been pretty low. But were recruit ing those who think they have what it takes to become a CDH provider, said Williams. The reward is there and the sacrifice will not go unnoticed. New providers are always needed both on and off base, especially for infants and pretoddlers and on weekends. If you are interested in becoming a CDH provider, con tact Williams at 542-5381. CDH

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The Navy announced the establishment of the Navys newest Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) initiative, the Victims Legal Counsel (VLC) Program Aug. 9, that will provide legal advice and advocacy for eligible victims of sexual assault. The VLC will help vic tims understand the inves tigation and military justice process, advocate their legal rights and interests and, when appropriate, appear in court on their behalf. The Navy is commit ted to protecting the rights and interests of victims of sexual assault and ensuring the administration of a fair, transparent and efficient military justice system that guarantees due process for the accused and promotes good order and discipline, said Vice Adm. Nanette DeRenzi, Judge Advocate General of the Navy. The Navys VLC Program complements the Navys broader efforts to care for victims of sexual assault by providing them with legal advice and assistance throughout the military justice process. Initially, the VLC Program will consist of 29 specially-trained, independent judge advocates assigned regionally to maximize availability of counsel across the Fleet. Navy VLCs will serve every geographic region, includ ing the United States, Europe, the Pacific, and the Middle East. The programs attorneys will not be in the victims or the accuseds chain of command and will not be involved in cases prosecution or defense. Through increased training and bystander intervention, we are con fronting sexual assault fleet wide, while ensuring that we provide needed care and support to victims, said Rear Adm. Sean Buck, director, 21st Century Sailor Office (N17). This program further adds to that sup port. For more information and resources to combat sexu al assault, visit www.sapr. navy.mil. Sexual assault affects Navy readiness, and the Navy is committed to pre venting sexual assault. Join the Navys conversation about sexual assault on social media and help raise awareness by using #NavySAPR. Question : How concerned should I be about mela noma? The doctor says: One in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. Although melanoma accounts for less than five percent of skin cancer cases it causes the majority of skin cancer deaths. Ultraviolet radiation from the sun and indoor tanning are major risk factors. Check your skin regularly, preferably once a month, looking for any unusual mole, sore, lump, blemish, marking or change in skin appearance. Watch for ABCDE warning signs: match the other) blurred) color). If you find one or more of these warning signs, get it checked by your healthcare provider immedi ately. And remember that some melanomas dont fit these rules. Its important to tell your doctor about any changes or new spots on the skin, or growths that look different from the rest of your moles. Find our more from the American Cancer Society at www.cancer.org. Ask the Doc is a new feature from Naval Branch Health Clinic Key West. This column is written by Laura Kyer, PA-C, physician assistant. If you have a question for a physician, dentist, phar macist or optometrist, please send it to kwaskthedoc@ med.navy.mil.Navy creates Victims Legal Counsel 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 15, 2013

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Lt. Cmdr. Todd Nichols of the VR-62 Nomads was named Full Time Support (Line) Junior Officer of the Year by the Association of the United States Navy (AUSN). Nichols is the operations officer at VR-62 and was on detachment in the Pacific when he heard the news. He said, I am extremely honored to be recognized as the AUSN Junior Officer of the Year. This award is especially meaningful as I spent an entire year deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Kabul, Afghanistan. The time spent away from my fam ily was especially challenging, but I am enormously proud of the work my team accom plished supporting war fighters on the ground and in the air space of Southeast Asia. I absolutely could not have earned this award without the incredible support I received from my front office, fellow members of the wardroom, chiefs mess, and especially the Sailors that I have the privilege of working with and leading on a daily basis,said Nichols. Their hard work enabled me to focus on furthering the mis sion of the VR community and Navy unique fleet-essential air craft, said Nichols. I have witnessed on count less occasions the profession alism, dedication and com mitment exhibited by VR-62s maintenance personnel, sup port staff and aircrew. I consid er myself very fortunate to be surrounded by such talent and am grateful for all the opportu nities my shipmates and I have had over the last three years. Nichols went on to thank his wife and family for their sup port during his time away. I could not have even been considered for this award with out the help from my family. My wife, Courtney, has been a single mother for our two boys for well over half of my time in VR-62. Shes done it all with a smile on her face and an unwavering commitment to her role in the defense of this nation, added Nichols. He will be leaving the Nomads for new challenges as he prepares to move to Naval Air Facility Washington and join the VR-1 Starlifters in November. AUSN is the leading voice for Americas Sailors and the premier advocate for a strong Navy. Founded in 1954, AUSN has a long distinguished reputation with the Navy and Congress. The organization is dedi cated to advocating for Navy equipment and benefits AUSN informs and educates members of Congress and their staffs on issues of importance to the Navy. VR-62 is one of five Navy C-130T Hercules Reserve squadrons that provide air logistics support for Navy commands around the globe. VR-62 is based at NAS Jacksonville. The men and women of VP-26 Tridents Combat Aircrew Four (CAC-4) and their supporting contingent of main tenance professionals recently represented Commander, Task Group 72.2/4 in Indonesia as the American participants in Sea Surveillance Exercise 13-1. The detachment flew a single P-3C Orion patrol air craft to Juanda International Airport, a joint military/civil ian airport located in Surabaya, Indonesia on the Island of Java. Upon arrival, members of the Indonesian Air Force, as well as local municipal leaders warmly welcomed the Americans. SEASURVEX 13-1 involved both U.S. and Malaysian air borne units and ground sup port personnel, providing an opportunity to showcase capa bilities and best practices. The four-day exercise built bilateral ties and further strengthened the bonds between the U.S. and their Indonesian counterparts. Indonesian personnel accom panied CAC-4 on two flights, allowing them to experience and observe the U.S. Navys primary maritime patrol air craft. Coordinated operations between the P-3C and two dis similar Indonesian aircraft the CASA CN-235 and 737-2X9 Surveiller provided invalu able experience for the three aircrews involved. SEASURVEX 13-1 was not spent exclusively flying, how ever. CAC-4 and their support ing maintenance profession als provided a static display of their Lockheed P-3C Orion, an event that was well-attended and warmly received by their Indonesian counterparts. Outside of the busy schedule of events, the Indonesian Air Force graciously received all American service personnel nightly for dinner and to enjoy music and karaoke in hopes of building strong interpersonal ties between the two services. The detachment Officer in Charge, Lt. Cmdr. John Walden stated, We are absolutely hon ored and humbled by the gra cious and lavish way in which we have been received by the Indonesian Air Force. Were proud to participate in an exercise so beneficial to both nations. The Team Tridents detach ment flew to Surabaya after participating in CARAT Malaysia. Their next stop will be back to their main deploy ment site at Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. Military commissaries worldwide will return to normal operating schedules the week of Aug. 18-24. The DeCA announcement comes in the wake of the Department of Defenses Aug. 6 decision to curtail fur loughs of its civilian workforce from 11 to six days. This is welcome news for us all, said Defense Commissary Agency Director and CEO Joseph Jeu. Our stores will return to their regular schedules after Aug. 17. I encourage our patrons to check the DeCA website for their com missarys operating hours. We recognize the disruption that furloughs presented to our patrons as far as access to their commissary ben efit, he added. We also understand the economic hardships many of our employees faced with the pay they lost during the furlough period. Since July 8, the one-day-per-week furloughs impacted all of DeCAs more than 14,000 U.S. civilian employees world wide. With the end of furloughs, Jeu asked that patrons be patient as product deliv ery schedules return to normal. We will do everything possible to ensure that our shelves are properly stocked with the products our customers want when they shop, he said. However, there will be a short adjustment period as our stores settle back into their prefurlough operating and delivery rou tines. Commissary customers can quickly find out about any changes to their local stores operating schedule by going to www.commissaries.com clicking on the Locations tab, then Alphabetical Listing to locate their store, and click ing on Local Store Information. Members of VP-16 were given a break from nor mal flight operations Aug. 5 to enjoy a com mand picnic along the shores of Camp Blanding in Stark, Fla. AWO3 Julio Smith, one of VP-16s electronics warfare oper ators, was happy for the opportunity to social ize with other squadron members and their fami lies. Being new to the com mand, this event was great for me and my wife. I was able to introduce her to many of the other spouses in a casual envi ronment. Its nice get ting to know everyone on a personal level, said Smith. VR-62 officer earns top recognitionVP-26 participates in Indonesian Sea Surveillance exercise Commissaries return to normal hours Aug. 18-24VP-16 War Eagles host command picnic 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 15, 2013

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cy to both safely upload and download ordinance to the P-8A over the course of the three-day inspection. Following CWTPI, Mad Fox aircrew completed five tactical flights in the Poseidon under the instruction of VP-30 instructor aircrew. These flights took VP-5 aircrew members from the Florida Keys to New Orleans to showcase their abilities operating this new aircraft. The month concluded with VP-5 naval flight offi cers, acoustic operators, and electronic warfare operators receiving their suc cessful NATOPS evaluations from VP-30 instructors. The very last stage of Safe for Flight certification began on July 29 as CPRW11 kicked off a comprehensive inspec tion of every VP-5 maintenance pro gram, administrative instruction, safety program, and NATOPS program to name just a few. Following these intensive four days of drills and inspec tions, Skipper Pottenburgh proudly announced to the assembled squadron that VP-5 was recommended as Safe for Flight by CPRW-11 to Patrol and Reconnaissance Group. Each and every Mad Fox is now focused on beginning the inter-deploy ment readiness cycle (IDRC) with their two new P-8A Poseidon aircraft, side numbers 436 and 437. VP-5 looks to exe cute safely and efficiently in preparation for its upcoming 7th Fleet deployment. The squadron continues to embody their motto: No Fox Like a Mad Fox! Cameron Kreeger, ESI site superin tendent, explained that the system also monitors salt levels in the water tank. Thats important information when working with Navy aircraft that oper ate in a salt-laden environment. Today is our first day putting a P-8 Poseidon repeatedly through the rinse rack to make sure we set the proper nozzle heights for the undercarriage rinse and that were also hitting the tail with enough fresh water. According to ESI President Geoff Keogh, who was on site at the rinse rack located near NAS Jax Hangar 113, The water requirement for rinsing a salty P-8A Poseidon is about 1,160 gallons per minute (gpm) 850 gpm for the undercarriage/fuselage and 300 gpm for the tail nozzles. Im glad I could be here today to help our team adjust and calibrate the new rinse rack system. Key to the improved performance is the more powerful, high-capacity pumps and nozzles that provide bet ter coverage of the aircraft. As needed, the system activates highly absorbent carbon filters that polish the water in the tank removing any heavy metals or other pollutants that come off the aircraft. Keogh added, Reclaiming the water for repeated use eliminates untreated water being discharged into the base storm water system. Now you get six to 10 rinses from each gallon of water.experience, Many of our aircrew have prior experience firing a Harpoon [from their time in the P-3C Orion]. What has been most interesting, though, has been seeing the improvement in the way we interface with the missile. The capabili ties the Poseidon provides makes this weapon much more user-friendly. Lt. j.g. Troy Tillson, a naval flight offi cer and tactical coordinator in VP-16 agreed, stating, In comparison to the P-3C, the P-8As hardware and software is much more comprehensive. It does, however, require greater coordination between the flight station and the tube. Its a good lesson in CRM. The War Eagles Aviation Ordnance team has also been preparing for this historic addition, getting their sailors ready for the day when the first live fire will take place. VP-16 Gunner, Chief Warrant Officer Roddy Wiggins high lighted some of the training his Sailors have been undergoing. The aviation ordnance personnel are well on track to getting their ordnance certification in order to load, download and troubleshoot the AGM-84D mis sile, Wiggins commented. They have been going through a very rigorous training syllabus while main taining delay-free flight operations. In preparation for the AGM-84D missile we have made numerous trips to VX-1 in Patuxent River, Md. for training. The first phase, which was completed last month, included training on proper installation of the SUU-93 wing pylons. The second phase of training saw us send two weapons load teams to VX-1 to conduct AGM-84 weapons release and control system checks and AGM-84 Harpoon missile weapons proficiency loading over a one-week period. We are now entering the third phase of training where we will send a six member load team back to VX-1 to conduct the first P-8A Conventional Weapons Proficiency Refresher (CWPR) course, continued Wiggins. Once completed with the CWPR course we will be doing weapons pro ficiency training every week at VX-1 in preparation for our upcoming Conventional Weapons Proficiency Inspection (CWTPI) that is scheduled to be held at the beginning of September. VP-16s first live firing of the AGM-84 Harpoon missile is slated to occur later this fall. VP-16 VP-5 RINSE RACK JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 15, 2013 11

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Officer Richard Hunt, who coordinated the event with MWR. By holding events like this, it helps promotes a bet ter crime watch community. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander welcomed the families to the event. Thanks so much for coming out tonight. Were here to heighten awareness about crime prevention and drug use and generate support of local anti-crime programs. Were also here to strengthen our com munity support in our neighborhoods on the station, Undersander told the crowd. Its a great night, so enjoy the camaraderie and introduce yourselves to your neighbors. Families and security personnel spent the evening interacting as they feasted on free hamburgers, hot dogs and chips courtesy of MWR. The children were entertained by McGruff the Crime Dog, a giant bouncy slide, dancing to the DJs music and swimming in the outdoor pool. Military dog handlers MA2(EXW) Keith Danalewich and MA2 Erick Ortiz and MASA Cheli Matlock of the NAS Jax Security Department and Military Working Dogs Pato and Doly demonstrated their obedience skills. MWD Doly also showed how she can apprehend a suspect as the crowd cheered her on. Members of the Florida Masonic Child ID Program, also fingerprinted and took photos of children to pro vide parents with CD identification kits and discussed the importance of having the information on hand updated to help authorities if a child ever goes miss ing. Representatives from the Florida Highway Patrol and Jacksonville Sheriffs Office were also on hand to offer information and talk to guests about their pro grams in the local area. I think this is great event for the families and com munity. We just moved here about two weeks ago from Virginia Beach and its nice to meet people here and learn about crime prevention in our area. We didnt have events like this at my past duty station, said HM1(SW) Nelson Carmona of Naval Hospital Jacksonville, who brought his family out to the event. HM1(FMF/AW) Patrick Lumas, also of Naval Hospital Jacksonville agreed. I think its awesome to get the kids out here and help them realize that our security and fire depart ment personnel are here to help them if something goes wrong and to go to them if they need help. The first National Night Out began in early 1984 through the National Association of Town Watch (NATW). The event has been held around the country on the first Tuesday in August ever since. NATW is a non profit, crime prevention organization which works in cooperation with thousands of crime watch groups and law enforcement agencies throughout the coun try. Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any com pany, sponsor or its products or services. NIGHT OUT 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 15, 2013

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The following are the new chief selectees from NAS Jacksonville and tenant commands: CPO Selectees save 5 percent Chief Petty Officer (CPO) selectees can pay for newly required Navy uniforms using the MILITARY STAR Card and receive a five percent credit on their next MILITARY STAR Card statement showing the pur chase of CPO uniforms. This special offer is good at any NEX Uniform Shop worldwide, but not for uniform purchases made online or toll-free phone calls to the Uniform Support Center. Using the MILITARY STAR Card lets CPO selectees charge their new uniforms like anything else in the NEX, said Cmdr. Marcia Coleman, director, Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) Uniform Program Management Office. Its quick, easy and the new CPO selectee receives a five percent credit by using their MILITARY STAR Card. Patrons who open a MILITARY STAR Card account will receive 10 percent off their first days purchases, including a uniform purchase. The 10 percent discount is also applied to the cus tomers MILITARY STAR Card statement. Chief selectees announced JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 15, 2013 13

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Fighting Tigers volunteer to make a differenceEight Sailors assigned to the Fighting Tigers of VP-8 supported a Clay County Habitat for Humanity (CCHH) con struction project, July 26. During the event, VP-8 Sailors installed soffit, a plastic material used to cover the overhang on the roof of a house, and aids proper temperature regulation in a home attic. I volunteer and plan to continue vol unteering because giving back to the community provides me with satisfac tion in knowing that I have made a dif ference, and it allows me to step out of my comfort zone and experience all types of work, said VP-8 ADAN Emilio Vasquez. CCHH is a non-profit organiza tion that works in partnership with the community to build and renovate homes for people in need of assistance. Once selected, prospect homeowners invest 300 to 500 hours of their own labor, known as sweat equity, toward construction of their new home. Stephanie Cotton, the prospective homeowner stated, So far weve had approximately eight groups of Navy personnel assist in the construction of my new home, and I feel blessed and grateful that everyone gathered togeth er to make a difference for me. The home is scheduled for comple tion in early September, and VP-8 Sailors are scheduled to continue assisting in its construction. Retired PR1 Bob Boles recently cel ebrated his 90th birthday visiting VP-62 at NAS Jacksonville. Boles served in the Navy beginning just prior to World War II, retiring as a first class petty officer in 1963. I was too young to sign up on my own, said Boles who joined the Navy at age 17 on June 25, 1941. Six months before the war started, my dad signed for me to get in. That was the start of my Navy career. I started the parachute work when I was overseas in the islands, said Boles. I had to make a jump with my para chute for graduation. If it opens you graduate. I wasnt scared, just nervous. Boles met AWF1(NAC/AW) Stephen Ryczek of VP-62 at the NAS Jacksonville Commissary and inquired about seeing the squadrons parachute loft. I asked myself, I wonder if he could get me into the parachute loft, said Boles. So I asked him, and he said sure, he would get me in. The squadron gave Boles a tour of the spaces, and took time to show him 90-year-old parachute rigger visits VP-62 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 15, 2013

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 15, 2013 their medications. Patients can also refill their pre scriptions manuallyby phone, mail or online. Satisfaction with TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery continues to grow as our patients discover the many benefits, said Cmdr. Andrea Petrovanie, Naval Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville officer in charge. Enrollment is easy and it gives our patients unlimited access to a pharmacist 24 hours a day. Prescriptions can be delivered to any address in the U.S. and its territories, including temporary addresses and APO/FPO addresses. Patients living outside the U.S. and its territories who dont have an APO/FPO address can have medications shipped to their U.S. embassy. Refrigerated medications cant be mailed to APO/FPO addresses. To enroll at no-cost, therere three options: online at www.tricare.mil/homedelivery by telephone at (877) 363-1303, or by mailing a registration form to Express Scripts Inc., P.O. Box 52150, Phoenix, AZ 85072-9954. TRICARESquadron members participated in boating activi ties, swam in the lake, and dined on hot dogs and burgers. A mobile game truck allowed squad ron members and their families to face off against one another during games played on Xbox 360, Play Station 3, and Wii. In addition, the War Eagles held a cook-off for the title of VP-16 Barbecue Pitmaster. Lt. Cmdr. Adam Schantz, head of VP-16s Command Services Department remarked on the success of the event. Its always great to be able to reward our Sailors and their families for all of the hard work and sacrifices they make on a daily basis. We had a great turnout and everyone seemed to be enjoying them selves. Today was a well-deserved break for the War Eagles. AWO2 Delbert Cerpa, an acoustic warfare opera tor with VP-16 agreed, stating, It was fun to have the day off to spend with squadron mates. The food was excellent, and I particularly enjoyed watching friends attempts at waterskiing. VP-16 returned to normal flight operations the next day with renewed energy. VP-16around the loft. Ryczek suggested maybe Boles could come back and fly in the simulator. Boles was able to return during the July reserve drill weekend, and spent several hours in the P-3C Orion aircraft flight simulator with Naval Flight Officer Lt. Cmdr. Steven Mondy. I even made two landings, said Boles. Afterward, Boles spent time talking to Broadarrow Sailors in the first class petty officers mess about his Navy career and time spent overseas during World War II. The squadron visit was capped by taking a moment to pay tribute to this veteran during squadron quar ters. VP-62 DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Friday at 7 p.m. Monday Night Football Kick-off Sept. 9 at 7 p.m. Complimentary food & give-a-waysFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Free bowling for active duty Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 510 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 1 6 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer Going on now through Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 years and younger receive one free game of bowling every day until 5 p.m. Win prizes all summer long! Fall and winter bowling leagues are now forming! Leagues begin in September.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Lap Swim (no concessions, slide or waterpark will be open) Mon. Fri. 6-8 am, 11 a.m. 1 p.m., 4:307 p.m. Recreational swim Sat. & Sun 11 a.m. 6 p.m. For more information, call 542-3518I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Halloween Horror Nights Vendor Day Oct 2, 10 a.m. 2 p.m. Prize drawing every 30 minutes Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets on sale now $70 section 147 Legoland Florida Free ticket for active duty military through Oct. 27 Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Gatorland Free admission for active duty and retired military until the end of the year. Family tickets can be pur chased at ITT. $19.95 adult, $12.50 child, zip line $54.25 Monster Truck Jam club seating $42, regular seating $22 201314 Artist Series featuring Mama Mia, Memphis, Celtic Thunder, War Horse, Men are From Mars, Women are from Venus, Million Dollar Quartet and The D* Word is a Musical are on sale now! Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 201314 season featuring Menopause, River North Dance Chicago, Hungarian State Folk Ensemble, Clay County Christmas, Godspell, Driving Miss Daisy, Bronx Wanderers, Celtic Fire and Swan Lake are on sale now!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restrict ed to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Jacksonville Suns Game Aug. 15 at 6 p.m. Beach Trip Aug. 17 at 9 a.m. Movie in the Yard Featuring Fast & Furious 6 Barracks Courtyard at 8 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Aug. 20 for active duty Aug. 22 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Movie Under the Stars Aug. 23 at 8 p.m. featuring Monsters University Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Oct. 7 Nov. 20 $500 per person The base gym on board NAS Jacksonville officially opened this week after six months of renova tions that will bring an energized workout to its visitors. An official ribbon cutting ceremony was held Aug. 9. The entire facility is a very sharp looking facility that is very inviting to all Navy personnel, said Lt. Cmdr. Michael James, Navy Reserve civil engineer, who uses the gym while stationed at NAS Jax. This was a great sur prise as the last time I was here, the gym was still under renova tions. Josh Bass, NAS Jax installation energy manager, explained that the formerly dark environment of a typical gym and sometimes questionable odors has been replaced by a clean interior with fresh paint, new air conditioning and ventilation systems, as well as a reconfigured lighting system, low-flow water fixtures and sev eral architectural improvements. In addition to providing a quality venue for Sailors, their families and the civilian employ ees at NAS Jax to improve their physical fitness, another goal of this project was to make the gym more energy and water efficient, said Bass. Visitors should notice the ener gy efficient features of the gym the moment they walk through the door. The new lobby con figuration at the front entrance minimizes the loss of cool air as patrons enter and exit the build ing. The new lighting configura tion provides coverage across the entire space with the appropriate level of lighting. The T8 lamps are lower watt age than standard lamps and therefore use less energy, said Bass. Additionally, there are occupancy sensors installed within each space of the gym so when no one is using a particu lar room for an extended period of time, the lights will turn off. When someone enters a space, the sensor detects the movement and turns on the lights. In regards to water conserva tion, the fixtures in the restrooms and showers were changed to low flow. Patrons should hardly notice the difference, but they will be using significantly less water. The greatest energy improve ment made to the facility was in the heating, ventilating and air conditioning equipment. Bass explained the three types of energy improvements. The first is a packaged roof top air condi tioner that provides conditioned (cooled or heated depending on the time of year) fresh outdoor air to the building. This units energy efficient motor will speed up or slow down based on the pressure of the building. The exhaust system consists of several exhaust fans driven by energy efficient motors. These fans can be programmed to start and stop at different times and operate at different speeds. As exhaust fans turn off or change speed, the building begins to build pressure. The outdoor air unit senses the rise in pressure and scales back its output. This action/reaction results in energy savings. These two systems working together is what will keep the facility comfortable and smell ing fresh for years to come, Bass added. The second system that is most visible to patrons is called the variable refrigerant flow sys tem. Instead of using a giant air handler and ductwork to cool a large volume of air and then move that air throughout the build ing, a small amount of refriger ant is sent to units located either on the wall or the ceiling of each room. Instead of seeing ductwork in the open ceiling, you now see refrigerant piping that makes this method more efficient than tradi tional air conditioning methods. This system provides supplemen tal cooling in each of the spac es, further reducing any heat or humidity issues associated with Floridas climate. The gyms last piece of ener gy efficient design is how all of these systems are networked together by a computer program that allows the systems to talk to each other. Through this pro gram, the outdoor air system determines when to provide more or less fresh air. Additionally, this program allows all of the systems to be placed on schedules. Through scheduling, we fur ther maximize energy efficiency by determining when peak occu pancy times occur and program the systems to ramp up and meet that demand, explained Bass. The opposite is true during offpeak and unoccupied time peri ods.Gym renovations complete, providing an energy efficient environment

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The NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service mem bers and their fami lies. Preregistration is required. The following is the schedule for 2013: Training Aug. 19-21 (8 a.m.-4 p.m.), Nov. 12-15 (5:30-10 p.m.) Program (TAP) Separation Workshop (7:30 a.m.4:15 p.m.) Aug. 19-23, Sept. 9-13, Sept. 16-20, Oct. 7-11, Oct. 21-25, Nov. 4-8, Dec. 2-6. Program (TAP) Retirement Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) Aug. 26-30, Sept. 23-27, Oct. 28-Nov. 1, Nov. 18-22, Dec. 16-20. Workshop (9 a.m.-noon) Aug. 16, Sept. 6, Oct. 17, Nov. 27, Dec. 11. (Noon-3 p.m.) July 2. Interview Techniques Workshop (8-9:30 a.m.) Sept. 5, Nov. 25. Letters Workshop (9:40 a.m.-noon) Sept. 5, Nov. 25. Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Nov. 13-14. Specialist Training (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Sept. 30-Oct. 4, Dec. 9-13. Credit Management Workshop (8-11 a.m.) Oct. 15. time Home Buyers (1-3:30 p.m.) Sept. 4. Deals in Car Buying (9-10:30 a.m.) Nov. 26. (1:30-3 p.m.) Oct. 10, Dec. 12. Workshop (1:30-4 p.m.) July 11, Sept. 12, Nov. 14. 101 Workshop Sept. 14 (1-2:30 p.m.) Nov. 21 (5-6:30 p.m.) (9-11 a.m.) Aug. 12, Sept. 9, Oct. 7, Nov. 4, Dec. 9. 101 Workshop (9-10:30 a.m.) Sept. 10, Oct. 8, Nov. 5, Dec. 10. Extended Stress Management Workshop (8 a.m.-noon) Oct. 15 & 29. Workshop (8 a.m.-noon) Aug. 27, Sept. 24, Oct. 22, Nov. 26, Dec. 17. Personal Anger Control Group Aug. 15 Sept. 19 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.), Oct. 8 Nov. 12 (2-4 p.m.) Individual Communication (11 a.m.1 p.m.) Sept. 10, Nov. 19. Parenting with Love & Logic (1-3 p.m.) Sept. 3, 10, 17, 24; Nov. 5, 12, 19, 26. Active Parenting of Teens (1-4 p.m.) Aug. 21, 28; Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23. Power 2 Change, Womens Support Group (9:30-11 a.m.) Every Wednesday Expectant Families (9 a.m.-3 p.m.) Sept. 16, Dec. 3. Tiny Tots Play Group (10 a.m.-noon) Aug. 20; Sept. 3, 17; Oct. 1, 15, 29; Nov. 12, 16; Dec. 10, 17. Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) Orientation (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) Sept. 5, Nov. 7. EFMP Command POC Training (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) Oct. 3, Dec. 5. To register for work shops, call 542-5745. FFSC offers life skills workshops JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 15, 2013 17

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 15, 2013 RX DELIVERY CDH PROGRAM CHIEF SELECTS Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The VP-5 Mad Foxes received their certification from Patrol and Reconnais-sance Group Aug. 2 as Safe for Flight in operating the P-8A Poseidon. This concludes nearly seven months of incredibly hard work by every Mad Fox that began on Jan. 4 with their transition pro cess from the P-3C Orion to the P-8A. VP-5 has flown the P-3C since 1974. The Mad Foxes history of excellence in the P-3C includes locating pieces of the tragic Space Shuttle Challenger explo sion, remaining on top of a sink ing Soviet Yankee Class sub marine, support of Operations Desert Shield, Desert Storm, Enduring Freedom, Iraqi Freedom and the first employment of an AGM-65F Maverick Missile from a maritime patrol aircraft during Operation Odyssey Dawn. This memorable P-3C history came to an end Dec. 4, 2012 as then VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Erin Osborne landed the squadrons final Orion flight at NAS Jacksonville after a suc cessful 7th Fleet deployment. Safe for Flight was a Herculean accomplishment for 240 Mad Foxes, VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Matthew Pottenburgh told squadron personnel during the Aug. 1 command quarters. The work that began the day when Skipper Osborne landed our last P-3C Orion could not have been possible without the total effort of each and every Mad Fox. VP-5s Safe for Flight inspection was conducted by Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) -11 and began June 3 when the ordnance shop was inspected through a conventional weap ons training proficiency inspec tion (CWTPI). Mad Fox ordnance men and women demonstrated proficien The NAS Jax Security and Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Departments hosted the annual National Night Out at the Allegheny softball fields and outdoor pool on Aug. 6. The event is held each year to heighten crime and drug prevention aware ness, generate support for local anticrime programs, strengthen neighborhood and police partnerships and let criminals know that neighborhoods are fighting back against crime. This years event was sponsored by First Command Financial Planning. The base is our community and National Night Out is a way to bring the community together in an effort to fight crime. Our security depart ment strives to keep NAS Jax a safe place to live and work, but we need the employees and residents assistance in remaining vigilant to criminal activi ties, said NAS Jax Physical Security Its simple corrosion affects readi ness, said NAS Jax Airfield Facilities Manager Doug Chaney at the new rinse rack for P-8A, P-3C, C-40A and C-130T aircraft based at the station. Corrosion prevention and control affects both the cost and availability of naval aircraft. This new top-of-the-line rinse rack is more efficient and envi ronmentally sensitive than the original. For aircraft that fulfill unique maritime operational requirements in a harsh, corrosive environment this is a valu able resource. Keshia Torruella, QC site superintendent and site safety manager for Cape Design Engineering Company said, A new 8-inch water main keeps the 5,000-gallon fresh-water tank filled to the proper level. Two pumps work in tandem to spray the fuselage and the tail of P-3s and P-8s. Depending on the aircraft, the rinse process takes two to three minutes. All used water is collected through the drain system and pumped through an oil/water separator that directs most of the cleaned water back to the freshwater tank. In the underground pump house, a control system designed by Enviremedial Services Inc. (ESI) uses Internet telemetry to monitor every component 24/7 through an off-base monitoring station. The War Eagles of VP-16 have recently begun training to add the AGM-84D Harpoon missile to the current armament of their P-8A Poseidon aircraft. The Harpoon is an all-weather, over the horizon, anti-ship missile currently being utilized by numerous platforms including the P-3C Orion, surface ships, and submarines. Over half of our aircrews have already undergone the initial Harpoon training in preparation for our first live firing. This training is an important step in preparing our team to operate at full readiness during our deployment later this year, VP-16 Commanding Officer Cmdr. William Pennington remarked. The feedback from the crews in training has been overwhelmingly positive, and we are looking forward to the day when we will put our knowledge to the test. Current Harpoon training consists of ground school classes taught by the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Weapons School. Crews then travel to NAS Patuxent River in Patuxent River, MD where instructors walk them through the procedures and steps, culminating in the practice firing of a Harpoon in the simulator. Lt. Zack Sutton, a VP-16 patrol plane commander who has already under gone the initial training remarked of his VP-5 certified Safe for Flight Navys second P-8A Poseidon squadron begins IDRC VP-16 War Eagles train for Harpoon firing New rinse rack fights aircraft corrosionNational Night Out raises crime prevention awareness

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 15, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Aug. 15 1845 U.S. Naval Academy established at Annapolis, Md. on former site of Fort Severn. 1895 Commissioning of USS Texas, the first American steel-hulled battle ship. Texas served off Cuba during the Spanish-American War and took part in the naval battle of Santiago. Under the name of San Marcos, she was sunk in weapon-effects tests in Chesapeake Bay in 1911. Her hulk continued in use as a gunnery target through World War II. 1908 First Navy post offices estab lished in Navy ships. 1944 Operation Dragoon, Allied invasion of Southern France 1953 First naval officer appointed Chairman, Joints Chiefs of Staff, Adm. William Radford. 1958 USS Lexington (CVA-16) arrives in vicinity of Taiwan. Aug. 16 1812 Frigate USS Constitution recaptures American merchant brig Adeline. 1954 Beginning of Operation Passage to Freedom, transport of refugees from Haiphong to Saigon, Vietnam. Aug. 17 1812 Frigate President captures British schooner LAdeline in North Atlantic. 1942 Submarines USS Nautilus (SS168) and USS Argonaut (SM-1) land 222 Marines on Makin Island. It was the first amphibious attack made from subma rines. 1959 Adm. Arleigh Burke reappointed CNO for third, two-year term, serving longest term as CNO. 1962 Navys first hydrofoil patrol craft, USS High Point (PCH-1) launched at Seattle, Wash. Aug. 18 1838 Expedition under Lt. Charles Wilkes embarks on world cruise. 1911 First Navy Nurse Corps super intendent, Esther Voorhees Hasson, appointed. 1965 First major amphibious assault in Vietnam, Operation Starlight cap tures 2,000 Viet Cong. 1966 First ship-to-shore satellite radio message sent from USS Annapolis (AGMR-1) in South China Sea to Pacific Fleet Headquarters at Pearl Harbor. 1974 After flooding in Philippines, Navy helicopters begin six days of oper ations to rescue people and bring sup plies (244 flights) Aug. 19 1812 Frigate USS Constitution cap tures HMS Guerriere. 1812Devastating hurricane struck the Navys New Orleans station, delay ing military preparations in the War of 1812. 1818 Capt. James Biddle takes pos session of Oregon Territory for U.S. 1967 Operation Coronado IV begins in Mekong Delta. 1981 Two VF-41 aircraft from USS Nimitz (CVN 68) shoot down two Libyan aircraft that fired on them over international waters. Aug. 20 1952 Inter-service air operation (U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force) at Chang Pyong-ni, Korea destroys 80 percent of assigned area. 1959 USS Thetis Bay (LPH-6) com pletes six-day humanitarian operation after floods in Taiwan. 1969 Navy Seabees and sailors from Helicopter Training Squadron Eight (HT-8) evacuate 820 people from Pass Christian, Miss. after Hurricane Camille. Aug. 21 1800 U.S. Marine Corps Band per forms its first concert in Washington, D.C. 1883 Installation of the first electric lighting on a U.S. Navy Ship completed on USS Trenton. 1920 Radio station built by U.S. Navy and French Government transmits first wireless message heard around the world. At the time it was the most powerful radio station in the world. 1951 First contract for nuclear-pow ered submarine awarded. 1965 Launch of Gemini 5, piloted by Lt. Cmdr. Charles Conrad Jr., who completed 120 orbits in almost eight days at an altitude of 349.8 km. Recovery was by helicopter from USS Lake Champlain (CVS-39). 1980 USS Truxtun (CGN 35) res cues 42 Vietnamese refugees and USS Merrill (DD 976) rescues 62 Vietnamese refugees, about 200 miles southeast of Saigon. You have thoughts about what the military is like. All of us do. Yes, even those of us who are affiliated with the military. Even those of us who have been with it, in one way or another, for more than 36 years. Typical stereotypes include the following: The military isnt into shar ing feelings. The military thinks counsel ing is for sissies. The military encourages bra vado. The military is filled with people who love a good fight. For most of my life, Ive shared some of these thoughts. Then, last month, I attended a Returning Warrior Workshop, and my beliefs were shat tered. RWWs are run by the Navy Reserve and designed for Sailors who have recently returned from an overseas deployment. When Dustin asked me to be his guest at the workshop which was out-of-state and would involve arranging travel and childcare I wasnt enthusiastic. Ive been to military work shops before. Most of them are incredibly bland and reminis cent of the worlds most boring college lecture. They are run by people whose hands are tied by regulations and whose pay is not necessarily affected by performance. There usually is no incentive, nor room, for mean ingful conversation and definitely not entertainment in standard military briefings. This will be different, Dustin said. Trust me. Each attendee and their guest is put up in a nice hotel for the weekend. Our RWW was in Baltimore, Md., and held at the citys inner harbor. If nothing else, I was excited about a weekend away with my husband. When we checked-in, we received the usual confer ence handouts: pamphlets with things like The Phases of Reintergration printed on them. Snore, I thought. More of the same. What the mili tary promotes is historically at odds with its reality. How many times have I received a book let informing me of the stress of deployments, then been met with the unspoken directive to soldier on? I was skeptical and preemp tively annoyed when we arrived for the first dinner. You can take the military off base, but can you ever take the military out of the military? That was before Eric Harris came onto the stage. Harris is a family support administra tor with Navy Region MidAtlantic Reserve Component Command. He is energetic and funny, and perhaps most importantly, not military. He didnt have on a uniform. He didnt speak in acronyms. His hands werent tied by the same formalities. The weekend opened with National Geographic photogra pher Dewitt Joness motivation al film Celebrate Whats Right with the World, a truly beau tiful and moving presentation that gave me goosebumps. For 22 minutes, I forgot that I was at a military workshop. Later, we broke into small groups to share our story. Small groups? In the military? What? Service members in their civilians clothes talked about what its like to come home from deployment. Some of them even got emotional. Others did not. But everyone seemed to be relaxed and, well, not military. Senior officers in civilian clothes mingled with junior members in civilian clothes. It was all so very . normal. There were breakout sessions with focused presentations of particular concern to individ ual service members and their guests. Dustin and I attended one session about dealing with childrens reactions to deploy ments and another one by Linda MacNeal, a humorist, about using humor to deal with stress. Dustin, who has been schooled in service etiquette since the day he entered the Naval Academy when he was 17-years-old, actually raised his hand and asked personal questions. I wanted to take a picture of it. Never before, in my 14 years of knowing Dustin as a commissioned officer, have I seen him break character in a military setting. At the RWW, he was Dustin the father and husband, not Dustin the service member. After hours, we made great friends at the hotel bar and shared more stories of deploy ments. And, of course, we had a weekend in a nice hotel without children, so besides the work shop, it was like a honeymoon for me and Dustin. I cant share the workshops ending with you, because it is a great surprise for attend ees. What I can tell you is that after 36 years of feeling at the mercy of the military, for that one night, the military cele brated me and every other family member in attendance. We even got a standing ovation. The military is evolving. RWWs prove it. If you or a loved one has recently returned from a deployment, dont be fooled by the sound of workshop. This is unlike anything youre experienced in the military before, and I cant recommend it enough. You can find a listing of upcoming Returning Warrior Workshops at: http://www. public.navy.mil/ia/Pages/rww. aspx. TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery offers a safe, affordable and convenient method of getting prescriptions deliv ered to patients doors, by way of the U.S. Postal Service. Home Delivery includes generics at no-cost; a 90-day supply for most medications; refills by mail, phone or online; and an automatic refill option. Active duty have no co-pays, while other patients have no co-pay for generics, $13 for brand-name formulary and $43 for non-formulary. For brand-name and non-formulary medications, the co-pays for a 90-day supply are about the same as a 30-day supply from a retail pharmacya sav ings of up to 65 percent. TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery offers patients the opportunity to save time and money on prescription medi cations, said Capt. Gayle Shaffer, Naval Hospital (NH) commanding officer. For our patients, this means no waiting in line, no extra driving, and the assurance of safe, reliable and confi dential receipt of medications. It also reduces DoD retail pharmacy costs and places hard-earned money back into the pockets of our nations heroes and their families. According to TRICARE, more than one million prescriptions are filled each month through Home Delivery, which is administered by Express Scripts, Inc. Home Delivery is best suited for maintenance medicationsthose taken on a regular basis. Benefits of Home Delivery include free generic medica tions, refill reminders, help with renewing expired prescriptions, and a review of prescription history to help prevent harmful drug interactions. One of the most popular features is the automatic refill option, which ensures that patients dont run out of Navys Returning Warrior Workshop breaking moldTRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery: The convenient way to fill prescriptions

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The Navys new chief of naval personnel held all hands calls with his staff in Washington, D.C., to introduce him self, discuss his priorities and listen to Sailors and Navy civilians thoughts and concerns. Vice Adm. Bill Moran assumed the duties as the 57th chief of naval per sonnel Aug. 2. He is responsible for the overwhelming majority of policies and programs that directly affect Sailors and their families. We will proactively communicate with Sailors and families, and strive to be transparent in all our dealings, Said Moran. He added that he wanted Sailors and their families to feel comfortable sharing ideas and concerns with him, whether at all hands calls or through social media opportunities. Im honored to be here, said Moran during an interview with All Hands Magazine. I look forward to working on behalf of Sailors and families to earn their trust. Moran takes the helm of a command that has an operating budget of $29 billion and a staff of more than 26,000 Sailors and civilians that perform a wide variety of missions, including managing Navy manpower, readiness, education and training, and professional development of Sailors. Moran did not shy away from addressing a concern foremost on the minds of many Sailors and civilians the budget. He said managing the force will be driven by fiscal realities, which will dictate force structure decisions and ultimately the total number of Sailors Navy wide. We understand todays fiscal and operational challenges, he said. We must reach a balance thats in the best interest of the Navy and the nation, as well as Sailors and their families. Despite the uncertain fiscal environment, Moran said one of his main priorities remains getting Sailors to the fleet with the right skill sets and training. We will continue to provide trained and ready Sailors to meet fleet manning demands, he said. Moran also wanted Sailors and their families to know his staff will seek ways to bring stability and certainty to the work force. New Chief of Naval Personnel holds all hands calls with staff JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 15, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 15, 2013 NAS Jax in need of Child Development Home providersSince 1994, NAS Jacksonville Child Development Home (CDH) program has provided military families quality childcare with flexible hours in a home setting environment. CDH Monitor Lisa Williams said, The advantage of a CDH is the home away from home environment. The childcare ratio is smaller so theres more one-on-one time. The CDH provides a more indepth communication with one provider, verses the NAS Jax Child Development Center (CDC) where there are different teachers throughout the day. Parent Besa Pira-Romero said, My son loves going to his CDH providers home. Its less traumatic because of the smaller number of children. According to Williams, the CDH monitor inspects the home on an unan nounced monthly visit to ensure that providers are in compliance with Navy standards. Other inspections, conducted by the CDH monitor, CDC director and CDC assistant director are for quality con trol purposes. The U.S. Department of Agriculture inspec tions are conducted to ensure providers are serving wellbalanced meals and snacks that are in accordance with the Child Care Food Program policies and procedures. The providers home includes an initial inspection by the local fire department, safety and preventive medi cine to make sure the home is free of hazards and up to par with Navy standards. We need more quality CDH providers. We are always looking for people who want to make the commitment to childcare and families. The sacrifice is huge but well worth it when the families and spouses are committed to supporting the dependent in his and her career choice. We would like to see at least 25 to 30 active CDH providers in the near future, said Williams. CDH providers are trained professional who follow specific guidelines and regulations mandated by the Department of Defense and the State of Florida, when they are located off base. The CDH program is regulated by the Navy Child and Youth Programs and offers free training and support for providers. Active military member spouses or retired military members, who have a high school diploma or GED equivalent, may apply to become a certified provider. The applicant must complete the five-day orientation class, the family members must pass a back-ground

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 15, 2013 5 check such as a health screen ing, Fleet and Family Support checks, security, substance abuse, home inspections, etc. The process may take up to 60 days. The benefits of being a home childcare provider include, but are not limited to, free monthly and on-going train ing, unlimited use of the free lending library, the ability to transfer to another base where there is a CDH program and receive a transfer bonus, added Williams. There are also financial incentives for providers when working flexible hours, extended hours or weekends for the military families. Ask about the opportunity to receive the highest standard a provider can earn, the National Association for Family Child Care accreditation, that is fully paid for by the Navy, she con tinued. A home childcare provider can watch up to six children, between the ages of six weeks to 12 years old, however, space is taken into consideration when determining how many chil dren a provider can take care of. CDH provider Samantha Martin said, I have always loved kids and always knew I would open up a day care after my 20-year Navy career. I knew when I retired from the Navy; I would take care of children. I feel I have a strong connection with them and spend eight to 10 hours a day with them. It hurts when they have to leave, either moving away or graduating. My husband always tells me not to get too attached, but how can you not? These are like my children. My daughter has practically grown up in a CDH home and I really like the closeness you develop with the CDH provid er, said Sabrina Chipanov. Providing childcare takes a special kind of person to make this sacrifice, said Williams. Providers are turning their private homes into a daycare which takes discipline and flexibility. They have to really listen to the military families needs not just to meet those needs but to ensure the children are growing in a healthy atmo sphere. Because we focus so much on quality verses quantity, our numbers of providers have been pretty low. But were recruit ing those who think they have what it takes to become a CDH provider, said Williams. The reward is there and the sacrifice will not go unnoticed. New providers are always needed both on and off base, especially for infants and pretoddlers and on weekends. If you are interested in becoming a CDH provider, contact Williams at 542-5381. CDH

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The Navy announced the establishment of the Navys newest Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) initiative, the Victims Legal Counsel (VLC) Program Aug. 9, that will provide legal advice and advocacy for eligible victims of sexual assault. The VLC will help vic tims understand the inves tigation and military justice process, advocate their legal rights and interests and, when appropriate, appear in court on their behalf. The Navy is commit ted to protecting the rights and interests of victims of sexual assault and ensuring the administration of a fair, transparent and efficient military justice system that guarantees due process for the accused and promotes good order and discipline, said Vice Adm. Nanette DeRenzi, Judge Advocate General of the Navy. The Navys VLC Program complements the Navys broader efforts to care for victims of sexual assault by providing them with legal advice and assistance throughout the military justice process. Initially, the VLC Program will consist of 29 specially-trained, independent judge advocates assigned regionally to maximize availability of counsel across the Fleet. Navy VLCs will serve every geographic region, includ ing the United States, Europe, the Pacific, and the Middle East. The programs attorneys will not be in the victims or the accuseds chain of command and will not be involved in cases prosecution or defense. Through increased training and bystander intervention, we are con fronting sexual assault fleet wide, while ensuring that we provide needed care and support to victims, said Rear Adm. Sean Buck, director, 21st Century Sailor Office (N17). This program further adds to that sup port. For more information and resources to combat sexu al assault, visit www.sapr. navy.mil. Sexual assault affects Navy readiness, and the Navy is committed to pre venting sexual assault. Join the Navys conversation about sexual assault on social media and help raise awareness by using #NavySAPR. Question : How concerned should I be about mela noma? The doctor says: One in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. Although melanoma accounts for less than five percent of skin cancer cases it causes the majority of skin cancer deaths. Ultraviolet radiation from the sun and indoor tanning are major risk factors. Check your skin regularly, preferably once a month, looking for any unusual mole, sore, lump, blemish, marking or change in skin appearance. Watch for ABCDE warning signs: match the other) blurred) color). If you find one or more of these warning signs, get it checked by your healthcare provider immedi ately. And remember that some melanomas dont fit these rules. Its important to tell your doctor about any changes or new spots on the skin, or growths that look different from the rest of your moles. Find our more from the American Cancer Society at www.cancer.org. Ask the Doc is a new feature from Naval Branch Health Clinic Key West. This column is written by Laura Kyer, PA-C, physician assistant. If you have a question for a physician, dentist, pharmacist or optometrist, please send it to kwaskthedoc@ med.navy.mil.Navy creates Victims Legal Counsel 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 15, 2013

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Lt. Cmdr. Todd Nichols of the VR-62 Nomads was named Full Time Support (Line) Junior Officer of the Year by the Association of the United States Navy (AUSN). Nichols is the operations officer at VR-62 and was on detachment in the Pacific when he heard the news. He said, I am extremely honored to be recognized as the AUSN Junior Officer of the Year. This award is especially meaningful as I spent an entire year deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Kabul, Afghanistan. The time spent away from my fam ily was especially challenging, but I am enormously proud of the work my team accom plished supporting war fighters on the ground and in the air space of Southeast Asia. I absolutely could not have earned this award without the incredible support I received from my front office, fellow members of the wardroom, chiefs mess, and especially the Sailors that I have the privilege of working with and leading on a daily basis,said Nichols. Their hard work enabled me to focus on furthering the mission of the VR community and Navy unique fleet-essential aircraft, said Nichols. I have witnessed on count less occasions the profession alism, dedication and com mitment exhibited by VR-62s maintenance personnel, sup port staff and aircrew. I consider myself very fortunate to be surrounded by such talent and am grateful for all the opportunities my shipmates and I have had over the last three years. Nichols went on to thank his wife and family for their sup port during his time away. I could not have even been considered for this award without the help from my family. My wife, Courtney, has been a single mother for our two boys for well over half of my time in VR-62. Shes done it all with a smile on her face and an unwavering commitment to her role in the defense of this nation, added Nichols. He will be leaving the Nomads for new challenges as he prepares to move to Naval Air Facility Washington and join the VR-1 Starlifters in November. AUSN is the leading voice for Americas Sailors and the premier advocate for a strong Navy. Founded in 1954, AUSN has a long distinguished reputation with the Navy and Congress. The organization is dedi cated to advocating for Navy equipment and benefits AUSN informs and educates members of Congress and their staffs on issues of importance to the Navy. VR-62 is one of five Navy C-130T Hercules Reserve squadrons that provide air logistics support for Navy commands around the globe. VR-62 is based at NAS Jacksonville. The men and women of VP-26 Tridents Combat Aircrew Four (CAC-4) and their supporting contingent of maintenance professionals recently represented Commander, Task Group 72.2/4 in Indonesia as the American participants in Sea Surveillance Exercise 13-1. The detachment flew a single P-3C Orion patrol air craft to Juanda International Airport, a joint military/civil ian airport located in Surabaya, Indonesia on the Island of Java. Upon arrival, members of the Indonesian Air Force, as well as local municipal leaders warmly welcomed the Americans. SEASURVEX 13-1 involved both U.S. and Malaysian air borne units and ground sup port personnel, providing an opportunity to showcase capabilities and best practices. The four-day exercise built bilateral ties and further strengthened the bonds between the U.S. and their Indonesian counterparts. Indonesian personnel accom panied CAC-4 on two flights, allowing them to experience and observe the U.S. Navys primary maritime patrol air craft. Coordinated operations between the P-3C and two dissimilar Indonesian aircraft the CASA CN-235 and 737-2X9 Surveiller provided invalu able experience for the three aircrews involved. SEASURVEX 13-1 was not spent exclusively flying, how ever. CAC-4 and their support ing maintenance profession als provided a static display of their Lockheed P-3C Orion, an event that was well-attended and warmly received by their Indonesian counterparts. Outside of the busy schedule of events, the Indonesian Air Force graciously received all American service personnel nightly for dinner and to enjoy music and karaoke in hopes of building strong interpersonal ties between the two services. The detachment Officer in Charge, Lt. Cmdr. John Walden stated, We are absolutely honored and humbled by the gra cious and lavish way in which we have been received by the Indonesian Air Force. Were proud to participate in an exercise so beneficial to both nations. The Team Tridents detach ment flew to Surabaya after participating in CARAT Malaysia. Their next stop will be back to their main deploy ment site at Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. Military commissaries worldwide will return to normal operating schedules the week of Aug. 18-24. The DeCA announcement comes in the wake of the Department of Defenses Aug. 6 decision to curtail furloughs of its civilian workforce from 11 to six days. This is welcome news for us all, said Defense Commissary Agency Director and CEO Joseph Jeu. Our stores will return to their regular schedules after Aug. 17. I encourage our patrons to check the DeCA website for their commissarys operating hours. We recognize the disruption that furloughs presented to our patrons as far as access to their commissary ben efit, he added. We also understand the economic hardships many of our employees faced with the pay they lost during the furlough period. Since July 8, the one-day-per-week furloughs impacted all of DeCAs more than 14,000 U.S. civilian employees world wide. With the end of furloughs, Jeu asked that patrons be patient as product delivery schedules return to normal. We will do everything possible to ensure that our shelves are properly stocked with the products our customers want when they shop, he said. However, there will be a short adjustment period as our stores settle back into their prefurlough operating and delivery rou tines. Commissary customers can quickly find out about any changes to their local stores operating schedule by going to www.commissaries.com clicking on the Locations tab, then Alphabetical Listing to locate their store, and click ing on Local Store Information. Members of VP-16 were given a break from nor mal flight operations Aug. 5 to enjoy a com mand picnic along the shores of Camp Blanding in Stark, Fla. AWO3 Julio Smith, one of VP-16s electronics warfare operators, was happy for the opportunity to social ize with other squadron members and their fami lies. Being new to the command, this event was great for me and my wife. I was able to introduce her to many of the other spouses in a casual envi ronment. Its nice get ting to know everyone on a personal level, said Smith. VR-62 officer earns top recognitionVP-26 participates in Indonesian Sea Surveillance exercise Commissaries return to normal hours Aug. 18-24VP-16 War Eagles host command picnic 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 15, 2013

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cy to both safely upload and download ordinance to the P-8A over the course of the three-day inspection. Following CWTPI, Mad Fox aircrew completed five tactical flights in the Poseidon under the instruction of VP-30 instructor aircrew. These flights took VP-5 aircrew members from the Florida Keys to New Orleans to showcase their abilities operating this new aircraft. The month concluded with VP-5 naval flight offi cers, acoustic operators, and electronic warfare operators receiving their suc cessful NATOPS evaluations from VP-30 instructors. The very last stage of Safe for Flight certification began on July 29 as CPRW11 kicked off a comprehensive inspec tion of every VP-5 maintenance pro gram, administrative instruction, safety program, and NATOPS program to name just a few. Following these intensive four days of drills and inspections, Skipper Pottenburgh proudly announced to the assembled squadron that VP-5 was recommended as Safe for Flight by CPRW-11 to Patrol and Reconnaissance Group. Each and every Mad Fox is now focused on beginning the inter-deploy ment readiness cycle (IDRC) with their two new P-8A Poseidon aircraft, side numbers 436 and 437. VP-5 looks to execute safely and efficiently in preparation for its upcoming 7th Fleet deployment. The squadron continues to embody their motto: No Fox Like a Mad Fox! Cameron Kreeger, ESI site superin tendent, explained that the system also monitors salt levels in the water tank. Thats important information when working with Navy aircraft that oper ate in a salt-laden environment. Today is our first day putting a P-8 Poseidon repeatedly through the rinse rack to make sure we set the proper nozzle heights for the undercarriage rinse and that were also hitting the tail with enough fresh water. According to ESI President Geoff Keogh, who was on site at the rinse rack located near NAS Jax Hangar 113, The water requirement for rinsing a salty P-8A Poseidon is about 1,160 gallons per minute (gpm) 850 gpm for the undercarriage/fuselage and 300 gpm for the tail nozzles. Im glad I could be here today to help our team adjust and calibrate the new rinse rack system. Key to the improved performance is the more powerful, high-capacity pumps and nozzles that provide bet ter coverage of the aircraft. As needed, the system activates highly absorbent carbon filters that polish the water in the tank removing any heavy metals or other pollutants that come off the aircraft. Keogh added, Reclaiming the water for repeated use eliminates untreated water being discharged into the base storm water system. Now you get six to 10 rinses from each gallon of water.experience, Many of our aircrew have prior experience firing a Harpoon [from their time in the P-3C Orion]. What has been most interesting, though, has been seeing the improvement in the way we interface with the missile. The capabilities the Poseidon provides makes this weapon much more user-friendly. Lt. j.g. Troy Tillson, a naval flight officer and tactical coordinator in VP-16 agreed, stating, In comparison to the P-3C, the P-8As hardware and software is much more comprehensive. It does, however, require greater coordination between the flight station and the tube. Its a good lesson in CRM. The War Eagles Aviation Ordnance team has also been preparing for this historic addition, getting their sailors ready for the day when the first live fire will take place. VP-16 Gunner, Chief Warrant Officer Roddy Wiggins high lighted some of the training his Sailors have been undergoing. The aviation ordnance personnel are well on track to getting their ordnance certification in order to load, download and troubleshoot the AGM-84D mis sile, Wiggins commented. They have been going through a very rigorous training syllabus while main taining delay-free flight operations. In preparation for the AGM-84D missile we have made numerous trips to VX-1 in Patuxent River, Md. for training. The first phase, which was completed last month, included training on proper installation of the SUU-93 wing pylons. The second phase of training saw us send two weapons load teams to VX-1 to conduct AGM-84 weapons release and control system checks and AGM-84 Harpoon missile weapons proficiency loading over a one-week period. We are now entering the third phase of training where we will send a six member load team back to VX-1 to conduct the first P-8A Conventional Weapons Proficiency Refresher (CWPR) course, continued Wiggins. Once completed with the CWPR course we will be doing weapons pro ficiency training every week at VX-1 in preparation for our upcoming Conventional Weapons Proficiency Inspection (CWTPI) that is scheduled to be held at the beginning of September. VP-16s first live firing of the AGM-84 Harpoon missile is slated to occur later this fall. VP-16 VP-5 RINSE RACK JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 15, 2013 11

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Officer Richard Hunt, who coordinated the event with MWR. By holding events like this, it helps promotes a better crime watch community. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Roy Undersander welcomed the families to the event. Thanks so much for coming out tonight. Were here to heighten awareness about crime prevention and drug use and generate support of local anti-crime programs. Were also here to strengthen our com munity support in our neighborhoods on the station, Undersander told the crowd. Its a great night, so enjoy the camaraderie and introduce yourselves to your neighbors. Families and security personnel spent the evening interacting as they feasted on free hamburgers, hot dogs and chips courtesy of MWR. The children were entertained by McGruff the Crime Dog, a giant bouncy slide, dancing to the DJs music and swimming in the outdoor pool. Military dog handlers MA2(EXW) Keith Danalewich and MA2 Erick Ortiz and MASA Cheli Matlock of the NAS Jax Security Department and Military Working Dogs Pato and Doly demonstrated their obedience skills. MWD Doly also showed how she can apprehend a suspect as the crowd cheered her on. Members of the Florida Masonic Child ID Program, also fingerprinted and took photos of children to provide parents with CD identification kits and discussed the importance of having the information on hand updated to help authorities if a child ever goes missing. Representatives from the Florida Highway Patrol and Jacksonville Sheriffs Office were also on hand to offer information and talk to guests about their pro grams in the local area. I think this is great event for the families and community. We just moved here about two weeks ago from Virginia Beach and its nice to meet people here and learn about crime prevention in our area. We didnt have events like this at my past duty station, said HM1(SW) Nelson Carmona of Naval Hospital Jacksonville, who brought his family out to the event. HM1(FMF/AW) Patrick Lumas, also of Naval Hospital Jacksonville agreed. I think its awesome to get the kids out here and help them realize that our security and fire depart ment personnel are here to help them if something goes wrong and to go to them if they need help. The first National Night Out began in early 1984 through the National Association of Town Watch (NATW). The event has been held around the country on the first Tuesday in August ever since. NATW is a non profit, crime prevention organization which works in cooperation with thousands of crime watch groups and law enforcement agencies throughout the coun try. Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any com pany, sponsor or its products or services. NIGHT OUT 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 15, 2013

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The following are the new chief selectees from NAS Jacksonville and tenant commands: CPO Selectees save 5 percent Chief Petty Officer (CPO) selectees can pay for newly required Navy uniforms using the MILITARY STAR Card and receive a five percent credit on their next MILITARY STAR Card statement showing the pur chase of CPO uniforms. This special offer is good at any NEX Uniform Shop worldwide, but not for uniform purchases made online or toll-free phone calls to the Uniform Support Center. Using the MILITARY STAR Card lets CPO selectees charge their new uniforms like anything else in the NEX, said Cmdr. Marcia Coleman, director, Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) Uniform Program Management Office. Its quick, easy and the new CPO selectee receives a five percent credit by using their MILITARY STAR Card. Patrons who open a MILITARY STAR Card account will receive 10 percent off their first days purchases, including a uniform purchase. The 10 percent discount is also applied to the cus tomers MILITARY STAR Card statement. Chief selectees announced JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 15, 2013 13

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Fighting Tigers volunteer to make a differenceEight Sailors assigned to the Fighting Tigers of VP-8 supported a Clay County Habitat for Humanity (CCHH) con struction project, July 26. During the event, VP-8 Sailors installed soffit, a plastic material used to cover the overhang on the roof of a house, and aids proper temperature regulation in a home attic. I volunteer and plan to continue volunteering because giving back to the community provides me with satisfac tion in knowing that I have made a difference, and it allows me to step out of my comfort zone and experience all types of work, said VP-8 ADAN Emilio Vasquez. CCHH is a non-profit organiza tion that works in partnership with the community to build and renovate homes for people in need of assistance. Once selected, prospect homeowners invest 300 to 500 hours of their own labor, known as sweat equity, toward construction of their new home. Stephanie Cotton, the prospective homeowner stated, So far weve had approximately eight groups of Navy personnel assist in the construction of my new home, and I feel blessed and grateful that everyone gathered together to make a difference for me. The home is scheduled for comple tion in early September, and VP-8 Sailors are scheduled to continue assisting in its construction. Retired PR1 Bob Boles recently cel ebrated his 90th birthday visiting VP-62 at NAS Jacksonville. Boles served in the Navy beginning just prior to World War II, retiring as a first class petty officer in 1963. I was too young to sign up on my own, said Boles who joined the Navy at age 17 on June 25, 1941. Six months before the war started, my dad signed for me to get in. That was the start of my Navy career. I started the parachute work when I was overseas in the islands, said Boles. I had to make a jump with my para chute for graduation. If it opens you graduate. I wasnt scared, just nervous. Boles met AWF1(NAC/AW) Stephen Ryczek of VP-62 at the NAS Jacksonville Commissary and inquired about seeing the squadrons parachute loft. I asked myself, I wonder if he could get me into the parachute loft, said Boles. So I asked him, and he said sure, he would get me in. The squadron gave Boles a tour of the spaces, and took time to show him 90-year-old parachute rigger visits VP-62 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 15, 2013

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 15, 2013 their medications. Patients can also refill their pre scriptions manuallyby phone, mail or online. Satisfaction with TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery continues to grow as our patients discover the many benefits, said Cmdr. Andrea Petrovanie, Naval Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville officer in charge. Enrollment is easy and it gives our patients unlimited access to a pharmacist 24 hours a day. Prescriptions can be delivered to any address in the U.S. and its territories, including temporary addresses and APO/FPO addresses. Patients living outside the U.S. and its territories who dont have an APO/FPO address can have medications shipped to their U.S. embassy. Refrigerated medications cant be mailed to APO/FPO addresses. To enroll at no-cost, therere three options: online at www.tricare.mil/homedelivery, by telephone at (877) 363-1303, or by mailing a registration form to Express Scripts Inc., P.O. Box 52150, Phoenix, AZ 85072-9954. TRICARESquadron members participated in boating activi ties, swam in the lake, and dined on hot dogs and burgers. A mobile game truck allowed squad ron members and their families to face off against one another during games played on Xbox 360, Play Station 3, and Wii. In addition, the War Eagles held a cook-off for the title of VP-16 Barbecue Pitmaster. Lt. Cmdr. Adam Schantz, head of VP-16s Command Services Department remarked on the success of the event. Its always great to be able to reward our Sailors and their families for all of the hard work and sacrifices they make on a daily basis. We had a great turnout and everyone seemed to be enjoying them selves. Today was a well-deserved break for the War Eagles. AWO2 Delbert Cerpa, an acoustic warfare opera tor with VP-16 agreed, stating, It was fun to have the day off to spend with squadron mates. The food was excellent, and I particularly enjoyed watching friends attempts at waterskiing. VP-16 returned to normal flight operations the next day with renewed energy. VP-16around the loft. Ryczek suggested maybe Boles could come back and fly in the simulator. Boles was able to return during the July reserve drill weekend, and spent several hours in the P-3C Orion aircraft flight simulator with Naval Flight Officer Lt. Cmdr. Steven Mondy. I even made two landings, said Boles. Afterward, Boles spent time talking to Broadarrow Sailors in the first class petty officers mess about his Navy career and time spent overseas during World War II. The squadron visit was capped by taking a moment to pay tribute to this veteran during squadron quar ters. VP-62 DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Friday at 7 p.m. Monday Night Football Kick-off Sept. 9 at 7 p.m. Complimentary food & give-a-waysFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Free bowling for active duty Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 510 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 1 6 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer Going on now through Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 years and younger receive one free game of bowling every day until 5 p.m. Win prizes all summer long! Fall and winter bowling leagues are now forming! Leagues begin in September.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Lap Swim (no concessions, slide or waterpark will be open) Mon. Fri. 6-8 am, 11 a.m. 1 p.m., 4:307 p.m. Recreational swim Sat. & Sun 11 a.m. 6 p.m. For more information, call 542-3518I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Halloween Horror Nights Vendor Day Oct 2, 10 a.m. 2 p.m. Prize drawing every 30 minutes Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets on sale now $70 section 147 Legoland Florida Free ticket for active duty military through Oct. 27 Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Gatorland Free admission for active duty and retired military until the end of the year. Family tickets can be purchased at ITT. $19.95 adult, $12.50 child, zip line $54.25 Monster Truck Jam club seating $42, regular seating $22 201314 Artist Series featuring Mama Mia, Memphis, Celtic Thunder, War Horse, Men are From Mars, Women are from Venus, Million Dollar Quartet and The D* Word is a Musical are on sale now! Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts 201314 season featuring Menopause, River North Dance Chicago, Hungarian State Folk Ensemble, Clay County Christmas, Godspell, Driving Miss Daisy, Bronx Wanderers, Celtic Fire and Swan Lake are on sale now!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Jacksonville Suns Game Aug. 15 at 6 p.m. Beach Trip Aug. 17 at 9 a.m. Movie in the Yard Featuring Fast & Furious 6 Barracks Courtyard at 8 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Aug. 20 for active duty Aug. 22 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Movie Under the Stars Aug. 23 at 8 p.m. featuring Monsters University Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Oct. 7 Nov. 20 $500 per person The base gym on board NAS Jacksonville officially opened this week after six months of renova tions that will bring an energized workout to its visitors. An official ribbon cutting ceremony was held Aug. 9. The entire facility is a very sharp looking facility that is very inviting to all Navy personnel, said Lt. Cmdr. Michael James, Navy Reserve civil engineer, who uses the gym while stationed at NAS Jax. This was a great sur prise as the last time I was here, the gym was still under renova tions. Josh Bass, NAS Jax installation energy manager, explained that the formerly dark environment of a typical gym and sometimes questionable odors has been replaced by a clean interior with fresh paint, new air conditioning and ventilation systems, as well as a reconfigured lighting system, low-flow water fixtures and sev eral architectural improvements. In addition to providing a quality venue for Sailors, their families and the civilian employees at NAS Jax to improve their physical fitness, another goal of this project was to make the gym more energy and water efficient, said Bass. Visitors should notice the energy efficient features of the gym the moment they walk through the door. The new lobby con figuration at the front entrance minimizes the loss of cool air as patrons enter and exit the build ing. The new lighting configura tion provides coverage across the entire space with the appropriate level of lighting. The T8 lamps are lower watt age than standard lamps and therefore use less energy, said Bass. Additionally, there are occupancy sensors installed within each space of the gym so when no one is using a particu lar room for an extended period of time, the lights will turn off. When someone enters a space, the sensor detects the movement and turns on the lights. In regards to water conserva tion, the fixtures in the restrooms and showers were changed to low flow. Patrons should hardly notice the difference, but they will be using significantly less water. The greatest energy improve ment made to the facility was in the heating, ventilating and air conditioning equipment. Bass explained the three types of energy improvements. The first is a packaged roof top air condi tioner that provides conditioned (cooled or heated depending on the time of year) fresh outdoor air to the building. This units energy efficient motor will speed up or slow down based on the pressure of the building. The exhaust system consists of several exhaust fans driven by energy efficient motors. These fans can be programmed to start and stop at different times and operate at different speeds. As exhaust fans turn off or change speed, the building begins to build pressure. The outdoor air unit senses the rise in pressure and scales back its output. This action/reaction results in energy savings. These two systems working together is what will keep the facility comfortable and smell ing fresh for years to come, Bass added. The second system that is most visible to patrons is called the variable refrigerant flow sys tem. Instead of using a giant air handler and ductwork to cool a large volume of air and then move that air throughout the build ing, a small amount of refriger ant is sent to units located either on the wall or the ceiling of each room. Instead of seeing ductwork in the open ceiling, you now see refrigerant piping that makes this method more efficient than traditional air conditioning methods. This system provides supplemental cooling in each of the spac es, further reducing any heat or humidity issues associated with Floridas climate. The gyms last piece of ener gy efficient design is how all of these systems are networked together by a computer program that allows the systems to talk to each other. Through this pro gram, the outdoor air system determines when to provide more or less fresh air. Additionally, this program allows all of the systems to be placed on schedules. Through scheduling, we fur ther maximize energy efficiency by determining when peak occu pancy times occur and program the systems to ramp up and meet that demand, explained Bass. The opposite is true during offpeak and unoccupied time peri ods.Gym renovations complete, providing an energy efficient environment

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The NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service mem bers and their fami lies. Preregistration is required. The following is the schedule for 2013: Training Aug. 19-21 (8 a.m.-4 p.m.), Nov. 12-15 (5:30-10 p.m.) Program (TAP) Separation Workshop (7:30 a.m.4:15 p.m.) Aug. 19-23, Sept. 9-13, Sept. 16-20, Oct. 7-11, Oct. 21-25, Nov. 4-8, Dec. 2-6. Program (TAP) Retirement Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m.) Aug. 26-30, Sept. 23-27, Oct. 28-Nov. 1, Nov. 18-22, Dec. 16-20. Workshop (9 a.m.-noon) Aug. 16, Sept. 6, Oct. 17, Nov. 27, Dec. 11. (Noon-3 p.m.) July 2. Interview Techniques Workshop (8-9:30 a.m.) Sept. 5, Nov. 25. Letters Workshop (9:40 a.m.-noon) Sept. 5, Nov. 25. Workshop (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Nov. 13-14. Specialist Training (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) Sept. 30-Oct. 4, Dec. 9-13. Credit Management Workshop (8-11 a.m.) Oct. 15. time Home Buyers (1-3:30 p.m.) Sept. 4. Deals in Car Buying (9-10:30 a.m.) Nov. 26. (1:30-3 p.m.) Oct. 10, Dec. 12. Workshop (1:30-4 p.m.) July 11, Sept. 12, Nov. 14. 101 Workshop Sept. 14 (1-2:30 p.m.) Nov. 21 (5-6:30 p.m.) (9-11 a.m.) Aug. 12, Sept. 9, Oct. 7, Nov. 4, Dec. 9. 101 Workshop (9-10:30 a.m.) Sept. 10, Oct. 8, Nov. 5, Dec. 10. Extended Stress Management Workshop (8 a.m.-noon) Oct. 15 & 29. Workshop (8 a.m.-noon) Aug. 27, Sept. 24, Oct. 22, Nov. 26, Dec. 17. Personal Anger Control Group Aug. 15 Sept. 19 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.), Oct. 8 Nov. 12 (2-4 p.m.) Individual Communication (11 a.m.1 p.m.) Sept. 10, Nov. 19. Parenting with Love & Logic (1-3 p.m.) Sept. 3, 10, 17, 24; Nov. 5, 12, 19, 26. Active Parenting of Teens (1-4 p.m.) Aug. 21, 28; Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23. Power 2 Change, Womens Support Group (9:30-11 a.m.) Every Wednesday Expectant Families (9 a.m.-3 p.m.) Sept. 16, Dec. 3. Tiny Tots Play Group (10 a.m.-noon) Aug. 20; Sept. 3, 17; Oct. 1, 15, 29; Nov. 12, 16; Dec. 10, 17. Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) Orientation (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) Sept. 5, Nov. 7. EFMP Command POC Training (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) Oct. 3, Dec. 5. To register for work shops, call 542-5745. FFSC offers life skills workshops JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 15, 2013 17

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