Jax air news

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Material Information

Title:
Jax air news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note:
Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID:
UF00028307:02053


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THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, 2013 66 YEARS NEW GYM DEWE YS Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Hagel reveals best, worst case Carrier strike groups may be reduced from 11 to eightThe Pentagon will reduce funding for major headquarters by a fifth, will seek to trim allowanc es and limit pay raises, and could cut troop numbers and new weapons pro grams as it plans for what Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel called unprece dented budget uncertain ty. Hagel and Navy Adm. James Winnefeld Jr., vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, briefed Pentagon reporters July 31 on the Strategic Choices in Management Review Hagel directed in March. The secretary said the review clarified the major options and difficult choices ahead. He noted all future defense cuts will add to the $487 billion reduction in defense spending over the next decade required by the Budget Control Act of 2011, which DOD is cur rently implementing. If sequester-level cuts persist, DOD would expe rience nearly $1 trillion in defense spending reduc tions over the next 10 years, Hagel said. To help DOD balance strategic ends, ways and means under these bud get scenarios, the Strategic Choices and Management Review scrutinized every aspect of DODs budget, including contingency planning, business prac tices, force structure, pay and benefits, acquisition practices, and moderniza tion portfolios. Everything was on the table. Hagel explained the review considered mul tiple possible budget sce narios: Obamas fiscal year 2014 budget, which includes what he called a care fully calibrated and large ly back-loaded $150 bil lion reduction in defense spending over the next 10 years; Acts sequester-level caps, which would cut another $52 billion from defense in fiscal year 2014, with $500 billion in reductions for the department over the next 10 years; and Capt. Roy Undersander relieved Capt. Bob Sanders as NAS Jacksonville commanding officer during a change of command cer emony Aug. 2. Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. was the guest speaker. Changes of command have always seemed to me to be tinged with a bitter sweet flavor on one hand they communi cate a job well done and represent a farewell to a valued leader and friend, said Scorby. On the other hand, it is a time to look for ward to new ideas and direction under the guidance of a new commanding officer. For the past year and a half, Skipper Sanders has done a tremendous job of lead ing this vital command. Its almost impos sible to describe the literally hundreds of diverse issues he has had to deal with as commanding officer, but suffice it to say, he has handled each and every issue bril liantly, continued Scorby. Scorby went on to mention some of the highlights of Sanders career and presented him with the Legion of Merit Award for an exceptional job well done. Sanders was also recognized by Sen. Bill Nelson in a letter read by his representa tive Katie Ross; Sen. Marco Rubio in a let ter read by his representative Adele Griffin and Congressman Ander Crenshaw in a let ter read by his representative Jackie Smith. He was also presented a memento from Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown given by On the morning of July 17, the HSM-72 Proud Warriors reached a significant milestone in naval aviation, having flown 200,000 Class A mishap-free flight hours. The milestone came just after midnight during the flight of Lt. Sean Castle, Lt. Lance Herndon and AWR3 Dave Chokas. This achievement is a testament to the squadrons proud history of aviation safety and impeccable maintenance. HSM-72 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Derek Fleck reflected on the milestone, say ing, it was rewarding to take Individual Augmentee (IA) families were treated to a first look at the NFL Jacksonville Jaguars by attending their training camp on July 27 a trip orchestrated by the NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC). The families were provided with a private set of bleachers and transportation from the base to Everbank Field. We try to do these type of events for IA families at least once a quarter, comment ed Bobby Johns, individual deployment support specialist with FFSC. Its a great opportunity for everyone to come together and support each other while their respective Sailors are on IA assignment. The families were able to witness the intense training that the Jaguars go through in preparation for their upcoming Undersander takes command at NAS Jax HSM-72 celebrates 200,000 Class A mishap-free flight hours FFSC takes Individual Augmentee families to Jags training camp

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JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Aug. 9 1815 Capt. Stephen Decatur con cludes treaty for U.S. with Tripoli. 1842 Signing of Webster-Ashburton Treaty under which U.S. and Great Britain agreed to cooperate in suppress ing the slave trade. 1865 Return of Naval Academy to Annapolis after four years at Newport, R.I. 1919 Construction of rigid airship ZR-1 (Shenandoah) authorized. 1941 Atlantic Charter Conference is first meeting between President Roosevelt and Winston Churchill. 1942 Battle of Savo Island begins, the first of many sea battles near Guadalcanal. 1945 U.S. drops atomic bomb armed by Navy weaponeer on Nagasaki, Japan. 1949 First use of pilot-ejection seat for emergency escape in U.S. made by Lt. Jack Fruin of VF-171 near Walterboro, S.C. Aug. 10 1916 First naval production contract for N-9 amphibious aircraft. 1921 General Order establishes the Bureau of Aeronautics under Rear Adm. William Moffett. 1944 Guam secured by U.S. forces. 1964 Signing of Gulf of Tonkin Resolution that is used as the starting point of the Vietnam Conflict. Aug. 11 1812 Frigate USS Constitution cap tures and destroys brig Lady Warren. 1877 Professor Asaph Hall of Naval Observatory discovers first of two satel lites of Mars. He found the second one within a week. 1921 Carrier arresting gear first test ed at Hampton Roads, Va. 1960 USNS Longview, using Navy helicopters and frogmen, recovers a Discover satellite capsule after 17 orbits. This is first recovery of U.S. satellite from orbit. Aug. 12 1812 Frigate USS Constitution cap tures and destroys British brig Adeona. 1918 SECNAV approves acceptance of women as yeoman (F) in U.S. Navy. 1942 Light cruiser USS Cleveland (CL-55) demonstrates effectiveness of radio-proximity fuze (VT-fuze) against aircraft by successfully destroying three drones with proximity bursts fired by her five-inch guns. 1944 Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy Jr., USNR, the older brother of John F. Kennedy, was killed with his co-pilot in a mid-air explosion after taking off from England in a PB4Y from Special Attack Unit One (SAU-1). Following manual takeoff, they were supposed to parachute out over the English Channel while the radio-controlled explo sive filled drone proceeded to attack a German V-2 missile-launching site. Possible causes include faulty wiring or FM signals from a nearby transmitter. 1957 In first test of Automatic Carrier Landing System, Lt. Cmdr. Don Walker lands on USS Antietam (CV-36). 1958 USS Nautilus (SSN-571) arrives Portland, England completing first sub merged under ice cruise from Pacific to Atlantic Oceans. Aug. 13 1777 American explosive device made by David Bushnell explodes near British vessel off New London, Conn. 1846 Joint expedition led by Cmdr. Robert Stockton seizes Los Angeles, Calif. 1870 Armed tug Palos becomes first U.S. Navy ship to transit Suez Canal Aug. 14 1813 HMS Pelican captures USS Argus. 1886 SECNAV establishes Naval Gun Factory at Washington Navy Yard. 1945 Japan agrees to surrender; last Japanese ships sunk in World War II. Continued from last week Until I flew to Washington, D.C., with Dustin last month I hadnt flown commercially in 17 years. Being in an airplane wasnt as bad as I thought. Aside from digging my nails into Dustins forearm and panicking over every creak or thump, I kind of enjoyed myself. (I cant say the same for Dustin.) Also, watching the nations capitol come into view through the airplane window was nothing short of spectacu lar. But I wasnt disappointed when we touched down at Reagan International Airport. I was in no hurry to fly again. Except, eventually I had to fly back to Maine alone. A week later, Dustin walked me to the airports security check point and went over my instructions: Put your shoes in the plastic bins. Your computer, too. Show your ticket to the attendant and get on the bus when they tell you to. I felt like a child with her name and bus number safety-pinned to her shirt. I was crying and scared. Everyone in the airport knew it. A kind man befriended me on the bus that took us to the CRJ200 waiting on the tarmac. My hands were shaking as I talked to him. My heart was beating in my throat. In Maine, when I got on the airplane with Dustin, I walked through a hallway first, allowing me the illusion that I was still in a building, not a metal tube. Now I had to board from the tarmac, where I could see my worst fear up close and personal. My bus friend call him John walked beside me off the bus. Just before we got to the stairs of the airplane, I panicked. I turned to John, my hand at my throat, and said, I cant do this, Im going back. John got behind me and said, Up you go, onto the stairs. He was blocking me from turning around, and for the next 30 minutes, I despised him for that. John asked the flight attendant if I could sit beside him. Again, I felt like a child. All of this probably seems silly to someone who isnt afraid to fly. But if you think about facing your greatest fear standing on the ledge of a tall build ing, being in the middle of the ocean, riding a roller coaster, speaking in front of an audience maybe you can understand the complete terror I felt as I pulled my seatbelt tighter and silently cursed at John for making me board. I cried (yes, more crying) for the first 30 minutes of the 90-minutes flight. John spoke evenly and calmly. He asked me about my family, but I didnt want to think about them yet. I was focused on surviving, like I had any control. John asked me about my work and I answered in quick, nervous one-word replies. I was stiff with fear. But John kept talking. The flight attendant asked me if I wanted a drink, but she didnt mean water. Yes, please, I said eagerly, hop ing for something anything to make me relax. John interrupted. Alcohol might make you more emotional, he said. Now he looked scared, too. He was already dealing with a white-knuckle flyer; he didnt need me telling him all my troubles in that I-love-you-man sort of way, too. I opted for water. An hour later, I started to relax when I heard the landing gear come down. By then, I knew I was going to be okay. I finally sat back in the seat and felt like myself. I fluffed up my hair and wiped at the mascara slid ing down my cheeks. I was aware of my surroundings again. So, I wrote a book, I told John, as if the past hour hadnt happened, and I started to tell him about it. Wait a minute, he said, I read about you! Youre the dinner girl. Then, for the first time, I felt embar rassed. Before, I was a nameless, ridicu lous person crying on an airplane. Now I was the dinner girl. After we landed, John helped me find my baggage and made sure I got to the taxi stand. When he said goodbye, he told me his last name for the first time. It rang a bell, so I googled it. Turns out, John is a pretty important person in our nations government. Im glad I didnt know this before. For 90 minutes, we were just two people on a plane one scared, one not. I looked up from my phone just as Johns taxi was pulling away. And the next thoughts I had came quickly in this order: Thank goodness for people like John. Im so embarrassed. I wish we could have had him to Dinner with the Smileys. In MemoriamA memorial service was held at the NAS Jacksonville Chapel for Shawna Criswell-Seward of the NAS Jax Public Works Department July 30. Criswell-Seward was born in Pittsburgh, Pa. on April 4, 1980, and spent her younger years there. As a teen ager, she moved to Charlotte, N.C. where she com pleted high school. She earned her Bachelor of Science in Architectural Engineering in 2003 at Tennessee State University in Nashville. While in college she was a member on the volleyball team, the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, and the National Society of Black Engineers. Criswell-Seward began her employment with M.A. Mortenson Company in January 2004. She started in their Engineer-in-Training program that placed her in a variety of positions at multiple project sites that included Memphis, Tenn., Minneapolis, Minn. and Des Moines, Iowa. In the summer of 2007, she arrived at NAS Jacksonville as a project engineer on M.A. Mortensons staff, working on the construction of Hangar 511. Upon completion of the Hangar 511 project in 2009, she joined the NAS Jax Public Works Department as an engineering technician. She is survived by her father, Shawn Criswell, mother, Carla Thompson, stepmother, Pamela Criswell, brother, Carson Criswell, sister, Ebony Carter, stepsister, Chelsea Mack, and daughter, Bailey. Fearful flyer gets help from seatmate The chapel is located at the corner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road. Call 542-3051 for more information. 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013 NAS Jax Gymnasium reopened July 29 at 5 a.m. after undergoing seven months of renovations. The project, cost ing nearly $2.8 million, offers patrons free weights, cardio machines, TRX training, a bas ketball court, spin classes and other fitness equipment. Additional improvements include new tile floors, painted walls and ceilings, new mir rors, new energy efficient light ing and air conditioning sys tems, new steam baths, and refurbished flooring on the basketball court. To support Navy Physical Training (PT), a covered out door pavilion was constructed behind the gym. Commands may utilize the PT Pavilion on a first come, first served basis. One of my favorite improve ments in this facility is the bas ketball court. The gym entry door that was directly behind one of the hoops was relocated for safety reasons. It is now eas ier and safer for patrons enter ing the basketball courts, said NAS Jax Fitness Director Tanya Henigman. As soon as you open the door of this fitness facil ity youll see the air quality has greatly improved as well as the effectiveness of the air conditioning system, said Henigman The gym now appears so clean and inviting. Before the renovations it looked dingy and worn out. I am so glad they renovated it. I will be coming here a lot more, said Michele Natividad, a financial analyst with Navy Region Southeast. The new gym is filled with weights and cardio machines, a full size basketball court, an Olympic size pool, two rac quetball courts, a TRX room and a spin classroom. All other group exercise classes will continue to be held at the NAS Jax Fitness Center, explained Henigman. A separate space in the gym now contains Navy approved Physical Readiness Test (PRT) equipment that may be reserved during the PRT sea son. She added that the indoor pool will open in early October and TRX classes will resume in September. I love to see the smiles on peoples faces when they see all the improvements that were made in the gym. I love serving the military, and it makes me feel so good to see our patrons so pleased and happy with all the positive changes made to this facility, said NAS Jax Recreation Aid Gigi Neff. Just today, I had more than a dozen patrons come in and give me a hug and tell me how much they love the improve ments, said Henigman. It makes me feel like we have accomplished our goal to deliver the best customer ser vice MWR can provide, she added. The gym offers various ser vices to aid patrons with their daily fitness activities, includ ing a bicycle tire inflation sta tion and a full-time massage therapist (by appointment only). Basketball teams, both Greybeard (age 30 and up) and Intramural (up to age 29) will resume practice in August. Newly renovated NAS Jax Gym welcomes patrons

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013 5 Photos by MC2 Amanda Cabasos

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The Pelicans of VP-45 recently partnered with Habitat for Humanity in order to help build affordable housing for those in need in the Jacksonville area. Since returning from their recent deployment to Okinawa Japan, the Pelicans got right back to work. Instead of tracking subma rines, the squadron was help ing to build low-cost housing for hard-working citizens. Over the course of three days, several groups of Pelicans took part in the building of multiple Habitat for Humanity homes in the Jacksonville Beach area. It was a great experience, said Lt. j.g. Gregory Stewart. Jacksonville has given so much to us in our time here, it was great to get the chance to give something back. Upon arriving at the work sites, the Pelicans donned their hard hats and got to work with whatever tasks needed to be done. The Pelicans were able to help in everything from erect ing scaffolding to carpentry and electrical work giving them the opportunity to help in every facet of the houses con struction. It was a lot of hard work, remarked Lt. Josh Stokes. It definitely gives you an appreciation for how much work and dedication goes into constructing each house. It was all worth it though when youd see the smil ing faces of the people whose homes we were constructing. In order to take part in Habitat for Humanity, potential homeowners are required to put in more than 300 hours of volunteer service known as sweat equity at the building sites before they are allowed to purchase a home. At the end of the day, the Pelicans left the sites feeling that they had made a real dif ference in the lives of people in the Jacksonville Beach area and all while having some fun at the same time. While it was a lot of hard work, we had a blast working with the volunteers and with each other, said Lt. j.g. Levi Blackwell. As the Pelicans begin their transition to the P-8A Poseidon, the Navys newest maritime patrol aircraft, they also look forward to their next opportunity to give back to Jacksonville through volunteer opportunities such as Habitat for Humanity. Center for Service Support (CSS) announced they are actively looking for high-quality senior Sailors to enhance its already dynamic team July 23. CSS and its learning sites provide Sailors with the knowledge and skills needed to support the Fleets warfight ing mission. More than 300 staff and faculty work hand-in-hand with the Fleet and are dedicated to ensure training is current and well executed on behalf of 10,000 Sailors who graduate from CSS courses annually in the administration, logis tics and media communities. During a three-year tour, a subject matter expert (SME) attends the Navy Instructor Training Course, granting them the Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) 9502, works closely with learn ing sites, compiles questions for rat ing advancement exams and may also earn the prestigious Master Training Specialist (MTS) qualification. Command Master Chief CMDCM(SW/SCW/AW) Reinaldo Rosado said that an SMEs influence doesnt just extend to the Sailors, but to the commands they serve in, all over the globe. Sailors we train often serve in diverse assignments, said Rosado. Many of our former students have served everywhere from the front lines of Afghanistan to the decks of our car riers. They report to their commands trained and ready to go to work imme diately. Capt. Mark Murphy, CSS command ing officer said the commands expec tations and goals are high but very obtainable. Work hard: be brilliant on the basics and take care of our people, said Murphy. Work, study and learn at the job youve been given. Be ready when opportunity knocks. Work smart. Mission first, safety always. Push decision making to the lowest level. Communicate up and down the chain. Have fun. Keep a balance, keep a sense of humor and test your ideas. We want the best to train the Navys future. CSS was established Feb. 7, 2003, in response to Naval Education and Trainings (NETC) initiative to address challenges in Fleet training and to improve Sailors professional devel opment products and processes. In streamlining the business of deliver ing training, NETC charged 15 learning centers like CSS with specific areas of naval training. NETC organized the centers around their functional areas and appropriately aligned schools and respective training sites to each center. Sailors who are eligible for shore duty and in their transfer window are encouraged to contact their command career counselors and detailers. For available billet opportunities, visit https://www.cmsid.navy.mil/.Center for Service Support looking for Subject Matter Experts Pelicans help out with Habitat For Humanity 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013

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Military Affairs, Veterans and Disabled Services Division Chief Victor Guillory. NAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM)(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd also presented Sanders with the NAS Jax Commissioning Pennant on behalf of the NAS Jax Chiefs Mess. As Sanders took the podium for the last time, he thanked the numerous staff members who contributed to the successful tour as commanding officer. NAS Jax has a culture where the peo ple in the organization do not accept, know or understand what it means to fail. We are in the customer service business and I want to give my person al thanks to each and every Sailor and employee of NAS Jax who made it look simple and who made my job very easy, said Sanders. You see, it is the people of NAS Jax that makes this place great. Although I am the guy typically accepting all the awards, I am departing yet this com mitment to excellence will continue. Sanders also thanked his family for their support during his naval career. This is the time when the outgoing skipper thanks all the friends and fam ily who came from far and wide but since I only have Kathy, TJ and Alexa here, they win the award for furthest traveled. One mile from the RV Park. Thanks for putting up with me through another command tour. I love you guys, he said. Sanders added, I would also like to thank the City of Jacksonville. Ive been stationed in a lot of places and I have never been to a city that embraces the military more than Jacksonville. There were so many people that touched my life. You are the best in the Navy and I will always remember NAS Jax as my best and most rewarding tour, he concluded. Sanders then read his orders directing him to report to Commander, Naval Air Forces Pacific as chief of staff, Carrier Strike Group 1 on board USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70). After assuming command, Undersander offered his remarks. Capt. Sanders, it has been my extreme pleasure to serve with and work for you. I appreciated your mentor ing and willingness to go out on a limb for the command. The NAS Jax Team has benefitted from your leadership and despite external challenges, continued to fire on all eight cylinders, he said. I was fortunate to be brought up as a farm boy, and I attribute my success to the strong family values and work ethic that my parents and siblings instilled in me. Their support has always be unwav ering, as evident in the fact that we have four generations of Undersanders here today, he continued. I have often said that a career in the Navy is a family business and that couldnt be more true for me. Our chil dren, Molly, Michael and Carl are the most wonderful blessing to Pam and I, and we could not be more proud of them. And my wife, Pam, is the founda tion of our family, said Undersander. I believe strong family values are central to NAS Jax meeting its mission of providing effective and efficient shore services to the fleet, fighter and fam ily. We are at a point in history where we face many challenges and issues, and how we bond together to overcome those challenges is what will make the difference. Undersander went on to address the NAS Jax Team. You have continually demonstrated excellence even in the face of adversity. You truly have the right attitude and I am here to serve and provide you the tools and opportunity to continue your personal and collective greatness. He concluded, I want to assure you I am confident in my abilities, but hum ble enough to ask for your prayers for the success of NAS Jax. Following the ceremony, a recep tion was held at the NAS Jax River Cove Catering and Conference Center. UNDERSANDER JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013 7

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a break to acknowledge a milestone that is derived from the contributions of so many Proud Warriors over the years. It was also a reminder that the most important flight hour is the next one were about to execute, and only through the safe practices of all will we continue a record of safety excellence. A Class A mishap is defined by the Naval Safety Center as $2 million or more in total property damages and/or aircraft destroyed, a fatality, or perma nent total disability. The Proud Warriors 200,000 Class A mishap-free flight hours span all the way back to 1986. While HSM-72 may be a relatively new squadron, it is new in name only. HSM-72 was recently commissioned Jan. 15, 2013 at NAS Jacksonville after the decommissioning of HSL-42 in a joint ceremony. HSL-42 was established as the east coasts first LAMPS MK-III squadron Oct. 5, 1984 at Naval Station Mayport. The overwhelming majority of the squadrons 200,000 Class A mishap-free flight hours were flown in the SH-60B during the tenure of HSL-42. Having recently retired their last SH-60B, HSM-72 reached this avia tion milestone flying one of their new MH-60R helicopters. The squadron has also flown the MQ-8B Fire Scout while serving as the first naval aviation squadron to deploy with a vertical takeoff and landing unmanned aerial vehicle. The Proud Warriors recent his tory has been dominated by change, first moving from NS Mayport to NAS Jacksonville in 2010, and then transi tioning this year from a detachmentbased, expeditionary squadron to a car rier air wing-based squadron. The one constant has been the squad rons dedication to safety. The lessons learned and experience gained over the years embarked in the shipboard envi ronment will allow HSM-72 to transi tion safely and effectively to the carrier air wing. This new era of operations will rely upon the foundation of hard work and the dedication of previous generations of Proud Warriors and instill a culture of mission accomplishment and safety. The squadrons tradition of safety excellence has seen the squadron earn, among other awards, 12 Battle E Awards, eight CNO Safety S Awards, four Golden Wrench Awards and two Secretary of the Navy Safety Excellence Awards, most recently in 2013. These maintenance and safety awards are a testament to the squad rons leadership and professionalism. The hard work and dedication of past and present Proud Warriors have yield ed this incredible milestone. By the book maintenance is taught and preached to every member of the Proud Warrior maintenance team, said Lt. Cmdr. Chris Conlon, HSM-72 main tenance officer. It is the cornerstone on which this prestigious milestone was built. HSM-72 is set to join Carrier Air Wing Seven (CVW-7) and deploy on board USS Dwight. D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). While HSM-72 may be new to the car rier air wing environment, the com mand looks forward to the challenge. The Proud Warriors are aim ing to continue their Principled . Disciplined . Confident ways. HSM-72 The 2013 Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) Singapore exercise concluded with a closing cer emony at Changi Naval Base, July 26. The two-week annual exer cise with the Republic of Singapore consisted of shorebased and at-sea training events designed to address shared maritime security pri orities, develop relationships, and enhance interoperability among the participating forces. CARAT Singapore is part of a series of bilateral naval exer cises between the U.S. Navy and the armed forces of nine partner nations in South and Southeast Asia. Training events in each CARAT phase are tailored based on available assets and mutual exercise goals. As one of the original exercise partners, CARAT Singapore is among the most complex in the series and features a highly sophisticat ed sequence of training events across the spectrum of naval capabilities. Every year we try to raise the bar a bit higher during the planning process, making each successive CARAT Singapore a bit more complex, said Capt. Paul Schlise, commander, Task Group 73.1. The 19th CARAT Singapore featured 11 days of shore-based events and a lengthy 96-hour sea phase. Shore-based train ing included visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) drills, military law enforcement expert exchanges and military operations in urban terrain (MOUT) training. The sea phase was a series of coordinated air defense, anti-submarine warfare, mar itime patrol aircraft and sur face warfare training scenarios led by a combined afloat staff embarked on the Singaporean frigate, RSS Intrepid (69). The multiple-day sea phase was again the capstone course of CARAT Singapore, and given its enduring complexity, pre sented our Sailors, ships and aircraft with many opportuni ties to enhance interoperability among our forces, said Schlise. USN and RSN sailors con ducted a simulated shipboard helicopter and small boat med ical evacuation, tracked sub marines from both navies dur ing multiple anti-submarine warfare scenarios, and con ducted a coordinated air-tosurface MISSILEX in which a Republic of Singapore Air Force (RSAF) Fokker 50 fired a har poon missile against a surface target tracked by ships in the Combined Task Group. More than 700 U.S. Sailors and Marines participated in CARAT Singapore 2013. Participating ships included the guided-missile destroy er USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62), the littoral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS 1) and the dry cargo ammunition ship USNS Washington Chambers (T-AKE 14). Also participating in CARAT Singapore were staff from Commander, Task Group 73.1/ Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 7, a P-3C Orion maritime patrol aircraft from Patrol Squadron (VP) 62, a platoon of Marines from 3rd Law Enforcement Battalion, as well as VBSS evaluators from Maritime Civil Affairs and Security Training Command.19th CARAT Singapore concludes at Changi Naval Base 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013

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IA FAMILIESseason, including a full practice scrim mage and interacting with the official mascot of the Jaguars, Jaxson de Ville. Its important for the morale of our Sailors that they know we are commit ted to the welfare of their families while they are away on duty, Johns contin ued. Its great to see that so many fami lies took advantage of this excursion today, and I hope they all enjoyed this opportunity to see the Jaguars players up close and personal. For more information about IA family services provided by NAS Jax FFSC, call 542-5771. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013 9

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Florida Girls Troupe tours VP-16The Florida Girls Troupe, an affiliate of the Miss America Organization, visited VP-16 on July 31 as part of a USO tour of NAS Jacksonville. Consisting of young women who are contestants for the title of Miss Florida and for educational scholarships, the Florida Girls Troupe members are selected from all over the state through local competitions and each holds local titles. After spending time in a flight simulator in the morning, the young women were escorted through the War Eagles spaces, where they met with Sailors and aircrew to catch a glimpse of the day-to-day operations of a maritime patrol and reconnaissance squadron. The five girls and their chaperone were given pre sentations by various departments detailing a daily work schedule including a gear demonstration in the paraloft where the troupe was invited to try on hel mets, life vests and water survival suits. They were also given a static tour of the P-8A Poseidon aircraft. Following the tour, the Florida Girls Troupe presented VP-16 with a Certificate of Honor, commending them on their achievements during the transition from the P-3C Orion and wishing them the best of luck as they prepare for their upcoming deploy ment. Don Steere, the director of the Florida Girls Troupe, was enthusiastic about the visit. An experience like this is fantastic for the educational development of our members. Being able to meet and interact with women in uniform was particularly wonderful as they are such positive role models for our girls. This is a day we will never forget! Its great to see organizations from the community take an active interest in the training and work that we do, Lt. Nikee Giampietro stated. The service our sailors and aircrew provide is vital to our nations well being and the additional recognition is always greatly appreciated. I wish these girls the best of luck as they continue to pursue further educational opportuni ties. VP-5 Gray Fox Heritage Day Aug. 23VP-5 cordially invites all former Mad Foxes to join current members for a Gray Fox Heritage Day at NAS Jacksonville Aug. 23. The schedule of events begins at 8 a.m. at Deweys All Hands Club, located across from Freedom Lanes between Saratoga and Enterprise Avenues at Keily Street. The squadron requests all attending Mad Foxes to RSVP by Aug. 12 with your name, rank/rate (retired or active), number of guests in your party, and dates served with VP-5. Email brian.obannon@navy.mil for additional information. No Fox Like a Mad Fox! JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013 11

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More than 300 military and civilian hazardous waste coor dinators gathered July 30 and Aug.6 at the NAS Jax Chapel Center for a workshop designed to reduce violations. Pam Fellabaum, an envi ronmental specialist with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, per forms the states annual haz ardous waste inspection at NAS Jacksonville. Todays workshop is focused on discussion of Floridas Top10 hazardous waste (HW) vio lations, said Fellabaum. We just concluded the first of two sessions this morning and I was impressed with the questions that the audience asked. The NAS Jacksonville Environmental Department does a very good job of training their base HW coordinators, as well as those at the tenant com mands. To ensure compliance with federal and state regula tions, Florida incorporated portions of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Parts 260-271 into its Florida Administrative Code (FAC) Rule 62-730. When discarded material is deemed hazardous, then it must be recycled, treated, stored or disposed at a proper HW facility. HW may not be disposed of on or in the ground, or in local landfills, septic tanks, or injec tion wells. Also, regardless of quan tity, the generator of HW is ultimately responsible for the waste from cradle to grave, and can be held liable for improper management. Our Top-10 list of HW viola tions is an interesting way to re-engage HW coordinators and increase compliance. We also bring plenty of tips and practical advice on how to keep violations from occurring in the first place, said Fellabaum. She noted that NAS Jacksonville leadership has always been willing to work with environmental regulators and open to suggestions that regain compliance as soon as possible. Its always great to see such a good turnout. An enthusias tic audience usually comes up with interesting questions that benefit everyone, she conclud ed. Top-10 Hazardous Waste Violations 10: Open containers of haz ardous waste pursuant to 40 CFR 265.173(a). 9: Failure to date hazardous waste containers pursuant to 40 CFR 262.34(a)(2). 8: Failure to respond to a release of used oil pursuant to 40 CFR 279.22(d). 7: Failure to document weekly hazardous waste con tainer inspections pursuant to 62-730.160(6), FAC. 6: Failure to properly label universal waste lamp contain ers pursuant to 62-737.400(5) (b), FAC and 40 CFR 273.14(e). 5: Failure to keep containers of spent mercury lamps closed pursuant to 40 CFR 273.13(d) (1). 4: Failure to label used oil fil ter containers with the words Used Oil Filters pursuant to 62-710.850(5)(a), FAC. 3: Failure to label used oil tanks and containers with the words Used Oil pursuant to 40 CFR 279.22(c)(1). 2: Failure to perform a haz ardous waste determination pursuant to 40 CFR 262.11. 1: Failure to provide second ary containment for used oil tanks and containers pursuant to 62-710.401(6), FAC. New Pass & ID hoursYorktown Gate Building 9 Pass and ID Office hours: Monday Friday from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Commercial Gate/Pass Office: Monday Friday from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. Passes will be issued by the Yorktown gate sentry after hours and weekends. Non-NCAC (RAPID Gate) personnel will only be authorized access during commercial gate hours. Hazardous waste coordinators attend DEP training at chapel 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Friday at 7 p.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 510 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 16 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer Going on now through Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 years and younger receive one free game of bowling every day until 5 p.m. Win prizes all summer long! Fall and winter bowling leagues are now forming! Leagues begin in September.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Last day for recreational swimming during the week is Aug. 9. Beginning Aug. 12, the hours of operation will be lap swim (no concessions, slide or water park will be open) Mon. Fri. 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m., 4:30-7 p.m. Recreation swim Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. until further notice. Private pool parties can be reserved at the fitness center or base gym. Parties are not available during regular business hours of operation and occur in the evenings when the pool is closed. Parties must be reserved 10 days prior to party date, payment due at time of reservation. For more information call 542-3518. Dive In Movie at the outdoor pool Featuring Despicable Me Aug. 10, 610 p.m. Movie begins at 8:30 p.m. Free admission, hot dog, chips and a drink!I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets on sale now $70 section 147 Legoland Florida Free ticket for active duty military through Oct. 27 Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Gatorland Free admission for active duty and retired military until the end of the year. Family tickets can be pur chased at ITT. $19.95 adult, $12.50 child, zip line $54.25 Monster Truck Jam club seating $42, regular seating $22 2013 2014 Artist Series featuring Mama Mia, Memphis, Celtic Thunder, War Horse, Men are From Mars, Women are from Venus, Million Dollar Quartet and The D* Word is a Musical are on sale now!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restrict ed to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Free Jags Shuttle Aug. 9 at 6 p.m. Volunteer at HabiJax Aug. 10 at 7 a.m. Jacksonville Suns Game Aug.15 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Aug. 20 for active duty Aug. 8 & 22 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Furlough Fridays All civilian employees that have been furloughed can play 18-holes with cart & green fee for $20 Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Movie Under the Stars Aug. 23 at 8 p.m. featuring Monsters University Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Oct. 7 Nov. 20 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013 13

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This NAVADMIN announces the cancellation of automatic Family Service Members Group Life Insurance (FSGLI) enroll ment of spouses (active and reserve) who are military mem bers and the intent to reimburse members who had premiums incorrectly deducted from their pay accounts. Military members mar ried to military members on or after Jan. 2, 2013 will no longer be automatically enrolled for FSGLI coverage. In cases where Sailors mar ried another military member on or after Jan. 2, 2013 neither member is currently covered under the FSGLI program, but premiums were automatically deducted from each member through April 2013, due to sys tem configuration. These erro neously collected premiums will be refunded. Sailors married to non-mil itary spouses are not affected by this change. The non-mil itary spouse of a Sailor with Servicemembers Group Life Insurance (SGLI) coverage will automatically be enrolled in the FSGLI program. Sailors married to military members desiring to enroll their spouse in the FSGLI pro gram should submit completed Family Coverage Election Form (SGLV 8286A) to the personnel office or servicing Personnel Support Detachment (PSD). The personnel office or PSD will retain the document until incorrectly collected premiums are refunded. The SGLV 8286A will then be submitted electron ically for adjudication. Enrolled qualified spouses are cov ered from the date of submis sion to the personnel office or PSD. Enrollment forms requir ing Office of Servicemembers Group Life Insurance (OSGLI) approval of pre-existing health conditions should be forwarded to OSGLI by the PSD or person nel office upon receipt. Upon completion of system updates and premium refunds, electronic enrollment will be processed, and premiums will be retroactively collected from the date of enrollment. The following scenarios illustrate a service members options: a. Sailor married military member prior to Jan. 2, 2013: (1) Both members were automatically enrolled in FSGLI. (2) Coverage was effective as of the date of the marriage. (3) Premiums were collect ed as of the date of marriage. (4) Either member may decline FSGLI coverage per ref (b). b. Sailor marries a military member on or after Jan. 2, 2013: (1) Sailor is not enrolled in FSGLI. (2) Erroneous automat ic premium deductions made between Jan. 2, 2013 and April 2013 have been stopped and are being refunded. (3) Automatic enrollment did not constitute spouse FSGLI coverage. (4) Sailors desiring to enroll their military spouse in the FSGLI program must complete and submit a SGLV 8286A. Members are reminded to carefully follow instructions on the form including comple tion of the health questionnaire portion of the form. c. Sailor married to a nonmilitary spouse, who then enlists or is commissioned in a uniformed service after Jan. 2, 2013: (1) Existing FSGLI coverage for the spouse remains in place. (2) Newly commissioned or enlisted spouse must complete and submit the SGLV 8286A if desired to enroll the Sailor in FSGLI. d. Military members married to each other, and one separates from service: (1) If the separating spouse has FSGLI coverage, no action is required. (2) If the separating spouse has no FSGLI coverage the Sailor must complete an SGLV 8286A should they desire FSGLI coverage for the spouse that separated from service. For more information, contact Al Gorski at (901) 874-4559/DSN 882 or e-mail alan.gorski@navy. mil. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy. mil. The Greater Jax Area USO has now opened-up ticket sales for the pre-season Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Miami Dolphins game Aug. 9 at 7:30 p.m. and the preseason Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Philadelphia Eagles game Aug. 24 at 7:30 p.m. to all active duty, retirees, veterans with ID cards, National Guard, Reservists, DoD civilians and their families. Tickets are available at the NAS Jax and NS Mayport USO for $15 each, cash transactions only. Regular season tickets are avail able the following days and times: Guidelines: All active duty including Florida National Guard and Reservists on current active duty orders and dependents are eligible to purchase/ use these tickets. rized dependents may buy a maxi mum of four tickets if member and dependents equals four. If you have less than four you may only pur chase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military person nel, but dependent children are not authorized to represent the service member/spouse to purchase tick ets. Larger families desiring to pur chase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO director. purchase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest. No exceptions. a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the execu tive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the season.Requests, with justifica tion, must be sent to Mike OBrien at mobrien@usojax.com excess tickets or reselling tickets will be prohibited from buying any more tickets for the entire season. tickets are first come, first served. For more information, call 7782821.Repeal of FSGLI automatic enrollment for military members married to military members Jaguars tickets available at USO 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013

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MTOC-7 in IDRC for next deployment Mobile Tactical Operations Center (MTOC) Seven is in the third month of its InterDeployment Readiness Cycle (IDRC) at NAS Jacksonville. It will be the units second deployment after its homeport change to NAS Jacksonville from NAS Sigonella, Sicily. MTOC-7 is comprised of 15 Sailors who are an integral part of the P-3 Orion mission team. From their Operations Control Center (OPCON), they assist P-3 aircrews with safety of flight briefs, flight following during the mission, and pro viding post-mission analyses. During their most recent seven-month deployment to NAS Sigonella, they were able to work side-by-side with fellow TOC/MTOC community per sonnel in the execution of their homeport training cycle. Preparations were comprised of formal schools, on-the-job training, and an Operational Readiness Exam for certifica tion prior to their departure overseas. MTOC-7 supported multiple operations and exercises in the 5th and 6th Fleets during their deployment. While they kept a core group of OPCON watch standers in Sigonella to augment the Tactical Operations Center (TOC), they also sent Sailors to several remote P-3 operations locations including: Souda Bay, Greece; Djibouti, Africa; Rota, Spain; and Leuchars, Scotland. At each of these locations, MTOC-7 proved to be an invaluable asset to the warfare commanders, earning Bravo Zulus from CTF-67, VP-9 and VP-4. While deployed, MTOC-7 worked alongside internation al military forces during fleet operations and joint military exercises including the larg est annual NATO Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft ASW exercise involv ing the 6th Fleet Exercise PROUD MANTA. Throughout the deployment, they conducted Safety of Flight briefs for 865 flights, as well as flight tracking for more than 6,950 hours of flight time, pro viding integral support from pre-flight to post-flight debrief. Raising children can be the most challenging yet most rewarding part of a parents life. When parents do not remain togeth er, raising those children can be even more of a challenge. How do we make sure that our chil dren are financially supported after we no longer live as a family unit? Whether you are the custodial par ent who wants to collect child support or the noncustodial parent who has to provide child support, knowing your rights and how to go about enforcing them is essential. State child support guidelinesWhat parents need to know JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013 15

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HAGEL 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013

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Hundreds of military family mem bers enjoyed a sunny afternoon Aug. 2 at Deweys Family Night presented by NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department. The free event featured bag toss, bounce houses, rock climbing wall, back to school goodie bags, balloon ani mals, a magic show and much more! The Fleet and Family Support Center offered free face painting and the Navy Exchange provided a lollipop tree with prizes. The purpose of the event was to pro vide a fun, high energy environment for the families of NAS Jacksonville, said Liberty Program Manager Tom Kubalewski. We plan to continue offering Deweys Family Night, on a smaller scale, in the near future. We are very happy with this great turn out and we have taken note that providing low cost family events are a priority to our cus tomers at NAS Jax. Local celebrity appearances included Jenn and Ayako with the ROAR of the Jaguars and the Jacksonville Suns mas cot Southpaw. This is a wonderfully organized, affordable, family oriented event, said Kathleen Spively. It is difficult to find something to do on a Friday night with our kids that we can all enjoy. MWR thanks everyone who partici pated in or volunteered for this event. Sponsors, University of Phoenix, USAA and VyStar Credit Union were generous in their support of Family Night.Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its prod ucts or services. Deweys Family Night is a hit! JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013 17

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18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013 Who is eligible to receive child support? Only custodial parents are eligible to receive child support payments. So what exactly is a custodial par ent? The custodial parent is the primary caregiver, providing the daily needs of the child. If each parent spends relatively equal time with the child, it is the parent who spends slightly more time with the child. That being said, there may be other legal and practical hurdles to overcome before a cus todial parent can receive child support. For example, the other parent will have to be located and/or pater nity will have to be established. How much is enough? Some people are under the false impression that child support only needs to cover the very basics for a child, such as food and clothing. Wrong! Child sup port should include a variety of anticipated expenses, including but not limited to school fees, entertain ment, medical expenses, and extracurricular activi ties. So, you ask, how do two parents who cannot get along come to an agreement on what these expenses should be? You do not have to thats right! Federal law mandates that a states child support guidelines apply to any court action or administrative proceeding in which there is an order determining child support. This could include a separation, divorce, paternity, or modification proceeding, just to name a few. This means that the amount of child support paid is based on guidelines defined by each state, not on what you as the parents think is the right amount. What are child support guidelines? Child support guidelines are standards used to fig ure out the support needed for a child and the amount a parent has to pay. Guidelines help to make sure that support amounts are fair. Every state has guidelines, but those guidelines may vary by state. In general, all of the guidelines are based on the parents incomes, childs living expenses and health care, childcare costs and standard needs for the children. Often, as is the case in Florida, the guidelines cal culate the amount of child support as a percentage of the parents income and factor in the number of minor children being supported. There may be special cir cumstances where support amounts can deviate from the guidelines. Some states actually allow their judges a lot of leeway in setting the amount, as long as the general state guidelines are followed. Others have very strict guidelines that provide the judges with very little discretion. The factors usually include the needs of the child including health insur ance, education, day care, and special needs; and the income and needs of the custodial parent. The paying parents ability to pay can also come into play. Some states, however, will impute income on a parent with no income by expecting them to pay child support even if he/she is unemployed, filing for bankruptcy or homeless. What is a child support order? A child support order tells the parents specifically what they must do and how much they must pay to support their children, according to the guidelines. Some states limit the support to age 18 or when the child graduates high school. Some states even require college expenses to be included. What if the noncustodial parent does not pay? Enforcing child support orders means getting the parent to do what the order says. If a noncustodial parent is working, the states law may require that the employer deduct support payments from the par ents paycheck. In some states, businesses must report all new and rehired employees to the child support enforcement agency in their state so it is difficult for a parent to hide their new job. When noncustodial parents owe past-due support, the states child support enforcement program may be able to intercept tax refunds, lottery winnings, unem ployment compensation and other payments, and may work with banks and credit unions to deduct money from a bank account. They may have liens placed against their property such as houses, mobile homes, land, cars, boats and other valuable items until the support is paid. If you fail to make child support payments according to a court order, child support enforcement agencies in many states will suspend your drivers license or any professional, occupational or recreational license. The judge may also find you in contempt of court and order you to pay a large sum of money or go to jail or an arrest warrant may be issued. Can the amount of support ever change? Once a child support order or agreement is in place, the payment amount may be modified under certain situations, usually a substantial change in circum stances. This may include a parents promotion or raise, or the child needing orthodontic work or new school expenses. Some states review support orders every few years automatically in an effort to keep the sup port consistent with the parents income and the respective states support guidelines. Bottom line: Whether you are the custodial parent who wants to collect child support or the noncusto dial parent who has to provide child support, know ing your rights and how to go about enforcing them is essential. Please contact your local legal assistance office to speak with an attorney. CHILD SUPPORT The number of positive results for synthetic drug in urinalysis tests has decreased significantly since testing began in March 2012, according to data presented to Navy leaders by Navy Alcohol and Drug Prevention (NADAP) office on July 16. For the past year, the NADAP office has focused on educating Sailors about the risks to their health, career and family, from using synthetic drugs like spice and bath salts. We consider this a win for all Sailors, said Dorice Favorite, NADAP director, about the decrease in positive results. It means they are listening to facts and making responsible choices for themselves and their shipmates. The reasons for the decline are multidimensional, said Favorite. Sailors understand the Navy has zero tolerance for drug use, includ ing the use of designer and synthetic chemical compounds. Our education efforts sent a clear message that syn thetic drugs are not regulated; there fore, they may be up to 200 times more potent than marijuana and much more harmful. Educating Sailors on the danger of illegal drug use is a multi-organiza tional effort. NADAP partnered with Navys Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, Naval Criminal Investigative Service, and other U.S. military law enforcement agencies to monitor for criminal activ ity, including possession, use, or distri bution of illegal substances, the direc tor said. There is also encouraging news in the responsible use of alcohol efforts. During the past year, driving under the influence and alcohol-related inci dents (AI) have continued to drop. The number of these incidents is down by more than 20 percent since 2006, said Favorite. The NADAP office contributes to this improvement through a comprehensive communication strategy that includes complimentary prevention awareness campaigns that reach out to all audi ences, she added. In April 2013, the Navy launched Keep What Youve Earned campaign to replace the outdated Right Spirit campaign. Keep What Youve Earned encourages responsible alcohol use by celebrating the achievements in Sailors Navy careers and actively engages Sailors as advocates for responsible drinking. This campaign, in concert with The Domino Strategy, Who Will Stand Your Watch and That Guy speaks to Sailors about responsible drinking and accountability. In mid2013, the Navy implemented the use of handheld alcohol detection devices (ADD). More than 13,000 devic es were shipped to commands, both afloat and ashore. These devices are intended as tools that complement the units campaign against irresponsible alcohol use and promote Sailor safety, education and training. ADD also helps leadership identify Sailors who may require positive intervention before a career-ending incident. NADAP plans to publish a report of lessons learned and best practices submitted by commands in January 2014. NADAP has had a very busy year, developing programs on synthetic drug testing, alcohol detection device dis tribution and implementation, and prevention awareness campaigns for a prescription drug campaign that is currently under development, Favorite stated. We feel that every effort we expend on the front end to prevent a Sailor from misusing or abusing a sub stance improves Sailor resilience and strengthens Navy readiness. Sailors can claim a win where synthetic drugs are concerned

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, 2013 66 YEARS NEW GYM DEWE YS Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Hagel reveals best, worst case Carrier strike groups may be reduced from 11 to eightThe Pentagon will reduce funding for major headquarters by a fifth, will seek to trim allowances and limit pay raises, and could cut troop numbers and new weapons pro grams as it plans for what Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel called unprece dented budget uncertain ty. Hagel and Navy Adm. James Winnefeld Jr., vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, briefed Pentagon reporters July 31 on the Strategic Choices in Management Review Hagel directed in March. The secretary said the review clarified the major options and difficult choices ahead. He noted all future defense cuts will add to the $487 billion reduction in defense spending over the next decade required by the Budget Control Act of 2011, which DOD is cur rently implementing. If sequester-level cuts persist, DOD would expe rience nearly $1 trillion in defense spending reduc tions over the next 10 years, Hagel said. To help DOD balance strategic ends, ways and means under these bud get scenarios, the Strategic Choices and Management Review scrutinized every aspect of DODs budget, including contingency planning, business prac tices, force structure, pay and benefits, acquisition practices, and moderniza tion portfolios. Everything was on the table. Hagel explained the review considered mul tiple possible budget sce narios: Obamas fiscal year 2014 budget, which includes what he called a care fully calibrated and large ly back-loaded $150 bil lion reduction in defense spending over the next 10 years; Acts sequester-level caps, which would cut another $52 billion from defense in fiscal year 2014, with $500 billion in reductions for the department over the next 10 years; and Capt. Roy Undersander relieved Capt. Bob Sanders as NAS Jacksonville commanding officer during a change of command cer emony Aug. 2. Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. was the guest speaker. Changes of command have always seemed to me to be tinged with a bitter sweet flavor on one hand they communicate a job well done and represent a farewell to a valued leader and friend, said Scorby. On the other hand, it is a time to look forward to new ideas and direction under the guidance of a new commanding officer. For the past year and a half, Skipper Sanders has done a tremendous job of leading this vital command. Its almost impos sible to describe the literally hundreds of diverse issues he has had to deal with as commanding officer, but suffice it to say, he has handled each and every issue bril liantly, continued Scorby. Scorby went on to mention some of the highlights of Sanders career and presented him with the Legion of Merit Award for an exceptional job well done. Sanders was also recognized by Sen. Bill Nelson in a letter read by his representa tive Katie Ross; Sen. Marco Rubio in a let ter read by his representative Adele Griffin and Congressman Ander Crenshaw in a letter read by his representative Jackie Smith. He was also presented a memento from Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown given by On the morning of July 17, the HSM-72 Proud Warriors reached a significant milestone in naval aviation, having flown 200,000 Class A mishap-free flight hours. The milestone came just after midnight during the flight of Lt. Sean Castle, Lt. Lance Herndon and AWR3 Dave Chokas. This achievement is a testament to the squadrons proud history of aviation safety and impeccable maintenance. HSM-72 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Derek Fleck reflected on the milestone, saying, it was rewarding to take Individual Augmentee (IA) families were treated to a first look at the NFL Jacksonville Jaguars by attending their training camp on July 27 a trip orchestrated by the NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC). The families were provided with a private set of bleachers and transportation from the base to Everbank Field. We try to do these type of events for IA families at least once a quarter, comment ed Bobby Johns, individual deployment support specialist with FFSC. Its a great opportunity for everyone to come together and support each other while their respective Sailors are on IA assignment. The families were able to witness the intense training that the Jaguars go through in preparation for their upcoming Undersander takes command at NAS Jax HSM-72 celebrates 200,000 Class A mishap-free flight hours FFSC takes Individual Augmentee families to Jags training camp

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JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Aug. 9 1815 Capt. Stephen Decatur con cludes treaty for U.S. with Tripoli. 1842 Signing of Webster-Ashburton Treaty under which U.S. and Great Britain agreed to cooperate in suppressing the slave trade. 1865 Return of Naval Academy to Annapolis after four years at Newport, R.I. 1919 Construction of rigid airship ZR-1 (Shenandoah) authorized. 1941 Atlantic Charter Conference is first meeting between President Roosevelt and Winston Churchill. 1942 Battle of Savo Island begins, the first of many sea battles near Guadalcanal. 1945 U.S. drops atomic bomb armed by Navy weaponeer on Nagasaki, Japan. 1949 First use of pilot-ejection seat for emergency escape in U.S. made by Lt. Jack Fruin of VF-171 near Walterboro, S.C. Aug. 10 1916 First naval production contract for N-9 amphibious aircraft. 1921 General Order establishes the Bureau of Aeronautics under Rear Adm. William Moffett. 1944 Guam secured by U.S. forces. 1964 Signing of Gulf of Tonkin Resolution that is used as the starting point of the Vietnam Conflict. Aug. 11 1812 Frigate USS Constitution cap tures and destroys brig Lady Warren. 1877 Professor Asaph Hall of Naval Observatory discovers first of two satellites of Mars. He found the second one within a week. 1921 Carrier arresting gear first tested at Hampton Roads, Va. 1960 USNS Longview, using Navy helicopters and frogmen, recovers a Discover satellite capsule after 17 orbits. This is first recovery of U.S. satellite from orbit. Aug. 12 1812 Frigate USS Constitution cap tures and destroys British brig Adeona. 1918 SECNAV approves acceptance of women as yeoman (F) in U.S. Navy. 1942 Light cruiser USS Cleveland (CL-55) demonstrates effectiveness of radio-proximity fuze (VT-fuze) against aircraft by successfully destroying three drones with proximity bursts fired by her five-inch guns. 1944 Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy Jr., USNR, the older brother of John F. Kennedy, was killed with his co-pilot in a mid-air explosion after taking off from England in a PB4Y from Special Attack Unit One (SAU-1). Following manual takeoff, they were supposed to parachute out over the English Channel while the radio-controlled explo sive filled drone proceeded to attack a German V-2 missile-launching site. Possible causes include faulty wiring or FM signals from a nearby transmitter. 1957 In first test of Automatic Carrier Landing System, Lt. Cmdr. Don Walker lands on USS Antietam (CV-36). 1958 USS Nautilus (SSN-571) arrives Portland, England completing first submerged under ice cruise from Pacific to Atlantic Oceans. Aug. 13 1777 American explosive device made by David Bushnell explodes near British vessel off New London, Conn. 1846 Joint expedition led by Cmdr. Robert Stockton seizes Los Angeles, Calif. 1870 Armed tug Palos becomes first U.S. Navy ship to transit Suez Canal Aug. 14 1813 HMS Pelican captures USS Argus. 1886 SECNAV establishes Naval Gun Factory at Washington Navy Yard. 1945 Japan agrees to surrender; last Japanese ships sunk in World War II. Continued from last week Until I flew to Washington, D.C., with Dustin last month I hadnt flown commercially in 17 years. Being in an airplane wasnt as bad as I thought. Aside from digging my nails into Dustins forearm and panicking over every creak or thump, I kind of enjoyed myself. (I cant say the same for Dustin.) Also, watching the nations capitol come into view through the airplane window was nothing short of spectacular. But I wasnt disappointed when we touched down at Reagan International Airport. I was in no hurry to fly again. Except, eventually I had to fly back to Maine alone. A week later, Dustin walked me to the airports security check point and went over my instructions: Put your shoes in the plastic bins. Your computer, too. Show your ticket to the attendant and get on the bus when they tell you to. I felt like a child with her name and bus number safety-pinned to her shirt. I was crying and scared. Everyone in the airport knew it. A kind man befriended me on the bus that took us to the CRJ200 waiting on the tarmac. My hands were shaking as I talked to him. My heart was beating in my throat. In Maine, when I got on the airplane with Dustin, I walked through a hallway first, allowing me the illusion that I was still in a building, not a metal tube. Now I had to board from the tarmac, where I could see my worst fear up close and personal. My bus friend call him John walked beside me off the bus. Just before we got to the stairs of the airplane, I panicked. I turned to John, my hand at my throat, and said, I cant do this, Im going back. John got behind me and said, Up you go, onto the stairs. He was blocking me from turning around, and for the next 30 minutes, I despised him for that. John asked the flight attendant if I could sit beside him. Again, I felt like a child. All of this probably seems silly to someone who isnt afraid to fly. But if you think about facing your greatest fear standing on the ledge of a tall build ing, being in the middle of the ocean, riding a roller coaster, speaking in front of an audience maybe you can understand the complete terror I felt as I pulled my seatbelt tighter and silently cursed at John for making me board. I cried (yes, more crying) for the first 30 minutes of the 90-minutes flight. John spoke evenly and calmly. He asked me about my family, but I didnt want to think about them yet. I was focused on surviving, like I had any control. John asked me about my work and I answered in quick, nervous one-word replies. I was stiff with fear. But John kept talking. The flight attendant asked me if I wanted a drink, but she didnt mean water. Yes, please, I said eagerly, hoping for something anything to make me relax. John interrupted. Alcohol might make you more emotional, he said. Now he looked scared, too. He was already dealing with a white-knuckle flyer; he didnt need me telling him all my troubles in that I-love-you-man sort of way, too. I opted for water. An hour later, I started to relax when I heard the landing gear come down. By then, I knew I was going to be okay. I finally sat back in the seat and felt like myself. I fluffed up my hair and wiped at the mascara sliding down my cheeks. I was aware of my surroundings again. So, I wrote a book, I told John, as if the past hour hadnt happened, and I started to tell him about it. Wait a minute, he said, I read about you! Youre the dinner girl. Then, for the first time, I felt embar rassed. Before, I was a nameless, ridiculous person crying on an airplane. Now I was the dinner girl. After we landed, John helped me find my baggage and made sure I got to the taxi stand. When he said goodbye, he told me his last name for the first time. It rang a bell, so I googled it. Turns out, John is a pretty important person in our nations government. Im glad I didnt know this before. For 90 minutes, we were just two people on a plane one scared, one not. I looked up from my phone just as Johns taxi was pulling away. And the next thoughts I had came quickly in this order: Thank goodness for people like John. Im so embarrassed. I wish we could have had him to Dinner with the Smileys. In MemoriamA memorial service was held at the NAS Jacksonville Chapel for Shawna Criswell-Seward of the NAS Jax Public Works Department July 30. Criswell-Seward was born in Pittsburgh, Pa. on April 4, 1980, and spent her younger years there. As a teen ager, she moved to Charlotte, N.C. where she com pleted high school. She earned her Bachelor of Science in Architectural Engineering in 2003 at Tennessee State University in Nashville. While in college she was a member on the volleyball team, the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, and the National Society of Black Engineers. Criswell-Seward began her employment with M.A. Mortenson Company in January 2004. She started in their Engineer-in-Training program that placed her in a variety of positions at multiple project sites that included Memphis, Tenn., Minneapolis, Minn. and Des Moines, Iowa. In the summer of 2007, she arrived at NAS Jacksonville as a project engineer on M.A. Mortensons staff, working on the construction of Hangar 511. Upon completion of the Hangar 511 project in 2009, she joined the NAS Jax Public Works Department as an engineering technician. She is survived by her father, Shawn Criswell, mother, Carla Thompson, stepmother, Pamela Criswell, brother, Carson Criswell, sister, Ebony Carter, stepsister, Chelsea Mack, and daughter, Bailey. Fearful flyer gets help from seatmate The chapel is located at the corner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road. Call 542-3051 for more information. 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013 NAS Jax Gymnasium reopened July 29 at 5 a.m. after undergoing seven months of renovations. The project, costing nearly $2.8 million, offers patrons free weights, cardio machines, TRX training, a basketball court, spin classes and other fitness equipment. Additional improvements include new tile floors, painted walls and ceilings, new mir rors, new energy efficient lighting and air conditioning sys tems, new steam baths, and refurbished flooring on the basketball court. To support Navy Physical Training (PT), a covered out door pavilion was constructed behind the gym. Commands may utilize the PT Pavilion on a first come, first served basis. One of my favorite improvements in this facility is the basketball court. The gym entry door that was directly behind one of the hoops was relocated for safety reasons. It is now easier and safer for patrons entering the basketball courts, said NAS Jax Fitness Director Tanya Henigman. As soon as you open the door of this fitness facil ity youll see the air quality has greatly improved as well as the effectiveness of the air conditioning system, said Henigman The gym now appears so clean and inviting. Before the renovations it looked dingy and worn out. I am so glad they renovated it. I will be coming here a lot more, said Michele Natividad, a financial analyst with Navy Region Southeast. The new gym is filled with weights and cardio machines, a full size basketball court, an Olympic size pool, two rac quetball courts, a TRX room and a spin classroom. All other group exercise classes will continue to be held at the NAS Jax Fitness Center, explained Henigman. A separate space in the gym now contains Navy approved Physical Readiness Test (PRT) equipment that may be reserved during the PRT sea son. She added that the indoor pool will open in early October and TRX classes will resume in September. I love to see the smiles on peoples faces when they see all the improvements that were made in the gym. I love serving the military, and it makes me feel so good to see our patrons so pleased and happy with all the positive changes made to this facility, said NAS Jax Recreation Aid Gigi Neff. Just today, I had more than a dozen patrons come in and give me a hug and tell me how much they love the improve ments, said Henigman. It makes me feel like we have accomplished our goal to deliver the best customer ser vice MWR can provide, she added. The gym offers various ser vices to aid patrons with their daily fitness activities, includ ing a bicycle tire inflation sta tion and a full-time massage therapist (by appointment only). Basketball teams, both Greybeard (age 30 and up) and Intramural (up to age 29) will resume practice in August. Newly renovated NAS Jax Gym welcomes patrons

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013 5 Photos by MC2 Amanda Cabasos

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The Pelicans of VP-45 recently partnered with Habitat for Humanity in order to help build affordable housing for those in need in the Jacksonville area. Since returning from their recent deployment to Okinawa Japan, the Pelicans got right back to work. Instead of tracking subma rines, the squadron was help ing to build low-cost housing for hard-working citizens. Over the course of three days, several groups of Pelicans took part in the building of multiple Habitat for Humanity homes in the Jacksonville Beach area. It was a great experience, said Lt. j.g. Gregory Stewart. Jacksonville has given so much to us in our time here, it was great to get the chance to give something back. Upon arriving at the work sites, the Pelicans donned their hard hats and got to work with whatever tasks needed to be done. The Pelicans were able to help in everything from erect ing scaffolding to carpentry and electrical work giving them the opportunity to help in every facet of the houses con struction. It was a lot of hard work, remarked Lt. Josh Stokes. It definitely gives you an appreciation for how much work and dedication goes into constructing each house. It was all worth it though when youd see the smil ing faces of the people whose homes we were constructing. In order to take part in Habitat for Humanity, potential homeowners are required to put in more than 300 hours of volunteer service known as sweat equity at the building sites before they are allowed to purchase a home. At the end of the day, the Pelicans left the sites feeling that they had made a real dif ference in the lives of people in the Jacksonville Beach area and all while having some fun at the same time. While it was a lot of hard work, we had a blast working with the volunteers and with each other, said Lt. j.g. Levi Blackwell. As the Pelicans begin their transition to the P-8A Poseidon, the Navys newest maritime patrol aircraft, they also look forward to their next opportunity to give back to Jacksonville through volunteer opportunities such as Habitat for Humanity. Center for Service Support (CSS) announced they are actively looking for high-quality senior Sailors to enhance its already dynamic team July 23. CSS and its learning sites provide Sailors with the knowledge and skills needed to support the Fleets warfighting mission. More than 300 staff and faculty work hand-in-hand with the Fleet and are dedicated to ensure training is current and well executed on behalf of 10,000 Sailors who graduate from CSS courses annually in the administration, logis tics and media communities. During a three-year tour, a subject matter expert (SME) attends the Navy Instructor Training Course, granting them the Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) 9502, works closely with learn ing sites, compiles questions for rat ing advancement exams and may also earn the prestigious Master Training Specialist (MTS) qualification. Command Master Chief CMDCM(SW/SCW/AW) Reinaldo Rosado said that an SMEs influence doesnt just extend to the Sailors, but to the commands they serve in, all over the globe. Sailors we train often serve in diverse assignments, said Rosado. Many of our former students have served everywhere from the front lines of Afghanistan to the decks of our carriers. They report to their commands trained and ready to go to work imme diately. Capt. Mark Murphy, CSS command ing officer said the commands expec tations and goals are high but very obtainable. Work hard: be brilliant on the basics and take care of our people, said Murphy. Work, study and learn at the job youve been given. Be ready when opportunity knocks. Work smart. Mission first, safety always. Push decision making to the lowest level. Communicate up and down the chain. Have fun. Keep a balance, keep a sense of humor and test your ideas. We want the best to train the Navys future. CSS was established Feb. 7, 2003, in response to Naval Education and Trainings (NETC) initiative to address challenges in Fleet training and to improve Sailors professional devel opment products and processes. In streamlining the business of deliver ing training, NETC charged 15 learning centers like CSS with specific areas of naval training. NETC organized the centers around their functional areas and appropriately aligned schools and respective training sites to each center. Sailors who are eligible for shore duty and in their transfer window are encouraged to contact their command career counselors and detailers. For available billet opportunities, visit https://www.cmsid.navy.mil/.Center for Service Support looking for Subject Matter Experts Pelicans help out with Habitat For Humanity 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013

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Military Affairs, Veterans and Disabled Services Division Chief Victor Guillory. NAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM)(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd also presented Sanders with the NAS Jax Commissioning Pennant on behalf of the NAS Jax Chiefs Mess. As Sanders took the podium for the last time, he thanked the numerous staff members who contributed to the successful tour as commanding officer. NAS Jax has a culture where the people in the organization do not accept, know or understand what it means to fail. We are in the customer service business and I want to give my person al thanks to each and every Sailor and employee of NAS Jax who made it look simple and who made my job very easy, said Sanders. You see, it is the people of NAS Jax that makes this place great. Although I am the guy typically accepting all the awards, I am departing yet this com mitment to excellence will continue. Sanders also thanked his family for their support during his naval career. This is the time when the outgoing skipper thanks all the friends and fam ily who came from far and wide but since I only have Kathy, TJ and Alexa here, they win the award for furthest traveled. One mile from the RV Park. Thanks for putting up with me through another command tour. I love you guys, he said. Sanders added, I would also like to thank the City of Jacksonville. Ive been stationed in a lot of places and I have never been to a city that embraces the military more than Jacksonville. There were so many people that touched my life. You are the best in the Navy and I will always remember NAS Jax as my best and most rewarding tour, he concluded. Sanders then read his orders directing him to report to Commander, Naval Air Forces Pacific as chief of staff, Carrier Strike Group 1 on board USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70). After assuming command, Undersander offered his remarks. Capt. Sanders, it has been my extreme pleasure to serve with and work for you. I appreciated your mentoring and willingness to go out on a limb for the command. The NAS Jax Team has benefitted from your leadership and despite external challenges, continued to fire on all eight cylinders, he said. I was fortunate to be brought up as a farm boy, and I attribute my success to the strong family values and work ethic that my parents and siblings instilled in me. Their support has always be unwavering, as evident in the fact that we have four generations of Undersanders here today, he continued. I have often said that a career in the Navy is a family business and that couldnt be more true for me. Our chil dren, Molly, Michael and Carl are the most wonderful blessing to Pam and I, and we could not be more proud of them. And my wife, Pam, is the foundation of our family, said Undersander. I believe strong family values are central to NAS Jax meeting its mission of providing effective and efficient shore services to the fleet, fighter and fam ily. We are at a point in history where we face many challenges and issues, and how we bond together to overcome those challenges is what will make the difference. Undersander went on to address the NAS Jax Team. You have continually demonstrated excellence even in the face of adversity. You truly have the right attitude and I am here to serve and provide you the tools and opportunity to continue your personal and collective greatness. He concluded, I want to assure you I am confident in my abilities, but hum ble enough to ask for your prayers for the success of NAS Jax. Following the ceremony, a recep tion was held at the NAS Jax River Cove Catering and Conference Center. UNDERSANDER JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013 7

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a break to acknowledge a milestone that is derived from the contributions of so many Proud Warriors over the years. It was also a reminder that the most important flight hour is the next one were about to execute, and only through the safe practices of all will we continue a record of safety excellence. A Class A mishap is defined by the Naval Safety Center as $2 million or more in total property damages and/or aircraft destroyed, a fatality, or perma nent total disability. The Proud Warriors 200,000 Class A mishap-free flight hours span all the way back to 1986. While HSM-72 may be a relatively new squadron, it is new in name only. HSM-72 was recently commissioned Jan. 15, 2013 at NAS Jacksonville after the decommissioning of HSL-42 in a joint ceremony. HSL-42 was established as the east coasts first LAMPS MK-III squadron Oct. 5, 1984 at Naval Station Mayport. The overwhelming majority of the squadrons 200,000 Class A mishap-free flight hours were flown in the SH-60B during the tenure of HSL-42. Having recently retired their last SH-60B, HSM-72 reached this avia tion milestone flying one of their new MH-60R helicopters. The squadron has also flown the MQ-8B Fire Scout while serving as the first naval aviation squadron to deploy with a vertical takeoff and landing unmanned aerial vehicle. The Proud Warriors recent his tory has been dominated by change, first moving from NS Mayport to NAS Jacksonville in 2010, and then transi tioning this year from a detachmentbased, expeditionary squadron to a carrier air wing-based squadron. The one constant has been the squadrons dedication to safety. The lessons learned and experience gained over the years embarked in the shipboard environment will allow HSM-72 to transi tion safely and effectively to the carrier air wing. This new era of operations will rely upon the foundation of hard work and the dedication of previous generations of Proud Warriors and instill a culture of mission accomplishment and safety. The squadrons tradition of safety excellence has seen the squadron earn, among other awards, 12 Battle E Awards, eight CNO Safety S Awards, four Golden Wrench Awards and two Secretary of the Navy Safety Excellence Awards, most recently in 2013. These maintenance and safety awards are a testament to the squad rons leadership and professionalism. The hard work and dedication of past and present Proud Warriors have yielded this incredible milestone. By the book maintenance is taught and preached to every member of the Proud Warrior maintenance team, said Lt. Cmdr. Chris Conlon, HSM-72 maintenance officer. It is the cornerstone on which this prestigious milestone was built. HSM-72 is set to join Carrier Air Wing Seven (CVW-7) and deploy on board USS Dwight. D. Eisenhower (CVN 69). While HSM-72 may be new to the carrier air wing environment, the com mand looks forward to the challenge. The Proud Warriors are aim ing to continue their Principled . Disciplined . Confident ways. HSM-72 The 2013 Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) Singapore exercise concluded with a closing cer emony at Changi Naval Base, July 26. The two-week annual exer cise with the Republic of Singapore consisted of shorebased and at-sea training events designed to address shared maritime security pri orities, develop relationships, and enhance interoperability among the participating forces. CARAT Singapore is part of a series of bilateral naval exer cises between the U.S. Navy and the armed forces of nine partner nations in South and Southeast Asia. Training events in each CARAT phase are tailored based on available assets and mutual exercise goals. As one of the original exercise partners, CARAT Singapore is among the most complex in the series and features a highly sophisticat ed sequence of training events across the spectrum of naval capabilities. Every year we try to raise the bar a bit higher during the planning process, making each successive CARAT Singapore a bit more complex, said Capt. Paul Schlise, commander, Task Group 73.1. The 19th CARAT Singapore featured 11 days of shore-based events and a lengthy 96-hour sea phase. Shore-based train ing included visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) drills, military law enforcement expert exchanges and military operations in urban terrain (MOUT) training. The sea phase was a series of coordinated air defense, anti-submarine warfare, mar itime patrol aircraft and sur face warfare training scenarios led by a combined afloat staff embarked on the Singaporean frigate, RSS Intrepid (69). The multiple-day sea phase was again the capstone course of CARAT Singapore, and given its enduring complexity, pre sented our Sailors, ships and aircraft with many opportuni ties to enhance interoperability among our forces, said Schlise. USN and RSN sailors con ducted a simulated shipboard helicopter and small boat medical evacuation, tracked sub marines from both navies dur ing multiple anti-submarine warfare scenarios, and con ducted a coordinated air-tosurface MISSILEX in which a Republic of Singapore Air Force (RSAF) Fokker 50 fired a har poon missile against a surface target tracked by ships in the Combined Task Group. More than 700 U.S. Sailors and Marines participated in CARAT Singapore 2013. Participating ships included the guided-missile destroy er USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62), the littoral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS 1) and the dry cargo ammunition ship USNS Washington Chambers (T-AKE 14). Also participating in CARAT Singapore were staff from Commander, Task Group 73.1/ Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 7, a P-3C Orion maritime patrol aircraft from Patrol Squadron (VP) 62, a platoon of Marines from 3rd Law Enforcement Battalion, as well as VBSS evaluators from Maritime Civil Affairs and Security Training Command.19th CARAT Singapore concludes at Changi Naval Base 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013

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IA FAMILIESseason, including a full practice scrim mage and interacting with the official mascot of the Jaguars, Jaxson de Ville. Its important for the morale of our Sailors that they know we are committed to the welfare of their families while they are away on duty, Johns contin ued. Its great to see that so many fami lies took advantage of this excursion today, and I hope they all enjoyed this opportunity to see the Jaguars players up close and personal. For more information about IA family services provided by NAS Jax FFSC, call 542-5771. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013 9

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Florida Girls Troupe tours VP-16The Florida Girls Troupe, an affiliate of the Miss America Organization, visited VP-16 on July 31 as part of a USO tour of NAS Jacksonville. Consisting of young women who are contestants for the title of Miss Florida and for educational scholarships, the Florida Girls Troupe members are selected from all over the state through local competitions and each holds local titles. After spending time in a flight simulator in the morning, the young women were escorted through the War Eagles spaces, where they met with Sailors and aircrew to catch a glimpse of the day-to-day operations of a maritime patrol and reconnaissance squadron. The five girls and their chaperone were given pre sentations by various departments detailing a daily work schedule including a gear demonstration in the paraloft where the troupe was invited to try on hel mets, life vests and water survival suits. They were also given a static tour of the P-8A Poseidon aircraft. Following the tour, the Florida Girls Troupe presented VP-16 with a Certificate of Honor, commending them on their achievements during the transition from the P-3C Orion and wishing them the best of luck as they prepare for their upcoming deployment. Don Steere, the director of the Florida Girls Troupe, was enthusiastic about the visit. An experience like this is fantastic for the educational development of our members. Being able to meet and interact with women in uniform was particularly wonderful as they are such positive role models for our girls. This is a day we will never forget! Its great to see organizations from the community take an active interest in the training and work that we do, Lt. Nikee Giampietro stated. The service our sailors and aircrew provide is vital to our nations well being and the additional recognition is always greatly appreciated. I wish these girls the best of luck as they continue to pursue further educational opportuni ties. VP-5 Gray Fox Heritage Day Aug. 23VP-5 cordially invites all former Mad Foxes to join current members for a Gray Fox Heritage Day at NAS Jacksonville Aug. 23. The schedule of events begins at 8 a.m. at Deweys All Hands Club, located across from Freedom Lanes between Saratoga and Enterprise Avenues at Keily Street. The squadron requests all attending Mad Foxes to RSVP by Aug. 12 with your name, rank/rate (retired or active), number of guests in your party, and dates served with VP-5. Email brian.obannon@navy.mil for additional information. No Fox Like a Mad Fox! JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013 11

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More than 300 military and civilian hazardous waste coor dinators gathered July 30 and Aug.6 at the NAS Jax Chapel Center for a workshop designed to reduce violations. Pam Fellabaum, an envi ronmental specialist with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, performs the states annual haz ardous waste inspection at NAS Jacksonville. Todays workshop is focused on discussion of Floridas Top10 hazardous waste (HW) vio lations, said Fellabaum. We just concluded the first of two sessions this morning and I was impressed with the questions that the audience asked. The NAS Jacksonville Environmental Department does a very good job of training their base HW coordinators, as well as those at the tenant commands. To ensure compliance with federal and state regula tions, Florida incorporated portions of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Parts 260-271 into its Florida Administrative Code (FAC) Rule 62-730. When discarded material is deemed hazardous, then it must be recycled, treated, stored or disposed at a proper HW facility. HW may not be disposed of on or in the ground, or in local landfills, septic tanks, or injection wells. Also, regardless of quan tity, the generator of HW is ultimately responsible for the waste from cradle to grave, and can be held liable for improper management. Our Top-10 list of HW violations is an interesting way to re-engage HW coordinators and increase compliance. We also bring plenty of tips and practical advice on how to keep violations from occurring in the first place, said Fellabaum. She noted that NAS Jacksonville leadership has always been willing to work with environmental regulators and open to suggestions that regain compliance as soon as possible. Its always great to see such a good turnout. An enthusias tic audience usually comes up with interesting questions that benefit everyone, she concluded. Top-10 Hazardous Waste Violations 10: Open containers of haz ardous waste pursuant to 40 CFR 265.173(a). 9: Failure to date hazardous waste containers pursuant to 40 CFR 262.34(a)(2). 8: Failure to respond to a release of used oil pursuant to 40 CFR 279.22(d). 7: Failure to document weekly hazardous waste con tainer inspections pursuant to 62-730.160(6), FAC. 6: Failure to properly label universal waste lamp contain ers pursuant to 62-737.400(5) (b), FAC and 40 CFR 273.14(e). 5: Failure to keep containers of spent mercury lamps closed pursuant to 40 CFR 273.13(d) (1). 4: Failure to label used oil filter containers with the words Used Oil Filters pursuant to 62-710.850(5)(a), FAC. 3: Failure to label used oil tanks and containers with the words Used Oil pursuant to 40 CFR 279.22(c)(1). 2: Failure to perform a haz ardous waste determination pursuant to 40 CFR 262.11. 1: Failure to provide second ary containment for used oil tanks and containers pursuant to 62-710.401(6), FAC. New Pass & ID hoursYorktown Gate Building 9 Pass and ID Office hours: Monday Friday from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Commercial Gate/Pass Office: Monday Friday from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. Passes will be issued by the Yorktown gate sentry after hours and weekends. Non-NCAC (RAPID Gate) personnel will only be authorized access during commercial gate hours. Hazardous waste coordinators attend DEP training at chapel 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment Friday at 7 p.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 510 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 16 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer Going on now through Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 years and younger receive one free game of bowling every day until 5 p.m. Win prizes all summer long! Fall and winter bowling leagues are now forming! Leagues begin in September.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Last day for recreational swimming during the week is Aug. 9. Beginning Aug. 12, the hours of operation will be lap swim (no concessions, slide or water park will be open) Mon. Fri. 6-8 a.m., 11 a.m. 1 p.m., 4:30-7 p.m. Recreation swim Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. until further notice. Private pool parties can be reserved at the fitness center or base gym. Parties are not available during regular business hours of operation and occur in the evenings when the pool is closed. Parties must be reserved 10 days prior to party date, payment due at time of reservation. For more information call 542-3518. Dive In Movie at the outdoor pool Featuring Despicable Me Aug. 10, 610 p.m. Movie begins at 8:30 p.m. Free admission, hot dog, chips and a drink!I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets on sale now $70 section 147 Legoland Florida Free ticket for active duty military through Oct. 27 Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Gatorland Free admission for active duty and retired military until the end of the year. Family tickets can be purchased at ITT. $19.95 adult, $12.50 child, zip line $54.25 Monster Truck Jam club seating $42, regular seating $22 2013 2014 Artist Series featuring Mama Mia, Memphis, Celtic Thunder, War Horse, Men are From Mars, Women are from Venus, Million Dollar Quartet and The D* Word is a Musical are on sale now!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Free Jags Shuttle Aug. 9 at 6 p.m. Volunteer at HabiJax Aug. 10 at 7 a.m. Jacksonville Suns Game Aug.15 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Aug. 20 for active duty Aug. 8 & 22 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Furlough Fridays All civilian employees that have been furloughed can play 18-holes with cart & green fee for $20 Monday Friday Play 18 holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Movie Under the Stars Aug. 23 at 8 p.m. featuring Monsters University Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Oct. 7 Nov. 20 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013 13

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This NAVADMIN announces the cancellation of automatic Family Service Members Group Life Insurance (FSGLI) enroll ment of spouses (active and reserve) who are military members and the intent to reimburse members who had premiums incorrectly deducted from their pay accounts. Military members mar ried to military members on or after Jan. 2, 2013 will no longer be automatically enrolled for FSGLI coverage. In cases where Sailors mar ried another military member on or after Jan. 2, 2013 neither member is currently covered under the FSGLI program, but premiums were automatically deducted from each member through April 2013, due to sys tem configuration. These erro neously collected premiums will be refunded. Sailors married to non-mil itary spouses are not affected by this change. The non-mil itary spouse of a Sailor with Servicemembers Group Life Insurance (SGLI) coverage will automatically be enrolled in the FSGLI program. Sailors married to military members desiring to enroll their spouse in the FSGLI pro gram should submit completed Family Coverage Election Form (SGLV 8286A) to the personnel office or servicing Personnel Support Detachment (PSD). The personnel office or PSD will retain the document until incorrectly collected premiums are refunded. The SGLV 8286A will then be submitted electronically for adjudication. Enrolled qualified spouses are cov ered from the date of submis sion to the personnel office or PSD. Enrollment forms requir ing Office of Servicemembers Group Life Insurance (OSGLI) approval of pre-existing health conditions should be forwarded to OSGLI by the PSD or personnel office upon receipt. Upon completion of system updates and premium refunds, electronic enrollment will be processed, and premiums will be retroactively collected from the date of enrollment. The following scenarios illustrate a service members options: a. Sailor married military member prior to Jan. 2, 2013: (1) Both members were automatically enrolled in FSGLI. (2) Coverage was effective as of the date of the marriage. (3) Premiums were collect ed as of the date of marriage. (4) Either member may decline FSGLI coverage per ref (b). b. Sailor marries a military member on or after Jan. 2, 2013: (1) Sailor is not enrolled in FSGLI. (2) Erroneous automat ic premium deductions made between Jan. 2, 2013 and April 2013 have been stopped and are being refunded. (3) Automatic enrollment did not constitute spouse FSGLI coverage. (4) Sailors desiring to enroll their military spouse in the FSGLI program must complete and submit a SGLV 8286A. Members are reminded to carefully follow instructions on the form including comple tion of the health questionnaire portion of the form. c. Sailor married to a nonmilitary spouse, who then enlists or is commissioned in a uniformed service after Jan. 2, 2013: (1) Existing FSGLI coverage for the spouse remains in place. (2) Newly commissioned or enlisted spouse must complete and submit the SGLV 8286A if desired to enroll the Sailor in FSGLI. d. Military members married to each other, and one separates from service: (1) If the separating spouse has FSGLI coverage, no action is required. (2) If the separating spouse has no FSGLI coverage the Sailor must complete an SGLV 8286A should they desire FSGLI coverage for the spouse that separated from service. For more information, contact Al Gorski at (901) 874-4559/DSN 882 or e-mail alan.gorski@navy. mil. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy. mil. The Greater Jax Area USO has now opened-up ticket sales for the pre-season Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Miami Dolphins game Aug. 9 at 7:30 p.m. and the preseason Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Philadelphia Eagles game Aug. 24 at 7:30 p.m. to all active duty, retirees, veterans with ID cards, National Guard, Reservists, DoD civilians and their families. Tickets are available at the NAS Jax and NS Mayport USO for $15 each, cash transactions only. Regular season tickets are avail able the following days and times: Guidelines: All active duty including Florida National Guard and Reservists on current active duty orders and dependents are eligible to purchase/ use these tickets. rized dependents may buy a maxi mum of four tickets if member and dependents equals four. If you have less than four you may only pur chase total for family. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but dependent children are not authorized to represent the service member/spouse to purchase tick ets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO director. purchase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest. No exceptions. a request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the execu tive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the season.Requests, with justifica tion, must be sent to Mike OBrien at mobrien@usojax.com excess tickets or reselling tickets will be prohibited from buying any more tickets for the entire season. tickets are first come, first served. For more information, call 7782821.Repeal of FSGLI automatic enrollment for military members married to military members Jaguars tickets available at USO 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013

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MTOC-7 in IDRC for next deployment Mobile Tactical Operations Center (MTOC) Seven is in the third month of its InterDeployment Readiness Cycle (IDRC) at NAS Jacksonville. It will be the units second deployment after its homeport change to NAS Jacksonville from NAS Sigonella, Sicily. MTOC-7 is comprised of 15 Sailors who are an integral part of the P-3 Orion mission team. From their Operations Control Center (OPCON), they assist P-3 aircrews with safety of flight briefs, flight following during the mission, and pro viding post-mission analyses. During their most recent seven-month deployment to NAS Sigonella, they were able to work side-by-side with fellow TOC/MTOC community per sonnel in the execution of their homeport training cycle. Preparations were comprised of formal schools, on-the-job training, and an Operational Readiness Exam for certifica tion prior to their departure overseas. MTOC-7 supported multiple operations and exercises in the 5th and 6th Fleets during their deployment. While they kept a core group of OPCON watch standers in Sigonella to augment the Tactical Operations Center (TOC), they also sent Sailors to several remote P-3 operations locations including: Souda Bay, Greece; Djibouti, Africa; Rota, Spain; and Leuchars, Scotland. At each of these locations, MTOC-7 proved to be an invaluable asset to the warfare commanders, earning Bravo Zulus from CTF-67, VP-9 and VP-4. While deployed, MTOC-7 worked alongside internation al military forces during fleet operations and joint military exercises including the larg est annual NATO Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft ASW exercise involv ing the 6th Fleet Exercise PROUD MANTA. Throughout the deployment, they conducted Safety of Flight briefs for 865 flights, as well as flight tracking for more than 6,950 hours of flight time, pro viding integral support from pre-flight to post-flight debrief. Raising children can be the most challenging yet most rewarding part of a parents life. When parents do not remain together, raising those children can be even more of a challenge. How do we make sure that our children are financially supported after we no longer live as a family unit? Whether you are the custodial par ent who wants to collect child support or the noncustodial parent who has to provide child support, knowing your rights and how to go about enforcing them is essential. State child support guidelinesWhat parents need to know JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013 15

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Hundreds of military family mem bers enjoyed a sunny afternoon Aug. 2 at Deweys Family Night presented by NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department. The free event featured bag toss, bounce houses, rock climbing wall, back to school goodie bags, balloon animals, a magic show and much more! The Fleet and Family Support Center offered free face painting and the Navy Exchange provided a lollipop tree with prizes. The purpose of the event was to provide a fun, high energy environment for the families of NAS Jacksonville, said Liberty Program Manager Tom Kubalewski. We plan to continue offering Deweys Family Night, on a smaller scale, in the near future. We are very happy with this great turn out and we have taken note that providing low cost family events are a priority to our customers at NAS Jax. Local celebrity appearances included Jenn and Ayako with the ROAR of the Jaguars and the Jacksonville Suns mascot Southpaw. This is a wonderfully organized, affordable, family oriented event, said Kathleen Spively. It is difficult to find something to do on a Friday night with our kids that we can all enjoy. MWR thanks everyone who partici pated in or volunteered for this event. Sponsors, University of Phoenix, USAA and VyStar Credit Union were generous in their support of Family Night.Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its prod ucts or services. Deweys Family Night is a hit! JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013 17

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18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 8, 2013 Who is eligible to receive child support? Only custodial parents are eligible to receive child support payments. So what exactly is a custodial parent? The custodial parent is the primary caregiver, providing the daily needs of the child. If each parent spends relatively equal time with the child, it is the parent who spends slightly more time with the child. That being said, there may be other legal and practical hurdles to overcome before a cus todial parent can receive child support. For example, the other parent will have to be located and/or paternity will have to be established. How much is enough? Some people are under the false impression that child support only needs to cover the very basics for a child, such as food and clothing. Wrong! Child support should include a variety of anticipated expenses, including but not limited to school fees, entertain ment, medical expenses, and extracurricular activi ties. So, you ask, how do two parents who cannot get along come to an agreement on what these expenses should be? You do not have to thats right! Federal law mandates that a states child support guidelines apply to any court action or administrative proceeding in which there is an order determining child support. This could include a separation, divorce, paternity, or modification proceeding, just to name a few. This means that the amount of child support paid is based on guidelines defined by each state, not on what you as the parents think is the right amount. What are child support guidelines? Child support guidelines are standards used to fig ure out the support needed for a child and the amount a parent has to pay. Guidelines help to make sure that support amounts are fair. Every state has guidelines, but those guidelines may vary by state. In general, all of the guidelines are based on the parents incomes, childs living expenses and health care, childcare costs and standard needs for the children. Often, as is the case in Florida, the guidelines cal culate the amount of child support as a percentage of the parents income and factor in the number of minor children being supported. There may be special cir cumstances where support amounts can deviate from the guidelines. Some states actually allow their judges a lot of leeway in setting the amount, as long as the general state guidelines are followed. Others have very strict guidelines that provide the judges with very little discretion. The factors usually include the needs of the child including health insur ance, education, day care, and special needs; and the income and needs of the custodial parent. The paying parents ability to pay can also come into play. Some states, however, will impute income on a parent with no income by expecting them to pay child support even if he/she is unemployed, filing for bankruptcy or homeless. What is a child support order? A child support order tells the parents specifically what they must do and how much they must pay to support their children, according to the guidelines. Some states limit the support to age 18 or when the child graduates high school. Some states even require college expenses to be included. What if the noncustodial parent does not pay? Enforcing child support orders means getting the parent to do what the order says. If a noncustodial parent is working, the states law may require that the employer deduct support payments from the par ents paycheck. In some states, businesses must report all new and rehired employees to the child support enforcement agency in their state so it is difficult for a parent to hide their new job. When noncustodial parents owe past-due support, the states child support enforcement program may be able to intercept tax refunds, lottery winnings, unemployment compensation and other payments, and may work with banks and credit unions to deduct money from a bank account. They may have liens placed against their property such as houses, mobile homes, land, cars, boats and other valuable items until the support is paid. If you fail to make child support payments according to a court order, child support enforcement agencies in many states will suspend your drivers license or any professional, occupational or recreational license. The judge may also find you in contempt of court and order you to pay a large sum of money or go to jail or an arrest warrant may be issued. Can the amount of support ever change? Once a child support order or agreement is in place, the payment amount may be modified under certain situations, usually a substantial change in circum stances. This may include a parents promotion or raise, or the child needing orthodontic work or new school expenses. Some states review support orders every few years automatically in an effort to keep the sup port consistent with the parents income and the respective states support guidelines. Bottom line: Whether you are the custodial parent who wants to collect child support or the noncusto dial parent who has to provide child support, know ing your rights and how to go about enforcing them is essential. Please contact your local legal assistance office to speak with an attorney. CHILD SUPPORT The number of positive results for synthetic drug in urinalysis tests has decreased significantly since testing began in March 2012, according to data presented to Navy leaders by Navy Alcohol and Drug Prevention (NADAP) office on July 16. For the past year, the NADAP office has focused on educating Sailors about the risks to their health, career and family, from using synthetic drugs like spice and bath salts. We consider this a win for all Sailors, said Dorice Favorite, NADAP director, about the decrease in positive results. It means they are listening to facts and making responsible choices for themselves and their shipmates. The reasons for the decline are multidimensional, said Favorite. Sailors understand the Navy has zero tolerance for drug use, includ ing the use of designer and synthetic chemical compounds. Our education efforts sent a clear message that syn thetic drugs are not regulated; there fore, they may be up to 200 times more potent than marijuana and much more harmful. Educating Sailors on the danger of illegal drug use is a multi-organiza tional effort. NADAP partnered with Navys Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, Naval Criminal Investigative Service, and other U.S. military law enforcement agencies to monitor for criminal activ ity, including possession, use, or distri bution of illegal substances, the director said. There is also encouraging news in the responsible use of alcohol efforts. During the past year, driving under the influence and alcohol-related inci dents (AI) have continued to drop. The number of these incidents is down by more than 20 percent since 2006, said Favorite. The NADAP office contributes to this improvement through a comprehensive communication strategy that includes complimentary prevention awareness campaigns that reach out to all audi ences, she added. In April 2013, the Navy launched Keep What Youve Earned campaign to replace the outdated Right Spirit campaign. Keep What Youve Earned encourages responsible alcohol use by celebrating the achievements in Sailors Navy careers and actively engages Sailors as advocates for responsible drinking. This campaign, in concert with The Domino Strategy, Who Will Stand Your Watch and That Guy speaks to Sailors about responsible drinking and accountability. In mid2013, the Navy implemented the use of handheld alcohol detection devices (ADD). More than 13,000 devices were shipped to commands, both afloat and ashore. These devices are intended as tools that complement the units campaign against irresponsible alcohol use and promote Sailor safety, education and training. ADD also helps leadership identify Sailors who may require positive intervention before a career-ending incident. NADAP plans to publish a report of lessons learned and best practices submitted by commands in January 2014. NADAP has had a very busy year, developing programs on synthetic drug testing, alcohol detection device dis tribution and implementation, and prevention awareness campaigns for a prescription drug campaign that is currently under development, Favorite stated. We feel that every effort we expend on the front end to prevent a Sailor from misusing or abusing a sub stance improves Sailor resilience and strengthens Navy readiness. Sailors can claim a win where synthetic drugs are concerned

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