Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
Publication Date:

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note:
Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID:
UF00028307:02052


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THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 2013 FIGHT CRIME TEAMWORK P-8A SUPPORT Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders hosted a ribbon-cutting ceremony with representatives from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, St Johns River Water Management District and City of Jacksonville July 24 to recognize completion of the third phase of the NAS Jacksonville Wastewater Reuse Project. Using a St. Johns River Water Management District $400,000 grant, the City of Jacksonville in partnership with the installation environmental and utilities staff completed construction of a pump station and 800-foot pipeline from the station reuse pond to the sta tion golf course irrigation system. The new system provides more than 300,000 gallons per day of treated wastewater from the reuse pond and eliminates the need for 37 million gallons a year of groundwater from the Floridian aquifer. In 2014, the city will use a district $1.4 million grant to com plete the final phase of the project to construct a two-mile pipeline HSM-72 spearheads H-60 Mode 5 testing during Bold QuestThe first MH-60R Seahawk heli copter detachment from HSM72 returned to NAS Jacksonville recently after participating in Bold Quest 13-1, a multinational Joint Fires assessment event that fea tured a joint operational test of the Mode 5 Identification, Friend or Foe (IFF) system. The two-week exercise, overseen by the Joint Staff J-6 (Command, Control, Communications and Computers/Cyber), was centered at MCAS Cherry Point, N.C., and covered the mid-Atlantic off-shore training ranges from Hampton Roads, Va., to the Jacksonville area. The Mode 5 system under test offers many improvements over existing IFF systems, including features such as GPS position, unique aircraft platform identifica tion numbers and modern crypto Sanders praises team for successful tourNAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders and his family will bid farewell to the station following a change of command ceremony Friday, Aug. 2 at 9 a.m. at Hangar 117. Sanders will relinquish command to Capt. Roy Undersander who assumed the position of NAS Jax executive officer in January 2012. A native of Boonton, N.J., Sanders was com missioned in the Navy in September 1987 and designated a naval flight officer in January 1989. As an aviator, Sanders has completed numerous squadron tours and deployments throughout the world including instructor duty at the Navy Fighter Weapons School (TOPGUN) in Fallon, Nev. I have had a lot of challenging tours over the past 26 years, but I can definitely say this has been the most challenging and memorable tour of my naval career. I was very fortunate to fly for 20 years including a tour at Top Gun, but it was doing the same thing every day yes, it was flying, but here I had a unique opportunity to get out of my com fort zone and do things I never imagined, said Sanders. When you are part of a tenant command, you have no idea the complexity of how an installa tion runs. On a daily basis, I could be dealing with issues about the golf course to spending $50M on an integrated training center. Its different every day, he said. During his tenure, NAS Jax was selected as the best naval base in the world by Commander, Navy Installations Command for the past two years and earned presidential recognition as the best in the Department of Defense in 2012. Its all about the people working here they are true professionals. Ive been blessed to have some great people to work with over the past three years. Ive never seen an organization so committed to the job and people who are trying to make a differ ence, continued Sanders. Everyone is always striving to improve which is even more evident these past couple months with the furlough and reduction in force. That is why this tour has been so successful and my favorite. Ive met a lot of great people and will really miss the team here. According to Sanders, one of his most memora ble moments was being pinned an honorary chief petty officer by NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd last year. I think thats the one that touched me the most. That really meant something to me. I believe in the chiefs mess as an organization and I think that is how we function in the U.S. Navy. If you have a strong chiefs mess, you will have a strong com mand. You have to back them and they have to back you it has to be a mutual buy-in. And I see that at NAS Jax, said Sanders. Ive never seen a group like the chiefs mess here get together to solve the problems of the base as a whole. Here you see that and thats a testament to CMDCM Shepherd. This base rallies around him and his leadership that not only make the base stronger, but the tenant commands stronger so if they run into a barrier that affects their mission, they can reach out for help, he said. He also is quick to reflect on some of the other memorable moments such as hosting First Lady Michelle Obama, Secretary of Defense (SECDEF) Chuck Hagel, Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus and Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert who all paid visits to the station during his tenure. Its very interesting when you get the opportu nity to sit down and talk to the SECDEF, SECNAV and CNO. Only a job like this allows you to have access to and hear what the leadership of the Navy thinks, Sanders stated. Sanders also stressed the importance of recog nizing people for their accomplishments. There have just been so many unique opportunities of this job from handing out awards and command coins to junior Sailors to accepting cookies from the Girls Scouts, he said. Ill cherish all these memories. On a lighter side, Sanders, an avid golfer, proud ly recalls making a hole-in-one on the NAS Jax Golf Course during a Saturday morning golf ses sion. It was on Red No. 7, while golfing with my Saturday morning golf team. Ill never forget that one, added Sanders. As for the future of the station, Sanders is con fident in its success. NAS Jax will continue that commitment to excellence long after Im gone. Yes, NAS Jax continues its environmental stewardship Undersander to take helm of NAS JacksonvilleCapt. Roy Undersander will relieve Capt. Bob Sanders as NAS Jax Commanding Officer at a change of command ceremo ny tomorrow, Aug. 2 at 9 a.m. at Hangar 117. Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast, will be the guest speaker. A native of Saint Cloud, Minn., Undersander joined the Navy in June 1987 through the Naval Aviation Cadet program. Upon completion of Aviation Officer Candidate School, he was designated a naval aviation cadet and reported to NAS Whiting Field, Fla. for primary and heli copter flight training. He was des ignated a naval aviator and com missioned as an ensign on March, 17, 1989. He earned his Bachelors Degree in Professional Aeronautics from Embry-Riddle University and a Masters Degree in National Security and Strategic Studies from the Naval War College.

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013 Aug. 1 1801 U.S. schooner Enterprise captures Tripolitan ship Tripoli. 1921 Successful tests of gyroscopic high-level bomb sight (Norden Bombsight) at Torpedo Station, Yorktown, Va. Carl Norden developed the bombsight for the Bureau of Ordnance. 1946 Office of Naval Research (ONR) established. 1950 Control of Guam transferred to U.S. Department of Interior. 1958 USS Nautilus (SSN571) submerges under Arctic ice cap near Point Barrow. Aug. 2 1943 PT-109, under com mand of Lt. j.g. John F. Kennedy, is cut in half by Japanese destroyer Amagiri. 1943 Naval task groups bombard Japanese forces on Kiska, Alaska. 1950 Amphibious force ships land Marine First Provisional Brigade at Pusan, Korea helping to save this last area of South Korea from cap ture. 1964 Three North Vietnamese PT boats attack USS Maddox (DD-731) in inter national waters in Gulf of Tonkin. Maddox sinks one. Aug. 3 1804 American Squadron, including USS Constitution, attacks Tripoli. 1812 U.S. frigate Essex cap tures British brig Brothers. 1861 Construction of USS Monitor authorized. 1861 First manned ascent in a balloon from a ship (gun boat USS Fanny) to observe Confederate artillery position at Hampton Roads, Va. 1942 Mildred McAffee (Horton) becomes the first woman officer commissioned into Naval Reserve. 1950 First Marine Corps aviation mission against North Korea by VMF-214, from USS Sicily. 1950 First helicopter evacu ation in Korea by VMO-6. 1958 USS Nautilus (SSN571) is first ship to reach the geographic North Pole sub merged. 1970 USS James Madison (SSBN-627) conducts first sub merged launching of Poseidon nuclear missile off Cape Kennedy. Aug. 4 1846 Sailors and Marines from USS Congress capture Santa Barbara. 1858 First trans-Atlan tic cable completed by USS Niagara and British ship Agamemnon. 1944 Fifth Fleet carrier task forces begin air attack against Iwo Jima and the Bonin Islands. 1947 Birth date of the Medical Service Corps. 1964 The Navy and nation al intelligence sources report a North Vietnamese PT boat attack on USS Turner Joy and USS Maddox in the Tokin Gulf prompting Congress to pass the Tonkin Gulf Resolution on Aug. 7, 1964. The attack was later proven untrue. Aug. 5 1832 Frigate Potomac is first U.S. Navy ship to entertain royalty, the king and queen of Sandwich Islands, Honolulu. 1864 Rear Adm. David Farragut wins Battle of Mobile Bay, sealing off last Confederate port on Gulf Coast. 1882 Authorization of first steel warships begins the mod ern Navy. 1915 First air spotting for shore batteries at Fort Monroe, Va. 1921 Yangtze River Patrol Force established as command under Asiatic Fleet. 1953 Exchange of prison ers of war of Korean Conflict (Operation Big Switch) begins. 1967 Operation Coronado III begins in Rung Sat Zone, Vietnam. 1990 Navy and Marine Task Force (USS Saipan, USS Ponce, and USS Sumter) begin evacua tion of U.S. citizens and foreign nationals from Liberia during civil war. Aug. 6 1862 CSS Arkansas destroyed by her command ing officer to prevent capture by USS Essex. 1943 Battle of Vella Gulf begins. U.S. destroy ers sink three of four Japanese destroyers. 1945 Atomic bomb deto nated over Hiroshima, Japan. Navy weaponeer, Capt. W.S. Parsons, armed the atomic bomb on the B-29 bomber, Enola Gay. 1990 President George Bush orders Operation Desert Shield, largest overseas deployment since Vietnam, to protect Saudi Arabia after Iraqis invasion of Kuwait. 1997 Naval Forces on Guam help rescue and provide medi cal care to survivors of Korean Airlines Flight 801 that crashed on Guam. Aug. 7 1782 Badge of Military Merit (Purple Heart) established. 1942 Navy Amphibious Task Force lands Marines on Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands in first U.S. land offensive of World War II. Aug. 8 1813U.S. schooners Hamilton and Scourge founder in storm on Lake Ontario. 1959 Announcement of Project Teepee, electronic sys tem to monitor 95 percent of earths atmosphere for missile launchings or nuclear explo sions. System developed by William Thaler, ONR physicist. 1972 Women authorized for sea duty as regular ships com pany. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS I hadnt flown in a commercial air plane for 17 years. Yes, even though both my husband, Dustin, and my dad are Navy pilots. After 9/11, I honestly thought Id never would fly again. In 2010, I flew in the Air National Guards KC-135 because Dustin volun teered me to do it. I think he hoped it would end my fear of flying. It didnt. I never felt like the KC-135 left the ground, probably because it doesnt have passenger windows. Even when I watched a mid-air refueling, the whole thing seemed surreal. But a commercial airplane with lots of windows and piloted by someone I dont know? No way. Then, two weeks ago, Dustin asked me to fly with him to Washington, D.C., for our anniversary. I said yes even though backing out last minute remained a viable option. For me, at least. The day of our flight, I followed Dustin like a lost sheep through air port security. Which is to say, Dustin helped me place all my belongings in the proper plastic bins bumping along a conveyor belt. None of it seemed real. I still fancied running out the terminal. Then it was time to board the plane. Were just going to walk down this hallway and find our seats, Dustin said. It all looked so easy. Inviting, even. Sure, I thought, Ill walk down this hall way and then maybe Ill run back out. But Dustin held my hand and talked to me about aerodynamics. More than once he said, All those times I went to work in Pensacola, I was flying a sin gle engine airplane. You never worried about me, right? I couldnt answer. My face was cold with fright. Also, every fearful flyer knows that the process of realizing air planes are safe and the process of get ting our feet inside one are managed by two different parts of the brain: the mature, 36-year-old part, and the one that defaults to the fetal position. Before I could change my mind, however, we were rumbling down the runway. You did it, Dustin said once the wheels were off the ground, as if the whole thing was over. It was just begin ning! For one hour, I panicked over every noise (The engines sound dif ferent) and Dustin reassured me (Theyre pulling back on the power to make our descent). When we landed in D.C., he said, There, now youre not afraid anymore. What? It doesnt work that way, Dustin. In five days, I had to fly back home alone. I put this out of my mind while I enjoyed time with Dustin. On the last day, I started looking at Plan Bs: Take the train. Hitch a ride with friends. Take a bus. Dustin was confused. Why not just fly? he asked. Youve already done it. Youre cured. Whats there to be afraid of anymore? Dustin, Dustin, Dustin. [shaking head] Dustin is an engineer, a numbers per son. He understands things like risk and probability. Indeed, after I was pregnant with our first son and said, I think were on a roll of having all boys, Dustin is the one who famously said: One son does not make a roll. Besides, our chances of having a boy are 50/50 every time. The probability doesnt change. He flipped a penny multiple times to prove the point. So, I applied the same logic to my fear: The general populations risk of dying in a plane crash is about 1 in 2 million. That must reset with each flight, right? Or cue the ominous music are my chances getting better (worse?) with every flight? Is one safe flight a roll? Or do my chances remain the same every time? This is how a words-person who is afraid of flying thinks about risk. Sitting beside me in the airport termi nal, Dustin looked stunned as he con templated my logic. Youre going to get on the plane, he said dryly, and youre going to be fine. Easy for him to say. Hed be watching my plane take off from the comfort of the ground. We said goodbye outside the line for security. Streams of mascara made tracks down my face. My stomach was in knots, and I was breathing too fast. Dustin waved until he couldnt see me anymore, and I realized he fully believed Id get on the plane. I followed other passengers onto a bus that was waiting to take us to the CRJ-200. I was still crying, and everyone saw. We exited the bus and there was no pleasant hallway to distract me from what I was about to get into. I turned to the man beside me, my hand at my throat, and said, I cant do this; Im going back. To be continued . .Hey, MoneyChic! I do not have a budget, but would like to try and use one. I really want to start saving and think a budget could help. How much should I be setting aside each month for savings? Money Chic Sez: Great question! Did you know that not many families budget? Only one-third of households budget, leaving the other two-thirds wondering where their money went. Without a household budget there is little chance you have money left at the end of the month to invest. I am a big follower of Jean Chatzky, Today Show financial editor, and she offers great advice on budgeting to help you get started saving for retirement. First things first, how well do you allocate your money? You should have five categories when you are setting up a budget. Those cat egories should include: housing, transportation, life, debt, and saving. What percentage of your income should you use for each category? Housing, which includes mortgage/rent, maintenance, utili ties, insurance, and taxes, should be 35 per cent of your budget. Transportation, which includes car payments, gas, repairs, insur ance, parking/tolls, train/bus fees, should be 15 percent of your budget. Life expenses such as, eating out, vacations, gifts, clothing, and entertainment should be 25 percent. Student loans, credit cards, and personal loans are part of the debt category and should be no more than 15 percent. If you can reach 10 percent of your income for sav ings, including your 401K or TSP in military speak, you are doing well and can then think about non-retirement investing. The best way to start to budget is to first keep track of all expenses. That means keep ing receipts and categorizing your spending each month so you know exactly where your money is going. By knowing how much you spend, you can make changes about where you want your money to go. You can set lim its to how much you want to spend on life so that you can reach goals for saving. The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society can help you plan for now and your future. Stop by the office outside the Yorktown Gate or call 542-2832. Have questions for Hey, Money Chic? Drop me an email at megan.stolle@nmcrs.org Overcoming fear of flying (maybe)

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Navy Medicine East Commander visits hospitalThe Commander of Navy Medicine East visited Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville July 24 for an operational briefing and Naval Dental Corps call. Rear Adm. Elaine Wagner, who is also the commander of Naval Medical Center Portsmouth and chief of the Naval Dental Corps, attended senior leadership meet ings and toured the facility during her visit to the hospital the Navys fourth largest. During an executive steering com mittee meeting, Wagner met with NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer, and her senior leadership team for a status briefing on the com mands operations, goals, performance and readiness. I am clearly impressed with the direc tion that Naval Hospital Jacksonville is headed everything seems to be moving right along, said Wagner during a review at the executive meeting. Its fabulous to see significant prog ress in all areas of your Medical Home Port patient care teams. Wagner toured NH Jacksonvilles inpa tient wards, including labor and delivery, maternal infant unit and multi-service unit. She then had lunch with Shaffer, Navy Medicine East Command Master Chief Michael James, NH Jacksonville Command Master Chief Bennora Simmons and Medical Home Port cham pions. This provided an opportunity to discuss the commands Medical Home Port care teams. Medical Home Port is Navy Medicines approach to the nationwide med ical home model of care, placing the patient in the center of a collaborative team of caregivers from doctors and nurses to case managers led by the primary care manager. The patient and medical team work together for a coordi nated, whole-person approach to health including preventive, routine and urgent needs. NH Jacksonville has 14 Medical Home Port care teams across the command, and is currently seeking health care industry recognition from the National Committee for Quality Assurance, the gold standard in the patient-centered medical home model. Wagner concluded her visit with a command dental call, with participa tion from the commands military, civil ian and contract staff at the hospital and five branch health clinics (via video conference). She addressed the current sta tus and future of the Navy Dental Corps. It was great to host a visit for such a positive Navy Medicine leader, said Shaffer. The feedback we received from Rear Admiral Wagner and her chief of staff was invaluable. This allows us to evaluate ourselves and the direction were headed, ensuring the care and readiness of our nations heroes our warfighters and their families. The NAS Jax Security Department and Morale, Welfare and Recreation invites you and your family to celebrate the 30th annu al National Night Out Tuesday, Aug. 6. The event will take place from 6-10 p.m. at the outdoor pool and Allegheny softball field. This year, National Night Out will be celebrated with events for all age groups and a free BBQ. National Night Out is a unique crime/ drug prevention event sponsored National Association of Town Watch. It is an effec tive and enjoyable program to promote neighborhood spirit and police-community partnerships in our fight for a safer nation. For more info, call NAS Jax Youth Activities at 778-9772 or Security at 5420960, Ext. 104.Annual National Night Out is Aug. 6 at pool JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013 Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville held its annual Command Master Chief (CMC) Challenge on board NAS Jacksonville July 8-12, promoting unity and emphasizing physical fitness within the command. Sailors from Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles hospital and branch health clin ics competed in 23 events throughout the week, all with hopes of dethroning Directorate for Clinical Support Services (DCSS), winner of the previous three CMC challenges. The Command Master Chief Challenge is designed to promote staff readiness and teamwork, stated NH Jacksonville Command Master Chief Bennora Simmons. The team-concept events chosen for the challenge are events that require unity and teamwork in order to be suc cessful, regardless of work center, pay grade, race or gender. Its important, as medical professionals, to have camarade rie amongst one another, and this years challenge was a total success in accom plishing this task, while bringing out the competitive juices of our sailors. The commands directorates fielded teams, comprised of military and civil ian staff, to compete in multiple events as they pursued the CMC challenge cup and bragging rights for one year. Teams designed flags and t-shirts, and earned points by placing in competitions with extra points for bringing the team flag to events and event participation by direc torate leaders. Other events included such activities as an obstacle course, 5K run, basket ball, volleyball, softball, swimming, pullups, tug-of-war, relay run, blind canoe race, spades, ultimate frisbee and Are you smarter than a recruit? a game based on the famous television quiz-show Jeopardy, where Navy-themed questions were answered for team points. For the fourth consecutive year, DCSS took first place, receiving the challenge cup and bragging rights for the next year. Directorate for Administration placed second overall, while Directorate for Branch Health Clinics placed third over all. Simmons awarded the CMC chal lenge cup to DCSS participants at NH Jacksonvilles command picnic on July 12the culmination of the week-long challenge. This was the most competitive chal lenge to date, stated Simmons. First through third place were separat ed by less than 100 points. I am looking forward to next years challenge, which is sure to rekindle fierce competition between the commands directorates. Command Master Chief Challenge sparks competitive juices at hospital

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013 5 PHOTO S BY YAN KENNON AND JA C OB SI PP EL

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VP-26 combat aircrew and support personnel travel to MalaysiaThe men and women of VP-26s Combat Aircrew Four (CAC-4) and their supporting contingent of main tenance professionals recently rep resented Commander, Task Group 72.2/4 in the Malaysia phase of Cooperative Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) 2013. Also participating were USS Freedom (LCS-1), amphibious assault units of the United States Marine Corps and sea and air components of the Malaysian Navy. The weeklong exercise is designed to enhance bilat eral ties between the countries mili taries and to build individual and col lective readiness. CAC-4 hosted a static display of the P-3C Orion and flew two flights with Malaysian Air Force personnel onboard to demonstrate the search and rescue and anti-submarine war fare capabilities of the aircraft. Working with the U.S. Navy has been good for both nations and helped us see into the world of antisubmarine warfare, said Lt. Ashnia, who serves as a tactical coordination officer on one of the Malaysian Navys Super Lynx Helicopters. When not flying or interacting with the Malaysian military, the detach ment served the local civilian popula tion through a community relation and cultural exchange project. A com bined group of U.S. patrol squadron and surface fleet Sailors came togeth er to spend a day at the Kuantan Boys Home, an orphanage for young boys in the local countryside. The group shared music, sports and traditional foods. After leaving Malaysia, Team Trident will continue on to Surabaya, Indonesia to participate in Sea Surveillance Exercise 13-1. This weeks P-8A transition spot light shines on AWO3 Sean Joy, a native of Chicago. He is part of a large mili tary family. His cousins, stepfather, and grandfather have all served in the armed forces. This strong military family history inspired him to join the U.S. Navy in May 2010. VP-5 is his first operational command and he is currently qualify ing as an electronic warfare operator (EWO). VP-5 EWOs have been transitioning to the P-8A Poseidon through a series of interactive courseware, partial task trainers, crew simulators, and training flights. Currently, Joy is participating in P-8A Poseidon tactical flights with Combat Aircrew 2. Each crew of pilots, naval flight officers, acoustic operators, and electronic warfare operators must com plete five tactical flights in order to fin ish their transition to the P-8A. The EWO is responsible for operat ing Electronic Support Measures (ESM), Radar, Identification Friend or Foe Interrogator (IFFI), and Electro-Optical Camera. The P-8A is unique from the P-3C in that it will utilize a Sensor 4 operator who assists the EWO with the radar, camera and IFFI. It is a great pairing as it allows the more experienced EWO to focus on the more robust ESM system, commented Joy. Where an over-tasked EWO may have depended on acoustic operators, he or she can now turn to another EWO for assistance. When Joy isnt studying hard for his upcoming EWO board and Poseidon transition flights, he enjoys listening to music, attending concerts and playing or watching sports. VP-5 transition spotlight: AWO3 Sean Joy 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013 7

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I was the person up there accepting the installation excellence award, but I just happened to be in this job at the time. Its the people who continue to make this place great. And that will con tinue long into the future, expressed Sanders. Just look ahead at all the new construction here the P-8A replacing the P-3s, the unmanned aerial systems, FRCSE growing its a bright future! Sanders also praised the City of Jacksonville for their ongoing sup port to NAS Jax and the military. We have a great partnership with city and I couldnt be more pleased and fortunate to have the City of Jacksonvilles sup port. Its not only support to the base, but to the people who work here, vet erans and the military as a whole, he said. Its not just the local government. The people here have so much respect for the military and what we stand for. After the change of command and a family vacation while transferring across the country, Sanders will report to Commander, Naval Air Forces Pacific as chief of staff for Carrier Strike Group 1 on board USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) for the next two years. After that, Ive been guaranteed follow-on orders in San Diego for two years. Then, I plan to retire and we plan to come back to Jacksonville. Its a great place and we know a lot of people here, said Sanders. FAREWELLgraphic features. This was the 11th event in the Bold Quest series and was comprised of live air, land and sea assets from the United States Air Force, Army, Marine Corps and Navy, as well as French, German, Italian and Norwegian avia tion and ground units. The test was the final exam required prior to the declaration of ini tial operational capability for Mode 5. Participants squawked and interrogat ed Mode 5 during each days vulner ability window while data recorders logged the Mode 5 data and compared it to Link 16 and other aircraft timespace-position information. The exer cise sought to achieve its test objec tives in the context of a simulated air war between opposing blue and red forces in a realistic and complex battle space. Each day fixed-wing red forc es launched and attempted to attack defended blue force positions while blue forces used Mode 5 to discrimi nate hostile tracks and defend those positions. To further simulate a complex and realistic battle space, multiple rota ry-wing platforms, surface ships, and Army and Marine Corps ground units simultaneously conducted various mission sets to further stress Mode 5s fidelity in a modern-day battlefield. The Proud Warriors flew close to 100 hours over two weeks in support of Bold Quest. The detachments 12 maintainers put forth a tireless effort and worked long hours to ensure their two helicopters met 100 percent of scheduled vulnerability windows and provided valid Mode 5 transponder interrogation responses. In addition to fully satisfying the exercises primary objective, Bold Quest 13-1 provided a forum for inter national training rarely experienced by stateside units. Participants had the opportunity to practice tactics, techniques, and procedures with other services and with coalition partners to validate their effective ness prior to employment in theatre. HSM-72 aircrews provided a test plat form for Patriot missile battery Mode 5 lethal interrogations, practiced close air support with American and Italian Joint Terminal Air Controllers and fer ried PMA-281 technical representa tives to USS Jason Dunham (DDG-109) to ensure Mode 5 functionality and to calibrate the ships Close-In Weapons System. Upon completion of the event, recorded data greatly exceeded Joint Staff requirements making Bold Quest an outstanding success. HSM-72s participation was instrumental in facilitating the expected certification of Mode 5 IFF for all Navy APX-123 equipped H-60 aircraft. HSM-72Undersanders numerous operation al assignments include HS-4 Black Knights with an embark on board USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63); HS-1 as a fleet readiness squadron instructor; HS-5 Nightdippers as quality assurance offi cer; HS-15 Red Lions as a department head, and HS-5 Nightdippers as execu tive officer with a follow on assignment as commanding officer. During his tenure, the Nightdippers were awarded the Isbell Trophy and Thatch Award for anti-submarine warfare and anti-sur face warfare excellence and completed successful deployments in support of Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. He has accumulated 4,500 flight hours during his naval career. Undersanders shore and staff assign ments include Naval Strike and Air Warfare Center (NSAWC) in Fallon, Nev. as an air wing instructor and later helped develop the Seahawk Weapons and Tactics Instructor course. During this tour he also served as flag aide to Commander, Naval Strike & Air Warfare Center. In addition, he had assign ments at Naval Air Systems Command Airworthiness Office, and U.S. Strategic Command, JFCC Global Strike J5, where he served as chief, Conventional Nonkinetic Plans Division. On Jan. 13, 2012, Undersander assumed the position of NAS Jacksonville executive officer. During his tour as command ing officer, Sanders expertly led NAS Jacksonville, the third largest naval base in the U.S., employing 22,000 personnel. NAS Jacksonville is a primary instru ment of national security and its warf ighters play a prominent role in conduct ing every core capability of the Maritime Strategy. Focused directly on support to operational units, air station person nel worked around the clock providing services to 14 home-based squadrons, numerous detachments, joint com mands, government agencies and carrier strike group exercises. Air Operations handled over 52,600 flight operations and supported 30 detachments consist ing of 1,300 personnel and 242 aircraft. Additionally, station personnel sup ported Pinecastle Training Complex, the only Navy range on the East Coast where the warfighter can deliver live ordnance. Sanders ensured its unprecedented and accident-free growth in fiscal year 2012 by exceeding the Chief of Naval Operations mandated 75 percent mishap reduction goal in addition to being almost 60 percent below the industry guidelines for days-away restricted time established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Sanders also aligned the require ments, resources and acquisition pro cesses and provided support and service to transition the P-3 to P-8A, HS to HSM, logistic and reserve squadrons, joint ser vices and allies. During his tenure, NAS Jax completed or started construction on nearly $100 million to support the P-8A Poseidon aircraft as well as the Triton and Fire Scout unmanned aerial systems and var ious other quality of life facilities. Sanders led his team to achiev ing two unprecedented back-to-back Commander-in-Chief Installation Excellence Awards for best installa tion in the United States Navy and the Secretary of the Navy Gold Energy Level of Achievement. NAS Jacksonville has installed 1,440 square feet of roofmounted solar collectors with a first year utility savings of over $30,000. Sanders will report to Commander, Naval Air Forces Pacific as chief of staff, Carrier Strike Group 1 on board USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70). The new NAS Jax executive officer will be Cmdr. Howard Wanamaker. CHANGE OF COMMANDand spray fields in the South Antenna Farm area. This will provide more than 200,000 gallons per day of treated wastewater from the reuse pond and will result in zero discharge of all treat ed wastewater from the station to the St. Johns River. NAS Jax has a long history of reusing treated wastewater instead of discharg ing to the St. Johns River. In 1997, the station and Timuquana Country Club partnered to construct the first phase of the Reuse Project: a 200,000 gallonsper-day gravity-fed wastewater reuse system from the station to the club to irrigate its golf course. In 2011, NAS Jax constructed phase two of the project a pump station at the wastewater treat ment plant on the north side of the air field and 2.2-mile pipeline under the airfield and cantonment area to a reuse pond in the middle of the station. This is the prime example of part nerships working together to achieve a common goal. Next year, we will start the final phase with a spray field at the antenna farm which will mean zerodischarge to the St. Johns River, said NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders. Its amazing to see the enthusiasm people have for the river here and how excited they are to learn about this proj ect, he continued. You would think a new aircraft hangar being built would garner the attention, but even those outside the environmental side of the house are extremely interested in this project. The City of Jacksonville really loves this river. Florida Department of Environmental Protection Director Greg Strong also addressed those in attendance at the ceremony. Not only is NAS Jax helping to min imize impacts to river, but you are also helping to reduce withdrawals of groundwater from the aquifer. NAS Jax is leading the way, showing how to be a good and responsible environmental stewards of the river and we couldnt be more proud of this partnership, he said. NAS Jax Environmental Director Kevin Gartland praised those involved in the project. Its the partnerships with our city and state counterparts that are making this all happen. We couldnt have done this without them. Its a win-win for all of us, he stated. WATER Yorktown Gate Building 9 Pass and ID Office hours: Monday Friday from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Commercial Gate/Pass Office: Monday Friday from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. Passes will be issued by the Yorktown gate sentry after hours and weekends. Non-NCAC (RAPID Gate) personnel will only be authorized access during commercial gate hours.Pass & ID hours of operation 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013

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The VR-62 Nomads crew of Convoy 3744 was recently tasked with airlifting a rare piece of naval history the remains of Howell Torpedo No.24. Initially the Nomads were unaware of the significance of the lift. The only thing the crew knew was that at the bottom of the lift message there was Lift F and next to that was the word Historical. The Nomads landed at NAS North Island, Calif., and picked up Lift F containing one of three known examples of the Howell torpedo Howell serial number 24. The lift message directed the Nomad crew to deliver the torpedo to Naval Air Facility Washington D.C. and as usual, the Nomads deliv ered. Waiting for the crew of Convoy 3744, were staff mem bers of Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC), Washington Navy Yard ready to take custody of this important piece of naval history. As a result of this successful mission, the Nomads received a thank-you letter from J.B. Thomas, assistant director for collections management at NHHC. Dolphins in the Navy Marine Mammal Program off the coast of San Diego discov ered the mid and tail sections of the Howell torpedo in early 2013. Only 50 torpedos of this design were manufactured in the late 1800s. Prior to the dis covery of this latest example, only two were known to exist which are located at the Naval Undersea Museum and the Naval War College Museum. VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Anthony Scarpino said, Providing air logistics support for U.S. Naval forces around the world is a privilege, but relo cating an object of such his torical significance is a thrill. The Sailors of VR-62 were hon ored to receive praise from the Naval History and Heritage Command. The Nomads are based at NAS Jacksonville and are one of five Navy Reserve C-130 squadrons serving the Navys global logistics needs fulltime. As the only hospital in Northeast Florida certi fied as Baby Friendly by the World Health Organization and United Nations Childrens Fund, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville recognizes World Breastfeeding Week Aug. 1-7. This years World Breastfeeding Week theme, Breast Feeding Support: Close to Mothers stresses the need to provide support to mothers so they can initiate, establish and maintain proper breast feeding practices. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics journal, infant mortality is reduced by 21 percent among breast fed babies in the U.S. And of the two to three babies born each day at NH Jacksonville, about 90 percent are breast fed when they leave compared to a national breastfeeding rate of about 75 percent. Other benefits to baby of mothers milk include less ear infections, diar rhea, respiratory infec tions, asthma, diabe tes, obesity, childhood leukemia and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Benefits for mom include less postpartum depres sion, diabetes, and breast and ovarian cancer. Proper breastfeed ing offers health ben efits for both the mother and child, while reliev ing some of the finan cial pressures associ ated with baby formula and medical care, said NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer. Were commited to supporting new parents and reducing childhood illnesses, as evidenced by the commands Baby Friendly certification. VR-62 Nomads transport important historical find Naval Hospital Jacksonville recognizes World Breastfeeding Week Aug. 1-7 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013 9

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For the week of July 29, Tactical Operations Center-Jacksonville is standing down as Mobile Tactical Operations Center (MTOC) One takes over the Operations Control Center (OPCON) watch duties for maritime patrol aircraft operating from the sta tion. That means every P-3 and P-8 air crew will come to our temporary tented compound near the stations Commercial Gate for their pre-flight briefings and post-mission analyses. All radio and Internet traffic will also go through MTOC-1, as they monitor every maritime patrol flight that origi nates from NAS Jacksonville during the week, said MTOC-1 Officer in Charge Lt. Cmdr. Thomas Jacobson. Our MTOCs can load up and fly to an expeditionary airfield and be ready to support P-3 and P-8 mari time patrol missions within 96 hours, said Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing-11, Capt. Eric Wiese during a tour of the unit July 24. MTOC personnel lead the way in col lecting and analyzing mission data to provide force commanders integrated and actionable tactical information in support of naval expeditionary forces. Our OPCON receives the air task ing orders, collects information per taining to the tasking, and provides aircrew with pre-flight briefs that pre pare them to execute their missions, said AWOC(NAC/AW) Steven Smith, the MTOC-1 operations CPO. On the P-8 side of the house, MTOC1 is the first to receive the P-8 TacMobile Increment 2.1 network and gear set. It includes new situational awareness tools that enable more effective tactical picture management as well as network mass storage and content management. It also delivers significant acoustic sys tem upgrades that support P-8 and leg acy P-3 anti-submarine warfare mis sions, explained Smith. MTOC-1 has synchronized its InterDeployment Readiness Cycle (IDRC) with that of VP-16, the Navys first oper ational P-8A squadron that is sched uled to deploy to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan this November. Whenever a VP-16 Poseidon dets from Kadena for an exercise, MTOC-1 will load the right mix of specialized expe ditionary equipment onto a logistics air craft and accompany them, said Smith.MTOC-1 is also the first to simulta neously support two platforms the MTOC-1 ready to support first P-8 deployment JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013 11

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VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens and retired Navy Capt. Timothy Norgart, vice president of busi ness development for Boeing Military Aircraft awarded naval flight officer (NFO) wings to 13 officers July 19. Those receiving their wings included: Ensign Charles Ballard, Ensign Joseph Case, Lt. j.g. Chad Compton, Ensign Brian Cotroneo, CWO2 Patrick Habr, Lt. j.g. Kelly Harkins, Lt. j.g. Celesse Hidrovo-Guidry, Lt. j.g. Justin Jackson, Lt. j.g. Tatiana Kish, Ensign Ellen Roesberry, Ensign Avik Saha, Ensign Russell Smith, and Lt. j.g. Gregory Syers. The recipients completed the Undergraduate Maritime Flight Officer syllabus at VP-30, earning their coveted wings of gold. These newly winged aviators will now enroll in the CAT I Fleet Replacement Squadron syllabus at VP-30. Upon completion of the CAT I sylla bus, they will report to operational mar itime patrol and reconnaissance squad rons to begin their initial sea tours in either Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, Whidbey Island, Wash. or Jacksonville. The NFO training pipeline begins with Aviation Preflight Introduction (API) instruction in Pensacola, where all aviation officers undergo a class room syllabus and are taught the basics of naval aviation which includes aero dynamics, meteorology and principles of navigation. After completing API, all student NFOs report for primary training at VT-10, co-located at NAS Pensacola. While assigned to VT-10 they transi tion from a classroom learning environ ment to initial airborne flight training in the T-6A Texan II. Upon completion of primary flight training at NAS Pensacola, officers who are selected for the P-3, EP-3 or P-8 training pipeline report to VP-30 for specific aircraft training. VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens recognized recent graduates of the P-8A Acoustic and NonAcoustic initial training (CAT I) syllabus during a ceremony July 12. The graduates of Acoustic Operator Class 1302 and Non-Acoustic Operator Class 1302 will now report to their assigned operational squadrons to begin their initial sea tour. Honor Graduates AWO1 John Herrman AWO3 David Richie Class 1302 CAT I Acoustic Operator AWO3 EJ Clarence Gasmen AWO3 David Richie AWO3 Juan Segura-Perez Class 1302 CAT I Nonacoustic Operator AWO1 John Herrman AWO3 Justin Bibrey AWO3 Jonathan Grimaldo AWO3 Michal Herman AWO3 Cody Wojasinski VP-30 wings Navys newest naval flight officers VP-30 P-8 Aircrewman classes graduate VP-45s new senior chief keeps tradition aliveAt a July 9 cer emony held at VP-45 Maintenance Control, ADCS(AW) Loleni Talo became the squadrons newest senior chief petty officer. Talos daugh ters, Malia and Mailee, pinned on his new singlestar anchors after VP-45 Commanding Officer Cmdr. John Brabazon, administered the oath to make his promotion offi cial. A native of Honolulu, Hawaii, Talo has more than 17 years of service in the Navy. The news of his pro motion came while on a plane to San Diego dur ing VP-45s recent postdeployment leave. Messages and calls to congratulate him began pouring in just as he was required to turn off his phone prior to takeoff. I had to wait five hours to talk to anyone about the news. By the time I landed, everyone already knew, Talo said. The day following the promotion ceremony, Talo continued a tradi tion of passing his chiefs anchors to two up-andcoming Pelican Sailors AD2(AW) Catherine Larkin and AD2 (AW) JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013 13

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment July 26 Jason Lamar Duo Deweys Family Night Aug. 2, 48 p.m. Enjoy free activities including a magic show, games, back-to-school goodies, inflatables and more!Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 510 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 1 6 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer Going on now through Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 years and younger receive one free game of bowling every day until 5 p.m. Win prizes all summer long! Fall and winter bowling leagues are now forming! Leagues begin in September.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Lap Swim (water park, water slide and concessions are not open) Monday Friday 68 a.m. & 67 p.m. Recreational Swim (waterpark, water slide and concessions are open) Monday Sunday, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. 2013 Learn to Swim Program Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1 Private pool parties can be reserved at the fitness center Parties are not available during regular business hours of operation and occur in the evenings when the pool is closed. Parties must be reserved ten days prior to party date, payment due at time of reservation For more information, call 542-3518 Dive In Movie at the outdoor pool Aug.10, 610 p.m. Movie begins at 8:30 p.m. Free admission, hot dog, chips and a drink! I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets on sale now $70 section 147 Legoland Florida Free ticket for active duty military through Oct. 27 Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 2013 2014 Artist Series featuring Mama Mia, Memphis, Celtic Thunder, War Horse, Men are From Mars, Women are from Venus, Million Dollar Quartet and The D* Word is a Musical are on sale now!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Paintball Trip Aug. 3 at 9 a.m. Free Jags Shuttle Aug. 9 at 6 p.m. Volunteer at HabiJax Aug. 10 at 7 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Aug. 6 & 20 for active duty Aug. 8 & 22 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Furlough Fridays All civilian employees that have been furloughed can play 18-holes with cart & green fee for $20Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Movie Under the Stars Aug. 23 at 8 p.m. featuring Monsters University Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Aug. 5 Sept. 16 $500 per person The Greater Jax Area USO has now opened-up ticket sales for the preseason Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Miami Dophins game Aug. 9 at 7:30 p.m. and the preseason Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Philadelphia Eagles game Aug. 24 at 7:30 p.m. to all active duty, retirees, vet erans with ID cards, National Guard, Reservists, DoD civilians and their fam ilies. Tickets are available at the NAS Jax and NS Mayport USO for $15 each, cash transactions only. Guidelines: All active duty including Florida National Guard and Reservists on cur rent active duty orders and dependents are eligible to purchase/use these tick ets. dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equals four. If you have less than four you may only purchase total for fam ily. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but dependent chil dren are not authorized to represent the service member/spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to pur chase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO director. chase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest. No excep tions. request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the sea son.Requests, with justification, must be sent to Mike OBrien at mobrien@ usojax.com Anyone caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets will be pro hibited from buying any more tickets for the entire season. tickets are first come, first served. For more information, call 778-2821.Jaguars preand regular season football tickets available at USORegular season tickets are available for the following days and timesDateof Game Opponent Time Sale Begins Sept. 8 Kansas City Chiefs 1 p.m. Aug. 26 Sept. 29 Indianapolis Colts 1 p.m. Sept. 16 Oct. 20 San Diego Chargers 1 p.m. Oct. 7 Nov. 17 Arizona Cardinals 1 p.m. Nov. 4 Dec. 5 Houston Texans 8:25 p.m. Nov. 25 Dec. 15 Buffalo Bills 1 p.m. Dec. 2 Dec. 22 Tennessee Titans 1 p.m. Dec. 9 For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013

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Students from DarnellCookman Middle/High School of the Medical Arts partici pated in a weeklong training course at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville, July 15-19, as part of the hospitals Science, Service, Medicine and Mentoring (S2M2) program. Ten students participated in the intense five-day outreach program that included panel discussions, hands-on medical applications, workshops, job shadowing and engagement with NH Jacksonville clinicians (physicians, surgeons, nurses, physician assistants, pharma cists and psychologists). Your selection to our S2M2 program speaks to your com mitment and passion for the medical profession, said Capt. Gayle Shaffer, NH Jacksonville commanding officer during opening remarks to the stu dents. Being a part of medicine can be one of the most reward ing things you can ever achieve in your lifetime. And if you choose military medicine, youll have the added oppor tunity of providing battlefield, disaster and humanitarian care around the world. The students received realworld experience in patient care areas from the oper ating room and emergency department to pharmacy and physical/occupational therapy. It was absolutely fun to have the opportunity to simu late stabilizing broken bones through external fixation, and immobilizing bones through internal fixation, said Tiffany Hoeckelberg, a DarnellCookman junior. My goal is to apply for the Naval Academy next year, and pursue a career as a Navy orthopedic surgeon. The goal of NH Jacksonvilles S2M2 program is to encour age, nurture, and enhance high school students commit ment to science and medicine in a welcoming and intellec tually stimulating environ ment. The S2M2 partnership with Darnell-Cookman com plements the schools focus on equipping high-perform ing students with the skills and experiences to pursue advanced medical degrees. I have always been interest ed in medicine, and my goal is to work in the field of neu rology, said Rory Peterson, a Darnell-Cookman junior. My passion was further excited when I was allowed to job-shadow one of the neu ro-radiologists, who shared his knowledge and expertise with me. This experience has brought my dream of becom ing a physician one step closer to reality. Developed in 2004 by the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, the S2M2 program is designed to support the next generation of health care professionals by nurturing high school stu dents commitment to science and medicine. Sailors aboard aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) held a cake-cutting ceremony July 25 to commemorate the 15th anni versary of the ships commission ing. Several plank owners, again assigned to Harry S. Truman, were on hand for the ceremony. A plank owner is a Sailor who was a mem ber of a commands original crew. Truman was my first com mand, and as a plank owner, this ship will always be special to me, said AO1(AW/SW) James Spencer. I learned my job, made rank, and learned leadership on this ship. ABH1(AW/SW) Brandon Coffelt said the anniversary remind ed him of his early years in the Navy. This is a special day for me because I was here 15 years ago during the commissioning, and it shows me how far the Navy has come and how far I have come in my career since starting as a 19-year-old airman apprentice, said Coffelt. CWO4 Brian Armstrong, plank owner and Trumans food ser vice officer said the ships his tory of success is due largely in part to its superb upkeep by the crew. Truman has always had a great reputation as a carrier and as far as maintenance and safety, we have improved so much, said Armstrong. I have noticed over the years, ships can go down very quickly if they are not taken care of and Truman has been main tained very well. Lt. Jason Conyer, plank owner and Weapons Department G-3 division officer, attributes Trumans success to the pride and professionalism of its crew. The crew makes the ship, said Conyer. This is my third deployment on Truman, and the ship looks just as new as it did 15 years ago. Some members of Trumans crew have made long-lasting friendships while serving on board. I still keep in contact with a lot of the Sailors I served with 15 years ago, said Spencer. The thing I will miss the most when I get out of the Navy is the people I have met and the bonds I have formed with them. Truman Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Roth credited the crew, past and present, for bringing out the best in the ship. Truman was an outstand ing ship 15 years ago, Truman is an outstanding ship today, and Truman will continue to be an out standing ship 15 years from now, said Roth. This will always be because of the men and women who make it happen each day. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation is host ing a Hiring Our Heroes Jacksonville, a hiring fair for veterans and military spouses Aug. 7 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at JaxPort Cruise Terminal, 9810 August Dr., Jacksonville. More than 45 employers are expected to participate with jobs available for veterans and military spouses of all ranks and levels of experience. The event will also include a free GE employ ment workshop that features one-on-one mentor ing sessions on resume building, job search tools, and interviewing techniques for all job-seekers. Interested job seekers should register for free at hoh. greatjob.net. Walk-in job seekers are allowed (veterans must pro vide proof of service). Naval Hospital mentors high school students Truman celebrates 15th anniversary Job fair slated for veterans/military spouses at JaxPort Cruise Terminal 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013

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Center for Service Support (CSS) announced they are actively looking for high-quality senior Sailors to enhance its already dynamic team July 23. CSS and its learning sites provide Sailors with the knowledge and skills needed to support the Fleets warfighting mission. More than 300 staff and faculty work hand-in-hand with the Fleet and are dedicated to ensure training is current and well executed on behalf of 10,000 Sailors who graduate from CSS courses annually in the administration, logis tics and media communities. During a three-year tour, a subject matter expert (SME) attends the Navy Instructor Training Course, granting them the Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) 9502, works closely with learn ing sites, compiles questions for rat ing advancement exams and may also earn the prestigious Master Training Specialist (MTS) qualification. Command Master Chief CMDCM(SW/SCW/AW) Reinaldo Rosado said that an SMEs influence doesnt just extend to the Sailors, but to the commands they serve in, all over the globe. Sailors we train often serve in diverse assignments, said Rosado. Many of our former students have served everywhere from the front lines of Afghanistan to the decks of our car riers. They report to their commands trained and ready to go to work imme diately. Capt. Mark Murphy, CSS command ing officer said the commands expec tations and goals are high but very obtainable. Work hard: be brilliant on the basics and take care of our people, said Murphy. Work, study and learn at the job youve been given. Be ready when opportunity knocks. Work smart. Mission first, safety always. Push decision making to the lowest level. Communicate up and down the chain. Have fun. Keep a balance, keep a sense of humor and test your ideas. We want the best to train the Navys future. CSS was established Feb. 7, 2003, in response to Naval Education and Trainings (NETC) initiative to address challenges in Fleet training and to improve Sailors professional develop ment products and processes. In streamlining the business of deliv ering training, NETC charged 15 learn ing centers like CSS with specific areas of naval training. NETC organized the centers around their functional areas and appropriately aligned schools and respective training sites to each center. Sailors who are eligible for shore duty and in their transfer window are encouraged to contact their com mand career counselors and detailers. For available billet opportunities, visit https://www.cmsid.navy.mil/. The Defense Department continues working toward its goal of ensuring the mission is met with fully qualified and capable personnel, regardless of gender, the Pentagons director of officer and enlisted personnel management said recently. Speaking at a House Armed Services Committee subcommittee hearing on women in service, Juliet Beyler said the services and U.S. Special Operations Command are working with research agencies to review and validate occupa tional standards. The department is proceeding in a measured, deliberate and respon sible manner to implement changes that enable service members to serve in any capacity based on their ability and qualifications, she said. Each ser vice is conducting thorough doctrine, training, education, facilities and pol icy analyses to ensure deliberate and responsible implementation, she added. Beyler was joined at the hearing by witnesses from each of the military ser vices and Socom. Our goal is to integrate women lead ers and soldiers into recently opened positions and units as expeditiously as possible, said Army Lt. Gen. Howard B. Bromberg, deputy chief of staff for personnel. The first step is to validate the physical and mental performance standards for every military occupa tion, he said. From there, a battery of tests will be developed to assess whether recruits are capable of achieving the standards of their potential occupation, said Marine Corps Lt. Gen. Robert Milstead Jr., deputy commandant for manpower and reserve affairs. Standards ultimately will become gender-neutral, Bromberg said, though training for those standards may be different for men and women. Occupational training in the Marine Corps is gender-mixed, Milstead told the panel, but in recognition of the need to train men and women differently, the transformation from recruit to Marine is gender-segregated. Our boot camp is about the trans formation of individuals -men and women -from being a civilian to being a United States Marine. ... They just need different steps as they go, he said. They end up in the same place -theyre United States Marines. The decision to rescind the 1994 rule excluding women from direct ground combat and combat occupations was announced earlier this year. ThenDefense Secretary Leon Panetta and Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, directed the military services and Socom to imple ment the change by Jan. 1, 2016, Beyler said. By September 2015, each service and Socom must review and validate all occupational standards to ensure that they are occupationally and operation CSS looking for Subject Matter Experts Services to open combat jobs for women Nicholas Hernandez. Its been a long-stand ing tradition that we pass our anchors down to someone we think will be in our place one day, Talo said. I stayed true to my roots (by passing them on to fellow avia tion machinists mates) plus, I see a little of me in them. The roots of this par ticular set of anchors run deep. Talo received them almost 13 years ago from his senior chief, ADCS Mike Miller. Talo knows that Miller had received them from another AD chief many years before that. Larkin, who has served almost six years and worked for Talo since 2010, used one word to describe receiving the anchors, awesome. Hes always been there and has been the first person Id go to with any problems, Larkin said. Hernandez, who has 10 years of service, has known Talo since 2005. During those years, he has always listened and taken care of his Sailors. Receiving Talos anchors confirmed what many at VP-45 already know, that these two out standing Sailors have a very bright future ahead of them. PROMOTION JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013 17

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18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013 NH Jacksonville is currently one of 166 Baby Friendly hospitals and birth centers in the U.S. The Baby Friendly designation is awarded after a rigorous onsite survey is completed, and maintained by continu ing to practice 10 crucial program elements. The com prehensive program includes initiating breastfeeding in the first hour of life, rooming-in with moms and babies in the same room, educating staff and patients, and fostering breastfeeding support groups. Baby Friendly certification is all about reducing infant mortality, said Heather Huffman, chair of the Northeast Florida Breastfeeding Collaborative. Naval Hospital Jacksonville and other hospitals like it across the nation are doing their part to promote healthier babies. Throughout the year, NH Jacksonville offers a wide range of classes free-of-charge to patients giving birth at its hospitalincluding baby boot camp, new parent orientation, prenatal exercise, Hypnobirthing, infant massage, breastfeeding and prepared childbirth. Plus, the hospitals private labor/delivery and mater nal/infant suites offer couplet care (with mom and baby rooming together), breast pumps, breastfeeding counseling from lactation nurses, siesta for the fiesta daily quiet time to support feeding, newborn hearing screening, and an educational newborn channel on television. Dads are welcome to stay the night and vis iting hours are round-the-clock. NH Jacksonville patients can register for free classes by calling 904-542-2229 (BABY). To learn more about the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (administered in the U.S. by Baby Friendly USA), visit www.babyfriend lyusa.org BREASTFEEDING P-8A and P-3C. Adding the Poseidon to mix required about six more stacks of technical equipment. When deployed to Okinawa, MTOC-1 will support both the VP-16 War Eagles (P-8A) and the VP-46 Grey Knights (P-3C). MTOC-1 mission configurations range from a 3,000-pound pallet of gear to full expeditionary mode includ ing tents, generators, air conditioners, antennas and equipment that weigh in at more than 60,000 pounds. Jacobson noted that a naval reserve unit, MTOC-Selfridge from Michigan, is in training with MTOC-1 to pre pare for their upcoming deployment to the 5th Fleet AOR. Theyve been a significant part of our training basi cally intertwined with our people from when the first generator hit the deck to erecting tents and getting gear properly installed. When they arrive in their new AOR, I know theyll be well trained to set up the right way, right away. According to a July 8 NAVAIR news release, the P-8A Poseidon program successfully completed its Initial Operational Test and Evaluation (IOT&E). Achieving IOT&E is a mile stone that will inform the full-rate pro duction decision for the program. It also means the P-8A program continues to be on track for an initial operational deployment this winter when the first P-8A squadron (VP-16) will deploy with P-3C squadrons to the 7th Fleet AOR. To date, nine low rate initial production aircraft have been delivered to the fleet and six test aircraft have been delivered to NAVAIR. According to the program of record, the Navy plans on purchasing 117 P-8A aircraft. MTOC-1 ally relevant and applied gender-neutrally, she added. We have always maintained that our [special oper ations forces] standards are occupationally specif ic, operationally relevant and gender-neutral. They are just the standards, said Army Maj. Gen. Bennet Sacolick, director of force management and develop ment for Socom. Our review will be a good opportu nity to verify this assumption. Plans for managing the integration of women into previously closed units and occupations already have been submitted and reviewed by Dempsey and Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and were released last month, Beyler said. Each plan manages positions in two general catego ries: currently open occupations that previously were restricted by the unit of assignment, and currently closed occupations, such as infantry or armor special ties. And each has identified decision points by which they will make final determinations to open occupa tions and positions or request an exception to policy to keep the position or occupation closed, Beyler said. For Socom, the focus is on whether small units, operating near or behind enemy lines, can achieve full integration while maintaining unit readiness, cohe sion and morale, Sacolick said. Women have been attached to our combat units for several years, part of our cultural support teams, civil affairs, military information support teams, intel ligence support and a host of other occupational spe cialties, he said. And they have performed magnificently. The Air Force already has more than 99 percent of its positions open to both men and women, said Brig. Gen. Gina Grosso, director of force management pol icy and deputy chief of staff for manpower, personnel and services. The remaining 4,600 positions are in seven career fields affiliated with special operations and longrange reconnaissance ground combat units. The Air Force is working to open these positions as well, Grosso added. [The] Navy expects to have no closed occupations, a very limited number of closed positions, and equal professional opportunity for females in every officer designator and enlisted rating by 2016, said Navy Rear Adm. Barbara Sweredoski, reserve deputy for military personnel plans and policy. Exceptions must be personally approved by both the defense secretary and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Beyler said. Opening combat occupations to women will enhance the readiness and combat effec tiveness of forces, she added. Implementation through 2016 will be an evolution ary process, she said. We are committed to opening positions and occupations when and how it makes sense while preserving unit readiness, cohesion and the quality of the all-volunteer force. Standards will be uncompromising, established for the task of defending our nation and rooted in care fully analyzed requirements, she added. Bromberg said the Army is taking that approach. We will not sacrifice warfighting capability, the trust of Congress or that of the American people as we seek to enhance force readiness and capability, he said. We will select the best-qualified soldiers, regard less of gender, for each job within the Army profession, ensuring our future force capability and readiness. Beyler told the House panel that the Defense Department is committed to doing it right. We recognize there will be challenges, but we will learn much from each step, she said. By addressing issues head-on, capitalizing on les sons learned and through open communication with Congress, we will institutionalize these important changes integrating women into occupations and units in a climate where they can succeed and flour ish. COMBAT WOMEN In coordination with the Australian Defense Force (ADF), U.S. 7th Fleet is taking the lead in the safe retrieval and disposal of four bombs that were jet tisoned off the coast of Queensland, Australia by two AV-8B Harrier aircraft in an emergency situation July 16. The U.S. military is aware of its professional responsibility to mitigate the environmental impact of its exercises and operations. In partnership with Australian counterparts, and particularly in the context of Exercise Talisman Saber, the U.S. military conscientiously conforms to the proper rules and protocols set forth by Australian military and civilian authorities. In conducting the retrieval, 7th Fleet will coordi nate closely with the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA) and ADF to ensure the environ ment is protected with the greatest care. The U.S. military has been in close contact with ADF and GBRMPA to determine the appropriate course of action. The U.S 7th Fleet is fully committed to redressing any potential adverse environmental impact in a timely manner. More detailed plans for recovery operations will be announced as they are finalized. Take control of summer entertaining Navy officials reminded Sailors July 20 to be respon sible hosts, especially when planning to serve alco holic beverages. First thing to do as a party host is make sure you know who the designated drivers are ahead of time, said Dorice Favorite, director, Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Office (NADAP). As the host of the party you should provide a safe, fun-filled environ ment, ensure designated drivers are identified at the beginning of the party and keep a watchful eye for guests who may appear to be intoxicated. Here are some tips to help host an enjoyable event: ignated drivers; dont drink alcoholic beverages; reliable bartender to help you keep track of the size and number of drinks that guests consume; available; from serving him or her any more alcohol. Serve him/ her either water or non-alcoholic beverages; serve a great dessert treat with coffee; been drinking; anyone leave without your knowledge. Hosting a party should be fun and guests should drink responsibly, Favorite said. If, despite your efforts, some of your guests have had too much to drink take control. Take their car keys, arrange for a ride with another guest who is sober, or call a taxi. 7th Fleet plans Harrier-jettisoned ordnance retrieval

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 1, 2013 FIGHT CRIME TEAMWORK P-8A SUPPORT Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders hosted a ribbon-cutting ceremony with representatives from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, St Johns River Water Management District and City of Jacksonville July 24 to recognize completion of the third phase of the NAS Jacksonville Wastewater Reuse Project. Using a St. Johns River Water Management District $400,000 grant, the City of Jacksonville in partnership with the installation environmental and utilities staff completed construction of a pump station and 800-foot pipeline from the station reuse pond to the sta tion golf course irrigation system. The new system provides more than 300,000 gallons per day of treated wastewater from the reuse pond and eliminates the need for 37 million gallons a year of groundwater from the Floridian aquifer. In 2014, the city will use a district $1.4 million grant to com plete the final phase of the project to construct a two-mile pipeline HSM-72 spearheads H-60 Mode 5 testing during Bold QuestThe first MH-60R Seahawk heli copter detachment from HSM72 returned to NAS Jacksonville recently after participating in Bold Quest 13-1, a multinational Joint Fires assessment event that fea tured a joint operational test of the Mode 5 Identification, Friend or Foe (IFF) system. The two-week exercise, overseen by the Joint Staff J-6 (Command, Control, Communications and Computers/Cyber), was centered at MCAS Cherry Point, N.C., and covered the mid-Atlantic off-shore training ranges from Hampton Roads, Va., to the Jacksonville area. The Mode 5 system under test offers many improvements over existing IFF systems, including features such as GPS position, unique aircraft platform identification numbers and modern cryptoSanders praises team for successful tourNAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders and his family will bid farewell to the station following a change of command ceremony Friday, Aug. 2 at 9 a.m. at Hangar 117. Sanders will relinquish command to Capt. Roy Undersander who assumed the position of NAS Jax executive officer in January 2012. A native of Boonton, N.J., Sanders was com missioned in the Navy in September 1987 and designated a naval flight officer in January 1989. As an aviator, Sanders has completed numerous squadron tours and deployments throughout the world including instructor duty at the Navy Fighter Weapons School (TOPGUN) in Fallon, Nev. I have had a lot of challenging tours over the past 26 years, but I can definitely say this has been the most challenging and memorable tour of my naval career. I was very fortunate to fly for 20 years including a tour at Top Gun, but it was doing the same thing every day yes, it was flying, but here I had a unique opportunity to get out of my com fort zone and do things I never imagined, said Sanders. When you are part of a tenant command, you have no idea the complexity of how an installa tion runs. On a daily basis, I could be dealing with issues about the golf course to spending $50M on an integrated training center. Its different every day, he said. During his tenure, NAS Jax was selected as the best naval base in the world by Commander, Navy Installations Command for the past two years and earned presidential recognition as the best in the Department of Defense in 2012. Its all about the people working here they are true professionals. Ive been blessed to have some great people to work with over the past three years. Ive never seen an organization so committed to the job and people who are trying to make a difference, continued Sanders. Everyone is always striving to improve which is even more evident these past couple months with the furlough and reduction in force. That is why this tour has been so successful and my favorite. Ive met a lot of great people and will really miss the team here. According to Sanders, one of his most memorable moments was being pinned an honorary chief petty officer by NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd last year. I think thats the one that touched me the most. That really meant something to me. I believe in the chiefs mess as an organization and I think that is how we function in the U.S. Navy. If you have a strong chiefs mess, you will have a strong com mand. You have to back them and they have to back you it has to be a mutual buy-in. And I see that at NAS Jax, said Sanders. Ive never seen a group like the chiefs mess here get together to solve the problems of the base as a whole. Here you see that and thats a testament to CMDCM Shepherd. This base rallies around him and his leadership that not only make the base stronger, but the tenant commands stronger so if they run into a barrier that affects their mission, they can reach out for help, he said. He also is quick to reflect on some of the other memorable moments such as hosting First Lady Michelle Obama, Secretary of Defense (SECDEF) Chuck Hagel, Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus and Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert who all paid visits to the station during his tenure. Its very interesting when you get the opportunity to sit down and talk to the SECDEF, SECNAV and CNO. Only a job like this allows you to have access to and hear what the leadership of the Navy thinks, Sanders stated. Sanders also stressed the importance of recog nizing people for their accomplishments. There have just been so many unique opportunities of this job from handing out awards and command coins to junior Sailors to accepting cookies from the Girls Scouts, he said. Ill cherish all these memories. On a lighter side, Sanders, an avid golfer, proudly recalls making a hole-in-one on the NAS Jax Golf Course during a Saturday morning golf ses sion. It was on Red No. 7, while golfing with my Saturday morning golf team. Ill never forget that one, added Sanders. As for the future of the station, Sanders is con fident in its success. NAS Jax will continue that commitment to excellence long after Im gone. Yes, NAS Jax continues its environmental stewardship Undersander to take helm of NAS JacksonvilleCapt. Roy Undersander will relieve Capt. Bob Sanders as NAS Jax Commanding Officer at a change of command ceremo ny tomorrow, Aug. 2 at 9 a.m. at Hangar 117. Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast, will be the guest speaker. A native of Saint Cloud, Minn., Undersander joined the Navy in June 1987 through the Naval Aviation Cadet program. Upon completion of Aviation Officer Candidate School, he was designated a naval aviation cadet and reported to NAS Whiting Field, Fla. for primary and heli copter flight training. He was des ignated a naval aviator and com missioned as an ensign on March, 17, 1989. He earned his Bachelors Degree in Professional Aeronautics from Embry-Riddle University and a Masters Degree in National Security and Strategic Studies from the Naval War College.

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013 Aug. 1 1801 U.S. schooner Enterprise captures Tripolitan ship Tripoli. 1921 Successful tests of gyroscopic high-level bomb sight (Norden Bombsight) at Torpedo Station, Yorktown, Va. Carl Norden developed the bombsight for the Bureau of Ordnance. 1946 Office of Naval Research (ONR) established. 1950 Control of Guam transferred to U.S. Department of Interior. 1958 USS Nautilus (SSN571) submerges under Arctic ice cap near Point Barrow. Aug. 2 1943 PT-109, under com mand of Lt. j.g. John F. Kennedy, is cut in half by Japanese destroyer Amagiri. 1943 Naval task groups bombard Japanese forces on Kiska, Alaska. 1950 Amphibious force ships land Marine First Provisional Brigade at Pusan, Korea helping to save this last area of South Korea from cap ture. 1964 Three North Vietnamese PT boats attack USS Maddox (DD-731) in inter national waters in Gulf of Tonkin. Maddox sinks one. Aug. 3 1804 American Squadron, including USS Constitution, attacks Tripoli. 1812 U.S. frigate Essex captures British brig Brothers. 1861 Construction of USS Monitor authorized. 1861 First manned ascent in a balloon from a ship (gunboat USS Fanny) to observe Confederate artillery position at Hampton Roads, Va. 1942 Mildred McAffee (Horton) becomes the first woman officer commissioned into Naval Reserve. 1950 First Marine Corps aviation mission against North Korea by VMF-214, from USS Sicily. 1950 First helicopter evacuation in Korea by VMO-6. 1958 USS Nautilus (SSN571) is first ship to reach the geographic North Pole sub merged. 1970 USS James Madison (SSBN-627) conducts first submerged launching of Poseidon nuclear missile off Cape Kennedy. Aug. 4 1846 Sailors and Marines from USS Congress capture Santa Barbara. 1858 First trans-Atlan tic cable completed by USS Niagara and British ship Agamemnon. 1944 Fifth Fleet carrier task forces begin air attack against Iwo Jima and the Bonin Islands. 1947 Birth date of the Medical Service Corps. 1964 The Navy and nation al intelligence sources report a North Vietnamese PT boat attack on USS Turner Joy and USS Maddox in the Tokin Gulf prompting Congress to pass the Tonkin Gulf Resolution on Aug. 7, 1964. The attack was later proven untrue. Aug. 5 1832 Frigate Potomac is first U.S. Navy ship to entertain royalty, the king and queen of Sandwich Islands, Honolulu. 1864 Rear Adm. David Farragut wins Battle of Mobile Bay, sealing off last Confederate port on Gulf Coast. 1882 Authorization of first steel warships begins the modern Navy. 1915 First air spotting for shore batteries at Fort Monroe, Va. 1921 Yangtze River Patrol Force established as command under Asiatic Fleet. 1953 Exchange of prison ers of war of Korean Conflict (Operation Big Switch) begins. 1967 Operation Coronado III begins in Rung Sat Zone, Vietnam. 1990 Navy and Marine Task Force (USS Saipan, USS Ponce, and USS Sumter) begin evacuation of U.S. citizens and foreign nationals from Liberia during civil war. Aug. 6 1862 CSS Arkansas destroyed by her command ing officer to prevent capture by USS Essex. 1943 Battle of Vella Gulf begins. U.S. destroyers sink three of four Japanese destroyers. 1945 Atomic bomb deto nated over Hiroshima, Japan. Navy weaponeer, Capt. W.S. Parsons, armed the atomic bomb on the B-29 bomber, Enola Gay. 1990 President George Bush orders Operation Desert Shield, largest overseas deployment since Vietnam, to protect Saudi Arabia after Iraqis invasion of Kuwait. 1997 Naval Forces on Guam help rescue and provide medical care to survivors of Korean Airlines Flight 801 that crashed on Guam. Aug. 7 1782 Badge of Military Merit (Purple Heart) established. 1942 Navy Amphibious Task Force lands Marines on Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands in first U.S. land offensive of World War II. Aug. 8 1813U.S. schooners Hamilton and Scourge founder in storm on Lake Ontario. 1959 Announcement of Project Teepee, electronic system to monitor 95 percent of earths atmosphere for missile launchings or nuclear explo sions. System developed by William Thaler, ONR physicist. 1972 Women authorized for sea duty as regular ships company. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS I hadnt flown in a commercial air plane for 17 years. Yes, even though both my husband, Dustin, and my dad are Navy pilots. After 9/11, I honestly thought Id never would fly again. In 2010, I flew in the Air National Guards KC-135 because Dustin volun teered me to do it. I think he hoped it would end my fear of flying. It didnt. I never felt like the KC-135 left the ground, probably because it doesnt have passenger windows. Even when I watched a mid-air refueling, the whole thing seemed surreal. But a commercial airplane with lots of windows and piloted by someone I dont know? No way. Then, two weeks ago, Dustin asked me to fly with him to Washington, D.C., for our anniversary. I said yes even though backing out last minute remained a viable option. For me, at least. The day of our flight, I followed Dustin like a lost sheep through air port security. Which is to say, Dustin helped me place all my belongings in the proper plastic bins bumping along a conveyor belt. None of it seemed real. I still fancied running out the terminal. Then it was time to board the plane. Were just going to walk down this hallway and find our seats, Dustin said. It all looked so easy. Inviting, even. Sure, I thought, Ill walk down this hallway and then maybe Ill run back out. But Dustin held my hand and talked to me about aerodynamics. More than once he said, All those times I went to work in Pensacola, I was flying a sin gle engine airplane. You never worried about me, right? I couldnt answer. My face was cold with fright. Also, every fearful flyer knows that the process of realizing air planes are safe and the process of get ting our feet inside one are managed by two different parts of the brain: the mature, 36-year-old part, and the one that defaults to the fetal position. Before I could change my mind, however, we were rumbling down the runway. You did it, Dustin said once the wheels were off the ground, as if the whole thing was over. It was just beginning! For one hour, I panicked over every noise (The engines sound dif ferent) and Dustin reassured me (Theyre pulling back on the power to make our descent). When we landed in D.C., he said, There, now youre not afraid anymore. What? It doesnt work that way, Dustin. In five days, I had to fly back home alone. I put this out of my mind while I enjoyed time with Dustin. On the last day, I started looking at Plan Bs: Take the train. Hitch a ride with friends. Take a bus. Dustin was confused. Why not just fly? he asked. Youve already done it. Youre cured. Whats there to be afraid of anymore? Dustin, Dustin, Dustin. [shaking head] Dustin is an engineer, a numbers person. He understands things like risk and probability. Indeed, after I was pregnant with our first son and said, I think were on a roll of having all boys, Dustin is the one who famously said: One son does not make a roll. Besides, our chances of having a boy are 50/50 every time. The probability doesnt change. He flipped a penny multiple times to prove the point. So, I applied the same logic to my fear: The general populations risk of dying in a plane crash is about 1 in 2 million. That must reset with each flight, right? Or cue the ominous music are my chances getting better (worse?) with every flight? Is one safe flight a roll? Or do my chances remain the same every time? This is how a words-person who is afraid of flying thinks about risk. Sitting beside me in the airport terminal, Dustin looked stunned as he con templated my logic. Youre going to get on the plane, he said dryly, and youre going to be fine. Easy for him to say. Hed be watching my plane take off from the comfort of the ground. We said goodbye outside the line for security. Streams of mascara made tracks down my face. My stomach was in knots, and I was breathing too fast. Dustin waved until he couldnt see me anymore, and I realized he fully believed Id get on the plane. I followed other passengers onto a bus that was waiting to take us to the CRJ-200. I was still crying, and everyone saw. We exited the bus and there was no pleasant hallway to distract me from what I was about to get into. I turned to the man beside me, my hand at my throat, and said, I cant do this; Im going back. To be continued . .Hey, MoneyChic! I do not have a budget, but would like to try and use one. I really want to start saving and think a budget could help. How much should I be setting aside each month for savings? Money Chic Sez: Great question! Did you know that not many families budget? Only one-third of households budget, leaving the other two-thirds wondering where their money went. Without a household budget there is little chance you have money left at the end of the month to invest. I am a big follower of Jean Chatzky, Today Show financial editor, and she offers great advice on budgeting to help you get started saving for retirement. First things first, how well do you allocate your money? You should have five categories when you are setting up a budget. Those categories should include: housing, transportation, life, debt, and saving. What percentage of your income should you use for each category? Housing, which includes mortgage/rent, maintenance, utili ties, insurance, and taxes, should be 35 per cent of your budget. Transportation, which includes car payments, gas, repairs, insur ance, parking/tolls, train/bus fees, should be 15 percent of your budget. Life expenses such as, eating out, vacations, gifts, clothing, and entertainment should be 25 percent. Student loans, credit cards, and personal loans are part of the debt category and should be no more than 15 percent. If you can reach 10 percent of your income for sav ings, including your 401K or TSP in military speak, you are doing well and can then think about non-retirement investing. The best way to start to budget is to first keep track of all expenses. That means keeping receipts and categorizing your spending each month so you know exactly where your money is going. By knowing how much you spend, you can make changes about where you want your money to go. You can set lim its to how much you want to spend on life so that you can reach goals for saving. The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society can help you plan for now and your future. Stop by the office outside the Yorktown Gate or call 542-2832. Have questions for Hey, Money Chic? Drop me an email at megan.stolle@nmcrs.org Overcoming fear of flying (maybe)

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Navy Medicine East Commander visits hospitalThe Commander of Navy Medicine East visited Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville July 24 for an operational briefing and Naval Dental Corps call. Rear Adm. Elaine Wagner, who is also the commander of Naval Medical Center Portsmouth and chief of the Naval Dental Corps, attended senior leadership meet ings and toured the facility during her visit to the hospital the Navys fourth largest. During an executive steering com mittee meeting, Wagner met with NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer, and her senior leadership team for a status briefing on the com mands operations, goals, performance and readiness. I am clearly impressed with the direc tion that Naval Hospital Jacksonville is headed everything seems to be moving right along, said Wagner during a review at the executive meeting. Its fabulous to see significant prog ress in all areas of your Medical Home Port patient care teams. Wagner toured NH Jacksonvilles inpatient wards, including labor and delivery, maternal infant unit and multi-service unit. She then had lunch with Shaffer, Navy Medicine East Command Master Chief Michael James, NH Jacksonville Command Master Chief Bennora Simmons and Medical Home Port champions. This provided an opportunity to discuss the commands Medical Home Port care teams. Medical Home Port is Navy Medicines approach to the nationwide medical home model of care, placing the patient in the center of a collaborative team of caregivers from doctors and nurses to case managers led by the primary care manager. The patient and medical team work together for a coordinated, whole-person approach to health including preventive, routine and urgent needs. NH Jacksonville has 14 Medical Home Port care teams across the command, and is currently seeking health care industry recognition from the National Committee for Quality Assurance, the gold standard in the patient-centered medical home model. Wagner concluded her visit with a command dental call, with participa tion from the commands military, civil ian and contract staff at the hospital and five branch health clinics (via video conference). She addressed the current status and future of the Navy Dental Corps. It was great to host a visit for such a positive Navy Medicine leader, said Shaffer. The feedback we received from Rear Admiral Wagner and her chief of staff was invaluable. This allows us to evaluate ourselves and the direction were headed, ensuring the care and readiness of our nations heroes our warfighters and their families. The NAS Jax Security Department and Morale, Welfare and Recreation invites you and your family to celebrate the 30th annual National Night Out Tuesday, Aug. 6. The event will take place from 6-10 p.m. at the outdoor pool and Allegheny softball field. This year, National Night Out will be celebrated with events for all age groups and a free BBQ. National Night Out is a unique crime/ drug prevention event sponsored National Association of Town Watch. It is an effec tive and enjoyable program to promote neighborhood spirit and police-community partnerships in our fight for a safer nation. For more info, call NAS Jax Youth Activities at 778-9772 or Security at 5420960, Ext. 104.Annual National Night Out is Aug. 6 at pool JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013 Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville held its annual Command Master Chief (CMC) Challenge on board NAS Jacksonville July 8-12, promoting unity and emphasizing physical fitness within the command. Sailors from Naval Hospital Jacksonvilles hospital and branch health clin ics competed in 23 events throughout the week, all with hopes of dethroning Directorate for Clinical Support Services (DCSS), winner of the previous three CMC challenges. The Command Master Chief Challenge is designed to promote staff readiness and teamwork, stated NH Jacksonville Command Master Chief Bennora Simmons. The team-concept events chosen for the challenge are events that require unity and teamwork in order to be suc cessful, regardless of work center, pay grade, race or gender. Its important, as medical professionals, to have camaraderie amongst one another, and this years challenge was a total success in accom plishing this task, while bringing out the competitive juices of our sailors. The commands directorates fielded teams, comprised of military and civil ian staff, to compete in multiple events as they pursued the CMC challenge cup and bragging rights for one year. Teams designed flags and t-shirts, and earned points by placing in competitions with extra points for bringing the team flag to events and event participation by direc torate leaders. Other events included such activities as an obstacle course, 5K run, basket ball, volleyball, softball, swimming, pullups, tug-of-war, relay run, blind canoe race, spades, ultimate frisbee and Are you smarter than a recruit? a game based on the famous television quiz-show Jeopardy, where Navy-themed questions were answered for team points. For the fourth consecutive year, DCSS took first place, receiving the challenge cup and bragging rights for the next year. Directorate for Administration placed second overall, while Directorate for Branch Health Clinics placed third over all. Simmons awarded the CMC chal lenge cup to DCSS participants at NH Jacksonvilles command picnic on July 12the culmination of the week-long challenge. This was the most competitive chal lenge to date, stated Simmons. First through third place were separated by less than 100 points. I am looking forward to next years challenge, which is sure to rekindle fierce competition between the commands directorates. Command Master Chief Challenge sparks competitive juices at hospital

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013 5 PHOTO S BY YAN KENNON AND JAC OB SI PP EL

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VP-26 combat aircrew and support personnel travel to MalaysiaThe men and women of VP-26s Combat Aircrew Four (CAC-4) and their supporting contingent of main tenance professionals recently rep resented Commander, Task Group 72.2/4 in the Malaysia phase of Cooperative Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) 2013. Also participating were USS Freedom (LCS-1), amphibious assault units of the United States Marine Corps and sea and air components of the Malaysian Navy. The weeklong exercise is designed to enhance bilat eral ties between the countries mili taries and to build individual and collective readiness. CAC-4 hosted a static display of the P-3C Orion and flew two flights with Malaysian Air Force personnel onboard to demonstrate the search and rescue and anti-submarine war fare capabilities of the aircraft. Working with the U.S. Navy has been good for both nations and helped us see into the world of antisubmarine warfare, said Lt. Ashnia, who serves as a tactical coordination officer on one of the Malaysian Navys Super Lynx Helicopters. When not flying or interacting with the Malaysian military, the detach ment served the local civilian population through a community relation and cultural exchange project. A combined group of U.S. patrol squadron and surface fleet Sailors came together to spend a day at the Kuantan Boys Home, an orphanage for young boys in the local countryside. The group shared music, sports and traditional foods. After leaving Malaysia, Team Trident will continue on to Surabaya, Indonesia to participate in Sea Surveillance Exercise 13-1. This weeks P-8A transition spot light shines on AWO3 Sean Joy, a native of Chicago. He is part of a large mili tary family. His cousins, stepfather, and grandfather have all served in the armed forces. This strong military family history inspired him to join the U.S. Navy in May 2010. VP-5 is his first operational command and he is currently qualify ing as an electronic warfare operator (EWO). VP-5 EWOs have been transitioning to the P-8A Poseidon through a series of interactive courseware, partial task trainers, crew simulators, and training flights. Currently, Joy is participating in P-8A Poseidon tactical flights with Combat Aircrew 2. Each crew of pilots, naval flight officers, acoustic operators, and electronic warfare operators must complete five tactical flights in order to finish their transition to the P-8A. The EWO is responsible for operat ing Electronic Support Measures (ESM), Radar, Identification Friend or Foe Interrogator (IFFI), and Electro-Optical Camera. The P-8A is unique from the P-3C in that it will utilize a Sensor 4 operator who assists the EWO with the radar, camera and IFFI. It is a great pairing as it allows the more experienced EWO to focus on the more robust ESM system, commented Joy. Where an over-tasked EWO may have depended on acoustic operators, he or she can now turn to another EWO for assistance. When Joy isnt studying hard for his upcoming EWO board and Poseidon transition flights, he enjoys listening to music, attending concerts and playing or watching sports. VP-5 transition spotlight: AWO3 Sean Joy 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013

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I was the person up there accepting the installation excellence award, but I just happened to be in this job at the time. Its the people who continue to make this place great. And that will con tinue long into the future, expressed Sanders. Just look ahead at all the new construction here the P-8A replacing the P-3s, the unmanned aerial systems, FRCSE growing its a bright future! Sanders also praised the City of Jacksonville for their ongoing sup port to NAS Jax and the military. We have a great partnership with city and I couldnt be more pleased and fortunate to have the City of Jacksonvilles sup port. Its not only support to the base, but to the people who work here, vet erans and the military as a whole, he said. Its not just the local government. The people here have so much respect for the military and what we stand for. After the change of command and a family vacation while transferring across the country, Sanders will report to Commander, Naval Air Forces Pacific as chief of staff for Carrier Strike Group 1 on board USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70) for the next two years. After that, Ive been guaranteed follow-on orders in San Diego for two years. Then, I plan to retire and we plan to come back to Jacksonville. Its a great place and we know a lot of people here, said Sanders. FAREWELLgraphic features. This was the 11th event in the Bold Quest series and was comprised of live air, land and sea assets from the United States Air Force, Army, Marine Corps and Navy, as well as French, German, Italian and Norwegian aviation and ground units. The test was the final exam required prior to the declaration of initial operational capability for Mode 5. Participants squawked and interrogated Mode 5 during each days vulner ability window while data recorders logged the Mode 5 data and compared it to Link 16 and other aircraft timespace-position information. The exer cise sought to achieve its test objec tives in the context of a simulated air war between opposing blue and red forces in a realistic and complex battle space. Each day fixed-wing red forc es launched and attempted to attack defended blue force positions while blue forces used Mode 5 to discrimi nate hostile tracks and defend those positions. To further simulate a complex and realistic battle space, multiple rota ry-wing platforms, surface ships, and Army and Marine Corps ground units simultaneously conducted various mission sets to further stress Mode 5s fidelity in a modern-day battlefield. The Proud Warriors flew close to 100 hours over two weeks in support of Bold Quest. The detachments 12 maintainers put forth a tireless effort and worked long hours to ensure their two helicopters met 100 percent of scheduled vulnerability windows and provided valid Mode 5 transponder interrogation responses. In addition to fully satisfying the exercises primary objective, Bold Quest 13-1 provided a forum for international training rarely experienced by stateside units. Participants had the opportunity to practice tactics, techniques, and procedures with other services and with coalition partners to validate their effective ness prior to employment in theatre. HSM-72 aircrews provided a test platform for Patriot missile battery Mode 5 lethal interrogations, practiced close air support with American and Italian Joint Terminal Air Controllers and ferried PMA-281 technical representa tives to USS Jason Dunham (DDG-109) to ensure Mode 5 functionality and to calibrate the ships Close-In Weapons System. Upon completion of the event, recorded data greatly exceeded Joint Staff requirements making Bold Quest an outstanding success. HSM-72s participation was instrumental in facilitating the expected certification of Mode 5 IFF for all Navy APX-123 equipped H-60 aircraft. HSM-72Undersanders numerous operation al assignments include HS-4 Black Knights with an embark on board USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63); HS-1 as a fleet readiness squadron instructor; HS-5 Nightdippers as quality assurance officer; HS-15 Red Lions as a department head, and HS-5 Nightdippers as execu tive officer with a follow on assignment as commanding officer. During his tenure, the Nightdippers were awarded the Isbell Trophy and Thatch Award for anti-submarine warfare and anti-sur face warfare excellence and completed successful deployments in support of Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. He has accumulated 4,500 flight hours during his naval career. Undersanders shore and staff assign ments include Naval Strike and Air Warfare Center (NSAWC) in Fallon, Nev. as an air wing instructor and later helped develop the Seahawk Weapons and Tactics Instructor course. During this tour he also served as flag aide to Commander, Naval Strike & Air Warfare Center. In addition, he had assign ments at Naval Air Systems Command Airworthiness Office, and U.S. Strategic Command, JFCC Global Strike J5, where he served as chief, Conventional Nonkinetic Plans Division. On Jan. 13, 2012, Undersander assumed the position of NAS Jacksonville executive officer. During his tour as command ing officer, Sanders expertly led NAS Jacksonville, the third largest naval base in the U.S., employing 22,000 personnel. NAS Jacksonville is a primary instru ment of national security and its warf ighters play a prominent role in conduct ing every core capability of the Maritime Strategy. Focused directly on support to operational units, air station person nel worked around the clock providing services to 14 home-based squadrons, numerous detachments, joint com mands, government agencies and carrier strike group exercises. Air Operations handled over 52,600 flight operations and supported 30 detachments consist ing of 1,300 personnel and 242 aircraft. Additionally, station personnel sup ported Pinecastle Training Complex, the only Navy range on the East Coast where the warfighter can deliver live ordnance. Sanders ensured its unprecedented and accident-free growth in fiscal year 2012 by exceeding the Chief of Naval Operations mandated 75 percent mishap reduction goal in addition to being almost 60 percent below the industry guidelines for days-away restricted time established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Sanders also aligned the require ments, resources and acquisition pro cesses and provided support and service to transition the P-3 to P-8A, HS to HSM, logistic and reserve squadrons, joint services and allies. During his tenure, NAS Jax completed or started construction on nearly $100 million to support the P-8A Poseidon aircraft as well as the Triton and Fire Scout unmanned aerial systems and various other quality of life facilities. Sanders led his team to achiev ing two unprecedented back-to-back Commander-in-Chief Installation Excellence Awards for best installa tion in the United States Navy and the Secretary of the Navy Gold Energy Level of Achievement. NAS Jacksonville has installed 1,440 square feet of roofmounted solar collectors with a first year utility savings of over $30,000. Sanders will report to Commander, Naval Air Forces Pacific as chief of staff, Carrier Strike Group 1 on board USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70). The new NAS Jax executive officer will be Cmdr. Howard Wanamaker. CHANGE OF COMMANDand spray fields in the South Antenna Farm area. This will provide more than 200,000 gallons per day of treated wastewater from the reuse pond and will result in zero discharge of all treated wastewater from the station to the St. Johns River. NAS Jax has a long history of reusing treated wastewater instead of discharging to the St. Johns River. In 1997, the station and Timuquana Country Club partnered to construct the first phase of the Reuse Project: a 200,000 gallonsper-day gravity-fed wastewater reuse system from the station to the club to irrigate its golf course. In 2011, NAS Jax constructed phase two of the project a pump station at the wastewater treat ment plant on the north side of the airfield and 2.2-mile pipeline under the airfield and cantonment area to a reuse pond in the middle of the station. This is the prime example of part nerships working together to achieve a common goal. Next year, we will start the final phase with a spray field at the antenna farm which will mean zerodischarge to the St. Johns River, said NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders. Its amazing to see the enthusiasm people have for the river here and how excited they are to learn about this project, he continued. You would think a new aircraft hangar being built would garner the attention, but even those outside the environmental side of the house are extremely interested in this project. The City of Jacksonville really loves this river. Florida Department of Environmental Protection Director Greg Strong also addressed those in attendance at the ceremony. Not only is NAS Jax helping to min imize impacts to river, but you are also helping to reduce withdrawals of groundwater from the aquifer. NAS Jax is leading the way, showing how to be a good and responsible environmental stewards of the river and we couldnt be more proud of this partnership, he said. NAS Jax Environmental Director Kevin Gartland praised those involved in the project. Its the partnerships with our city and state counterparts that are making this all happen. We couldnt have done this without them. Its a win-win for all of us, he stated. WATER Yorktown Gate Building 9 Pass and ID Office hours: Monday Friday from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Commercial Gate/Pass Office: Monday Friday from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. Passes will be issued by the Yorktown gate sentry after hours and weekends. Non-NCAC (RAPID Gate) personnel will only be authorized access during commercial gate hours.Pass & ID hours of operation 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013

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The VR-62 Nomads crew of Convoy 3744 was recently tasked with airlifting a rare piece of naval history the remains of Howell Torpedo No.24. Initially the Nomads were unaware of the significance of the lift. The only thing the crew knew was that at the bottom of the lift message there was Lift F and next to that was the word Historical. The Nomads landed at NAS North Island, Calif., and picked up Lift F containing one of three known examples of the Howell torpedo Howell serial number 24. The lift message directed the Nomad crew to deliver the torpedo to Naval Air Facility Washington D.C. and as usual, the Nomads deliv ered. Waiting for the crew of Convoy 3744, were staff mem bers of Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC), Washington Navy Yard ready to take custody of this important piece of naval history. As a result of this successful mission, the Nomads received a thank-you letter from J.B. Thomas, assistant director for collections management at NHHC. Dolphins in the Navy Marine Mammal Program off the coast of San Diego discov ered the mid and tail sections of the Howell torpedo in early 2013. Only 50 torpedos of this design were manufactured in the late 1800s. Prior to the discovery of this latest example, only two were known to exist which are located at the Naval Undersea Museum and the Naval War College Museum. VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Anthony Scarpino said, Providing air logistics support for U.S. Naval forces around the world is a privilege, but relo cating an object of such his torical significance is a thrill. The Sailors of VR-62 were honored to receive praise from the Naval History and Heritage Command. The Nomads are based at NAS Jacksonville and are one of five Navy Reserve C-130 squadrons serving the Navys global logistics needs fulltime. As the only hospital in Northeast Florida certi fied as Baby Friendly by the World Health Organization and United Nations Childrens Fund, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville recognizes World Breastfeeding Week Aug. 1-7. This years World Breastfeeding Week theme, Breast Feeding Support: Close to Mothers stresses the need to provide support to mothers so they can initiate, establish and maintain proper breast feeding practices. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics journal, infant mortality is reduced by 21 percent among breastfed babies in the U.S. And of the two to three babies born each day at NH Jacksonville, about 90 percent are breast fed when they leave compared to a national breastfeeding rate of about 75 percent. Other benefits to baby of mothers milk include less ear infections, diar rhea, respiratory infec tions, asthma, diabe tes, obesity, childhood leukemia and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. Benefits for mom include less postpartum depres sion, diabetes, and breast and ovarian cancer. Proper breastfeed ing offers health ben efits for both the mother and child, while reliev ing some of the finan cial pressures associ ated with baby formula and medical care, said NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer. Were commited to supporting new parents and reducing childhood illnesses, as evidenced by the commands Baby Friendly certification. VR-62 Nomads transport important historical find Naval Hospital Jacksonville recognizes World Breastfeeding Week Aug. 1-7 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013 9

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For the week of July 29, Tactical Operations Center-Jacksonville is standing down as Mobile Tactical Operations Center (MTOC) One takes over the Operations Control Center (OPCON) watch duties for maritime patrol aircraft operating from the sta tion. That means every P-3 and P-8 air crew will come to our temporary tented compound near the stations Commercial Gate for their pre-flight briefings and post-mission analyses. All radio and Internet traffic will also go through MTOC-1, as they monitor every maritime patrol flight that origi nates from NAS Jacksonville during the week, said MTOC-1 Officer in Charge Lt. Cmdr. Thomas Jacobson. Our MTOCs can load up and fly to an expeditionary airfield and be ready to support P-3 and P-8 mari time patrol missions within 96 hours, said Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing-11, Capt. Eric Wiese during a tour of the unit July 24. MTOC personnel lead the way in collecting and analyzing mission data to provide force commanders integrated and actionable tactical information in support of naval expeditionary forces. Our OPCON receives the air task ing orders, collects information per taining to the tasking, and provides aircrew with pre-flight briefs that pre pare them to execute their missions, said AWOC(NAC/AW) Steven Smith, the MTOC-1 operations CPO. On the P-8 side of the house, MTOC1 is the first to receive the P-8 TacMobile Increment 2.1 network and gear set. It includes new situational awareness tools that enable more effective tactical picture management as well as network mass storage and content management. It also delivers significant acoustic sys tem upgrades that support P-8 and legacy P-3 anti-submarine warfare mis sions, explained Smith. MTOC-1 has synchronized its InterDeployment Readiness Cycle (IDRC) with that of VP-16, the Navys first operational P-8A squadron that is sched uled to deploy to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan this November. Whenever a VP-16 Poseidon dets from Kadena for an exercise, MTOC-1 will load the right mix of specialized expe ditionary equipment onto a logistics aircraft and accompany them, said Smith.MTOC-1 is also the first to simulta neously support two platforms the MTOC-1 ready to support first P-8 deployment JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013 11

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VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens and retired Navy Capt. Timothy Norgart, vice president of business development for Boeing Military Aircraft awarded naval flight officer (NFO) wings to 13 officers July 19. Those receiving their wings included: Ensign Charles Ballard, Ensign Joseph Case, Lt. j.g. Chad Compton, Ensign Brian Cotroneo, CWO2 Patrick Habr, Lt. j.g. Kelly Harkins, Lt. j.g. Celesse Hidrovo-Guidry, Lt. j.g. Justin Jackson, Lt. j.g. Tatiana Kish, Ensign Ellen Roesberry, Ensign Avik Saha, Ensign Russell Smith, and Lt. j.g. Gregory Syers. The recipients completed the Undergraduate Maritime Flight Officer syllabus at VP-30, earning their coveted wings of gold. These newly winged aviators will now enroll in the CAT I Fleet Replacement Squadron syllabus at VP-30. Upon completion of the CAT I sylla bus, they will report to operational maritime patrol and reconnaissance squadrons to begin their initial sea tours in either Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, Whidbey Island, Wash. or Jacksonville. The NFO training pipeline begins with Aviation Preflight Introduction (API) instruction in Pensacola, where all aviation officers undergo a class room syllabus and are taught the basics of naval aviation which includes aero dynamics, meteorology and principles of navigation. After completing API, all student NFOs report for primary training at VT-10, co-located at NAS Pensacola. While assigned to VT-10 they transi tion from a classroom learning environment to initial airborne flight training in the T-6A Texan II. Upon completion of primary flight training at NAS Pensacola, officers who are selected for the P-3, EP-3 or P-8 training pipeline report to VP-30 for specific aircraft training. VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens recognized recent graduates of the P-8A Acoustic and NonAcoustic initial training (CAT I) syllabus during a ceremony July 12. The graduates of Acoustic Operator Class 1302 and Non-Acoustic Operator Class 1302 will now report to their assigned operational squadrons to begin their initial sea tour. Honor Graduates AWO1 John Herrman AWO3 David Richie Class 1302 CAT I Acoustic Operator AWO3 EJ Clarence Gasmen AWO3 David Richie AWO3 Juan Segura-Perez Class 1302 CAT I Nonacoustic Operator AWO1 John Herrman AWO3 Justin Bibrey AWO3 Jonathan Grimaldo AWO3 Michal Herman AWO3 Cody Wojasinski VP-30 wings Navys newest naval flight officers VP-30 P-8 Aircrewman classes graduate VP-45s new senior chief keeps tradition aliveAt a July 9 cer emony held at VP-45 Maintenance Control, ADCS(AW) Loleni Talo became the squadrons newest senior chief petty officer. Talos daugh ters, Malia and Mailee, pinned on his new singlestar anchors after VP-45 Commanding Officer Cmdr. John Brabazon, administered the oath to make his promotion offi cial. A native of Honolulu, Hawaii, Talo has more than 17 years of service in the Navy. The news of his pro motion came while on a plane to San Diego dur ing VP-45s recent postdeployment leave. Messages and calls to congratulate him began pouring in just as he was required to turn off his phone prior to takeoff. I had to wait five hours to talk to anyone about the news. By the time I landed, everyone already knew, Talo said. The day following the promotion ceremony, Talo continued a tradi tion of passing his chiefs anchors to two up-andcoming Pelican Sailors AD2(AW) Catherine Larkin and AD2 (AW) JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013 13

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment July 26 Jason Lamar Duo Deweys Family Night Aug. 2, 48 p.m. Enjoy free activities including a magic show, games, back-to-school goodies, inflatables and more!Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 510 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 1 6 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer Going on now through Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 years and younger receive one free game of bowling every day until 5 p.m. Win prizes all summer long! Fall and winter bowling leagues are now forming! Leagues begin in September.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Lap Swim (water park, water slide and concessions are not open) Monday Friday 68 a.m. & 67 p.m. Recreational Swim (waterpark, waterslide and concessions are open) Monday Sunday, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. 2013 Learn to Swim Program Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1 Private pool parties can be reserved at the fitness center Parties are not available during regular business hours of operation and occur in the evenings when the pool is closed. Parties must be reserved ten days prior to party date, payment due at time of reservation For more information, call 542-3518 Dive In Movie at the outdoor pool Aug.10, 610 p.m. Movie begins at 8:30 p.m. Free admission, hot dog, chips and a drink! I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets on sale now $70 section 147 Legoland Florida Free ticket for active duty military through Oct. 27 Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 2013 2014 Artist Series featuring Mama Mia, Memphis, Celtic Thunder, War Horse, Men are From Mars, Women are from Venus, Million Dollar Quartet and The D* Word is a Musical are on sale now!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Paintball Trip Aug. 3 at 9 a.m. Free Jags Shuttle Aug. 9 at 6 p.m. Volunteer at HabiJax Aug. 10 at 7 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees Aug. 6 & 20 for active duty Aug. 8 & 22 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Furlough Fridays All civilian employees that have been furloughed can play 18-holes with cart & green fee for $20Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Movie Under the Stars Aug. 23 at 8 p.m. featuring Monsters University Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Aug. 5 Sept. 16 $500 per person The Greater Jax Area USO has now opened-up ticket sales for the preseason Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Miami Dophins game Aug. 9 at 7:30 p.m. and the preseason Jacksonville Jaguars vs. Philadelphia Eagles game Aug. 24 at 7:30 p.m. to all active duty, retirees, veterans with ID cards, National Guard, Reservists, DoD civilians and their families. Tickets are available at the NAS Jax and NS Mayport USO for $15 each, cash transactions only. Guidelines: All active duty including Florida National Guard and Reservists on cur rent active duty orders and dependents are eligible to purchase/use these tick ets. dependents may buy a maximum of four tickets if member and dependents equals four. If you have less than four you may only purchase total for fam ily. Spouses may purchase tickets for military personnel, but dependent children are not authorized to represent the service member/spouse to purchase tickets. Larger families desiring to purchase in excess of four tickets must be approved by the USO director. chase a maximum of two tickets, one for their use and one for a guest. No exceptions. request for a block of game day tickets may be requested by CO/XO/CMC only to the executive director. These blocks may be approved for commands either deploying or returning during the season.Requests, with justification, must be sent to Mike OBrien at mobrien@ usojax.com Anyone caught purchasing excess tickets or reselling tickets will be pro hibited from buying any more tickets for the entire season. tickets are first come, first served. For more information, call 778-2821.Jaguars preand regular season football tickets available at USORegular season tickets are available for the following days and timesDateof Game Opponent Time Sale Begins Sept. 8 Kansas City Chiefs 1 p.m. Aug. 26 Sept. 29 Indianapolis Colts 1 p.m. Sept. 16 Oct. 20 San Diego Chargers 1 p.m. Oct. 7 Nov. 17 Arizona Cardinals 1 p.m. Nov. 4 Dec. 5 Houston Texans 8:25 p.m. Nov. 25 Dec. 15 Buffalo Bills 1 p.m. Dec. 2 Dec. 22 Tennessee Titans 1 p.m. Dec. 9 For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013

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Students from DarnellCookman Middle/High School of the Medical Arts partici pated in a weeklong training course at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville, July 15-19, as part of the hospitals Science, Service, Medicine and Mentoring (S2M2) program. Ten students participated in the intense five-day outreach program that included panel discussions, hands-on medical applications, workshops, job shadowing and engagement with NH Jacksonville clinicians (physicians, surgeons, nurses, physician assistants, pharma cists and psychologists). Your selection to our S2M2 program speaks to your com mitment and passion for the medical profession, said Capt. Gayle Shaffer, NH Jacksonville commanding officer during opening remarks to the stu dents. Being a part of medicine can be one of the most rewarding things you can ever achieve in your lifetime. And if you choose military medicine, youll have the added oppor tunity of providing battlefield, disaster and humanitarian care around the world. The students received realworld experience in patient care areas from the oper ating room and emergency department to pharmacy and physical/occupational therapy. It was absolutely fun to have the opportunity to simu late stabilizing broken bones through external fixation, and immobilizing bones through internal fixation, said Tiffany Hoeckelberg, a DarnellCookman junior. My goal is to apply for the Naval Academy next year, and pursue a career as a Navy orthopedic surgeon. The goal of NH Jacksonvilles S2M2 program is to encour age, nurture, and enhance high school students commit ment to science and medicine in a welcoming and intellec tually stimulating environ ment. The S2M2 partnership with Darnell-Cookman com plements the schools focus on equipping high-perform ing students with the skills and experiences to pursue advanced medical degrees. I have always been interested in medicine, and my goal is to work in the field of neu rology, said Rory Peterson, a Darnell-Cookman junior. My passion was further excited when I was allowed to job-shadow one of the neu ro-radiologists, who shared his knowledge and expertise with me. This experience has brought my dream of becom ing a physician one step closer to reality. Developed in 2004 by the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, the S2M2 program is designed to support the next generation of health care professionals by nurturing high school stu dents commitment to science and medicine. Sailors aboard aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) held a cake-cutting ceremony July 25 to commemorate the 15th anniversary of the ships commission ing. Several plank owners, again assigned to Harry S. Truman, were on hand for the ceremony. A plank owner is a Sailor who was a mem ber of a commands original crew. Truman was my first com mand, and as a plank owner, this ship will always be special to me, said AO1(AW/SW) James Spencer. I learned my job, made rank, and learned leadership on this ship. ABH1(AW/SW) Brandon Coffelt said the anniversary remind ed him of his early years in the Navy. This is a special day for me because I was here 15 years ago during the commissioning, and it shows me how far the Navy has come and how far I have come in my career since starting as a 19-year-old airman apprentice, said Coffelt. CWO4 Brian Armstrong, plank owner and Trumans food ser vice officer said the ships his tory of success is due largely in part to its superb upkeep by the crew. Truman has always had a great reputation as a carrier and as far as maintenance and safety, we have improved so much, said Armstrong. I have noticed over the years, ships can go down very quickly if they are not taken care of and Truman has been main tained very well. Lt. Jason Conyer, plank owner and Weapons Department G-3 division officer, attributes Trumans success to the pride and professionalism of its crew. The crew makes the ship, said Conyer. This is my third deployment on Truman, and the ship looks just as new as it did 15 years ago. Some members of Trumans crew have made long-lasting friendships while serving on board. I still keep in contact with a lot of the Sailors I served with 15 years ago, said Spencer. The thing I will miss the most when I get out of the Navy is the people I have met and the bonds I have formed with them. Truman Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Roth credited the crew, past and present, for bringing out the best in the ship. Truman was an outstand ing ship 15 years ago, Truman is an outstanding ship today, and Truman will continue to be an outstanding ship 15 years from now, said Roth. This will always be because of the men and women who make it happen each day. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation is hosting a Hiring Our Heroes Jacksonville, a hiring fair for veterans and military spouses Aug. 7 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at JaxPort Cruise Terminal, 9810 August Dr., Jacksonville. More than 45 employers are expected to participate with jobs available for veterans and military spouses of all ranks and levels of experience. The event will also include a free GE employ ment workshop that features one-on-one mentor ing sessions on resume building, job search tools, and interviewing techniques for all job-seekers. Interested job seekers should register for free at hoh. greatjob.net. Walk-in job seekers are allowed (veterans must provide proof of service). Naval Hospital mentors high school students Truman celebrates 15th anniversary Job fair slated for veterans/military spouses at JaxPort Cruise Terminal 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013

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Center for Service Support (CSS) announced they are actively looking for high-quality senior Sailors to enhance its already dynamic team July 23. CSS and its learning sites provide Sailors with the knowledge and skills needed to support the Fleets warfighting mission. More than 300 staff and faculty work hand-in-hand with the Fleet and are dedicated to ensure training is current and well executed on behalf of 10,000 Sailors who graduate from CSS courses annually in the administration, logis tics and media communities. During a three-year tour, a subject matter expert (SME) attends the Navy Instructor Training Course, granting them the Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) 9502, works closely with learn ing sites, compiles questions for rat ing advancement exams and may also earn the prestigious Master Training Specialist (MTS) qualification. Command Master Chief CMDCM(SW/SCW/AW) Reinaldo Rosado said that an SMEs influence doesnt just extend to the Sailors, but to the commands they serve in, all over the globe. Sailors we train often serve in diverse assignments, said Rosado. Many of our former students have served everywhere from the front lines of Afghanistan to the decks of our carriers. They report to their commands trained and ready to go to work imme diately. Capt. Mark Murphy, CSS command ing officer said the commands expec tations and goals are high but very obtainable. Work hard: be brilliant on the basics and take care of our people, said Murphy. Work, study and learn at the job youve been given. Be ready when opportunity knocks. Work smart. Mission first, safety always. Push decision making to the lowest level. Communicate up and down the chain. Have fun. Keep a balance, keep a sense of humor and test your ideas. We want the best to train the Navys future. CSS was established Feb. 7, 2003, in response to Naval Education and Trainings (NETC) initiative to address challenges in Fleet training and to improve Sailors professional develop ment products and processes. In streamlining the business of delivering training, NETC charged 15 learning centers like CSS with specific areas of naval training. NETC organized the centers around their functional areas and appropriately aligned schools and respective training sites to each center. Sailors who are eligible for shore duty and in their transfer window are encouraged to contact their com mand career counselors and detailers. For available billet opportunities, visit https://www.cmsid.navy.mil/. The Defense Department continues working toward its goal of ensuring the mission is met with fully qualified and capable personnel, regardless of gender, the Pentagons director of officer and enlisted personnel management said recently. Speaking at a House Armed Services Committee subcommittee hearing on women in service, Juliet Beyler said the services and U.S. Special Operations Command are working with research agencies to review and validate occupational standards. The department is proceeding in a measured, deliberate and respon sible manner to implement changes that enable service members to serve in any capacity based on their ability and qualifications, she said. Each service is conducting thorough doctrine, training, education, facilities and pol icy analyses to ensure deliberate and responsible implementation, she added. Beyler was joined at the hearing by witnesses from each of the military services and Socom. Our goal is to integrate women leaders and soldiers into recently opened positions and units as expeditiously as possible, said Army Lt. Gen. Howard B. Bromberg, deputy chief of staff for personnel. The first step is to validate the physical and mental performance standards for every military occupa tion, he said. From there, a battery of tests will be developed to assess whether recruits are capable of achieving the standards of their potential occupation, said Marine Corps Lt. Gen. Robert Milstead Jr., deputy commandant for manpower and reserve affairs. Standards ultimately will become gender-neutral, Bromberg said, though training for those standards may be different for men and women. Occupational training in the Marine Corps is gender-mixed, Milstead told the panel, but in recognition of the need to train men and women differently, the transformation from recruit to Marine is gender-segregated. Our boot camp is about the trans formation of individuals -men and women -from being a civilian to being a United States Marine. ... They just need different steps as they go, he said. They end up in the same place -theyre United States Marines. The decision to rescind the 1994 rule excluding women from direct ground combat and combat occupations was announced earlier this year. ThenDefense Secretary Leon Panetta and Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, directed the military services and Socom to imple ment the change by Jan. 1, 2016, Beyler said. By September 2015, each service and Socom must review and validate all occupational standards to ensure that they are occupationally and operation CSS looking for Subject Matter Experts Services to open combat jobs for women Nicholas Hernandez. Its been a long-stand ing tradition that we pass our anchors down to someone we think will be in our place one day, Talo said. I stayed true to my roots (by passing them on to fellow avia tion machinists mates) plus, I see a little of me in them. The roots of this par ticular set of anchors run deep. Talo received them almost 13 years ago from his senior chief, ADCS Mike Miller. Talo knows that Miller had received them from another AD chief many years before that. Larkin, who has served almost six years and worked for Talo since 2010, used one word to describe receiving the anchors, awesome. Hes always been there and has been the first person Id go to with any problems, Larkin said. Hernandez, who has 10 years of service, has known Talo since 2005. During those years, he has always listened and taken care of his Sailors. Receiving Talos anchors confirmed what many at VP-45 already know, that these two outstanding Sailors have a very bright future ahead of them. PROMOTION JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013 17

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18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013 NH Jacksonville is currently one of 166 Baby Friendly hospitals and birth centers in the U.S. The Baby Friendly designation is awarded after a rigorous onsite survey is completed, and maintained by continu ing to practice 10 crucial program elements. The com prehensive program includes initiating breastfeeding in the first hour of life, rooming-in with moms and babies in the same room, educating staff and patients, and fostering breastfeeding support groups. Baby Friendly certification is all about reducing infant mortality, said Heather Huffman, chair of the Northeast Florida Breastfeeding Collaborative. Naval Hospital Jacksonville and other hospitals like it across the nation are doing their part to promote healthier babies. Throughout the year, NH Jacksonville offers a wide range of classes free-of-charge to patients giving birth at its hospitalincluding baby boot camp, new parent orientation, prenatal exercise, Hypnobirthing, infant massage, breastfeeding and prepared childbirth. Plus, the hospitals private labor/delivery and mater nal/infant suites offer couplet care (with mom and baby rooming together), breast pumps, breastfeeding counseling from lactation nurses, siesta for the fiesta daily quiet time to support feeding, newborn hearing screening, and an educational newborn channel on television. Dads are welcome to stay the night and visiting hours are round-the-clock. NH Jacksonville patients can register for free classes by calling 904-542-2229 (BABY). To learn more about the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (administered in the U.S. by Baby Friendly USA), visit www.babyfriend lyusa.org BREASTFEEDING P-8A and P-3C. Adding the Poseidon to mix required about six more stacks of technical equipment. When deployed to Okinawa, MTOC-1 will support both the VP-16 War Eagles (P-8A) and the VP-46 Grey Knights (P-3C). MTOC-1 mission configurations range from a 3,000-pound pallet of gear to full expeditionary mode includ ing tents, generators, air conditioners, antennas and equipment that weigh in at more than 60,000 pounds. Jacobson noted that a naval reserve unit, MTOC-Selfridge from Michigan, is in training with MTOC-1 to pre pare for their upcoming deployment to the 5th Fleet AOR. Theyve been a significant part of our training basi cally intertwined with our people from when the first generator hit the deck to erecting tents and getting gear properly installed. When they arrive in their new AOR, I know theyll be well trained to set up the right way, right away. According to a July 8 NAVAIR news release, the P-8A Poseidon program successfully completed its Initial Operational Test and Evaluation (IOT&E). Achieving IOT&E is a mile stone that will inform the full-rate production decision for the program. It also means the P-8A program continues to be on track for an initial operational deployment this winter when the first P-8A squadron (VP-16) will deploy with P-3C squadrons to the 7th Fleet AOR. To date, nine low rate initial production aircraft have been delivered to the fleet and six test aircraft have been delivered to NAVAIR. According to the program of record, the Navy plans on purchasing 117 P-8A aircraft. MTOC-1 ally relevant and applied gender-neutrally, she added. We have always maintained that our [special operations forces] standards are occupationally specif ic, operationally relevant and gender-neutral. They are just the standards, said Army Maj. Gen. Bennet Sacolick, director of force management and development for Socom. Our review will be a good opportunity to verify this assumption. Plans for managing the integration of women into previously closed units and occupations already have been submitted and reviewed by Dempsey and Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and were released last month, Beyler said. Each plan manages positions in two general categories: currently open occupations that previously were restricted by the unit of assignment, and currently closed occupations, such as infantry or armor specialties. And each has identified decision points by which they will make final determinations to open occupa tions and positions or request an exception to policy to keep the position or occupation closed, Beyler said. For Socom, the focus is on whether small units, operating near or behind enemy lines, can achieve full integration while maintaining unit readiness, cohe sion and morale, Sacolick said. Women have been attached to our combat units for several years, part of our cultural support teams, civil affairs, military information support teams, intelligence support and a host of other occupational specialties, he said. And they have performed magnificently. The Air Force already has more than 99 percent of its positions open to both men and women, said Brig. Gen. Gina Grosso, director of force management policy and deputy chief of staff for manpower, personnel and services. The remaining 4,600 positions are in seven career fields affiliated with special operations and longrange reconnaissance ground combat units. The Air Force is working to open these positions as well, Grosso added. [The] Navy expects to have no closed occupations, a very limited number of closed positions, and equal professional opportunity for females in every officer designator and enlisted rating by 2016, said Navy Rear Adm. Barbara Sweredoski, reserve deputy for military personnel plans and policy. Exceptions must be personally approved by both the defense secretary and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Beyler said. Opening combat occupations to women will enhance the readiness and combat effectiveness of forces, she added. Implementation through 2016 will be an evolutionary process, she said. We are committed to opening positions and occupations when and how it makes sense while preserving unit readiness, cohesion and the quality of the all-volunteer force. Standards will be uncompromising, established for the task of defending our nation and rooted in care fully analyzed requirements, she added. Bromberg said the Army is taking that approach. We will not sacrifice warfighting capability, the trust of Congress or that of the American people as we seek to enhance force readiness and capability, he said. We will select the best-qualified soldiers, regard less of gender, for each job within the Army profession, ensuring our future force capability and readiness. Beyler told the House panel that the Defense Department is committed to doing it right. We recognize there will be challenges, but we will learn much from each step, she said. By addressing issues head-on, capitalizing on lessons learned and through open communication with Congress, we will institutionalize these important changes integrating women into occupations and units in a climate where they can succeed and flourish. COMBAT WOMEN In coordination with the Australian Defense Force (ADF), U.S. 7th Fleet is taking the lead in the safe retrieval and disposal of four bombs that were jet tisoned off the coast of Queensland, Australia by two AV-8B Harrier aircraft in an emergency situation July 16. The U.S. military is aware of its professional responsibility to mitigate the environmental impact of its exercises and operations. In partnership with Australian counterparts, and particularly in the context of Exercise Talisman Saber, the U.S. military conscientiously conforms to the proper rules and protocols set forth by Australian military and civilian authorities. In conducting the retrieval, 7th Fleet will coordinate closely with the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA) and ADF to ensure the environment is protected with the greatest care. The U.S. military has been in close contact with ADF and GBRMPA to determine the appropriate course of action. The U.S 7th Fleet is fully committed to redressing any potential adverse environmental impact in a timely manner. More detailed plans for recovery operations will be announced as they are finalized. Take control of summer entertaining Navy officials reminded Sailors July 20 to be responsible hosts, especially when planning to serve alco holic beverages. First thing to do as a party host is make sure you know who the designated drivers are ahead of time, said Dorice Favorite, director, Navy Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Office (NADAP). As the host of the party you should provide a safe, fun-filled environ ment, ensure designated drivers are identified at the beginning of the party and keep a watchful eye for guests who may appear to be intoxicated. Here are some tips to help host an enjoyable event: ignated drivers; dont drink alcoholic beverages; reliable bartender to help you keep track of the size and number of drinks that guests consume; available; from serving him or her any more alcohol. Serve him/ her either water or non-alcoholic beverages; serve a great dessert treat with coffee; been drinking; anyone leave without your knowledge. Hosting a party should be fun and guests should drink responsibly, Favorite said. If, despite your efforts, some of your guests have had too much to drink take control. Take their car keys, arrange for a ride with another guest who is sober, or call a taxi. 7th Fleet plans Harrier-jettisoned ordnance retrieval

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, August 1, 2013