Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
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Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
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Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID:
UF00028307:02051


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THURSDAY, JULY 25, 2013 NEX AW ARD SEA CADET S ST ELLAR SAILORS Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com During his first visit to NAS Jacksonville on July 16, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel called on Congress to work with DOD to avoid sequestration in fiscal 2014. Otherwise, DOD will be forced to cut $52 billion from its budget that only could be accomplished by put ting together an extremely severe pack age of military and civilian personnel actions. With U.S. Reps Corrine Brown (D-FL5), Ander Crenshaw (R-FL4) and Ted Yoho (R-FL3) joining the audience at a town hall meeting with civilians and Sailors at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) aboard base, Hagel called on Congress to work with DOD to avoid sequestration in fiscal 2014. If the cuts continue, the depart ment will have to make sharp reduc tions with far-reaching consequences including limited combat power and reduced readiness that will undermine our countrys national security inter ests, Hagel told the audience. He remarked that if sequestration remains in effect, the size, readi ness and technological superiority of Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert discussed the status of the fleet, readiness impact due to sequestration, and modi fications to Navy policies at a press conference July 19 at the Pentagon. Presence remains our man date, Greenert said. This is what we are mostly about, and its an essential element of our defense strategic guidance. Greenert pointed out that the Navy has about 95 ships deployed and about 3,700 operational aircraft. The current ship count in the Mediterranean has been higher than it has been through the years. USS Kearsarge and USS San Antonio are positioned in the Red Sea and stand ready with a range of missions and opera tions if required. USS Nimitz is deployed to the North Arabian Sea supporting ground opera tions in Afghanistan with close air support, and piracy in the region is slowly increasing and is becoming more of a concern. In the Pacific theater, Talisman Saber Exercise, started July 14, off the coast of Australia and in the Coral Sea. TS13 is an ongoing bien nial training exercise with Australia and currently has George Washington Carrier Strike Group and Bonhomme Richard Amphibious Ready Group assets participating. In the Southern Command, sequestration has caused the reduction to zero combat ships in the region. There are other naval forces in the region, Greenert said. Non-combatant ships and other forces. The Navys first spearhead class joint high-speed ves sel will deploy to the Southern Command area of operation in FY 14. Presence forward, assuring our allies and deterring poten VP-45 celebrates 44-year safety milestoneCompleting one year of mishap-free flying is an accomplishment of which any squadron would be proud. Completing 44 years of mis hap-free flying is something to be especially proud of and that is precisely what Patrol Squadron (VP) 45 has accomplished. Over the past 44 years, the VP-45 Pelicans surpassed 265,100 mishap-free flight hours. In a congratulatory message, Rear Adm. Sean Buck, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group, pointed out that VP-45s complete professionalism and genuine dedication to safety have been the corner stones of this impressive avia tion achievement. While every Pelican has contributed to this achieve ment, VP-45s Quality Assurance (QA) Division, the backbone of the maintenance department, has played a crucial role over the years by ensuring that every P-3C Orion aircraft is safe to fly. Although aircrew play a major role by safely taking aircraft aloft and returning without a mishap, its main tenance professionals who ensure the aircraft is as safe as possible prior to leaving the ground. Without their dedication to by-the-book maintenance, Hagel talks budget with Sailors, civilians CNO updates Navy status Power outage to affect numerous facilitiesA power outage will take place at NAS Jacksonville on Sunday, July 28 from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. to replace a damaged concrete power pole. This will affect numer ous facilities aboard the sta tion. The Navy Exchange (NEX) Main Store, Home and Garden Center, Car Care Center and NEX Gas Station will be closed. The following Morale, Welfare and Recreation facilities will also be closed: Fitness Center, Outdoor Pool, Car Wash, Deweys, NAS Freedom Lanes, Liberty Center and Long Term RV Storage Lot. The power outage will also affect the barracks. The work is being conducted by Fluor Federal Solutions base contractors.

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS July 25 1779 Amphibious expedition against British in Penobscot Bay, Maine. 1863 U.S. Squadron bombards Fort Wagner, N.C. 1866 Rank of Admiral created. David G. Farragut is appointed the first Admiral in the U.S. Navy. 1898 Landing party from armed yacht Gloucester occupies Guanica, Puerto Rico. 1912 First specifications for naval aircraft pub lished. 1934 First President to visit Hawaii, Franklin D. Roosevelt, reaches Hilo on board the cruiser USS Houston (CA-30). 1941 Bureau of Ordnance issues first Navy Ecertificates (for excellence) for industry. 1943 Launching of destroyer escort USS Harmon (DE-72), first ship named for an African-American. 1990 Oiler USS Cimarron (AO 22) rescues 25 refu gees adrift southeast of Subic Bay, Philippines. July 26 1812 Frigate Essex captures British brig Leander. 1912 First airborne radio communications from naval aircraft to ship (Lt. John Rodgers to USS Stringham). 1946 Capt Joy Bright Hancock appointed director, Womens Naval Reserve. 1948 President Harry S. Truman orders desegrega tion of the Armed Services. 1954 Three aircraft from USS Philippine Sea (CVA47) shoot down Chinese fighters that fired on them while they were providing air cover for rescue opera tions for a U.K. airliner shot down by a Chinese air craft. July 27 1953 Korean War armistice signed at Panmunjon, Korea, cease-fire went into effect at 10 p.m. July 28 1915 Sailors and Marines land in Haiti to restore order. 1916 Navy establishes a Code and Signal Section which initially worked against German ciphers and tested the security of communications during U.S. naval training maneuvers. 1926 Team of scientists from Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Carnegie Institution determine height of the ionosphere through use of radio pulse transmitter developed by NRL. 1945 USS Callaghan (DD-792) is last U.S. Navy ship sunk by a Japanese kamikaze attack, off Okinawa. 1973 Launch of Skylab III, the second manned mission to the first U.S. manned space station, was piloted by Maj. Jack Lousma, USMC with Capt. Alan Bean, USN as the commander of the mission and former Navy electronics officer, Owen Garriott as Science Pilot. The mission lasted 59 days, 11 hours and included 858 Earth orbits. Recovery by USS New Orleans (LPH-11). July 29 1846 Sailors and Marines from U.S. sloop Cyane capture San Diego, Calif. 1918 Assistant Secretary of the Navy Franklin D. Roosevelt visits Queenstown, Ireland. 1945 U.S. warships bombard Hamamatsu, Japan. 1967 Fire on board USSForrestal (CV-59) kills 134 crew members. July 30 1918 Units of First Marine Aviation Force arrive at Brest, France. 1941 Japanese aircraft bomb USS Tutuila (PR-4) at Chungking, China the first Navy ship damaged by Axis forces during World War II. 1942 FDR signs act establishing WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service). During World War II, over 80,000 officer and enlisted women served in the WAVES. 1944 Naval Task Force lands Army troops near Cape Opmarai, New Guinea. 1945 Japanese submarine, I-58, sinks cruiser USS Indianapolis (CA-35) in Philippine Sea only 316 of 1199 crew survived. 1967 Fire on board aircraft carrier USSForrestal (CV-59) off the coast of Vietnam results in death of 134 crew. July 31 1815 Commodore Stephen Decatur concludes agreement with Bey of Tunis to compensate U.S. for seizure of merchant ships during the War of 1812. 1874 Commissioning of USS Intrepid, first U.S. warship equipped with torpedoes. 1912 First attempt to launch an airplane by cata pult made at Annapolis, Md. 1964 All-nuclear task force of USS Long Beach (CGN 9), USS Enterprise (CVN 65) and USS Bainbridge l(CGN 25) eaves Norfolk, Va. to begin Operation Sea Orbit, to circle the globe without refueling. They returned on Oct. 3. When I tell people I live in Maine, they almost always ask about the moose. And it turns out there are many misconceptions about moose, such as the idea that they out number people in Maine, but the biggest of all is probably that they exist. The only moose Ive seen is on the state flag. Oh, alright, I supposedly saw an adolescent moose running down I-95, but Im not 100-percent sure that wasnt a small horse. I didnt see ant lers. And until I see a big bull moose with 50-pound antlers, I wont be con vinced the species wasnt invented by the Office of Tourism to attract tourists. Ive been on a mission to see a moose since I moved to Maine in 2008. Previously, I was one of those neverbeen-to-Maine types (but I got here as soon as I could) who thought people in Maine probably kept the animals as pets or something. As I drove into the state for the first time, the big moose-warning signs made me excited. I was going to see one before I even had a house! Our Realtor told me to be careful on the drive, because thats how people die in Maine they hit a moose. I thought Id be dodging them for Heavens sake. Ive never seen one. But taking all the best parts of what Mainers had told me about the animals, I developed quite the mental picture. I imagined them stepping over cars, completely unafraid of the highway, their legs like stilts casually moving in and out of traffic. People had told me moose eyes dont reflect light at night, so I wondered if maybe I had missed them altogether. Maybe they are that stealthy. I knew friends who had seen moose. I saw their pictures on Facebook, and I studied them for indications that theyd been Photoshopped. You need to go further north, a friend who is a game war den told me. Moose are everywhere up there. Youre guar anteed to see one. So last September I took the kids to Mt. Katahdin, and I asked the rangers for the best spot to see moose. Definitely Sandy Stream, they said. Down the path we went, rain jack ets hanging from our arms just in case. When we got to the lookout at Sandy Stream, a couple was sitting there posi tively radiant from having just seen a moose, which, of course, was gone now. Also, last week I was here, the man said, and, Im not kidding, there were a dozen moose in the stream. My boys and I sat at the lookout for as long as my youngest son, Lindell, could tolerate. We never saw anything. Occasionally, throughout the year, my game warden friend would tell me about moose found wandering the city streets. I even put on the police scan ner once and tried to follow the clues to a supposed moose bathing in the Kenduskeag Stream. By the time I got there, the moose was gone. Try going in the heat of the summer, my friend said. They are more likely to be at the stream to cool off. So last month, Dustin and I took the kids back up to Sandy Stream at Mt. Katahdin. This time, we saw moose tracks along the trail. They were as big as Lindells head, and I took about 20 photographs of them. I just knew I was about to see a moose this time. One of the boys stepped in moose poop it went all the way up his shins and into his sock and I could hardly stand the excitement. Who steps in moose droppings and doesnt actually see the animal? Two professional photographers were on the lookout. They told us about all the moose they had seen just yester day. Everyone sees moose yesterday, my oldest son, Ford, said. But there were no moose none in the stream that day. The park rangers had radioed their crews in the woods and instructed them to pull back the Office of Tourismsponsored, mechanical, radio-con trolled beasts because the Smileys were coming. (Thats what they do, right?) Or maybe Im moose repellant. A week later, I was on a bus in Washington, D.C., melting from the heat. The driver asked where I was from. When I told him Maine, I hoped he would ask me about lobster, Acadia National Park, loons, or the snow. But I could tell by his face in the rearview mirror what he wanted to ask. He turned around in his chair and said, Man, you must see a ton of moose up there! Do they, like, walk around in your backyard and stuff?If youre looking for moose in Maine . The base gym did not open as scheduled on July 22 due to unfore seen delays in the renovation project. When a firm date is established for the opening, MWR will notify cus tomers through social media (MWR Facebook page, www.facebook.com/ nasjaxmwr), POW and an MWR elec tronic News Flash e-mail. We apologize for any inconvenience. Spin classes will resume when the gym is open. For more information, call 542-3225. Unforseen delays postpone gymnasium opening

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013 3

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The Navy Exchange at NAS Jacksonville showed superior performance over the past year in service to military personnel and their families earning the runner-up 2012 Bingham Award for sales above $85 million. General Manager Marsha Brooks said, Its a big honor for our associates to place second in the top sales category. Were also proud of the support that our active duty and retired patrons provide. We work diligently to provide quality products at competitive prices that con sistently attract and reward shoppers. She added that, Our high overall presentation standards help NAS Jax to get good marks from both patrons and associates on NEX satisfaction sur veys. The Bingham Award shows that our associates really know their mission and deliver the goods the way our patrons prefer. Winning the Bingham Award repre sents a tremendous achievement on the part of all our store associates and man agers, as well as the base community, said retired Rear Adm. Robert Bianchi, chief executive officer of NEXCOM. This award is presented to the best of the best Navy Exchanges in the nine sales categories for overall financial results and customer service. The Bingham Award program was established in 1979 to recognize excel lence in customer service, operations and management at NEX activities. NAS Jax Navy Exchange named Bingham Award winner Sailors aboard air craft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) said their goodbyes to friends and family prior to getting underway for an eight to ninemonth deployment July 22. Truman, along with the other components of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (HST CSG), completed a composite training unit exercise in January prior to their originally scheduled February deployment, and also a sustainment exercise and fleet syn thetic training exercise in June. The crew has operated and trained extensively at sea the past several months and the train ing scenarios were more complex and challeng ing, said Capt. Bob Roth, Trumans commanding officer. The ships and air wings warfighting proficiency has increased substantially since our deployment was delayed in February. I couldnt be more proud of the crew; they are dedicat ed, skilled, and tremen dously enthusiastic about deploying. The February deploy ment was delayed due to sequestration and the change of aircraft car rier presence require ments in the U.S. Central Command Area of Responsibility. The current deploy ment is part of an ongo ing rotation of forwarddeployed forces to sup port maritime security operations (MSO) in the U.S. 6th and 5th Fleet areas of operations. MSO set the conditions for security and stability in the maritime environ ment and complement the counter-terrorism and security efforts of regional nations. MSO deny interna tional terrorists use of the maritime environment as a venue for attack or to transport personnel, weapons or other mate rial. Truman is the flagship for HST CSG. It can trav el in excess of 30 knots, and has a ships company of approximately 3,000. With the embarked air wing and staffs, the num ber rises to about 5,000. HST CSG also consists of USS Bulkeley (DDG 84), USS Gettysburg (CG 64), USS Mason (DDG 87), USS San Jacinto (CG 56), 1st Combined Destroyer Squadron staff. Also on board is Carrier Air Wing 3 and its associ ated squadrons Strike Fighter Squadrons (VFA) 32 Swordsmen, VFA-37 Ragin Bulls, and VFA-105 Gunslingers; Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 312 Checkerboards; Airborne Early Warning Squadron 126 Seahawks; Electronic Attack Squadron) 130 Zappers; Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 7 Dusty Dogs; and Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 74 Swamp Foxes.HSM-74 Swamp Foxes deploy with USS Harry S. Truman to U.S. 5th and 6th Fleets 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013

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The Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Family Readiness Program hosted phase II of an Emergency Family Assistance Center (EFAC) exercise aboard NAS Jacksonville July 17. The training was the second installment of a three-phase exercise designed to test the regions ability to establish and sustain EFAC operations in the days and weeks following the landfall of a hurricane. Phase I, conducted on May 30, involved more than 30 Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) representatives from NAS Jacksonville, Naval Station (NS) Mayport and Naval Submarine Base (NSB) Kings Bay, as well as installation and training officers and emer gency management personnel from all three bases. Phase II incorporated a vari ety of additional base organiza tions, such as the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, Navy Legal Service Office, Navy Gateway Inns and Suites, base housing and many others. This training is vital because its not a matter of if one of our installations will be affected by a hurricane, its a matter of when, said Rear Adm. John Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast. Our ability to bring togeth er multiple organizations and people to work as a cohesive unit is crucial to our recovery efforts in this kind of scenario, and I think training like this has a huge impact on our abil ity to respond when the real thing does happen. The EFAC exercise is essen tially a continuation of the regions HURREX 2013, that tested the regions hurricane preparedness through a sce nario involving multiple, simu lated storms that made landfall near installations throughout the Southeast Region. While HURREX focused on pre-land fall preparations, the EFAC exercise focused on the recov ery phase of disaster response. In this scenario, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay residents were evacuated prior to land fall and each base suffered extensive flooding as the simu lated storm passed. Afterward, FFSC person nel from all three participat ing bases worked with emer gency management, training personnel and other installa tion departments to estab lish an EFAC on board NAS Jacksonville. Phase II of this exercise had a lot more moving pieces due to the fact that we brought in a variety of additional agen cies to participate, said Carol Lucius, CNRSE Family Readiness Program work and family life coordinator. To incorporate all these dif ferent people into this exer cise is invaluable because we will be working together in the event of a real disaster and establishing roles, responsibili ties and relationships is cru cial. After a real disaster, the EFAC would function as a hub for FFSC case workers and emergency response personnel to provide a wide range of sup port services for affected fam ily members. According to Lucius, much of that support is managed through the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System (NFAAS). After a disaster, people can go into the Needs Assessment portion of NFAAS and specify what they need, then our case managers can go in and see what those needs are. We will then call them back and get them the appropriate resourc es, she said. Although NFAAS is one of the primary methods for EFAC personnel to assess needs after a disaster, it is not the only one. People can also come direct ly to the EFAC for assistance, Lucius added. Circumstances can change very quickly in the days and weeks following a hurricane, so our recovery efforts need to be flexible and our services have to be adjusted accordingly, Lucius said. Its important for us to identify exactly who we need to have in the EFAC based on what peoples needs are. The EFAC is not staffed with only FFSC personnel, but there are a lot of other organizations involved, such as chaplains, medical, legal, housing and a long list of others. Part of this exercise is to establish a clearer picture of what resources we are likely to need in the EFAC at different times in the recov ery process. After an actual hurricane, EFAC personnel would also coordinate with a number of civilian agencies and local offi cials in order to get people the help they need. Lucius said most people who seek help are in need of food, shelter, clothes or some other physical need, which makes it important to conduct this kind of exercise in order to be better prepared for recovery efforts when a real-world scenario occurs. The nature of an emergency or crisis event is that of unpre dictability, she said. However, even though things will inevitably hap pen that we dont necessarily expect, we still need to have a plan in place so that our people are confident in themselves, confident in their leadership and confident in the plan. Lucius said training like this is essential for preparing emer gency management and FFSC personnel for an actual event, but it is equally as important for family members and depen dents to know what to do in the event of an emergency. They really need to know about NFAAS. They need to know that it is essential for them to have their personal contact information updated in NFAAS so that when a disaster strikes, they can be contacted and they know how to contact somebody for help, she said. While phase II of the exercise included about 30 more par ticipants than phase I, phase III of the exercise will expand even further and will include a number of civilian agencies and organizations, includ ing the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Salvation Army and others. Sailors, dependents and gov ernment civilians can log into NFAAS at https://navyfam ily.navy.mil where they can update their contact informa tion, report their status or sub mit a needs assessment. Family Readiness Program conducts emergency response exercise JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013 Sea Cadets gain experience from NAS Jax sailorsFifty-one U.S. Naval Sea Cadets and adult volunteers from various divi sions, squadrons and battalions in the Southeast, reported to NAS Jax for annu al training July 1-14 to help youths gain knowledge and experience through hands-on training. The cadets, ages 13-17, spent the week working at various locations at NAS Jax, including the Flight Line Caf, NAS Jax Fire Department, Air Traffic Control Tower, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Power Plants Division, and Basic Airman Training at VP-16 All cadets were required to complete a two-week boot camp, located at vari ous places across the country, before they could report to NAS Jax for their advanced training program. I have been working with the Sea Cadet program for more than 18 years, and having participated in other youth programs, I can honestly say that our program is the best around, said U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps (NSCC) Regional Director 6-2 Lt. Cmdr. June Tillet. What other program allows young folks the opportunity to experience the U.S. Navy and other services so close up and personal? Ive seen cadets grow up from 11 years old to full adulthood and I am amazed at the transformation. Our cadets develop into responsible, stable adults due to the outstanding sup port of the Navy and our dedicated adult volunteers who spend countless hours mentoring and training, said Tillet. Our track record speaks for itself in that 65 percent of our cadets join the military and they arrive at recruit train ing and Officer Candidate School with a good understanding of what is expected of them and how they need to perform. NSCC not only benefits our cadets and leaders, it benefits our country as well. Six cadets spent two weeks at the Flight Line Caf and learned essential culinary skills that included proper food prepa ration, baking and cooking techniques. They also assisted Navy culinary special ists at the food service line. My favorite part about this job is preparing the meals, said Sea Cadet Theodore Owens. I have learned a lot so far about how to handle and stow food. I am learning to work with other peo ple, added Sea Cadet Alex Long. I really enjoyed working in the bakery. Sea Cadet Leader Lt. j.g. Kathy DOrlando said, As adults, we can men tor the students and teach them military bearing, that also helps them in their daily life skills. These Sea Cadets make life-long friends. The program helps them learn new skills and preps them for their future careers. Twenty cadets were selected to work at Jacksonville Navy Metro Fire and Emergency Services. Divided into two groups, they learned either basic fire fighting knowledge that involved both hose and ladder training, or first responders training, that included sce narios of first and second injury assess ments and backboard training. Sea Cadet Jon-Michael Borzeka stat ed, The firefighting training is impor tant because it gives us an opportunity to experience what it is like to be a fire fighter and to see if it would be a career path we may pursue. The Sea Cadet pro gram provides many other opportunities for hands-on learning as well. The primary reason this program is beneficial for the cadets is because theyre figuring out the careers they may want to pursue. They learn real skills, such as EMT, that they can apply to their lives. We provide basic knowledge they can use daily, said Sea Cadet Leader Lt. j.g. Mark Theroux. They learn the fundamentals of fire hazards and avoid them to prevent fires. The cadets are also trained in CPR, he added. Four cadets chose to spend the week at the NAS Jax Air Operations Control Tower where they learned the ins and outs about communicating with aviators and vector ing aircraft in the radar room. This is my second year doing this, said Sea Cadet Jesse Moniz. Its a cool job. It has been great observ ing the air traffic controllers (AC) and learning about all their special equip ment. The ACs set a good example of how to stay calm under pressure, he added. The NSCC Program is open to youths ages 13-17 who have a desire to learn about the Navy, Marines and Merchant Marine. Members drill at their local units weekly or monthly during the year and are given the opportunity to partici pate in advanced training during school breaks at various locations around the country.

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tial adversaries is our primary function, Greenert said. I think we are out there at the, what I call, the maritime crossroads where it matters, when it matters. CNO addressed the readiness impact of seques tration for FY 13 and FY 14. There is one carri er strike group (CSG) and one amphibious ready group (ARG) deployed to each of the Arabian Gulf and Western Pacific theaters. However, the surge force is a concern, Greenert said. Currently, there is only CSG and one ARG ready to surge if needed. A year ago, the Navy had three CSGs and ARGs ready to surge. Despite reduced operations and mainte nance spending in FY 13, Greenert said the Navys focus is to keep sea commands ready for deploy ments scheduled for FY 14. Sequestration for FY 14 could reduce each account by 10 percent. The Navy possibly faces deeper cuts for FY 14, because FY 13 used money available from previous years to help pad the effects of sequestration, Greenert explained. CNOs goal is to preserve shipbuilding and avi ation contracts through this process. Furlough impacts to the civilian force continue to be a chal lenge. Regrettably, were enduring furloughs, Greneert said. Its an impact, I felt it last week. I feel it this week. It hurts our readiness and it hurts our pro ductivity as well. CNO addressed sexual assault organizational changes and a revision to the Navy Exchange alco hol sales policy by further discussing the Navys newest changes that are taking place fleet-wide. Greenert said with more than half of all sexual assaults involving alcohol, the Navy had to look more critically at the atmosphere and climate of its bases. He said after a review of Navy Exchange alcohol sales trends at base stores the data showed a high volume of sales occurring late into the night and early morning and were not in line with main stream retailers. CNOthe Pelicans 44 years of mishapfree flying would likely not have been possible. The quality assur ance division provides an extra set of experienced eyes to ensure the job is done right and done safely. This ensures the safety of not only the aircrew flying the plane, but also of those who are performing the maintenance. Everyone here must have safety on their mind as their number one priority, said QA Safety Representative AME1(AW) Scott Walker. They do this by stay ing involved with the maintenance shops, providing frequent training and conducting audits of every thing from the paperwork and workspace organization to mainte nance practices. One of our main goals, Walker added, is to promote an atmo sphere of safety and to mold peo ples attitudes. Hand picked for their technical expertise and strong character, personnel in VP-45s QA Division take their jobs seriously and work hard to promote a culture of safety within the squadron. I think consistency is what has helped us achieve this milestone, said AZ2(AW) Terry Wright, QAs central technical publications librarian. Knowledge and consis tency will be key during the squad rons next major milestone the transition to the P-8A Poseidon. Luckily, the Pelicans know that their QA representatives are up to the task of leading them through the P-8 transition safely as they strive to add another 44 years to an already outstanding safety record. VP-45 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013

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Sailors and other staff assigned to the NAS Jacksonville Flight Line Caf (gal ley) celebrated the arrival of their 2013 runner-up trophy for the annual Capt. Edward F. Ney Memorial Award for the Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) Large General Mess Category. Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. presented the styl ized eagle trophy to NAS Jax Food Service Officer CWO4 Teresa Cullipher. My personal congratulations go out to each one of your staff for winning this exceptional award, said Scorby. Whether you cook, bake or man the service lines, Ive no doubt about your commitment to providing a truly superior dining experience. Keep creating the great-tast ing menus that youre known for and stay focused on bring ing home the first place tro phy. Runner-up is a great accom plishment when you consider the high quality of the 19 gal leys we competed against. Our culinary specialists are the best of the best, stated NAS Jax Food Service Officer CWO4 Teresa Cullipher. They have won numerous culinary competitions in the southeast region and have earned chef certifications that enhance their knowledge and culinary skills. This represents apprecia tion for the hard work that we put into our program to exceed the expectations of our cus tomers. Runner-up is good but now we want to press on and take on the challenge of win ning first place, said CSCS Wendell Heyward, LCPO of the NAS Jax Supply Department. The NAS Jax galley was inspected on all aspects of food service including preparation, presentation and food qual ity, accountability of records and returns, sanitation, cus tomer service and crew morale. Our goal is to provide out standing food service every single meal and ensure our customers have the best nutri tional meal possible, added Cullipher. The annual award, co-spon sored by the International Food Service Executives Association, encourages Navy Food Service program excellence with the goal of improving the quality of life for Navy personnel. It is named in honor of Capt. Edward Ney, head of the sub sistence division of the Bureau of Supplies and Account from 1940-45. Flight Line Caf celebrates arrival of Ney Award JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013 9

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NAS Jacksonville recognized 102 top Sailors from the base and tenant com mands during the Sailor of the Quarter (SOQ) luncheon at the NAS Jax River Cove Catering and Conference Center July 18. NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd was master of ceremonies. It is my dis tinct honor to welcome you to Team Jax Sailor of the Quarter Luncheon for the third quarter. I dont have to tell you about the insanely hectic operational tempo that were supporting right now. In fact, there are about 319,000 Sailors serving in various capacities through out the world. We have 286 ships in service, including aircraft carriers and big-deck amphibious ships that are cur rently underway in every AOR around the world. Its truly a privilege to be an America as we continue to defend the freedoms that others envy. Despite furloughs and other budget constraints, I believe that our Navy will prevail against any future challenges. Today, we are here to recognize the elite our very best of the best for the valuable leadership they bring to their commands, said Shepherd. Guest speaker CS1 Marnika Ash, assistant LPO of the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf, opened her remarks with a quote by Thomas Jefferson, I am a great believer in luck, and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it. She asked the audience how a sixyear first class petty officer like herself recently won Senior Sailor of the Second Quarter. Its how motivated, determined and focused you are and how much will power you bring to the game. You must constantly push yourself to be a better person, take advantage of educational opportunities, and instill character and values in those around you, said Ash. My leadership appointed me a gal ley watch captain, responsible for four cooks and 18 foodservice attendants. And, yes, I found that the harder I worked, the more responsibility was bestowed upon me, said Ash. Soon thereafter, she was awarded Blue Jacket of the Quarter. What we have to do as Sailors of the Quarter is to identify the next wave of superior sailors and push them to real ize their potential. Is it worth all the mentoring, judging and scrutiny? You bet it is. So remember to constantly talk the talk and walk the walk. Youll find todays recognition to be one of the greatest benchmarks in your naval career. Congratulations to you all, said Ash. The events keynote speaker was YNCS Yolanda Walls, the staff senior enlisted leader for Navy Region Southeast. Ive been in the Navy for 23 years and have witnessed a lot of change but theres one thing that has remained consistent and that is the exceptional quality of our Sailors. Its my honor to be part of todays recognition of Sailors I consider to be heroes and who have been singled out as the best of the best within their com mand. You should be justifiably proud of your accomplishment. You are part of an elite group who put service to our nation over self and family. You also share one very important thing in common you hold tight to the values that make this country and our Navy the best in the world. Both on and off the job you live our core values of honor, courage and com mitment. You reflect honor by conduct ing yourselves according to the highest standards. Whenever I meet Sailors of the Quarter, I find them to be professionals who exude a standard of excellence in everything they do, representing their country and their Navy with pride. They often contribute to their community while also pursuing personal and pro fessional development. Your command leadership recog nizes that you didnt get to this point alone. To your family members, I also say thank you. Anyone who has served, knows we could not do what we do without the support of our families. To the leaders of these Sailors the chiefs and officers who inspired them to this point you can be proud of the results of your investment. The quote for todays event comes from Rear Admiral Farragut, who said, The world is sadly mistaken when it supposes that battles are won by this or that kind of vessel. The best gun and vessel should certainly be chosen, but victory, three times out of four, depends on those who fight them. Sailors of the Quarter, you are the kind of people I am proud to be in the fight with each and every day. But now is not the time to rest on this accom plishment. As the Navy continually transforms to become more efficient and effective, we will continue to depend on you to get the job done, con cluded Walls. Following lunch, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders told the audience, I know it took a lot of hard work to get to where youre sitting right now and in many cases, a lot of support from your families. I want to thank all the spouses, significant others and children here who support your Navy career. Whether youre an E3 or a first class, you are now a leader in your command. Every Sailor will look up to you just as every chief and officer will expect more from you. You are the future of the United States Navy, he concluded. Sanders then presented each SOQ an award envelope with a $25 gift card from VyStar Credit Union, a discount coupon from Navy Exchange, and a special coin from First Command Financial Services. The NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department, USAA, University of Phoenix and Columbia College picked up the cost of the buffet luncheon for the SOQs and their family members. The luncheon was coordinated by NC1 Paul Otie. MA1(EXW) Ronald Hughes, senior sailor of the quarter for NAS Jax Security Department, said, This event is great because it brings together all the leading Sailors from the base as well as tenant commands. Being part of this tradition takes a give it all you can attitude, plus, the support of your ship mates, as well as your chain of com mand, said Hughes. Its a privilege to be honored to be here today.Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government official ly endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. Stellar Sailors recognized for achievements 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013

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Mobile Tactical Operations Center (MTOC) -3, assigned to CPRW-11 and home-ported at Naval Air Station Jacksonville, recently completed its success ful deployment to the 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility in sup port of Operation Enduring Freedom and multiple mari time patrol squadrons. MTOC-3 arrived October 23, 2012, and took over the MTOC duties officially on October 29. They played an integral role in missions of maintain ing peace in the Persian Gulf and allowing for safe passage of all vessels through the Strait of Hormuz. They entered into a highly dynamic deployment, support ing VP-46, VQ-1, VSX-1, and VP-40. They executed more than 560 flights that encom passed more than 5,000 flight hours, supported 17 transits through the Strait of Hormuz, 27 Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) exercises, and a twoweek period of 24-hour flight operations. MTOC-3 averaged three flights per day for six months, said Capt. Mark Creasey, com mander, Task Force (CTF) 57. They never missed a beat. MTOC-3 palletized and brought out all of the equip ment they used to communi cate with the P-3C Orions. They employed a variety of electronic systems for their safety of flight and operations. From the ground, they pro vided critical communication links between task force com manders and P-3C aircrews. During operations, MTOC personnel connected P-3C air crews to the internet for pre flight mission planning, which included commanders tasking, radio frequencies and environ mental data. While airborne, P-3C air crews relied heavily on the critical communications paths, provided by the MTOC, for bidirectional flow of tasking and operational information. When a flight ended, MTOC mem bers utilized their specialized equipment to download data from the aircraft for analysis, and quickly disseminate it to operational commanders. In addition to successful mis sions, four personnel qualified for Enlisted Aviation Warfare Specialist (EAWS), eight per sonnel qualified for Enlisted Information Dominance Warfare Specialist (EIDWS), 14 personnel received their indi vidual watch qualifications, and they completed 32 watch team qualifications. MTOC-3 has set the stan dard for all other MTOCs, said Creasey. We couldnt do what we do out here without MTOC. Yorktown Gate Building 9 Pass and ID Office hours: Monday Friday from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Commercial Gate/Pass Office: Monday Friday from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. Passes will be issued by the Yorktown gate sentry after hours and weekends. Non-NCAC (RAPID Gate) personnel will only be authorized access during commercial gate hours. MTOC-3 home from 5th Fleet deployment New Pass & ID hours set JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013 13

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VP-5 transition spotlight This weeks Mad Fox spotlight shines on IS3 Nicole Souza, an intel ligence specialist who hails from Dartmouth, Mass. She is from a Portuguese family that was granted asylum in the U.S. and is the first in her family to be native born. She holds a bach elors degree in political science and is currently working on her masters degree in professional studies. After graduating col lege, Souza worked a civilian desk job before answering the call to ser vice and joining the U.S. Navy in May 2011. The VP-5 Intelligence Department has kept very busy during the P-8A transition by study ing for upcoming inspec tions, preparing squad ron intelligence briefs, and organizing volunteer events where the Mad Foxes seize the opportu nity to give back to their local communities. The transition has been challenging for the intelligence department because we have no spe cific school to attend, commented Souza. Thanks to the hard work of everyone in intel ligence, we have stayed on track in preparing to bring the Poseidon to the 7th Fleet Area of Responsibility for our next deployment. Intelligence specialists are responsible for brief ing and debriefing air crew, imagery analysis, and preparation of the battle space. When Souza isnt working hard on new intelligence, she vol unteers at an art camp run by the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville. VP-5 has been tran sitioning to the P-8A Poseidon since Jan. 4, 2013. More than 2,000 museums across the nation are open ing their doors, free of charge, to service members and their families this summer. From now through Labor Day, Sept. 2, all active duty service members, National Guardsmen and reservists and their families can take advantage of this cultural and educational opportunity in all 50 states. Its an exciting, inspiring, educational and economi cal activity for our families to enjoy this summer, said Navy Cmdr. Leslie Hull-Ryde, a Pentagon spokeswoman. The 2013 Blue Star Museums Program is a collabora tion among the Defense Department, Blue Star Families, the National Endowment for the Arts and the museums to give service members and their families a way to spend time together in their local museums. A record number of museums are participating this year. The program began in 2010 with free access to about 600 museums, while this years 2,000 is a figure thats still growing, Blue Star Families and NEA officials said.Sailors, families can visit museums free for summer The NAS Jacksonville Child Development Center is looking for home providers to care for children both on and off the station. If you are an on-base resident, you will only need to be Navy-certified to become a home provider. If you are an off-base resident, you will have to be state-certified as well as Navy-certified. Certifications include background checks, home inspections and a training program. Caregivers will be given use of the lending library and free monthly training sessions. For more information, contact Lisa Williams at 5425434/5381.Home providers needed 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013

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VBS children head to SonWest RoundupNearly 80 5-12 year-old children headed to the SonWest Roundup (this years theme), a week-long Vacation Bible School (VBS) held NAS Jax Chapel July 15-19. Children participated in various activities admin istered by 32 dedicated adults and teen volunteers. Activities included arts and crafts, classroom lessons, music sessions, games and food. Each morning began where the children were escorted to a main room and seated for an energiz ing sing-along session, followed by the lesson of the day presented by NAS Jax Chaplain Lt. Hylanie ChanWilliams. From there, they were split up according to age groups and sent to various locations to complete their daily activities. I am having great time and I am learning lots at VBS. My highlight so far is learning new arts and crafts and new songs, said 8-year-old Mikayla Roberts. I think it is important for young children to gain a sense of spirituality and to decide for themselves if they wish to embrace religion. VBS gives them options to explore faith and to ask questions and have fun, said NAS Jax Chaplain Lt. Hylanie Chan-Williams. The main purpose of VBS is to introduce the chil dren or reinforce them in their Christian faith. We do this by using arts and crafts, music and classroom ses sions. They spend approximately 45 minutes in each of these areas, plus we supply them with lunch. On Friday, we invite the parents, neighbors and siblings to come watch a program that goes on in the chapel and the children perform songs that they learned throughout the week, said Grace Heffner, who coordinates VBS here every year. Children who started VBS as early as age five or six, after they have gone through the program, return as teen volunteers, implied Heffner. According to Heffner the children come from a wide spread of backgrounds. We have children every year that learn about Jesus for the first time. They want to know who is Jesus. That is the bottom line for us, said Heffner. After all the hard work invested into planning and preparing for VBS, my reward for the program comes on Friday when I sit in the congregation and I hear these children singing, said Heffner. 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013

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For more information about any of the sports arti cles, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill. bonser@navy.mil. Visit the MWR website at www.cnic. navy.mil or www.facebook.com nasjaxmwr. After 27 games over two weeks, Baker County Little League defeated Mill Creek Little League to win the Florida District 11 Little League 9-10-year-old tourna ment hosted by Navy Ortega Lakeshore (NOL) Little League at NAS Jax June 28. In the third and conclusive game between the two teams, Baker County jumped out to an early 10 run lead thanks in part to a towering home run by Cason Milton. Mill Creek came back with a spirited rally, cut ting the lead to one run. In the end, Baker county received some outstanding relief pitching from Jordan Rhoden and went on to win by a margin of 149. Baker County now goes to the Florida Section 3 tournament hosted by Mims Little League, located near Titusville, Fla. The winner of the sectional tour nament advances to the Florida Little League State Championship. This year, the District 11 tournament included 14 teams from a five-county area in Northeast Florida including two NOL teams. NOLs A team made it to the final four teams before being eliminated. The tournament rotates from year to year between the leagues located in District 11, which is the second largest Little League district in Florida. According to NOL, it takes a tremendous amount of time and numerous volunteers to host the district tournament. It all starts at the top with NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Robert Sanders and Morale, Welfare and Recreation Director John Bushick who made it pos sible to hold the tournament on base. NOL also sends out special thanks to Maribel Guzman (MWR), Tyesha Donaldson (MWR) and Penny Roberts (Base Pass and ID Office) for a great job of administering the base passes for the visiting teams and fans. In addition, Tom Fagan and his grounds crew at the golf course were a tremendous help with the playing fields. NOL was founded in 1960 and has been located at NAS JAX since it started. NOL is an officially chartered league of Little League International, home of the Little League World Series as seen on ABC and ESPN. Baker County Little League wins tournament at NAS Jax JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013 17

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Americas armed forces will begin a downward spiral that will be costly to reverse. If Congress cant find a way to avoid sequestration in 2014 DOD will have to consider involuntary reductions in force to reduce civilian personnel costs, said Hagel. Hiring freezes will continue and facilities maintenance funds will further erode. He added that DOD could meet fur ther reductions only through a severe package of military personnel actions, including halting all accessions, end ing all permanent-change-of-station moves, stopping discretionary bonuses and freezing promotions. FRCSE Commanding Officer Capt. Robert Caldwell said, This was a great opportunity for SECDEF to learn about our aviation maintenance mission and to gain a better understanding of our numerous contributions to the warf ighter. At the town hall meeting attended by our civilian federal employees, the sec retary said, You cant buy back readi ness, and that is so true. What we do here and in the field is very important to Sailors and Marines operating forward. Mr. Hagels message was clear we can expect another round of budget cuts. The FRCSE team has been cost-con scious for a very long time, but what the SECDEF said only reinforces our resolve to continue finding innovative and costeffective solutions to better meet warf ighter demands, added Caldwell. Hagel recently called on Congress to work with DOD to approve the presi dents defense budget request. The presidents budget request slows military pay raises and raises fees for some military retirees health care. It also looks to retire older Air Force and Navy assets, as well as calling for a new base realignment and closure program. He said, Uncertainty is a tremendous enemy when military families live in a state of uncertainty, it impacts their concentration and that impacts their job. Ultimately, it can create a loss of skill sets that are vital to our national security and our readiness. Hagel, an Army combat veteran in Vietnam and a former member of the U.S. Senate, stressed that service mem bers do more than just put on a uni form, and civilians do more than just show up for work. Everyone connected with DOD is part of something bigger than them selves. Were helping build a new world a more free and fair world because tol erance, respect and dignity still anchor the human condition, said Hagel. In addition to Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, Hagels tour of NAS Jacksonville included: a luncheon with regional business and civic leaders; a media roundtable; a commissary tour; a P-8A Integrated Training Center (ITC) tour; and a flight line tour of a VP-30 P-8A Poseidon aircraft. At the P-8A ITC, instructor pilot Lt. Brett Eckert welcomed Hagel to one of the flight simulators. He was interested in the differences between a commercial Boeing 737 and the P-8A Poseidon. He sat in the left pilot seat as we executed a simulated landing at Joint Base Andrews, manual ly flying the last 200 feet to the runway, said Eckert. It was a privilege to meet Secretary Hagel and show him how we train on the Poseidon. After landing, he told me, that wasnt bad for an old Vietnam infantryman, he added. At the NAS Jacksonville Commissary, Store Director Larry Bentley welcomed the secretary of defense to the ninthlargest (in sales volume) store in the world. It was an honor to take Mr. Hagel on a tour he was greeting patrons as we walked the aisles. Active duty and retired shoppers were pleasantly surprised to meet him, said Bentley. According to Bentley, the secretary was very impressed with the store and the warm welcome from the staff. SECDEF VISIT Photos by Clark Pierce, Lt. Kevin Wendt and MC2 Amanda Cabasos VP-26 trains with New Zealand forcesA VP-26 Tridents aircrew, assigned to Commander, Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (CMPRF) 7th Fleet arrived in Auckland, New Zealand on July 6 to support a scheduled bilateral Maritime Patrol Reconnaissance Aircraft (MPRA) Exchange. The exchange marked the first U.S. Navy P-3C Orion visit to New Zealand in nearly 30 years. The 9-day visit improved interoperability between the U.S. Navy and Royal New Zealand Air Force MPRA communities. The visit is the culmination of the first exchange between CTF 72 and the RNZAF 5 Squadron. As part of the first half of the exchange, a New Zealand P-3K2 recently visited CTF 72 at Kadena Air Base, Japan from July 2-4. The reciprocating U.S. P-3C visit conducted train ing in New Zealand at RNZAF Base Whenuapai in Auckland through July 15. Our visit will further develop the ability to oper ate with a key partner in the region, said Lt. Cmdr. Jason Zaharris, CTF 72 Theater Security Cooperation Officer. This exchange consisted of symposium briefs such Maritime Domain Awareness and Search and Rescue Operations. The crews also participated in several missions orientated to putting into practice the infor mation garnered during the symposium briefs. Based at NAS Jacksonville, the Tridents are current ly on a six-month deployment to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility, as part of CMPRF 7th Fleet. Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus fur thered his commitment to improve the Department of the Navys sexual assault response by announc ing additional resources for investigators and a new initiative designed to enhance accountability and transparency across the department. Mabus approved nearly $10 million to hire more than 50 additional Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) Family and Sexual Violence Program personnel to shorten investigation times. He also directed the Navy and Marine Corps to regularly publish online the results of each services courtsmartial. Our Navy and Marine Corps is the greatest mari time force the world has ever known. To uphold our core values of honor, courage, and commitment, we must do all we can to protect our people from those who would wish to do them harm, especially if they reside within our own ranks, said Mabus. This department is fully committed to using all available resources to prevent this crime, aggres sively investigate allegations and prosecute as appro priate. We will not hide from this challenge-we will be active, open and transparent. The additional Adult Sexual Assault Program (ASAP) special agents and crime scene personnel approved by Mabus will further help decrease the sexual assaults investigation timeline. ASAP teams with specialized training in legal jurisdiction, investigative procedures, evidence col lection, sexual assault victim sensitivities, and the handling of reports and official statements are cur rently being deployed to fleet concentration areas worldwide. To increase transparency of the departments criminal proceedings, SECNAV directed the services to begin publishing the results of all Special and General Courts-Martial, including sexual assault cases, on the service primary Web sites of Navy.mil and Marines.mil, respectively, by July 25. The first of these summaries will cover those cases concluded from January through June of this year, but future editions will be published regularly. Additional information and resources to combat sexual assault is available at www.sapr.navy.mil. Sexual assault affects Navy readiness, and the Navy is committed to preventing sexual assault. Join the Navys conversation about sexual assault on social media and help raise awareness by using #NavySAPR.SECNAV announces new initiatives to help combat sexual assault 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment July 26 Jason Lamar Duo Deweys Family Night August 2, 4 8 p.m. Enjoy free activities including a magic show, games, back-to-school goodies, inflatables and more!Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 510 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 1 6 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer Going on now through Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 years and younger receive one free game of bowling every day until 5 p.m. Win prizes all summer long!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Lap Swim (water park, water slide and concessions are not open) Monday Friday 6 8 a.m. & 6 7 p.m. Recreational Swim (water park, water slide and concessions are open) Monday Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. 2013 Learn to Swim Program Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1 Private pool parties can be reserved at the fitness center Parties are not available during regular business hours of operation and occur in the evenings when the pool is closed. Parties must be reserved ten days prior to party date, payment due at time of reservation For more information call (904) 5423518 The temporary gym, The Zone, Bldg. 798 is closed. Dive In Movie at the outdoor pool August 10, 6 10 p.m. Movie begins at 8:30 p.m. Free admission, hot dog, chips and a drink!I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets on sale now $70 section 147 Legoland Florida Free ticket for active duty military through Oct. 27 Wet n Wild Orlando $37 adult, $45 adult w/ meal, $40 child w/ meal Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Amelia Island Museum of History $10 family pass, Ghost tour $8 adult, $4 child Florida Ecosafaris in St. Cloud EcoPark $119, Coach safari adult $28, child $25, Zipline safari $75, Cypress canopy cycle $40 for one hour Gatorland Free admission for active duty and retired military until the end of the year. Family tickets can be pur chased at ITT. $19.95 adult, $12.50 child, zip line $54.25 Blue Man Group Orlando $49 adult, $29 child Monster Truck Jam coming soon! 2013 2014 Artist Series featuring Mama Mia, Memphis, Celtic Thunder, War Horse, Men are From Mars, Women are from Venus, Million Dollar Quartet and The D* Word is a Musical are on sale now!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Kayak Trip July 27 at 9 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees August 6 & 20 for active duty August 8 & 22 for retirees, DoD person nel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Furlough Fridays All civilian employees that have been furloughed can play 18-holes with cart & green fee for $20 Junior Golf Clinic Session 3, July 29 Aug. 2, ages 1117 $110 per child, per sessionMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Movie Under the Stars August 23 at 8 p.m. featuring Monsters University Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School August 5 September 16 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013 19

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The Virtual Education Center (VEC) and all Navy College Offices (NCOs) are closed each Friday during the Defense Department furlough of civil ian employees this fiscal year, said officials at the Center for Personal and Professional Development July 18. The VEC and NCOs worldwide are staffed by government civilians, who began furloughs of one day per week in early July for 11 weeks. During this peri od, the VEC is open to serve customers Monday through Thursday from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. Eastern Time. NCOs are gen erally open Monday through Thursday with hours varying by location. Closing NCOs on Friday has the least impact on Sailors and our support to the fleet, said Jon Richardson, who works for CPPD as Voluntary Education Regional Director West. Many local commands schedule in-house activi ties for Fridays. Also, the majority of our academic institutions that provide on-base, instructor-led programs do not schedule classes on Friday. School representatives cannot be on base or offer instruction if an NCO rep resentative isnt available unless spe cific permission is granted by the host command, he said. Visiting academic institutions and counselors/advisors have adjusted schedules and are avail able Monday through Thursday, match ing NCO work schedules. The workload of voluntary educa tion staffs cannot be picked up by con tractors, who are not allowed to advise Sailors on using tuition assistance, which allocates government resources for their education. Additionally, a memo regarding civilian furloughs from the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Readiness and Force Management dated June 28 stipulates that govern ment civilian workloads cannot be shifted to contractors to compensate for productivity loss as a result of the furlough. While Richardson said its too early to foresee all the impacts of these office closures on Sailors, one he anticipates is an increase in waiting time for cus tomers. Since weve only been closed one Friday, the real business impact is unknown. It appears the number of Sailors visiting NCOs has increased during our open hours. That could be hiccup, but we wont know until we have more data. Wait times for VEC customers may also rise, according to Sharen Richardson, VEC supervisor. We encourage Sailors to do a few things to lessen the impact of the reduced hours, she said. First, ensure you submit your Tuition Assistance (TA) request up to 30 days prior to your class start date. Then track it to ensure your command approves and forwards it to the VEC with enough time for staff to review and authorize it. She said Sailors who wait too long to submit their TA request may not be able to begin a class on time. Dont start a class without an approved TA voucher in hand, Richardson said. We cant process a TA request after a schools advertised add/drop date, so its the Sailors responsibility to follow up with his or her command to track that TA request. We ask Sailors to please bear with us during this time. HA William Jones, pharmacy technician at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville, may look like your average sailor, but in reality he is a vibrant music and dance enthusiast with a passion for the bright lights. Since the age of three, Jones has been singing and dancing with the confidence and flair of a natural star. The 20-year-old hospi tal corpsman, a native of Indianapolis, Ind., recently rekindled his love for musical performance by auditioning and landing a roll in 9 to 5: The Musical at Theater Jacksonville Floridas longest running community theater. When I first reported for duty at NH Jacksonville, I didnt know what to do with myself after work, explained Jones. Then one day a friend of mine encouraged me to follow my passion and explore the ater opportunities that may be available in north Florida. After searching newspapers and the internet, he saw an advertisement for auditions at Theater Jacksonville. Being no stranger to audi tions Jones has performed in such musicals as Aida, Sweeney Todd and The Wiz while grow ing up in Indianapolis he sang A Joyful Noise, and earned a role in the musicals 25-per son cast on the last day of audi tions. Achieving this accomplish ment was very exciting for Jones, who at a young age was heavily influenced by music, being raised by old-school music enthusiasts who were natives of southern blues music cities such as Memphis, Tenn. and Owensboro, Ky. The producer was some what skeptical of me in the beginning, said Jones. But once the producers and cast saw my passion and dedi cation, they were willing to give me that chance, which I greatly appreciate. After two months of grueling practices, it was time for the shows Jacksonville debut. It was difficult at first, but when you enjoy doing some thing, you have to make sacri fices such as this, stated Jones. Portraying a new employee, in the productions ensemble, Joness character appeared in the very first scene of the musi cal, when the curtains were raised. As soon as the stage lights come on, its just me, expressed Jones. I was pumped with adrena line, but was able to perform well. I became more relaxed and confident after the first few shows, and everything went as planned. My biggest challenge of the musical was performing the associated choreography, said Jones. I was one of the worst danc ers when practices began in April, and by the first show, I was one of the directors favor ites. Jones plans to continue his passion of music and danc ing while assigned to NH Jacksonville, by auditioning for upcoming plays and musicals in the area. Corpsman shines bright on public stage Navy Voluntary Education support hours reduced during furlough 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013

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THURSDAY, JULY 25, 2013 NEX AWARD SEA CADETS STELLAR SAILORS Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com During his first visit to NAS Jacksonville on July 16, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel called on Congress to work with DOD to avoid sequestration in fiscal 2014. Otherwise, DOD will be forced to cut $52 billion from its budget that only could be accomplished by put ting together an extremely severe package of military and civilian personnel actions. With U.S. Reps Corrine Brown (D-FL5), Ander Crenshaw (R-FL4) and Ted Yoho (R-FL3) joining the audience at a town hall meeting with civilians and Sailors at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) aboard base, Hagel called on Congress to work with DOD to avoid sequestration in fiscal 2014. If the cuts continue, the depart ment will have to make sharp reduc tions with far-reaching consequences including limited combat power and reduced readiness that will undermine our countrys national security inter ests, Hagel told the audience. He remarked that if sequestration remains in effect, the size, readi ness and technological superiority of Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert discussed the status of the fleet, readiness impact due to sequestration, and modi fications to Navy policies at a press conference July 19 at the Pentagon. Presence remains our man date, Greenert said. This is what we are mostly about, and its an essential element of our defense strategic guidance. Greenert pointed out that the Navy has about 95 ships deployed and about 3,700 operational aircraft. The current ship count in the Mediterranean has been higher than it has been through the years. USS Kearsarge and USS San Antonio are positioned in the Red Sea and stand ready with a range of missions and operations if required. USS Nimitz is deployed to the North Arabian Sea supporting ground opera tions in Afghanistan with close air support, and piracy in the region is slowly increasing and is becoming more of a concern. In the Pacific theater, Talisman Saber Exercise, started July 14, off the coast of Australia and in the Coral Sea. TS13 is an ongoing bien nial training exercise with Australia and currently has George Washington Carrier Strike Group and Bonhomme Richard Amphibious Ready Group assets participating. In the Southern Command, sequestration has caused the reduction to zero combat ships in the region. There are other naval forces in the region, Greenert said. Non-combatant ships and other forces. The Navys first spearhead class joint high-speed ves sel will deploy to the Southern Command area of operation in FY 14. Presence forward, assuring our allies and deterring poten VP-45 celebrates 44-year safety milestoneCompleting one year of mishap-free flying is an accomplishment of which any squadron would be proud. Completing 44 years of mis hap-free flying is something to be especially proud of and that is precisely what Patrol Squadron (VP) 45 has accomplished. Over the past 44 years, the VP-45 Pelicans surpassed 265,100 mishap-free flight hours. In a congratulatory message, Rear Adm. Sean Buck, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group, pointed out that VP-45s complete professionalism and genuine dedication to safety have been the corner stones of this impressive aviation achievement. While every Pelican has contributed to this achieve ment, VP-45s Quality Assurance (QA) Division, the backbone of the maintenance department, has played a crucial role over the years by ensuring that every P-3C Orion aircraft is safe to fly. Although aircrew play a major role by safely taking aircraft aloft and returning without a mishap, its main tenance professionals who ensure the aircraft is as safe as possible prior to leaving the ground. Without their dedication to by-the-book maintenance, Hagel talks budget with Sailors, civilians CNO updates Navy status Power outage to affect numerous facilitiesA power outage will take place at NAS Jacksonville on Sunday, July 28 from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. to replace a damaged concrete power pole. This will affect numer ous facilities aboard the sta tion. The Navy Exchange (NEX) Main Store, Home and Garden Center, Car Care Center and NEX Gas Station will be closed. The following Morale, Welfare and Recreation facilities will also be closed: Fitness Center, Outdoor Pool, Car Wash, Deweys, NAS Freedom Lanes, Liberty Center and Long Term RV Storage Lot. The power outage will also affect the barracks. The work is being conducted by Fluor Federal Solutions base contractors.

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS July 25 1779 Amphibious expedition against British in Penobscot Bay, Maine. 1863 U.S. Squadron bombards Fort Wagner, N.C. 1866 Rank of Admiral created. David G. Farragut is appointed the first Admiral in the U.S. Navy. 1898 Landing party from armed yacht Gloucester occupies Guanica, Puerto Rico. 1912 First specifications for naval aircraft pub lished. 1934 First President to visit Hawaii, Franklin D. Roosevelt, reaches Hilo on board the cruiser USS Houston (CA-30). 1941 Bureau of Ordnance issues first Navy Ecertificates (for excellence) for industry. 1943 Launching of destroyer escort USS Harmon (DE-72), first ship named for an African-American. 1990 Oiler USS Cimarron (AO 22) rescues 25 refugees adrift southeast of Subic Bay, Philippines. July 26 1812 Frigate Essex captures British brig Leander. 1912 First airborne radio communications from naval aircraft to ship (Lt. John Rodgers to USS Stringham). 1946 Capt Joy Bright Hancock appointed director, Womens Naval Reserve. 1948 President Harry S. Truman orders desegregation of the Armed Services. 1954 Three aircraft from USS Philippine Sea (CVA47) shoot down Chinese fighters that fired on them while they were providing air cover for rescue operations for a U.K. airliner shot down by a Chinese air craft. July 27 1953 Korean War armistice signed at Panmunjon, Korea, cease-fire went into effect at 10 p.m. July 28 1915 Sailors and Marines land in Haiti to restore order. 1916 Navy establishes a Code and Signal Section which initially worked against German ciphers and tested the security of communications during U.S. naval training maneuvers. 1926 Team of scientists from Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Carnegie Institution determine height of the ionosphere through use of radio pulse transmitter developed by NRL. 1945 USS Callaghan (DD-792) is last U.S. Navy ship sunk by a Japanese kamikaze attack, off Okinawa. 1973 Launch of Skylab III, the second manned mission to the first U.S. manned space station, was piloted by Maj. Jack Lousma, USMC with Capt. Alan Bean, USN as the commander of the mission and former Navy electronics officer, Owen Garriott as Science Pilot. The mission lasted 59 days, 11 hours and included 858 Earth orbits. Recovery by USS New Orleans (LPH-11). July 29 1846 Sailors and Marines from U.S. sloop Cyane capture San Diego, Calif. 1918 Assistant Secretary of the Navy Franklin D. Roosevelt visits Queenstown, Ireland. 1945 U.S. warships bombard Hamamatsu, Japan. 1967 Fire on board USSForrestal (CV-59) kills 134 crew members. July 30 1918 Units of First Marine Aviation Force arrive at Brest, France. 1941 Japanese aircraft bomb USS Tutuila (PR-4) at Chungking, China the first Navy ship damaged by Axis forces during World War II. 1942 FDR signs act establishing WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service). During World War II, over 80,000 officer and enlisted women served in the WAVES. 1944 Naval Task Force lands Army troops near Cape Opmarai, New Guinea. 1945 Japanese submarine, I-58, sinks cruiser USS Indianapolis (CA-35) in Philippine Sea only 316 of 1199 crew survived. 1967 Fire on board aircraft carrier USSForrestal (CV-59) off the coast of Vietnam results in death of 134 crew. July 31 1815 Commodore Stephen Decatur concludes agreement with Bey of Tunis to compensate U.S. for seizure of merchant ships during the War of 1812. 1874 Commissioning of USS Intrepid, first U.S. warship equipped with torpedoes. 1912 First attempt to launch an airplane by cata pult made at Annapolis, Md. 1964 All-nuclear task force of USS Long Beach (CGN 9), USS Enterprise (CVN 65) and USS Bainbridge l(CGN 25) eaves Norfolk, Va. to begin Operation Sea Orbit, to circle the globe without refueling. They returned on Oct. 3. When I tell people I live in Maine, they almost always ask about the moose. And it turns out there are many misconceptions about moose, such as the idea that they out number people in Maine, but the biggest of all is probably that they exist. The only moose Ive seen is on the state flag. Oh, alright, I supposedly saw an adolescent moose running down I-95, but Im not 100-percent sure that wasnt a small horse. I didnt see ant lers. And until I see a big bull moose with 50-pound antlers, I wont be con vinced the species wasnt invented by the Office of Tourism to attract tourists. Ive been on a mission to see a moose since I moved to Maine in 2008. Previously, I was one of those neverbeen-to-Maine types (but I got here as soon as I could) who thought people in Maine probably kept the animals as pets or something. As I drove into the state for the first time, the big moose-warning signs made me excited. I was going to see one before I even had a house! Our Realtor told me to be careful on the drive, because thats how people die in Maine they hit a moose. I thought Id be dodging them for Heavens sake. Ive never seen one. But taking all the best parts of what Mainers had told me about the animals, I developed quite the mental picture. I imagined them stepping over cars, completely unafraid of the highway, their legs like stilts casually moving in and out of traffic. People had told me moose eyes dont reflect light at night, so I wondered if maybe I had missed them altogether. Maybe they are that stealthy. I knew friends who had seen moose. I saw their pictures on Facebook, and I studied them for indications that theyd been Photoshopped. You need to go further north, a friend who is a game war den told me. Moose are everywhere up there. Youre guar anteed to see one. So last September I took the kids to Mt. Katahdin, and I asked the rangers for the best spot to see moose. Definitely Sandy Stream, they said. Down the path we went, rain jack ets hanging from our arms just in case. When we got to the lookout at Sandy Stream, a couple was sitting there positively radiant from having just seen a moose, which, of course, was gone now. Also, last week I was here, the man said, and, Im not kidding, there were a dozen moose in the stream. My boys and I sat at the lookout for as long as my youngest son, Lindell, could tolerate. We never saw anything. Occasionally, throughout the year, my game warden friend would tell me about moose found wandering the city streets. I even put on the police scan ner once and tried to follow the clues to a supposed moose bathing in the Kenduskeag Stream. By the time I got there, the moose was gone. Try going in the heat of the summer, my friend said. They are more likely to be at the stream to cool off. So last month, Dustin and I took the kids back up to Sandy Stream at Mt. Katahdin. This time, we saw moose tracks along the trail. They were as big as Lindells head, and I took about 20 photographs of them. I just knew I was about to see a moose this time. One of the boys stepped in moose poop it went all the way up his shins and into his sock and I could hardly stand the excitement. Who steps in moose droppings and doesnt actually see the animal? Two professional photographers were on the lookout. They told us about all the moose they had seen just yester day. Everyone sees moose yesterday, my oldest son, Ford, said. But there were no moose none in the stream that day. The park rangers had radioed their crews in the woods and instructed them to pull back the Office of Tourismsponsored, mechanical, radio-con trolled beasts because the Smileys were coming. (Thats what they do, right?) Or maybe Im moose repellant. A week later, I was on a bus in Washington, D.C., melting from the heat. The driver asked where I was from. When I told him Maine, I hoped he would ask me about lobster, Acadia National Park, loons, or the snow. But I could tell by his face in the rearview mirror what he wanted to ask. He turned around in his chair and said, Man, you must see a ton of moose up there! Do they, like, walk around in your backyard and stuff?If youre looking for moose in Maine . The base gym did not open as scheduled on July 22 due to unfore seen delays in the renovation project. When a firm date is established for the opening, MWR will notify cus tomers through social media (MWR Facebook page, www.facebook.com/ nasjaxmwr), POW and an MWR elec tronic News Flash e-mail. We apologize for any inconvenience. Spin classes will resume when the gym is open. For more information, call 542-3225. Unforseen delays postpone gymnasium opening

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The Navy Exchange at NAS Jacksonville showed superior performance over the past year in service to military personnel and their families earning the runner-up 2012 Bingham Award for sales above $85 million. General Manager Marsha Brooks said, Its a big honor for our associates to place second in the top sales category. Were also proud of the support that our active duty and retired patrons provide. We work diligently to provide quality products at competitive prices that consistently attract and reward shoppers. She added that, Our high overall presentation standards help NAS Jax to get good marks from both patrons and associates on NEX satisfaction surveys. The Bingham Award shows that our associates really know their mission and deliver the goods the way our patrons prefer. Winning the Bingham Award repre sents a tremendous achievement on the part of all our store associates and managers, as well as the base community, said retired Rear Adm. Robert Bianchi, chief executive officer of NEXCOM. This award is presented to the best of the best Navy Exchanges in the nine sales categories for overall financial results and customer service. The Bingham Award program was established in 1979 to recognize excel lence in customer service, operations and management at NEX activities. NAS Jax Navy Exchange named Bingham Award winner Sailors aboard air craft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) said their goodbyes to friends and family prior to getting underway for an eight to ninemonth deployment July 22. Truman, along with the other components of the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (HST CSG), completed a composite training unit exercise in January prior to their originally scheduled February deployment, and also a sustainment exercise and fleet syn thetic training exercise in June. The crew has operated and trained extensively at sea the past several months and the train ing scenarios were more complex and challeng ing, said Capt. Bob Roth, Trumans commanding officer. The ships and air wings warfighting proficiency has increased substantially since our deployment was delayed in February. I couldnt be more proud of the crew; they are dedicat ed, skilled, and tremen dously enthusiastic about deploying. The February deploy ment was delayed due to sequestration and the change of aircraft car rier presence require ments in the U.S. Central Command Area of Responsibility. The current deploy ment is part of an ongo ing rotation of forwarddeployed forces to sup port maritime security operations (MSO) in the U.S. 6th and 5th Fleet areas of operations. MSO set the conditions for security and stability in the maritime environment and complement the counter-terrorism and security efforts of regional nations. MSO deny interna tional terrorists use of the maritime environment as a venue for attack or to transport personnel, weapons or other mate rial. Truman is the flagship for HST CSG. It can trav el in excess of 30 knots, and has a ships company of approximately 3,000. With the embarked air wing and staffs, the number rises to about 5,000. HST CSG also consists of USS Bulkeley (DDG 84), USS Gettysburg (CG 64), USS Mason (DDG 87), USS San Jacinto (CG 56), 1st Combined Destroyer Squadron staff. Also on board is Carrier Air Wing 3 and its associated squadrons Strike Fighter Squadrons (VFA) 32 Swordsmen, VFA-37 Ragin Bulls, and VFA-105 Gunslingers; Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 312 Checkerboards; Airborne Early Warning Squadron 126 Seahawks; Electronic Attack Squadron) 130 Zappers; Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 7 Dusty Dogs; and Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron 74 Swamp Foxes.HSM-74 Swamp Foxes deploy with USS Harry S. Truman to U.S. 5th and 6th Fleets 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013

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The Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Family Readiness Program hosted phase II of an Emergency Family Assistance Center (EFAC) exercise aboard NAS Jacksonville July 17. The training was the second installment of a three-phase exercise designed to test the regions ability to establish and sustain EFAC operations in the days and weeks following the landfall of a hurricane. Phase I, conducted on May 30, involved more than 30 Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) representatives from NAS Jacksonville, Naval Station (NS) Mayport and Naval Submarine Base (NSB) Kings Bay, as well as installation and training officers and emer gency management personnel from all three bases. Phase II incorporated a vari ety of additional base organizations, such as the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, Navy Legal Service Office, Navy Gateway Inns and Suites, base housing and many others. This training is vital because its not a matter of if one of our installations will be affected by a hurricane, its a matter of when, said Rear Adm. John Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast. Our ability to bring togeth er multiple organizations and people to work as a cohesive unit is crucial to our recovery efforts in this kind of scenario, and I think training like this has a huge impact on our ability to respond when the real thing does happen. The EFAC exercise is essentially a continuation of the regions HURREX 2013, that tested the regions hurricane preparedness through a sce nario involving multiple, simulated storms that made landfall near installations throughout the Southeast Region. While HURREX focused on pre-land fall preparations, the EFAC exercise focused on the recov ery phase of disaster response. In this scenario, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay residents were evacuated prior to land fall and each base suffered extensive flooding as the simulated storm passed. Afterward, FFSC person nel from all three participat ing bases worked with emer gency management, training personnel and other installa tion departments to estab lish an EFAC on board NAS Jacksonville. Phase II of this exercise had a lot more moving pieces due to the fact that we brought in a variety of additional agen cies to participate, said Carol Lucius, CNRSE Family Readiness Program work and family life coordinator. To incorporate all these different people into this exer cise is invaluable because we will be working together in the event of a real disaster and establishing roles, responsibilities and relationships is cru cial. After a real disaster, the EFAC would function as a hub for FFSC case workers and emergency response personnel to provide a wide range of support services for affected fam ily members. According to Lucius, much of that support is managed through the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System (NFAAS). After a disaster, people can go into the Needs Assessment portion of NFAAS and specify what they need, then our case managers can go in and see what those needs are. We will then call them back and get them the appropriate resourc es, she said. Although NFAAS is one of the primary methods for EFAC personnel to assess needs after a disaster, it is not the only one. People can also come direct ly to the EFAC for assistance, Lucius added. Circumstances can change very quickly in the days and weeks following a hurricane, so our recovery efforts need to be flexible and our services have to be adjusted accordingly, Lucius said. Its important for us to identify exactly who we need to have in the EFAC based on what peoples needs are. The EFAC is not staffed with only FFSC personnel, but there are a lot of other organizations involved, such as chaplains, medical, legal, housing and a long list of others. Part of this exercise is to establish a clearer picture of what resources we are likely to need in the EFAC at different times in the recov ery process. After an actual hurricane, EFAC personnel would also coordinate with a number of civilian agencies and local officials in order to get people the help they need. Lucius said most people who seek help are in need of food, shelter, clothes or some other physical need, which makes it important to conduct this kind of exercise in order to be better prepared for recovery efforts when a real-world scenario occurs. The nature of an emergency or crisis event is that of unpredictability, she said. However, even though things will inevitably hap pen that we dont necessarily expect, we still need to have a plan in place so that our people are confident in themselves, confident in their leadership and confident in the plan. Lucius said training like this is essential for preparing emergency management and FFSC personnel for an actual event, but it is equally as important for family members and dependents to know what to do in the event of an emergency. They really need to know about NFAAS. They need to know that it is essential for them to have their personal contact information updated in NFAAS so that when a disaster strikes, they can be contacted and they know how to contact somebody for help, she said. While phase II of the exercise included about 30 more par ticipants than phase I, phase III of the exercise will expand even further and will include a number of civilian agencies and organizations, includ ing the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Salvation Army and others. Sailors, dependents and government civilians can log into NFAAS at https://navyfam ily.navy.mil where they can update their contact informa tion, report their status or submit a needs assessment. Family Readiness Program conducts emergency response exercise JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013 Sea Cadets gain experience from NAS Jax sailorsFifty-one U.S. Naval Sea Cadets and adult volunteers from various divi sions, squadrons and battalions in the Southeast, reported to NAS Jax for annual training July 1-14 to help youths gain knowledge and experience through hands-on training. The cadets, ages 13-17, spent the week working at various locations at NAS Jax, including the Flight Line Caf, NAS Jax Fire Department, Air Traffic Control Tower, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Power Plants Division, and Basic Airman Training at VP-16 All cadets were required to complete a two-week boot camp, located at vari ous places across the country, before they could report to NAS Jax for their advanced training program. I have been working with the Sea Cadet program for more than 18 years, and having participated in other youth programs, I can honestly say that our program is the best around, said U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps (NSCC) Regional Director 6-2 Lt. Cmdr. June Tillet. What other program allows young folks the opportunity to experience the U.S. Navy and other services so close up and personal? Ive seen cadets grow up from 11 years old to full adulthood and I am amazed at the transformation. Our cadets develop into responsible, stable adults due to the outstanding support of the Navy and our dedicated adult volunteers who spend countless hours mentoring and training, said Tillet. Our track record speaks for itself in that 65 percent of our cadets join the military and they arrive at recruit train ing and Officer Candidate School with a good understanding of what is expected of them and how they need to perform. NSCC not only benefits our cadets and leaders, it benefits our country as well. Six cadets spent two weeks at the Flight Line Caf and learned essential culinary skills that included proper food prepa ration, baking and cooking techniques. They also assisted Navy culinary specialists at the food service line. My favorite part about this job is preparing the meals, said Sea Cadet Theodore Owens. I have learned a lot so far about how to handle and stow food. I am learning to work with other people, added Sea Cadet Alex Long. I really enjoyed working in the bakery. Sea Cadet Leader Lt. j.g. Kathy DOrlando said, As adults, we can men tor the students and teach them military bearing, that also helps them in their daily life skills. These Sea Cadets make life-long friends. The program helps them learn new skills and preps them for their future careers. Twenty cadets were selected to work at Jacksonville Navy Metro Fire and Emergency Services. Divided into two groups, they learned either basic fire fighting knowledge that involved both hose and ladder training, or first responders training, that included sce narios of first and second injury assess ments and backboard training. Sea Cadet Jon-Michael Borzeka stat ed, The firefighting training is impor tant because it gives us an opportunity to experience what it is like to be a fire fighter and to see if it would be a career path we may pursue. The Sea Cadet program provides many other opportunities for hands-on learning as well. The primary reason this program is beneficial for the cadets is because theyre figuring out the careers they may want to pursue. They learn real skills, such as EMT, that they can apply to their lives. We provide basic knowledge they can use daily, said Sea Cadet Leader Lt. j.g. Mark Theroux. They learn the fundamentals of fire hazards and avoid them to prevent fires. The cadets are also trained in CPR, he added. Four cadets chose to spend the week at the NAS Jax Air Operations Control Tower where they learned the ins and outs about communicating with aviators and vectoring aircraft in the radar room. This is my second year doing this, said Sea Cadet Jesse Moniz. Its a cool job. It has been great observing the air traffic controllers (AC) and learning about all their special equip ment. The ACs set a good example of how to stay calm under pressure, he added. The NSCC Program is open to youths ages 13-17 who have a desire to learn about the Navy, Marines and Merchant Marine. Members drill at their local units weekly or monthly during the year and are given the opportunity to partici pate in advanced training during school breaks at various locations around the country.

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tial adversaries is our primary function, Greenert said. I think we are out there at the, what I call, the maritime crossroads where it matters, when it matters. CNO addressed the readiness impact of seques tration for FY 13 and FY 14. There is one carri er strike group (CSG) and one amphibious ready group (ARG) deployed to each of the Arabian Gulf and Western Pacific theaters. However, the surge force is a concern, Greenert said. Currently, there is only CSG and one ARG ready to surge if needed. A year ago, the Navy had three CSGs and ARGs ready to surge. Despite reduced operations and mainte nance spending in FY 13, Greenert said the Navys focus is to keep sea commands ready for deploy ments scheduled for FY 14. Sequestration for FY 14 could reduce each account by 10 percent. The Navy possibly faces deeper cuts for FY 14, because FY 13 used money available from previous years to help pad the effects of sequestration, Greenert explained. CNOs goal is to preserve shipbuilding and avi ation contracts through this process. Furlough impacts to the civilian force continue to be a challenge. Regrettably, were enduring furloughs, Greneert said. Its an impact, I felt it last week. I feel it this week. It hurts our readiness and it hurts our pro ductivity as well. CNO addressed sexual assault organizational changes and a revision to the Navy Exchange alcohol sales policy by further discussing the Navys newest changes that are taking place fleet-wide. Greenert said with more than half of all sexual assaults involving alcohol, the Navy had to look more critically at the atmosphere and climate of its bases. He said after a review of Navy Exchange alcohol sales trends at base stores the data showed a high volume of sales occurring late into the night and early morning and were not in line with mainstream retailers. CNOthe Pelicans 44 years of mishapfree flying would likely not have been possible. The quality assur ance division provides an extra set of experienced eyes to ensure the job is done right and done safely. This ensures the safety of not only the aircrew flying the plane, but also of those who are performing the maintenance. Everyone here must have safety on their mind as their number one priority, said QA Safety Representative AME1(AW) Scott Walker. They do this by staying involved with the maintenance shops, providing frequent training and conducting audits of every thing from the paperwork and workspace organization to maintenance practices. One of our main goals, Walker added, is to promote an atmo sphere of safety and to mold peoples attitudes. Hand picked for their technical expertise and strong character, personnel in VP-45s QA Division take their jobs seriously and work hard to promote a culture of safety within the squadron. I think consistency is what has helped us achieve this milestone, said AZ2(AW) Terry Wright, QAs central technical publications librarian. Knowledge and consis tency will be key during the squadrons next major milestone the transition to the P-8A Poseidon. Luckily, the Pelicans know that their QA representatives are up to the task of leading them through the P-8 transition safely as they strive to add another 44 years to an already outstanding safety record. VP-45 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013

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Sailors and other staff assigned to the NAS Jacksonville Flight Line Caf (gal ley) celebrated the arrival of their 2013 runner-up trophy for the annual Capt. Edward F. Ney Memorial Award for the Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) Large General Mess Category. Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. presented the styl ized eagle trophy to NAS Jax Food Service Officer CWO4 Teresa Cullipher. My personal congratulations go out to each one of your staff for winning this exceptional award, said Scorby. Whether you cook, bake or man the service lines, Ive no doubt about your commitment to providing a truly superior dining experience. Keep creating the great-tasting menus that youre known for and stay focused on bringing home the first place tro phy. Runner-up is a great accomplishment when you consider the high quality of the 19 gal leys we competed against. Our culinary specialists are the best of the best, stated NAS Jax Food Service Officer CWO4 Teresa Cullipher. They have won numerous culinary competitions in the southeast region and have earned chef certifications that enhance their knowledge and culinary skills. This represents apprecia tion for the hard work that we put into our program to exceed the expectations of our cus tomers. Runner-up is good but now we want to press on and take on the challenge of win ning first place, said CSCS Wendell Heyward, LCPO of the NAS Jax Supply Department. The NAS Jax galley was inspected on all aspects of food service including preparation, presentation and food qual ity, accountability of records and returns, sanitation, cus tomer service and crew morale. Our goal is to provide out standing food service every single meal and ensure our customers have the best nutritional meal possible, added Cullipher. The annual award, co-spon sored by the International Food Service Executives Association, encourages Navy Food Service program excellence with the goal of improving the quality of life for Navy personnel. It is named in honor of Capt. Edward Ney, head of the sub sistence division of the Bureau of Supplies and Account from 1940-45. Flight Line Caf celebrates arrival of Ney Award JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013 9

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NAS Jacksonville recognized 102 top Sailors from the base and tenant com mands during the Sailor of the Quarter (SOQ) luncheon at the NAS Jax River Cove Catering and Conference Center July 18. NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd was master of ceremonies. It is my dis tinct honor to welcome you to Team Jax Sailor of the Quarter Luncheon for the third quarter. I dont have to tell you about the insanely hectic operational tempo that were supporting right now. In fact, there are about 319,000 Sailors serving in various capacities through out the world. We have 286 ships in service, including aircraft carriers and big-deck amphibious ships that are currently underway in every AOR around the world. Its truly a privilege to be an America as we continue to defend the freedoms that others envy. Despite furloughs and other budget constraints, I believe that our Navy will prevail against any future challenges. Today, we are here to recognize the elite our very best of the best for the valuable leadership they bring to their commands, said Shepherd. Guest speaker CS1 Marnika Ash, assistant LPO of the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf, opened her remarks with a quote by Thomas Jefferson, I am a great believer in luck, and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it. She asked the audience how a sixyear first class petty officer like herself recently won Senior Sailor of the Second Quarter. Its how motivated, determined and focused you are and how much will power you bring to the game. You must constantly push yourself to be a better person, take advantage of educational opportunities, and instill character and values in those around you, said Ash. My leadership appointed me a gal ley watch captain, responsible for four cooks and 18 foodservice attendants. And, yes, I found that the harder I worked, the more responsibility was bestowed upon me, said Ash. Soon thereafter, she was awarded Blue Jacket of the Quarter. What we have to do as Sailors of the Quarter is to identify the next wave of superior sailors and push them to real ize their potential. Is it worth all the mentoring, judging and scrutiny? You bet it is. So remember to constantly talk the talk and walk the walk. Youll find todays recognition to be one of the greatest benchmarks in your naval career. Congratulations to you all, said Ash. The events keynote speaker was YNCS Yolanda Walls, the staff senior enlisted leader for Navy Region Southeast. Ive been in the Navy for 23 years and have witnessed a lot of change but theres one thing that has remained consistent and that is the exceptional quality of our Sailors. Its my honor to be part of todays recognition of Sailors I consider to be heroes and who have been singled out as the best of the best within their command. You should be justifiably proud of your accomplishment. You are part of an elite group who put service to our nation over self and family. You also share one very important thing in common you hold tight to the values that make this country and our Navy the best in the world. Both on and off the job you live our core values of honor, courage and commitment. You reflect honor by conducting yourselves according to the highest standards. Whenever I meet Sailors of the Quarter, I find them to be professionals who exude a standard of excellence in everything they do, representing their country and their Navy with pride. They often contribute to their community while also pursuing personal and pro fessional development. Your command leadership recog nizes that you didnt get to this point alone. To your family members, I also say thank you. Anyone who has served, knows we could not do what we do without the support of our families. To the leaders of these Sailors the chiefs and officers who inspired them to this point you can be proud of the results of your investment. The quote for todays event comes from Rear Admiral Farragut, who said, The world is sadly mistaken when it supposes that battles are won by this or that kind of vessel. The best gun and vessel should certainly be chosen, but victory, three times out of four, depends on those who fight them. Sailors of the Quarter, you are the kind of people I am proud to be in the fight with each and every day. But now is not the time to rest on this accom plishment. As the Navy continually transforms to become more efficient and effective, we will continue to depend on you to get the job done, concluded Walls. Following lunch, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders told the audience, I know it took a lot of hard work to get to where youre sitting right now and in many cases, a lot of support from your families. I want to thank all the spouses, significant others and children here who support your Navy career. Whether youre an E3 or a first class, you are now a leader in your command. Every Sailor will look up to you just as every chief and officer will expect more from you. You are the future of the United States Navy, he concluded. Sanders then presented each SOQ an award envelope with a $25 gift card from VyStar Credit Union, a discount coupon from Navy Exchange, and a special coin from First Command Financial Services. The NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department, USAA, University of Phoenix and Columbia College picked up the cost of the buffet luncheon for the SOQs and their family members. The luncheon was coordinated by NC1 Paul Otie. MA1(EXW) Ronald Hughes, senior sailor of the quarter for NAS Jax Security Department, said, This event is great because it brings together all the leading Sailors from the base as well as tenant commands. Being part of this tradition takes a give it all you can attitude, plus, the support of your shipmates, as well as your chain of com mand, said Hughes. Its a privilege to be honored to be here today.Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government official ly endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. Stellar Sailors recognized for achievements 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013

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Mobile Tactical Operations Center (MTOC) -3, assigned to CPRW-11 and home-ported at Naval Air Station Jacksonville, recently completed its successful deployment to the 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility in sup port of Operation Enduring Freedom and multiple mari time patrol squadrons. MTOC-3 arrived October 23, 2012, and took over the MTOC duties officially on October 29. They played an integral role in missions of maintain ing peace in the Persian Gulf and allowing for safe passage of all vessels through the Strait of Hormuz. They entered into a highly dynamic deployment, support ing VP-46, VQ-1, VSX-1, and VP-40. They executed more than 560 flights that encom passed more than 5,000 flight hours, supported 17 transits through the Strait of Hormuz, 27 Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) exercises, and a twoweek period of 24-hour flight operations. MTOC-3 averaged three flights per day for six months, said Capt. Mark Creasey, commander, Task Force (CTF) 57. They never missed a beat. MTOC-3 palletized and brought out all of the equip ment they used to communi cate with the P-3C Orions. They employed a variety of electronic systems for their safety of flight and operations. From the ground, they pro vided critical communication links between task force com manders and P-3C aircrews. During operations, MTOC personnel connected P-3C air crews to the internet for pre flight mission planning, which included commanders tasking, radio frequencies and environmental data. While airborne, P-3C air crews relied heavily on the critical communications paths, provided by the MTOC, for bidirectional flow of tasking and operational information. When a flight ended, MTOC mem bers utilized their specialized equipment to download data from the aircraft for analysis, and quickly disseminate it to operational commanders. In addition to successful missions, four personnel qualified for Enlisted Aviation Warfare Specialist (EAWS), eight per sonnel qualified for Enlisted Information Dominance Warfare Specialist (EIDWS), 14 personnel received their indi vidual watch qualifications, and they completed 32 watch team qualifications. MTOC-3 has set the stan dard for all other MTOCs, said Creasey. We couldnt do what we do out here without MTOC. Yorktown Gate Building 9 Pass and ID Office hours: Monday Friday from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Commercial Gate/Pass Office: Monday Friday from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. Passes will be issued by the Yorktown gate sentry after hours and weekends. Non-NCAC (RAPID Gate) personnel will only be authorized access during commercial gate hours. MTOC-3 home from 5th Fleet deployment New Pass & ID hours set JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013 13

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VP-5 transition spotlight This weeks Mad Fox spotlight shines on IS3 Nicole Souza, an intel ligence specialist who hails from Dartmouth, Mass. She is from a Portuguese family that was granted asylum in the U.S. and is the first in her family to be native born. She holds a bach elors degree in political science and is currently working on her masters degree in professional studies. After graduating col lege, Souza worked a civilian desk job before answering the call to service and joining the U.S. Navy in May 2011. The VP-5 Intelligence Department has kept very busy during the P-8A transition by studying for upcoming inspections, preparing squad ron intelligence briefs, and organizing volunteer events where the Mad Foxes seize the opportu nity to give back to their local communities. The transition has been challenging for the intelligence department because we have no spe cific school to attend, commented Souza. Thanks to the hard work of everyone in intelligence, we have stayed on track in preparing to bring the Poseidon to the 7th Fleet Area of Responsibility for our next deployment. Intelligence specialists are responsible for brief ing and debriefing air crew, imagery analysis, and preparation of the battle space. When Souza isnt working hard on new intelligence, she vol unteers at an art camp run by the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville. VP-5 has been tran sitioning to the P-8A Poseidon since Jan. 4, 2013. More than 2,000 museums across the nation are open ing their doors, free of charge, to service members and their families this summer. From now through Labor Day, Sept. 2, all active duty service members, National Guardsmen and reservists and their families can take advantage of this cultural and educational opportunity in all 50 states. Its an exciting, inspiring, educational and economical activity for our families to enjoy this summer, said Navy Cmdr. Leslie Hull-Ryde, a Pentagon spokeswoman. The 2013 Blue Star Museums Program is a collabora tion among the Defense Department, Blue Star Families, the National Endowment for the Arts and the museums to give service members and their families a way to spend time together in their local museums. A record number of museums are participating this year. The program began in 2010 with free access to about 600 museums, while this years 2,000 is a figure thats still growing, Blue Star Families and NEA officials said.Sailors, families can visit museums free for summer The NAS Jacksonville Child Development Center is looking for home providers to care for children both on and off the station. If you are an on-base resident, you will only need to be Navy-certified to become a home provider. If you are an off-base resident, you will have to be state-certified as well as Navy-certified. Certifications include background checks, home inspections and a training program. Caregivers will be given use of the lending library and free monthly training sessions. For more information, contact Lisa Williams at 5425434/5381.Home providers needed 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013

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VBS children head to SonWest RoundupNearly 80 5-12 year-old children headed to the SonWest Roundup (this years theme), a week-long Vacation Bible School (VBS) held NAS Jax Chapel July 15-19. Children participated in various activities admin istered by 32 dedicated adults and teen volunteers. Activities included arts and crafts, classroom lessons, music sessions, games and food. Each morning began where the children were escorted to a main room and seated for an energiz ing sing-along session, followed by the lesson of the day presented by NAS Jax Chaplain Lt. Hylanie ChanWilliams. From there, they were split up according to age groups and sent to various locations to complete their daily activities. I am having great time and I am learning lots at VBS. My highlight so far is learning new arts and crafts and new songs, said 8-year-old Mikayla Roberts. I think it is important for young children to gain a sense of spirituality and to decide for themselves if they wish to embrace religion. VBS gives them options to explore faith and to ask questions and have fun, said NAS Jax Chaplain Lt. Hylanie Chan-Williams. The main purpose of VBS is to introduce the children or reinforce them in their Christian faith. We do this by using arts and crafts, music and classroom sessions. They spend approximately 45 minutes in each of these areas, plus we supply them with lunch. On Friday, we invite the parents, neighbors and siblings to come watch a program that goes on in the chapel and the children perform songs that they learned throughout the week, said Grace Heffner, who coordinates VBS here every year. Children who started VBS as early as age five or six, after they have gone through the program, return as teen volunteers, implied Heffner. According to Heffner the children come from a wide spread of backgrounds. We have children every year that learn about Jesus for the first time. They want to know who is Jesus. That is the bottom line for us, said Heffner. After all the hard work invested into planning and preparing for VBS, my reward for the program comes on Friday when I sit in the congregation and I hear these children singing, said Heffner. 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013

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For more information about any of the sports arti cles, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill. bonser@navy.mil. Visit the MWR website at www.cnic. navy.mil or www.facebook.com nasjaxmwr. After 27 games over two weeks, Baker County Little League defeated Mill Creek Little League to win the Florida District 11 Little League 9-10-year-old tournament hosted by Navy Ortega Lakeshore (NOL) Little League at NAS Jax June 28. In the third and conclusive game between the two teams, Baker County jumped out to an early 10 run lead thanks in part to a towering home run by Cason Milton. Mill Creek came back with a spirited rally, cutting the lead to one run. In the end, Baker county received some outstanding relief pitching from Jordan Rhoden and went on to win by a margin of 149. Baker County now goes to the Florida Section 3 tournament hosted by Mims Little League, located near Titusville, Fla. The winner of the sectional tournament advances to the Florida Little League State Championship. This year, the District 11 tournament included 14 teams from a five-county area in Northeast Florida including two NOL teams. NOLs A team made it to the final four teams before being eliminated. The tournament rotates from year to year between the leagues located in District 11, which is the second largest Little League district in Florida. According to NOL, it takes a tremendous amount of time and numerous volunteers to host the district tournament. It all starts at the top with NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Robert Sanders and Morale, Welfare and Recreation Director John Bushick who made it pos sible to hold the tournament on base. NOL also sends out special thanks to Maribel Guzman (MWR), Tyesha Donaldson (MWR) and Penny Roberts (Base Pass and ID Office) for a great job of administering the base passes for the visiting teams and fans. In addition, Tom Fagan and his grounds crew at the golf course were a tremendous help with the playing fields. NOL was founded in 1960 and has been located at NAS JAX since it started. NOL is an officially chartered league of Little League International, home of the Little League World Series as seen on ABC and ESPN. Baker County Little League wins tournament at NAS Jax JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013 17

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Americas armed forces will begin a downward spiral that will be costly to reverse. If Congress cant find a way to avoid sequestration in 2014 DOD will have to consider involuntary reductions in force to reduce civilian personnel costs, said Hagel. Hiring freezes will continue and facilities maintenance funds will further erode. He added that DOD could meet fur ther reductions only through a severe package of military personnel actions, including halting all accessions, end ing all permanent-change-of-station moves, stopping discretionary bonuses and freezing promotions. FRCSE Commanding Officer Capt. Robert Caldwell said, This was a great opportunity for SECDEF to learn about our aviation maintenance mission and to gain a better understanding of our numerous contributions to the warf ighter. At the town hall meeting attended by our civilian federal employees, the secretary said, You cant buy back readi ness, and that is so true. What we do here and in the field is very important to Sailors and Marines operating forward. Mr. Hagels message was clear we can expect another round of budget cuts. The FRCSE team has been cost-con scious for a very long time, but what the SECDEF said only reinforces our resolve to continue finding innovative and costeffective solutions to better meet warfighter demands, added Caldwell. Hagel recently called on Congress to work with DOD to approve the presi dents defense budget request. The presidents budget request slows military pay raises and raises fees for some military retirees health care. It also looks to retire older Air Force and Navy assets, as well as calling for a new base realignment and closure program. He said, Uncertainty is a tremendous enemy when military families live in a state of uncertainty, it impacts their concentration and that impacts their job. Ultimately, it can create a loss of skill sets that are vital to our national security and our readiness. Hagel, an Army combat veteran in Vietnam and a former member of the U.S. Senate, stressed that service members do more than just put on a uni form, and civilians do more than just show up for work. Everyone connected with DOD is part of something bigger than them selves. Were helping build a new world a more free and fair world because tolerance, respect and dignity still anchor the human condition, said Hagel. In addition to Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, Hagels tour of NAS Jacksonville included: a luncheon with regional business and civic leaders; a media roundtable; a commissary tour; a P-8A Integrated Training Center (ITC) tour; and a flight line tour of a VP-30 P-8A Poseidon aircraft. At the P-8A ITC, instructor pilot Lt. Brett Eckert welcomed Hagel to one of the flight simulators. He was interested in the differences between a commercial Boeing 737 and the P-8A Poseidon. He sat in the left pilot seat as we executed a simulated landing at Joint Base Andrews, manually flying the last 200 feet to the runway, said Eckert. It was a privilege to meet Secretary Hagel and show him how we train on the Poseidon. After landing, he told me, that wasnt bad for an old Vietnam infantryman, he added. At the NAS Jacksonville Commissary, Store Director Larry Bentley welcomed the secretary of defense to the ninthlargest (in sales volume) store in the world. It was an honor to take Mr. Hagel on a tour he was greeting patrons as we walked the aisles. Active duty and retired shoppers were pleasantly surprised to meet him, said Bentley. According to Bentley, the secretary was very impressed with the store and the warm welcome from the staff. SECDEF VISIT Photos by Clark Pierce, Lt. Kevin Wendt and MC2 Amanda Cabasos VP-26 trains with New Zealand forcesA VP-26 Tridents aircrew, assigned to Commander, Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (CMPRF) 7th Fleet arrived in Auckland, New Zealand on July 6 to support a scheduled bilateral Maritime Patrol Reconnaissance Aircraft (MPRA) Exchange. The exchange marked the first U.S. Navy P-3C Orion visit to New Zealand in nearly 30 years. The 9-day visit improved interoperability between the U.S. Navy and Royal New Zealand Air Force MPRA communities. The visit is the culmination of the first exchange between CTF 72 and the RNZAF 5 Squadron. As part of the first half of the exchange, a New Zealand P-3K2 recently visited CTF 72 at Kadena Air Base, Japan from July 2-4. The reciprocating U.S. P-3C visit conducted train ing in New Zealand at RNZAF Base Whenuapai in Auckland through July 15. Our visit will further develop the ability to oper ate with a key partner in the region, said Lt. Cmdr. Jason Zaharris, CTF 72 Theater Security Cooperation Officer. This exchange consisted of symposium briefs such Maritime Domain Awareness and Search and Rescue Operations. The crews also participated in several missions orientated to putting into practice the information garnered during the symposium briefs. Based at NAS Jacksonville, the Tridents are currently on a six-month deployment to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility, as part of CMPRF 7th Fleet. Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus fur thered his commitment to improve the Department of the Navys sexual assault response by announc ing additional resources for investigators and a new initiative designed to enhance accountability and transparency across the department. Mabus approved nearly $10 million to hire more than 50 additional Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) Family and Sexual Violence Program personnel to shorten investigation times. He also directed the Navy and Marine Corps to regularly publish online the results of each services courtsmartial. Our Navy and Marine Corps is the greatest maritime force the world has ever known. To uphold our core values of honor, courage, and commitment, we must do all we can to protect our people from those who would wish to do them harm, especially if they reside within our own ranks, said Mabus. This department is fully committed to using all available resources to prevent this crime, aggres sively investigate allegations and prosecute as appropriate. We will not hide from this challenge-we will be active, open and transparent. The additional Adult Sexual Assault Program (ASAP) special agents and crime scene personnel approved by Mabus will further help decrease the sexual assaults investigation timeline. ASAP teams with specialized training in legal jurisdiction, investigative procedures, evidence collection, sexual assault victim sensitivities, and the handling of reports and official statements are cur rently being deployed to fleet concentration areas worldwide. To increase transparency of the departments criminal proceedings, SECNAV directed the services to begin publishing the results of all Special and General Courts-Martial, including sexual assault cases, on the service primary Web sites of Navy.mil and Marines.mil, respectively, by July 25. The first of these summaries will cover those cases concluded from January through June of this year, but future editions will be published regularly. Additional information and resources to combat sexual assault is available at www.sapr.navy.mil. Sexual assault affects Navy readiness, and the Navy is committed to preventing sexual assault. Join the Navys conversation about sexual assault on social media and help raise awareness by using #NavySAPR.SECNAV announces new initiatives to help combat sexual assault 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment July 26 Jason Lamar Duo Deweys Family Night August 2, 4 8 p.m. Enjoy free activities including a magic show, games, back-to-school goodies, inflatables and more!Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 510 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 1 6 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer Going on now through Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 years and younger receive one free game of bowling every day until 5 p.m. Win prizes all summer long!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Lap Swim (water park, water slide and concessions are not open) Monday Friday 6 8 a.m. & 6 7 p.m. Recreational Swim (water park, water slide and concessions are open) Monday Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. 2013 Learn to Swim Program Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1 Private pool parties can be reserved at the fitness center Parties are not available during regular business hours of operation and occur in the evenings when the pool is closed. Parties must be reserved ten days prior to party date, payment due at time of reservation For more information call (904) 5423518 The temporary gym, The Zone, Bldg. 798 is closed. Dive In Movie at the outdoor pool August 10, 6 10 p.m. Movie begins at 8:30 p.m. Free admission, hot dog, chips and a drink!I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Jacksonville Jaguar Tickets on sale now $70 section 147 Legoland Florida Free ticket for active duty military through Oct. 27 Wet n Wild Orlando $37 adult, $45 adult w/ meal, $40 child w/ meal Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Amelia Island Museum of History $10 family pass, Ghost tour $8 adult, $4 child Florida Ecosafaris in St. Cloud EcoPark $119, Coach safari adult $28, child $25, Zipline safari $75, Cypress canopy cycle $40 for one hour Gatorland Free admission for active duty and retired military until the end of the year. Family tickets can be purchased at ITT. $19.95 adult, $12.50 child, zip line $54.25 Blue Man Group Orlando $49 adult, $29 child Monster Truck Jam coming soon! 2013 2014 Artist Series featuring Mama Mia, Memphis, Celtic Thunder, War Horse, Men are From Mars, Women are from Venus, Million Dollar Quartet and The D* Word is a Musical are on sale now!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Kayak Trip July 27 at 9 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees August 6 & 20 for active duty August 8 & 22 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Furlough Fridays All civilian employees that have been furloughed can play 18-holes with cart & green fee for $20 Junior Golf Clinic Session 3, July 29 Aug. 2, ages 1117 $110 per child, per sessionMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Movie Under the Stars August 23 at 8 p.m. featuring Monsters University Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School August 5 September 16 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013 19

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The Virtual Education Center (VEC) and all Navy College Offices (NCOs) are closed each Friday during the Defense Department furlough of civil ian employees this fiscal year, said officials at the Center for Personal and Professional Development July 18. The VEC and NCOs worldwide are staffed by government civilians, who began furloughs of one day per week in early July for 11 weeks. During this period, the VEC is open to serve customers Monday through Thursday from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. Eastern Time. NCOs are gen erally open Monday through Thursday with hours varying by location. Closing NCOs on Friday has the least impact on Sailors and our support to the fleet, said Jon Richardson, who works for CPPD as Voluntary Education Regional Director West. Many local commands schedule in-house activi ties for Fridays. Also, the majority of our academic institutions that provide on-base, instructor-led programs do not schedule classes on Friday. School representatives cannot be on base or offer instruction if an NCO representative isnt available unless spe cific permission is granted by the host command, he said. Visiting academic institutions and counselors/advisors have adjusted schedules and are avail able Monday through Thursday, matching NCO work schedules. The workload of voluntary educa tion staffs cannot be picked up by con tractors, who are not allowed to advise Sailors on using tuition assistance, which allocates government resources for their education. Additionally, a memo regarding civilian furloughs from the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Readiness and Force Management dated June 28 stipulates that govern ment civilian workloads cannot be shifted to contractors to compensate for productivity loss as a result of the furlough. While Richardson said its too early to foresee all the impacts of these office closures on Sailors, one he anticipates is an increase in waiting time for cus tomers. Since weve only been closed one Friday, the real business impact is unknown. It appears the number of Sailors visiting NCOs has increased during our open hours. That could be hiccup, but we wont know until we have more data. Wait times for VEC customers may also rise, according to Sharen Richardson, VEC supervisor. We encourage Sailors to do a few things to lessen the impact of the reduced hours, she said. First, ensure you submit your Tuition Assistance (TA) request up to 30 days prior to your class start date. Then track it to ensure your command approves and forwards it to the VEC with enough time for staff to review and authorize it. She said Sailors who wait too long to submit their TA request may not be able to begin a class on time. Dont start a class without an approved TA voucher in hand, Richardson said. We cant process a TA request after a schools advertised add/drop date, so its the Sailors responsibility to follow up with his or her command to track that TA request. We ask Sailors to please bear with us during this time. HA William Jones, pharmacy technician at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville, may look like your average sailor, but in reality he is a vibrant music and dance enthusiast with a passion for the bright lights. Since the age of three, Jones has been singing and dancing with the confidence and flair of a natural star. The 20-year-old hospi tal corpsman, a native of Indianapolis, Ind., recently rekindled his love for musical performance by auditioning and landing a roll in 9 to 5: The Musical at Theater Jacksonville Floridas longest running community theater. When I first reported for duty at NH Jacksonville, I didnt know what to do with myself after work, explained Jones. Then one day a friend of mine encouraged me to follow my passion and explore the ater opportunities that may be available in north Florida. After searching newspapers and the internet, he saw an advertisement for auditions at Theater Jacksonville. Being no stranger to audi tions Jones has performed in such musicals as Aida, Sweeney Todd and The Wiz while grow ing up in Indianapolis he sang A Joyful Noise, and earned a role in the musicals 25-per son cast on the last day of auditions. Achieving this accomplish ment was very exciting for Jones, who at a young age was heavily influenced by music, being raised by old-school music enthusiasts who were natives of southern blues music cities such as Memphis, Tenn. and Owensboro, Ky. The producer was some what skeptical of me in the beginning, said Jones. But once the producers and cast saw my passion and dedi cation, they were willing to give me that chance, which I greatly appreciate. After two months of grueling practices, it was time for the shows Jacksonville debut. It was difficult at first, but when you enjoy doing some thing, you have to make sacri fices such as this, stated Jones. Portraying a new employee, in the productions ensemble, Joness character appeared in the very first scene of the musical, when the curtains were raised. As soon as the stage lights come on, its just me, expressed Jones. I was pumped with adrenaline, but was able to perform well. I became more relaxed and confident after the first few shows, and everything went as planned. My biggest challenge of the musical was performing the associated choreography, said Jones. I was one of the worst dancers when practices began in April, and by the first show, I was one of the directors favorites. Jones plans to continue his passion of music and danc ing while assigned to NH Jacksonville, by auditioning for upcoming plays and musicals in the area. Corpsman shines bright on public stage Navy Voluntary Education support hours reduced during furlough 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 25, 2013

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