Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication:
United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
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Subjects / Keywords:
Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates:
30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

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Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note:
Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
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Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding:
Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID:
UF00028307:02050


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THURSDAY, JULY 18, 2013 FRCSE COC NJR OTC VP-45 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The HSM-72 Proud Warriors, based at NAS Jacksonville, are recipients of the 2013 Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Safety Excellence Award chosen from among all active duty naval aviation squadrons worldwide. Upon hearing the news, HSM-72 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Derek Fleck said, We were honored when we won the CNO Safety S Award in 2012 but bringing home the SECNAV Safety Excellence Award in 2013 is a tremendous honor. It is a testament to all our people for setting the standard in safe and efficient practices, both on and off duty. SECNAV Ray Mabus announced his 2013 Safety Excellence Award recipients in a July 2 message. He stated, Safety and risk management are indispensable to effectively prepare for and complete our mission, whether at home or deployed in harms way. Your safety accomplish ments are proof positive of your mission safety command culture and your commitment to each other, to safety excel lence, to the Nation, and to the Department of the Navy as a world-class safety organiza tion, said Mabus. The Proud Warriors fly the MH-60R Seahawk helicopter and are recognized as a leader in the naval rotary wing com munity, as noted by their other recent awards the 2012 Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Safety S Award; the Arleigh Burke Fleet Trophy; Capt. Arnold Jay Isbell Trophy; Blue M for Medical Readiness; Commander, Maritime Strike Wing U.S. Atlantic Fleet Talon Award; and the Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic Battle E Award the squadrons third consecutive Battle E and 12th in its 28-year history. When you consider all of the Navys top squadrons The X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System (UCAS) demonstrator completed its first carrier-based arrested landing on board USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) off the coast of Virginia July 10. It isnt very often you get a glimpse of the future. Today, those of us on board USS George H.W. Bush got that chance as we witnessed the X-47B make its firstever arrested landing on an aircraft carrier, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. The operational unmanned aircraft soon to be developed have the opportu nity to radically change the way presence and combat power are delivered from our aircraft carriers. Todays demonstration was the first time a tailless, unmanned autonomous aircraft landed on an aircraft carrier. This test marks an historic event for naval aviation that Navy leaders believe will impact the way the Navy integrates manned and unmanned aircraft on the carrier flight deck in the future. Today, we witnessed the capstone moment for the Navy UCAS program as the team flawlessly performed integrated carrier operations aboard USS George H.W. Bush with the X-47B aircraft, said Capt. Jaime Engdahl, Navy UCAS pro gram manager. Our precision landing performance, advanced autonomous flight controls and digital carrier air traffic control envi ronment are a testament to the innova tion and technical excellence of the Navy and Northrop Grumman team. The July 10 landing was the begin ning of the final part of three at-sea test periods for X-47B during the last eight months culminating a decade of Navy unmanned integration efforts that show the Navys readiness to move forward with unmanned carrier aviation says Rear Adm. Mat Winter, who oversees the Program Executive Office for Unmanned Aviation and Strike Weapons in Patuxent River, Md. This demonstration has enabled us to merge industry and government technol ogies together, which enables the Navy to pursue future unmanned aviation car rier capabilities, said Winter, who wit nessed the historic landing. The government engineering and testing team in partnership with our Northrop Grumman team members have matured the technologies in this X-47B system to position us for todays event, which marks a milestone in naval avia tion. The X-47B completed the 35-minute transit from NAS Pax River to the carrier and caught the 3 wire with the aircrafts tailhook. The arrested landing brought the air craft from approximately 145 knots to stop in less than 350 feet. Shortly after the initial landing, the As DOD enters the furlough period, the department will concentrate on the core mission of defending the United States and its interests, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said July 8. Thats where our center of gravity is during this furlough period, Little said. Because of sequestration, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel made the diffi cult decision to furlough about 85 per cent of DOD civilian employees one day a week through the end of the fis cal year a total of 11 days, the press secretary said. My assumption is the vast majority of that population is on furlough at least one day this week, Little said. Little estimated the action will save the department $1.8 billion by the end of September. Some missions in the department will be impacted, he said. Were very clear with our own staff that there will be some impact, and we expect other offices to have similar impacts, the press secretary said. What happens in fiscal 2014 remains up in the air, Little said in response to a reporters question about the pos sibility of future layoffs. Were getting ahead of ourselves talking about layoffs at this stage, he said. Right now were in the furlough period and no deci sions have been reached about what may happen going forward. Much of what will happen depends on the governments ability to move beyond sequestration, Little said. [Hagel] has been clear that he would like for there to be a deal on sequestra tion, so we can lift this burden off of all our employees in the department, Little said. Sequestration was an unfortunate mechanism designed to avoid unfor tunate consequences. Were seeing some of those consequences already in regards to military training and readi ness, the press secretary said. Its unfortunate were in this period but were going to muscle through it best we can, he added.Editors Note: Due to press deadlines, the story of Secretary of Defense Hagels visit to NAS Jax will appear in our July 25 edition. Yorktown Gate Building 9 Pass and ID Office hours: Monday Friday from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Commercial Gate/Pass Office: Monday Friday from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. Passes will be issued by the Yorktown gate sentry after hours and weekends. Non-NCAC (RAPID Gate) personnel will only be authorized access during commercial gate hours. HSM-72 captures 2013 Safety Excellence Award X-47B makes first arrested landing at sea Defense Department will muscle through furlough periodNew Pass & ID hours set

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 18, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS July 18 1775 Continental Congress resolves that each colo ny provide armed vessels. 1779 Commodore Abraham Whipples squad ron captures 11 prizes in largest prize value of Revolutionary War. 1792 John Paul Jones dies in Paris, France. 1813 U.S. Frigate President captures British Daphne, Eliza Swan, Alert and Lion. 1920 Naval aircraft sink ex-German cruiser Frankfurt in target practice. 1943 German submarine shoots down K-74, the first and only U.S. airship lost during World War II. 1966 Launch of Gemini 10 with Lt. Cmdr. John Young as command pilot. Mission involved 43 orbits at an altitude of 412.2 nautical miles and lasted two days, 22 hours and 46 minutes. Recovery was by HS-3 heli copter from USS Guadalcanal (LPH-7). 1973 Task Force 78, Mine Countermeasures Force, departs waters of North Vietnam after completing minesweeping operations of 1,992 tow hours at a cost of $20,394,000. July 19 1812 Frigate USS Constitution escapes from British squadron after three-day chase off New Jersey. 1886 USS Atlanta, the first steel-hulled American cruiser armed with breech-loading rifled guns, is commissioned. 1897 Lt. Robert Peary departs on year long arctic expedition that makes many important discoveries, including large meteorites at Cape York. 1918 Armored cruiser USS San Diego (CA-6) sunk off Fire Island, N.Y. by a mine laid by U-156. 1940 President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs second Naval Expansion Act. July 20 1846 First visit of U.S. warships (USS Columbus and USS Vincennes) to Japan is unsuccessful in nego tiating a treaty. 1960 In first Polaris missile launch, USS George Washington (SSBN 598) successfully fires two opera tional Polaris missiles while submerged off Florida. 1964 Four Navy divers enter Project Sealab I cap sule moored 192 feet on the ocean floor off Bermuda for 11-day experiment. 1969 Former Navy pilot Neil Armstrong is the first man to set foot on the moon. While taking the first step, he said, Thats one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. Armstrong was commander of Apollo 11, which during its 8-day mission landed on the Sea of Tranquility. Recovery was by HS-4 helicop ters from USS Hornet (CVS-12). July 21 1823 After pirate attack, Lt. David Farragut leads landing party to destroy pirate stronghold in Cuba. 1944 Invasion and recapture of Guam begins. 1946 In first U.S. test of adaptability of jet aircraft to shipboard operations, XFD-1 Phantom makes land ings and takeoffs without catapults from USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVS-42). July 22 1802 Frigate Constellation defeats nine Corsair gunboats off Tripoli. 1905 Body of John Paul Jones moved to Annapolis, Md. for reburial. 1953 U.S. ships laid down heavy barrage to support UN troops in Korea. 1964 Four Navy divers (Lt. Cmdr. Robert Thompson, GM1 Lester Anderson, QMC Robert Barth, and HMC Sanders Manning) submerge in Sealab I at a depth of 192 feet, 39 miles off Hamilton, Bermuda. They surfaced on July 31. July 23 1947 First Navy all-jet squadron (VF-17A) receives its first aircraft (FH). 1948 USS Putnum (DD-757) evacuates U.N. team from Haifa, Israel and becomes first U.S. Navy ship to fly the U.N. flag. 1950 USS Boxer(CV-21) sets record crossing of Pacific to bring aircraft, troops, and supplies to Korea at start of the conflict. 1958 USS Nautilus (SSN-571) departs Pearl Harbor for first submerged transit of North Pole. 1993 Sarah Deal becomes first woman Marine selected for naval aviation training. July 24 1813Sailing Master Elijah Mix attempts to blow up British warship Plantagenet with a torpedo near Cape Henry, Va. 1944 Following 43 days of naval gunfire and air bombardment, Naval Task Force lands Marines on Tinian Island. Just in time (or not, keep reading) and on the heels of my previous columns about father hood and the military, comes Armin Brotts book, The Military Father: a Hands-on Guide for Deployed Dads. Brott, is a former Marine with a syndicated newspa per column, Ask Mr. Dad, as well as a radio show, Positive Parenting. He has built his post-mili tary career around writing and talking about issues of father hood and families. In The Military Father, he has writ ten what might possibly be the most comprehensive and con temporary book about deploy ments that Ive ever read. Ive been a military depen dent since the day I was born 36 years ago, so youd think I know it all. I dont. I devoured The Military Father in the course of a day. This was no Service Etiquette rerun when I opened to the third page and found a cartoon that in one ink-andpaper sketch sums up many of my deployment experiences in particular, the year in which we did our Dinner with the Smileys project. A mother and two children are eating dinner with a computer at the head of the table. Above the mother it reads, Julie honey, please refresh your father. (More proof that Brott gets it and speaks to a new generation of military families is on page 62. Wowzas! Thats all I can say.) Brott gets it because hes been there, done that. He introduces himself as a for mer Marine, but quickly fol lows that up with, I know, I know, once a Marine, always a Marine. He was busy writing books (six of them) about fatherhood in general, when he noticed an uptick in 2001 of parent ing questions from service members. (Hmmmm, 2001? Probably not a coincidence.) So he decided to write a different kind of book about fatherhood, one geared toward the military family in particular. Brott proves his military experience with a text box titled, When youre in, youre in. When youre out, you could still be in. This made me smile perhaps you are smiling, too and my confidence in Brott was sealed. Hes referring to the militarys ability to recall supposedly discharged mem bers who are automatically placed in the Individual Ready Reserve and the stop loss fine print whereby a former service member with special training can be called back into service at any time. Maybe youre thinking, Why do military families need a book about coping with deployments? Didnt they sign up for this? Didnt they know all this before they married someone in the military? Brott assures readers even seasoned military fami lies that shock, sadness and fear are a natural response to deployments, even when you know that deployments are bound to happen. The Military Father is pep pered with great moments like this to make you feel normal. Its also full of what Ive come to realize is Brotts natural wit and humor. His style is conver sational and funny. Having an argument by e-mail, he writes, is like ski ing through a revolving door: neither fun nor effective. Although Brott makes a disclaimer that he is not a doctor (nor a financial plan ner, accountant, lawyer or congressman), in the section titled A Brief Overview of Your Childs Development, he pegs some of my boys as if he lived next door. The book is written in three sections: pre-deployment, deployment and post-deploy ment. Each addresses the con cerns of the service member, the spouse and the children. There is page after page of advice and concrete ways to deal with deployments. In any case, The Military Father is an easy and inter esting read sure to make you chuckle. Its a unique blend of parenting book and military how-to and for anyone who is about to face a deployment, it is on my list of recommendations. The Military Father arrives just in time or not In a letter issued July 1 to the men and women of the armed forces, the nations top two mili tary officers and senior enlisted member marked the 40th anniversary of the all-volun teer force. The letter signed by Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Navy Adm. James Winnefeld Jr., vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs; and Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Bryan Battaglia, senior enlisted advisor to the chairman reads as follows: Since the Nations founding, our sons and daughters have volunteered to leave the every day comforts of their homes, their neighbor hoods, and their families to join and serve a cause greater than themselves. They have joined a profession bound by honor, sacri fice, bravery, and in many cases danger. They serve a greater purpose protecting and defending the Constitution of the United States. On 1 July 1973, the United States instituted the All-Volunteer Force. Those who choose to wear the cloth of our Nation do so with a great sense of pride and allegiance. To volunteer speaks volumes to the character, patriotism, and commitment of Americas most precious resource our men and women who serve. As we commemorate the 40th Anniversary of the All-Volunteer Force, we would like to pass our heartfelt appreciation to all those who have served and are serving in the United States Armed Forces. You are Americas strength you honor our past, and you preserve our futureTop service members mark all-volunteer forces anniversary

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Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), the largest tenant com mand aboard NAS Jacksonville, will hold a change of command ceremony July 25 at 9 a.m. in Hangar 1000. FRCSE Executive Officer Capt. John Kemna, a Professional Aviation Maintenance Officer (PAMO) who hails from Missouri, will assume command of the avia tion maintenance depot from Capt. Robert Caldwell Jr., also a PAMO, who will retire during the ceremo ny with 27 years of military service. FRCSE is one of three Fleet Readiness Centers commissioned by the Navy to perform in-depth overhaul, repair, and modifica tion of aircraft, engines, and aero nautical components. FRCSE is the largest industrial employer in Northeast Florida, and Southeast George with a workforce of near ly 4,600 military, civil service and contract personnel. Kemna comes with a vast wealth of knowledge and experience gained throughout his 24-year military career filling numer ous positions ashore and afloat. He graduated in 1989 from the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md. with a Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering. He later attended Aviation Maintenance Officer School at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Fla. From 1996 to 1998, he attended the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif., earning a Master of Science in Aeronautical Engineering. During the change of command ceremony, Caldwell will retire from active military service. Caldwell first reported to FRCSE in September 2006 and served as the director of depot operations until April 2008. He next served on the staff of Commander, Fleet Readiness Centers at NAS Patuxent River, Md. In July 2009 he returned to FRCSE where he began his tour as executive officer and assumed command in July 2011. As commander, Caldwell over saw the return of more than 145 aircraft, 2,800 engines and mod ules and 51,000 aircraft compo nents to the Fleet in support of warfighting readiness. Further, he held customer per-hour rates at Fiscal Year 2007 levels, a remark able feat given todays fiscal con straints. Caldwell oversaw F414 engine output increase by 89 percent to meet operational requirements three months ahead of the recov ery plan when faced with a criti cal, Navy-wide shortage of F/A-18 aircraft engines in 2012. This was accomplished without increasing unit cost or plant manning levels. Further, he leveraged the com bined strengths of government and private industry to provide a best-value approach to Naval avi ation sustainment. He cemented FRCSEs reputation as the provider of choice for 40 industry partners through cost, quality and schedule performance. Under Caldwells leadership, FRCSE received the FY12 and FY11 Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Aviation Safety Award, the 2012 CNO Safety Excellence Unit Award for Medium Industrial Shore Activity, the 2011 NAVAIR Commanders Award Program Management Category (Environmental Program Team) and the 2011 Thompson-Ravitz Award for Excellence in Public Affairs. Industry awards include the 2012 JAXUSA Partnership Industry Leader Award for Business Achievements and Corporate Citizenship, the 2012 Lockheed Martin STAR Supplier Award for Exceptional Quality Performance in Electronics, and the 2011 Founders Service Award from the First Coast Manufacturers Association. Caldwell, along with Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown and mem bers of state and local agencies signed the Northeast Florida Environmental Compliance Partnering Team Charter on Feb. 12, renewing their commitment to environmental stewardship. The team was established in 2002 to ensure Navy and regula tory agencies achieve environmen tal compliance by identifying and implementing innovative solu tions. FRCSE change of command is July 25 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 18, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 18, 2013 Despite cutbacks due to sequestration, 34 Naval Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (NJROTC) students from high schools throughout Florida and Georgia spent the week of June 24-28 at NAS Jacksonville to learn how to sail. This is the 12th consecutive year the sailing academy has been held here. The Interscholastic Sailing Association, South Atlantic Division sponsors the weeklong sailing academy that teach es all aspects of sailing such as safety guidelines, terminol ogy, rigging the boat, launching, navigation, teamwork, wind direction, weather conditions and emergency proce dures. Weve has a lot of changes this year due to cutbacks. Normally we have 65-70 cadets but we had to charge more this year to offset an increase in fees on the station so we have half the number of students. Weve also decreased the number of sailboats to seven Flying Scots which means the students will work in teams instead of indi vidually, said retired Navy Cmdr. Pat Thurman, officer in charge of the program. We also shortened the program by a day to reduce cost. And, with the marina closed on Tuesday and Wednesday now, we had to pay to bring someone in to work to assist us. It was a cost increase for the program, but we didnt want to cancel it because its a valuable training tool for these students, added Thurman. It also has a historical aspect in that 150 years, we were still sailing boats in war so it will help them in the naval history classes. The week began in the classroom where students learned basic boat handling techniques, rigging and de-rigging, knot tying and the different parts of the sailboat before actually heading out on the water. They are also required to pass a 50-yard swimming test and treading water for two minutes. Once out on the water, the students were broken down into seven teams with an instructor on board each boat for morning, afternoon and evening sessions. We practice tacking and jibbing through the wind, towing skills and approaching and tying up to buoys. If we get all our skills accomplished, well let them have some friendly race competitions, said Thurman, mid way through the week. Thurman also stressed the importance of safety. Luckily, weve been blessed with pretty good weath er. We are extremely safety conscious. If we see a thunderstorm within 30 miles of us, we immedi ately get out of the water, he added. The students are housed at the NAS Jax Navy Gateway Inns & Suites and eat most of their meals in the base galley. In the evenings, they visited VP-8 to tour a P-3C Orion, the base bowling alley and pool. Kirstyn Higdon, an NJROTC cadet from Bishop Kenny High School in Jacksonville, was thrilled to attend the sailing academy. I think this is a really great experience learning to sail. I love the water and was excited to get out there and participate. I also enjoyed the leadership training and teamwork involved, she said. Its really fun. Weve learned how to sail, how to work as a team, leadership skills and about safety issues. Ive been on power boats but never a sailboat its a lot dif ferent because you constantly have to watch whats going on and how the wind changes, added Kaleb Thomas, an NJROTC cadet from Union Grove High School in McDonough, Ga. The class ended June 28 with the stu dents participating in a graduation ceremony attended by family mem bers and friends. Each of the cadets was awarded a certificate of achieve ment for participating in the program.NJROTC students learn at 12th annual sailing academy

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Aircrew assigned to the Fighting Tigers of VP-8 provided a squadron tour to Navy Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (NJROTC) cadets on June 27. Thirty-six cadets received some valuable hands on experience at an operational maritime patrol squadron, while also learning about possible career opportunities in the U.S. Navy. I think it is important to provide this unique opportunity to these cadets because they could become future P-3C Orion or P-8A aircrew men or maintainers, said AWO2 Jordan Radford, one of the VP-8 tour guides. The tour allowed us to show the cadets the functions of the P-3C aircraft, inform the students about what our job is like on a daily basis and why it is important to do what we do, he added. At NAS Jax Hangar 1000, the stu dents toured the inside of a P-3C Orion aircraft and received a hands on tutorial with certain air craft equipment operations. They also visited maintenance workspac es. I think this is a great opportu nity to see how an active duty Navy squadron operates on a daily basis, as well as to learn how the maritime patrol and reconnaissance commu nity has changed over the years, said NJROTC Cadet Ensign Joseph Gannon. During the tour I was able to see many of the aircraft functions, and more specifically, I learned the basics of radio detection and rang ing operation and how it works, he added. NJROTC units around the coun try teach an accredited curriculum to students in grades 9 12 empha sizing citizenship and leadership development. They also study maritime heri tage, the strategic significance of sea power, and naval topics such as seamanship, navigation and meteo rology. The NJROTC program is designed to moti vate stu dents to graduate from high school and continue to higher education by offering free ACT/SAT preparation.Approximately 60 percent of NJROTC cadets who graduate high school continue to a higher education. Running for a causeWhen a Sailor assigned to the VP-8 Fighting Tigers learned that her mother was diagnosed with a form of blood cancer, she took action to help to raise funds for blood cancer research. AWO2 Michelle Workman joined a marathon running team called Team in Training (TNT) that consists of volunteers across the United States who run in marathons to raise funds for blood cancer research. According to TNT, every four minutes someone is diagnosed with a type of blood cancer. I train for marathons by myself because I dont have anyone from my TNT nearby but I motivate myself by thinking about my mother and friends and how I can make a difference for those who are fighting cancer, or who may be diagnosed with can cer in the future, said Workman. Her most recent marathon was the Rock N Roll San Diego Marathon on June 3, where more than 30,000 people participated. Its really inspirational to be a part of something so important, and whenever we all come together, how much we can achieve, said Workman. Since Joining TNT, Workman has person ally raised more than $3,000 towards blood cancer research. Her TNT team has raised more than $64,000. Since 1988, TNT participants have raised more than $1.3 billion towards lifesaving cancer research and therapies. My friend, whose father died from cancer, told me about the group and how it helped him cope and understand cancer treatments. He felt it would help me too, said Workman. She added, Being a part of the TNT has helped me see that cancer isnt a death sentence, and not only affects the people around me, but all over the world. Workman continues to participate with TNT and has set a personal goal of raising more than $20,000 within her lifetime. NJROTC cadets visit VP-8 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 18, 2013

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The NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club Scholarship Committee has named the first recipients of the $1,000 scholarships sponsored by the First Command Education Foundation and the local First Command Advisors in Jacksonville. The recipients are Clayton Rix and Natalie Widergren. The presentation cer emony took place on July 9 at 10:30 a.m. at Mulligans. Presentations were made by First Command District Advisor Jim Schless. Awardees were selected from applications received, and based on scholarship merit and community service. First Command Education Foundation (FCEF), a 501(c)(3) public charity, promotes edu cation as the foundation of a productive society through scholarships and financial lit eracy programs. Originally created in 1983, FCEF was founded to award scholarships to military per sonnel and their dependents. FCEF expanded its mission in 2001 to encompass financial literacy training. In 2004, FCEF broadened scholarship eligi bility to individuals pursuing both undergraduate and grad uate degrees. Over its 27-year history, FCEF has awarded more than $3.7 million in scholarships to over 2,000 stu dents across the country. The NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club and the First Command Education Foundation are non-federal entities. They are not part of the Department of Defense or any of its components and they have no governmental status. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. No changes in service or hoursNaval Hospital Jacksonville along with its five branch health clinics (BHCs) in Albany, Jacksonville, Key West, Kings Bay and Mayport will continue to support the health and well being of its patients throughout Florida and Georgia during the furlough of approximately 660 civilian employees. The furlough will not affect hours of operation at any location. Keeping Sailors and Marines our nations heroes healthy and fit to fight continues to be our first prior ity, said Naval Hospital Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer. Like all of Navy Medicine, well continue to meet our operational requirements in support of our warf ighters and their families at our hospital and branch health clinics across the region. Because its critical that decreased staffing caused by the furloughs not compromise the ability to provide patients with high-quality care, some non-emergency, non-urgent care may be delayed or referred to the TRICARE network. Patients may also experience longer than usual wait times. Other cost-cutting measures already in place include limiting travel, delaying cos metic facility renovations and non-critical equipment purchases, and eliminating civilian merit pay awards. Additionally, military staff will be redistributed and civilian staff fur lough days will be staggered to align with patient care needs. People are our most important asset and we are extremely proud of and highly value the important contribu tions of our civilian workforce, Shaffer said. Its most devastating to all of our civilian employees who are required to stay home, in a non-paid status, begin ning July 8 for a total of 11 days by the end of September. It also affects our military staff who will be redistributed throughout our facilities to optimize care delivery as well as our patients who face delays in access to non-emergency, non-urgent care and increased referrals out to the TRICARE network. While our priority to heal our nations heroes remains unchanged and our team of civilian, military and con tractor staff at our hospital and branch health clinics will continue to work dili gently to provide outstanding care to our patients, the impact of sequestra tion and work lost due to civilian fur loughs will be felt. We ask for under standing during this difficult time, Shaffer said Hospital, BHC Kings Bay or BHC Mayport patients should continue to use the Appointment Line: call (904) 542-4677 or (800) 529-4677, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. PCM to a specialty clinic at the hospital, call weekdays from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. 7884/7886, weekdays from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 7094/7095, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. 4834/4850/4851, weekdays from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. advice remains available on evenings, weekends and holidays via its com mand Appointment Line at (800) 5294677. Officers spouses club scholarship recipients recognized Naval hospital CO reinforces commitment to care during DoD civilian furloughs 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 18, 2013

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aircraft was launched off the ship using the carriers catapult. The X-47B then proceeded to execute one more arrested landing. On the third approach to Bush the X-47B aircraft self-detected a navigation computer anomaly that required the air vehicle to transit to the assigned shorebased divert landing site, Wallops Island Air Field. The X-47B navigated to and landed without incident. We have been using the same [car rier] landing technology for more than 50 years now and the idea that we can take a large UAV and operate in that environment is fascinating, said Engdahl. Across the entire spectrum of military operations, an integrated force of manned and unmanned platforms is the future, said Mabus. The X-47Bs autonomous arrested landing aboard USS George H.W. Bush shows how the Navy and Marine Corps are riding the bow wave of technological advances to create this 21st century force. The X-47B UCAS spent several weeks aboard aircraft carriers in recent months, completing CVN deck opera tions aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) in December 2012 and on board Bush in May. During the May underway peri od, the X-47B completed its first-ever cat apult launch. Since May, the integrated test team conducted a number of shorebased arrestments at Pax River in prepa ration for the demonstration aboard the ship. We have learned a lot from our flight deck operations, our shore-based flight test and extensive modeling and simula tion, Engdahl added. Our team has exe cuted all major program objectives and developed the concept of operations and demonstrated technologies for a future unmanned carrier-based aircraft capa bility. [Today] we proved we can seam lessly integrate unmanned systems into the carrier environment. Mabus concluded, We have certainly come a long way in the 102 years since Eugene Ely made the first arrested land ing aboard an aircraft carrier. Naval avia tors have always been at the fore front of opera tional and tactical innova tion, and today was no exception. People make unmanned aviation possible and it is people who will provide the fresh think ing and new ideas so crucial to suc cesses like the X-47B program and the unmanned aircraft of the future. In a message to flag officers, com manding officers, and officers in charge, Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO) Adm. Mark Ferguson highlight ed Navy wide accountability for sexual assault July 8. The message from Adm. Mark Ferguson explains the Navy will soon announce policies and programs to address sexual assault across the fleet and sets the expectation that Navy lead ership will do everything they can to prevent the crime. Sexual assault ruins lives, divides teams and erodes trust. As leaders, we must provide our Sailors a respon sible, professional and safe environ ment in which to work and live, said Ferguson. He told fleet leaders that preventing the crime of sexual assault starts with command climate. They must create atmospheres of trust and confidence that ensure Sailors can report sexual assault or sexual harass ment without fear of retribution or retaliation. He also stressed that once victims report crimes, it is the responsibility of the chain of command to ensure vic tims receive the appropriate level of care and support. Command climate has a role in not only reassuring victims, but in send ing a message that committing sexual assault will not be tolerated. We must reaffirm our commitment to our shipmates, and our actions must make clear to potential perpetrators of this crime that they will be held appro priately accountable, Ferguson said. Telling leaders this is our issue to solve, he reminded them they are: are treated with dignity and respect; tion measures into their commands; port; assault allegations are promptly report ed to NCIS for investigation; accountable. In the near future, the Navy will announce additional policies and pro grams to address sexual assault, includ ing a continued effort to highlight the responsible use of alcohol. The goal of these programs is to promote safe living and working environments across the Navy. Get more information and resources to combat sexual assault at www.sapr. navy.mil. Sexual assault affects Navy readi ness, and the Navy is committed to pre venting sexual assault. Join the Navys conversation about sexual assault on social media and help raise awareness by using #NavySAPR. Vice CNO to fleet leaders: Preventing sexual assault begins with you X-47B JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 18, 2013 9

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that were in contention for this award, winning it was truly a surprise, said HSM-72 Safety Officer Lt. Cmdr. Rob Macynski. We were measured against every active duty naval aviation plat form including the F/A-18 Hornet, P-3C Orion, EA-18G Growler and E-2C Hawkeye. Macynskis seven-man safety depart ment liaisons with safety petty officers in each division of the squadron. Every maintenance shop fine tunes its safety processes according to the needs of their particular rate. Our pro gram includes frequent mishap drills, as well as a monthly enlisted safety council where we discuss squadron risk management issues. We also hold a quarterly human factors council to discuss situations that may affect ship mates on a personal level. For our air crew, flight briefs always cover opera tional risks and mitigation procedures, explained Macynski. The Safety Excellence Award was established in 2002 by Gordon England, who twice served as SECNAV. It is the Department of the Navys premier trib ute to commands and programs that promote the safety of Sailors, Marines and civilians, in addition to protecting aircraft, ships and facilities from mis hap. According to Mabus message, HSM72 will receive a plaque, citation and the SECNAVs Safety Excellence flag at a presentation to take place at the com mand level. Recipients have the right to fly the SECNAV Safety Excellence flag for one year. HSM-72 Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VR) 62 Nomads is conducting mul tiple C-130T airlifts of personnel and material to support joint exercise Talisman Saber 2013 in Rockhampton, Queensland Australia. Talisman Saber 2013 is a bien nial exercise involving U.S. forces and Australian Defence Force (ADF) units to maintain and improve readi ness between the two countries armed forces. The main thrust is to improve interoperability, combined task force operations and combat readiness between the two countries. The exercise runs from July 15 to August 5, and involves training oper ations that include airborne, ground and amphibious assaults. Its designed to enhance collaboration in support of future combined operations, humani tarian emergencies and natural disas ters. Approximately 18,000 U.S. and 9,000 Australian personnel will take part, including ships from the USS George Washington Carrier Strike Group and USS Bonhomme Richard Amphibious Ready Group with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit embarked, along with a variety of other U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Army units working alongside their Royal Australian Navy, Royal Australian Air Force and Australian Army counter parts. Exercise locations in Australia include Rockhampton, Enoggera, Amberley, Williamtown, Richmond, the maritime areas of the Coral Sea; and Australian ranges to include Shoalwater Bay Training Area and Townsville Field Training Area. VR-62 will provide airlift through out the exercise, including retrograde, and will surge an additional C-130T Hercules, if needed to handle extra demand. Based at NAS Jacksonville, the VR-62 Nomads are in their regular detach ment rotation in U.S. Pacific Command. The squadron is one of five Navy Reserve C-130T squadrons serving the U.S. Navys high priority logistics needs around the globe. The ADF consists of the Royal Australian Navy, Australian Army and Royal Australian Air Force. The ADF has a strength of more than 80,000 fulltime personnel and active reservists.Nomads build combat readiness in Australia 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 18, 2013

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Culinary specialists from the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf, along with a group of U.S. Naval Sea Cadets and culinary students in the Clara White Mission Culinary Training Program, received some spe cialized training July 8-12 from Executive Chef Michael Riggs, a culinary instructor at Bowling Green Technical College. The training was held as a result of the Flight Line Caf being recognized as the 2013 runner-up in the overall large category for the Capt. Edward F. Ney competition. The weeklong training cov ered safety, sanitation, knife skills, food preparation, dif ferent cooking procedures and presentation of the finished products. Some of the meals included chicken roulade, pork tenderloin with roast potatoes and baked fish. Ive helped train Navy culi nary specialists in the past. Its hard for me to get away from campus but my schedule worked out for this opportuni ty and I enjoy participating in these events, said Riggs. My father was a career Army offi cer so I grew up in the military environment and respect what they do. By coming here, I can bring them the knowledge from 30 years as an educator and chef and maybe show them some new ways from how they nor mally cook. Riggs continued, I know food service is pretty structured in the military and follows spe cific nutritional guidelines but occasionally they may be called on to create a special meal and come up with a different prod uct. He also stressed the impor tance of what he takes back from the experience. Its great to see a different type of opera tion from a restaurant and the school. While we do volume cooking at times, we dont feed an entire base, three meals a day. Its interesting to see how the Navy runs their food ser vice program and I can take the knowledge back to the classroom to help promote the career paths of the Navy. For those attending the train ing sessions, it provided some valuable lessons. I learned how to make several new dishes. It was a great learning experience and really expanded my knowl edge in the kitchen. Im really grateful for this training, said CS2 Ray Johnson, a baker at the Flight Line Caf. For 25 students in the Clara White Mission Culinary Training Program, the training proved invaluable. This has given our students the chance to see how a professional kitchen operates and to gain another aspect of cooking skills, said Bruce Kinney, chef instructor at the Clara White Mission. The 600-hour culinary train ing program teaches students a broad range of culinary experiences and allows them to secure employment in the industry. Members of the Flight Line Caf often volunteer their time to help out at the mission and with the program. I have always worked behind the scenes in a restaurant as a server and have always wanted to learn to cook. This class is free which really helps because Im a victim of domestic vio lence, have no money and am staying in the shelter. By com pleting this course, I wont have to wait tables anymore and will have a career, said culinary student Donyalle Jackson. Its great to come here today to work in a professional kitch en and learn some new skills. Executive chef offers training at Flight Line Caf JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 18, 2013 11

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CARAT 2013 in IndonesiaDuring their most recent deployment, the Pelicans of VP-45 spread their wings to conduct a notable operational detachment to Indonesia. Operating out of the busy capi tal city of Jakarta, the detachment of 21 Pelicans worked closely with the Indonesian Navy during CARAT (Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training) 2013 from May 22 29. The joint exercise began with an aviation symposium hosted by the Indonesian Navys Western Fleet. Presentations from both Indonesian and U.S. aircrews sparked discussion on safety best practices, as well as the capabilities of U.S. Navy P-3C Orion and various aircraft of the Indonesian Navy including the NC-212 Casa Maritime Patrol Aircraft. The Pelicans next hosted a static dis play for CARAT 2013 participants, as well as children from Assifa Al Islami Orphanage and SMK Angkasa High School. I really enjoyed how excited the chil dren were about being on the P-3 and seeing women in uniform, said IS2 Darsheen Smith. On May 24, the Pelicans took to the air for a SAREX (Search and Rescue Exercise), cooperating with a shiplaunched Indonesian B-412 helicopter and several U.S. and Indonesian war ships. The Pelicans also provided range clearing for a missile firing, followed by participating in a joint ASW exercise. It was exciting to work with the Indonesians and to learn about their country and culture, said AWV2(NAC) Tim Shafer. In addition to its normal crew, sev eral pilots and engineers from the Indonesian Navy flew on the Pelicans P-3C, giving them the unique opportu nity to experience first hand the Orions capabilities. This exercise was a great opportu nity to work with our Indonesian coun terparts, said Lt. Mike Lehman. The professional relationships that weve developed over this last week will not be forgotten by either side. Although busy conducting flights and aircraft maintenance, the Pelicans also found time to visit the children at the orphanage who, a few days before, came to tour the P-3. The visit was a good reminder to appreciate what we have at home, said AM2(AW) Nicolas Hernandez after the visit. Overall, CARAT 2013 was a great suc cess, in no small part thanks to the hard work of VP-45s maintenance profes sionals and aircrew. Now returned from deployment to Jacksonville, the Pelicans are confident that their interaction will facilitate U.S./ Indonesian ties for years to come. Residents are invited to pro vide feedback on Balfour Beatty Communities (BBC) operations through the 2013 CEL Resident Satisfaction Housing Survey. The annual survey is an important part of the continuous improvement program that analyzes operational performance to ensure BBC consis tently delivers quality housing servic es. Topics covered in the survey include resident experiences regarding leas ing, housing and maintenance. The CEL Resident Satisfaction Housing Survey allows us to see where we excel operationally and where there is room for improvement, said Diana Heintz, community manager for BBC. We encourage all residents to fill out the survey so that we may better assist them in the future. Surveys will be available at the CEL Splash Event scheduled for July 25, from 6 8 p.m. at the NAS Jax Outdoor Pool. If you are unable to attend the event, stop by Building 960 on Ballard St. to pick up a survey or call the Community Management Office at 904-908-0821 for delivery to your resi dence. Residents who submit a completed survey by Aug. 31, will be entered in a prize drawing. Residents who submit a survey by Aug. 9, will also qualify for a special Early Bird drawing. At Balfour Beatty Communities, we strive to exceed our residents expec tations and hope that every resident enjoys their experience living with us, added Heintz. Surveys may be returned to the authorized locked mailbox located at the Balfour Beatty Communities Management Office in the postagepaid envelope provided. Survey infor mation is confidential and anonymous and only CEL employees will have access to the returned surveys. VP-45 Pelicans deployment memory Balfour Beatty offers annual housing survey 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 18, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment July 19 Karaoke with Randy July 26 Jason Lamar Duo Deweys Family Night August 2, 4 8 p.m. Enjoy free activities including a magic show, games, back-to-school goodies, inflatables & more.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 -10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 5 10 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 4 6 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 1 6 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer Going on now through Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 years and younger receive one free game every day until 5 p.m. Win prizes all summer long!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Lap Swim (water park, water slide and concessions are not open) Monday Friday 6 8 a.m. & 6 7 p.m. Recreational Swim (water park, water slide and concessions are open) Monday Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Learn to Swim Program Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1 Private pool parties can be reserved at the fitness center Parties are not available during regular business hours of operation and occur in the evenings when the pool is closed. Parties must be reserved ten days prior to party date, payment due at time of reservation For more information call (904) 5423518 The temporary gym, The Zone, Bldg. 798 is closed. The Base Gym, Building 614, reopens July 22. Dive In Movie at the outdoor pool August 10, 6 10 p.m. Movie begins at 8:30 p.m. Free admission, hot dog, chips and a drink!I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. NFL Jacksonville Jaguars tickets on sale now $70 section 147 Legoland Florida Free ticket for active duty military through Oct. 27 Wet n Wild Orlando $37 adult, $45 adult w/ meal, $40 child w/ meal Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Amelia Island Museum of History $10 family pass, Ghost tour $8 adult, $4 child Florida EcoSafaris in St. Cloud EcoPark $119, Coach safari adult $28, child $25, Zip-line safari $75, Cypress canopy cycle $40 for one hour Gatorland Free admission for active duty and retired military until the end of the year. Family tickets can be pur chased at ITT. $19.95 adult, $12.50 child, zip-line $54.25 Blue Man Group Orlando $49 adult, $29 child Monster Truck Jam coming soon! 2013 2014 Artist Series featuring Mama Mia, Memphis, Celtic Thunder, War Horse, Men are From Mars, Women are from Venus, Million Dollar Quartet and The D* Word is a Musical are on sale now!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restrict ed to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Jacksonville Beach Trip July 20 at 9 a.m. Kayak Trip July 27 at 9 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees July 23 for active duty July 25 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Furlough Fridays Civilian employees who are furloughed can play 18-holes with cart & green fees for $20 Junior Golf Clinic, Session 3, July 29 Aug. 2. Ages 1117, $110 per child, per sessionMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina July 20, 21, 27 & 28 Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27 Auto Skills Center Call 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE-certified mechanic on siteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available. Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Movie Under the Stars July 19 at 8:30 p.m. Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School August 5 September 16 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 18, 2013 13

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During the busy season of military transfers, adjusting to new communities and reg istering children for school, more than 2,000 museums across the nation will open their doors, free of charge, to service members and their families as a break from the summer challenges, a Defense Department official said today. From now through Labor Day, Sept. 2, all active duty service members, National Guardsmen and reservists and their families can take advantage of this cultural and educational opportunity in all 50 states. Its an exciting, inspiring, educational and economi cal activity for our families to enjoy this summer, said Navy Cmdr. Leslie Hull-Ryde, a Pentagon spokeswoman. Launching its fourth year in a news conference today at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the 2013 Blue Star Museums Program is a collaboration among the Defense Department, Blue Star Families, the National Endowment for the Arts and the museums to give service members and their families a way to spend time together in their local museums. After long deployments, rigorous training schedules and very long hours, our time with our families is very lim ited and extremely precious to us, Hull-Ryde said. We are so grateful [to have] these programs. This program is an investment in our families. A record number of muse ums are participating this year. The program began in 2010 with free access to about 600 museums, while this years 2,000 is a figure thats still growing, Blue Star Families and NEA officials said. This program is helping us make memories -memories for our families, Hull-Ryde said. But its more than that. It is making a difference not only in the force of today, but in the force of the future.Sailors, families can visit museums free for summer Tuesday August 6 6 9 p.m. Outdoor Pool & Allegheny Softball Field Join our community and help heighten crime and drug awareness, strengthen neighborhood spirit and send a mes 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 18, 2013

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A celebration was held June 27 for the newly-constructed com munity clusters constructed in Desdunes, Mandarin, and Ecole Pont Gaudin Haiti. The new facilities, located within the Artibonite depart ment of Haiti, were built as part of U.S. Southern Commands Humanitarian Assistance Program (HAP) in Haiti. Each cluster consists of a school, clinic, community cen ter, and restroom facilities, said Lt. j.g. Blaine Henning, Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast (NAVFAC Southeast) Resident Officer in Charge of Construction (ROICC), Haiti. The 2,500 square foot com munity center, complete with a large indoor gathering area and an outdoor kitchen for large events, provides a safe and cen tral area for the community to gather. Additionally, the 1,800 square foot clinic provides multiple examination rooms, pharmacy, and on site laboratory for test ing. A key component of the clinic was the construction of a stu dio apartment to allow for the full time on site stay of a physi cian or medical resident in these remote locations of Haiti, said Henning. In her comments during the ceremony at Desdunes, the Haitian Minister of Health Florence Guillaume thanked the U.S. government for the opportunities the newly-con structed clinic and community center will provide to the Haitan government and its people. Army Major Will Hogan, with the U.S. Military Liaison Office, Haiti, stressed that only through close coordination with the Government of Haiti were such complicated projects able to come to fruition to bring a bet ter quality of life to the people of Haiti. During the ceremony, Haitian Minister of Health Florence Guillaume, signed the docu ments officially transferring the community center, health clinic, and restrooms at all three sites from U.S. Southern Command to the government of Haiti. The clinics will be man aged and staffed by members of the Ministry of Health, while the schools will be managed and staffed by members of the Ministry of Education. Participants in the inaugura tion ceremony were Guillaume; U.S. Army Major Will Hogan, Military Liaison Office, U.S. Embassy; Paul Emanual Laurent, Artibonite director of education; Roberde Honore, Artibonite director of health; Wesner Archeluse, mayor of Desdunes. Also in attendance were Henning; Sgt. 1st Class Roland Laforest, U.S. Southern Command HAP manager; and members of the local commu nity. The three projects totaling $5.8 million are part of 62 HAP projects NAVFAC Southeast is administering the design and construction of for U.S. Southern Command on behalf of the government of Haiti and the Haitian people. The $33 million program is being executed, with ROICC Haiti oversight, through 20 con tracts at 22 sites and will provide EOCs, DRWs, fire stations, med ical clinics, community centers, and schools for the Haitian peo ple. NAVFAC Southeast completes community clusters in Haiti For more information about any of the sports articles, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. Visit the MWR website at www.cnic.navy. mil or www.facebook.com nasjaxmwr. 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 18, 2013

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Psychological fitness keeping your mind fit This month, we encouraged you to take charge of your men tal health and reflect on wheth er yours could be improved. Its easy to forget how impor tant our mental health is to our overall health and wellbeing, and how with very little effort we can maintain it. Everyone faces stresses and demands. Life can take a toll on our mind and body, but if we commit a little time each day to improving our mental health, we will do for our mind what regular physical exercise does for our bodies makes us stronger and more fit. The Real Warriors Campaign article, Psychological Fitness Keeping Your Mind Fit, does a good job of summing up the importance of having a fit mind, not just a fit body. Psychological fitness involves building your mental, emotional and behavioral abil ities in order to effectively cope with the unique and changing challenges of military service. In other words, developing a healthier mental state can carry you through tough times. It can also help you be a source of strength for others. By focusing on the following five areas, you can strengthen your psychological fitness: ronment interaction with others With these five areas in mind, there are many ways that you can achieve psychological fitness and help manage stress in your life. The following tips can get you started find ways to incorporate them in your life that work best for you: over and over again, and with summer almost here, its a good time to commit to being more active. That doesnt mean you have to join a gym or run a race. You can simply decide to move around more, take a walk before, after or during the work day, spend time in the garden, rent a bicycle if you dont have one, take a dance or yoga class, and get out on the weekends to enjoy a walk in a park or hike a trail. Research shows there are psychological health ben efits from exercise, such as better sleep, increased energy, reduced symptoms of anxiety and depression. ing you. Avoid letting concerns silently build up inside. Talk to a trained health care pro fessional, commanding offi cer, trusted buddy or chaplain. Also, consider these resources for psychological health care and support. ties that interest you. Seek out people or groups that share your experiences, and make an effort to connect with them. This will help you build and maintain healthy connections with others so that you can reap the benefits of social sup port. Choose to have a more posi tive outlook on things. While stressful situations may be unavoidable, staying in con trol of your thoughts can help you remain resilient in difficult times. expectations for goals youre trying to attain to avoid set ting yourself up for failure. Celebrate small accomplish ments and reevaluate your goals when necessary. stress. Work on balancing fam ily and work responsibilities to avoid becoming overwhelmed. Learn healthy ways to active ly manage stress exercise, journal or meditate. Explore mobile apps that can help you relax. Earlier this month we asked you through Facebook to share your ideas on how you keep stress in check. Interestingly, many of you are doing things that these tips suggest: yoga and other forms of exercise, spending time with family and friends, prayer and meditation, helping others, practicing your military skills, and participat ing in activities that you enjoy like working on cars or caring for animals. Improving or maintaining your mental health can be easy. Small actions and positive choices can add up to signifi cant gains in overall strength and improved readiness to confront common challenges in military and civilian life. The important thing is to do something . use these tips to manage your way to better mental health.Small steps to improve mental health The U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels, announced the officers selected for the 2014 team July 12. The squadron selected an adminis trative officer and a public affairs officer to join a pre-selected C-130 pilot and a maintenance officer on the 2014 team. Many highly qualified Navy and Marine Corps officers submit applica tions to join the Blue Angels each year. The Blue Angels select finalists to inter view at the Blue Angels home base at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Fla., dur ing the week of the Pensacola Beach Air Show. The team makes selections at the conclusion of the interview week. The newly selected 2014 team mem bers include: j.g. Phillip Harper, 33, from Chicago, is currently assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron 195 (VFA-195), at Naval Air Facility Atsugi, Japan. He is a 2011 graduate of Hawaii Pacific University, Honolulu. Amber Lynn Daniel, 32, from Ramona, Calif., is currently assigned to the Navy Office of Diversity and Inclusion, Washington, D.C. She is a 2004 gradu ate of Southern Oregon University, Ashland, Ore. Pre-selected to join the 2014 team were: Cook, 32, of East Bernard, Texas, is currently assigned to Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron 252 (VMGR-252) at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Cherry Point, N.C. He is a 2003 graduate of Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas. Cmdr. Declan Hartney, 43, of Limerick, Ireland, is currently assigned to Naval Special Warfare Support Activity 1 (NSWSA-1) at Naval Amphibious Base (NAB) Coronado, Calif. Expected to return for the 2014 season are F/A-18 demonstration pilots: Clinton Township, Mich. Fort Mitchell, Ky. Hummelstown, Pa. Hemet, Calif. Birmingham, Ala. Charleroi, Penn. Also expected to return for the 2014 season are: Chamberlain, 28, of Bloomington, Ill. Lt. Cmdr. Michael Cheng, 39, of San Francisco. Harrell, 32, of Frederick, Md. and Marine Capt. Mike Van Wyk, 31, of Orland Park, Ill. DeBuse, 39, of Longmont, Colo. 29, of Omaha, Neb. The mission of the Blue Angels is to enhance Navy recruiting and credibly represent Navy and Marine Corps avia tion to the United States and its Armed Forces to America and other countries as international ambassadors of good will. Since its inception in 1946 at NAS Jacksonville, the Blue Angels have per formed for more than 484 million fans. Blue Angels announce 2014 team members JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 18, 2013 17

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THURSDAY, JULY 18, 2013 FRCSE COC NJROTC VP-45 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The HSM-72 Proud Warriors, based at NAS Jacksonville, are recipients of the 2013 Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Safety Excellence Award chosen from among all active duty naval aviation squadrons worldwide. Upon hearing the news, HSM-72 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Derek Fleck said, We were honored when we won the CNO Safety S Award in 2012 but bringing home the SECNAV Safety Excellence Award in 2013 is a tremendous honor. It is a testament to all our people for setting the standard in safe and efficient practices, both on and off duty. SECNAV Ray Mabus announced his 2013 Safety Excellence Award recipients in a July 2 message. He stated, Safety and risk management are indispensable to effectively prepare for and complete our mission, whether at home or deployed in harms way. Your safety accomplish ments are proof positive of your mission safety command culture and your commitment to each other, to safety excel lence, to the Nation, and to the Department of the Navy as a world-class safety organiza tion, said Mabus. The Proud Warriors fly the MH-60R Seahawk helicopter and are recognized as a leader in the naval rotary wing com munity, as noted by their other recent awards the 2012 Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Safety S Award; the Arleigh Burke Fleet Trophy; Capt. Arnold Jay Isbell Trophy; Blue M for Medical Readiness; Commander, Maritime Strike Wing U.S. Atlantic Fleet Talon Award; and the Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic Battle E Award the squadrons third consecutive Battle E and 12th in its 28-year history. When you consider all of the Navys top squadrons The X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System (UCAS) demonstrator completed its first carrier-based arrested landing on board USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) off the coast of Virginia July 10. It isnt very often you get a glimpse of the future. Today, those of us on board USS George H.W. Bush got that chance as we witnessed the X-47B make its firstever arrested landing on an aircraft carrier, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. The operational unmanned aircraft soon to be developed have the opportu nity to radically change the way presence and combat power are delivered from our aircraft carriers. Todays demonstration was the first time a tailless, unmanned autonomous aircraft landed on an aircraft carrier. This test marks an historic event for naval aviation that Navy leaders believe will impact the way the Navy integrates manned and unmanned aircraft on the carrier flight deck in the future. Today, we witnessed the capstone moment for the Navy UCAS program as the team flawlessly performed integrated carrier operations aboard USS George H.W. Bush with the X-47B aircraft, said Capt. Jaime Engdahl, Navy UCAS pro gram manager. Our precision landing performance, advanced autonomous flight controls and digital carrier air traffic control environment are a testament to the innova tion and technical excellence of the Navy and Northrop Grumman team. The July 10 landing was the begin ning of the final part of three at-sea test periods for X-47B during the last eight months culminating a decade of Navy unmanned integration efforts that show the Navys readiness to move forward with unmanned carrier aviation says Rear Adm. Mat Winter, who oversees the Program Executive Office for Unmanned Aviation and Strike Weapons in Patuxent River, Md. This demonstration has enabled us to merge industry and government technologies together, which enables the Navy to pursue future unmanned aviation car rier capabilities, said Winter, who wit nessed the historic landing. The government engineering and testing team in partnership with our Northrop Grumman team members have matured the technologies in this X-47B system to position us for todays event, which marks a milestone in naval avia tion. The X-47B completed the 35-minute transit from NAS Pax River to the carrier and caught the 3 wire with the aircrafts tailhook. The arrested landing brought the air craft from approximately 145 knots to stop in less than 350 feet. Shortly after the initial landing, the As DOD enters the furlough period, the department will concentrate on the core mission of defending the United States and its interests, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said July 8. Thats where our center of gravity is during this furlough period, Little said. Because of sequestration, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel made the diffi cult decision to furlough about 85 percent of DOD civilian employees one day a week through the end of the fis cal year a total of 11 days, the press secretary said. My assumption is the vast majority of that population is on furlough at least one day this week, Little said. Little estimated the action will save the department $1.8 billion by the end of September. Some missions in the department will be impacted, he said. Were very clear with our own staff that there will be some impact, and we expect other offices to have similar impacts, the press secretary said. What happens in fiscal 2014 remains up in the air, Little said in response to a reporters question about the pos sibility of future layoffs. Were getting ahead of ourselves talking about layoffs at this stage, he said. Right now were in the furlough period and no deci sions have been reached about what may happen going forward. Much of what will happen depends on the governments ability to move beyond sequestration, Little said. [Hagel] has been clear that he would like for there to be a deal on sequestration, so we can lift this burden off of all our employees in the department, Little said. Sequestration was an unfortunate mechanism designed to avoid unfor tunate consequences. Were seeing some of those consequences already in regards to military training and readi ness, the press secretary said. Its unfortunate were in this period but were going to muscle through it best we can, he added.Editors Note: Due to press deadlines, the story of Secretary of Defense Hagels visit to NAS Jax will appear in our July 25 edition. Yorktown Gate Building 9 Pass and ID Office hours: Monday Friday from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Commercial Gate/Pass Office: Monday Friday from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. Passes will be issued by the Yorktown gate sentry after hours and weekends. Non-NCAC (RAPID Gate) personnel will only be authorized access during commercial gate hours. HSM-72 captures 2013 Safety Excellence Award X-47B makes first arrested landing at sea Defense Department will muscle through furlough periodNew Pass & ID hours set

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 18, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS July 18 1775 Continental Congress resolves that each colony provide armed vessels. 1779 Commodore Abraham Whipples squad ron captures 11 prizes in largest prize value of Revolutionary War. 1792 John Paul Jones dies in Paris, France. 1813 U.S. Frigate President captures British Daphne, Eliza Swan, Alert and Lion. 1920 Naval aircraft sink ex-German cruiser Frankfurt in target practice. 1943 German submarine shoots down K-74, the first and only U.S. airship lost during World War II. 1966 Launch of Gemini 10 with Lt. Cmdr. John Young as command pilot. Mission involved 43 orbits at an altitude of 412.2 nautical miles and lasted two days, 22 hours and 46 minutes. Recovery was by HS-3 helicopter from USS Guadalcanal (LPH-7). 1973 Task Force 78, Mine Countermeasures Force, departs waters of North Vietnam after completing minesweeping operations of 1,992 tow hours at a cost of $20,394,000. July 19 1812 Frigate USS Constitution escapes from British squadron after three-day chase off New Jersey. 1886 USS Atlanta, the first steel-hulled American cruiser armed with breech-loading rifled guns, is commissioned. 1897 Lt. Robert Peary departs on year long arctic expedition that makes many important discoveries, including large meteorites at Cape York. 1918 Armored cruiser USS San Diego (CA-6) sunk off Fire Island, N.Y. by a mine laid by U-156. 1940 President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs second Naval Expansion Act. July 20 1846 First visit of U.S. warships (USS Columbus and USS Vincennes) to Japan is unsuccessful in negotiating a treaty. 1960 In first Polaris missile launch, USS George Washington (SSBN 598) successfully fires two operational Polaris missiles while submerged off Florida. 1964 Four Navy divers enter Project Sealab I cap sule moored 192 feet on the ocean floor off Bermuda for 11-day experiment. 1969 Former Navy pilot Neil Armstrong is the first man to set foot on the moon. While taking the first step, he said, Thats one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. Armstrong was commander of Apollo 11, which during its 8-day mission landed on the Sea of Tranquility. Recovery was by HS-4 helicopters from USS Hornet (CVS-12). July 21 1823 After pirate attack, Lt. David Farragut leads landing party to destroy pirate stronghold in Cuba. 1944 Invasion and recapture of Guam begins. 1946 In first U.S. test of adaptability of jet aircraft to shipboard operations, XFD-1 Phantom makes landings and takeoffs without catapults from USS Franklin D. Roosevelt (CVS-42). July 22 1802 Frigate Constellation defeats nine Corsair gunboats off Tripoli. 1905 Body of John Paul Jones moved to Annapolis, Md. for reburial. 1953 U.S. ships laid down heavy barrage to support UN troops in Korea. 1964 Four Navy divers (Lt. Cmdr. Robert Thompson, GM1 Lester Anderson, QMC Robert Barth, and HMC Sanders Manning) submerge in Sealab I at a depth of 192 feet, 39 miles off Hamilton, Bermuda. They surfaced on July 31. July 23 1947 First Navy all-jet squadron (VF-17A) receives its first aircraft (FH). 1948 USS Putnum (DD-757) evacuates U.N. team from Haifa, Israel and becomes first U.S. Navy ship to fly the U.N. flag. 1950 USS Boxer(CV-21) sets record crossing of Pacific to bring aircraft, troops, and supplies to Korea at start of the conflict. 1958 USS Nautilus (SSN-571) departs Pearl Harbor for first submerged transit of North Pole. 1993 Sarah Deal becomes first woman Marine selected for naval aviation training. July 24 1813Sailing Master Elijah Mix attempts to blow up British warship Plantagenet with a torpedo near Cape Henry, Va. 1944 Following 43 days of naval gunfire and air bombardment, Naval Task Force lands Marines on Tinian Island. Just in time (or not, keep reading) and on the heels of my previous columns about fatherhood and the military, comes Armin Brotts book, The Military Father: a Hands-on Guide for Deployed Dads. Brott, is a former Marine with a syndicated newspa per column, Ask Mr. Dad, as well as a radio show, Positive Parenting. He has built his post-mili tary career around writing and talking about issues of father hood and families. In The Military Father, he has writ ten what might possibly be the most comprehensive and con temporary book about deploy ments that Ive ever read. Ive been a military depen dent since the day I was born 36 years ago, so youd think I know it all. I dont. I devoured The Military Father in the course of a day. This was no Service Etiquette rerun when I opened to the third page and found a cartoon that in one ink-andpaper sketch sums up many of my deployment experiences in particular, the year in which we did our Dinner with the Smileys project. A mother and two children are eating dinner with a computer at the head of the table. Above the mother it reads, Julie honey, please refresh your father. (More proof that Brott gets it and speaks to a new generation of military families is on page 62. Wowzas! Thats all I can say.) Brott gets it because hes been there, done that. He introduces himself as a for mer Marine, but quickly fol lows that up with, I know, I know, once a Marine, always a Marine. He was busy writing books (six of them) about fatherhood in general, when he noticed an uptick in 2001 of parent ing questions from service members. (Hmmmm, 2001? Probably not a coincidence.) So he decided to write a different kind of book about fatherhood, one geared toward the military family in particular. Brott proves his military experience with a text box titled, When youre in, youre in. When youre out, you could still be in. This made me smile perhaps you are smiling, too and my confidence in Brott was sealed. Hes referring to the militarys ability to recall supposedly discharged mem bers who are automatically placed in the Individual Ready Reserve and the stop loss fine print whereby a former service member with special training can be called back into service at any time. Maybe youre thinking, Why do military families need a book about coping with deployments? Didnt they sign up for this? Didnt they know all this before they married someone in the military? Brott assures readers even seasoned military fami lies that shock, sadness and fear are a natural response to deployments, even when you know that deployments are bound to happen. The Military Father is peppered with great moments like this to make you feel normal. Its also full of what Ive come to realize is Brotts natural wit and humor. His style is conversational and funny. Having an argument by e-mail, he writes, is like ski ing through a revolving door: neither fun nor effective. Although Brott makes a disclaimer that he is not a doctor (nor a financial plan ner, accountant, lawyer or congressman), in the section titled A Brief Overview of Your Childs Development, he pegs some of my boys as if he lived next door. The book is written in three sections: pre-deployment, deployment and post-deploy ment. Each addresses the concerns of the service member, the spouse and the children. There is page after page of advice and concrete ways to deal with deployments. In any case, The Military Father is an easy and inter esting read sure to make you chuckle. Its a unique blend of parenting book and military how-to and for anyone who is about to face a deployment, it is on my list of recommendations. The Military Father arrives just in time or not In a letter issued July 1 to the men and women of the armed forces, the nations top two mili tary officers and senior enlisted member marked the 40th anniversary of the all-volun teer force. The letter signed by Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Navy Adm. James Winnefeld Jr., vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs; and Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Bryan Battaglia, senior enlisted advisor to the chairman reads as follows: Since the Nations founding, our sons and daughters have volunteered to leave the every day comforts of their homes, their neighbor hoods, and their families to join and serve a cause greater than themselves. They have joined a profession bound by honor, sacri fice, bravery, and in many cases danger. They serve a greater purpose protecting and defending the Constitution of the United States. On 1 July 1973, the United States instituted the All-Volunteer Force. Those who choose to wear the cloth of our Nation do so with a great sense of pride and allegiance. To volunteer speaks volumes to the character, patriotism, and commitment of Americas most precious resource our men and women who serve. As we commemorate the 40th Anniversary of the All-Volunteer Force, we would like to pass our heartfelt appreciation to all those who have served and are serving in the United States Armed Forces. You are Americas strength you honor our past, and you preserve our futureTop service members mark all-volunteer forces anniversary

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Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), the largest tenant com mand aboard NAS Jacksonville, will hold a change of command ceremony July 25 at 9 a.m. in Hangar 1000. FRCSE Executive Officer Capt. John Kemna, a Professional Aviation Maintenance Officer (PAMO) who hails from Missouri, will assume command of the aviation maintenance depot from Capt. Robert Caldwell Jr., also a PAMO, who will retire during the ceremony with 27 years of military service. FRCSE is one of three Fleet Readiness Centers commissioned by the Navy to perform in-depth overhaul, repair, and modifica tion of aircraft, engines, and aero nautical components. FRCSE is the largest industrial employer in Northeast Florida, and Southeast George with a workforce of near ly 4,600 military, civil service and contract personnel. Kemna comes with a vast wealth of knowledge and experience gained throughout his 24-year military career filling numer ous positions ashore and afloat. He graduated in 1989 from the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md. with a Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering. He later attended Aviation Maintenance Officer School at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Fla. From 1996 to 1998, he attended the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif., earning a Master of Science in Aeronautical Engineering. During the change of command ceremony, Caldwell will retire from active military service. Caldwell first reported to FRCSE in September 2006 and served as the director of depot operations until April 2008. He next served on the staff of Commander, Fleet Readiness Centers at NAS Patuxent River, Md. In July 2009 he returned to FRCSE where he began his tour as executive officer and assumed command in July 2011. As commander, Caldwell over saw the return of more than 145 aircraft, 2,800 engines and mod ules and 51,000 aircraft compo nents to the Fleet in support of warfighting readiness. Further, he held customer per-hour rates at Fiscal Year 2007 levels, a remark able feat given todays fiscal con straints. Caldwell oversaw F414 engine output increase by 89 percent to meet operational requirements three months ahead of the recov ery plan when faced with a criti cal, Navy-wide shortage of F/A-18 aircraft engines in 2012. This was accomplished without increasing unit cost or plant manning levels. Further, he leveraged the com bined strengths of government and private industry to provide a best-value approach to Naval avi ation sustainment. He cemented FRCSEs reputation as the provider of choice for 40 industry partners through cost, quality and schedule performance. Under Caldwells leadership, FRCSE received the FY12 and FY11 Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Aviation Safety Award, the 2012 CNO Safety Excellence Unit Award for Medium Industrial Shore Activity, the 2011 NAVAIR Commanders Award Program Management Category (Environmental Program Team) and the 2011 Thompson-Ravitz Award for Excellence in Public Affairs. Industry awards include the 2012 JAXUSA Partnership Industry Leader Award for Business Achievements and Corporate Citizenship, the 2012 Lockheed Martin STAR Supplier Award for Exceptional Quality Performance in Electronics, and the 2011 Founders Service Award from the First Coast Manufacturers Association. Caldwell, along with Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown and mem bers of state and local agencies signed the Northeast Florida Environmental Compliance Partnering Team Charter on Feb. 12, renewing their commitment to environmental stewardship. The team was established in 2002 to ensure Navy and regula tory agencies achieve environmental compliance by identifying and implementing innovative solu tions. FRCSE change of command is July 25 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 18, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 18, 2013 Despite cutbacks due to sequestration, 34 Naval Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (NJROTC) students from high schools throughout Florida and Georgia spent the week of June 24-28 at NAS Jacksonville to learn how to sail. This is the 12th consecutive year the sailing academy has been held here. The Interscholastic Sailing Association, South Atlantic Division sponsors the weeklong sailing academy that teaches all aspects of sailing such as safety guidelines, terminology, rigging the boat, launching, navigation, teamwork, wind direction, weather conditions and emergency procedures. Weve has a lot of changes this year due to cutbacks. Normally we have 65-70 cadets but we had to charge more this year to offset an increase in fees on the station so we have half the number of students. Weve also decreased the number of sailboats to seven Flying Scots which means the students will work in teams instead of indi vidually, said retired Navy Cmdr. Pat Thurman, officer in charge of the program. We also shortened the program by a day to reduce cost. And, with the marina closed on Tuesday and Wednesday now, we had to pay to bring someone in to work to assist us. It was a cost increase for the program, but we didnt want to cancel it because its a valuable training tool for these students, added Thurman. It also has a historical aspect in that 150 years, we were still sailing boats in war so it will help them in the naval history classes. The week began in the classroom where students learned basic boat handling techniques, rigging and de-rigging, knot tying and the different parts of the sailboat before actually heading out on the water. They are also required to pass a 50-yard swimming test and treading water for two minutes. Once out on the water, the students were broken down into seven teams with an instructor on board each boat for morning, afternoon and evening sessions. We practice tacking and jibbing through the wind, towing skills and approaching and tying up to buoys. If we get all our skills accomplished, well let them have some friendly race competitions, said Thurman, midway through the week. Thurman also stressed the importance of safety. Luckily, weve been blessed with pretty good weather. We are extremely safety conscious. If we see a thunderstorm within 30 miles of us, we immedi ately get out of the water, he added. The students are housed at the NAS Jax Navy Gateway Inns & Suites and eat most of their meals in the base galley. In the evenings, they visited VP-8 to tour a P-3C Orion, the base bowling alley and pool. Kirstyn Higdon, an NJROTC cadet from Bishop Kenny High School in Jacksonville, was thrilled to attend the sailing academy. I think this is a really great experience learning to sail. I love the water and was excited to get out there and participate. I also enjoyed the leadership training and teamwork involved, she said. Its really fun. Weve learned how to sail, how to work as a team, leadership skills and about safety issues. Ive been on power boats but never a sailboat its a lot dif ferent because you constantly have to watch whats going on and how the wind changes, added Kaleb Thomas, an NJROTC cadet from Union Grove High School in McDonough, Ga. The class ended June 28 with the students participating in a graduation ceremony attended by family mem bers and friends. Each of the cadets was awarded a certificate of achievement for participating in the program.NJROTC students learn at 12th annual sailing academy

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Aircrew assigned to the Fighting Tigers of VP-8 provided a squadron tour to Navy Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (NJROTC) cadets on June 27. Thirty-six cadets received some valuable hands on experience at an operational maritime patrol squadron, while also learning about possible career opportunities in the U.S. Navy. I think it is important to provide this unique opportunity to these cadets because they could become future P-3C Orion or P-8A aircrew men or maintainers, said AWO2 Jordan Radford, one of the VP-8 tour guides. The tour allowed us to show the cadets the functions of the P-3C aircraft, inform the students about what our job is like on a daily basis and why it is important to do what we do, he added. At NAS Jax Hangar 1000, the stu dents toured the inside of a P-3C Orion aircraft and received a hands on tutorial with certain air craft equipment operations. They also visited maintenance workspaces. I think this is a great opportu nity to see how an active duty Navy squadron operates on a daily basis, as well as to learn how the maritime patrol and reconnaissance commu nity has changed over the years, said NJROTC Cadet Ensign Joseph Gannon. During the tour I was able to see many of the aircraft functions, and more specifically, I learned the basics of radio detection and rang ing operation and how it works, he added. NJROTC units around the coun try teach an accredited curriculum to students in grades 9 12 emphasizing citizenship and leadership development. They also study maritime heri tage, the strategic significance of sea power, and naval topics such as seamanship, navigation and meteo rology. The NJROTC program is designed to moti vate stu dents to graduate from high school and continue to higher education by offering free ACT/SAT preparation.Approximately 60 percent of NJROTC cadets who graduate high school continue to a higher education. Running for a causeWhen a Sailor assigned to the VP-8 Fighting Tigers learned that her mother was diagnosed with a form of blood cancer, she took action to help to raise funds for blood cancer research. AWO2 Michelle Workman joined a marathon running team called Team in Training (TNT) that consists of volunteers across the United States who run in marathons to raise funds for blood cancer research. According to TNT, every four minutes someone is diagnosed with a type of blood cancer. I train for marathons by myself because I dont have anyone from my TNT nearby but I motivate myself by thinking about my mother and friends and how I can make a difference for those who are fighting cancer, or who may be diagnosed with cancer in the future, said Workman. Her most recent marathon was the Rock N Roll San Diego Marathon on June 3, where more than 30,000 people participated. Its really inspirational to be a part of something so important, and whenever we all come together, how much we can achieve, said Workman. Since Joining TNT, Workman has person ally raised more than $3,000 towards blood cancer research. Her TNT team has raised more than $64,000. Since 1988, TNT participants have raised more than $1.3 billion towards lifesaving cancer research and therapies. My friend, whose father died from cancer, told me about the group and how it helped him cope and understand cancer treatments. He felt it would help me too, said Workman. She added, Being a part of the TNT has helped me see that cancer isnt a death sentence, and not only affects the people around me, but all over the world. Workman continues to participate with TNT and has set a personal goal of raising more than $20,000 within her lifetime. NJROTC cadets visit VP-8 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 18, 2013

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The NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club Scholarship Committee has named the first recipients of the $1,000 scholarships sponsored by the First Command Education Foundation and the local First Command Advisors in Jacksonville. The recipients are Clayton Rix and Natalie Widergren. The presentation cer emony took place on July 9 at 10:30 a.m. at Mulligans. Presentations were made by First Command District Advisor Jim Schless. Awardees were selected from applications received, and based on scholarship merit and community service. First Command Education Foundation (FCEF), a 501(c)(3) public charity, promotes edu cation as the foundation of a productive society through scholarships and financial lit eracy programs. Originally created in 1983, FCEF was founded to award scholarships to military per sonnel and their dependents. FCEF expanded its mission in 2001 to encompass financial literacy training. In 2004, FCEF broadened scholarship eligi bility to individuals pursuing both undergraduate and grad uate degrees. Over its 27-year history, FCEF has awarded more than $3.7 million in scholarships to over 2,000 stu dents across the country. The NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club and the First Command Education Foundation are non-federal entities. They are not part of the Department of Defense or any of its components and they have no governmental status. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. No changes in service or hoursNaval Hospital Jacksonville along with its five branch health clinics (BHCs) in Albany, Jacksonville, Key West, Kings Bay and Mayport will continue to support the health and well being of its patients throughout Florida and Georgia during the furlough of approximately 660 civilian employees. The furlough will not affect hours of operation at any location. Keeping Sailors and Marines our nations heroes healthy and fit to fight continues to be our first prior ity, said Naval Hospital Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer. Like all of Navy Medicine, well continue to meet our operational requirements in support of our warf ighters and their families at our hospital and branch health clinics across the region. Because its critical that decreased staffing caused by the furloughs not compromise the ability to provide patients with high-quality care, some non-emergency, non-urgent care may be delayed or referred to the TRICARE network. Patients may also experience longer than usual wait times. Other cost-cutting measures already in place include limiting travel, delaying cos metic facility renovations and non-critical equipment purchases, and eliminating civilian merit pay awards. Additionally, military staff will be redistributed and civilian staff fur lough days will be staggered to align with patient care needs. People are our most important asset and we are extremely proud of and highly value the important contribu tions of our civilian workforce, Shaffer said. Its most devastating to all of our civilian employees who are required to stay home, in a non-paid status, begin ning July 8 for a total of 11 days by the end of September. It also affects our military staff who will be redistributed throughout our facilities to optimize care delivery as well as our patients who face delays in access to non-emergency, non-urgent care and increased referrals out to the TRICARE network. While our priority to heal our nations heroes remains unchanged and our team of civilian, military and contractor staff at our hospital and branch health clinics will continue to work diligently to provide outstanding care to our patients, the impact of sequestra tion and work lost due to civilian fur loughs will be felt. We ask for understanding during this difficult time, Shaffer said Hospital, BHC Kings Bay or BHC Mayport patients should continue to use the Appointment Line: call (904) 542-4677 or (800) 529-4677, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. PCM to a specialty clinic at the hospital, call weekdays from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. 7884/7886, weekdays from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 7094/7095, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. 4834/4850/4851, weekdays from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. advice remains available on evenings, weekends and holidays via its com mand Appointment Line at (800) 5294677. Officers spouses club scholarship recipients recognized Naval hospital CO reinforces commitment to care during DoD civilian furloughs 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 18, 2013

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aircraft was launched off the ship using the carriers catapult. The X-47B then proceeded to execute one more arrested landing. On the third approach to Bush the X-47B aircraft self-detected a navigation computer anomaly that required the air vehicle to transit to the assigned shorebased divert landing site, Wallops Island Air Field. The X-47B navigated to and landed without incident. We have been using the same [car rier] landing technology for more than 50 years now and the idea that we can take a large UAV and operate in that environment is fascinating, said Engdahl. Across the entire spectrum of military operations, an integrated force of manned and unmanned platforms is the future, said Mabus. The X-47Bs autonomous arrested landing aboard USS George H.W. Bush shows how the Navy and Marine Corps are riding the bow wave of technological advances to create this 21st century force. The X-47B UCAS spent several weeks aboard aircraft carriers in recent months, completing CVN deck opera tions aboard USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) in December 2012 and on board Bush in May. During the May underway peri od, the X-47B completed its first-ever cat apult launch. Since May, the integrated test team conducted a number of shorebased arrestments at Pax River in preparation for the demonstration aboard the ship. We have learned a lot from our flight deck operations, our shore-based flight test and extensive modeling and simulation, Engdahl added. Our team has executed all major program objectives and developed the concept of operations and demonstrated technologies for a future unmanned carrier-based aircraft capa bility. [Today] we proved we can seam lessly integrate unmanned systems into the carrier environment. Mabus concluded, We have certainly come a long way in the 102 years since Eugene Ely made the first arrested landing aboard an aircraft carrier. Naval avia tors have always been at the fore front of opera tional and tactical innova tion, and today was no exception. People make unmanned aviation possible and it is people who will provide the fresh thinking and new ideas so crucial to suc cesses like the X-47B program and the unmanned aircraft of the future. In a message to flag officers, com manding officers, and officers in charge, Vice Chief of Naval Operations (VCNO) Adm. Mark Ferguson highlighted Navy wide accountability for sexual assault July 8. The message from Adm. Mark Ferguson explains the Navy will soon announce policies and programs to address sexual assault across the fleet and sets the expectation that Navy leadership will do everything they can to prevent the crime. Sexual assault ruins lives, divides teams and erodes trust. As leaders, we must provide our Sailors a respon sible, professional and safe environ ment in which to work and live, said Ferguson. He told fleet leaders that preventing the crime of sexual assault starts with command climate. They must create atmospheres of trust and confidence that ensure Sailors can report sexual assault or sexual harass ment without fear of retribution or retaliation. He also stressed that once victims report crimes, it is the responsibility of the chain of command to ensure vic tims receive the appropriate level of care and support. Command climate has a role in not only reassuring victims, but in send ing a message that committing sexual assault will not be tolerated. We must reaffirm our commitment to our shipmates, and our actions must make clear to potential perpetrators of this crime that they will be held appropriately accountable, Ferguson said. Telling leaders this is our issue to solve, he reminded them they are: are treated with dignity and respect; tion measures into their commands; port; assault allegations are promptly reported to NCIS for investigation; accountable. In the near future, the Navy will announce additional policies and pro grams to address sexual assault, including a continued effort to highlight the responsible use of alcohol. The goal of these programs is to promote safe living and working environments across the Navy. Get more information and resources to combat sexual assault at www.sapr. navy.mil. Sexual assault affects Navy readi ness, and the Navy is committed to preventing sexual assault. Join the Navys conversation about sexual assault on social media and help raise awareness by using #NavySAPR. Vice CNO to fleet leaders: Preventing sexual assault begins with you X-47B JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 18, 2013 9

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that were in contention for this award, winning it was truly a surprise, said HSM-72 Safety Officer Lt. Cmdr. Rob Macynski. We were measured against every active duty naval aviation plat form including the F/A-18 Hornet, P-3C Orion, EA-18G Growler and E-2C Hawkeye. Macynskis seven-man safety depart ment liaisons with safety petty officers in each division of the squadron. Every maintenance shop fine tunes its safety processes according to the needs of their particular rate. Our pro gram includes frequent mishap drills, as well as a monthly enlisted safety council where we discuss squadron risk management issues. We also hold a quarterly human factors council to discuss situations that may affect shipmates on a personal level. For our air crew, flight briefs always cover opera tional risks and mitigation procedures, explained Macynski. The Safety Excellence Award was established in 2002 by Gordon England, who twice served as SECNAV. It is the Department of the Navys premier tribute to commands and programs that promote the safety of Sailors, Marines and civilians, in addition to protecting aircraft, ships and facilities from mis hap. According to Mabus message, HSM72 will receive a plaque, citation and the SECNAVs Safety Excellence flag at a presentation to take place at the command level. Recipients have the right to fly the SECNAV Safety Excellence flag for one year. HSM-72 Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VR) 62 Nomads is conducting mul tiple C-130T airlifts of personnel and material to support joint exercise Talisman Saber 2013 in Rockhampton, Queensland Australia. Talisman Saber 2013 is a bien nial exercise involving U.S. forces and Australian Defence Force (ADF) units to maintain and improve readi ness between the two countries armed forces. The main thrust is to improve interoperability, combined task force operations and combat readiness between the two countries. The exercise runs from July 15 to August 5, and involves training oper ations that include airborne, ground and amphibious assaults. Its designed to enhance collaboration in support of future combined operations, humani tarian emergencies and natural disas ters. Approximately 18,000 U.S. and 9,000 Australian personnel will take part, including ships from the USS George Washington Carrier Strike Group and USS Bonhomme Richard Amphibious Ready Group with the 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit embarked, along with a variety of other U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Army units working alongside their Royal Australian Navy, Royal Australian Air Force and Australian Army counter parts. Exercise locations in Australia include Rockhampton, Enoggera, Amberley, Williamtown, Richmond, the maritime areas of the Coral Sea; and Australian ranges to include Shoalwater Bay Training Area and Townsville Field Training Area. VR-62 will provide airlift through out the exercise, including retrograde, and will surge an additional C-130T Hercules, if needed to handle extra demand. Based at NAS Jacksonville, the VR-62 Nomads are in their regular detach ment rotation in U.S. Pacific Command. The squadron is one of five Navy Reserve C-130T squadrons serving the U.S. Navys high priority logistics needs around the globe. The ADF consists of the Royal Australian Navy, Australian Army and Royal Australian Air Force. The ADF has a strength of more than 80,000 fulltime personnel and active reservists.Nomads build combat readiness in Australia 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 18, 2013

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Culinary specialists from the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf, along with a group of U.S. Naval Sea Cadets and culinary students in the Clara White Mission Culinary Training Program, received some spe cialized training July 8-12 from Executive Chef Michael Riggs, a culinary instructor at Bowling Green Technical College. The training was held as a result of the Flight Line Caf being recognized as the 2013 runner-up in the overall large category for the Capt. Edward F. Ney competition. The weeklong training cov ered safety, sanitation, knife skills, food preparation, dif ferent cooking procedures and presentation of the finished products. Some of the meals included chicken roulade, pork tenderloin with roast potatoes and baked fish. Ive helped train Navy culi nary specialists in the past. Its hard for me to get away from campus but my schedule worked out for this opportuni ty and I enjoy participating in these events, said Riggs. My father was a career Army offi cer so I grew up in the military environment and respect what they do. By coming here, I can bring them the knowledge from 30 years as an educator and chef and maybe show them some new ways from how they nor mally cook. Riggs continued, I know food service is pretty structured in the military and follows spe cific nutritional guidelines but occasionally they may be called on to create a special meal and come up with a different prod uct. He also stressed the impor tance of what he takes back from the experience. Its great to see a different type of operation from a restaurant and the school. While we do volume cooking at times, we dont feed an entire base, three meals a day. Its interesting to see how the Navy runs their food ser vice program and I can take the knowledge back to the classroom to help promote the career paths of the Navy. For those attending the training sessions, it provided some valuable lessons. I learned how to make several new dishes. It was a great learning experience and really expanded my knowledge in the kitchen. Im really grateful for this training, said CS2 Ray Johnson, a baker at the Flight Line Caf. For 25 students in the Clara White Mission Culinary Training Program, the training proved invaluable. This has given our students the chance to see how a professional kitchen operates and to gain another aspect of cooking skills, said Bruce Kinney, chef instructor at the Clara White Mission. The 600-hour culinary train ing program teaches students a broad range of culinary experiences and allows them to secure employment in the industry. Members of the Flight Line Caf often volunteer their time to help out at the mission and with the program. I have always worked behind the scenes in a restaurant as a server and have always wanted to learn to cook. This class is free which really helps because Im a victim of domestic vio lence, have no money and am staying in the shelter. By com pleting this course, I wont have to wait tables anymore and will have a career, said culinary student Donyalle Jackson. Its great to come here today to work in a professional kitch en and learn some new skills. Executive chef offers training at Flight Line Caf JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 18, 2013 11

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CARAT 2013 in IndonesiaDuring their most recent deployment, the Pelicans of VP-45 spread their wings to conduct a notable operational detachment to Indonesia. Operating out of the busy capi tal city of Jakarta, the detachment of 21 Pelicans worked closely with the Indonesian Navy during CARAT (Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training) 2013 from May 22 29. The joint exercise began with an aviation symposium hosted by the Indonesian Navys Western Fleet. Presentations from both Indonesian and U.S. aircrews sparked discussion on safety best practices, as well as the capabilities of U.S. Navy P-3C Orion and various aircraft of the Indonesian Navy including the NC-212 Casa Maritime Patrol Aircraft. The Pelicans next hosted a static display for CARAT 2013 participants, as well as children from Assifa Al Islami Orphanage and SMK Angkasa High School. I really enjoyed how excited the children were about being on the P-3 and seeing women in uniform, said IS2 Darsheen Smith. On May 24, the Pelicans took to the air for a SAREX (Search and Rescue Exercise), cooperating with a shiplaunched Indonesian B-412 helicopter and several U.S. and Indonesian warships. The Pelicans also provided range clearing for a missile firing, followed by participating in a joint ASW exercise. It was exciting to work with the Indonesians and to learn about their country and culture, said AWV2(NAC) Tim Shafer. In addition to its normal crew, sev eral pilots and engineers from the Indonesian Navy flew on the Pelicans P-3C, giving them the unique opportunity to experience first hand the Orions capabilities. This exercise was a great opportu nity to work with our Indonesian counterparts, said Lt. Mike Lehman. The professional relationships that weve developed over this last week will not be forgotten by either side. Although busy conducting flights and aircraft maintenance, the Pelicans also found time to visit the children at the orphanage who, a few days before, came to tour the P-3. The visit was a good reminder to appreciate what we have at home, said AM2(AW) Nicolas Hernandez after the visit. Overall, CARAT 2013 was a great success, in no small part thanks to the hard work of VP-45s maintenance profes sionals and aircrew. Now returned from deployment to Jacksonville, the Pelicans are confident that their interaction will facilitate U.S./ Indonesian ties for years to come. Residents are invited to pro vide feedback on Balfour Beatty Communities (BBC) operations through the 2013 CEL Resident Satisfaction Housing Survey. The annual survey is an important part of the continuous improvement program that analyzes operational performance to ensure BBC consis tently delivers quality housing services. Topics covered in the survey include resident experiences regarding leas ing, housing and maintenance. The CEL Resident Satisfaction Housing Survey allows us to see where we excel operationally and where there is room for improvement, said Diana Heintz, community manager for BBC. We encourage all residents to fill out the survey so that we may better assist them in the future. Surveys will be available at the CEL Splash Event scheduled for July 25, from 6 8 p.m. at the NAS Jax Outdoor Pool. If you are unable to attend the event, stop by Building 960 on Ballard St. to pick up a survey or call the Community Management Office at 904-908-0821 for delivery to your residence. Residents who submit a completed survey by Aug. 31, will be entered in a prize drawing. Residents who submit a survey by Aug. 9, will also qualify for a special Early Bird drawing. At Balfour Beatty Communities, we strive to exceed our residents expec tations and hope that every resident enjoys their experience living with us, added Heintz. Surveys may be returned to the authorized locked mailbox located at the Balfour Beatty Communities Management Office in the postagepaid envelope provided. Survey information is confidential and anonymous and only CEL employees will have access to the returned surveys. VP-45 Pelicans deployment memory Balfour Beatty offers annual housing survey 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 18, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment July 19 Karaoke with Randy July 26 Jason Lamar Duo Deweys Family Night August 2, 4 8 p.m. Enjoy free activities including a magic show, games, back-to-school goodies, inflatables & more.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 -10 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 5 10 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 4 6 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 1 6 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer Going on now through Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 years and younger receive one free game every day until 5 p.m. Win prizes all summer long!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Lap Swim (water park, water slide and concessions are not open) Monday Friday 6 8 a.m. & 6 7 p.m. Recreational Swim (water park, water slide and concessions are open) Monday Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Learn to Swim Program Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1 Private pool parties can be reserved at the fitness center Parties are not available during regular business hours of operation and occur in the evenings when the pool is closed. Parties must be reserved ten days prior to party date, payment due at time of reservation For more information call (904) 5423518 The temporary gym, The Zone, Bldg. 798 is closed. The Base Gym, Building 614, reopens July 22. Dive In Movie at the outdoor pool August 10, 6 10 p.m. Movie begins at 8:30 p.m. Free admission, hot dog, chips and a drink!I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. NFL Jacksonville Jaguars tickets on sale now $70 section 147 Legoland Florida Free ticket for active duty military through Oct. 27 Wet n Wild Orlando $37 adult, $45 adult w/ meal, $40 child w/ meal Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Amelia Island Museum of History $10 family pass, Ghost tour $8 adult, $4 child Florida EcoSafaris in St. Cloud EcoPark $119, Coach safari adult $28, child $25, Zip-line safari $75, Cypress canopy cycle $40 for one hour Gatorland Free admission for active duty and retired military until the end of the year. Family tickets can be purchased at ITT. $19.95 adult, $12.50 child, zip-line $54.25 Blue Man Group Orlando $49 adult, $29 child Monster Truck Jam coming soon! 2013 2014 Artist Series featuring Mama Mia, Memphis, Celtic Thunder, War Horse, Men are From Mars, Women are from Venus, Million Dollar Quartet and The D* Word is a Musical are on sale now!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Jacksonville Beach Trip July 20 at 9 a.m. Kayak Trip July 27 at 9 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees July 23 for active duty July 25 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Furlough Fridays Civilian employees who are furloughed can play 18-holes with cart & green fees for $20 Junior Golf Clinic, Session 3, July 29 Aug. 2. Ages 1117, $110 per child, per sessionMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina July 20, 21, 27 & 28 Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27 Auto Skills Center Call 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE-certified mechanic on siteYouth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available. Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Movie Under the Stars July 19 at 8:30 p.m. Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School August 5 September 16 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 18, 2013 13

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During the busy season of military transfers, adjusting to new communities and registering children for school, more than 2,000 museums across the nation will open their doors, free of charge, to service members and their families as a break from the summer challenges, a Defense Department official said today. From now through Labor Day, Sept. 2, all active duty service members, National Guardsmen and reservists and their families can take advantage of this cultural and educational opportunity in all 50 states. Its an exciting, inspiring, educational and economi cal activity for our families to enjoy this summer, said Navy Cmdr. Leslie Hull-Ryde, a Pentagon spokeswoman. Launching its fourth year in a news conference today at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the 2013 Blue Star Museums Program is a collaboration among the Defense Department, Blue Star Families, the National Endowment for the Arts and the museums to give service members and their families a way to spend time together in their local museums. After long deployments, rigorous training schedules and very long hours, our time with our families is very lim ited and extremely precious to us, Hull-Ryde said. We are so grateful [to have] these programs. This program is an investment in our families. A record number of muse ums are participating this year. The program began in 2010 with free access to about 600 museums, while this years 2,000 is a figure thats still growing, Blue Star Families and NEA officials said. This program is helping us make memories -memories for our families, Hull-Ryde said. But its more than that. It is making a difference not only in the force of today, but in the force of the future.Sailors, families can visit museums free for summer Tuesday August 6 6 9 p.m. Outdoor Pool & Allegheny Softball Field Join our community and help heighten crime and drug awareness, strengthen neighborhood spirit and send a mes14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 18, 2013

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A celebration was held June 27 for the newly-constructed com munity clusters constructed in Desdunes, Mandarin, and Ecole Pont Gaudin Haiti. The new facilities, located within the Artibonite depart ment of Haiti, were built as part of U.S. Southern Commands Humanitarian Assistance Program (HAP) in Haiti. Each cluster consists of a school, clinic, community cen ter, and restroom facilities, said Lt. j.g. Blaine Henning, Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast (NAVFAC Southeast) Resident Officer in Charge of Construction (ROICC), Haiti. The 2,500 square foot com munity center, complete with a large indoor gathering area and an outdoor kitchen for large events, provides a safe and central area for the community to gather. Additionally, the 1,800 square foot clinic provides multiple examination rooms, pharmacy, and on site laboratory for test ing. A key component of the clinic was the construction of a stu dio apartment to allow for the full time on site stay of a physi cian or medical resident in these remote locations of Haiti, said Henning. In her comments during the ceremony at Desdunes, the Haitian Minister of Health Florence Guillaume thanked the U.S. government for the opportunities the newly-con structed clinic and community center will provide to the Haitan government and its people. Army Major Will Hogan, with the U.S. Military Liaison Office, Haiti, stressed that only through close coordination with the Government of Haiti were such complicated projects able to come to fruition to bring a bet ter quality of life to the people of Haiti. During the ceremony, Haitian Minister of Health Florence Guillaume, signed the docu ments officially transferring the community center, health clinic, and restrooms at all three sites from U.S. Southern Command to the government of Haiti. The clinics will be man aged and staffed by members of the Ministry of Health, while the schools will be managed and staffed by members of the Ministry of Education. Participants in the inaugura tion ceremony were Guillaume; U.S. Army Major Will Hogan, Military Liaison Office, U.S. Embassy; Paul Emanual Laurent, Artibonite director of education; Roberde Honore, Artibonite director of health; Wesner Archeluse, mayor of Desdunes. Also in attendance were Henning; Sgt. 1st Class Roland Laforest, U.S. Southern Command HAP manager; and members of the local commu nity. The three projects totaling $5.8 million are part of 62 HAP projects NAVFAC Southeast is administering the design and construction of for U.S. Southern Command on behalf of the government of Haiti and the Haitian people. The $33 million program is being executed, with ROICC Haiti oversight, through 20 contracts at 22 sites and will provide EOCs, DRWs, fire stations, medical clinics, community centers, and schools for the Haitian people. NAVFAC Southeast completes community clusters in Haiti For more information about any of the sports articles, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. Visit the MWR website at www.cnic.navy. mil or www.facebook.com nasjaxmwr. 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 18, 2013

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Psychological fitness keeping your mind fit This month, we encouraged you to take charge of your mental health and reflect on whether yours could be improved. Its easy to forget how impor tant our mental health is to our overall health and wellbeing, and how with very little effort we can maintain it. Everyone faces stresses and demands. Life can take a toll on our mind and body, but if we commit a little time each day to improving our mental health, we will do for our mind what regular physical exercise does for our bodies makes us stronger and more fit. The Real Warriors Campaign article, Psychological Fitness Keeping Your Mind Fit, does a good job of summing up the importance of having a fit mind, not just a fit body. Psychological fitness involves building your mental, emotional and behavioral abilities in order to effectively cope with the unique and changing challenges of military service. In other words, developing a healthier mental state can carry you through tough times. It can also help you be a source of strength for others. By focusing on the following five areas, you can strengthen your psychological fitness: ronment interaction with others With these five areas in mind, there are many ways that you can achieve psychological fitness and help manage stress in your life. The following tips can get you started find ways to incorporate them in your life that work best for you: over and over again, and with summer almost here, its a good time to commit to being more active. That doesnt mean you have to join a gym or run a race. You can simply decide to move around more, take a walk before, after or during the work day, spend time in the garden, rent a bicycle if you dont have one, take a dance or yoga class, and get out on the weekends to enjoy a walk in a park or hike a trail. Research shows there are psychological health ben efits from exercise, such as better sleep, increased energy, reduced symptoms of anxiety and depression. ing you. Avoid letting concerns silently build up inside. Talk to a trained health care pro fessional, commanding offi cer, trusted buddy or chaplain. Also, consider these resources for psychological health care and support. ties that interest you. Seek out people or groups that share your experiences, and make an effort to connect with them. This will help you build and maintain healthy connections with others so that you can reap the benefits of social support. Choose to have a more posi tive outlook on things. While stressful situations may be unavoidable, staying in con trol of your thoughts can help you remain resilient in difficult times. expectations for goals youre trying to attain to avoid set ting yourself up for failure. Celebrate small accomplish ments and reevaluate your goals when necessary. stress. Work on balancing family and work responsibilities to avoid becoming overwhelmed. Learn healthy ways to active ly manage stress exercise, journal or meditate. Explore mobile apps that can help you relax. Earlier this month we asked you through Facebook to share your ideas on how you keep stress in check. Interestingly, many of you are doing things that these tips suggest: yoga and other forms of exercise, spending time with family and friends, prayer and meditation, helping others, practicing your military skills, and participat ing in activities that you enjoy like working on cars or caring for animals. Improving or maintaining your mental health can be easy. Small actions and positive choices can add up to signifi cant gains in overall strength and improved readiness to confront common challenges in military and civilian life. The important thing is to do something . use these tips to manage your way to better mental health.Small steps to improve mental health The U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels, announced the officers selected for the 2014 team July 12. The squadron selected an adminis trative officer and a public affairs officer to join a pre-selected C-130 pilot and a maintenance officer on the 2014 team. Many highly qualified Navy and Marine Corps officers submit applica tions to join the Blue Angels each year. The Blue Angels select finalists to interview at the Blue Angels home base at Naval Air Station Pensacola, Fla., dur ing the week of the Pensacola Beach Air Show. The team makes selections at the conclusion of the interview week. The newly selected 2014 team mem bers include: j.g. Phillip Harper, 33, from Chicago, is currently assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron 195 (VFA-195), at Naval Air Facility Atsugi, Japan. He is a 2011 graduate of Hawaii Pacific University, Honolulu. Amber Lynn Daniel, 32, from Ramona, Calif., is currently assigned to the Navy Office of Diversity and Inclusion, Washington, D.C. She is a 2004 gradu ate of Southern Oregon University, Ashland, Ore. Pre-selected to join the 2014 team were: Cook, 32, of East Bernard, Texas, is currently assigned to Marine Aerial Refueler Transport Squadron 252 (VMGR-252) at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Cherry Point, N.C. He is a 2003 graduate of Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas. Cmdr. Declan Hartney, 43, of Limerick, Ireland, is currently assigned to Naval Special Warfare Support Activity 1 (NSWSA-1) at Naval Amphibious Base (NAB) Coronado, Calif. Expected to return for the 2014 season are F/A-18 demonstration pilots: Clinton Township, Mich. Fort Mitchell, Ky. Hummelstown, Pa. Hemet, Calif. Birmingham, Ala. Charleroi, Penn. Also expected to return for the 2014 season are: Chamberlain, 28, of Bloomington, Ill. Lt. Cmdr. Michael Cheng, 39, of San Francisco. Harrell, 32, of Frederick, Md. and Marine Capt. Mike Van Wyk, 31, of Orland Park, Ill. DeBuse, 39, of Longmont, Colo. 29, of Omaha, Neb. The mission of the Blue Angels is to enhance Navy recruiting and credibly represent Navy and Marine Corps aviation to the United States and its Armed Forces to America and other countries as international ambassadors of good will. Since its inception in 1946 at NAS Jacksonville, the Blue Angels have per formed for more than 484 million fans. Blue Angels announce 2014 team members JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 18, 2013 17

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