Jax air news

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Title:
Jax air news
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Newspaper
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English
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United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 2013
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Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
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United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
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30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

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Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
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Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
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Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
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Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

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University of Florida
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aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
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THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013 DUAL AWAR DS LEARN TO FLY FAST ROPING Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com VAW-120 certifies fleet replacement pilots A training detachment from the Greyhawks of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 120 concluded its field carrier landing practice (FCLP) at Outlying Landing Field (OLF) Whitehouse June 26. The shore-based training from NAS Jacksonville was followed in short order by shipboard training on an underway aircraft carrier in the Atlantic. VAW-120 is the Navys fleet replacement squadron (FRS) for carrier airborne early warning squadrons flying the E-2C Hawkeye and fleet logistics support squadrons flying the C-2A Greyhound aircraft. Lt. Cmdr. Chris Swanson led the detachment of 16 instructor pilots, 18 student pilots and eight landing signal officers (LSO). We detach to NAS Jacksonville about four times a year for routine FCLP training. For students, FCLP represents the approaching completion of their FRS training syllabi, explained Swanson. A major part of the training is ball flying that involves the Improved Fresnel Lens Optical Landing System (IFLOLS) at OLF The island of Iwo To (Iwo Jima) is on many Sailors lists of places to visit if they ever get close enough. For a crew from Fleet Logistic Support Squadron Six Two (VR-62) that opportunity finally came dur ing their recent detachment to Naval Air Facility Atsugi, Japan. The Nomads were tasked with delivering Sailors and cargo to a Navy unit operating on the island and retrieving it a few days later. On June 21, we visited the famous battleground where so many Soldiers, Sailors and Marines made the ultimate sacrifice, said AWFCS Mike Wendelin, one of the loadmas ters on the trip. The trip came and went fast, but it will always be in our memories. We were tasked to move 25 Sailors and 15,000 pounds of cargo. It was three hours from NAF Atsugi via our C-130T Hercules. One of the striking things was how small Iwo To is mostly a flat island, except for Mount Suribachi at the end. While only a few hours south of Atsugi, Iwo To is half a world away from the Nomads home base of NAS Jacksonville, Fla. On June 17, they departed Jacksonville for NAS Whidbey Island, Wash. The next day they flew to Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. The 4.5 hour leg to Alaska was the easy day. Day three was a killer 11-hour and 50-minute flight to NAF Atsugi, Japan, said Wendelin. To pass the time on the long trip, Cmdr. Brad Carr, one of the pilots, worked on his gui tar skills while taking a break from flying. After three days of travel, the Nomads were on the ground in Atsugi, ready to start moving high-priority cargo for U.S. Pacific Command. After transporting a group of Seabees, the Nomads were sent back to Iwo To to pick up the stuff they left there the week before. Mission Commander Lt. Timothy Berryhill, a for mer Marine, wanted to take a closer look at the famous bat tleground. He even arranged transportation to the top of Mount Suribachi. Having the opportunity to visit Iwo Jima is the opportu nity of a lifetime. Im very hum bled and honored to be able to see such a historic site, said Berryhill. The Nomads were transport ing 16,200 pounds of cargo and 11 passengers back to NAF Atsugi, so they had to load the Base leaders from NAS Jacksonville engaged with Sailors June 25-28 to rein force the necessity of all hands to work together to eliminate sexual misconduct within the Navys ranks. The training comes in response to Defense Secretary Chuck Hagels directive for all military services to conduct a Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) standdown prior to July 1. According to the 2012 Department of Defense (DoD) annual report on sexu al assault in the military, the military services received 3,374 reports of sexual assault in FY-12. The reported incidents involved service members as either being the victim or the accused. The command training was held by NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders, Command Master Chief (CMDCM)(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd, Command Chaplain (Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore and Command Judge Advocate General (Lt.) Ingrid Paige. In the majority of sexual assault cases reported, the victims knew the predator in some form or fashion and there is a level of trust between the two, said Sanders. Sanders continued, It is very easy not to be a leader and to not step in and say something when a wrong has occurred. We have avenues to assist you with situations like this. You can do it yourself by talking to the individual and tell them to stop, or go to your chief petty officer. I dont care if you are an E-1 or an E-6, this is where leadership comes in and where we need your help. During the training, the base leaders posed questions regarding SAPR and the Sailors expressed their concerns and opinions. Among topics dis cussed were creating proper command climates and treat ment to all individuals. We all have different beliefs. We all have different systems, points of reference. Its our compass, said Skidmore. We need to learn to listen Pass & ID change of hours The following are the new hours of operation for Pass & ID: Yorktown Gate Building 9/Pass & ID Office hours: Monday Friday from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Commercial Gate/Pass Office: Monday Friday from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. Passes will be issued by the Yorktown gate sentry after hours and weekends. Non-NCAC (RAPID Gate) personnel will only be authorized access during commercial gate hours. NAS Jax holds SAPR standdown VR-62 Nomads visit Iwo Jima during Japan detachment

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 11, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Reactions to a recent column about Fords last year of Little League sur prisingly helped to solidify my points in another recent column (about the changing role of fatherhood and how it affects military dads), which, by the way, also received interesting reactions. For a while, my inbox felt like a vor tex, with readers disagreeing with me one week and then proving my point the next. All of which shows me that the concept of fatherhood, and in particular military fatherhood, is still in flux. Three weeks ago, I wrote that soci etys new expectations of fathers mean that military men who leave their chil dren for months at a time are sacrific ing in new and different ways than did their predecessors military men from the 1970s and earlier who were need ed around the house about as often as fathers in general were. I wrote about my own father, who missed my birth, and how that didnt seem strange because most men mil itary or not were not allowed in the delivery room anyway. Readers said I was complaining about being a military wife. This is what you signed up for and military families always want sympathy were common sentiments. But that column wasnt about me. And it wasnt particularly supportive of the military, either. What I wrote is that as it becomes more commonplace for all fathers to be at every parent-teach er conference, Little League game and school play, men considering a career in the military will have more to consider before they enlist. Its becoming a new hurdle for recruitment and retention. Men who arent fully and physically (a key qualifier) present in their childrens lives are looked upon with the same disdain as working mothers used to be a generation ago. The whole thing has flip-flopped. Women have, for the most part, come to terms with their dual home/work lives, but for men, it is a new concept. Its not enough just to bring home the bacon; a dad has to be there to cook it, eat it and clean up afterward, too. And if you cant do it all, well then, you pretty much stink. (PS: welcome to our world, dads.) This is a new and unbeatable chal lenge for military dads in particular because they have no choice (aside from enlisting in the first place) about wheth er they are home for tonights dinner or the next 365 family dinners. Several generations ago, men enlisted to protect the women and children they love back home. Now they enlist to do the same thing, but people view them as dead beat dads because of it. (Sound familiar moms?) A week after that column was pub lished, I wrote a separate one about my oldest sons last year of Little League and how he did not make the All-Star team. My husband has not been physically present for most of Fords Little League career. He has, however, provided much encouragement and lessons through e-mail and the telephone. In fact, while Dustin was deployed overseas, he watched Ford pitch for the first time through Skype on my iPhone. But you cant play catch through the phone or the computer. I realize that. Everyone knows that. Still, some readers wasted no time reinforcing the point: If Dustin hadnt been away, maybe his son would have made AllStars. (Would we have thought that 20 years ago?) Except, guess who did play catch with Ford. Me! And also his brothers and anyone else in the community who accepted Fords invitation. (One of the boys favorite parts of our Dinner with the Smileys project was when former Maine Gov. John Baldacci played catch with them in the backyard.) So Im not sure the blame can be placed squarely on Dustin. Neither do I think it should, anymore than a working mother should be blamed for a childs poor grades. Ford didnt make All-Stars because he cant hit the ball very far. Maybe thats because his dad wasnt here. Maybe its because his mom was helping him. Maybe its because he hasnt hit his growth spurt. Maybe he hadnt had his Wheaties that morning. But does it really even matter why? These are Fords life circumstances. Everyone has some. After the second column, a read er wrote me and asked, Why does a father join the military and do that to his kids? Im not sure what that is, but my answer is this: a father joins the mili tary today for the same reason fathers always have to protect the ones they love. The only thing that has changed is societys idea of what a father should be, which is moving closer to what a mother always has been expected to be. So shouldnt it have been enough that I was out there playing catch with Ford? Or should I have been folding laundry and making beds instead? Two columns spark reader debates

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Unaccompanied Housing earns prestigious awardsThe staff of NAS Jacksonville Unaccompanied Housing was recognized for their outstanding ser vice to its customers by earning the prestigious CEL and Associates, Inc. A-List Platinum and 2012 Crystal Award July 3. This is the second consecutive year NAS Jax Unaccompanied Housing team has received the Platinum Award and the fourth consecutive year theyve earned the Crystal Award. Each year, the Navy conducts resident satisfaction surveys to monitor the level of customer satisfac tion, a program that is managed and administered by Commander, Navy Installations Command. I attribute these awards to the staff here. I have an excellent staff and they do a great job. Their care, con cern and respect for the residents who live here is what makes this possible. Our motto is dont treat people how they treat you, treat them how you want to be treated. Its all about customer service, said NAS Jax Unaccompanied Housing Manager Beverly Nix. Nix also praised Wayne Jensen of NAS Jax Public Works for overseeing the maintenance of the Unaccompanied Housing buildings. As facilities manager for our buildings, he has the same mindset as our staff that customer service is the top priority. He ensures that all trouble calls are handled efficiently, she added. NAS Jax Unaccompanied Housing boasts 838 rooms at 86 percent capacity. We have 21 people on staff work ing around the clock to ensure all their needs are met. Its all about customer service and I have a superb team which I am extremely thankful for, Nix said. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 11, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 11, 2013 Sharing the runway alongside the P-8A Poseidon, P-3C Orion aircraft and helicopters at NAS Jacksonville are several small Piper and Cessna air craft belonging to the Jax Navy Flying Club (JNFC). These aircraft are used for pilot training, maintaining proficiency and private travel by club members. While JNFC is sponsored by the NAS Jax command ing officer and administered by the NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department, they are a nonprofit, operating self sufficiently through club mem bership, aircraft rentals and their Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) Part 141 flight school. The club is open to all active duty mem bers, reservists, retirees, Department of Defense employees and members of the Civil Air Patrol. We offer flight training from private pilot through airline transport pilot. As a Part 141 school, we are recognized by the VA so eligible students can use their GI Bill to help defray 60 percent of the cost, said JNFC Manager Moe Vazquez. To earn a private pilots license, students must have an FAA medical screening which is recommended before enrolling in any flight program. It is also rec ommended they enroll in six weeks of Private Pilot Ground School or complete an accredited course online. The course is not required to complete the flying portion requirements, however, students must have an endorsement by an accredited institution or flight instructor stating they have sufficient knowledge to pass the FAA private pilot written exam. This written exam must be satisfactorily completed before tak ing the final check ride with an FAA instructor, said Vazquez. Before students are accepted into a flight program, they are interviewed by a JNFC flight instructor to ensure they are up to the challenge. It takes a lot of time and dedication to earn a pilots license. We recommend they complete ground school which is two nights a week for six weeks. Once they finish ground school, we try to schedule flight les sons in the aircraft as least twice a week. Students must complete 40 hours of flight time before testing with an FAA instructor, explained JNFC Chief Flight Instructor John Nayfack, a retired Navy pilot who has trained more than 300 students over the past 20 years. According to Vazquez, students should expect to pay around $8,500 for a private pilots license, although the majority of students in the military use their VA benefits. Depending on which VA training benefits a military student is under, they may be able to utilize it for flight training above the private pilot level. Its definitely a commitment. The pipeline varies for each student based on their schedules but it usu ally takes about four months to obtain their private pilot license, he said. They can continue training to earn their instrument rating certification and go on to become commercial pilots, flight instructors or airline transport pilots. For student, AE3(AW) Daniel Coulter of VP-16 learn ing to fly has always been a dream of his. I grew up in Mississippi and have wanted to fly since I was young. We used to go to Keesler Air Force Base and watch the aircraft there. So when I arrived here and learned about the flying club, I decided to learn to fly, said Coulter, who recently completed his first solo crosscountry flight to visit his family in Leesburg, Fla. My solo flight was quite a rush because it was the first time flying by myself. But I was confident because of the great training Ive gotten at JNFC, added Coulter. Daniel has really progressed quickly through this course. He realized the opportunity he has here and knows the sacrifices involved time and money. After working at his squadron, he comes here to work on his flying curriculum instead of doing other activities. Its a real sacrifice, said Nayfack. Once the student earns their private pilot license and remains a member of the club, they are required to fly once every 90 days. There is no expiration on the license, however, for those under the age of 40, medi cal screenings are required every five years for private pilots and every two years for commercial pilots. JNFC members are encouraged to use the clubs aircraft. We currently have three Cessna aircraft, one Piper Archer and are purchasing a Piper Arrow, said Vazquez. Our members can pick a destination, rent an aircraft and go providing they follow base instruc tions and safety guidelines. The club also takes care of all maintenance on the aircraft. Members meet monthly to discuss finan cial, safety and maintenance issues. They also relay interesting stories about some of their flights, lessons learned and publicly acknowledge students for their accomplishments. There are also two half-day stand downs each spring and fall. I joined the club a few months ago because its a great way to maintain my flight experience and cur rency for my certification. And, because I really love to fly! said Ensign Winston, a student at VP-30. I got my private pilots license about nine years and someday plan to become an airline pilot. Currently JNFC boasts about 130 members. Our members come and go. One great thing about the club is that the membership transfers if another base has a flying club. All they have to do is get a letter of good standing with us and they can go to another club and (with an appro priate checkout) rent their aircraft, said Vazquez. We are always looking for new members and our flight school is one of the best around. So if anyone is interested, they can contact us and well explain what we are all about.For more information on the Jax Navy Flying Club, call 777-8549 or visit their Web site at www.jaxnfc.net Learning to fly with .

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 11, 2013 5 Soaring through the sky like a birdAnother avenue for private pilots is a certification to fly glid er aircraft with the North Florida Soaring Society (NFSS) located at Herlong Field. Currently there are about 75 members, mostly with mili tary back grounds. I became inter-ested in becoming a glider pilot while performing touch-and-goes at Herlong Field as a JNFC pilot. Glider flying captivated me, said Joseph Campisano of Naval Hospital Jax, who earned his private pilots license with JNFC in 1987. Gliding in a sailplane is a unique experience. The glider is towed to a certain altitude by a tow plane and released to soar freely using thermals and piloting skillsto sustain flight. Some flights may last several hours if conditions are in sync. In landing a glider, the pilot must perform a precision landing; the same precision required when landing on the flight deck of a carrier. The only difference is theres no engine to execute a goaround. Anyone interested in learning about glider training, can visit www.nfsoaring.org

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to our moral compass so when we get into situations or see others in situa tions where the red light is flashing, we watch, step in, intervene and inform someone, Skidmore stated. That is what shipmates do. They take care of one another and should be able to trust and protect them. And that comes from who we are as individuals. Among inquiries asked, female Sailors were asked what they could do to prevent their risk of sexual assault. The women responded with several ideas, including being mindful of your surroundings, dressing appropriately, having a plan, knowing your alcohol limits and using the buddy system. The purpose of this training is to inform Sailors, officers or enlisted to address the different issues relating to sexual assaults and harassment, said RP1 (SW/FMF) Gregory Haywood of the NAS Jax Chapel. This training reminds us to keep an open eye on what is going on in the commands and communities. I think this is great training and helps point out certain things people might not know or different things we should be looking for. If a sexual assault case does occur, the training helps prepare us for what steps to take, he stated. I think most sexual assault cases occur because of a lack of a mor als, said NAS Jax Command SAPR ACC(AW/SW) John Jones of NAS Jax Air Operations. I think some times the predators think they are above the law. They think they wont get caught, or they wont be that guy. Even though they attend training, and it brings awareness, once they leave, they forget everything they learned. It has gotten to the point where it is affecting our mission. The mission at hand is to take care of our people, he continued. The training fully reinforced the understanding that sexual assault or harassment is a crime that truly hurts one and affects all and has no place in the United States Navy. Get more information and resources to combat sexual assault at http://www. sapr.navy.mil. SAPR Wing 11 adds another MTOCMobile Tactical Operations Center Nine (MTOC-9) was established June 26 aboard NAS Jacksonville by Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 11, Capt. Eric Wiese. Lt. Jason York was named officer in charge of the rapidly deployable mobile command and control, communications, computers and intelligence (C4I) unit that supports mari time patrol and reconnais sance operators worldwide. York said MTOC-9 consists of four officers and 22 enlist ed personnel. Were already moving forward with our IDRC (Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle) in conjunction with VP-10. Well be working with the VP-10 operations and train ing officers to intertwine our schedules. Commander, Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) announced the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) F414 Engine and Module Team as one of seven category winners to earn a commanders national award during a video teleconference broadcast from Patuxent River, Md., June 27. Rear Adm. CJ Jaynes, commander, Fleet Readiness Centers, read the team accomplishments in Maryland as FRCSE Production Director Holly Martinez presented the award in Florida to Donald Dunlap, the Aircraft Engine Repair Strategic Business Team division director. The F414 engine team earned the 2012 NAVAIR Commanders National Award in the Logistics and Industrial Operations category that recognizes techni cal, business and leadership excellence. Team members recognized for their individual contri butions were Donald Dunlap, Richard Eveson, Richard OCain, Greg Davis, Richard Morris, Kevin Fowler, Benjamin Phipps, Jr., Joseph Donato, Mary Ann Ball and Terry Fenske. Im proud and honored to accept this award on behalf of the F414 Engine/Module Team, said Dunlap. This was the ultimate team effort in support of engine readiness for the Fleet and the warfighter. The people standing here today and the 60-80 men and women back home at the engine building are the ones that made it happen. This award validates their hard work, technical skill, leadership and professionalism. NAVAIR recognized the team for its extraordinary achievement from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 2012, in surging capabilities to provide F414 engine modules to sup port Fleet requirements with a remarkable 53 percent increase in engine module throughput. During this period, the team exceeded all expecta tions in meeting an aggressive production schedule and proved the highest quality delivery of F414 engine modules to Fleet Readiness Center West and other Fleet activities. In his remarks during the award ceremony, Vice Adm. David Dunaway, NAVAIR commander, congratulated all the winners and said the teams recognized in the various categories are standing out in a sea of standout people.FRCSE F414 engine team earns NAVAIR commanders award, improves Fleet support 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 11, 2013

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Mayport EOD fast ropes with DragonslayersExplosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) technicians from EOD Detachment Mayport teamed up with the HS-11 Dragonslayers in mid-June to certify personnel in Helicopter Rope Suspension Techniques (HRST) at the south antenna farm aboard NAS Jacksonville. HRST is a means to insert or extract ground forces by helicopter primarily reconnaissance, special operations and EOD teams from rural terrain, urban areas, or mari time vessels, explained EOD1 Ryan Waller. This afternoon, the Dragonslayers are providing the aerial platform an HH-60H Seahawk from where our EOD team will recertify in rappelling and fast roping. Waller was joined by shipmates EOD1 Zachary Phillips, EOD1 Gabriel Cantu, EOD1 Joel Graves and EODC Jack Hanson. For the first evolution, HS-11 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Ryan Keys flew in the left seat as an observer of one of his junior pilots. The Dragonslayers are using this exercise to cer tify four of our Seahawk pilots in HRST. Were also providing two SARqualified hospital corps men as safety observers, said Ryan. When the ropers clear the egress site, they recover the rope so the Seahawk can land and board more ropers, as well as change out pilots when needed. Part of the pilot qualification is flying a fourminute racetrack holding pat tern. HRST Masters are qualified instructors who teach the methods of rappelling/fast roping typically used for inser tions on board ships, in jungle environments or clearing buildings from the outside in. Waller summarized the exercise as, Approach the egress site, kick a rope out, send some ropers down, recover the rope, fly a racetrack and repeat. When the HRST exercise was underway for about 25 minutes, a malfunctioning electrical generator grounded the HH-60H Seahawk at the antenna farm. They radioed for a troubleshooter from the squadron, but ultimately the Seahawk could not be repaired until the following day and the exercise would be rescheduled. EOD Detachment Mayport consists of a five-person team whose mission is to render safe all types of ordnance, both conventional and unconventional, improvised, chemical, biological, and nuclear to include Improvised Explosive Devices and Weapons of Mass Destruction. September case lot sale cancelled The Defense Commissary Agency is canceling its September case lot sale because of budgetary reductions mandated under sequestration. This announcement follows DeCAs deci sion in February to cancel the May case lot sale. The case lot sale cancellations are part of ongoing steps to reduce oper ating costs wherever possible. Those steps include a hiring freeze, restric tions for official travel, and postpone ment of all Guard and Reserve on-site sales after July 8 until further notice. Commissaries will continue to offer savings on sidewalk sales, truckload events and in-store pro motions. Stores will also continue to offer items in the value-sized, eco nomical club pack format found in off-base club warehouse stores. Customers should check with their local commissary to get information about upcoming sales. Customers can visit commissaries.com, click on the Locations tab on the home page, then Alphabetical Listing, find your local store, and then click on Local Store Information. They can also click on the Shopping tab on the home page to access promotional prices. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 11, 2013

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Whitehouse. IFLOLS is a system consisting of 12 vertical light cells and 10 horizontal datum lights that a pilot can see from about 1.5 nautical miles out, giving them time to make the necessary final adjustments that will ensure their tail hook connects with the arresting gear on board the aircraft carriers flight deck. Assistant Officer in Charge Lt. Alex Glass said, Our LSOs at Whitehouse are focused on one thing accu rate landings without mishaps. Their most important job is grading each touchand-go landing (a bounce) at Whitehouse. After flight ops, each student pilot is debriefed by their LSO. Every day, for 10 days, the students average 32 day and night bounces. The squadrons training goal is to achieve consistent landing accuracy, whether it takes place during day or night operations. The runway at OLF Whitehouse is the same width as an aircraft carrier flight deck. Because the Hawkeyes wingspan is so wide, student pilots must fly the ball for a dead-on centerline landing without drifting to one side or the other. During their detachment to NAS Jacksonville, each student pilot averaged 200 or more bounces at OLF Whitehouse. Glass added that, In the week following FCLP, our student pilots undergo ship-board carrier qualifications where each Hawkeye or Greyhound pilot must accomplish at least 10 daytime traps and six night traps. The FRS mission is to train pilots, naval flight offi cers and maintainers. Upon successful completion of their syllabi, they depart VAW-120 for assignment to one of the Navys operational E-2 or C-2 squadrons based at Naval Station Norfolk, Va. or Naval Base Ventura County at Point Mugu, Calif. According to the Naval Air Systems Command fact sheet, the E-2C Hawkeye provides all-weather air borne early warning, airborne battle management and command and control functions for the carrier strike group and joint force commander. Additional missions include surface surveillance coordination, air interdiction, offensive and defensive counter air control, close air support coordination, time critical strike coordination, search and rescue airborne coordination and communications relay. The C-2A Greyhound, or COD (carrier onboard delivery), provides critical logistics support to carrier strike groups. Its primary mission is the transport of high-priority cargo and passengers between carriers and shore bases. Priority cargo such as jet engines can be transported from shore to ship in a matter of hours. A cargo cage system or transport stand provides restraint for loads during launches and landings. VAW-120 About 50,000 service members will get refunds averaging $100 though some will be far higher after an enforcement action involving auto loans that Consumer Financial Protection Bureau officials announced June 27. The bureau is order ing U.S. Bank and one of its nonbank part ners, Dealers Financial Services, to return about $6.5 million to service members across the country, CFPB Director Richard Cordray told reporters during a con ference call today. Weve determined that the companies devel oped a joint program that engaged in deceptive marketing and lending practices while provid ing subprime auto loans to tens of thousands of active-duty military members, he said. Cordray explained that U.S. Bank and DFS created the Military Installment Loans and Educational Services pro gram, better known as MILES, to sell subprime auto loans to activeduty service members at communities across the country located near mil itary bases. The consumer bureau found that MILES used the military discre tionary allotment sys tem to its advantage. Service members were required to pay by allot ment, which he noted is straight from their pay check before the money hit their personal bank accounts, without dis closing all associated fees and the way the program worked. Specifically, he said, MILES failed to accurate ly disclose the finance charge, annual percent age rate, payment sched ule and total payments for the loans. The examination also found that the MILES program deceived service members by understat ing the cost and scope of certain add-on products, such as a service con tract, marketed and sold in connection with the loans, he said. The action requires return of at least $3.2 mil lion in undisclosed fees and costs, he said, and $3.3 million for the cost of the add-on products. CFPB wont impose civil penalties, he said, in part because of the manner in which U.S. Bank and DFS cooper ated with the bureau to resolve these matters. The action reflects our determination to act to protect service members against harmful prac tices in the consumer financial marketplace. . Everyone at the bureau will continue to stand side by side with our military and veterans, Cordray said. The director said he is pleased that Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel ordered an interagen cy effort to determine whether the allot ment system should be changed to further pro tect service members. Holly Petraeus, CFPBs assistant director for service member affairs, joined Cordray on the call and echoed his senti ments about allotments. The system has been around since long before electronic fund transfers existed, she noted, and has been extremely use ful for troops who need to make regular payments to their creditors, espe cially when deployed or on the move. But allotments have drawbacks, she added. They may include costs for third-party proces sors, as we saw in this case, she said, and they reduce budget flexibil ity, because an allotment comes out before a ser vice member receives his or her pay. Allotments also offer less protection and less transparency than elec tronic bank transfers, she said. Noting Hagels inter agency working group to study allotments, Petraeus said, I hope all of us can work together to try to eliminate the risks to military con sumers that have grown up around the use of the allotment system. According to Kent Markus, the bureaus assistant director for enforcement, service members due refunds dont need to take action. They will receive them either through an account credit or by check. Markus noted the enforcement action also mandates that MILES drop the allotment requirement, and that the institutions involved make no further decep tive statements or omis sions.Bureau orders refunds for troops after faulty car loans JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 11, 2013 9

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aircraft first and then visit the moun tain. Then they would return to their aircraft, load the passengers and fly to Atsugi. AWF3 Daniel Jacobson figured out the puzzle of a balanced load, and we were ready, said Wendelin. Getting things in the right order is a lot of what a loadmaster does. We sent the loading team back to put the pallets in the right order to balance the aircraft for flight. When the aircraft was loaded, we got in the van to drive up the mountain. As we drove to the top, I felt a lump in my throat imagining what it must have been like to be here for the big battle. Marines and Sailors fighting for every blood soaked inch of this small island, said Wendelin. The view from the top of Mount Suribachi is beautiful. We could look down the coast and see where it hap pened. Its peaceful now, with the bat tlefield silent. Our crew was silent, too, as we took it all in. Then we headed to the beach to see what it looked like from that vantage point. Open fields of fire with nowhere to hide, but very peace ful now. After some reflection, it was time to go back to our aircraft. We got the passengers loaded and flew back to Atsugi. But I will never forget my visit to that place, Wendelin concluded. I feel humbled by all those Marines and Sailors who fought here. We have the watch now. May they rest in peace. July 13 7 a.m. 3 p.m. The Zone (Brew house) Bldg. 798MWR will be selling restaurant equipment and supplies such as: reefer, shelving, chairs, pans, VR-62 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 11, 2013 11

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For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil The 2013 Captains Cup Soccer League began in April with 17 teams playing on the new turf field for the first time. One of the factors that the teams faced was playing the regular season without paid officials due to the sequestra tion. Some games were officiat ed by volunteers while other games were officiated by play ers playing in the game. Most teams played at least eight games in the regular season with Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) winning the league with an 8-0 record and VP-8 finishing second with a 7-0 record. Twelve out of the 17 teams made it to the double elimina tion playoffs to determine the base champion. The 22 game playoffs were officiated by paid officials. The top seed in the playoffs was FRCSE who won their first match against the VP-30 Es 3-1. FRCSE was not so fortu nate in their second game of the playoffs when they were handed a 2-1 loss by the Coast Guard Hitron Unit out of Cecil Commerce Center. The VP-30 Os finished the regular season with a 6-5 record and the number seventh seed in the playoffs. The VP-30 Os cruised to the championship game by recording defeats over Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station (10-0); VP-8 (3-2); Navy Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Jacksonville (2-1); and Hitron (2-0). Meanwhile, top seed ed FRCSE fought their way through the losers bracket beating the VP-30 Es again 6-1; NBHC 2-1; and Hitron 3-1 to set up a match with the VP-30 Os for the soccer base champion ship. The VP-30 Os had not lost a match in the playoffs and FRCSE had one loss in the play offs so FRCSE would have to beat the VP-30 Os twice to win the championship. FRCSE took a 1-0 lead at the end of the first half. The VP-30 Os Mattus Paulsen scored a goal to tie the game at one in the second half. The teams battled back and forth until finally the VP-30 Os Matt McCullough scored a goal to put VP-30 up 2-1. The score would stand as neither team could make another goal and the VP-30 Os defeated the top seed FRCSE to win the 2013 Captains Cup Soccer League Base Championship. Naval Branch Health Clinics Trap House 3-on-3 Sand Volleyball Team finished the 2013 Captains Cup 3-on-3 Sand Volleyball League regular season June 25 with a 4-2 record. The league is played at the out door sand volleyball courts located next to the Mulberry Cove Marina. Trap House won their first match of the playoffs, but lost to Naval Hospital Jacksonville in their second match of the playoffs sending them to the losers bracket. Trap House bounced back by win ning their next two matches to set up a second showdown with Naval Hospital Jacksonville in the playoffs. Trap House had their work cut out for them as they would have to win three consecutive best two out of three game matches to win the 2013 Captains Cup 3-on-3 Sand Volleyball Championship. Trap Hose beat Naval Hospital Jacksonville 21-10 and 21-20 to win the match and to get into the championship game against unbeaten Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE). To win the championship, Trap House would have to beat FRCSE four out of six games. In the first match, Trap House won the first two games 21-14 and 21-12 to force a second and final best two out of three game match against FRCSE since both teams had one loss in the double elimination play offs. In the first game of the final match, Trap House defeated FRCSE 21-9. However, FRCSE did not give up and won the second game 21-18 to set up a third and final game for the match and the base championship. The third game of the best out of three game match was to 15 points with a win by two up to a 21 point cap. The match was even for a while as both teams battled back and forth. In the end, Trap House managed to pull away to win the game 15-10 and to win the 2013 Captains Cup 3-on-3 Sand Volleyball Championship. VP-30 Os complete clean sweep in soccer playoffs Naval Branch Health Clinics Trap House wins sand volleyball championship 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 11, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Live Entertainment July 12 Kevin the Human Jukebox July 19 Karaoke with Randy July 26 Jason Lamar Duo Freedom Lanes Bowling Center Call 542-3493. Free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per per son Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 1 6 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer Going on now through Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 years and younger receive one free game of bowling every day until 5 p.m. Win prizes all summer long!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Lap Swim (water park, water slide and concessions are not open) Monday Friday 68 a.m. & 67 p.m. Recreational Swim (water park, water slide and concessions are open) Monday Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. 2013 Learn to Swim Program Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1 Private pool parties can be reserved at the fitness center Parties are not available during regular business hours of oper ation and occur in the evenings when the pool is closed. Parties must be reserved 10 days prior to party date, pay ment due at time of reservation For more information call 5423518 The temporary gym, The Zone, Bldg. 798 closes July 10 The Base Gym, Bldg. 614 will reopen July 22I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Jacksonville Jaguars Tickets on sale July 12 $70 section 147 Legoland Florida Free ticket for active duty military through Oct. 27 Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Amelia Island Museum of History $10 family pass, Ghost tour $8 adult, $4 child Gatorland Free admission for active duty and retired military until the end of the year. Family tickets can be purchased at ITT. $19.95 adult, $12.50 child, zip line $54.25The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Mandarin Mills Putt Putt Trip July 13 at 6 p.m. $5 per person Jacksonville Beach Trip July 20 at 9 a.m. Kayak Trip July 27 at 9 a.m. NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees July 23 for active duty July 11 & 25 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holi days. Furlough Fridays All civilian employees that have been furloughed can play 18-holes with cart & green fee for $20 Junior Golf Clinic Session 2, July 1519, ages 610 Session 3, July 29 Aug. 2, ages 1117 $110 per child, per sessionMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina July 20, 21, 27 & 28 Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recre ation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more infor mation. Movie Under the Stars July 19 at 8:30 p.m. Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Aug. 5 Sept. 16 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 11, 2013 13

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The Summer Splash Pool Party proved highly successful despite inclement weather con ditions June 29. More than 450 patrons enjoyed a day of fun, enter tainment and activities at the outdoor swimming pool cour tesy of the Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department and presenting sponsor Sprint. Patrons received a free hot dog, beverage of their choice, and chips. The Sprint NASCAR simulator allowed guests to experience a simulated race on a NASCAR speedway. One of the highlights of the party was a cardboard boat regatta, where teams competed to build a floatable boat out of cardboard and other materi als,, such as duct tape and pool noodles. The first three teams to finish won tickets to Adventure Landing. Participants also enjoyed karaoke and showcased their singing talents for free ice cream. The weather held out and it was a great time. The music and food were awesome and the event was a great opportu nity for the kids to have some fun, said Suzanne Speight. Ten-year-old Jaden Strange added, My favorite event was the boat regatta competition. It was great working together as a team. Special thanks to the pre senting sponsor Sprint for making this day possible for military families.Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services.Summer Splash Pool Party held for military families 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 11, 2013

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Today and in the next decade, Sailors and civilians will remain the centerpiece of the U.S. Navys warfighting capability. To maintain our warfight ing edge, it is essential that our people be diverse in experience, background and ideas; person ally and professionally ready; and proficient in the operation of their weapons and systems. Diversity is not founded on statistics, percentages, or quo tas. Diversity is about achieving peak performance. Our force will draw upon the widest possible set of tal ents and backgrounds to maxi mize our warfighting capabil ity, adapt to address new threats and challenges, and take advan tage of new opportunities. Naval Hospital Jacksonville staff members share their thoughts on why diversity is important to the U.S. Navy. VP-5 transition spotlightAs VP-5 transitions to the P-8A Poseidon, the squadron is highlighting a transitioning Mad Fox each week. This weeks spotlight shines on YN3 Alan Trahan. Trahan is from Queens, N.Y. and is the youngest of seven children. His father is a retired Air Force tech sergeant who performed air traffic control duties. Trahan previously served an operational tour with Navy Information Operations Command in Fort Meade, Md. before coming to VP-5. As a mem ber of the Mad Foxes Administration Department, Trahan has been very busy during the P-8A tran sition. Each administra tion member has continued the behind-the -scenes work that ensures Mad Fox main tainers and aircrew can focus on their demanding transition syllabus. These duties included routing qualifications, keeping records up to date, rout ing award nominations, and processing gains and losses. The transition has presented many new chal lenges with handling the administration of our people across multiple training syllabi, comment ed Trahan. I would not be able to do my part if it wasnt for the support and motivation provided to me by everyone on our administration team. Along with his primary administration job, Trahan keeps busy as president of VP-5s Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD). The goal of this group is to provide junior enlist ed Sailors under the age of 25 the opportunity and support to participate in low-risk, yet highly enter taining off duty activities. CSADD has already had a bowling and Adventure Landing night and look forward to an upcoming Gas and Glass fundraiser. In his off time, Trahan enjoys playing his guitar, going to church, singing, weight lifting and playing basketball. He is also taking night classes with the American Military University as he works towards a degree in homeland security. VP-5 has been transitioning to the P-8A Poseidon since Jan. 4. Diversity: Promoting readiness 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 11, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 11, 2013 17 Navy Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 101 received the Navys first F-35C Lightning II carrier variant aircraft from Lockheed Martin June 22 at the squadrons home at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. The F-35C is a fifth generation fighter, combining advanced stealth with fight er speed and agility, fully fused sensor information, network-enabled opera tions and advanced sustainment. The F-35C will enhance the flexibili ty, power projection and strike capabili ties of carrier air wings and joint task forces and will complement the capa bilities of the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet, which currently serves as the Navys premier strike fighter. By 2025, the Navys aircraft flying in carrier-based air wings will con sist of a mix of F-35C, F/A-18E/F Super Hornets, EA-18G Growlers electronic attack aircraft, E-2D Hawkeye battle management and control aircraft, Unmanned Carrier Launched Airborne Surveillance and Strike (UCLASS) air vehicles, MH-60R/S helicopters and Carrier Onboard Delivery logistics air craft. VFA-101, based at Eglin Air Force Base, will serve as the F-35C Fleet Replacement Squadron, training both aircrew and maintenance personnel to fly and repair the F-35C. Cmdr. Tom Dailey asked per mission to go ashore for the final time of his naval career at the Officers Club Pavilion at NAS Jacksonville June 28. The ceremony hosted more than 100 people, some of whom had trav eled from across the country and globe, to celebrate Daileys retirement after 33 years of active naval service. Dailey had worked as the executive officer of NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville since June 2011. During his tenure at NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, his hands-on management entailed leading over 900 military, civilian and contractor personnel providing premier regional logistics sup port to 17 sites, 49 fleet units, and two industrial activities in seven states, throughout the Southeastern United States and the Caribbean. A native of Dracut, Mass., and the son of Joseph Dailey Jr., many family members attend the event including his wife and daughters. Donna Dailey was honored and officially retired as a Navy wife, and his daugh ters, Tiffanie and Fiona were recognized for their contribu tions and sacrifices. A former mess manage ment specialist, Daileys enlisted tours included: USS Constellation (CV-64) home ported in San Diego from 198082; USS Midway (CV-41) home ported in Yokosuka, Japan from 1982-84; USS Pegasus (PHM-1) home ported in Key West, Fla., from 1984-87; and Naval Air Forces Atsugi, Japan from 198790. Dailey earned his offi cer commission through the Limited Duty Officer Commissioning Program in August 1990. His officer assign ments include: wardroom/ food service officer on board USS Independence (CV-62), home ported in San Diego and Yokosuka, Japan from 1991-94; officer-in-charge of the Navy Food Management Team in San Diego from 1994-96, (during which he became the first naval officer to become a certified executive chef by the American Culinary Federation); prima ry assistant to the supply offi cer for services on board USS Independence (CV-62), home ported in Yokosuka, Japan from 1996-98; director, indus trial support at the Fleet and Industrial Supply Center, Ship Repair Facility in Yokosuka, Japan from 1998 to 2000; sup ply officer, USS Port Royal (CG-73) home ported in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 200002, rating assignment officer, Navy Personnel Command in Millington, Tenn. from 2002-03; and fleet readiness officer for Commander, Pacific Fleet, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 2003-07. Daileys previous tour before becoming the executive officer at NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville entailed serving as the director of Navy Food Services at the Naval Supply Systems Command in Mechanicsburg, Penn. from May 2007 to June 2011. During this tour, Dailey completed an Individual Augmentee tour as logis tics department head, Base Command Group at Al Asad Airbase, Iraq from October 2008 to May 2009. Dailey plans to continue residing in Jacksonville and open a consulting and market ing business. Commissaries collect items for Feds Feed Families through Aug. 31 Commissaries are again serving as one of the collection points on mili tary installations for the annual Feds Feed Families food drive campaign underway now through Aug. 31. Military customers and federal employees can donate nonperish able food and personal hygiene items to the campaign using marked bins in participating commissaries. Donations help charitable organiza tions such as the local food bank. This year, 180 commissaries in 46 states and Puerto Rico are collecting donations. The most needed items include: canned vegetables low sodium, no salt; canned fruits in light syrup or its own juices; canned proteins tuna, salmon, chicken, peanut butter and beans; soups beef stew, chili, chicken noodle, turkey or rice; condi ments tomato-based sauces, light soy sauce, ketchup, mustard, salad dressing or oils; snacks individually packed snacks, crackers, trail mix, dried fruit, granola and cereal bars, pretzels and sandwich crackers; mul tigrain cereal; 100 percent juice all sizes, including juice boxes; grains brown and white rice, oatmeal, bulgar, quinoa, couscous, pasta, and macaroni and cheese; paper prod ucts and household items paper towels, napkins, cleaning supplies; and hygiene items diapers, deodor ants, feminine products, toilet paper, tissues, soap, toothpaste and sham poo. Flight Line Caf holds vendor dayThe NAS Jax Flight Line Caf held a spe cial vendor day June 27 to allow military patrons the opportunity to sample a vari ety of foods to help determine what new food items they would like to see served during meals. We have 17 different vendors here today introducing new food products to the troops to get their feedback informa tion on their likes and dislikes. Then we will evaluate the products to see about adding them to our inventory. Its like a menu review board where we determine what meals will be served here, said NAS Jax Food Service Officer CWO4 Terresa Cullipher. We are holding this event because we care about our customers and want them to have a say so in what types of meals we are serving them, stated CS1(SW) Marnika Ash, who coordinated the event. We are asking our patrons to sample the items and fill out surveys to rate their favorite foods and ask them how we can improve our service. As military members went through the chow line, they were greeted by vendors promoting their products such as cooked samples, free give-a-ways and beverages. I think its cool they are allowing us to experience other foods, not normally served here and maybe adding it to the wide variety that we already have. Adding more just makes it even better, said AEAN Robert Lucas of the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jax. I came here to have lunch and was sur prised because I didnt know they were having vendor day. But its great because it gives us the opportunity to see what dif ferent foods they have to offer, added PS2 Audrey Hicks of Navy Operational Support Center Jax. Navy receives first F-35C Lightning II Supply Corps officer served with distinction

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THURSDAY, JULY 11, 2013 DUAL AWAR DS LEARN TO FLY FAST ROPING Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com VAW-120 certifies fleet replacement pilots A training detachment from the Greyhawks of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 120 concluded its field carrier landing practice (FCLP) at Outlying Landing Field (OLF) Whitehouse June 26. The shore-based training from NAS Jacksonville was followed in short order by shipboard training on an underway aircraft carrier in the Atlantic. VAW-120 is the Navys fleet replacement squadron (FRS) for carrier airborne early warning squadrons flying the E-2C Hawkeye and fleet logistics support squadrons flying the C-2A Greyhound aircraft. Lt. Cmdr. Chris Swanson led the detachment of 16 instructor pilots, 18 student pilots and eight landing signal officers (LSO). We detach to NAS Jacksonville about four times a year for routine FCLP training. For students, FCLP represents the approaching completion of their FRS training syllabi, explained Swanson. A major part of the training is ball flying that involves the Improved Fresnel Lens Optical Landing System (IFLOLS) at OLF The island of Iwo To (Iwo Jima) is on many Sailors lists of places to visit if they ever get close enough. For a crew from Fleet Logistic Support Squadron Six Two (VR-62) that opportunity finally came dur ing their recent detachment to Naval Air Facility Atsugi, Japan. The Nomads were tasked with delivering Sailors and cargo to a Navy unit operating on the island and retrieving it a few days later. On June 21, we visited the famous battleground where so many Soldiers, Sailors and Marines made the ultimate sacrifice, said AWFCS Mike Wendelin, one of the loadmasters on the trip. The trip came and went fast, but it will always be in our memories. We were tasked to move 25 Sailors and 15,000 pounds of cargo. It was three hours from NAF Atsugi via our C-130T Hercules. One of the striking things was how small Iwo To is mostly a flat island, except for Mount Suribachi at the end. While only a few hours south of Atsugi, Iwo To is half a world away from the Nomads home base of NAS Jacksonville, Fla. On June 17, they departed Jacksonville for NAS Whidbey Island, Wash. The next day they flew to Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. The 4.5 hour leg to Alaska was the easy day. Day three was a killer 11-hour and 50-minute flight to NAF Atsugi, Japan, said Wendelin. To pass the time on the long trip, Cmdr. Brad Carr, one of the pilots, worked on his gui tar skills while taking a break from flying. After three days of travel, the Nomads were on the ground in Atsugi, ready to start moving high-priority cargo for U.S. Pacific Command. After transporting a group of Seabees, the Nomads were sent back to Iwo To to pick up the stuff they left there the week before. Mission Commander Lt. Timothy Berryhill, a for mer Marine, wanted to take a closer look at the famous bat tleground. He even arranged transportation to the top of Mount Suribachi. Having the opportunity to visit Iwo Jima is the opportu nity of a lifetime. Im very humbled and honored to be able to see such a historic site, said Berryhill. The Nomads were transporting 16,200 pounds of cargo and 11 passengers back to NAF Atsugi, so they had to load the Base leaders from NAS Jacksonville engaged with Sailors June 25-28 to rein force the necessity of all hands to work together to eliminate sexual misconduct within the Navys ranks. The training comes in response to Defense Secretary Chuck Hagels directive for all military services to conduct a Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) standdown prior to July 1. According to the 2012 Department of Defense (DoD) annual report on sexu al assault in the military, the military services received 3,374 reports of sexual assault in FY-12. The reported incidents involved service members as either being the victim or the accused. The command training was held by NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders, Command Master Chief (CMDCM)(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd, Command Chaplain (Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore and Command Judge Advocate General (Lt.) Ingrid Paige. In the majority of sexual assault cases reported, the victims knew the predator in some form or fashion and there is a level of trust between the two, said Sanders. Sanders continued, It is very easy not to be a leader and to not step in and say something when a wrong has occurred. We have avenues to assist you with situations like this. You can do it yourself by talking to the individual and tell them to stop, or go to your chief petty officer. I dont care if you are an E-1 or an E-6, this is where leadership comes in and where we need your help. During the training, the base leaders posed questions regarding SAPR and the Sailors expressed their concerns and opinions. Among topics dis cussed were creating proper command climates and treat ment to all individuals. We all have different beliefs. We all have different systems, points of reference. Its our compass, said Skidmore. We need to learn to listen Pass & ID change of hours The following are the new hours of operation for Pass & ID: Yorktown Gate Building 9/Pass & ID Office hours: Monday Friday from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Commercial Gate/Pass Office: Monday Friday from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. Passes will be issued by the Yorktown gate sentry after hours and weekends. Non-NCAC (RAPID Gate) personnel will only be authorized access during commercial gate hours. NAS Jax holds SAPR standdown VR-62 Nomads visit Iwo Jima during Japan detachment

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 11, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Reactions to a recent column about Fords last year of Little League sur prisingly helped to solidify my points in another recent column (about the changing role of fatherhood and how it affects military dads), which, by the way, also received interesting reactions. For a while, my inbox felt like a vor tex, with readers disagreeing with me one week and then proving my point the next. All of which shows me that the concept of fatherhood, and in particular military fatherhood, is still in flux. Three weeks ago, I wrote that soci etys new expectations of fathers mean that military men who leave their children for months at a time are sacrific ing in new and different ways than did their predecessors military men from the 1970s and earlier who were need ed around the house about as often as fathers in general were. I wrote about my own father, who missed my birth, and how that didnt seem strange because most men military or not were not allowed in the delivery room anyway. Readers said I was complaining about being a military wife. This is what you signed up for and military families always want sympathy were common sentiments. But that column wasnt about me. And it wasnt particularly supportive of the military, either. What I wrote is that as it becomes more commonplace for all fathers to be at every parent-teach er conference, Little League game and school play, men considering a career in the military will have more to consider before they enlist. Its becoming a new hurdle for recruitment and retention. Men who arent fully and physically (a key qualifier) present in their childrens lives are looked upon with the same disdain as working mothers used to be a generation ago. The whole thing has flip-flopped. Women have, for the most part, come to terms with their dual home/work lives, but for men, it is a new concept. Its not enough just to bring home the bacon; a dad has to be there to cook it, eat it and clean up afterward, too. And if you cant do it all, well then, you pretty much stink. (PS: welcome to our world, dads.) This is a new and unbeatable chal lenge for military dads in particular because they have no choice (aside from enlisting in the first place) about whether they are home for tonights dinner or the next 365 family dinners. Several generations ago, men enlisted to protect the women and children they love back home. Now they enlist to do the same thing, but people view them as dead beat dads because of it. (Sound familiar moms?) A week after that column was pub lished, I wrote a separate one about my oldest sons last year of Little League and how he did not make the All-Star team. My husband has not been physically present for most of Fords Little League career. He has, however, provided much encouragement and lessons through e-mail and the telephone. In fact, while Dustin was deployed overseas, he watched Ford pitch for the first time through Skype on my iPhone. But you cant play catch through the phone or the computer. I realize that. Everyone knows that. Still, some readers wasted no time reinforcing the point: If Dustin hadnt been away, maybe his son would have made AllStars. (Would we have thought that 20 years ago?) Except, guess who did play catch with Ford. Me! And also his brothers and anyone else in the community who accepted Fords invitation. (One of the boys favorite parts of our Dinner with the Smileys project was when former Maine Gov. John Baldacci played catch with them in the backyard.) So Im not sure the blame can be placed squarely on Dustin. Neither do I think it should, anymore than a working mother should be blamed for a childs poor grades. Ford didnt make All-Stars because he cant hit the ball very far. Maybe thats because his dad wasnt here. Maybe its because his mom was helping him. Maybe its because he hasnt hit his growth spurt. Maybe he hadnt had his Wheaties that morning. But does it really even matter why? These are Fords life circumstances. Everyone has some. After the second column, a read er wrote me and asked, Why does a father join the military and do that to his kids? Im not sure what that is, but my answer is this: a father joins the mili tary today for the same reason fathers always have to protect the ones they love. The only thing that has changed is societys idea of what a father should be, which is moving closer to what a mother always has been expected to be. So shouldnt it have been enough that I was out there playing catch with Ford? Or should I have been folding laundry and making beds instead? Two columns spark reader debates

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Unaccompanied Housing earns prestigious awardsThe staff of NAS Jacksonville Unaccompanied Housing was recognized for their outstanding ser vice to its customers by earning the prestigious CEL and Associates, Inc. A-List Platinum and 2012 Crystal Award July 3. This is the second consecutive year NAS Jax Unaccompanied Housing team has received the Platinum Award and the fourth consecutive year theyve earned the Crystal Award. Each year, the Navy conducts resident satisfaction surveys to monitor the level of customer satisfac tion, a program that is managed and administered by Commander, Navy Installations Command. I attribute these awards to the staff here. I have an excellent staff and they do a great job. Their care, concern and respect for the residents who live here is what makes this possible. Our motto is dont treat people how they treat you, treat them how you want to be treated. Its all about customer service, said NAS Jax Unaccompanied Housing Manager Beverly Nix. Nix also praised Wayne Jensen of NAS Jax Public Works for overseeing the maintenance of the Unaccompanied Housing buildings. As facilities manager for our buildings, he has the same mindset as our staff that customer service is the top priority. He ensures that all trouble calls are handled efficiently, she added. NAS Jax Unaccompanied Housing boasts 838 rooms at 86 percent capacity. We have 21 people on staff work ing around the clock to ensure all their needs are met. Its all about customer service and I have a superb team which I am extremely thankful for, Nix said. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 11, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 11, 2013 Sharing the runway alongside the P-8A Poseidon, P-3C Orion aircraft and helicopters at NAS Jacksonville are several small Piper and Cessna air craft belonging to the Jax Navy Flying Club (JNFC). These aircraft are used for pilot training, maintaining proficiency and private travel by club members. While JNFC is sponsored by the NAS Jax commanding officer and administered by the NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation Department, they are a nonprofit, operating self sufficiently through club mem bership, aircraft rentals and their Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) Part 141 flight school. The club is open to all active duty mem bers, reservists, retirees, Department of Defense employees and members of the Civil Air Patrol. We offer flight training from private pilot through airline transport pilot. As a Part 141 school, we are recognized by the VA so eligible students can use their GI Bill to help defray 60 percent of the cost, said JNFC Manager Moe Vazquez. To earn a private pilots license, students must have an FAA medical screening which is recommended before enrolling in any flight program. It is also rec ommended they enroll in six weeks of Private Pilot Ground School or complete an accredited course online. The course is not required to complete the flying portion requirements, however, students must have an endorsement by an accredited institution or flight instructor stating they have sufficient knowledge to pass the FAA private pilot written exam. This written exam must be satisfactorily completed before tak ing the final check ride with an FAA instructor, said Vazquez. Before students are accepted into a flight program, they are interviewed by a JNFC flight instructor to ensure they are up to the challenge. It takes a lot of time and dedication to earn a pilots license. We recommend they complete ground school which is two nights a week for six weeks. Once they finish ground school, we try to schedule flight les sons in the aircraft as least twice a week. Students must complete 40 hours of flight time before testing with an FAA instructor, explained JNFC Chief Flight Instructor John Nayfack, a retired Navy pilot who has trained more than 300 students over the past 20 years. According to Vazquez, students should expect to pay around $8,500 for a private pilots license, although the majority of students in the military use their VA benefits. Depending on which VA training benefits a military student is under, they may be able to utilize it for flight training above the private pilot level. Its definitely a commitment. The pipeline varies for each student based on their schedules but it usually takes about four months to obtain their private pilot license, he said. They can continue training to earn their instrument rating certification and go on to become commercial pilots, flight instructors or airline transport pilots. For student, AE3(AW) Daniel Coulter of VP-16 learning to fly has always been a dream of his. I grew up in Mississippi and have wanted to fly since I was young. We used to go to Keesler Air Force Base and watch the aircraft there. So when I arrived here and learned about the flying club, I decided to learn to fly, said Coulter, who recently completed his first solo crosscountry flight to visit his family in Leesburg, Fla. My solo flight was quite a rush because it was the first time flying by myself. But I was confident because of the great training Ive gotten at JNFC, added Coulter. Daniel has really progressed quickly through this course. He realized the opportunity he has here and knows the sacrifices involved time and money. After working at his squadron, he comes here to work on his flying curriculum instead of doing other activities. Its a real sacrifice, said Nayfack. Once the student earns their private pilot license and remains a member of the club, they are required to fly once every 90 days. There is no expiration on the license, however, for those under the age of 40, medical screenings are required every five years for private pilots and every two years for commercial pilots. JNFC members are encouraged to use the clubs aircraft. We currently have three Cessna aircraft, one Piper Archer and are purchasing a Piper Arrow, said Vazquez. Our members can pick a destination, rent an aircraft and go providing they follow base instructions and safety guidelines. The club also takes care of all maintenance on the aircraft. Members meet monthly to discuss finan cial, safety and maintenance issues. They also relay interesting stories about some of their flights, lessons learned and publicly acknowledge students for their accomplishments. There are also two half-day stand downs each spring and fall. I joined the club a few months ago because its a great way to maintain my flight experience and cur rency for my certification. And, because I really love to fly! said Ensign Winston, a student at VP-30. I got my private pilots license about nine years and someday plan to become an airline pilot. Currently JNFC boasts about 130 members. Our members come and go. One great thing about the club is that the membership transfers if another base has a flying club. All they have to do is get a letter of good standing with us and they can go to another club and (with an appropriate checkout) rent their aircraft, said Vazquez. We are always looking for new members and our flight school is one of the best around. So if anyone is interested, they can contact us and well explain what we are all about.For more information on the Jax Navy Flying Club, call 777-8549 or visit their Web site at www.jaxnfc.net Learning to fly with .

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 11, 2013 5 Soaring through the sky like a birdAnother avenue for private pilots is a certification to fly glider aircraft with the North Florida Soaring Society (NFSS) located at Herlong Field. Currently there are about 75 members, mostly with mili tary back grounds. I became inter-ested in becoming a glider pilot while performing touch-and-goes at Herlong Field as a JNFC pilot. Glider flying captivated me, said Joseph Campisano of Naval Hospital Jax, who earned his private pilots license with JNFC in 1987. Gliding in a sailplane is a unique experience. The glider is towed to a certain altitude by a tow plane and released to soar freely using thermals and piloting skillsto sustain flight. Some flights may last several hours if conditions are in sync. In landing a glider, the pilot must perform a precision landing; the same precision required when landing on the flight deck of a carrier. The only difference is theres no engine to execute a goaround. Anyone interested in learning about glider training, can visit www.nfsoaring.org

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to our moral compass so when we get into situations or see others in situa tions where the red light is flashing, we watch, step in, intervene and inform someone, Skidmore stated. That is what shipmates do. They take care of one another and should be able to trust and protect them. And that comes from who we are as individuals. Among inquiries asked, female Sailors were asked what they could do to prevent their risk of sexual assault. The women responded with several ideas, including being mindful of your surroundings, dressing appropriately, having a plan, knowing your alcohol limits and using the buddy system. The purpose of this training is to inform Sailors, officers or enlisted to address the different issues relating to sexual assaults and harassment, said RP1 (SW/FMF) Gregory Haywood of the NAS Jax Chapel. This training reminds us to keep an open eye on what is going on in the commands and communities. I think this is great training and helps point out certain things people might not know or different things we should be looking for. If a sexual assault case does occur, the training helps prepare us for what steps to take, he stated. I think most sexual assault cases occur because of a lack of a mor als, said NAS Jax Command SAPR ACC(AW/SW) John Jones of NAS Jax Air Operations. I think some times the predators think they are above the law. They think they wont get caught, or they wont be that guy. Even though they attend training, and it brings awareness, once they leave, they forget everything they learned. It has gotten to the point where it is affecting our mission. The mission at hand is to take care of our people, he continued. The training fully reinforced the understanding that sexual assault or harassment is a crime that truly hurts one and affects all and has no place in the United States Navy. Get more information and resources to combat sexual assault at http://www. sapr.navy.mil. SAPR Wing 11 adds another MTOCMobile Tactical Operations Center Nine (MTOC-9) was established June 26 aboard NAS Jacksonville by Commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 11, Capt. Eric Wiese. Lt. Jason York was named officer in charge of the rapidly deployable mobile command and control, communications, computers and intelligence (C4I) unit that supports mari time patrol and reconnais sance operators worldwide. York said MTOC-9 consists of four officers and 22 enlist ed personnel. Were already moving forward with our IDRC (Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle) in conjunction with VP-10. Well be working with the VP-10 operations and training officers to intertwine our schedules. Commander, Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) announced the Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) F414 Engine and Module Team as one of seven category winners to earn a commanders national award during a video teleconference broadcast from Patuxent River, Md., June 27. Rear Adm. CJ Jaynes, commander, Fleet Readiness Centers, read the team accomplishments in Maryland as FRCSE Production Director Holly Martinez presented the award in Florida to Donald Dunlap, the Aircraft Engine Repair Strategic Business Team division director. The F414 engine team earned the 2012 NAVAIR Commanders National Award in the Logistics and Industrial Operations category that recognizes techni cal, business and leadership excellence. Team members recognized for their individual contributions were Donald Dunlap, Richard Eveson, Richard OCain, Greg Davis, Richard Morris, Kevin Fowler, Benjamin Phipps, Jr., Joseph Donato, Mary Ann Ball and Terry Fenske. Im proud and honored to accept this award on behalf of the F414 Engine/Module Team, said Dunlap. This was the ultimate team effort in support of engine readiness for the Fleet and the warfighter. The people standing here today and the 60-80 men and women back home at the engine building are the ones that made it happen. This award validates their hard work, technical skill, leadership and professionalism. NAVAIR recognized the team for its extraordinary achievement from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 2012, in surging capabilities to provide F414 engine modules to sup port Fleet requirements with a remarkable 53 percent increase in engine module throughput. During this period, the team exceeded all expecta tions in meeting an aggressive production schedule and proved the highest quality delivery of F414 engine modules to Fleet Readiness Center West and other Fleet activities. In his remarks during the award ceremony, Vice Adm. David Dunaway, NAVAIR commander, congratulated all the winners and said the teams recognized in the various categories are standing out in a sea of standout people.FRCSE F414 engine team earns NAVAIR commanders award, improves Fleet support 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 11, 2013

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Mayport EOD fast ropes with DragonslayersExplosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) technicians from EOD Detachment Mayport teamed up with the HS-11 Dragonslayers in mid-June to certify personnel in Helicopter Rope Suspension Techniques (HRST) at the south antenna farm aboard NAS Jacksonville. HRST is a means to insert or extract ground forces by helicopter primarily reconnaissance, special operations and EOD teams from rural terrain, urban areas, or mari time vessels, explained EOD1 Ryan Waller. This afternoon, the Dragonslayers are providing the aerial platform an HH-60H Seahawk from where our EOD team will recertify in rappelling and fast roping. Waller was joined by shipmates EOD1 Zachary Phillips, EOD1 Gabriel Cantu, EOD1 Joel Graves and EODC Jack Hanson. For the first evolution, HS-11 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Ryan Keys flew in the left seat as an observer of one of his junior pilots. The Dragonslayers are using this exercise to certify four of our Seahawk pilots in HRST. Were also providing two SARqualified hospital corps men as safety observers, said Ryan. When the ropers clear the egress site, they recover the rope so the Seahawk can land and board more ropers, as well as change out pilots when needed. Part of the pilot qualification is flying a fourminute racetrack holding pattern. HRST Masters are qualified instructors who teach the methods of rappelling/fast roping typically used for inser tions on board ships, in jungle environments or clearing buildings from the outside in. Waller summarized the exercise as, Approach the egress site, kick a rope out, send some ropers down, recover the rope, fly a racetrack and repeat. When the HRST exercise was underway for about 25 minutes, a malfunctioning electrical generator grounded the HH-60H Seahawk at the antenna farm. They radioed for a troubleshooter from the squadron, but ultimately the Seahawk could not be repaired until the following day and the exercise would be rescheduled. EOD Detachment Mayport consists of a five-person team whose mission is to render safe all types of ordnance, both conventional and unconventional, improvised, chemical, biological, and nuclear to include Improvised Explosive Devices and Weapons of Mass Destruction. September case lot sale cancelled The Defense Commissary Agency is canceling its September case lot sale because of budgetary reductions mandated under sequestration. This announcement follows DeCAs deci sion in February to cancel the May case lot sale. The case lot sale cancellations are part of ongoing steps to reduce operating costs wherever possible. Those steps include a hiring freeze, restric tions for official travel, and postponement of all Guard and Reserve on-site sales after July 8 until further notice. Commissaries will continue to offer savings on sidewalk sales, truckload events and in-store pro motions. Stores will also continue to offer items in the value-sized, eco nomical club pack format found in off-base club warehouse stores. Customers should check with their local commissary to get information about upcoming sales. Customers can visit commissaries.com, click on the Locations tab on the home page, then Alphabetical Listing, find your local store, and then click on Local Store Information. They can also click on the Shopping tab on the home page to access promotional prices. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 11, 2013

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Whitehouse. IFLOLS is a system consisting of 12 vertical light cells and 10 horizontal datum lights that a pilot can see from about 1.5 nautical miles out, giving them time to make the necessary final adjustments that will ensure their tail hook connects with the arresting gear on board the aircraft carriers flight deck. Assistant Officer in Charge Lt. Alex Glass said, Our LSOs at Whitehouse are focused on one thing accurate landings without mishaps. Their most important job is grading each touchand-go landing (a bounce) at Whitehouse. After flight ops, each student pilot is debriefed by their LSO. Every day, for 10 days, the students average 32 day and night bounces. The squadrons training goal is to achieve consistent landing accuracy, whether it takes place during day or night operations. The runway at OLF Whitehouse is the same width as an aircraft carrier flight deck. Because the Hawkeyes wingspan is so wide, student pilots must fly the ball for a dead-on centerline landing without drifting to one side or the other. During their detachment to NAS Jacksonville, each student pilot averaged 200 or more bounces at OLF Whitehouse. Glass added that, In the week following FCLP, our student pilots undergo ship-board carrier qualifications where each Hawkeye or Greyhound pilot must accomplish at least 10 daytime traps and six night traps. The FRS mission is to train pilots, naval flight offi cers and maintainers. Upon successful completion of their syllabi, they depart VAW-120 for assignment to one of the Navys operational E-2 or C-2 squadrons based at Naval Station Norfolk, Va. or Naval Base Ventura County at Point Mugu, Calif. According to the Naval Air Systems Command fact sheet, the E-2C Hawkeye provides all-weather airborne early warning, airborne battle management and command and control functions for the carrier strike group and joint force commander. Additional missions include surface surveillance coordination, air interdiction, offensive and defensive counter air control, close air support coordination, time critical strike coordination, search and rescue airborne coordination and communications relay. The C-2A Greyhound, or COD (carrier onboard delivery), provides critical logistics support to carrier strike groups. Its primary mission is the transport of high-priority cargo and passengers between carriers and shore bases. Priority cargo such as jet engines can be transported from shore to ship in a matter of hours. A cargo cage system or transport stand provides restraint for loads during launches and landings. VAW-120 About 50,000 service members will get refunds averaging $100 though some will be far higher after an enforcement action involving auto loans that Consumer Financial Protection Bureau officials announced June 27. The bureau is order ing U.S. Bank and one of its nonbank part ners, Dealers Financial Services, to return about $6.5 million to service members across the country, CFPB Director Richard Cordray told reporters during a con ference call today. Weve determined that the companies devel oped a joint program that engaged in deceptive marketing and lending practices while provid ing subprime auto loans to tens of thousands of active-duty military members, he said. Cordray explained that U.S. Bank and DFS created the Military Installment Loans and Educational Services program, better known as MILES, to sell subprime auto loans to activeduty service members at communities across the country located near military bases. The consumer bureau found that MILES used the military discre tionary allotment sys tem to its advantage. Service members were required to pay by allot ment, which he noted is straight from their pay check before the money hit their personal bank accounts, without dis closing all associated fees and the way the program worked. Specifically, he said, MILES failed to accurately disclose the finance charge, annual percent age rate, payment schedule and total payments for the loans. The examination also found that the MILES program deceived service members by understat ing the cost and scope of certain add-on products, such as a service con tract, marketed and sold in connection with the loans, he said. The action requires return of at least $3.2 million in undisclosed fees and costs, he said, and $3.3 million for the cost of the add-on products. CFPB wont impose civil penalties, he said, in part because of the manner in which U.S. Bank and DFS cooper ated with the bureau to resolve these matters. The action reflects our determination to act to protect service members against harmful prac tices in the consumer financial marketplace. . Everyone at the bureau will continue to stand side by side with our military and veterans, Cordray said. The director said he is pleased that Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel ordered an interagen cy effort to determine whether the allot ment system should be changed to further pro tect service members. Holly Petraeus, CFPBs assistant director for service member affairs, joined Cordray on the call and echoed his sentiments about allotments. The system has been around since long before electronic fund transfers existed, she noted, and has been extremely use ful for troops who need to make regular payments to their creditors, espe cially when deployed or on the move. But allotments have drawbacks, she added. They may include costs for third-party proces sors, as we saw in this case, she said, and they reduce budget flexibil ity, because an allotment comes out before a ser vice member receives his or her pay. Allotments also offer less protection and less transparency than elec tronic bank transfers, she said. Noting Hagels inter agency working group to study allotments, Petraeus said, I hope all of us can work together to try to eliminate the risks to military con sumers that have grown up around the use of the allotment system. According to Kent Markus, the bureaus assistant director for enforcement, service members due refunds dont need to take action. They will receive them either through an account credit or by check. Markus noted the enforcement action also mandates that MILES drop the allotment requirement, and that the institutions involved make no further decep tive statements or omis sions.Bureau orders refunds for troops after faulty car loans JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 11, 2013 9

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aircraft first and then visit the moun tain. Then they would return to their aircraft, load the passengers and fly to Atsugi. AWF3 Daniel Jacobson figured out the puzzle of a balanced load, and we were ready, said Wendelin. Getting things in the right order is a lot of what a loadmaster does. We sent the loading team back to put the pallets in the right order to balance the aircraft for flight. When the aircraft was loaded, we got in the van to drive up the mountain. As we drove to the top, I felt a lump in my throat imagining what it must have been like to be here for the big battle. Marines and Sailors fighting for every blood soaked inch of this small island, said Wendelin. The view from the top of Mount Suribachi is beautiful. We could look down the coast and see where it hap pened. Its peaceful now, with the bat tlefield silent. Our crew was silent, too, as we took it all in. Then we headed to the beach to see what it looked like from that vantage point. Open fields of fire with nowhere to hide, but very peace ful now. After some reflection, it was time to go back to our aircraft. We got the passengers loaded and flew back to Atsugi. But I will never forget my visit to that place, Wendelin concluded. I feel humbled by all those Marines and Sailors who fought here. We have the watch now. May they rest in peace. July 13 7 a.m. 3 p.m. The Zone (Brew house) Bldg. 798MWR will be selling restaurant equipment and supplies such as: reefer, shelving, chairs, pans, VR-62 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 11, 2013 11

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For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil The 2013 Captains Cup Soccer League began in April with 17 teams playing on the new turf field for the first time. One of the factors that the teams faced was playing the regular season without paid officials due to the sequestra tion. Some games were officiat ed by volunteers while other games were officiated by play ers playing in the game. Most teams played at least eight games in the regular season with Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) winning the league with an 8-0 record and VP-8 finishing second with a 7-0 record. Twelve out of the 17 teams made it to the double elimination playoffs to determine the base champion. The 22 game playoffs were officiated by paid officials. The top seed in the playoffs was FRCSE who won their first match against the VP-30 Es 3-1. FRCSE was not so fortu nate in their second game of the playoffs when they were handed a 2-1 loss by the Coast Guard Hitron Unit out of Cecil Commerce Center. The VP-30 Os finished the regular season with a 6-5 record and the number seventh seed in the playoffs. The VP-30 Os cruised to the championship game by recording defeats over Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station (10-0); VP-8 (3-2); Navy Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Jacksonville (2-1); and Hitron (2-0). Meanwhile, top seed ed FRCSE fought their way through the losers bracket beating the VP-30 Es again 6-1; NBHC 2-1; and Hitron 3-1 to set up a match with the VP-30 Os for the soccer base champion ship. The VP-30 Os had not lost a match in the playoffs and FRCSE had one loss in the playoffs so FRCSE would have to beat the VP-30 Os twice to win the championship. FRCSE took a 1-0 lead at the end of the first half. The VP-30 Os Mattus Paulsen scored a goal to tie the game at one in the second half. The teams battled back and forth until finally the VP-30 Os Matt McCullough scored a goal to put VP-30 up 2-1. The score would stand as neither team could make another goal and the VP-30 Os defeated the top seed FRCSE to win the 2013 Captains Cup Soccer League Base Championship. Naval Branch Health Clinics Trap House 3-on-3 Sand Volleyball Team finished the 2013 Captains Cup 3-on-3 Sand Volleyball League regular season June 25 with a 4-2 record. The league is played at the out door sand volleyball courts located next to the Mulberry Cove Marina. Trap House won their first match of the playoffs, but lost to Naval Hospital Jacksonville in their second match of the playoffs sending them to the losers bracket. Trap House bounced back by win ning their next two matches to set up a second showdown with Naval Hospital Jacksonville in the playoffs. Trap House had their work cut out for them as they would have to win three consecutive best two out of three game matches to win the 2013 Captains Cup 3-on-3 Sand Volleyball Championship. Trap Hose beat Naval Hospital Jacksonville 21-10 and 21-20 to win the match and to get into the championship game against unbeaten Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE). To win the championship, Trap House would have to beat FRCSE four out of six games. In the first match, Trap House won the first two games 21-14 and 21-12 to force a second and final best two out of three game match against FRCSE since both teams had one loss in the double elimination playoffs. In the first game of the final match, Trap House defeated FRCSE 21-9. However, FRCSE did not give up and won the second game 21-18 to set up a third and final game for the match and the base championship. The third game of the best out of three game match was to 15 points with a win by two up to a 21 point cap. The match was even for a while as both teams battled back and forth. In the end, Trap House managed to pull away to win the game 15-10 and to win the 2013 Captains Cup 3-on-3 Sand Volleyball Championship. VP-30 Os complete clean sweep in soccer playoffs Naval Branch Health Clinics Trap House wins sand volleyball championship 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 11, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Live Entertainment July 12 Kevin the Human Jukebox July 19 Karaoke with Randy July 26 Jason Lamar Duo Freedom Lanes Bowling Center Call 542-3493. Free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 1 6 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer Going on now through Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 years and younger receive one free game of bowling every day until 5 p.m. Win prizes all summer long!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Lap Swim (water park, water slide and concessions are not open) Monday Friday 68 a.m. & 67 p.m. Recreational Swim (water park, water slide and concessions are open) Monday Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. 2013 Learn to Swim Program Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1 Private pool parties can be reserved at the fitness center Parties are not available during regular business hours of operation and occur in the evenings when the pool is closed. Parties must be reserved 10 days prior to party date, payment due at time of reservation For more information call 5423518 The temporary gym, The Zone, Bldg. 798 closes July 10 The Base Gym, Bldg. 614 will reopen July 22I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Jacksonville Jaguars Tickets on sale July 12 $70 section 147 Legoland Florida Free ticket for active duty military through Oct. 27 Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 MOSH $7 $12 Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Amelia Island Museum of History $10 family pass, Ghost tour $8 adult, $4 child Gatorland Free admission for active duty and retired military until the end of the year. Family tickets can be purchased at ITT. $19.95 adult, $12.50 child, zip line $54.25The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Mandarin Mills Putt Putt Trip July 13 at 6 p.m. $5 per person Jacksonville Beach Trip July 20 at 9 a.m. Kayak Trip July 27 at 9 a.m. NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees July 23 for active duty July 11 & 25 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Furlough Fridays All civilian employees that have been furloughed can play 18-holes with cart & green fee for $20 Junior Golf Clinic Session 2, July 1519, ages 610 Session 3, July 29 Aug. 2, ages 1117 $110 per child, per sessionMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina July 20, 21, 27 & 28 Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Movie Under the Stars July 19 at 8:30 p.m. Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Aug. 5 Sept. 16 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 11, 2013 13

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The Summer Splash Pool Party proved highly successful despite inclement weather conditions June 29. More than 450 patrons enjoyed a day of fun, enter tainment and activities at the outdoor swimming pool cour tesy of the Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department and presenting sponsor Sprint. Patrons received a free hot dog, beverage of their choice, and chips. The Sprint NASCAR simulator allowed guests to experience a simulated race on a NASCAR speedway. One of the highlights of the party was a cardboard boat regatta, where teams competed to build a floatable boat out of cardboard and other materi als,, such as duct tape and pool noodles. The first three teams to finish won tickets to Adventure Landing. Participants also enjoyed karaoke and showcased their singing talents for free ice cream. The weather held out and it was a great time. The music and food were awesome and the event was a great opportunity for the kids to have some fun, said Suzanne Speight. Ten-year-old Jaden Strange added, My favorite event was the boat regatta competition. It was great working together as a team. Special thanks to the pre senting sponsor Sprint for making this day possible for military families.Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services.Summer Splash Pool Party held for military families 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 11, 2013

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Today and in the next decade, Sailors and civilians will remain the centerpiece of the U.S. Navys warfighting capability. To maintain our warfight ing edge, it is essential that our people be diverse in experience, background and ideas; personally and professionally ready; and proficient in the operation of their weapons and systems. Diversity is not founded on statistics, percentages, or quo tas. Diversity is about achieving peak performance. Our force will draw upon the widest possible set of tal ents and backgrounds to maxi mize our warfighting capabil ity, adapt to address new threats and challenges, and take advantage of new opportunities. Naval Hospital Jacksonville staff members share their thoughts on why diversity is important to the U.S. Navy. VP-5 transition spotlightAs VP-5 transitions to the P-8A Poseidon, the squadron is highlighting a transitioning Mad Fox each week. This weeks spotlight shines on YN3 Alan Trahan. Trahan is from Queens, N.Y. and is the youngest of seven children. His father is a retired Air Force tech sergeant who performed air traffic control duties. Trahan previously served an operational tour with Navy Information Operations Command in Fort Meade, Md. before coming to VP-5. As a mem ber of the Mad Foxes Administration Department, Trahan has been very busy during the P-8A tran sition. Each administra tion member has continued the behind-the -scenes work that ensures Mad Fox maintainers and aircrew can focus on their demanding transition syllabus. These duties included routing qualifications, keeping records up to date, rout ing award nominations, and processing gains and losses. The transition has presented many new chal lenges with handling the administration of our people across multiple training syllabi, comment ed Trahan. I would not be able to do my part if it wasnt for the support and motivation provided to me by everyone on our administration team. Along with his primary administration job, Trahan keeps busy as president of VP-5s Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD). The goal of this group is to provide junior enlisted Sailors under the age of 25 the opportunity and support to participate in low-risk, yet highly entertaining off duty activities. CSADD has already had a bowling and Adventure Landing night and look forward to an upcoming Gas and Glass fundraiser. In his off time, Trahan enjoys playing his guitar, going to church, singing, weight lifting and playing basketball. He is also taking night classes with the American Military University as he works towards a degree in homeland security. VP-5 has been transitioning to the P-8A Poseidon since Jan. 4. Diversity: Promoting readiness 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 11, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, July 11, 2013 17 Navy Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 101 received the Navys first F-35C Lightning II carrier variant aircraft from Lockheed Martin June 22 at the squadrons home at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. The F-35C is a fifth generation fighter, combining advanced stealth with fighter speed and agility, fully fused sensor information, network-enabled opera tions and advanced sustainment. The F-35C will enhance the flexibility, power projection and strike capabilities of carrier air wings and joint task forces and will complement the capa bilities of the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet, which currently serves as the Navys premier strike fighter. By 2025, the Navys aircraft flying in carrier-based air wings will con sist of a mix of F-35C, F/A-18E/F Super Hornets, EA-18G Growlers electronic attack aircraft, E-2D Hawkeye battle management and control aircraft, Unmanned Carrier Launched Airborne Surveillance and Strike (UCLASS) air vehicles, MH-60R/S helicopters and Carrier Onboard Delivery logistics air craft. VFA-101, based at Eglin Air Force Base, will serve as the F-35C Fleet Replacement Squadron, training both aircrew and maintenance personnel to fly and repair the F-35C. Cmdr. Tom Dailey asked per mission to go ashore for the final time of his naval career at the Officers Club Pavilion at NAS Jacksonville June 28. The ceremony hosted more than 100 people, some of whom had traveled from across the country and globe, to celebrate Daileys retirement after 33 years of active naval service. Dailey had worked as the executive officer of NAVSUP Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville since June 2011. During his tenure at NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, his hands-on management entailed leading over 900 military, civilian and contractor personnel providing premier regional logistics sup port to 17 sites, 49 fleet units, and two industrial activities in seven states, throughout the Southeastern United States and the Caribbean. A native of Dracut, Mass., and the son of Joseph Dailey Jr., many family members attend the event including his wife and daughters. Donna Dailey was honored and officially retired as a Navy wife, and his daughters, Tiffanie and Fiona were recognized for their contribu tions and sacrifices. A former mess manage ment specialist, Daileys enlisted tours included: USS Constellation (CV-64) home ported in San Diego from 198082; USS Midway (CV-41) home ported in Yokosuka, Japan from 1982-84; USS Pegasus (PHM-1) home ported in Key West, Fla., from 1984-87; and Naval Air Forces Atsugi, Japan from 198790. Dailey earned his offi cer commission through the Limited Duty Officer Commissioning Program in August 1990. His officer assignments include: wardroom/ food service officer on board USS Independence (CV-62), home ported in San Diego and Yokosuka, Japan from 1991-94; officer-in-charge of the Navy Food Management Team in San Diego from 1994-96, (during which he became the first naval officer to become a certified executive chef by the American Culinary Federation); prima ry assistant to the supply offi cer for services on board USS Independence (CV-62), home ported in Yokosuka, Japan from 1996-98; director, indus trial support at the Fleet and Industrial Supply Center, Ship Repair Facility in Yokosuka, Japan from 1998 to 2000; sup ply officer, USS Port Royal (CG-73) home ported in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 200002, rating assignment officer, Navy Personnel Command in Millington, Tenn. from 2002-03; and fleet readiness officer for Commander, Pacific Fleet, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from 2003-07. Daileys previous tour before becoming the executive officer at NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville entailed serving as the director of Navy Food Services at the Naval Supply Systems Command in Mechanicsburg, Penn. from May 2007 to June 2011. During this tour, Dailey completed an Individual Augmentee tour as logis tics department head, Base Command Group at Al Asad Airbase, Iraq from October 2008 to May 2009. Dailey plans to continue residing in Jacksonville and open a consulting and market ing business. Commissaries collect items for Feds Feed Families through Aug. 31 Commissaries are again serving as one of the collection points on mili tary installations for the annual Feds Feed Families food drive campaign underway now through Aug. 31. Military customers and federal employees can donate nonperish able food and personal hygiene items to the campaign using marked bins in participating commissaries. Donations help charitable organiza tions such as the local food bank. This year, 180 commissaries in 46 states and Puerto Rico are collecting donations. The most needed items include: canned vegetables low sodium, no salt; canned fruits in light syrup or its own juices; canned proteins tuna, salmon, chicken, peanut butter and beans; soups beef stew, chili, chicken noodle, turkey or rice; condiments tomato-based sauces, light soy sauce, ketchup, mustard, salad dressing or oils; snacks individually packed snacks, crackers, trail mix, dried fruit, granola and cereal bars, pretzels and sandwich crackers; multigrain cereal; 100 percent juice all sizes, including juice boxes; grains brown and white rice, oatmeal, bulgar, quinoa, couscous, pasta, and macaroni and cheese; paper prod ucts and household items paper towels, napkins, cleaning supplies; and hygiene items diapers, deodorants, feminine products, toilet paper, tissues, soap, toothpaste and sham poo. Flight Line Caf holds vendor dayThe NAS Jax Flight Line Caf held a special vendor day June 27 to allow military patrons the opportunity to sample a vari ety of foods to help determine what new food items they would like to see served during meals. We have 17 different vendors here today introducing new food products to the troops to get their feedback informa tion on their likes and dislikes. Then we will evaluate the products to see about adding them to our inventory. Its like a menu review board where we determine what meals will be served here, said NAS Jax Food Service Officer CWO4 Terresa Cullipher. We are holding this event because we care about our customers and want them to have a say so in what types of meals we are serving them, stated CS1(SW) Marnika Ash, who coordinated the event. We are asking our patrons to sample the items and fill out surveys to rate their favorite foods and ask them how we can improve our service. As military members went through the chow line, they were greeted by vendors promoting their products such as cooked samples, free give-a-ways and beverages. I think its cool they are allowing us to experience other foods, not normally served here and maybe adding it to the wide variety that we already have. Adding more just makes it even better, said AEAN Robert Lucas of the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jax. I came here to have lunch and was surprised because I didnt know they were having vendor day. But its great because it gives us the opportunity to see what different foods they have to offer, added PS2 Audrey Hicks of Navy Operational Support Center Jax. Navy receives first F-35C Lightning II Supply Corps officer served with distinction

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