<%BANNER%>

Jax air news ( May 30, 2013 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA SLAF
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012

Material Information

Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 30, 2013
Publication Date: 06-27-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02048

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012

Material Information

Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 30, 2013
Publication Date: 06-27-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02048


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 2013 MOSQUITOES HELPING OUT MWR CLOSUR ES Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com An Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) inspection team recently recertified the NAS Jacksonville safety program for continuing Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Star status during a recent command evaluation. The station was originally Star certified in April 2010, with the requirement to be recerti fied within three years. With this inspection, the station is certified though 2018 as long as mishap rates stay below established levels, said NAS Jacksonville Safety Manager Ron Williamson. The inspection involved a review of all OSHA requirements; a physical inspection of work places and interviews with randomly selected employees. There were very few and only mini mal safety deficiencies found in the work spaces; employees interviewed knew the safety program fundamentals; and all OSHA regulatory require ments reviewed had necessary documentation. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders applauded the VPP Star team. Unlike many base inspections, VPP Star involves all personnel. Anyone could be ran domly interviewed and any shop could be inspected. Only a few minor deficiencies were found, and everyone interviewed was very posi tive and knowledgeable about their personal safety which is one reason why we remain the best shore base in the U.S. Navy. He continued, We also completed this inspection in the face of sequestration cuts, funding reductions and with impending fur lough days on the horizon. Passing an OSHA VPP Star inspection is difficult enough under normal circumstances but to complete this with as few findings as the base had and under the present difficult circumstances is remarkable. This was truly a total NAS Jacksonville team effort, said Williamson. This certification shows we have done every thing possible to keep civilians and Sailors at NAS Jacksonville as safe as possible. Thanks again to everyone involved for keeping NAS Jax one of the few bases in the Navy with a VPP Star certified Star safety program. On June 9, VR-58 Detachment 5 departed for the Western Pacific area of responsibility initiating what will be an entire summers worth of C-40A Clipper logistical support to the fleet. The Clipper is a Boeing 737 that can be configured to carry passengers, cargo or a combination thereof, making it an ideal asset for use in the worlds largest theater. VR-58 Sunseekers Commanding Officer Cmdr. Rich Shettler asserts that its the hard work and ingenuity of the squadrons Sailors that make it all work. The greatest advantage of using VR squadrons for logistical support is the flexibility they provide by being able to react at a moments notice and execute missions virtually anywhere in the world. The C-40A is well suit Commander, Naval Air Forces Reserve visited the four Navy Reserve squadrons at NAS Jacksonville and NS Mayport recently. Rear Adm. Doug Asbjornsen held a series of meetings with senior leader ship as well as question and answer sessions with many of his Reservists and active-duty Sailors during a three-day tour of VR-58, VR-62 and VP-62 aboard NAS Jacksonville and HSL-60 at NS Mayport. He addressed topics ranging from the future of Reserve aviation, and Reserve manning, to liberty policies in the western Pacific. Cross-assignment of Reservists is a major issue for squadrons that have members in other states. These mem bers are actually assigned to two units one where they live and one where their actual billet is. Cross-assignment is an issue and we know it is an issue, Asbjornsen said. As people come off active duty, they have skills that we need to keep in the Navy because we are going to need those skills someday. Not every one chooses to live in a fleet concen tration area. That is why we have Navy Operational Support Centers in all 50 states. He said that senior leadership includ ing Chief of Naval Reserve, Vice Adm. Robin Braun, is working to make the process smoother so that those Sailors can continue to participate in the Navy Reserve no matter where they live. Asbjornsen talked about the rele vance of anti-submarine warfare (ASW) in the 21st Century, with many nations and non-state actors rapidly expanding their submarine fleets, ASW is receiv ing an emphasis not seen since the Cold War ended more than 20 years ago. As the P-8A Poseidon becomes the Navys primary ASW airplane, Reserve squadrons, flying the P-3C Orion will deploy overseas to fill in for active-duty squadrons that are receiving and train Comic recounts personal story, promotes sound decision makingComedian Bernie McGrenahan offered a special performance for NAS Jacksonville Sailors June 18 to deter alcohol abuse, sexual assault and sui cide by sharing his testimony of his own personal learning experiences. Sponsored by U.S. Fleet Forces Command, McGrenahan travels the world entertaining the Armed Forces and using comedy to push across his message that touches on sensitive issues military members face today, including alcohol abuse, suicide and sexual assault. I use comedy as a bridge to the seri ous topic, said McGrenahan. I hope that through the laughter they will establish a little bit of a relationship with me. And then they will allow me to be serious so I can tell them about my life and where I came from. What I did, where it took me, what I lost and what it took to build me back up to get resilient and focused again, he added. The comedian opened with a 30-minute comedy routine before dis cussing some of the more troubling experiences that affected him during his early life. According to McGrenahan, he start ed drinking when he was in eighth grade and by the age of 18 he had a fake ID which he used to enter bars and meet girls with his friends. He implied that he never had a drinking OSHA recertifies station for Star status VR-58 Sunseekers depart for WESTPAC detachment Reserve air boss visits Jacksonville squadrons 4TH OF JULY

PAGE 2

2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013 June 27 1813 Frigate USS President anchors in Bergen, Norway. 1950 To support U.N. call to assist South Korea, President Truman autho rizes U.S. naval and air operations south of 38th parallel in Korea. June 28 1794 Joshua Humphreys appointed master builder to build Navy ships at an annual salary of $2,000. 1814 USS Wasp captures HMS Reindeer. 1865 CSS Shenandoah captures 11 American whalers in one day. 1970 USS James Madison (SSBN-627) completes conversion to Poseidon mis sile capability. June 29 1950 President Truman authorizes sea blockade of the Korean coast. 1950 Light cruiser USS Juneau (CL119) fires first naval shore bombard ment of Korean Conflict. June 30 1815 USS Peacock takes HMS Nautilus, last action of the War of 1812. 1943 Third Fleet Amphibious Force lands troops on Rendova Island while naval gunfire silences Japanese artil lery. July 1 1800 First convoy duty; USS Essex escorts convoy of merchant ships from East Indies to U.S. 1801 U.S. squadron under Commodore Dale enters Mediterranean to strike Barbary Pirates. 1850 Naval School at Annapolis renamed Naval Academy. 1851 Naval Academy adopts fouryear course of study. 1911 Trial of first Navy aircraft, Curtiss A-1. The designer, Glenn Curtiss, makes first flight in Navys first aircraft, A-1, at Lake Keuka, N.Y. Followed by Lt. Theodore G. Ellyson, the first naval aviator, for his two solo flights in A-1. 1914 Prohibition of alcohol begins in the Navy. 1916 Establishment of informal school for officers assigned to subma rines at New London, Conn. 1918 USSCovington hit without warning by two torpedoes from German Submarine U-86, sinking the next day. 1933 USS Constitution commences tour of principal U.S. seaports. 1946 First of two detonations in Operation Crossroads nuclear test. 1972 Date of rank of Rear Adm. Samuel Lee Gravely, Jr., who was first U.S. Navy admiral of African-American descent. July 2 1923 Commissioning of Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 1926 Distinguished Flying Cross authorized by Congress. 1937 Amelia Earhart disappears in Pacific. Navy conducts extensive unsuccessful search. 1945 USS Barb (SS-220) bombards Japanese installations on Kaihyo Island, Japan; first successful use of rockets against shore positions. 1946 Establishment of VX-3 to eval uate adaptability of helicopters to naval purposes. 1950 USS Juneau and two British ships sink five attacking North Korean torpedo boats and gunboats. 1967 During Operation Bear Claw, 7th Fleet Amphibious Force conducts helicopter assault 12 miles inland at Con Thien. July 3 1898 At Battle of Santiago, Cuba, Rear Adm. Sampsons squadron destroys Spanish fleet. 1950 USS Valley Forge (CV 45) and HMS Triumph participate in first carrier action of Korean Conflict. VF-51 aircraft shoot down two North Korean aircraft. The action is first combat test of F9F Panther and AD-1 Skyraider. July 4 1776 American colonies declare their independence from Great Britain. 1777 John Paul Jones hoists first Stars and Stripes flag on Ranger at Portsmouth, N.H. 1801 First Presidential Review of U.S. Marine Band and Marines at the White House. 1842 First test of electrically oper ated underwater torpedo sinks gunboat Boxer. 1863 Confederates surrender Vicksburg, Miss., giving Union forces control of Mississippi River. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Ford was 9 years old the day I dropped him off for his first Little League practice. He ran from the car with only his glove and a bottle of water then he turned around and came back. I dont think thats my team, he said, pointing with his thumb at the ball field behind him. I looked out across the playground and beyond the fence with yellow plastic on it. Boys who looked like small men were playing catch. They do look older, dont they? I said. But the coach said to meet here, and thats the field, so Ford headed to the ball field again, a little slower this time. As I watched him go, I noticed his loose baseball pants and how his small, bouncy steps were still those of a little boy. By the second year of Little League, Ford had grown an inch or two, but he was still the smallest on the team. Our league keeps players together and with the same coach for all four years, so Fords teammates the older ones, especially were like mentors for him. The experience of Little League was as much about the game as it was time in the dugout. On the field, what little experience Ford had was starting to show from the way he handled the ball to his more confi dent stance at the plate. But he still missed more pitches than he hit, and he usually got on base by way of the other teams errors. Ford began his third year of Little League with his younger brother Owen. It was an exciting season to be on the team. They won all but two games and went on to win the champi onship. Another highlight for Ford was when the coach asked him to pitch a few games. Physically, his shoulders were get ting (just barely) broader, and he had outgrown some of his pants. Ford began his fourth and final year of Little League with Field of Dreams style aspirations. He was a team captain, one of the big kids that he remembered looking up to the ones who hit home runs or stole bases. But while some of his friends had already had their growth spurts, Ford was still among the shortest. He had become a great fielder with a soft glove, as one of the dads put it, and I no longer held my breath each time the ball came his way. I knew he would make the play. But he wasnt a big hitter. Ever aware that this was his last year, Ford went into each game with a growing sense of bitter sweetness. After the last game, the coach called Ford up in front of the team. He choked on his words as he said goodbye to him, and tears made tracks down Fords dirty face. You probably wanted a happy ending for this, but there isnt one. Ford never hit a home run. He wasnt the hot-shot pitcher. And he still hasnt hit his growth spurt. Whats worse: he didnt make the All Star team. These are moments we cant make better for our children. Ford shut himself in his room that night, angry at the world. While I cried myself, I took out his first and last years team pictures and looked at them side-by-side. At 9 years old, his big, eager smile said, I cant believe Im on Little League! At 12, his tough-guy stare with only a glimmer of a smile revealed just how tumultuous and ambiguous these years must feel. Little League was Fords boyhood, and now its gone. As the oldest of three brothers, he has no one to show him whats next. Yet, even though Ford has not reached his height, and hes stuck in the difficult place between a boy and a young man, when I looked at those pictures, I knew he had grown in per haps a more important way. He had just learned that we dont always get what we want, even when its all weve ever wanted. He learned that life sometimes feels unfair and not every thing comes easily. He had learned that wanting something and earning something are two different things. And soon, I hoped, he would also learn that disappointment gets easier over time, and, if we let it, makes us more determined in the future. It reminded me of a column entitled Lessons from the Dugout that I wrote when Ford first started tee-ball. I had wanted to go into the dugout and save him from kids who might make fun of him after missing the ball. But my husband had said, Do not go in the dugout. Some things, he told me, Ford had to learn on his own. So I wrote: I guess being a mother means allowing you to have experiences that will break my heart, even while they build your character.Rite of passage: Final year of Little League

PAGE 3

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013 3

PAGE 4

Heavy rains from Tropical Storm Debbie last year and Tropical Storm Andrea this year have resulted in the emergence of mosquitoes of frightening proportions commonly known as gal linippers. These mosquitoes are natu rally occurring in Jacksonville but the increased rainfall means they are expect ed to be present much larger numbers than the city is used to seeing. These gigantic mosquitoes are 20 times larger than typical mosquitoes and have a much more painful bite. The good news is that these blood suckers do not trans mit disease to humans unlike other local mosquitoes that are capable of transmit ting West Nile Virus and dengue. Gallinippers are the largest blood feeding mosquitoes in North America and what really sets them apart from other mosquitoes is there persistence, said Cmdr. Peter Obenauer, assistant offi cer in charge, Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE). I have seen this mosquito land on a person wearing thick clothing and their mouth parts are able to pierce right through it. The gallinippers have already been found aboard NAS Jacksonville in larger numbers than usual. These mosquitoes are quite visible and fairly easy to find on base, said Lt. Marcus McDonough, NECE staff entomologist. I think the most important thing for the public to know about these giants is that while their appearance is scary these mosquitoes occur here naturally and the only real threat they pose is a painful bite compared to other mosquito species. In cooperation with local mosquito control districts and public health agen cies, NECE continually monitors mosqui to and other insect populations through out the year, looking for trends that may impact personnel, to include nuisance and disease carriers. When requested, NECE offers a range of support from con sultation to control. Over the past 67 years, NECE has consistently responded to requests from the local community to provide insect control support, reducing the risk of dis ease from impacting civilians and our uniformed members and families who live outside the fence, said Cmdr. Eric Hoffman, NECE officer in charge. Developing and maintaining rela tionships with local public health officials ensures we are always aware of and responsive to threats that may impact our mission and the community. Whether through consultation or provid ing control, we are always standing by ready to assist. Whether a nuisance or disease carry ing mosquito, simple personal preventive measure will reduce the risk adversely affecting outdoor activities. Although local mosquito control dis tricts and public health departments do a tremendous job of controlling mosqui toes and other pests that carry human disease, everyone must play a role to ensure their efforts are successful, said Hoffman. Simple preventive measures to include using repellents, avoiding out door activities around dusk/dawn, wear ing long pants/shirts, eliminating stand ing water around your home and ensur ing screening on windows and around porches and pools is in good repair will significantly reduce the risk of not only being bitten but possibly contracting dis ease. Effective methods to reduce exposure to mosquitoes are to apply mosquito repellant such as 25-30 percent DEET or picardin on exposed skin and spray clothing with permethrin. Be sure to wear long sleeved light colored shirts and pants whenever outdoors or in places where mosquitoes may be present. For assistance or information on con trol of any vector-bone disease contact NECE at NECE-FleetSupport@med.navy. mil For more information please see the NECE website at http://www.med.navy. mil/sites/nmcphc/nece. Huge mosquitoes expected in Jacksonville 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013

PAGE 5

A wrap-up celebration held June 18 at the NAS Jacksonville River Cove Catering and Conference Center officially ended the 2013 Navy Region Southeast Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) fund drive. This years fund drive generated more than $309,000 to ben efit Sailors, Marines and their families who receive assistance through loans and grants in times of need. The total amount of funds exceeded this years goal of $237,912 by 130 percent. This has been a real ly great fund drive. Our keypersons were tasked with a mission and they stepped up to the plate by contacting every individual within their commands. They were diligent and should be commended for mak ing this such a successful fund drive, said Lt. Fred Pacifico, of VP-30, who coordinated this years fund drive. NAS Jax NMCRS Director Monika Woods also thanked those who continue to make the event so successful. NMCRS asks ship mates to donate to the fund drive one time per year to help fellow Marines and Sailors. Our goal is for every service member to donate $1 per paycheck to help a fellow service member in a time need, stated Woods. One of the basic prin ciples of NMCRS is good stewardship of donated dollars, which is how we are able to continue recy cling our donated dollars to provide interest free loans to those in need. So what does NMCRS do with all the money raised? Last year, the NAS Jax office served more than 2,000 individuals and distributed 1.4 million in assistance, said Woods. This years fund drive was an amazing success thanks to the continued support of Rear Adm. Scorby, VP-30 as fund drive chair and fund drive coordinator, Lt. Pacifico. His hard work and dedication to this project showed as the goal was exceeded by 130 percent, raising $309,173 for NMCRS. The fund drive is head ed up each year by a spe cific command aboard the station, who over sees and coordinates the event. This year, VP-30 took charge. Pacifico praised VP-30 for their efforts in rais ing more than $47,000 including $25,060 with their annual NMCRS Golf Tournament. He also acknowledged the VP-10 Red Lancers for exceed ing their goal by 190 percent with contribu tions totaling more than $13,602. Other key contributors included Naval Facilities Engineering Command which exceeded their goal by 326 percent by raising $6,000 and NS Guantanamo Bay, Cuba which exceeded their goal by 152 percent by contrib uting more than $25,500. The NAS Jax Navy Exchange was also recog nized for participating in the fund drive by offering customers discounts for purchasing a $5 card to benefit the NMCRS. Navy Exchange Command raised $357,690 world wide in donations for the society. Also assisting with the fund drive were the Jacksonville Jaguars who donated indi vidual tickets and sea son passes to be raffled off. Commander, Navy Region Southeasts NMCRS keyperson, Lt. Dustin Lockerman was praised raising $570 for the fund drive through ticket sales. Also on hand at the cel ebration to thank the vol unteers for their support during the fund drive was Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. This organization is all about shipmates help ing shipmates. With your assistance, we had anoth er successful campaign this year, Scorby said. And, for everyone who played a part in this fund drive, who ensured there was 100 percent contact, and made sure contribu tion forms were distrib uted and collected, thank you. The campaign runs each year from March through May to allow military personnel and civilian employees to contribute to the society. For more information, contact the NMCRS office at 542-3515.Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the fed eral government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. NMCRS fund drive benefits military families JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013 5

PAGE 6

6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013 About 20 Sailors from Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) visited a non-profit, homeless shelter in downtown Jacksonville June 11 to deliver donated items and visit with people, including military vet erans who are rebuilding their lives through faith. FRCSE CMDCM Leonard Gage with the support of the FRCSE Chief Petty Officers Mess and the First and Second Class Petty Officers asso ciations organized a clothing drive and a visit to the City Rescue Mission (CRM), a faithbased organization that has served the homeless and needy since 1946. The Sailors delivered more than two tons of clothing, lin ens and toiletries donated by the workforce at the military aviation maintenance depot. I truly believe the CRM clothing drive is in our wheel house of providing support to the local community, said Gage. As for our visit to the shelter, our support will continue. It was eye opening for our Sailors. The need is there, and those who visited the mission will be forever changed. It was evident that our Sailors enjoyed talk ing with the residents who are dealing with various addictions and trying to rebuild their lives. I also believe the residents FRCSE Sailors visit homeless shelter, donate items/efforts

PAGE 7

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013 7 enjoyed seeing our men and women in uniform supporting their recovery efforts. I couldnt be more proud! The LifeBuilders Recovery Program helps people off the streets and back on their feet with an 18-month recovery track. Students enrolled in the program go from living in the shelter full-time to completing educational opportunities and living on their own. The mission, although rarely at capacity, can accommodate 165 stu dents. There are no televisions or games to play, and telephone use is restricted to once weekly. Students are encouraged to focus on getting their lives back together without outside distractions. Leading the CRM tour was Dwight Anderson, a senior residential assis tant who credits his relationship with Christ as the turning point in his life. It allowed him to kick his crack cocaine habit and eventually find peace during the last eight years of a 13-year stint in prison. I had my dope, a pillow, and I would have stayed in that tunnel for the rest of my life, said Anderson of his life prior to his conviction and incarceration. I found something greater than dope. It was Jesus Christ. A woman intro duced me to some literature in prison and within 30 days I found myself on my knee. The last eight years in prison I was at peace. I got born again! After his release from prison in 2005, Anderson found it difficult to land a job, but his life experiences made him ide ally suited for a job at CRM where he started working in 2007. He says the residents call him the warden or the drill sergeant because he runs a tight ship. During a tour through the bunk rooms, Anderson told the Sailors that CRM provides the best facilities for a free overnight stay. There are shower facilities for men and women at the shelter. Toiletries are provided, along with a clean change of clothing. Guests receive a free meal and attend a mandatory chapel service before bed. They are up at 4:30 a.m., eat breakfast at 5 and are out the door to do it all again. He said some homeless people pre fer to stay on the streets sleeping in the bushes, under a bridge, or in a tunnel as he did. Anderson said the shelter also offers a work program for men who have a job but who have hit hard times. For a small weekly fee, they are provided room and board until they can get their life back on track and transition out. The missionhas allowed the City of Jacksonville to use an annex on CRMproperty to create a Day Center at the State Street location, where clients will have access to computers, informa tion about available services, or find shelter from extreme weather. FRCSE

PAGE 8

Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvillecomprised of its hospital and five branch health clinics (BHCs)Navy Operational Support Center (NOSC) Jacksonville and Navy Operational Health Support Unit (NR OHSU) Detachment G earned the Navy Surgeon Generals Health Promotion and Wellness Blue H for the fourth consecutive year for command excellence in health promotion for 2012. The Blue H award symbol izes our priority to provide the best care possible to each and every one of our patients our nations heroesand their families, stated Capt. Gayle Shaffer, NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer. People come from all over the nation to see us because we provide the highest quality care and best outcomes at our hospital and branch health clinics. NOSC Jacksonville and NH OHSU Detachment G each received the Gold Star level. At its hospital and Branch Health Clinics Jacksonville, Key West, Kings Bay and Mayport, NH Jacksonville received the Silver Eagle award and the Bronze Anchor award at its Branch Health Clinic Albany. Receiving the Navy Surgeon General Blue H award is a true reflection of our dedi cation and focus on health pro motions that all the members of the entire Navy Operation Support Center medical team exhibit on a daily basis, said Capt. Jonathan Groh, NOSC Jacksonville medical officer. The Blue H award recog nizes excellence in clinical primary prevention services, community health promotion and medical staff health. The award assesses health topics such as alcohol abuse preven tion, injury prevention, nutri tion physical activity, psycho logical health, sexual health, tobacco cessation and weight management. A total of 271 Navy and Marine Corps active and reserve units were selected for the Blue H award, which is divided into three categories: Fleet, Medical and Semper Fit Center. Managed by The Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center, headquar tered in Portsmouth, Va., the annual Blue-H encourages and rewards the promotion of health in Navy and Marine Corps organizations. NH Jacksonvilles prior ity since its founding in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. The com mand is comprised of the Navys fourth largest hospital and five branch health clin ics across Florida and Georgia. On average each day, a dedi cated team of 2,500 military and civilians personnel sees 1,800 outpatients, admits 15 inpatients, cares for 80 people in the ER, performs 14 sameday surgeries, fills 4,700 pre scriptions, conducts 4,600 lab tests and delivers three babies. Additionally, up to eight per cent of its active duty staff is deployed around the globe pro viding combat, humanitarian and disaster care. For more information on Navy wellness programs, con tact NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center at (904) 542-5292. For additional information on The Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center (NMCPHC), visit the Blue H website at: http:// www.med.navy.mil/sites/ nmcphc/health-promotion/ pages/blue-h.aspx A celebration was held June 5 for the newly-constructed emergency opera tions center (EOC) and disaster relief warehouse (DRW) in Forte Liberte, Haiti. The new facilities, located with in the Nord-Est Department of Haiti, were built as part of U.S. Southern Commands Humanitarian Assistance Program (HAP) in Haiti. The 4,000 square-foot EOC will pro vide a central hub for the local govern ment to coordinate response follow ing catastrophic events and report vital information to the Haitian govern ment for rapid decision making, said Lt. j.g. Blaine Henning, Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast (NAVFAC Southeast) Resident Officer in Charge of Construction (ROICC), Haiti. The 4,800 square-foot DRW should provide ample storage for items need ed to respond immediately following a major disaster. The warehouse also cre ates a place for supplies to be redistrib uted from a central area outside of the Haitian capital to help alleviate major supply chain issues discovered follow ing the 2010 earthquake, said Henning. In his comments during the ceremo ny the Haitian President, His Excellency Michel Martelly, thanked the U.S. gov ernment for the opportunities the new ly-constructed emergency operations center (EOC) and disaster relief ware house (DRW) will provide to the Haitan government and its people. During the ceremony, the Haitian Minister of the Interior, Daniel Basile, signed the documents officially trans ferring the EOC and DRW from U.S. Southern Command to the government of Haiti. The two buildings will be managed and staffed by members of the local Directorate of Civil Protection (DPC), the equivalent of the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Participants in the inauguration cer emony were His Excellency, Michel Martelly, the President of Haiti; U.S. Coast Guard Cmdr. Richter Tipton, Senior Defense Official, U.S. Embassy; Daniel Basile, the Minister of the Interior; Hugo Charles, Delegue to the region; Guiteau Pierre, Fort Liberte Mayor; and Madame Jean Baptiste, Director of DPC. Also in attendance were Lt. j.g. Blaine Henning, NAVFAC Southeast ROICC Haiti; Mr. Greg Marcellous, NAVFAC Southeast construction manager for the project, Sgt. 1st Class Roland Laforest, the U.S. Southern Command HAP Manager and volunteers of the local DPC. The $1.4 Million EOC and DRW are part of 62 Humanitaran Assistance projects NAVFAC Southeast is admin istering the design and construction of for U.S. Southern Command on behalf of the Government of Haiti and the Haitian people. The $33M program is being executed, with ROICC Haiti oversight, through 20 contracts at 22 sites and will provide EOCs, DRWs, fire stations, medical clin ics, community centers, and schools for the Haitian people. Hospital and reserve units receive Medical Blue H Award New facilities celebrated in Fort Libert, Haiti 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013

PAGE 9

problem because he and his friends only drank on week ends. By the time McGrenahan was 18, he already faced a large fine for a DUI. I made a bad decision to drive the 10 miles home that night. I saw the lights and was pulled over. I was fined $2,500 and lost my dream of getting a scholarship to play baseball in college. But I told myself, I didnt have a drinking problem and kept right on partying, he said. When I was 19, I was fired from my job for coming to work hung over. So what did I do, went right out and got drunk again. And, I made another bad decision to drive. Thats when I got my second DUI. Unfortunately, alcohol and drug abuse also impacted another member of his family, his younger brother, Scott. Scott was an aspiring model; he had everything going for him but he was on the same road I was drinking and being irresponsible. I could see it in him, but not myself. One day, I told him he needs to get it tighter and then I left the house. When I came home, an hour later, he had shot himself in the backyard. He was 19 and left behind our parents, my sis ter, me and his twin brother, said McGrenahan. When he pulled the trig ger, that bullet didnt just go through him. When you com mit suicide, you put a hole in the soul of your whole family. Even the death of his brother didnt stop McGrenahan from drinking. At age 26, I got my third DUI and ended up in Los Angeles County Jail for six months. My mom was the only one to visit me and I swore to her that I would stop the reckless behav ior. I have been sober now for 25 years, he expressed to the large audience. McGrenahan emphasized the importance to avoid alco hol and drugs when stressed and to seek help when needing to speak with someone. Sailors should not turn to alcohol and drugs as a method of coping with stress because alcohol is a depressant, he said. Whatever you are drinking over, the pain, the turmoil-the stress, you just compounded it 10 times worse by adding alco hol, he said. The comedian implied to the Sailors he was not trying to get them to stop drinking but to avoid the abuse of alcohol, which could impact individu als with finances, relationships and jobs. I want Sailors to know to be responsible, have a plan, dont drink and drive, dont make crude comments, dont be physically, touchy, feely with people on the job or at a bar, he added. Many of the Sailors were impacted by McGrenahans message. FN Tysie Taylor, assigned to NAS Jax, said, We need to be concerned about each other. Sailors need to take care of Sailors. She added, I think the comedian definitely got his point across through his jokes and entertainment. He emphasized on the series of situations we can get ourselves into and reminded us that help is readily available. McGrenahan started his show in 1997, traveling across America entertaining students from various colleges and universities, and in 2007, he started working with the mil itary. I started this program because I was tired of lecture speakers who said if you go out and drink this will hap pen to you. I wanted to create a show with humor to stress the dangers of alcohol, drugs, sexual conduct and suicide, said McGrenahan, who also performs on late night comedy shows. COMEDIAN Members from U.S. Fleet Forces Command visited NAS Jacksonville on June 17 to provide Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) and suicide prevention training to the senior leadership of Navy Region Southeasts tenant commands. The visit was in preparation for the SAPR/Suicide Prevention stand down that commands must complete before July 1. Additional topics of discussion included creating good command climates and proper treatment of Sailors. Nobody understands when a com mand is off track better than its Sailors, explained Capt. Kurt Johnson, inspec tor general with U.S. Fleet Forces Command. There are times when lead ership might be shielded from a prob lem, creating a communication issue. Ultimately though, it is the senior lead ership that Sailors turn to for guidance and the right answers, and it is the sole responsibility of the command triad to support the Sailors and their families, while still executing the mission. We all know that Sailors who are in a crisis can affect mission readiness. Johnson explained that the best com mands in the fleet have one consistent quality: outstanding chain of command communication, both up and down. When leaders take the time to inter act with their Sailors, it shows that they FFC provides SAPR and suicide awareness training at NAS Jax JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013 9

PAGE 10

ing with the new aircraft stateside. A detachment from VP-62 has already deployed to Japan to augment VP-26 during this transition. The reality is youre going to be around until the P-8 transition is complete, Asbjornsen said. What you need to do, is knock em dead in WESTPAC. Speaking to the Chiefs mess at HSL-60, Asbjornsen continued on the ASW theme. Become even better at ASW. No other service can do ASWits a Navy thing. If were ever called, any where in the world, weve got to get those subs fast. Speaking to the VR Sailors, Asbjornsen said, You play an absolutely critical role. If we have to fight, we have to have logistical support. The fleet logistics support community is unique to Reserve aviation. There is no active-duty equivalent flying C-130 or C-40 transport aircraft. In light of several high profile liberty incidents, Asbjornsen stressed the importance of being good ambassadors and representatives of the United States and the Navy both at work and after work. Your choices, on liberty and profes sionally, can have an impact on our capability, he said. ADMIRAL VISITSed for this kind of tasking, but its men and women of the VR squad rons, including the Sunseekers, that make it such a success, said Shettler. VR-58 is a Navy Reserve squad ron that consists of selected reserv ists and full-time support Sailors. The composition of this squad ron allows for a wide range of skill sets, talent and experience to be brought to the table, Shettler said. As a result, we are able to operate safely and effectively around the globe often with little or no outside support. Detachment 5 will fly missions in support of multi-national exer cises and will be prepared to meet the logistics needs of the Pacific Theater, including disaster relief when necessary. This squadron participat ed in Operation Tomodachi, the Japanese tsunami relief effort in 2011, and our Sailors showed their true colors by stepping up to the plate, stated Shettler. I expect Detachment 5 to be ready to do the same. care. It also leads to increased job satisfaction and motivation. Every command triad should be mak ing a great effort to communicate with their Sailors and learn of their concerns, Johnson continued. Guidance for SAPR and Suicide prevention was the main focus of the training, with Marie Parker, Fleet SAPR program manager, standards and con duct officer with U.S. Fleet Forces Command, out lining new changes to these programs and discuss ing growing trends that are being investigated. It may come as a surprise, but what we have found is that the majority of sexual assault cases are not alcohol related, Parker remarked. Ninety-five percent of the victims of blue on blue sexual assault tend to be E-5 and below, with only thirty percent of those cases involving alcohol. Sixty-five percent of the offenders are E-5 and below, with another thirty percent being committed by senior enlisted or officers. According to Parker, the majority of sexual assault crimes are incidences of unwanted physical contact in workspaces, stressing that commands must encourage bystander intervention and pro vide constant SAPR training to protect their Sailors. Parker concluded by outlining a new direction the Navy was considering with suicide prevention: developing a new program devoted specifically to the issue instead of just including it as a topic during general military training (GMT). She also encouraged command leadership to continue to be vigilant, and to focus on turning every Sailor into a sensor to identify warning signs. Suicidal ideation is a coping problem, and its extremely important that commands educate their Sailors on detecting changes and warning signs with individuals so we can get them the help they need, Parker explained. We are currently in the development of a whole suicide prevention pro gram that will be more than simply a topic dis cussed in a GMT, so commands can expect that in the near future. U.S. Fleet Forces Command will continue working with Navy Region Southeast in developing improved SAPR and suicide prevention training. SAPR VR-58 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013

PAGE 11

When furloughs are implemented, most military commissaries, includ ing NAS Jacksonville, will close one day a week on Mondays, said the director and CEO of the Defense Commissary Agency. The closures will be for up to 11 days between July 8 and Sept. 30. Closing commissaries on Mondays would be in addition to any day stores are routinely closed. The 148 stores that routinely close on Mondays would also close the next normal day of operation. Other than the furlough day, there are no other changes planned for store operation hours. The announcement comes as DeCA follows Department of Defense proto cols related to the automatic federal government budget reductions, known as sequestration, which began March 1. Like most DOD activities, DeCA is man dated by the Department to furlough its civil service employees. Furlough notices are scheduled to be delivered to DeCA employees between May 28 and June 5. DeCA has 247 commissaries with more than 16,000 employees operat ing in 13 countries and two U.S. territo ries. Furloughs will impact all of DeCAs more than 14,000 U.S. civilian employ ees. We know that any disruption in commissary operations will impact our patrons, said Joseph Jeu, DeCAs director and CEO. Also, we understand the tremendous burden this places on our employees, who, when furloughed, will lose 20 percent of their pay. We deter mined that Monday closures would present the least pain for our patrons, employees and industry partners. As sequestration continues, com missary customers can quickly find out about any changes to their local stores operating schedule by going to www.commissaries.com clicking on the Locations tab, then Alphabetical Listing, finding their store and clicking on local store information. Patrons are reminded that because sequestra tion is so fluid, DeCAs plan for this budget-cutting measure is subject to change. DeCA decided on Monday closures after weighing the potential disrup tion to patrons and suppliers of having rolling furloughs, where closure dates would differ from store to store. Universal Monday closures are less disruptive to shoppers and the agencys industry partners vendors, suppliers and distributors who deliver products daily to DeCAs commissaries. Select locations overseas will open if they have an adequate local national staff. However, if an overseas store is closed, its local national staff will report to work and perform other store-related duties. In January, DoD released guidance to allow defense components to plan for potential budget cuts by reducing operating costs. In line with that direc tion, DeCA later executed the following budget-cutting measures: conferences, training and any other events and activities considered non critical to the agencys mission. Worldwide Case Lot Sales for all com missaries. Instead, stores are conduct ing smaller-scale events such as out door sidewalk sales. compensatory time unless deemed mis sion-critical. restrict any increases. unless legally required. Reserve on-site sales scheduled after July 8 until further notice. We are in this together, Jeu said, and though limited in our ability by circumstances we cannot control, I assure you we will do all we can to miti gate the impact of sequestration on our patrons, employees and industry part ners, and on our mission. For more information about the NAS Jacksonville Commissary hours of oper ations, call 542.5311.Commissaries plan for Monday furloughs JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013 11

PAGE 12

12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013

PAGE 13

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013 13

PAGE 14

It was all smiles and high fives when five young Girl Scouts handed out cookies to about 900 Sailors assigned to Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), the largest tenant command aboard NAS Jacksonville, June 18. Girl Scouts Jordan Varrasse, Caitlin Varrasse, Lyric Etienne, DeMoni Wilson and Jasmine Wiggins presented each Sailor with free boxes of Trefoils and Tagalongs, along with their sincere thanks for the Sailors service. The Girls Scouts of Gateway Council donated 400 cases of Trefoils and Tagalongs to the active duty service members in recognition of their per sonal sacrifice in defense of the nation. FRCSE Command Master Chief (CMDCM) Leonard Gage and Gloria Ederer, a management assistant assigned to the indus trial busi ness office, coordi nated the event at Hangar 1000 where the major ity of the Sailors work. Ederer said the cookie giveaway was a result of her involvement with the Girl Scout council in past years to distribute cookies to deployed military personnel and civilian coworkers. I wanted to show my appreciation to the troops and provide a means of saying thank you for all they do, said Ederer. When Anita Walton, the direc tor of product sales, contacted me in the March or April timeframe with a proposal to distribute excess cookies to the troops, I knew it was a great oppor tunity for our command. Walton said the Girl Scouts continu ously do service projects, and the cook ie distribution seemed like a perfect fit to show the scouts gratitude for the selfless contributions of those serving on active duty. We have customers who make purchases just for this purpose, but we dont often get to present them to Sailors said Walton. It brings our work to fruition. During their visit, the Girl Scouts accompanied by Walton and Mary Anne Jacobs, the chief executive officer of the Girl Scouts of Gateway Council, had a unique opportunity to visit the Paraloft in the Survival Equipment (600) division. Sailors maintain and repair flight clothing, rubber life rafts, lifejackets, oxygen-breathing gear, protective clothing and air-sea rescue equipment. Jacobs said she would like to see everybody serving in the Armed Forces receive Girl Scout cookies. She was sur prised to learn that several of the scouts did not realize women served in the Navy. Im a big believer in, if they can see it, they can be it, she said of scouts who aspire to pursue careers in fields held predominately by males. PRC Brian Petros led the tour through the Survival Equipment division. Everyone here was excited to see the scouts and the cookies.Girl Scouts donate cookies to FRCSE Sailors for service to nation The possession of explosives and fireworks for sale, storage or use of any description on NAS Jacksonville prop erty is strictly prohibited. Fireworks are spectacular to watch, and make great noises, but can be extremely dangerous in the hands of amateurs. NAS Jacksonville Fire Prevention Division recommends attending public fireworks displays, because those shows are safer and have better visual displays than what might be accomplished at your home.Fireworks prohibited at NAS Jacksonville 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013

PAGE 15

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013 15

PAGE 16

When a man has looked directly into the face of poverty and devastation, he often finds an overwhelming drive to make a difference in the lives and wel fare of others. HM2 Rene Lumene, a native of Miami, has been driven by this compas sion and determination since he was a young man. Navy Reservist Lumene works as a dental X-ray technician at Naval Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville. He has worked in the health care industry for more than seven years, and in his civilian career, he is the practice manager of a specialty medical practice in Clay County. Im a compassionate person by nature, said Lumene. I just want to be able to help people in any way possible. This is the reason I turned to Navy medicine, as an ave nue for me to exercise my compassion, while simultaneously sustaining a pro ductive career. Lumene said that Navy training taught and reinforced the principle of attention to detail, which continues to help him excel in his work and stud ies. He enlisted in the Navy in 2005. After attending C School at the Naval School of Sciences in Portsmouth, Va., he graduated as a surgical technician. Since then, Lumene has continued to gain knowledge and skills with an ongoing drive to further his education. He earned an Associates degree in Healthcare Administration in 2008, followed by a Bachelors degree in Healthcare Management in 2009. After completing his active-duty obli gation in 2010, Lumene opted to reenlist in the Navy Reserve to take advantage of earned educational benefits and con tinue developing his civilian career. Last year, he earned a dual Masters degree in Health and Business Administration from Webster University. Lumene believes that the training and responsibilities that are part of being a Navy corpsman and petty offi cer have helped him to embrace the responsibilities and challenges that he faces daily as a business leader. As a civilian, he manages two occu pational medical clinics and serves as vice president of the We R Love Foundation, a non-profit organization established in 2009 to help pro vide opportunities and mentorship to underprivileged youth in the commu nity by supplying basic educational needs, such as stationery, book bags and textbooks. The organization is now affiliated with an affordable car-buying program for low-income adults. Lumene hopes that one day his organization will be able to help fund medical missions to needy places like Haiti, where he has many extended family members. I remember my first visit to Haiti in 2009, seeing the kids, conditions and poverty that they were living in, said Lumene. I really wanted to do something to help change that. He deployed a year later to Haiti aboard the hospital ship USNS Comfort (T-AH-20), as part of Operation Unified Response-providing humanitarian aid, after the devastating 2010 earthquake. This is where he had the opportunity to help, by translating Creole and assist ing Navy surgeons during treatment of patients with orthopedic trauma. For all the Navy has helped him accomplish, Lumene attributes much of it to mentorship. Be motivated and seek mentors who are doing what you want to be doing, said Lumene. Let them take you under their wing, and learn from them so that you can accomplish your dreams. Learn from those who have gone before you and always try to learn something new. The Navy is a great place for this! Jacksonville Reservist lends a healing hand 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013

PAGE 17

The intramural softball championship began June 10 as VP-16 quickly put up four runs in the top of the first inning. John Manderville tripled and scored on Jacob Hesselbachers infield hit. Later, Jose Gomez drove in two runs with a single and Juan Santiago scored Brian Johnson on a fielders choice. VP-30 got one run back in the bottom of the first inning after Jeff Labrake hit a triple to score Dave Heber. Labrake was thrown out at home trying to stretch his triple into an inside the park homer. VP-16 rallied in the top of the third with five runs. The big blow came after Gomezs three-run homer with VP-16 building a 9-1 lead. VP-30 came alive in the bottom of the third with three walks and a pop fly hit. Also helping was Labrake, who had a two-run single fol lowed by Kevin Browns tworun single. Jason Porter and Patrick Bilicki also drove in runs in the rally. VP-30 had scored seven runs in the bot tom of the third inning and now trailed by only one run with the score of 9-8. VP-16 made it 12-9 scoring three times in the top of the fourth inning. Chris Estes, Hesselbacher and Johnson all had runs batted in for VP-16 during the inning. VP-30 put up another big inning in the bottom of the fourth. Xavier Gonzales start ed it with a solo homer. Then Labrake hit a three-run home run as VP-30 took its first lead of the game 16-12. William Glaze, Bilicki, Robert Kinion and Gonzalez all drove in the runs for VP-30. The score stayed 16-12 until the last inning. VP-16 was barely hanging on with two outs. However, Shawn Gloyd of VP-16 hit a two-run triple and then scored to make it 16-15. With the tying run on base and two outs in the bottom of the seventh inning, VP-16s Estes hit a drive that hit the fence in centerfield as VP-16s tying runner made a break for home plate. Meanwhile, the relay from the outfield came to Heber in shallow centerfield. Heber threw a strike to home plate and nailed the VP-16 run ner at the plate to end the game with VP-30 winning the cham pionship 16-15. VP-30s Jeff Labrake led the way going four for four with a triple and a homerun driving in six runs. Dave Heber also had a fine day, collecting three hits and scoring three times. Jason Hesselbacher had three hits for VP-16. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown has created a Summer Basketball League for youth ages 10 to 18 years old. Browns Summer Basketball League will have its first games July 8 and will culminate with the championship games at the Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena Aug. 8. This initiative is to help keep the youth in our community focused on doing great things and being fit, Brown said. There are so many lessons that the game of basketball teaches, and cre ating this league in the summer fills a void that can keep children focused on goals and teamwork. The league will feature four age groups: Under 12, Under 14, Under 16, and Under 18. Teams will sign up through the City of Jacksonville Parks & Recreation Department (JaxParks); the fee is $75 per team. League registration will continue through June 30. Any individu als looking to join or create a team can contact the Parks & Recreation Department to get more informa tion or visit JaxParks.com. VP-30 wins intramural softball championship New summer city basketball league slated JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013 17

PAGE 18

Deweys Call 542-3521 Free Live Entertainment June 28 Jason Lamar Freedom Lanes Bowling Center Call 542-3493. Free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 1 6 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer Going on now through Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 years and younger receive one free game of bowling every day until 5 p.m. Win prizes all summer long! Fitness & Aquatics Call 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Lap Swim (water park, water slide and concessions are not open) Monday Friday 6 8 a.m. & 6 7 p.m. Recreational Swim (water park, waterslide and concessions are open) Monday Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. 2013 Learn to Swim Program Session 2 July 8-18 Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1 Summer Splash Outdoor Pool Party June 29, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free food, games and prizes! Private pool parties can be reserved at the fitness center Parties are not available during regular business hours of operation and occur in the evenings when the pool is closed. Parties must be reserved ten days prior to party date, payment due at time of reservation. For more information, call (904) 542-3518 I.T.T. Events Call 542-3318. Jacksonville Jaguars tickets on sale Friday, July 12 $70 section 147 Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Daytona International Speedway Subway Firecracker July 5 and Coke 400 July 6 Tickets on sale now! Amelia Island Museum of History $10 family pass, Ghost tour $8 adult, $4 child The Vault Liberty Recreation Center Trips, activities and costs may be restrict ed to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Orange Park Mall & Movie Trip July 6 at 5 p.m. $5 per person Mandarin Mills Putt-Putt Trip July 13 at 6 p.m. $5 per person Jacksonville Beach Trip July 20 at 9 a.m. NAS Jax Golf Club Golf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees July 9 & 23 for active duty June 27, July 11 & 25 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Loudmouth Thursday Any golfer wearing a pair of loudmouth shorts or pants plays 18 holes with cart for $20 Open to military, DoD and guests Junior Golf Clinic Session 2, July 1519, ages 610 Session 3, July 29 Aug. 2, ages 1117 $110 per child, per session Mulberry Cove Marina Call 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina July 20, 21, 27 & 28 Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27 Auto Skills Center Call 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite! Youth Activities Center Call 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Movie Under the Stars July 19 at 8:30 p.m. Patriots Grove Americas Kids Run June 28 at 9 a.m. Ages 5 12 Sign-up at the youth center Flying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Aug. 5 Sept. 16 $500 per person Personal finances surviving the furlough Are you financially pre pared for the furlough? Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) financial educators are offering a presentation regarding the financial health of furloughed fed eral workers. They will provide financial information in order for personnel to make informed deci sions. Visit FFSCs Facebook page for information on training regarding the sequestration and fur lough situation. If you are interested in FFSCs Personal Financial Manager visiting your command or department to provide training, call 542-5745. The presentation, Personal Finances, Before and After a Furlough, is available to civilians, active duty and family members. Retiree eventMeet your Retired Affairs Office Program advisors ask questions, get information about post military/ retired survi vor ben efits, pay issues, etc. Navy Exchange/ Commissary Food Court June 28, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. members, spouses and family members. 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013

PAGE 19

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013 19

PAGE 20

The following are changes to NAS Jacksonville Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department facilities due to the Continuing Resolution/ Sequestration issues: Fitness Hours of operation for fitness centers will be reduced to 90 hours per week. In order to comply with this directive, 10 hours per week have been reduced. The Zone Gymnasium operations will be as follows: Monday-Thursday (5 a.m. to 8 p.m.); Friday (5 a.m. to 1 p.m.) and Saturday-Sunday (closed). The fitness cen ter hours will be: Monday-Thursday (5 a.m. to 8 p.m.); Friday (5 a.m. to 7 p.m.); Saturday-Sunday (7 a.m. to 3 p.m.). Swimming pools: Only one pool will be open per installation. The outdoor pool is open through Sept. 8 the following days and times for recreational swim ming: Monday-Friday (11 a.m. to 7 p.m.) and SaturdaySunday (11 a.m. to 6 p.m.). Lap swimming is offered each morning from 6-8 a.m. The indoor pool will remain closed until October 2013. Intramural Sports: Captains Cup competitions will continue with condensed scheduling; winners will be based on double elimination tournaments, offi cials will be provided. If the teams agree to a round robin competition, volunteer officials will be utilized. Single and dual sporting events will not have officials. Greybeard league will have volunteer officials. Group exercise classes: Classes with volunteer instructors will continue. Classes will include spin, muscle max, Zumba, Pilates, power yoga, max core and step. Class schedules will be posted at the fitness source. CFL and NOFFS classes will continue. Liberty Liberty hours will be as follows: Monday-Friday (11 a.m. to 1 p.m.) and (4-10 p.m.); Saturday, holidays (Noon to 10 p.m.) and Sundays (closed). Off base trips will no longer be subsidized. Transportation will be provided. Awarding of gift cards and other prizes will be elim inated unless part of a sponsorship program. Category B Programs The Auto Skills Center hours of operation will be: Monday (Noon to 8 p.m.); Tuesday-Wednesday (closed); Thursday-Friday (noon to 8 p.m.); Saturday (9 a.m. to 5 p.m.); Sunday (closed) and holidays (9 a.m. to 3 p.m.). Outdoor recreation and the marina will oper ate: Monday (8 a.m. to 3 p.m.); Tuesday-Wednesday (closed); Thursday (8 a.m. to 8 p.m.); Friday (8 a.m. to 8 p.m.); Saturday-Sunday (7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.) and holidays (7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.). Child Development Center no change in operations. School Age Care Programs no impact to operations. This program also supports summer and holiday camps which will be business as usual. Youth open recreation and teen program hours will be cancelled. All Programs No free set-up of tents, chairs and/or tables unless it is in support of a signed contract with an MWR cater ing facility. If MWR is catering an event, tents, tables and chairs will be provided at no additional cost. A set-up fee will be charged if not in support of a catered event. Special Event/Entertainment Special/community events to include family and fitness events will be canceled unless funded 100 per cent by commercial sponsorship/advertising. For more information, call the MWR Administration office at 542-3111. Once again, its time for the 101 Critical Days of Summer campaign that runs from Memorial Day weekend to after Labor Day cor responding with the largest vaca tion period of the year. The sun is shining and people are out swimming, boating, vis iting family and friends far away, playing and having a good time. With all those fun summer activities there is a potential for increased risk. Motor Vehicle Safety Tips Every year nearly 36,000 people are killed and more than 3.5 mil lion people are injured in motor vehicle crashes, making it the lead ing cause of unintentional injuries and death for people between the ages of 1 and 33. There are many different issues affecting families traveling on the road and simple steps to reduce your likelihood of getting into a motor vehicle crash. Follow these tips to stay safe while traveling this summer: hours. hours. better to get there late than not at all. Perform a safety check on your vehicle before getting on the road. Be sure to check: oil, brakes, tire wear and air pressure, coolant, power steering fluid, windshield wipers, and spare tire (air pressure, jack and lug wrench Use TRiPS for your Trip: For more info on trip planning visit the TRiPS (Travel Risk Planning System) website at: https://trips. safety.army.mil/marines/login.asp x?ReturnUrl=%2fmarines%2fdefa ult.aspx Close the Motorcycle Training Gap In 2011, motorcycle riders were responsible for 64 percent of the Navys PMV fatalities, but motor cyclists comprise only 10 percent of motor vehicle operators. Of the Navys 16 motorcycles fatalities in 2011, sport bike riders are overrep resented. They equal 75 percent of this years fatalities, but comprise only 42 percent of the overall num ber of motorcycle operators. Its obvious that sport-bike rid ers are extremely high risk and we need to get those riders trained. A typical motorcycle fatality involves a sport bike rider in their first year of riding who is under 30 and has no formal training. To combat this, the Navy now requires that: ride must take the Basic Rider Course within 30 days of purchas ing a motorcycle. take the Military Sportbike Rider Course 60 days after completing the BRC. Experienced Rider Course. every three years. See your command Motorcycle Safety Representative or call Cindy Picklesimer at 542-2584 to sign up for classes. Base facilities impacted by CR/Sequestration Military can visit museums for free During the busy season of military transfers, adjust ing to new communities and registering children for school, more than 2,000 museums across the nation will open their doors, free of charge, to service mem bers and their families as a break from the summer challenges, a Defense Department official said today. Now through Labor Day, Sept. 2, all active duty ser vice members, National Guardsmen and reservists and their families can take advantage of this cultural and educational opportunity in all 50 states. A record number of museums are participating this year. 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013

PAGE 21

Have you come across the Balfour Beatty Communities Zero Harm logo or had the opportunity to meet BAL-4 or B-T, the defenders of our com munities? Many of our residents rec ognize the Zero Harm yellow banner and our robot friends but what do they stand for? Safety is a company focus at Balfour Beattysafety of our residents, contractors, and employees. Zero Harm More than just a slogan, Balfour Beatty puts safety at the forefront of every move we make. If you notice any unsafe practices or are con cerned about the safety in your home or community, please contact the Balfour Beatty Communities office at 9080821. BAL-4 & B-T While parents and neigh bors within our communities protect and serve our coun try, BAL-4 and his sidekick B-T educate and empower children within our commu nities to protect themselves and their family and to live safe and strong lives. For safe ty and environmental games and activities and to learn more about BAL-4 & B-T visit the Kids Corner section of your property website! In celebration of National Safety Month, Balfour Beatty called on our all-star employ ees to share safety tips with our residents. See below for safety snippets for the full-length articles, visit our Better Living Blog at http://betterliving.bal fourbeattycommunities.com Taken from Distracted Behind the Wheel by Jessica Ennis, LifeWorks coordina tor, NS Mayport Homes, Text messaging behind the wheel has become the most concern ing type of distracted driv ing because it involves visual, manual and cognitive atten tion from the driver. According to the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute, text messaging creates a crash risk 23 times worse than driv ing without distractions. Also, sending or receiv ing texts while driving takes the drivers eyes off the road for approximately 4.6 seconds. This action is equivalent to driving the length of a football field, blind-folded at 55 mph. Luckily, distracted driving is something that is easily pre vented just by being aware of your behavior. The Governors Highway Safety Association suggests turning off your phone or silencing it before get ting into your vehicle. Another tip is to set up a spe cial message that you can send callers to let them know that you are driving. If there is an emergency, pull over to a safe area to respond. Finally, make sure you are familiar with local laws as many states prohibit the use of hand held devices while driv ing. Taken from Skin Care Safety by Kristen Connor, resident specialist/LifeWorks coordinator, NAVSTA Newport Homes, Applying sunscreen to exposed areas of your body including face, neck, arms, and legs should be one of the most important things you do each morning. Skin cancer is the most common form of can cer in the United States, and 90 percent of skin cancers occur because of exposure to ultra violet sunrays. In order to prevent skin can cer, you should apply at least a 30 SPF or higher sunscreen every single day.Just because it is hazy or cold outside, does not mean you should forget about wearing sunscreen that day.The suns ultraviolet rays can penetrate through the haze and cold to permanently dam age your skin.For more tips, go to: nasjacksonvillehomes.com/ resident-resources/safety. Balfour Beatty Communities promotes safety awareness JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013 21

PAGE 22

22 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013

PAGE 23

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013 23

PAGE 24

24 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013



PAGE 1

THURSDAY, JUNE 27, 2013 MOSQUITOES HELPING OUT MWR CLOSURES Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com An Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) inspection team recently recertified the NAS Jacksonville safety program for continuing Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) Star status during a recent command evaluation. The station was originally Star certified in April 2010, with the requirement to be recerti fied within three years. With this inspection, the station is certified though 2018 as long as mishap rates stay below established levels, said NAS Jacksonville Safety Manager Ron Williamson. The inspection involved a review of all OSHA requirements; a physical inspection of work places and interviews with randomly selected employees. There were very few and only minimal safety deficiencies found in the work spaces; employees interviewed knew the safety program fundamentals; and all OSHA regulatory requirements reviewed had necessary documentation. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders applauded the VPP Star team. Unlike many base inspections, VPP Star involves all personnel. Anyone could be ran domly interviewed and any shop could be inspected. Only a few minor deficiencies were found, and everyone interviewed was very positive and knowledgeable about their personal safety which is one reason why we remain the best shore base in the U.S. Navy. He continued, We also completed this inspection in the face of sequestration cuts, funding reductions and with impending fur lough days on the horizon. Passing an OSHA VPP Star inspection is difficult enough under normal circumstances but to complete this with as few findings as the base had and under the present difficult circumstances is remarkable. This was truly a total NAS Jacksonville team effort, said Williamson. This certification shows we have done everything possible to keep civilians and Sailors at NAS Jacksonville as safe as possible. Thanks again to everyone involved for keeping NAS Jax one of the few bases in the Navy with a VPP Star certified Star safety program. On June 9, VR-58 Detachment 5 departed for the Western Pacific area of responsibility initiating what will be an entire summers worth of C-40A Clipper logistical support to the fleet. The Clipper is a Boeing 737 that can be configured to carry passengers, cargo or a combination thereof, making it an ideal asset for use in the worlds largest theater. VR-58 Sunseekers Commanding Officer Cmdr. Rich Shettler asserts that its the hard work and ingenuity of the squadrons Sailors that make it all work. The greatest advantage of using VR squadrons for logistical support is the flexibility they provide by being able to react at a moments notice and execute missions virtually anywhere in the world. The C-40A is well suit Commander, Naval Air Forces Reserve visited the four Navy Reserve squadrons at NAS Jacksonville and NS Mayport recently. Rear Adm. Doug Asbjornsen held a series of meetings with senior leader ship as well as question and answer sessions with many of his Reservists and active-duty Sailors during a three-day tour of VR-58, VR-62 and VP-62 aboard NAS Jacksonville and HSL-60 at NS Mayport. He addressed topics ranging from the future of Reserve aviation, and Reserve manning, to liberty policies in the western Pacific. Cross-assignment of Reservists is a major issue for squadrons that have members in other states. These mem bers are actually assigned to two units one where they live and one where their actual billet is. Cross-assignment is an issue and we know it is an issue, Asbjornsen said. As people come off active duty, they have skills that we need to keep in the Navy because we are going to need those skills someday. Not every one chooses to live in a fleet concen tration area. That is why we have Navy Operational Support Centers in all 50 states. He said that senior leadership including Chief of Naval Reserve, Vice Adm. Robin Braun, is working to make the process smoother so that those Sailors can continue to participate in the Navy Reserve no matter where they live. Asbjornsen talked about the rele vance of anti-submarine warfare (ASW) in the 21st Century, with many nations and non-state actors rapidly expanding their submarine fleets, ASW is receiv ing an emphasis not seen since the Cold War ended more than 20 years ago. As the P-8A Poseidon becomes the Navys primary ASW airplane, Reserve squadrons, flying the P-3C Orion will deploy overseas to fill in for active-duty squadrons that are receiving and trainComic recounts personal story, promotes sound decision makingComedian Bernie McGrenahan offered a special performance for NAS Jacksonville Sailors June 18 to deter alcohol abuse, sexual assault and sui cide by sharing his testimony of his own personal learning experiences. Sponsored by U.S. Fleet Forces Command, McGrenahan travels the world entertaining the Armed Forces and using comedy to push across his message that touches on sensitive issues military members face today, including alcohol abuse, suicide and sexual assault. I use comedy as a bridge to the serious topic, said McGrenahan. I hope that through the laughter they will establish a little bit of a relationship with me. And then they will allow me to be serious so I can tell them about my life and where I came from. What I did, where it took me, what I lost and what it took to build me back up to get resilient and focused again, he added. The comedian opened with a 30-minute comedy routine before discussing some of the more troubling experiences that affected him during his early life. According to McGrenahan, he started drinking when he was in eighth grade and by the age of 18 he had a fake ID which he used to enter bars and meet girls with his friends. He implied that he never had a drinking OSHA recertifies station for Star status VR-58 Sunseekers depart for WESTPAC detachment Reserve air boss visits Jacksonville squadrons 4TH OF JULY

PAGE 2

2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013 June 27 1813 Frigate USS President anchors in Bergen, Norway. 1950 To support U.N. call to assist South Korea, President Truman autho rizes U.S. naval and air operations south of 38th parallel in Korea. June 28 1794 Joshua Humphreys appointed master builder to build Navy ships at an annual salary of $2,000. 1814 USS Wasp captures HMS Reindeer. 1865 CSS Shenandoah captures 11 American whalers in one day. 1970 USS James Madison (SSBN-627) completes conversion to Poseidon mis sile capability. June 29 1950 President Truman authorizes sea blockade of the Korean coast. 1950 Light cruiser USS Juneau (CL119) fires first naval shore bombard ment of Korean Conflict. June 30 1815 USS Peacock takes HMS Nautilus, last action of the War of 1812. 1943 Third Fleet Amphibious Force lands troops on Rendova Island while naval gunfire silences Japanese artil lery. July 1 1800 First convoy duty; USS Essex escorts convoy of merchant ships from East Indies to U.S. 1801 U.S. squadron under Commodore Dale enters Mediterranean to strike Barbary Pirates. 1850 Naval School at Annapolis renamed Naval Academy. 1851 Naval Academy adopts fouryear course of study. 1911 Trial of first Navy aircraft, Curtiss A-1. The designer, Glenn Curtiss, makes first flight in Navys first aircraft, A-1, at Lake Keuka, N.Y. Followed by Lt. Theodore G. Ellyson, the first naval aviator, for his two solo flights in A-1. 1914 Prohibition of alcohol begins in the Navy. 1916 Establishment of informal school for officers assigned to subma rines at New London, Conn. 1918 USSCovington hit without warning by two torpedoes from German Submarine U-86, sinking the next day. 1933 USS Constitution commences tour of principal U.S. seaports. 1946 First of two detonations in Operation Crossroads nuclear test. 1972 Date of rank of Rear Adm. Samuel Lee Gravely, Jr., who was first U.S. Navy admiral of African-American descent. July 2 1923 Commissioning of Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 1926 Distinguished Flying Cross authorized by Congress. 1937 Amelia Earhart disappears in Pacific. Navy conducts extensive unsuccessful search. 1945 USS Barb (SS-220) bombards Japanese installations on Kaihyo Island, Japan; first successful use of rockets against shore positions. 1946 Establishment of VX-3 to evaluate adaptability of helicopters to naval purposes. 1950 USS Juneau and two British ships sink five attacking North Korean torpedo boats and gunboats. 1967 During Operation Bear Claw, 7th Fleet Amphibious Force conducts helicopter assault 12 miles inland at Con Thien. July 3 1898 At Battle of Santiago, Cuba, Rear Adm. Sampsons squadron destroys Spanish fleet. 1950 USS Valley Forge (CV 45) and HMS Triumph participate in first carrier action of Korean Conflict. VF-51 aircraft shoot down two North Korean aircraft. The action is first combat test of F9F Panther and AD-1 Skyraider. July 4 1776 American colonies declare their independence from Great Britain. 1777 John Paul Jones hoists first Stars and Stripes flag on Ranger at Portsmouth, N.H. 1801 First Presidential Review of U.S. Marine Band and Marines at the White House. 1842 First test of electrically oper ated underwater torpedo sinks gunboat Boxer. 1863 Confederates surrender Vicksburg, Miss., giving Union forces control of Mississippi River. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Ford was 9 years old the day I dropped him off for his first Little League practice. He ran from the car with only his glove and a bottle of water then he turned around and came back. I dont think thats my team, he said, pointing with his thumb at the ball field behind him. I looked out across the playground and beyond the fence with yellow plastic on it. Boys who looked like small men were playing catch. They do look older, dont they? I said. But the coach said to meet here, and thats the field, so Ford headed to the ball field again, a little slower this time. As I watched him go, I noticed his loose baseball pants and how his small, bouncy steps were still those of a little boy. By the second year of Little League, Ford had grown an inch or two, but he was still the smallest on the team. Our league keeps players together and with the same coach for all four years, so Fords teammates the older ones, especially were like mentors for him. The experience of Little League was as much about the game as it was time in the dugout. On the field, what little experience Ford had was starting to show from the way he handled the ball to his more confi dent stance at the plate. But he still missed more pitches than he hit, and he usually got on base by way of the other teams errors. Ford began his third year of Little League with his younger brother Owen. It was an exciting season to be on the team. They won all but two games and went on to win the championship. Another highlight for Ford was when the coach asked him to pitch a few games. Physically, his shoulders were getting (just barely) broader, and he had outgrown some of his pants. Ford began his fourth and final year of Little League with Field of Dreams style aspirations. He was a team captain, one of the big kids that he remembered looking up to the ones who hit home runs or stole bases. But while some of his friends had already had their growth spurts, Ford was still among the shortest. He had become a great fielder with a soft glove, as one of the dads put it, and I no longer held my breath each time the ball came his way. I knew he would make the play. But he wasnt a big hitter. Ever aware that this was his last year, Ford went into each game with a growing sense of bitter sweetness. After the last game, the coach called Ford up in front of the team. He choked on his words as he said goodbye to him, and tears made tracks down Fords dirty face. You probably wanted a happy ending for this, but there isnt one. Ford never hit a home run. He wasnt the hot-shot pitcher. And he still hasnt hit his growth spurt. Whats worse: he didnt make the All Star team. These are moments we cant make better for our children. Ford shut himself in his room that night, angry at the world. While I cried myself, I took out his first and last years team pictures and looked at them side-by-side. At 9 years old, his big, eager smile said, I cant believe Im on Little League! At 12, his tough-guy stare with only a glimmer of a smile revealed just how tumultuous and ambiguous these years must feel. Little League was Fords boyhood, and now its gone. As the oldest of three brothers, he has no one to show him whats next. Yet, even though Ford has not reached his height, and hes stuck in the difficult place between a boy and a young man, when I looked at those pictures, I knew he had grown in per haps a more important way. He had just learned that we dont always get what we want, even when its all weve ever wanted. He learned that life sometimes feels unfair and not every thing comes easily. He had learned that wanting something and earning something are two different things. And soon, I hoped, he would also learn that disappointment gets easier over time, and, if we let it, makes us more determined in the future. It reminded me of a column entitled Lessons from the Dugout that I wrote when Ford first started tee-ball. I had wanted to go into the dugout and save him from kids who might make fun of him after missing the ball. But my husband had said, Do not go in the dugout. Some things, he told me, Ford had to learn on his own. So I wrote: I guess being a mother means allowing you to have experiences that will break my heart, even while they build your character.Rite of passage: Final year of Little League

PAGE 3

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013 3

PAGE 4

Heavy rains from Tropical Storm Debbie last year and Tropical Storm Andrea this year have resulted in the emergence of mosquitoes of frightening proportions commonly known as gal linippers. These mosquitoes are natu rally occurring in Jacksonville but the increased rainfall means they are expected to be present much larger numbers than the city is used to seeing. These gigantic mosquitoes are 20 times larger than typical mosquitoes and have a much more painful bite. The good news is that these blood suckers do not trans mit disease to humans unlike other local mosquitoes that are capable of transmitting West Nile Virus and dengue. Gallinippers are the largest blood feeding mosquitoes in North America and what really sets them apart from other mosquitoes is there persistence, said Cmdr. Peter Obenauer, assistant officer in charge, Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE). I have seen this mosquito land on a person wearing thick clothing and their mouth parts are able to pierce right through it. The gallinippers have already been found aboard NAS Jacksonville in larger numbers than usual. These mosquitoes are quite visible and fairly easy to find on base, said Lt. Marcus McDonough, NECE staff entomologist. I think the most important thing for the public to know about these giants is that while their appearance is scary these mosquitoes occur here naturally and the only real threat they pose is a painful bite compared to other mosquito species. In cooperation with local mosquito control districts and public health agen cies, NECE continually monitors mosquito and other insect populations throughout the year, looking for trends that may impact personnel, to include nuisance and disease carriers. When requested, NECE offers a range of support from consultation to control. Over the past 67 years, NECE has consistently responded to requests from the local community to provide insect control support, reducing the risk of disease from impacting civilians and our uniformed members and families who live outside the fence, said Cmdr. Eric Hoffman, NECE officer in charge. Developing and maintaining rela tionships with local public health officials ensures we are always aware of and responsive to threats that may impact our mission and the community. Whether through consultation or provid ing control, we are always standing by ready to assist. Whether a nuisance or disease carry ing mosquito, simple personal preventive measure will reduce the risk adversely affecting outdoor activities. Although local mosquito control dis tricts and public health departments do a tremendous job of controlling mosqui toes and other pests that carry human disease, everyone must play a role to ensure their efforts are successful, said Hoffman. Simple preventive measures to include using repellents, avoiding out door activities around dusk/dawn, wearing long pants/shirts, eliminating stand ing water around your home and ensur ing screening on windows and around porches and pools is in good repair will significantly reduce the risk of not only being bitten but possibly contracting disease. Effective methods to reduce exposure to mosquitoes are to apply mosquito repellant such as 25-30 percent DEET or picardin on exposed skin and spray clothing with permethrin. Be sure to wear long sleeved light colored shirts and pants whenever outdoors or in places where mosquitoes may be present. For assistance or information on con trol of any vector-bone disease contact NECE at NECE-FleetSupport@med.navy. mil For more information please see the NECE website at http://www.med.navy. mil/sites/nmcphc/nece. Huge mosquitoes expected in Jacksonville 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013

PAGE 5

A wrap-up celebration held June 18 at the NAS Jacksonville River Cove Catering and Conference Center officially ended the 2013 Navy Region Southeast Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) fund drive. This years fund drive generated more than $309,000 to ben efit Sailors, Marines and their families who receive assistance through loans and grants in times of need. The total amount of funds exceeded this years goal of $237,912 by 130 percent. This has been a real ly great fund drive. Our keypersons were tasked with a mission and they stepped up to the plate by contacting every individual within their commands. They were diligent and should be commended for mak ing this such a successful fund drive, said Lt. Fred Pacifico, of VP-30, who coordinated this years fund drive. NAS Jax NMCRS Director Monika Woods also thanked those who continue to make the event so successful. NMCRS asks ship mates to donate to the fund drive one time per year to help fellow Marines and Sailors. Our goal is for every service member to donate $1 per paycheck to help a fellow service member in a time need, stated Woods. One of the basic prin ciples of NMCRS is good stewardship of donated dollars, which is how we are able to continue recycling our donated dollars to provide interest free loans to those in need. So what does NMCRS do with all the money raised? Last year, the NAS Jax office served more than 2,000 individuals and distributed 1.4 million in assistance, said Woods. This years fund drive was an amazing success thanks to the continued support of Rear Adm. Scorby, VP-30 as fund drive chair and fund drive coordinator, Lt. Pacifico. His hard work and dedication to this project showed as the goal was exceeded by 130 percent, raising $309,173 for NMCRS. The fund drive is headed up each year by a specific command aboard the station, who over sees and coordinates the event. This year, VP-30 took charge. Pacifico praised VP-30 for their efforts in rais ing more than $47,000 including $25,060 with their annual NMCRS Golf Tournament. He also acknowledged the VP-10 Red Lancers for exceeding their goal by 190 percent with contribu tions totaling more than $13,602. Other key contributors included Naval Facilities Engineering Command which exceeded their goal by 326 percent by raising $6,000 and NS Guantanamo Bay, Cuba which exceeded their goal by 152 percent by contributing more than $25,500. The NAS Jax Navy Exchange was also recognized for participating in the fund drive by offering customers discounts for purchasing a $5 card to benefit the NMCRS. Navy Exchange Command raised $357,690 world wide in donations for the society. Also assisting with the fund drive were the Jacksonville Jaguars who donated indi vidual tickets and sea son passes to be raffled off. Commander, Navy Region Southeasts NMCRS keyperson, Lt. Dustin Lockerman was praised raising $570 for the fund drive through ticket sales. Also on hand at the celebration to thank the volunteers for their support during the fund drive was Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. This organization is all about shipmates help ing shipmates. With your assistance, we had another successful campaign this year, Scorby said. And, for everyone who played a part in this fund drive, who ensured there was 100 percent contact, and made sure contribu tion forms were distrib uted and collected, thank you. The campaign runs each year from March through May to allow military personnel and civilian employees to contribute to the society. For more information, contact the NMCRS office at 542-3515.Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the fed eral government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. NMCRS fund drive benefits military families JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013 5

PAGE 6

6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013 About 20 Sailors from Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) visited a non-profit, homeless shelter in downtown Jacksonville June 11 to deliver donated items and visit with people, including military vet erans who are rebuilding their lives through faith. FRCSE CMDCM Leonard Gage with the support of the FRCSE Chief Petty Officers Mess and the First and Second Class Petty Officers asso ciations organized a clothing drive and a visit to the City Rescue Mission (CRM), a faithbased organization that has served the homeless and needy since 1946. The Sailors delivered more than two tons of clothing, lin ens and toiletries donated by the workforce at the military aviation maintenance depot. I truly believe the CRM clothing drive is in our wheel house of providing support to the local community, said Gage. As for our visit to the shelter, our support will continue. It was eye opening for our Sailors. The need is there, and those who visited the mission will be forever changed. It was evident that our Sailors enjoyed talk ing with the residents who are dealing with various addictions and trying to rebuild their lives. I also believe the residents FRCSE Sailors visit homeless shelter, donate items/efforts

PAGE 7

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013 7 enjoyed seeing our men and women in uniform supporting their recovery efforts. I couldnt be more proud! The LifeBuilders Recovery Program helps people off the streets and back on their feet with an 18-month recovery track. Students enrolled in the program go from living in the shelter full-time to completing educational opportunities and living on their own. The mission, although rarely at capacity, can accommodate 165 stu dents. There are no televisions or games to play, and telephone use is restricted to once weekly. Students are encouraged to focus on getting their lives back together without outside distractions. Leading the CRM tour was Dwight Anderson, a senior residential assis tant who credits his relationship with Christ as the turning point in his life. It allowed him to kick his crack cocaine habit and eventually find peace during the last eight years of a 13-year stint in prison. I had my dope, a pillow, and I would have stayed in that tunnel for the rest of my life, said Anderson of his life prior to his conviction and incarceration. I found something greater than dope. It was Jesus Christ. A woman intro duced me to some literature in prison and within 30 days I found myself on my knee. The last eight years in prison I was at peace. I got born again! After his release from prison in 2005, Anderson found it difficult to land a job, but his life experiences made him ide ally suited for a job at CRM where he started working in 2007. He says the residents call him the warden or the drill sergeant because he runs a tight ship. During a tour through the bunk rooms, Anderson told the Sailors that CRM provides the best facilities for a free overnight stay. There are shower facilities for men and women at the shelter. Toiletries are provided, along with a clean change of clothing. Guests receive a free meal and attend a mandatory chapel service before bed. They are up at 4:30 a.m., eat breakfast at 5 and are out the door to do it all again. He said some homeless people pre fer to stay on the streets sleeping in the bushes, under a bridge, or in a tunnel as he did. Anderson said the shelter also offers a work program for men who have a job but who have hit hard times. For a small weekly fee, they are provided room and board until they can get their life back on track and transition out. The missionhas allowed the City of Jacksonville to use an annex on CRMproperty to create a Day Center at the State Street location, where clients will have access to computers, information about available services, or find shelter from extreme weather. FRCSE

PAGE 8

Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvillecomprised of its hospital and five branch health clinics (BHCs)Navy Operational Support Center (NOSC) Jacksonville and Navy Operational Health Support Unit (NR OHSU) Detachment G earned the Navy Surgeon Generals Health Promotion and Wellness Blue H for the fourth consecutive year for command excellence in health promotion for 2012. The Blue H award symbol izes our priority to provide the best care possible to each and every one of our patients our nations heroesand their families, stated Capt. Gayle Shaffer, NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer. People come from all over the nation to see us because we provide the highest quality care and best outcomes at our hospital and branch health clinics. NOSC Jacksonville and NH OHSU Detachment G each received the Gold Star level. At its hospital and Branch Health Clinics Jacksonville, Key West, Kings Bay and Mayport, NH Jacksonville received the Silver Eagle award and the Bronze Anchor award at its Branch Health Clinic Albany. Receiving the Navy Surgeon General Blue H award is a true reflection of our dedication and focus on health promotions that all the members of the entire Navy Operation Support Center medical team exhibit on a daily basis, said Capt. Jonathan Groh, NOSC Jacksonville medical officer. The Blue H award recog nizes excellence in clinical primary prevention services, community health promotion and medical staff health. The award assesses health topics such as alcohol abuse preven tion, injury prevention, nutri tion physical activity, psycho logical health, sexual health, tobacco cessation and weight management. A total of 271 Navy and Marine Corps active and reserve units were selected for the Blue H award, which is divided into three categories: Fleet, Medical and Semper Fit Center. Managed by The Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center, headquar tered in Portsmouth, Va., the annual Blue-H encourages and rewards the promotion of health in Navy and Marine Corps organizations. NH Jacksonvilles prior ity since its founding in 1941 is to heal the nations heroes and their families. The com mand is comprised of the Navys fourth largest hospital and five branch health clin ics across Florida and Georgia. On average each day, a dedi cated team of 2,500 military and civilians personnel sees 1,800 outpatients, admits 15 inpatients, cares for 80 people in the ER, performs 14 sameday surgeries, fills 4,700 pre scriptions, conducts 4,600 lab tests and delivers three babies. Additionally, up to eight per cent of its active duty staff is deployed around the globe providing combat, humanitarian and disaster care. For more information on Navy wellness programs, con tact NH Jacksonvilles Wellness Center at (904) 542-5292. For additional information on The Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center (NMCPHC), visit the Blue H website at: http:// www.med.navy.mil/sites/ nmcphc/health-promotion/ pages/blue-h.aspx A celebration was held June 5 for the newly-constructed emergency opera tions center (EOC) and disaster relief warehouse (DRW) in Forte Liberte, Haiti. The new facilities, located with in the Nord-Est Department of Haiti, were built as part of U.S. Southern Commands Humanitarian Assistance Program (HAP) in Haiti. The 4,000 square-foot EOC will pro vide a central hub for the local govern ment to coordinate response follow ing catastrophic events and report vital information to the Haitian govern ment for rapid decision making, said Lt. j.g. Blaine Henning, Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast (NAVFAC Southeast) Resident Officer in Charge of Construction (ROICC), Haiti. The 4,800 square-foot DRW should provide ample storage for items need ed to respond immediately following a major disaster. The warehouse also creates a place for supplies to be redistributed from a central area outside of the Haitian capital to help alleviate major supply chain issues discovered follow ing the 2010 earthquake, said Henning. In his comments during the ceremony the Haitian President, His Excellency Michel Martelly, thanked the U.S. gov ernment for the opportunities the newly-constructed emergency operations center (EOC) and disaster relief ware house (DRW) will provide to the Haitan government and its people. During the ceremony, the Haitian Minister of the Interior, Daniel Basile, signed the documents officially trans ferring the EOC and DRW from U.S. Southern Command to the government of Haiti. The two buildings will be managed and staffed by members of the local Directorate of Civil Protection (DPC), the equivalent of the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Participants in the inauguration cer emony were His Excellency, Michel Martelly, the President of Haiti; U.S. Coast Guard Cmdr. Richter Tipton, Senior Defense Official, U.S. Embassy; Daniel Basile, the Minister of the Interior; Hugo Charles, Delegue to the region; Guiteau Pierre, Fort Liberte Mayor; and Madame Jean Baptiste, Director of DPC. Also in attendance were Lt. j.g. Blaine Henning, NAVFAC Southeast ROICC Haiti; Mr. Greg Marcellous, NAVFAC Southeast construction manager for the project, Sgt. 1st Class Roland Laforest, the U.S. Southern Command HAP Manager and volunteers of the local DPC. The $1.4 Million EOC and DRW are part of 62 Humanitaran Assistance projects NAVFAC Southeast is admin istering the design and construction of for U.S. Southern Command on behalf of the Government of Haiti and the Haitian people. The $33M program is being executed, with ROICC Haiti oversight, through 20 contracts at 22 sites and will provide EOCs, DRWs, fire stations, medical clinics, community centers, and schools for the Haitian people. Hospital and reserve units receive Medical Blue H Award New facilities celebrated in Fort Libert, Haiti 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013

PAGE 9

problem because he and his friends only drank on week ends. By the time McGrenahan was 18, he already faced a large fine for a DUI. I made a bad decision to drive the 10 miles home that night. I saw the lights and was pulled over. I was fined $2,500 and lost my dream of getting a scholarship to play baseball in college. But I told myself, I didnt have a drinking problem and kept right on partying, he said. When I was 19, I was fired from my job for coming to work hung over. So what did I do, went right out and got drunk again. And, I made another bad decision to drive. Thats when I got my second DUI. Unfortunately, alcohol and drug abuse also impacted another member of his family, his younger brother, Scott. Scott was an aspiring model; he had everything going for him but he was on the same road I was drinking and being irresponsible. I could see it in him, but not myself. One day, I told him he needs to get it tighter and then I left the house. When I came home, an hour later, he had shot himself in the backyard. He was 19 and left behind our parents, my sister, me and his twin brother, said McGrenahan. When he pulled the trig ger, that bullet didnt just go through him. When you com mit suicide, you put a hole in the soul of your whole family. Even the death of his brother didnt stop McGrenahan from drinking. At age 26, I got my third DUI and ended up in Los Angeles County Jail for six months. My mom was the only one to visit me and I swore to her that I would stop the reckless behavior. I have been sober now for 25 years, he expressed to the large audience. McGrenahan emphasized the importance to avoid alco hol and drugs when stressed and to seek help when needing to speak with someone. Sailors should not turn to alcohol and drugs as a method of coping with stress because alcohol is a depressant, he said. Whatever you are drinking over, the pain, the turmoil-the stress, you just compounded it 10 times worse by adding alcohol, he said. The comedian implied to the Sailors he was not trying to get them to stop drinking but to avoid the abuse of alcohol, which could impact individu als with finances, relationships and jobs. I want Sailors to know to be responsible, have a plan, dont drink and drive, dont make crude comments, dont be physically, touchy, feely with people on the job or at a bar, he added. Many of the Sailors were impacted by McGrenahans message. FN Tysie Taylor, assigned to NAS Jax, said, We need to be concerned about each other. Sailors need to take care of Sailors. She added, I think the comedian definitely got his point across through his jokes and entertainment. He emphasized on the series of situations we can get ourselves into and reminded us that help is readily available. McGrenahan started his show in 1997, traveling across America entertaining students from various colleges and universities, and in 2007, he started working with the mil itary. I started this program because I was tired of lecture speakers who said if you go out and drink this will hap pen to you. I wanted to create a show with humor to stress the dangers of alcohol, drugs, sexual conduct and suicide, said McGrenahan, who also performs on late night comedy shows. COMEDIAN Members from U.S. Fleet Forces Command visited NAS Jacksonville on June 17 to provide Sexual Assault Prevention and Response (SAPR) and suicide prevention training to the senior leadership of Navy Region Southeasts tenant commands. The visit was in preparation for the SAPR/Suicide Prevention stand down that commands must complete before July 1. Additional topics of discussion included creating good command climates and proper treatment of Sailors. Nobody understands when a com mand is off track better than its Sailors, explained Capt. Kurt Johnson, inspec tor general with U.S. Fleet Forces Command. There are times when leadership might be shielded from a prob lem, creating a communication issue. Ultimately though, it is the senior leadership that Sailors turn to for guidance and the right answers, and it is the sole responsibility of the command triad to support the Sailors and their families, while still executing the mission. We all know that Sailors who are in a crisis can affect mission readiness. Johnson explained that the best commands in the fleet have one consistent quality: outstanding chain of command communication, both up and down. When leaders take the time to interact with their Sailors, it shows that they FFC provides SAPR and suicide awareness training at NAS Jax JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013 9

PAGE 10

ing with the new aircraft stateside. A detachment from VP-62 has already deployed to Japan to augment VP-26 during this transition. The reality is youre going to be around until the P-8 transition is complete, Asbjornsen said. What you need to do, is knock em dead in WESTPAC. Speaking to the Chiefs mess at HSL-60, Asbjornsen continued on the ASW theme. Become even better at ASW. No other service can do ASWits a Navy thing. If were ever called, any where in the world, weve got to get those subs fast. Speaking to the VR Sailors, Asbjornsen said, You play an absolutely critical role. If we have to fight, we have to have logistical support. The fleet logistics support community is unique to Reserve aviation. There is no active-duty equivalent flying C-130 or C-40 transport aircraft. In light of several high profile liberty incidents, Asbjornsen stressed the importance of being good ambassadors and representatives of the United States and the Navy both at work and after work. Your choices, on liberty and profes sionally, can have an impact on our capability, he said. ADMIRAL VISITSed for this kind of tasking, but its men and women of the VR squadrons, including the Sunseekers, that make it such a success, said Shettler. VR-58 is a Navy Reserve squadron that consists of selected reservists and full-time support Sailors. The composition of this squad ron allows for a wide range of skill sets, talent and experience to be brought to the table, Shettler said. As a result, we are able to operate safely and effectively around the globe often with little or no outside support. Detachment 5 will fly missions in support of multi-national exer cises and will be prepared to meet the logistics needs of the Pacific Theater, including disaster relief when necessary. This squadron participat ed in Operation Tomodachi, the Japanese tsunami relief effort in 2011, and our Sailors showed their true colors by stepping up to the plate, stated Shettler. I expect Detachment 5 to be ready to do the same. care. It also leads to increased job satisfaction and motivation. Every command triad should be mak ing a great effort to communicate with their Sailors and learn of their concerns, Johnson continued. Guidance for SAPR and Suicide prevention was the main focus of the training, with Marie Parker, Fleet SAPR program manager, standards and conduct officer with U.S. Fleet Forces Command, out lining new changes to these programs and discussing growing trends that are being investigated. It may come as a surprise, but what we have found is that the majority of sexual assault cases are not alcohol related, Parker remarked. Ninety-five percent of the victims of blue on blue sexual assault tend to be E-5 and below, with only thirty percent of those cases involving alcohol. Sixty-five percent of the offenders are E-5 and below, with another thirty percent being committed by senior enlisted or officers. According to Parker, the majority of sexual assault crimes are incidences of unwanted physical contact in workspaces, stressing that commands must encourage bystander intervention and pro vide constant SAPR training to protect their Sailors. Parker concluded by outlining a new direction the Navy was considering with suicide prevention: developing a new program devoted specifically to the issue instead of just including it as a topic during general military training (GMT). She also encouraged command leadership to continue to be vigilant, and to focus on turning every Sailor into a sensor to identify warning signs. Suicidal ideation is a coping problem, and its extremely important that commands educate their Sailors on detecting changes and warning signs with individuals so we can get them the help they need, Parker explained. We are currently in the development of a whole suicide prevention pro gram that will be more than simply a topic dis cussed in a GMT, so commands can expect that in the near future. U.S. Fleet Forces Command will continue working with Navy Region Southeast in developing improved SAPR and suicide prevention training. SAPR VR-58 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013

PAGE 11

When furloughs are implemented, most military commissaries, includ ing NAS Jacksonville, will close one day a week on Mondays, said the director and CEO of the Defense Commissary Agency. The closures will be for up to 11 days between July 8 and Sept. 30. Closing commissaries on Mondays would be in addition to any day stores are routinely closed. The 148 stores that routinely close on Mondays would also close the next normal day of operation. Other than the furlough day, there are no other changes planned for store operation hours. The announcement comes as DeCA follows Department of Defense proto cols related to the automatic federal government budget reductions, known as sequestration, which began March 1. Like most DOD activities, DeCA is mandated by the Department to furlough its civil service employees. Furlough notices are scheduled to be delivered to DeCA employees between May 28 and June 5. DeCA has 247 commissaries with more than 16,000 employees operat ing in 13 countries and two U.S. territories. Furloughs will impact all of DeCAs more than 14,000 U.S. civilian employees. We know that any disruption in commissary operations will impact our patrons, said Joseph Jeu, DeCAs director and CEO. Also, we understand the tremendous burden this places on our employees, who, when furloughed, will lose 20 percent of their pay. We deter mined that Monday closures would present the least pain for our patrons, employees and industry partners. As sequestration continues, com missary customers can quickly find out about any changes to their local stores operating schedule by going to www.commissaries.com clicking on the Locations tab, then Alphabetical Listing, finding their store and clicking on local store information. Patrons are reminded that because sequestra tion is so fluid, DeCAs plan for this budget-cutting measure is subject to change. DeCA decided on Monday closures after weighing the potential disrup tion to patrons and suppliers of having rolling furloughs, where closure dates would differ from store to store. Universal Monday closures are less disruptive to shoppers and the agencys industry partners vendors, suppliers and distributors who deliver products daily to DeCAs commissaries. Select locations overseas will open if they have an adequate local national staff. However, if an overseas store is closed, its local national staff will report to work and perform other store-related duties. In January, DoD released guidance to allow defense components to plan for potential budget cuts by reducing operating costs. In line with that direction, DeCA later executed the following budget-cutting measures: conferences, training and any other events and activities considered non critical to the agencys mission. Worldwide Case Lot Sales for all com missaries. Instead, stores are conduct ing smaller-scale events such as out door sidewalk sales. compensatory time unless deemed mission-critical. restrict any increases. unless legally required. Reserve on-site sales scheduled after July 8 until further notice. We are in this together, Jeu said, and though limited in our ability by circumstances we cannot control, I assure you we will do all we can to mitigate the impact of sequestration on our patrons, employees and industry part ners, and on our mission. For more information about the NAS Jacksonville Commissary hours of oper ations, call 542.5311.Commissaries plan for Monday furloughs JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013 11

PAGE 12

12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013

PAGE 13

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013 13

PAGE 14

It was all smiles and high fives when five young Girl Scouts handed out cookies to about 900 Sailors assigned to Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), the largest tenant command aboard NAS Jacksonville, June 18. Girl Scouts Jordan Varrasse, Caitlin Varrasse, Lyric Etienne, DeMoni Wilson and Jasmine Wiggins presented each Sailor with free boxes of Trefoils and Tagalongs, along with their sincere thanks for the Sailors service. The Girls Scouts of Gateway Council donated 400 cases of Trefoils and Tagalongs to the active duty service members in recognition of their per sonal sacrifice in defense of the nation. FRCSE Command Master Chief (CMDCM) Leonard Gage and Gloria Ederer, a management assistant assigned to the indus trial busi ness office, coordi nated the event at Hangar 1000 where the major ity of the Sailors work. Ederer said the cookie giveaway was a result of her involvement with the Girl Scout council in past years to distribute cookies to deployed military personnel and civilian coworkers. I wanted to show my appreciation to the troops and provide a means of saying thank you for all they do, said Ederer. When Anita Walton, the direc tor of product sales, contacted me in the March or April timeframe with a proposal to distribute excess cookies to the troops, I knew it was a great opportunity for our command. Walton said the Girl Scouts continu ously do service projects, and the cookie distribution seemed like a perfect fit to show the scouts gratitude for the selfless contributions of those serving on active duty. We have customers who make purchases just for this purpose, but we dont often get to present them to Sailors said Walton. It brings our work to fruition. During their visit, the Girl Scouts accompanied by Walton and Mary Anne Jacobs, the chief executive officer of the Girl Scouts of Gateway Council, had a unique opportunity to visit the Paraloft in the Survival Equipment (600) division. Sailors maintain and repair flight clothing, rubber life rafts, lifejackets, oxygen-breathing gear, protective clothing and air-sea rescue equipment. Jacobs said she would like to see everybody serving in the Armed Forces receive Girl Scout cookies. She was surprised to learn that several of the scouts did not realize women served in the Navy. Im a big believer in, if they can see it, they can be it, she said of scouts who aspire to pursue careers in fields held predominately by males. PRC Brian Petros led the tour through the Survival Equipment division. Everyone here was excited to see the scouts and the cookies.Girl Scouts donate cookies to FRCSE Sailors for service to nation The possession of explosives and fireworks for sale, storage or use of any description on NAS Jacksonville prop erty is strictly prohibited. Fireworks are spectacular to watch, and make great noises, but can be extremely dangerous in the hands of amateurs. NAS Jacksonville Fire Prevention Division recommends attending public fireworks displays, because those shows are safer and have better visual displays than what might be accomplished at your home.Fireworks prohibited at NAS Jacksonville 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013

PAGE 15

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013 15

PAGE 16

When a man has looked directly into the face of poverty and devastation, he often finds an overwhelming drive to make a difference in the lives and wel fare of others. HM2 Rene Lumene, a native of Miami, has been driven by this compassion and determination since he was a young man. Navy Reservist Lumene works as a dental X-ray technician at Naval Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville. He has worked in the health care industry for more than seven years, and in his civilian career, he is the practice manager of a specialty medical practice in Clay County. Im a compassionate person by nature, said Lumene. I just want to be able to help people in any way possible. This is the reason I turned to Navy medicine, as an ave nue for me to exercise my compassion, while simultaneously sustaining a productive career. Lumene said that Navy training taught and reinforced the principle of attention to detail, which continues to help him excel in his work and stud ies. He enlisted in the Navy in 2005. After attending C School at the Naval School of Sciences in Portsmouth, Va., he graduated as a surgical technician. Since then, Lumene has continued to gain knowledge and skills with an ongoing drive to further his education. He earned an Associates degree in Healthcare Administration in 2008, followed by a Bachelors degree in Healthcare Management in 2009. After completing his active-duty obligation in 2010, Lumene opted to reenlist in the Navy Reserve to take advantage of earned educational benefits and continue developing his civilian career. Last year, he earned a dual Masters degree in Health and Business Administration from Webster University. Lumene believes that the training and responsibilities that are part of being a Navy corpsman and petty officer have helped him to embrace the responsibilities and challenges that he faces daily as a business leader. As a civilian, he manages two occu pational medical clinics and serves as vice president of the We R Love Foundation, a non-profit organization established in 2009 to help pro vide opportunities and mentorship to underprivileged youth in the commu nity by supplying basic educational needs, such as stationery, book bags and textbooks. The organization is now affiliated with an affordable car-buying program for low-income adults. Lumene hopes that one day his organization will be able to help fund medical missions to needy places like Haiti, where he has many extended family members. I remember my first visit to Haiti in 2009, seeing the kids, conditions and poverty that they were living in, said Lumene. I really wanted to do something to help change that. He deployed a year later to Haiti aboard the hospital ship USNS Comfort (T-AH-20), as part of Operation Unified Response-providing humanitarian aid, after the devastating 2010 earthquake. This is where he had the opportunity to help, by translating Creole and assisting Navy surgeons during treatment of patients with orthopedic trauma. For all the Navy has helped him accomplish, Lumene attributes much of it to mentorship. Be motivated and seek mentors who are doing what you want to be doing, said Lumene. Let them take you under their wing, and learn from them so that you can accomplish your dreams. Learn from those who have gone before you and always try to learn something new. The Navy is a great place for this! Jacksonville Reservist lends a healing hand 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013

PAGE 17

The intramural softball championship began June 10 as VP-16 quickly put up four runs in the top of the first inning. John Manderville tripled and scored on Jacob Hesselbachers infield hit. Later, Jose Gomez drove in two runs with a single and Juan Santiago scored Brian Johnson on a fielders choice. VP-30 got one run back in the bottom of the first inning after Jeff Labrake hit a triple to score Dave Heber. Labrake was thrown out at home trying to stretch his triple into an inside the park homer. VP-16 rallied in the top of the third with five runs. The big blow came after Gomezs three-run homer with VP-16 building a 9-1 lead. VP-30 came alive in the bottom of the third with three walks and a pop fly hit. Also helping was Labrake, who had a two-run single fol lowed by Kevin Browns tworun single. Jason Porter and Patrick Bilicki also drove in runs in the rally. VP-30 had scored seven runs in the bot tom of the third inning and now trailed by only one run with the score of 9-8. VP-16 made it 12-9 scoring three times in the top of the fourth inning. Chris Estes, Hesselbacher and Johnson all had runs batted in for VP-16 during the inning. VP-30 put up another big inning in the bottom of the fourth. Xavier Gonzales start ed it with a solo homer. Then Labrake hit a three-run home run as VP-30 took its first lead of the game 16-12. William Glaze, Bilicki, Robert Kinion and Gonzalez all drove in the runs for VP-30. The score stayed 16-12 until the last inning. VP-16 was barely hanging on with two outs. However, Shawn Gloyd of VP-16 hit a two-run triple and then scored to make it 16-15. With the tying run on base and two outs in the bottom of the seventh inning, VP-16s Estes hit a drive that hit the fence in centerfield as VP-16s tying runner made a break for home plate. Meanwhile, the relay from the outfield came to Heber in shallow centerfield. Heber threw a strike to home plate and nailed the VP-16 runner at the plate to end the game with VP-30 winning the championship 16-15. VP-30s Jeff Labrake led the way going four for four with a triple and a homerun driving in six runs. Dave Heber also had a fine day, collecting three hits and scoring three times. Jason Hesselbacher had three hits for VP-16. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown has created a Summer Basketball League for youth ages 10 to 18 years old. Browns Summer Basketball League will have its first games July 8 and will culminate with the championship games at the Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena Aug. 8. This initiative is to help keep the youth in our community focused on doing great things and being fit, Brown said. There are so many lessons that the game of basketball teaches, and cre ating this league in the summer fills a void that can keep children focused on goals and teamwork. The league will feature four age groups: Under 12, Under 14, Under 16, and Under 18. Teams will sign up through the City of Jacksonville Parks & Recreation Department (JaxParks); the fee is $75 per team. League registration will continue through June 30. Any individu als looking to join or create a team can contact the Parks & Recreation Department to get more informa tion or visit JaxParks.com. VP-30 wins intramural softball championship New summer city basketball league slated JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013 17

PAGE 18

Deweys Call 542-3521 Free Live Entertainment June 28 Jason Lamar Freedom Lanes Bowling Center Call 542-3493. Free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 1 6 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer Going on now through Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 years and younger receive one free game of bowling every day until 5 p.m. Win prizes all summer long! Fitness & Aquatics Call 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Lap Swim (water park, water slide and concessions are not open) Monday Friday 6 8 a.m. & 6 7 p.m. Recreational Swim (water park, waterslide and concessions are open) Monday Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. 2013 Learn to Swim Program Session 2 July 8-18 Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1 Summer Splash Outdoor Pool Party June 29, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free food, games and prizes! Private pool parties can be reserved at the fitness center Parties are not available during regular business hours of operation and occur in the evenings when the pool is closed. Parties must be reserved ten days prior to party date, payment due at time of reservation. For more information, call (904) 542-3518 I.T.T. Events Call 542-3318. Jacksonville Jaguars tickets on sale Friday, July 12 $70 section 147 Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Daytona International Speedway Subway Firecracker July 5 and Coke 400 July 6 Tickets on sale now! Amelia Island Museum of History $10 family pass, Ghost tour $8 adult, $4 child The Vault Liberty Recreation Center Trips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Orange Park Mall & Movie Trip July 6 at 5 p.m. $5 per person Mandarin Mills Putt-Putt Trip July 13 at 6 p.m. $5 per person Jacksonville Beach Trip July 20 at 9 a.m. NAS Jax Golf Club Golf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees July 9 & 23 for active duty June 27, July 11 & 25 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Loudmouth Thursday Any golfer wearing a pair of loudmouth shorts or pants plays 18 holes with cart for $20 Open to military, DoD and guests Junior Golf Clinic Session 2, July 1519, ages 610 Session 3, July 29 Aug. 2, ages 1117 $110 per child, per session Mulberry Cove Marina Call 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina July 20, 21, 27 & 28 Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27 Auto Skills Center Call 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite! Youth Activities Center Call 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Movie Under the Stars July 19 at 8:30 p.m. Patriots Grove Americas Kids Run June 28 at 9 a.m. Ages 5 12 Sign-up at the youth center Flying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School Aug. 5 Sept. 16 $500 per person Personal finances surviving the furlough Are you financially pre pared for the furlough? Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) financial educators are offering a presentation regarding the financial health of furloughed fed eral workers. They will provide financial information in order for personnel to make informed deci sions. Visit FFSCs Facebook page for information on training regarding the sequestration and fur lough situation. If you are interested in FFSCs Personal Financial Manager visiting your command or department to provide training, call 542-5745. The presentation, Personal Finances, Before and After a Furlough, is available to civilians, active duty and family members. Retiree eventMeet your Retired Affairs Office Program advisors ask questions, get information about post military/ retired survi vor ben efits, pay issues, etc. Navy Exchange/ Commissary Food Court June 28, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. members, spouses and family members. 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013

PAGE 19

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013 19

PAGE 20

The following are changes to NAS Jacksonville Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department facilities due to the Continuing Resolution/ Sequestration issues: Fitness Hours of operation for fitness centers will be reduced to 90 hours per week. In order to comply with this directive, 10 hours per week have been reduced. The Zone Gymnasium operations will be as follows: Monday-Thursday (5 a.m. to 8 p.m.); Friday (5 a.m. to 1 p.m.) and Saturday-Sunday (closed). The fitness center hours will be: Monday-Thursday (5 a.m. to 8 p.m.); Friday (5 a.m. to 7 p.m.); Saturday-Sunday (7 a.m. to 3 p.m.). Swimming pools: Only one pool will be open per installation. The outdoor pool is open through Sept. 8 the following days and times for recreational swimming: Monday-Friday (11 a.m. to 7 p.m.) and SaturdaySunday (11 a.m. to 6 p.m.). Lap swimming is offered each morning from 6-8 a.m. The indoor pool will remain closed until October 2013. Intramural Sports: Captains Cup competitions will continue with condensed scheduling; winners will be based on double elimination tournaments, offi cials will be provided. If the teams agree to a round robin competition, volunteer officials will be utilized. Single and dual sporting events will not have officials. Greybeard league will have volunteer officials. Group exercise classes: Classes with volunteer instructors will continue. Classes will include spin, muscle max, Zumba, Pilates, power yoga, max core and step. Class schedules will be posted at the fitness source. CFL and NOFFS classes will continue. Liberty Liberty hours will be as follows: Monday-Friday (11 a.m. to 1 p.m.) and (4-10 p.m.); Saturday, holidays (Noon to 10 p.m.) and Sundays (closed). Off base trips will no longer be subsidized. Transportation will be provided. Awarding of gift cards and other prizes will be eliminated unless part of a sponsorship program. Category B Programs The Auto Skills Center hours of operation will be: Monday (Noon to 8 p.m.); Tuesday-Wednesday (closed); Thursday-Friday (noon to 8 p.m.); Saturday (9 a.m. to 5 p.m.); Sunday (closed) and holidays (9 a.m. to 3 p.m.). Outdoor recreation and the marina will oper ate: Monday (8 a.m. to 3 p.m.); Tuesday-Wednesday (closed); Thursday (8 a.m. to 8 p.m.); Friday (8 a.m. to 8 p.m.); Saturday-Sunday (7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.) and holidays (7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.). Child Development Center no change in operations. School Age Care Programs no impact to operations. This program also supports summer and holiday camps which will be business as usual. Youth open recreation and teen program hours will be cancelled. All Programs No free set-up of tents, chairs and/or tables unless it is in support of a signed contract with an MWR catering facility. If MWR is catering an event, tents, tables and chairs will be provided at no additional cost. A set-up fee will be charged if not in support of a catered event. Special Event/Entertainment Special/community events to include family and fitness events will be canceled unless funded 100 percent by commercial sponsorship/advertising. For more information, call the MWR Administration office at 542-3111. Once again, its time for the 101 Critical Days of Summer campaign that runs from Memorial Day weekend to after Labor Day cor responding with the largest vaca tion period of the year. The sun is shining and people are out swimming, boating, vis iting family and friends far away, playing and having a good time. With all those fun summer activities there is a potential for increased risk. Motor Vehicle Safety Tips Every year nearly 36,000 people are killed and more than 3.5 mil lion people are injured in motor vehicle crashes, making it the leading cause of unintentional injuries and death for people between the ages of 1 and 33. There are many different issues affecting families traveling on the road and simple steps to reduce your likelihood of getting into a motor vehicle crash. Follow these tips to stay safe while traveling this summer: hours. hours. better to get there late than not at all. Perform a safety check on your vehicle before getting on the road. Be sure to check: oil, brakes, tire wear and air pressure, coolant, power steering fluid, windshield wipers, and spare tire (air pressure, jack and lug wrench Use TRiPS for your Trip: For more info on trip planning visit the TRiPS (Travel Risk Planning System) website at: https://trips. safety.army.mil/marines/login.asp x?ReturnUrl=%2fmarines%2fdefa ult.aspx Close the Motorcycle Training Gap In 2011, motorcycle riders were responsible for 64 percent of the Navys PMV fatalities, but motor cyclists comprise only 10 percent of motor vehicle operators. Of the Navys 16 motorcycles fatalities in 2011, sport bike riders are overrepresented. They equal 75 percent of this years fatalities, but comprise only 42 percent of the overall number of motorcycle operators. Its obvious that sport-bike rid ers are extremely high risk and we need to get those riders trained. A typical motorcycle fatality involves a sport bike rider in their first year of riding who is under 30 and has no formal training. To combat this, the Navy now requires that: ride must take the Basic Rider Course within 30 days of purchasing a motorcycle. take the Military Sportbike Rider Course 60 days after completing the BRC. Experienced Rider Course. every three years. See your command Motorcycle Safety Representative or call Cindy Picklesimer at 542-2584 to sign up for classes. Base facilities impacted by CR/Sequestration Military can visit museums for free During the busy season of military transfers, adjusting to new communities and registering children for school, more than 2,000 museums across the nation will open their doors, free of charge, to service members and their families as a break from the summer challenges, a Defense Department official said today. Now through Labor Day, Sept. 2, all active duty service members, National Guardsmen and reservists and their families can take advantage of this cultural and educational opportunity in all 50 states. A record number of museums are participating this year. 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013

PAGE 21

Have you come across the Balfour Beatty Communities Zero Harm logo or had the opportunity to meet BAL-4 or B-T, the defenders of our communities? Many of our residents rec ognize the Zero Harm yellow banner and our robot friends but what do they stand for? Safety is a company focus at Balfour Beattysafety of our residents, contractors, and employees. Zero Harm More than just a slogan, Balfour Beatty puts safety at the forefront of every move we make. If you notice any unsafe practices or are con cerned about the safety in your home or community, please contact the Balfour Beatty Communities office at 9080821. BAL-4 & B-T While parents and neigh bors within our communities protect and serve our coun try, BAL-4 and his sidekick B-T educate and empower children within our commu nities to protect themselves and their family and to live safe and strong lives. For safety and environmental games and activities and to learn more about BAL-4 & B-T visit the Kids Corner section of your property website! In celebration of National Safety Month, Balfour Beatty called on our all-star employ ees to share safety tips with our residents. See below for safety snippets for the full-length articles, visit our Better Living Blog at http://betterliving.bal fourbeattycommunities.com Taken from Distracted Behind the Wheel by Jessica Ennis, LifeWorks coordina tor, NS Mayport Homes, Text messaging behind the wheel has become the most concerning type of distracted driv ing because it involves visual, manual and cognitive atten tion from the driver. According to the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute, text messaging creates a crash risk 23 times worse than driv ing without distractions. Also, sending or receiv ing texts while driving takes the drivers eyes off the road for approximately 4.6 seconds. This action is equivalent to driving the length of a football field, blind-folded at 55 mph. Luckily, distracted driving is something that is easily pre vented just by being aware of your behavior. The Governors Highway Safety Association suggests turning off your phone or silencing it before getting into your vehicle. Another tip is to set up a special message that you can send callers to let them know that you are driving. If there is an emergency, pull over to a safe area to respond. Finally, make sure you are familiar with local laws as many states prohibit the use of hand held devices while driv ing. Taken from Skin Care Safety by Kristen Connor, resident specialist/LifeWorks coordinator, NAVSTA Newport Homes, Applying sunscreen to exposed areas of your body including face, neck, arms, and legs should be one of the most important things you do each morning. Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States, and 90 percent of skin cancers occur because of exposure to ultra violet sunrays. In order to prevent skin cancer, you should apply at least a 30 SPF or higher sunscreen every single day.Just because it is hazy or cold outside, does not mean you should forget about wearing sunscreen that day.The suns ultraviolet rays can penetrate through the haze and cold to permanently dam age your skin.For more tips, go to: nasjacksonvillehomes.com/ resident-resources/safety. Balfour Beatty Communities promotes safety awareness JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013 21

PAGE 22

22 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013

PAGE 23

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013 23

PAGE 24

24 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 27, 2013