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Jax air news ( May 30, 2013 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA SLAF
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012

Material Information

Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 30, 2013
Publication Date: 06-20-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02047

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012

Material Information

Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 30, 2013
Publication Date: 06-20-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02047


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THURSDAY, JUNE 20, 2013 NO MORE DECALS CLEANUP VP-30 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (HST CSG) is underway for its final sustainment exercise (SUSTAINEX) before its upcoming deployment. Aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) departed Naval Station Norfolk June 5 along with embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3. First Combined Destroyer Squadron staff, have joined guided-missile cruisers USS San Jacinto (CG 56), USS Gettysburg (CG 64) and guided-missile destroyers USS Bulkeley (DDG 84) and USS Mason (DDG 87) for the exercise. The cruisers and destroyers departed their home ports of NS Norfolk, Va. and NS Mayport, Fla. May 31. The ships and embarked units training together are focusing on maritime security operations, air Environmental compliance director tours base ecosystemThe NAS Jacksonville environmental team hosted Richard Mach, director of Environmental Compliance and Restoration Policy in the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Environment on June 11. His visit focused on reviewing the bases envi ronmental sustainability programs. Mach was provided a tour that showed off facilities and on going plans to maintain the stations record of environmental and energy excellence. NAS Jax Environmental Director Kevin Gartland kicked off the tour by driving along the airfield as he described the stations Bird Aircraft Strike Hazard (BASH) collision prevention program thats managed under an agreement with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The program includes a periodic Wildlife Hazard Assessment that helps measure the impact of birds and mammals on operations at naval aviation installations. Gartland explained, USDA wildlife experts and base natural resources staff understand the habitat and feeding preferences of each bird species as well as how to reduce environmental factors that attract birds. He noted that new habitat was being developed on base to attract the least tern (the smallest of American terns), which normally nests on sandy Southern beaches or the shores of major waterways, such as the St. Johns River. The NAS Jax least tern demonstration project is a great sustainable land use idea. It will use a large, closed landfill to support new least tern habitat far away from critical airfield operations said Mach. I look forward to hearing the results of relocating the least terns away from the hazardous airfield environ ment. Gartland also discussed the stations commitment to safe fueling practices, as well as avoiding other hazardous materials spills. He pointed out some of the spill response kits located at commands that operate in proximity to the airfield. NAS Jax is one of the top shore installations in naval aviation for practicing responsible environ mental policies and we have the awards to prove it, Gartland commented. Its a team effort here, from our commanding officer (Capt. Bob Sanders) to the deckplate Sailors who operate the base recycling center. We are constantly inspecting and following up with tenant commands to ensure we meet compliance requirements. Mach also visited the stations Black Point Interpretive Center near the Mulberry Cove Marina. Its a community outreach facility that exhibits local wildlife and functions as an environmental teaching tool. Public school children and Scouts are frequent visitors to the center where they learn about best practices that help to leave a greener footprint in the community. NAS Jacksonvilles consistent outreach to schools and other community organizations is a great initia tive resulting in a positive impact for the overall base The South Carolina Army National Guard 1st Battalion/151st Attack Reconnaissance Battalion (ARB) participated in joint exercises June 9-16 with the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group off the coast of northeast Florida in the Atlantic. Operating from NAS Jacksonville, the ARB detachment of 45 aircrew, maintainers and ord nancemen flew their six AH-64D Apache Longbow helicopters in Nomads detach to PACOMThe VR-62 Nomads depart ed NAS Jacksonville June 15 for their scheduled logistics detach ment cycle to serve U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM). Just 40 days after return ing from our U.S. European Command (EUCOM) detach ment, the Nomads are back on the road to PACOM, said VR-62 Operations Officer Lt. Cmdr. Todd Nichols. The Nomads are always hun gry for a new challenge when it comes to supplying our military customers logistics needs. The detachment of 23 Nomads, made up of Selected Reservists and Full Time Support Sailors, will be deployed for 90 days and rotate crews every two to three weeks. Nichols added, This is the Nomads third and final detach ment for FY-13. Our squadron of C-130T Hercules aircraft recently completed two detachments one in U.S. Central Command and one in EUCOM and were ready to finish the fiscal year on a high note at PACOM. He added that VR-62 has been recognized by Commander, Naval Air Force Reserve, with the 2012 Battle E award, the Golden Wrench award, and The Golden Anchor award. Most recently, a Nomad crew directed the rescue of five survi vors who floated for seven days on the Pacific Ocean in a 19-foot skiff. Based at NAS Jacksonville, VR-62 is one of five Navy Reserve C-130T squadrons serving the Navys high-priority logistics needs around the globe. Truman Strike Group underway for SUSTAINEXApaches join Truman overseas deployment certification

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS June 20 1813 Fifteen U.S. gunboats engage three British ships in Hampton Roads, Va. 1815 Trials of Fulton I, built by Robert Fulton, are completed in New York. This ship would become the Navys first steam-driven warship. 1898 U.S. forces occupied Guam, which became first colony of U.S. in the Pacific. 1913 First fatal accident in Naval Aviation, Ensign W. D. Billingsley killed at Annapolis, Md. 1934 Commander in Chief, Asiatic Fleet Admiral Frank Upham reports to CNO that, based on analyses of Japanese radio traffic, any attack by (Japan) would be made without previ ous declaration of war or intentional warning. 1944 Battle of Philippine Sea ends with Japanese losing two aircraft carri ers and hundreds of aircraft. June 21 1898 USS Charleston captures island of Guam from Spain. 1945 Okinawa declared secure after most costly naval campaign in history. U.S. had 30 ships sunk and 223 dam aged, mostly from kamikaze attacks, with 5,000 dead and 5,000 wounded, while the Japanese lost 100,000 dead June 22 1807 HMS Leopard attacks USS Chesapeake. 1865 Confederate raider Shenandoah fires last shot of Civil War in Bering Strait. 1884 Navy relief expedition under Cmdr. Winfield Schley rescues Lt. A.W. Greely, and six others from Ellesmere Island, where they were marooned for three years. 1898 Adm. Sampson begins amphibious landing near Santiago, Cuba. June 23 1933 Commissioning of USS Macon, the Navys last dirigible. 1961 Navys first major low-fre quency radio station commissioned at Cutler, Maine. 1972 Navy helicopter squadron aids flood-stricken residents in WilkesBarre, Scranton, and Pittstown areas of Pennsylvania. June 24 1833 USS Constitution enters dry dock at Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston, Mass., for overhaul. The ship was saved from scrapping after public support ral lied to save the ship following publica tion of Oliver Wendell Holmes poem, Old Ironsides. 1926 Office of Assistant SecNav set up to foster naval aeronautics; aircraft building increased. 1948 Berlin airlift initiated to offset the Soviet Unions blockade access of U.S., France, and Great Britain to their sectors of Berlin. June 25 1917 Navy convoy of troopships car rying American Expeditionary Forces arrives in France. 1950 North Korea invades South Korea, beginning the Korean Conflict. June 26 1884 Congress authorizes commis sioning of U.S. Naval Academy gradu ates as ensigns. 1918 U.S. Marines brigade captures Belleau Wood, France. 1959 Twenty-eight naval vessels sail from Atlantic to Great Lakes, marking the formal opening of Saint Lawrence Seaway to seagoing ships. 1962 NAVFAC Cape Hatteras makes first Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS) detection of a Soviet diesel submarine. 1973 Navy Task Force 78 completes minesweeping of North Vietnamese ports. A Pew Research report says that 40 percent of American households are supported by a working mother reflects changing views of gender roles in our society. But it also partly explains dramatic shifts in the military family culture and how it relates to fathers that have taken place in just one generation. When I was born in 1976, my Navy dad (who was on his first deployment) received news of my arrival through a tele gram New baby girl. Named Sarah. Mother and baby doing well. Twenty-two years later, when I married my own Navy pilot, my dad had accumulated 11 years of sea time. He had liter ally been away half my life. Yet, it never seemed strange that dad missed my birth and, later, most of my recitals and track meets. Many fathers of the late 70s and early 80s, mil itary or not, missed these things. They were too busy being breadwinners. Kid duty was moms job. In 1976, some hospitals still did not allow fathers to be in the delivery room. My mom didnt recognize the strangeness of that sparsely worded telegram announcing my birth until 23 years later, when I was preg nant with my first son and anx iously wondering if my hus band would be at sea near my due date. Cant the Navy fly him home? civilian friends asked. The answer, of course, was no. The military is the last American institution to fol low societal trends. If my husband were at sea when I went into labor, he would stay there. I fretted over this until the day I went to the hospital and was positive my husband would be with me. He left two weeks later and missed most of our sons first year, but at least I didnt need a telegram to tell him he had a son named Ford. Last year, more than a decade after Ford was born and was joined by two brothers, my husband left for a 13-month deployment. He missed seven family birthdays, two Thanksgivings, one Christmas, our anniversary, Little League games, and our youngest sons first day of kindergarten. That spring, I looked around at a baseball game and noticed how many fathers were there. Some of them had left work early and were still in their business suits. Dads were at the parent-teacher conferenc es at school, too. Indeed, they seemed to be everywhere we moms were. And my boys noticed. Our middle son, Owen, said, When I see kids playing catch with their dad, it makes me feel angry. Across the world, my hus band was equally distressed about missing so much of our childrens lives. When he returned, he decided to retire after 20 years and find a job where he can be a full-time dad. (How many fathers said that in the 1970s?) As gender roles continue to evolve, this will become a problem for mili tary retention. Im not suggesting that men from my dads genera tion didnt care about being a father. I know my dad missed being with us. Back then, how ever, society had different ideas about what it means to be a father. They expected dad to earn a living, not look after the kids. Like other modern families, my husband and I both put food on the table, but only one of us is there 24/7. As expecta tions at home move closer to a 50-50 shared responsibility, this trend will only increase. And military fathers will strug gle as they face new sacrifices when they ship out. They are still missing births and recit als but many of their civilian counterparts suddenly are not. And the children know it. Dads not at the Little League game, and its not just the way it is. Historically, we filled the gaps of motherhood with nan nies and mothers helpers. Previously, when dad couldnt be around, mom had to be enough. But now that parent ing is considered a full-time job for moms and dads, I wonder, especially as it relates to the military, when and how sup port systems will develop for dads who cant do it all? Hey, MoneyChic! I am retiring next year and have been looking into the different benefits avail able. I have heard about the Survivor Benefits Plan (SBP), but dont know much. Do you have any insight? Money Chic sez: I recently read an article by Jennifer Wake, a military spouse working on her financial coun seling accreditation. She does a great job of explaining the ins and outs of SBP: Retirement can be an exciting or scary change to your life. As you look at retirement, take time to review your financial needs and plans. Many service members retire after 20 years which guarantees them a pension. A pension is defined as a fixed sum of money paid regularly to a person, or a gratuity granted as a favor or reward, or one paid under given conditions to a person following retirement from ser vice or to surviving dependents. When you serve 20 years on active duty or 20 good years in the reserves you can retire and receive monthly pay from the government. But if the service member dies sud denly what happens to the spouse? In traditional pension plans, the spouse loses all benefits. This is why the SBP was created. SBP is an annuity and is decided upon at the time of retirement. An annuity is a form of insurance that guarantees payments to be received at intervals (monthly for military) over the life of the beneficiary (spouse or child(ren)) upon the death of service man after retirement. It is a guarantee for continuation of a portion of the ser vice members pension. SBP comes with many decisions; including, do both the service mem ber and the spouse want SBP and who will be the beneficiary. The choices are: spouse, child(ren) only, spouseand-child(ren), former spouse, for mer spouse-and-child(ren) or insur able interest. Who gets the benefits depends on your situation. For the spouse option you must be currently married. Spouse-and-child(ren) means the spouse is primary but if they die or remarry before 55 the benefits pass on to the eligible children. The default for SBP will be 55 percent of the service members retirement pay (maximum benefit), costing only 6.5 percent of the service members retire ment pay. By paying 6.5 percent of your retirement pay you will be giving your spouse 55 percent of your retirement for their lifetime. If you decide you have enough sav ings to last through your lifetime and your spouses lifetime, in order to decline SBP or lower the benefit per centage, both the service member and spouse must agree in writing. If one does not sign to decline coverage then SBP is automatic. By accepting SBP, your spouse is taken care of for life. However, you do not pay into SBP forever. If you are older than 70 and have paid into SBP for 30 years then you are fully paid up. This is a significant benefit for younger retir ees. If you joined when you were in your 20s and retired in your 40s you Changing gender roles and military dads

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MONEYCHIC would be fully paid in your 70s. If the spouse dies first the benefits are not used. If your spouse dies or you divorce you can stop SBP payments at that time by contacting DFAS and showing either divorce decree or death certificate. Opting out of SBP may not be a good financial deci sion for most service members. If you have millions in your savings and your spouse has a guaranteed pension then opting of SBP may be a choice for you. Remember you may not be able to enroll in SBP later. The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society can help you plan financially for your future, stop by the office out side the Yorktown Gate or call, 542-2832. Have questions for Hey, MoneyChic? Drop me an e-mail at megan.stolle@nmcrs.org NAS Jax and Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) are working together to provide electronic material recy cling. Please contact DLA at 542-3411, Ext. 102 to sched ule a day and time to take materials to DLA. DLA will assist commands with requirements, including sub mitting the necessary paperwork (DD Form 1348) for turn-in of items. Electronic material is regulated no recyclable materials can be put in base dumpsters. NAS Jax is subject to fines and penalties when electronic items are found in dumpsters. Anyone finding electronic items in dumpsters should call 542-5251/5789. NAS Jacksonville along with all other Navy Installations Command (CNIC) bases throughout the United States will stop issuing Department of Defense (DoD) vehicle decals for access to the base beginning July 1. The change will be made to comply with a new CNIC policy intend ed to enhance base secu rity by providing elec tronic credentialing and increased scrutiny of authorized identification cards. Before the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, decals were sufficient for access to military bases. Since then, however, the policy for entry has been a 100 percent I.D. card check. The DoD vehicle decals were used to ensure vehi cles complied with state requirements for vehicle registration and insurance. This requirement will still exist for entry to installations, said Capt. Robert Sanders, NAS Jacksonville commanding officer. All motorists entering the installation will be required to have current vehicle registration and proof of auto insurance and military motorcycle riders will still be required to receive motorcycle safety training, added Sanders. Nothing will change with regard to these policies and we will randomly check that people have the required information. The 100 percent I.D. card check policy for entry to NAS Jax will continue. To ensure compliance, the installation will rely on random command-authorized vehicle checks which are not new, but may be more frequent with the elimi nation of DoD vehicle decals. Visitors to the installation will continue to use the normal visitor procedures established by the com manding officer through the NAS Jax Pass & I.D. office at the Yorktown Main Gate. Contractors and vendors not currently enrolled in the Navy Commercial Access Control (NCAC) System supported by the access control program RAPIDGate will receive a temporary pass for a onetrip visit. Contractors and vendors who are not eligible for a NCAC are strongly encouraged to enroll in the NCACS/ RAPIDGate program through the NAS Jacksonville Commercial Gate in order to avoid delays when entering the installation. Once this change is implemented, the Navy rec ommends you remove decals from your vehicles, Sanders said. If, however, you are a frequent visitor to an instal lation that still requires a DoD vehicle decal, you may leave the decal on your vehicle until the expiration date. After that, you can check with the particular instal lation to see if you can register your vehicle with them and get one of their decals. According to Glenn Williams, NAS Jacksonville dep uty director of security, the procedures are part of the Navys Force Protection Program. He also explained the procedure for new personnel checking in aboard the installation. All new personnel, whether military or civilian, will have to process through Pass & ID office upon reporting for duty and when transferring. They will register their vehicle at check in and deregister it at check out. The measures we are taking are a cooperative effort to keep our installation, workforce and assets safe. Registering and deregistering a vehicle helps us to identify ownership quickly during times of emer gencies or heightened levels of national security, said Williams. CNIC estimates that eliminating vehicle decals will save $750,000 annually. The savings from eliminat ing decals at NAS Jacksonville will be used to support other essential force protection programs. The Army and Air Force have already done away with DoD vehicle decals, and the Marine Corps is developing its plan. A list of frequently asked questions and responses pertaining to the subject is located at www.cnic.navy. mil under the Useful Information Column. Vehicle decals being eliminated by Navy Electronics recycled at DLA JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013 More than 200 volunteers from NAS Jax and tenant commands came out to participate in the 2013 NAS Jax Shoreline Cleanup at Mulberry Cove Marina June 13. The event filled a large, 20-yard dumpster with a variety of trash and debris from the riverbanks. The day began with a short safety brief by Gregg Gillette of the NAS Jax Safety Office who emphasized the importance of staying hydrated in the muggy, hot conditions. I think the temperatures are much warmer than last year, so remember to drink lots of fluids. We also want to remind you of some safety issues as you head out to pick up debris. Watch out for poison ivy/poison oak. We also have a lot of snakes in the area so if you seen one wrapped around a piece of trash, leave it alone its not worth it, stressed Gillette. And remember the buddy system, do not go out on your own. You should also be cautious about crawling around on the rocks, so you dont slip and fall. We dont want anyone injured during this evolution, Gillette told the Sailors. NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Roy Undersander also greeted the group with some motivational words. Thanks for being out here today to help keep our base looking good. This day is about coming together to take care of the environment. Its all about stewardship and I would encourage you to keep this culture going around the base throughout the year. Lets keep our base clean, he said. So, keep it safe and have fun. Last year, we pretty much filled up the dumpster so lets see what we can do this year. The volunteers were then split up into various groups, some heading out to scour the shoreline while others headed to the base airfield. Others headed out on canoes and kayaks to pick up debris caught in the rocky shoreline areas of the St. Johns River. We hold this cleanup every year and its a huge group effort. Safety is out here monitoring the event and the marina staff is providing kayaks and canoes. We also greatly appreciate the NAS Jax Wardroom and Chief Petty Officers Mess for donating the food for the barbeque, said Assistant Natural Resources Manager Angela Glass, who coordinated the event. Every year, we pick up debris from along our five miles of the St. Johns River so our stewardship is vital to combat the never-ending challenge of careless people who come in contact with our river, she added. Some of the more unusual items found included a toothbrush, battery, saw, softball, old bottles and various pieces of boats. Awards were given to the top-four vol unteers with the most unusual find.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013 5 Taking home the first place award was AWF1 Brian Wilkerson of VP-30 who brought back a plastic hock ey stick, second place went to HM3 Aaron Stuckey of Naval Hospital Jacksonville for finding a karate sign, MA3 Drew Risley of NAS Jax Security took third for finding a handmade fishing net and EN3 Mark Ulbricht of the 1st Lieutenants Division placed fourth for half a tire covered in barnacles. The event concluded with a barbeque for the hun gry volunteers who arrived lugging numerous bags of trash. I just want to thank everyone again for coming out today. I think we did a great job cleaning up our base. Remember the lesson is if you are out boating on the river, whatever ends up in the water, will make it to our shoreline, Undersander told the volunteers as they returned to the marina. CLEANUP

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MACHecosystem, said Mach. I commend the command leadership and environ mental staff for developing effective partnerships with federal, state and local regulators as well as local com munity leaders. NAS Jacksonville recently installed an innovative (first-of-its-kind for the Defense Department) sludge treatment process at its wastewater treatment plant to reduce energy consumption and lower costs by more efficiently recycling waste. Sludge treatment that pre viously took four to six weeks now takes 10 minutes. Mach noted, Im also very impressed with the sus tainable wastewater reuse project a partnership with the City of Jacksonville that will ensure zero dis charge of treated wastewater into the St. Johns River by diverting it to base irrigation systems such as the golf course. He was also shown recently constructed base facil ities that incorporate several forms of low impact development (LID). LID is defined by EPA as working with nature to manage stormwater as close to its source as possible and includes bioswales, rain gardens and perme able pavements, said Mach. Its very evident that engineers at Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast and base public works are doing a good job when it comes to integrating LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification fea tures into their projects. Theyre using effective, sus tainable ways to realize the Navys water and energy conservation goals. At the conclusion of the tour, Mach out-briefed com mand leaders, stating, I thank you and your staff for showing me many aspects of your environmental, sustainability program. I am very impressed. It is clear to me environmental stewardship is ingrained within your command leaders, deckplate Sailors and civilian personnel. Your devotion to working in partnership to solve base ecological challenges will better inform how we shape Navy environmental policy today and in the future. The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 have been recognized by other Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft squadrons as the rescue squadron due to their effort in providing emergency main tenance and flights to various squadrons in need of assis tance from May 1 to June 15. VP-8 has assisted a total of three patrol squadrons as they have transited to and from deployments and their home ports. Several of their planes were unable to take off after stop ping at NAS Jacksonville, and required emergency repairs. VP-8 provided maintenance to the squadrons aircraft and was able to get all of the aircraft mission-ready. The Fighting Tigers com pleted a total of three propeller changes, several radio repairs, two propeller leaks, one engine oil leak and multiple power generator gripes. All of the maintenance issues were highly critical for the planes to fly safely and ensure their mission readi ness, said Lt. Kevin Follet. Additionally, VP-8 sent a res cue detachment to Bermuda in order to repair a propeller leak. VP-8 left two of its mainte nance experts, AMEC Brian Taylor and AD2 Fred Dansoh, in Bermuda for several days to ensure the aircraft was mis sion-ready and safe for flight. Without VP-8, the aircraft and aircrew wouldnt have made it to their deployment site and Im happy we were able to provide the required assistance so they could safe ly resume their mission, said AE1 Christopher Carpenter. VP-8 has gone above and beyond to get our aircraft and crew out on deployment, said VP-1 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Brian Rasmussen. Thanks so much to the Fighting Tigers and all of the support they have provided thus far, said Rasmussen. Another squadron, based at NAS Jax, was returning from their Japan deployment, when one of their aircraft had to make a stop at Fort Campbell, Ky. due to propeller issues. The crews families were all waiting for them to arrive in Jacksonville after being gone for six-months. The VP-8 Fighting Tigers were, once again, off to the rescue. The squadron sent five maintenance experts to Kentucky to fix the aircraft. Rather than keeping the families waiting, VP-8 aircrew elected themselves to fly back to NAS Jax with the stranded crew, leaving its own squadron members behind in Kentucky to make repairs. The actions of VP-8 resulted in one aircrewman making it back to Jacksonville in time to see his newborn baby being born. After stopping at NAS Jax on their way to Djibouti, Africa, a third aircraft was also plagued with maintenance problems. VP-8 successfully changed one propeller, fixed one engine oil leak and three propeller leaks on this aircraft. VP-8 has been paramount to the successful deployment of the squadrons, said AEC Guadalupe Gonzalez. The workload has been heavy, but its important we help all squadrons just as they would help us. Ive been awful ly proud of all the maintenance personnel being so dedicated to getting the job done in a timely manner. VP-8 dubbed the rescue squadron 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013

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defense, counter-piracy and anti-submarine warfare. Weve worked very hard to maintain our combat readiness these past few months, said Rear Adm. Kevin Sweeney, commander, Carrier Strike Group 10. Its wonderful to be back at sea, training as an inte grated strike group in a complex environment like we expect to see on deployment. The exercise is similar to the composite unit train ing exercise (COMPTUEX) the strike group completed earlier this year. Exercises such as SUSTAINEX and COMPTUEX ensure strike groups are trained and cer tified for an overseas deployment. TRUMAN APACHE NOMADSsupport of the Truman Strike Group sustainment exercise (SUSTAINEX). Over-water training allows the Navy to see what role Army avia tors can play in joint military exer cises, said 151st ARB Executive Officer Maj. Brian Pipkin. Our unit is DLQ deck landing qualified to set down on Navy ships equipped with flight decks. But for this exercise, our AH-64D Apache Longbow helicopters will fly to their exercise coordinates and return to NAS Jacksonville without landing on a ship or refu eling. Pipkin added, In addition to 30 mm chain guns and 2.75 rockets, were shooting live Hellfire mis siles (AGM-114L) at targets in the water. He would not elaborate on the targets. The 151st ARB consists of 460 officers and Soldiers and is sta tioned at McEntire Joint National Guard Base, a military facil ity located near Columbia, South Carolina. SUSTAINEX is similar to the composite training unit exer cise (COMPTUEX) that the strike group completed earlier this year to ensure the group is trained and certified for deployment. The ships and embarked units training together focused on maritime security operations, air defense, counter-piracy and antisubmarine warfare. As VP-5 transitions to the P-8A Poseidon the squadron is proud to highlight a transitioning Mad Fox each week. This weeks spot light shines on AA Jessica Diaz. Diaz is from El Paso, Texas and has two sisters. She joined the United States Navy last year and VP-5 is her first operational com mand. As an undesignated airman she works in VP-5s line shack to gain exposure on the numerous rates in the Navy. Her current plans are to strike for the aviation machinist mate rating. As a member of the line shack, she has qualified as a P-8A plane captain. The plane captain qualifica tion required her to gain, main tain and use her extensive knowl edge base regarding brake riding, auxiliary power unit operations, and all P-8A systems. This quali fied her to recover the Mad Foxes very first P-8A, side number 168436. I was extremely honored, commented Diaz. When our first P-8A arrived, there were many other plane cap tains available and as the first air man plane captain, I was chosen to recover it. VP-5 has been transitioning to the P-8A Poseidon since Jan. 4. VP-5 transition spotlight JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013 7

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General Information & Safety: For general information and updates resi dents can call 904-630-CITY (2489) or visit the Emergency Preparedness web site at www.JaxReady.org Social media users can follow updates on Twitter via @JaxReady and on Facebook at cityofjacksonville. Residents should be advised to monitor local news for updates and to refrain from being out side during the storm. After the storm residents should be cautious and avoid putting themselves in dangerous situ ations. Particular attention should be paid for hazards that may not be readily visible, such as downed power lines or driving through standing water. If you must go out, remember to turn on your headlights and drive safely. Power, Water & Sewer Outages: JEA has an automated system that identifies the location of power outages. However, residents wishing to report outages directly, or issues with water/sewer, may contact JEA at 904-665-6000. Beaches Energy customers may contact (904) 247-6241 (or 904-247-6161 after hours) to report outages. Water issues in Jacksonville Beach may be reported to 904-247-6278, and for Atlantic Beach call 904-247-5834. Neptune Beach Water & Sewer customers should call 904-270-2400 (or 904-270-2411 after hours) to report issues. Downed Power Lines: To report downed power lines call 911. Please remind residents to keep a safe distance from downed power lines as electricity travels across water. Fallen Trees and Debris: To report trees or other large debris blocking Jacksonville or Baldwin roadways, or on Penman Road and Florida Blvd. at the Beach, or otherwise endangering public safety, call 904-630-CITY (2489). To reach Jacksonville Beach public works directly, call 904-247-6219; for Neptune Beach public works call 904-270-2423 (or 904-270-2411 after hours); and Atlantic Beach Public Works at 904-2475834. Town of Baldwin Public Works may be reached at 904-635-5955. Flooding: Localized flooding should be reported to 904-630-CITY (2489), or to 904-270-2411 in Neptune Beach. Public Works in Jacksonville Beach Public Works may be reached at 904-247-6219; Atlantic Beach at 904247-5834; and Baldwin at 904-6355955. Street flooding rendering roads impassable should be reported to the Jacksonville Sheriffs Office at 904-6300500. Please remind residents not to drive or wade through standing water. Damage Reports: It is important that Duval County have an accurate list of all property damage. Report all prop erty damageincluding to businesses and homes by calling (904) 630-CITY (2489), online at www.630CITY.coj. net or via email at 630CITY@ coj.net Jacksonville Beach residents may report damage to 904-247-6240, and Neptune Beach residents may call 904-270-2411. Garbage & Recycling Collection: For information on garbage and recycling collection schedules, please call 904630-CITY (2489). Neptune Beach res idents should call 904-270-2400, and Atlantic Beach residents may call 904247-5834. Animal Control: Do not approach or try and capture stray or injured ani mals, or put your personal safety at risk. Report their location to 904-630-CITY (2489), or 904-270-2411 in Neptune Beach. If you lose your pet, you may contact Animal Care & Protective Services, located at 2020 Forest Street, through 904-630-CITY (2489), or try local non-profit animal rescue & shel ters, such as the Humane Society (904725-8766) and others. Neptune Beach residents may call 904-270-2411, and Atlantic Beach residents may call 904247-5866. Court Operations: For questions about activities at the Duval County Courthouse, call 904-255-2000. Emergency Information: Residents with iPhone and Android mobile devices are encouraged to download the citys new, free mobile app called JaxReady. It can be downloaded from the iTunes App Store and Google Play, or via the QR code at the top of this page. The app displays the latest EOCrelated threat levels, weather reports and wildfire dangers. More informa tion can be found at coj.net The Duval County Emergency Operations Center has implemented a telephone emer gency notification system called Code Red that will call residents in the event of a potential or pending emergency. Individuals who would like to receive notifications messages on their unlist ed, cellular or business phones should sign-up at www.coj.net Neptune Beach residents may register for emergency notices with First Call at https://aler tregistration.com/NeptunebeachFL/ City of Jacksonville emergency information Sunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 11 a.m. Protestant Worship 11:15 a.m. Catholic CCD Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study Wednesdays, 7 p.m. at Chapel Complex Building 749 and Thursdays at 7 p.m. in the barracksNAS Jacksonville Chapel CenterCorner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road542-3051 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013

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VP-30s Safety Department led the squadron in quarterly safety training, before a long Memorial Day weekend, in the form of a squadron safety fair. The event kicked off in VP-30s audi torium where officers, enlisted and civilian personnel stood proudly as the Navys only maritime patrol Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) was pre sented with the 2012 Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Aviation Safety Award, more commonly referred to as the Safety S. The Safety S commends the win ning commands superior leader ship, airmanship and proactive allhands commitment to the principles of operational risk management. Navy and Marine Corps aviation squadrons awarded the Safety S receive engraved plaques and citations for permanent display and are entitled to paint a prominent green S on their aircraft until the following years winners are announced. Members of the stellar safe ty team accepted the prestigious award on behalf of all the Sailors assigned to the Pros Nest, who steadfastly strive to maintain VP-30s exceptional safety ethic. The 2012 Safety S marks VP-30s second consecutive year winning and the eighth time the squadron has received the award. Last sum mer, the command surpassed 48 years and 460,000 Class A mishap free flight hours, an aviation record. With the introduction of VP-30s first P-8 Poseidon aircraft to NAS Jacksonville in March 2012, the VP-30 Safety Department assertively met new chal lenges and maintain sustained superior safety performance while concurrently meeting training. The day continued as aircrew and maintenance personnel, military and civilian, staff and student alike, flowed into the hangar to view presentations and displays coordinated by different squadron departments. Pertinent sum mer-time safety topics were presented by fellow Sailors. The safety fair also featured items such as a blood drive and a motorcycle simulator. One of VP-30s aviation safety officers, Lt. Lou Gerard, noted that, the fair allows us to epito mize the phrase everyone is a safety officer by stepping away from a tradi tional style stand down and allowing interaction on the hangar deck, while also providing an outlet for individual shop creativity and hopefully some fun. VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens and Cmdr. James Robinson Jr., U.S. Central Command Arabian Peninsula Branch chief award ed naval flight officer (NFO) wings to the following 14 officers May 31: Lt. j.g. Sarah Belmont, Lt .j.g. Kyle Benson, CWO2 Sefram Carlile, Lt. j.g. Erwin Hale, Lt. j.g. Alexander Kennedy, Ensign Winston Massey, Ensign Raymond McGrath, Lt. j.g. Brian Patterson, Lt. j.g. John Rutherford Jr., Lt. j.g. Dominique Smith, Ensign Jacob Torba, Ensign Matthew White, Lt. j.g. Chelsie Williams and Lt. j.g. Steven Wilson. The recipients completed the Undergraduate Maritime Flight Officer syllabus at VP-30, earning their coveted wings of gold. These newly winged aviators will now enroll in the CAT I Fleet Replacement Squadron syllabus at VP-30. Upon completion of the CAT I syl labus, they will report to operational Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance squadrons to begin their initial sea tours in either Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii; NAS Whidbey Island, Wash.; or NAS Jacksonville. The NFO training pipeline begins with Aviation Preflight Introduction (API) instruction in Pensacola, where all aviation officers undergo a class room syllabus and are taught the basics of naval aviation which includes aero dynamics, meteorology and principles of navigation. After completing API, all student NFOs report for primary training at VT-10, co-located at NAS Pensacola. While assigned to VT-10 they transition from a classroom learning environment to initial airborne flight training in the T-6A Texan II. Upon completion of primary flight training at NAS Pensacola, officers who are selected for the P-3, EP-3 or P-8 training pipeline report to VP-30 for specific aircraft training. Pros Nest presented with Safety S at squadron safety fair VP-30 wings Navys newest naval flight officers JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013 9

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The Family Fitness Center, geared for parents with children, is a facility avail able for those who desire to workout but struggle to do so because of the lack of childcare. According to NAS Jax Fitness Director Tanya Henigman, The Family Fitness Center was created to implement fitness throughout Navy Families by providing the opportunity to maintain optimal health for military spouses with small children. The Family Fitness Program started in 2006 at NAS Oceana and Kings Bay Naval Submarine Base and opened up a facility at NAS Jax in 2008, according to Henigman. Because the program has been successful, it has branched out through the entire Navy. The center provides an area for par ents and children to workout. The exer cise equipment is safe and geared for children five-years-old and up, as long as they are under parent supervision. Military spouse Ashley McIntyre said, I can bring my son here and he can play in the play area. There are a ton of children my son can socialize with which I think is really good. I get to go work out which I wouldnt be able to do when my husband is deployed. I think this gym is very beneficial, she added. The Center also provides a gated plexiglass play area abounding in vari ous toys, books and a T.V. for the young er children. I think this is a wonderful place for wives with children to come that can not go to the gym on their own because they cant leave kids at home, said McIntyre. The facility has a nice place for kids to play, she added. I am so glad I found it. I get a great workout with great childcare and I dont have to play for it, said McIntyre. The Family Fitness Center gives the opportunity for parents with kids to have the chance to work out daily, said Youth Activity Center Fitness Assistant Ashley Freeman. The equipment is designed for five-years-old and up to be able to work out, as long as they are properly supervised by their parent. Its good also for the family to be able to work out together to put fitness first in the kids lives as well as the adults and also to build camaraderie for fitness, said Freeman. It helps people when they workout with a bunch of others to stay motivated and stay with it. During hours of operation, the Family Fitness Center provides a certi fied trainer for those who desire a fit ness program or demonstration on how to properly use equipment. Every day the trainer writes down various circuit exercises that are timed or include repe titions. Circuit workouts estimate about 60-minutets long. Military Spouse Christine Doss said, I can bring my kids along with me to work out and Ashleys class fits my daily life style. I also can see the changes in my body and I love it. The Centers current hours are 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The facility stays busy in the mornings, but for extended hours, more patrons are encouraged to attend. Freeman said, I wish the family fit ness center had extended hours, espe cially for active duty members who get off later so they have the opportunity to workout. Our current hours do not leave a lot of opportunity for working parents to come and bring their kids to workout, she added. The benefit of this facility is that families can workout together, said Henigman. Its not just a place where parents go to bring their children, nor is it a place for just adults to workout; its a place where families can go together to workout. Fitness Center available for parents with children 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013

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The Mad Foxes transition from the P-3 Orion to the P-8 Poseidon is progressing accord ing to plan and scheduled for completion Aug. 9 including our safe for flight require ment, said VP-5 Maintenance Officer Lt. Cmdr. Jason Thompson. At that point, we immediately begin working our compressed IDRC (interdeployment readiness cycle) in order to meet our 2014 deploy ment date. VP-5 Maintenance Master Chief (AFCM) Thomas Hall said the transition for maintainers began in January at the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jacksonville. When we completed our P-8A systems familiarization, we moved to VP-30 for hands-on training with both Navy and Boeing instructors. They did an excellent job preparing our VP-5 maintainers to attain their required qualifications, said Hall. Now our maintainers are back together under one roof in our segment of Hangar 511. As our Mad Fox aircrew con tinue to sharpen their skills at the P-8A Integrated Training Center, maintainers, ordnance men and Boeing reps practice what theyve learned in the hangar and on the flight line, said Thompson. For the P-8A Poseidon, there are 41 NAMPs (Naval Aviation Maintenance Programs) that govern how we safely operate the maintenance department, as well as how we will be evalu ated whether it be satisfac tory, needs more attention or unsatisfactory, said Hall. VP-5 Assistant Maintenance Officer CWO4 Joseph Campbell added, Our progress in train ing and qualifications is ahead of schedule. In fact, the VP-5 Ordnance Department recent ly completed our first inspec tion as a P-8A squadron the Conventional Weapons Training Proficiency Inspection where load teams attached inert MK 54 torpedoes in the internal bomb bay. He explained that the safe for flight inspection includes some aircrew requirements, but its primarily a deep dive into the maintenance side of the house. Hall continued, Maintenance control and quality assur ance are the nucleus of our safe for flight inspection to ensure were operating by the book without any mishaps. The Mad Foxes also benefit from lessons learned by their sister squadron, the VP-16 War Eagles. VP-16 is the Navys first squadron to transition from the P-3 to the P-8. We have a solid working relationship with the War Eagles because they want other maritime patrol and reconnaissance squadrons to be successful, too. So they pass along information that may be helpful as we follow in their footsteps during our transi tion, said Thompson. The key is that were all moving forward toward a common goal. And well do the same for VP-45 when they begin transition after the Mad Foxes. VP-5 maintainers set sights on safe for flight JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013 11

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment June 21 Pam Affronti June 28 Jason LamarFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 510 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 16 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer Going on now through Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 years and younger receive one free game of bowling every day until 5 p.m. Win prizes all summer long!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Lap Swim (water park, water slide and concessions are not open) Monday Friday 68 a.m. & 67 p.m. Recreational Swim (water park, waterslide and concessions are open) Monday Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. 2013 Learn to Swim Program Session 2 July 8-18 Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1 Summer Splash Outdoor Pool Party June 29, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free food, games and prizes! Private pool parties can be reserved at the fitness center. Parties are not available during regular business hours of operation and occur in the evenings when the pool is closed. Parties must be reserved 10 days prior to party date, payment due at time of reservation For more information call 542-3518I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Jacksonville Jaguars Tickets on sale July 13 $70 section 147 Legoland Florida Free ticket for active duty military through Oct. 27 Wet n Wild Orlando $37 adult, $45 adult w/ meal, $40 child w/ meal Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Daytona International Speedway Subway Firecracker July 5 and Coke 400 July 6 Tickets on sale now! Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Amelia Island Museum of History $10 family pass, Ghost tour $8 adult, $4 child Florida Ecosafaris in St. Cloud EcoPark $119, Coach safari adult $28, child $25, Zipline safari $75, Cypress canopy cycle $40 for one hour Gatorland Free admission for active duty and retired military until the end of the year. Family tickets can be pur chased at ITT. $19.95 adult, $12.50 child, zip line $54.25The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Country Rocks the Beach Trip June 22 at 4 p.m. Summer Cookout June 26 at 6 p.m. At the Liberty Center Mayport Feedom Fest Trip May 29 at 3 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees June 25 for active duty June 27 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Loudmouth Thursday Any golfer wearing a pair of loudmouth shorts or pants plays 18 holes with cart for $20 Open to military, DoD and guests Junior Golf Clinic Session 2, July 1519, ages 610 Session 3, July 29 Aug. 2, ages 1117 $110 per child, per sessionMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina July 20, 21, 27 & 28 Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Movie Under the Stars Featuring Escape From Planet Earth June 21 at 8:30 p.m. Patriots Grove Americas Kids Run June 28 at 9 a.m. Ages 5 12 Sign-up at the youth centerFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School June 3 July 10 $500 per person 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013

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Dear Switch4Good, My friends are giving us their old refrigerator. Is having a second refrigerator in the garage going to impact our utility bill? Signed, Hand-me-down Dear Hand-me-down, Sometimes its best to say, no thanks! Old refrig erators are one of those gifts that can cost you a lot of money. You have three basic choices: electric bill; about $600 per year to your electric bill; erator runs for less energy than an incandescent light bulb burning 24/7. If your family would benefit from obtaining a sec ond fridge, do a little research. Even a mini-fridge may end up costing more than $100 a year in electricity. So, it may be a better investment to buy new than say yes to the hand-me-down. Signed, Switch4GoodBalfour Beatty Communities is partnered with WattzOn to establish the Switch4Good program to support energy consciousness and switch behav iors to help military residents save energy & money. Switch4Good is an energy savings program, fund ed by the Department of Energy and Balfour Beatty Communities, for residents on selected military bases. To learn more about the program, visit http://switch4good. org/ Visit the MWR Web site at www.cnic.navy.mil or www. facebook.com nasjaxmwr. NAS Jax will be hosting the Navy Ortega Lakeshore Little League 2013 District 11 All Star Tournament June 27 through July 13 at Blue Angel Field. The teams consist of 9and 10-year-old play ers. This is a double elimination tournament with approximately 12 teams that could encompass up to 500 guests visiting the base. The games will be played from approximately 4-10:30 p.m. nightly except during the 4th of July weekend when games will be played from 9 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Volunteers are needed to help with a variety of dif ferent jobs to support this event. If you can help, please email noljax@gmail.com .NAS Jax to host Little League All Star tournamentAre second refrigerators worth the energy cost? JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013 13

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Navy Secretary Ray Mabus is not concerned about sexual assault in the service. Hes angry. The Navy has been taking steps for years to combat the scourge of sexual assault in the ranks, Mabus told the Defense Writers Group here this morning, and has two cultural barriers to break down. The first culture that has to change is the one that says this is OK, or that it is not really serious, he said. The other is the mindset of a victim who says, Im not going to report this, because nothing will hap pen. I wont be taken seriously, it wont be investigated, and it will hurt my career. The Navy is aiming resources at where it has a problem, the secretary said. The Air Force has had a problem of sexual assault at basic train ing, he noted, and the Navy has had a problem at its follow-on schools. Weve have put a lot of attention at our A schools, he said. As the service finds programs that work, Mabus said, officials export them to other commands. The A school initiatives started at Great Lakes, Ill., and have moved on to Navy schools in San Diego and Pensacola, Fla. The Navy has been aggressive, the services top civilian official said. Were sending shore patrols out -the first time in a long time weve done that, he added. Were stressing bystander intervention. The service also is continuing efforts to cut alcohol abuse, because a large number of sexual assaults have had an alcohol component, the secretary said. Another area of focus zeroes in on what happens if an incident hap pens. Is it reported? How quickly and how well do we respond? Mabus said. Is the command climate right for people to report? Tied to this is victim assistance, he added. How local officials help the victims in these cases is important to him, Mabus said. Finally, investigation and prosecution is important to the Navy. Mabus has authorized more money to the Naval Criminal Investigative Service for more investigators and more resources. It was taking up to 180 days to investigate an incident, he said. Initially, we think we can get this down to 80 days. The Navy also is spending more to train its lawyers in these cases, the secretary said. Measuring what works and what doesnt also is part of this effort, Mabus said. Can we figure out what the best practices are? he asked. Were beginning to make some headway there. Mabus said he thinks taking away a commanders right to overturn a conviction is long overdue. Right now, if you are convicted of sexual assault, you are referred to a board of inquiry to see if youll be allowed to stay [in the service], he said. The notion that if youre convicted, youre out is the way to go, he added. The secretary said he looks at sexual assault as an internal attack that must be dealt with. Were finding pretty dramatic results in places like Great Lakes, where weve rolled out these programs, he said. Our job is to get them fleet-wide.Navy Secretary describes progress in combating sexual assaults 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013

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Burials in Arlington National Cemetery Arlington National Cemetery does not make pre-arrangements or take reservations before the time of death. Therefore, the surviving spouse or parent of the child should go to the local funeral home to make arrangements for any services. The funeral home director should contact Arlington National Cemetery to make burial arrangements. Normally, a copy of the last dis charge or retirement DD-214 is all the documentation that is neces sary. After calling, a case file number will be issued for further reference and use. The funeral home director will coordinate with a funeral home in the Washington, DC area for pick up, storage, and transportation to the cemetery of the service mem bers remains. While there is no charge for internment at Arlington, the deceased family will be respon sible for paying any and all trans portation and storage charges. Expect upwards of three to four months delay after being assigned a block time for burial. There are six funeral times (9, 10, or 11 a.m. and 1, 2 and 3 p.m.) with four to five funerals com menced daily at the same time from the administration building. The ideal requested funeral time is 1 p.m. to avoid out-of-town guests having to come the night before the ceremony. Internment/inurnment services and military honors are provided on a first-come, first-served basis. For enlisted personnel, honors will be provided by the appropri ate military service branch and consists of pallbearers, firing party and a bugler. The caisson, if available, as well as a chaplain, can be requested by the family at the time of burial arrangement. For commissioned and warrant officers, in addition to standard honors, the caisson, band, and escort troops are scheduled as requested by the family. The rid erless (caparisoned) horse is used for Army and Marine colonels and above rank. Only one set of official military honors is provided. If a surviving spouse/family desires to have military honors at a memorial service in the home town or where the deceased lived, contact the local military repre sentatives (i.e. ROTC or Junior ROTC unit, Fleet Reserve Unit, veterans group and volunteer groups) to perform at the service. Additional information can be found at the Arlington National Cemetery web site at: http://www.arlingtoncem etery.mil/FuneralInformation/ SchedulingServices.aspx or by calling the Consolidated Customer Service Center at (877) 907-8585 or e-mailing anc.isb@ army.conus.mil The fax number is (571) 2563334. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013 Furlough letters are already in the mail. Are you financially prepared? Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) financial educators are offering a presentation regarding the financial health of furloughed federal workers. They will provide financial infor mation in order for personnel to make informed decisions. Visit FFSCs Facebook page for infor mation on training regarding the sequestration and furlough situation. If you are interested in FFSCs Personal Financial Manager visiting your command or department to pro vide training, call 542-5745. The presentation, Personal Finances, Before and After a Furlough, is avail able to civilians, active duty and family members.Personal finances: Surviving the furlough U.S. Southern Command and its pre decessors have played a critical, sta bilizing role since the the Caribbean Defense Command was established in 1941 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Deputy Defense Secretary Ash Carter said today in Miami. Southcoms area of responsibility is immense, Carter told the audience at a ceremony marking the 50th anniver sary of the commands founding. The more than 40 countries it contains rep resent a sixth of the worlds landmass, he noted. Its a region from which millions of American immigrants trace their roots, Carter said, and a region of growing importance to both U.S. national secu rity and the worlds economy. President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Bidens recent trips to Central America underscore U.S. com mitment to being a strong and reliable partner to our regional allies, Carter said. And thats not going to change, he added. Southcoms motto, Partnership for the Americas, is fitting, the deputy defense secretary said, given the com mands range of responsibilities and activities. Your commitment to working with partners, both in the region and throughout the U.S. government -the military to the rest of our government -is helping build an integrated network of defense in the Western Hemisphere, based on shared responsibility and shared values, Carter told the audi ence. We recognize that, and our commit ment is to you, to help you carry out that commitment, he added. Through initiatives such as Operation Martillo, Southcom and its partners are dismantling transnational crimi nal networks and disrupting illicit drug trafficking, Carter said. Operation Martillo is a multinational, interagency and joint military operation combatting aerial and maritime drug trafficking off Central Americas coasts. According to Southcoms website, more than 67 percent of interdictions were supported by partner nations. In 2012, the operation stopped 152 metric tons of cocaine and 21 metric tons of mari juana from reaching the U.S. and $7 million in bulk cash from reaching drug traffickers in Central and South America. Through engagements with nations like Brazil, Colombia, Chile and El Salvador, youre energizing collabora tion on peacekeeping and multination al security operations throughout the world, Carter said. Southcoms humanitarian and disas ter relief assistance efforts enhance regional security and improve the abil ity of U.S. allies to respond in times of crisis, the deputy secretary said. Few would have predicted the remarkable progress made by the region in the 50 years since President John F. Kennedy established Southcom, Carter said. Today, though challenges remain, the Americas are more stable, more democratic and more prosperous, he said. And Southcoms engagement and investment in the region has been an important part of that kind of success. Once again, its time for the 101 Critical Days of Summer campaign that runs from Memorial Day weekend to after Labor Day corresponding with the largest vacation period of the year. The sun is shining and people are out swimming, boating, visiting family and friends far away, playing and having a good time. With all those fun sum mer activities there is a potential for increased risk. Heat-related deaths and illness are preventable yet annually many people succumb to extreme heat. People suffer heat-related illness when their bodies are unable to compensate and properly cool themselves. The body normally cools itself by sweating. But under some conditions, sweating just isnt enough. In such cases, a persons body tem perature rises rapidly. Very high body temperatures may damage the brain or other vital organs. Because heat-related deaths are preventable, people need to be aware of who is at greatest risk and what actions can be taken to prevent a heat-related illness or death. The elderly, the very young, and peo ple with mental illness and chronic diseases are at highest risk. However, even young and healthy individuals can succumb to heat if they participate in strenuous physical activities during hot weather. Summertime activity, whether on the playing field or the construction site, must be balanced with measures that aid the bodys cooling mechanisms and prevent heat-related illness. Naval Hospital Jacksonville has a website that tracks the local weather conditions and issues the flag warning for exercising and working outdoors: http://www.med.navy.mil/sites/naval hospitaljax/pages/nasjax%20weather. aspx Heat Cramps Occur after several hours of physical exertion in the heat. Symptoms: Painful muscle spasms usually in the legs or abdomen. Treatment: Get out of the heat and into the shade, hydrate with water or sports drink, and stretch/massage the muscle. Prevention: Acclimatize to the envi ronment so your body adapts to the heat, hydrate with water or sports drink before & during exercise, avoid exercis ing during hottest part of the day, and wear light, loose clothing & use sun screen. Heat Exhaustion Due to loss of water & salt through sweat. Symptoms: Headache, nausea, dizzi ness, weakness, and cool/clammy skin. Treatment: Stop and rest, hydrate and get into a cool room or shade, and loosen clothing and apply cool wet tow els or pour cool water over the head. Prevention: Same as heat cramp pre vention Heat Stroke A serious condition when the bodys cooling system stops working and core temperature rises to dangerous levels. If ignored, heat stroke can lead to death. Symptoms: Red, hot and dry skin, rapid but weak pulse, rapid but shallow breathing, confusion, faintness, stag gering, hallucinations, and unusual agi tation or coma. Treatment: Reduce body temper ature by cooling the body, remove unnecessary clothing, apply water, cool air, wet sheets or ice on the neck, groin & armpits to accelerate cooling, and seek medical attention immediately. Prevention: same procedure con cerning heat cramps or heat exhaustion. Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Robert Bianchi presented a cer emonial check to Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) President and CEO Steve Abbot June 10, symbolizing the record breaking $357,690 donated to NMCRS by NEX customers during a promotional event held in the spring. We are happy once again to repre sent the thousands of Navy Exchange (NEX) patrons who chose to donate to this Navy and Marine Corps focused cause and we are proud to present this check on behalf of our customers, said Bianchi. This is the third year customers have been able to purchase benefit tickets to support the Navy Marine Corps Relief Society. Each year, NEX customers have responded with greater generosity and enthusiasm than the year before. Beginning in March, NEX customers were able to purchase a $5 card to ben efit the NMCRS. The ticket entitled customers to spe cific discounts for a one-time purchase on either April 22 or 23. We are grateful for this strategic partnership with the Navy Exchange Command, said Abbot. This generous donation will make a significant, positive impact on the Societys ability to provide emergency financial assistance for active duty and retired Sailors, Marines and their fami lies. Thank you to all those who contrib uted! Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown has created a Summer Basketball League for youth ages 10 to 18 years old. Browns Summer Basketball League will have its first games July 8 and will culminate with the championship games at the Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena Aug. 8. This initiative is to help keep the youth in our community focused on doing great things and being fit, Brown said. There are so many lessons that the game of basketball teaches, and creating this league in the summer fills a void that can keep children focused on goals and teamwork. The league will feature four age groups: Under 12, Under 14, Under 16, and Under 18. Teams will sign up through the City of Jacksonville Parks & Recreation Department (JaxParks); the fee is $75 per team. League registration will continue through June 30. Anyone looking to join or create a team can contact the Parks & Recreation Department or visit JaxParks.com. Southcoms engagement critical to stabilityHospital Summer safety campaign begins NEX customers make record donations to Navy Marine Corps Relief SocietyNew summer basketball league slated

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THURSDAY, JUNE 20, 2013 NO MORE DECALS CLEANUP VP-30 Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group (HST CSG) is underway for its final sustainment exercise (SUSTAINEX) before its upcoming deployment. Aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) departed Naval Station Norfolk June 5 along with embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 3. First Combined Destroyer Squadron staff, have joined guided-missile cruisers USS San Jacinto (CG 56), USS Gettysburg (CG 64) and guided-missile destroyers USS Bulkeley (DDG 84) and USS Mason (DDG 87) for the exercise. The cruisers and destroyers departed their homeports of NS Norfolk, Va. and NS Mayport, Fla. May 31. The ships and embarked units training together are focusing on maritime security operations, air Environmental compliance director tours base ecosystemThe NAS Jacksonville environmental team hosted Richard Mach, director of Environmental Compliance and Restoration Policy in the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Environment on June 11. His visit focused on reviewing the bases environmental sustainability programs. Mach was provided a tour that showed off facilities and on going plans to maintain the stations record of environmental and energy excellence. NAS Jax Environmental Director Kevin Gartland kicked off the tour by driving along the airfield as he described the stations Bird Aircraft Strike Hazard (BASH) collision prevention program thats managed under an agreement with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The program includes a periodic Wildlife Hazard Assessment that helps measure the impact of birds and mammals on operations at naval aviation installations. Gartland explained, USDA wildlife experts and base natural resources staff understand the habitat and feeding preferences of each bird species as well as how to reduce environmental factors that attract birds. He noted that new habitat was being developed on base to attract the least tern (the smallest of American terns), which normally nests on sandy Southern beaches or the shores of major waterways, such as the St. Johns River. The NAS Jax least tern demonstration project is a great sustainable land use idea. It will use a large, closed landfill to support new least tern habitat far away from critical airfield operations said Mach. I look forward to hearing the results of relocating the least terns away from the hazardous airfield environment. Gartland also discussed the stations commitment to safe fueling practices, as well as avoiding other hazardous materials spills. He pointed out some of the spill response kits located at commands that operate in proximity to the airfield. NAS Jax is one of the top shore installations in naval aviation for practicing responsible environ mental policies and we have the awards to prove it, Gartland commented. Its a team effort here, from our commanding officer (Capt. Bob Sanders) to the deckplate Sailors who operate the base recycling center. We are constantly inspecting and following up with tenant commands to ensure we meet compliance requirements. Mach also visited the stations Black Point Interpretive Center near the Mulberry Cove Marina. Its a community outreach facility that exhibits local wildlife and functions as an environmental teaching tool. Public school children and Scouts are frequent visitors to the center where they learn about best practices that help to leave a greener footprint in the community. NAS Jacksonvilles consistent outreach to schools and other community organizations is a great initiative resulting in a positive impact for the overall base The South Carolina Army National Guard 1st Battalion/151st Attack Reconnaissance Battalion (ARB) participated in joint exercises June 9-16 with the Harry S. Truman Carrier Strike Group off the coast of northeast Florida in the Atlantic. Operating from NAS Jacksonville, the ARB detachment of 45 aircrew, maintainers and ord nancemen flew their six AH-64D Apache Longbow helicopters in Nomads detach to PACOMThe VR-62 Nomads depart ed NAS Jacksonville June 15 for their scheduled logistics detach ment cycle to serve U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM). Just 40 days after return ing from our U.S. European Command (EUCOM) detach ment, the Nomads are back on the road to PACOM, said VR-62 Operations Officer Lt. Cmdr. Todd Nichols. The Nomads are always hun gry for a new challenge when it comes to supplying our military customers logistics needs. The detachment of 23 Nomads, made up of Selected Reservists and Full Time Support Sailors, will be deployed for 90 days and rotate crews every two to three weeks. Nichols added, This is the Nomads third and final detach ment for FY-13. Our squadron of C-130T Hercules aircraft recently completed two detachments one in U.S. Central Command and one in EUCOM and were ready to finish the fiscal year on a high note at PACOM. He added that VR-62 has been recognized by Commander, Naval Air Force Reserve, with the 2012 Battle E award, the Golden Wrench award, and The Golden Anchor award. Most recently, a Nomad crew directed the rescue of five survi vors who floated for seven days on the Pacific Ocean in a 19-foot skiff. Based at NAS Jacksonville, VR-62 is one of five Navy Reserve C-130T squadrons serving the Navys high-priority logistics needs around the globe. Truman Strike Group underway for SUSTAINEXApaches join Truman overseas deployment certification

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS June 20 1813 Fifteen U.S. gunboats engage three British ships in Hampton Roads, Va. 1815 Trials of Fulton I, built by Robert Fulton, are completed in New York. This ship would become the Navys first steam-driven warship. 1898 U.S. forces occupied Guam, which became first colony of U.S. in the Pacific. 1913 First fatal accident in Naval Aviation, Ensign W. D. Billingsley killed at Annapolis, Md. 1934 Commander in Chief, Asiatic Fleet Admiral Frank Upham reports to CNO that, based on analyses of Japanese radio traffic, any attack by (Japan) would be made without previous declaration of war or intentional warning. 1944 Battle of Philippine Sea ends with Japanese losing two aircraft carri ers and hundreds of aircraft. June 21 1898 USS Charleston captures island of Guam from Spain. 1945 Okinawa declared secure after most costly naval campaign in history. U.S. had 30 ships sunk and 223 dam aged, mostly from kamikaze attacks, with 5,000 dead and 5,000 wounded, while the Japanese lost 100,000 dead June 22 1807 HMS Leopard attacks USS Chesapeake. 1865 Confederate raider Shenandoah fires last shot of Civil War in Bering Strait. 1884 Navy relief expedition under Cmdr. Winfield Schley rescues Lt. A.W. Greely, and six others from Ellesmere Island, where they were marooned for three years. 1898 Adm. Sampson begins amphibious landing near Santiago, Cuba. June 23 1933 Commissioning of USS Macon, the Navys last dirigible. 1961 Navys first major low-fre quency radio station commissioned at Cutler, Maine. 1972 Navy helicopter squadron aids flood-stricken residents in WilkesBarre, Scranton, and Pittstown areas of Pennsylvania. June 24 1833 USS Constitution enters dry dock at Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston, Mass., for overhaul. The ship was saved from scrapping after public support rallied to save the ship following publication of Oliver Wendell Holmes poem, Old Ironsides. 1926 Office of Assistant SecNav set up to foster naval aeronautics; aircraft building increased. 1948 Berlin airlift initiated to offset the Soviet Unions blockade access of U.S., France, and Great Britain to their sectors of Berlin. June 25 1917 Navy convoy of troopships carrying American Expeditionary Forces arrives in France. 1950 North Korea invades South Korea, beginning the Korean Conflict. June 26 1884 Congress authorizes commis sioning of U.S. Naval Academy gradu ates as ensigns. 1918 U.S. Marines brigade captures Belleau Wood, France. 1959 Twenty-eight naval vessels sail from Atlantic to Great Lakes, marking the formal opening of Saint Lawrence Seaway to seagoing ships. 1962 NAVFAC Cape Hatteras makes first Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS) detection of a Soviet diesel submarine. 1973 Navy Task Force 78 completes minesweeping of North Vietnamese ports. A Pew Research report says that 40 percent of American households are supported by a working mother reflects changing views of gender roles in our society. But it also partly explains dramatic shifts in the military family culture and how it relates to fathers that have taken place in just one generation. When I was born in 1976, my Navy dad (who was on his first deployment) received news of my arrival through a tele gram New baby girl. Named Sarah. Mother and baby doing well. Twenty-two years later, when I married my own Navy pilot, my dad had accumulated 11 years of sea time. He had literally been away half my life. Yet, it never seemed strange that dad missed my birth and, later, most of my recitals and track meets. Many fathers of the late 70s and early 80s, military or not, missed these things. They were too busy being breadwinners. Kid duty was moms job. In 1976, some hospitals still did not allow fathers to be in the delivery room. My mom didnt recognize the strangeness of that sparsely worded telegram announcing my birth until 23 years later, when I was preg nant with my first son and anxiously wondering if my hus band would be at sea near my due date. Cant the Navy fly him home? civilian friends asked. The answer, of course, was no. The military is the last American institution to fol low societal trends. If my husband were at sea when I went into labor, he would stay there. I fretted over this until the day I went to the hospital and was positive my husband would be with me. He left two weeks later and missed most of our sons first year, but at least I didnt need a telegram to tell him he had a son named Ford. Last year, more than a decade after Ford was born and was joined by two brothers, my husband left for a 13-month deployment. He missed seven family birthdays, two Thanksgivings, one Christmas, our anniversary, Little League games, and our youngest sons first day of kindergarten. That spring, I looked around at a baseball game and noticed how many fathers were there. Some of them had left work early and were still in their business suits. Dads were at the parent-teacher conferenc es at school, too. Indeed, they seemed to be everywhere we moms were. And my boys noticed. Our middle son, Owen, said, When I see kids playing catch with their dad, it makes me feel angry. Across the world, my hus band was equally distressed about missing so much of our childrens lives. When he returned, he decided to retire after 20 years and find a job where he can be a full-time dad. (How many fathers said that in the 1970s?) As gender roles continue to evolve, this will become a problem for mili tary retention. Im not suggesting that men from my dads genera tion didnt care about being a father. I know my dad missed being with us. Back then, however, society had different ideas about what it means to be a father. They expected dad to earn a living, not look after the kids. Like other modern families, my husband and I both put food on the table, but only one of us is there 24/7. As expecta tions at home move closer to a 50-50 shared responsibility, this trend will only increase. And military fathers will struggle as they face new sacrifices when they ship out. They are still missing births and recit als but many of their civilian counterparts suddenly are not. And the children know it. Dads not at the Little League game, and its not just the way it is. Historically, we filled the gaps of motherhood with nannies and mothers helpers. Previously, when dad couldnt be around, mom had to be enough. But now that parent ing is considered a full-time job for moms and dads, I wonder, especially as it relates to the military, when and how sup port systems will develop for dads who cant do it all? Hey, MoneyChic! I am retiring next year and have been looking into the different benefits available. I have heard about the Survivor Benefits Plan (SBP), but dont know much. Do you have any insight? Money Chic sez: I recently read an article by Jennifer Wake, a military spouse working on her financial coun seling accreditation. She does a great job of explaining the ins and outs of SBP: Retirement can be an exciting or scary change to your life. As you look at retirement, take time to review your financial needs and plans. Many service members retire after 20 years which guarantees them a pension. A pension is defined as a fixed sum of money paid regularly to a person, or a gratuity granted as a favor or reward, or one paid under given conditions to a person following retirement from ser vice or to surviving dependents. When you serve 20 years on active duty or 20 good years in the reserves you can retire and receive monthly pay from the government. But if the service member dies sud denly what happens to the spouse? In traditional pension plans, the spouse loses all benefits. This is why the SBP was created. SBP is an annuity and is decided upon at the time of retirement. An annuity is a form of insurance that guarantees payments to be received at intervals (monthly for military) over the life of the beneficiary (spouse or child(ren)) upon the death of service man after retirement. It is a guarantee for continuation of a portion of the service members pension. SBP comes with many decisions; including, do both the service mem ber and the spouse want SBP and who will be the beneficiary. The choices are: spouse, child(ren) only, spouseand-child(ren), former spouse, for mer spouse-and-child(ren) or insur able interest. Who gets the benefits depends on your situation. For the spouse option you must be currently married. Spouse-and-child(ren) means the spouse is primary but if they die or remarry before 55 the benefits pass on to the eligible children. The default for SBP will be 55 percent of the service members retirement pay (maximum benefit), costing only 6.5 percent of the service members retirement pay. By paying 6.5 percent of your retirement pay you will be giving your spouse 55 percent of your retirement for their lifetime. If you decide you have enough sav ings to last through your lifetime and your spouses lifetime, in order to decline SBP or lower the benefit per centage, both the service member and spouse must agree in writing. If one does not sign to decline coverage then SBP is automatic. By accepting SBP, your spouse is taken care of for life. However, you do not pay into SBP forever. If you are older than 70 and have paid into SBP for 30 years then you are fully paid up. This is a significant benefit for younger retirees. If you joined when you were in your 20s and retired in your 40s you Changing gender roles and military dads

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MONEYCHIC would be fully paid in your 70s. If the spouse dies first the benefits are not used. If your spouse dies or you divorce you can stop SBP payments at that time by contacting DFAS and showing either divorce decree or death certificate. Opting out of SBP may not be a good financial decision for most service members. If you have millions in your savings and your spouse has a guaranteed pension then opting of SBP may be a choice for you. Remember you may not be able to enroll in SBP later. The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society can help you plan financially for your future, stop by the office outside the Yorktown Gate or call, 542-2832. Have questions for Hey, MoneyChic? Drop me an e-mail at megan.stolle@nmcrs.org NAS Jax and Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) are working together to provide electronic material recycling. Please contact DLA at 542-3411, Ext. 102 to schedule a day and time to take materials to DLA. DLA will assist commands with requirements, including sub mitting the necessary paperwork (DD Form 1348) for turn-in of items. Electronic material is regulated no recyclable materials can be put in base dumpsters. NAS Jax is subject to fines and penalties when electronic items are found in dumpsters. Anyone finding electronic items in dumpsters should call 542-5251/5789. NAS Jacksonville along with all other Navy Installations Command (CNIC) bases throughout the United States will stop issuing Department of Defense (DoD) vehicle decals for access to the base beginning July 1. The change will be made to comply with a new CNIC policy intend ed to enhance base security by providing elec tronic credentialing and increased scrutiny of authorized identification cards. Before the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, decals were sufficient for access to military bases. Since then, however, the policy for entry has been a 100 percent I.D. card check. The DoD vehicle decals were used to ensure vehicles complied with state requirements for vehicle registration and insurance. This requirement will still exist for entry to installations, said Capt. Robert Sanders, NAS Jacksonville commanding officer. All motorists entering the installation will be required to have current vehicle registration and proof of auto insurance and military motorcycle riders will still be required to receive motorcycle safety training, added Sanders. Nothing will change with regard to these policies and we will randomly check that people have the required information. The 100 percent I.D. card check policy for entry to NAS Jax will continue. To ensure compliance, the installation will rely on random command-authorized vehicle checks which are not new, but may be more frequent with the elimination of DoD vehicle decals. Visitors to the installation will continue to use the normal visitor procedures established by the com manding officer through the NAS Jax Pass & I.D. office at the Yorktown Main Gate. Contractors and vendors not currently enrolled in the Navy Commercial Access Control (NCAC) System supported by the access control program RAPIDGate will receive a temporary pass for a onetrip visit. Contractors and vendors who are not eligible for a NCAC are strongly encouraged to enroll in the NCACS/ RAPIDGate program through the NAS Jacksonville Commercial Gate in order to avoid delays when entering the installation. Once this change is implemented, the Navy rec ommends you remove decals from your vehicles, Sanders said. If, however, you are a frequent visitor to an installation that still requires a DoD vehicle decal, you may leave the decal on your vehicle until the expiration date. After that, you can check with the particular installation to see if you can register your vehicle with them and get one of their decals. According to Glenn Williams, NAS Jacksonville deputy director of security, the procedures are part of the Navys Force Protection Program. He also explained the procedure for new personnel checking in aboard the installation. All new personnel, whether military or civilian, will have to process through Pass & ID office upon reporting for duty and when transferring. They will register their vehicle at check in and deregister it at check out. The measures we are taking are a cooperative effort to keep our installation, workforce and assets safe. Registering and deregistering a vehicle helps us to identify ownership quickly during times of emer gencies or heightened levels of national security, said Williams. CNIC estimates that eliminating vehicle decals will save $750,000 annually. The savings from eliminat ing decals at NAS Jacksonville will be used to support other essential force protection programs. The Army and Air Force have already done away with DoD vehicle decals, and the Marine Corps is developing its plan. A list of frequently asked questions and responses pertaining to the subject is located at www.cnic.navy. mil under the Useful Information Column. Vehicle decals being eliminated by Navy Electronics recycled at DLA JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013 More than 200 volunteers from NAS Jax and tenant commands came out to participate in the 2013 NAS Jax Shoreline Cleanup at Mulberry Cove Marina June 13. The event filled a large, 20-yard dumpster with a variety of trash and debris from the riverbanks. The day began with a short safety brief by Gregg Gillette of the NAS Jax Safety Office who emphasized the importance of staying hydrated in the muggy, hot conditions. I think the temperatures are much warmer than last year, so remember to drink lots of fluids. We also want to remind you of some safety issues as you head out to pick up debris. Watch out for poison ivy/poison oak. We also have a lot of snakes in the area so if you seen one wrapped around a piece of trash, leave it alone its not worth it, stressed Gillette. And remember the buddy system, do not go out on your own. You should also be cautious about crawling around on the rocks, so you dont slip and fall. We dont want anyone injured during this evolution, Gillette told the Sailors. NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Roy Undersander also greeted the group with some motivational words. Thanks for being out here today to help keep our base looking good. This day is about coming together to take care of the environment. Its all about stewardship and I would encourage you to keep this culture going around the base throughout the year. Lets keep our base clean, he said. So, keep it safe and have fun. Last year, we pretty much filled up the dumpster so lets see what we can do this year. The volunteers were then split up into various groups, some heading out to scour the shoreline while others headed to the base airfield. Others headed out on canoes and kayaks to pick up debris caught in the rocky shoreline areas of the St. Johns River. We hold this cleanup every year and its a huge group effort. Safety is out here monitoring the event and the marina staff is providing kayaks and canoes. We also greatly appreciate the NAS Jax Wardroom and Chief Petty Officers Mess for donating the food for the barbeque, said Assistant Natural Resources Manager Angela Glass, who coordinated the event. Every year, we pick up debris from along our five miles of the St. Johns River so our stewardship is vital to combat the never-ending challenge of careless people who come in contact with our river, she added. Some of the more unusual items found included a toothbrush, battery, saw, softball, old bottles and various pieces of boats. Awards were given to the top-four volunteers with the most unusual find.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013 5 Taking home the first place award was AWF1 Brian Wilkerson of VP-30 who brought back a plastic hock ey stick, second place went to HM3 Aaron Stuckey of Naval Hospital Jacksonville for finding a karate sign, MA3 Drew Risley of NAS Jax Security took third for finding a handmade fishing net and EN3 Mark Ulbricht of the 1st Lieutenants Division placed fourth for half a tire covered in barnacles. The event concluded with a barbeque for the hungry volunteers who arrived lugging numerous bags of trash. I just want to thank everyone again for coming out today. I think we did a great job cleaning up our base. Remember the lesson is if you are out boating on the river, whatever ends up in the water, will make it to our shoreline, Undersander told the volunteers as they returned to the marina. CLEANUP

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MACHecosystem, said Mach. I commend the command leadership and environmental staff for developing effective partnerships with federal, state and local regulators as well as local community leaders. NAS Jacksonville recently installed an innovative (first-of-its-kind for the Defense Department) sludge treatment process at its wastewater treatment plant to reduce energy consumption and lower costs by more efficiently recycling waste. Sludge treatment that previously took four to six weeks now takes 10 minutes. Mach noted, Im also very impressed with the sustainable wastewater reuse project a partnership with the City of Jacksonville that will ensure zero dis charge of treated wastewater into the St. Johns River by diverting it to base irrigation systems such as the golf course. He was also shown recently constructed base facilities that incorporate several forms of low impact development (LID). LID is defined by EPA as working with nature to manage stormwater as close to its source as possible and includes bioswales, rain gardens and perme able pavements, said Mach. Its very evident that engineers at Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast and base public works are doing a good job when it comes to integrating LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification features into their projects. Theyre using effective, sustainable ways to realize the Navys water and energy conservation goals. At the conclusion of the tour, Mach out-briefed command leaders, stating, I thank you and your staff for showing me many aspects of your environmental, sustainability program. I am very impressed. It is clear to me environmental stewardship is ingrained within your command leaders, deckplate Sailors and civilian personnel. Your devotion to working in partnership to solve base ecological challenges will better inform how we shape Navy environmental policy today and in the future. The Fighting Tigers of VP-8 have been recognized by other Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft squadrons as the rescue squadron due to their effort in providing emergency main tenance and flights to various squadrons in need of assis tance from May 1 to June 15. VP-8 has assisted a total of three patrol squadrons as they have transited to and from deployments and their home ports. Several of their planes were unable to take off after stop ping at NAS Jacksonville, and required emergency repairs. VP-8 provided maintenance to the squadrons aircraft and was able to get all of the aircraft mission-ready. The Fighting Tigers com pleted a total of three propeller changes, several radio repairs, two propeller leaks, one engine oil leak and multiple power generator gripes. All of the maintenance issues were highly critical for the planes to fly safely and ensure their mission readi ness, said Lt. Kevin Follet. Additionally, VP-8 sent a rescue detachment to Bermuda in order to repair a propeller leak. VP-8 left two of its mainte nance experts, AMEC Brian Taylor and AD2 Fred Dansoh, in Bermuda for several days to ensure the aircraft was mis sion-ready and safe for flight. Without VP-8, the aircraft and aircrew wouldnt have made it to their deployment site and Im happy we were able to provide the required assistance so they could safe ly resume their mission, said AE1 Christopher Carpenter. VP-8 has gone above and beyond to get our aircraft and crew out on deployment, said VP-1 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Brian Rasmussen. Thanks so much to the Fighting Tigers and all of the support they have provided thus far, said Rasmussen. Another squadron, based at NAS Jax, was returning from their Japan deployment, when one of their aircraft had to make a stop at Fort Campbell, Ky. due to propeller issues. The crews families were all waiting for them to arrive in Jacksonville after being gone for six-months. The VP-8 Fighting Tigers were, once again, off to the rescue. The squadron sent five maintenance experts to Kentucky to fix the aircraft. Rather than keeping the families waiting, VP-8 aircrew elected themselves to fly back to NAS Jax with the stranded crew, leaving its own squadron members behind in Kentucky to make repairs. The actions of VP-8 resulted in one aircrewman making it back to Jacksonville in time to see his newborn baby being born. After stopping at NAS Jax on their way to Djibouti, Africa, a third aircraft was also plagued with maintenance problems. VP-8 successfully changed one propeller, fixed one engine oil leak and three propeller leaks on this aircraft. VP-8 has been paramount to the successful deployment of the squadrons, said AEC Guadalupe Gonzalez. The workload has been heavy, but its important we help all squadrons just as they would help us. Ive been awfully proud of all the maintenance personnel being so dedicated to getting the job done in a timely manner. VP-8 dubbed the rescue squadron 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013

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defense, counter-piracy and anti-submarine warfare. Weve worked very hard to maintain our combat readiness these past few months, said Rear Adm. Kevin Sweeney, commander, Carrier Strike Group 10. Its wonderful to be back at sea, training as an inte grated strike group in a complex environment like we expect to see on deployment. The exercise is similar to the composite unit training exercise (COMPTUEX) the strike group completed earlier this year. Exercises such as SUSTAINEX and COMPTUEX ensure strike groups are trained and certified for an overseas deployment. TRUMAN APACHE NOMADSsupport of the Truman Strike Group sustainment exercise (SUSTAINEX). Over-water training allows the Navy to see what role Army avia tors can play in joint military exercises, said 151st ARB Executive Officer Maj. Brian Pipkin. Our unit is DLQ deck landing qualified to set down on Navy ships equipped with flight decks. But for this exercise, our AH-64D Apache Longbow helicopters will fly to their exercise coordinates and return to NAS Jacksonville without landing on a ship or refueling. Pipkin added, In addition to 30 mm chain guns and 2.75 rockets, were shooting live Hellfire mis siles (AGM-114L) at targets in the water. He would not elaborate on the targets. The 151st ARB consists of 460 officers and Soldiers and is sta tioned at McEntire Joint National Guard Base, a military facil ity located near Columbia, South Carolina. SUSTAINEX is similar to the composite training unit exer cise (COMPTUEX) that the strike group completed earlier this year to ensure the group is trained and certified for deployment. The ships and embarked units training together focused on maritime security operations, air defense, counter-piracy and antisubmarine warfare. As VP-5 transitions to the P-8A Poseidon the squadron is proud to highlight a transitioning Mad Fox each week. This weeks spotlight shines on AA Jessica Diaz. Diaz is from El Paso, Texas and has two sisters. She joined the United States Navy last year and VP-5 is her first operational com mand. As an undesignated airman she works in VP-5s line shack to gain exposure on the numerous rates in the Navy. Her current plans are to strike for the aviation machinist mate rating. As a member of the line shack, she has qualified as a P-8A plane captain. The plane captain qualifica tion required her to gain, main tain and use her extensive knowledge base regarding brake riding, auxiliary power unit operations, and all P-8A systems. This quali fied her to recover the Mad Foxes very first P-8A, side number 168436. I was extremely honored, commented Diaz. When our first P-8A arrived, there were many other plane captains available and as the first airman plane captain, I was chosen to recover it. VP-5 has been transitioning to the P-8A Poseidon since Jan. 4. VP-5 transition spotlight JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013 7

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General Information & Safety: For general information and updates resi dents can call 904-630-CITY (2489) or visit the Emergency Preparedness website at www.JaxReady.org Social media users can follow updates on Twitter via @JaxReady and on Facebook at cityofjacksonville. Residents should be advised to monitor local news for updates and to refrain from being out side during the storm. After the storm residents should be cautious and avoid putting themselves in dangerous situ ations. Particular attention should be paid for hazards that may not be readily visible, such as downed power lines or driving through standing water. If you must go out, remember to turn on your headlights and drive safely. Power, Water & Sewer Outages: JEA has an automated system that identifies the location of power outages. However, residents wishing to report outages directly, or issues with water/sewer, may contact JEA at 904-665-6000. Beaches Energy customers may contact (904) 247-6241 (or 904-247-6161 after hours) to report outages. Water issues in Jacksonville Beach may be reported to 904-247-6278, and for Atlantic Beach call 904-247-5834. Neptune Beach Water & Sewer customers should call 904-270-2400 (or 904-270-2411 after hours) to report issues. Downed Power Lines: To report downed power lines call 911. Please remind residents to keep a safe distance from downed power lines as electricity travels across water. Fallen Trees and Debris: To report trees or other large debris blocking Jacksonville or Baldwin roadways, or on Penman Road and Florida Blvd. at the Beach, or otherwise endangering public safety, call 904-630-CITY (2489). To reach Jacksonville Beach public works directly, call 904-247-6219; for Neptune Beach public works call 904-270-2423 (or 904-270-2411 after hours); and Atlantic Beach Public Works at 904-2475834. Town of Baldwin Public Works may be reached at 904-635-5955. Flooding: Localized flooding should be reported to 904-630-CITY (2489), or to 904-270-2411 in Neptune Beach. Public Works in Jacksonville Beach Public Works may be reached at 904-247-6219; Atlantic Beach at 904247-5834; and Baldwin at 904-6355955. Street flooding rendering roads impassable should be reported to the Jacksonville Sheriffs Office at 904-6300500. Please remind residents not to drive or wade through standing water. Damage Reports: It is important that Duval County have an accurate list of all property damage. Report all prop erty damageincluding to businesses and homes by calling (904) 630-CITY (2489), online at www.630CITY.coj. net or via email at 630CITY@ coj.net Jacksonville Beach residents may report damage to 904-247-6240, and Neptune Beach residents may call 904-270-2411. Garbage & Recycling Collection: For information on garbage and recycling collection schedules, please call 904630-CITY (2489). Neptune Beach res idents should call 904-270-2400, and Atlantic Beach residents may call 904247-5834. Animal Control: Do not approach or try and capture stray or injured ani mals, or put your personal safety at risk. Report their location to 904-630-CITY (2489), or 904-270-2411 in Neptune Beach. If you lose your pet, you may contact Animal Care & Protective Services, located at 2020 Forest Street, through 904-630-CITY (2489), or try local non-profit animal rescue & shel ters, such as the Humane Society (904725-8766) and others. Neptune Beach residents may call 904-270-2411, and Atlantic Beach residents may call 904247-5866. Court Operations: For questions about activities at the Duval County Courthouse, call 904-255-2000. Emergency Information: Residents with iPhone and Android mobile devices are encouraged to download the citys new, free mobile app called JaxReady. It can be downloaded from the iTunes App Store and Google Play, or via the QR code at the top of this page. The app displays the latest EOCrelated threat levels, weather reports and wildfire dangers. More informa tion can be found at coj.net The Duval County Emergency Operations Center has implemented a telephone emer gency notification system called Code Red that will call residents in the event of a potential or pending emergency. Individuals who would like to receive notifications messages on their unlist ed, cellular or business phones should sign-up at www.coj.net Neptune Beach residents may register for emergency notices with First Call at https://aler tregistration.com/NeptunebeachFL/ City of Jacksonville emergency information Sunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 11 a.m. Protestant Worship 11:15 a.m. Catholic CCD Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study Wednesdays, 7 p.m. at Chapel Complex Building 749 and Thursdays at 7 p.m. in the barracksNAS Jacksonville Chapel CenterCorner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road542-3051 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013

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VP-30s Safety Department led the squadron in quarterly safety training, before a long Memorial Day weekend, in the form of a squadron safety fair. The event kicked off in VP-30s audi torium where officers, enlisted and civilian personnel stood proudly as the Navys only maritime patrol Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) was pre sented with the 2012 Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Aviation Safety Award, more commonly referred to as the Safety S. The Safety S commends the win ning commands superior leader ship, airmanship and proactive allhands commitment to the principles of operational risk management. Navy and Marine Corps aviation squadrons awarded the Safety S receive engraved plaques and citations for permanent display and are entitled to paint a prominent green S on their aircraft until the following years winners are announced. Members of the stellar safe ty team accepted the prestigious award on behalf of all the Sailors assigned to the Pros Nest, who steadfastly strive to maintain VP-30s exceptional safety ethic. The 2012 Safety S marks VP-30s second consecutive year winning and the eighth time the squadron has received the award. Last sum mer, the command surpassed 48 years and 460,000 Class A mishap free flight hours, an aviation record. With the introduction of VP-30s first P-8 Poseidon aircraft to NAS Jacksonville in March 2012, the VP-30 Safety Department assertively met new chal lenges and maintain sustained superior safety performance while concurrently meeting training. The day continued as aircrew and maintenance personnel, military and civilian, staff and student alike, flowed into the hangar to view presentations and displays coordinated by different squadron departments. Pertinent sum mer-time safety topics were presented by fellow Sailors. The safety fair also featured items such as a blood drive and a motorcycle simulator. One of VP-30s aviation safety officers, Lt. Lou Gerard, noted that, the fair allows us to epito mize the phrase everyone is a safety officer by stepping away from a tradi tional style stand down and allowing interaction on the hangar deck, while also providing an outlet for individual shop creativity and hopefully some fun. VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens and Cmdr. James Robinson Jr., U.S. Central Command Arabian Peninsula Branch chief awarded naval flight officer (NFO) wings to the following 14 officers May 31: Lt. j.g. Sarah Belmont, Lt .j.g. Kyle Benson, CWO2 Sefram Carlile, Lt. j.g. Erwin Hale, Lt. j.g. Alexander Kennedy, Ensign Winston Massey, Ensign Raymond McGrath, Lt. j.g. Brian Patterson, Lt. j.g. John Rutherford Jr., Lt. j.g. Dominique Smith, Ensign Jacob Torba, Ensign Matthew White, Lt. j.g. Chelsie Williams and Lt. j.g. Steven Wilson. The recipients completed the Undergraduate Maritime Flight Officer syllabus at VP-30, earning their coveted wings of gold. These newly winged aviators will now enroll in the CAT I Fleet Replacement Squadron syllabus at VP-30. Upon completion of the CAT I syl labus, they will report to operational Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance squadrons to begin their initial sea tours in either Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii; NAS Whidbey Island, Wash.; or NAS Jacksonville. The NFO training pipeline begins with Aviation Preflight Introduction (API) instruction in Pensacola, where all aviation officers undergo a class room syllabus and are taught the basics of naval aviation which includes aero dynamics, meteorology and principles of navigation. After completing API, all student NFOs report for primary training at VT-10, co-located at NAS Pensacola. While assigned to VT-10 they transition from a classroom learning environment to initial airborne flight training in the T-6A Texan II. Upon completion of primary flight training at NAS Pensacola, officers who are selected for the P-3, EP-3 or P-8 training pipeline report to VP-30 for specific aircraft training. Pros Nest presented with Safety S at squadron safety fair VP-30 wings Navys newest naval flight officers JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013 9

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The Family Fitness Center, geared for parents with children, is a facility available for those who desire to workout but struggle to do so because of the lack of childcare. According to NAS Jax Fitness Director Tanya Henigman, The Family Fitness Center was created to implement fitness throughout Navy Families by providing the opportunity to maintain optimal health for military spouses with small children. The Family Fitness Program started in 2006 at NAS Oceana and Kings Bay Naval Submarine Base and opened up a facility at NAS Jax in 2008, according to Henigman. Because the program has been successful, it has branched out through the entire Navy. The center provides an area for par ents and children to workout. The exercise equipment is safe and geared for children five-years-old and up, as long as they are under parent supervision. Military spouse Ashley McIntyre said, I can bring my son here and he can play in the play area. There are a ton of children my son can socialize with which I think is really good. I get to go work out which I wouldnt be able to do when my husband is deployed. I think this gym is very beneficial, she added. The Center also provides a gated plexiglass play area abounding in various toys, books and a T.V. for the younger children. I think this is a wonderful place for wives with children to come that can not go to the gym on their own because they cant leave kids at home, said McIntyre. The facility has a nice place for kids to play, she added. I am so glad I found it. I get a great workout with great childcare and I dont have to play for it, said McIntyre. The Family Fitness Center gives the opportunity for parents with kids to have the chance to work out daily, said Youth Activity Center Fitness Assistant Ashley Freeman. The equipment is designed for five-years-old and up to be able to work out, as long as they are properly supervised by their parent. Its good also for the family to be able to work out together to put fitness first in the kids lives as well as the adults and also to build camaraderie for fitness, said Freeman. It helps people when they workout with a bunch of others to stay motivated and stay with it. During hours of operation, the Family Fitness Center provides a certi fied trainer for those who desire a fit ness program or demonstration on how to properly use equipment. Every day the trainer writes down various circuit exercises that are timed or include repetitions. Circuit workouts estimate about 60-minutets long. Military Spouse Christine Doss said, I can bring my kids along with me to work out and Ashleys class fits my daily life style. I also can see the changes in my body and I love it. The Centers current hours are 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. The facility stays busy in the mornings, but for extended hours, more patrons are encouraged to attend. Freeman said, I wish the family fit ness center had extended hours, espe cially for active duty members who get off later so they have the opportunity to workout. Our current hours do not leave a lot of opportunity for working parents to come and bring their kids to workout, she added. The benefit of this facility is that families can workout together, said Henigman. Its not just a place where parents go to bring their children, nor is it a place for just adults to workout; its a place where families can go together to workout. Fitness Center available for parents with children 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013

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The Mad Foxes transition from the P-3 Orion to the P-8 Poseidon is progressing according to plan and scheduled for completion Aug. 9 including our safe for flight require ment, said VP-5 Maintenance Officer Lt. Cmdr. Jason Thompson. At that point, we immediately begin working our compressed IDRC (interdeployment readiness cycle) in order to meet our 2014 deploy ment date. VP-5 Maintenance Master Chief (AFCM) Thomas Hall said the transition for maintainers began in January at the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jacksonville. When we completed our P-8A systems familiarization, we moved to VP-30 for hands-on training with both Navy and Boeing instructors. They did an excellent job preparing our VP-5 maintainers to attain their required qualifications, said Hall. Now our maintainers are back together under one roof in our segment of Hangar 511. As our Mad Fox aircrew con tinue to sharpen their skills at the P-8A Integrated Training Center, maintainers, ordnance men and Boeing reps practice what theyve learned in the hangar and on the flight line, said Thompson. For the P-8A Poseidon, there are 41 NAMPs (Naval Aviation Maintenance Programs) that govern how we safely operate the maintenance department, as well as how we will be evaluated whether it be satisfac tory, needs more attention or unsatisfactory, said Hall. VP-5 Assistant Maintenance Officer CWO4 Joseph Campbell added, Our progress in train ing and qualifications is ahead of schedule. In fact, the VP-5 Ordnance Department recent ly completed our first inspec tion as a P-8A squadron the Conventional Weapons Training Proficiency Inspection where load teams attached inert MK 54 torpedoes in the internal bomb bay. He explained that the safe for flight inspection includes some aircrew requirements, but its primarily a deep dive into the maintenance side of the house. Hall continued, Maintenance control and quality assurance are the nucleus of our safe for flight inspection to ensure were operating by the book without any mishaps. The Mad Foxes also benefit from lessons learned by their sister squadron, the VP-16 War Eagles. VP-16 is the Navys first squadron to transition from the P-3 to the P-8. We have a solid working relationship with the War Eagles because they want other maritime patrol and reconnaissance squadrons to be successful, too. So they pass along information that may be helpful as we follow in their footsteps during our transi tion, said Thompson. The key is that were all moving forward toward a common goal. And well do the same for VP-45 when they begin transition after the Mad Foxes. VP-5 maintainers set sights on safe for flight JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013 11

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment June 21 Pam Affronti June 28 Jason LamarFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. Free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 510 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 16 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer Going on now through Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 years and younger receive one free game of bowling every day until 5 p.m. Win prizes all summer long!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Lap Swim (water park, water slide and concessions are not open) Monday Friday 68 a.m. & 67 p.m. Recreational Swim (water park, waterslide and concessions are open) Monday Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. 2013 Learn to Swim Program Session 2 July 8-18 Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1 Summer Splash Outdoor Pool Party June 29, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free food, games and prizes! Private pool parties can be reserved at the fitness center. Parties are not available during regular business hours of operation and occur in the evenings when the pool is closed. Parties must be reserved 10 days prior to party date, payment due at time of reservation For more information call 542-3518I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Jacksonville Jaguars Tickets on sale July 13 $70 section 147 Legoland Florida Free ticket for active duty military through Oct. 27 Wet n Wild Orlando $37 adult, $45 adult w/ meal, $40 child w/ meal Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Daytona International Speedway Subway Firecracker July 5 and Coke 400 July 6 Tickets on sale now! Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Amelia Island Museum of History $10 family pass, Ghost tour $8 adult, $4 child Florida Ecosafaris in St. Cloud EcoPark $119, Coach safari adult $28, child $25, Zipline safari $75, Cypress canopy cycle $40 for one hour Gatorland Free admission for active duty and retired military until the end of the year. Family tickets can be purchased at ITT. $19.95 adult, $12.50 child, zip line $54.25The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Country Rocks the Beach Trip June 22 at 4 p.m. Summer Cookout June 26 at 6 p.m. At the Liberty Center Mayport Feedom Fest Trip May 29 at 3 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees June 25 for active duty June 27 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Loudmouth Thursday Any golfer wearing a pair of loudmouth shorts or pants plays 18 holes with cart for $20 Open to military, DoD and guests Junior Golf Clinic Session 2, July 1519, ages 610 Session 3, July 29 Aug. 2, ages 1117 $110 per child, per sessionMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina July 20, 21, 27 & 28 Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Movie Under the Stars Featuring Escape From Planet Earth June 21 at 8:30 p.m. Patriots Grove Americas Kids Run June 28 at 9 a.m. Ages 5 12 Sign-up at the youth centerFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School June 3 July 10 $500 per person 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013

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Dear Switch4Good, My friends are giving us their old refrigerator. Is having a second refrigerator in the garage going to impact our utility bill? Signed, Hand-me-down Dear Hand-me-down, Sometimes its best to say, no thanks! Old refrigerators are one of those gifts that can cost you a lot of money. You have three basic choices: electric bill; about $600 per year to your electric bill; erator runs for less energy than an incandescent light bulb burning 24/7. If your family would benefit from obtaining a second fridge, do a little research. Even a mini-fridge may end up costing more than $100 a year in electricity. So, it may be a better investment to buy new than say yes to the hand-me-down. Signed, Switch4GoodBalfour Beatty Communities is partnered with WattzOn to establish the Switch4Good program to support energy consciousness and switch behav iors to help military residents save energy & money. Switch4Good is an energy savings program, fund ed by the Department of Energy and Balfour Beatty Communities, for residents on selected military bases. To learn more about the program, visit http://switch4good. org/ Visit the MWR Web site at www.cnic.navy.mil or www. facebook.com nasjaxmwr. NAS Jax will be hosting the Navy Ortega Lakeshore Little League 2013 District 11 All Star Tournament June 27 through July 13 at Blue Angel Field. The teams consist of 9and 10-year-old players. This is a double elimination tournament with approximately 12 teams that could encompass up to 500 guests visiting the base. The games will be played from approximately 4-10:30 p.m. nightly except during the 4th of July weekend when games will be played from 9 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Volunteers are needed to help with a variety of different jobs to support this event. If you can help, please email noljax@gmail.com .NAS Jax to host Little League All Star tournamentAre second refrigerators worth the energy cost? JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013 13

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Navy Secretary Ray Mabus is not concerned about sexual assault in the service. Hes angry. The Navy has been taking steps for years to combat the scourge of sexual assault in the ranks, Mabus told the Defense Writers Group here this morning, and has two cultural barriers to break down. The first culture that has to change is the one that says this is OK, or that it is not really serious, he said. The other is the mindset of a victim who says, Im not going to report this, because nothing will happen. I wont be taken seriously, it wont be investigated, and it will hurt my career. The Navy is aiming resources at where it has a problem, the secretary said. The Air Force has had a problem of sexual assault at basic training, he noted, and the Navy has had a problem at its follow-on schools. Weve have put a lot of attention at our A schools, he said. As the service finds programs that work, Mabus said, officials export them to other commands. The A school initiatives started at Great Lakes, Ill., and have moved on to Navy schools in San Diego and Pensacola, Fla. The Navy has been aggressive, the services top civilian official said. Were sending shore patrols out -the first time in a long time weve done that, he added. Were stressing bystander intervention. The service also is continuing efforts to cut alcohol abuse, because a large number of sexual assaults have had an alcohol component, the secretary said. Another area of focus zeroes in on what happens if an incident happens. Is it reported? How quickly and how well do we respond? Mabus said. Is the command climate right for people to report? Tied to this is victim assistance, he added. How local officials help the victims in these cases is important to him, Mabus said. Finally, investigation and prosecution is important to the Navy. Mabus has authorized more money to the Naval Criminal Investigative Service for more investigators and more resources. It was taking up to 180 days to investigate an incident, he said. Initially, we think we can get this down to 80 days. The Navy also is spending more to train its lawyers in these cases, the secretary said. Measuring what works and what doesnt also is part of this effort, Mabus said. Can we figure out what the best practices are? he asked. Were beginning to make some headway there. Mabus said he thinks taking away a commanders right to overturn a conviction is long overdue. Right now, if you are convicted of sexual assault, you are referred to a board of inquiry to see if youll be allowed to stay [in the service], he said. The notion that if youre convicted, youre out is the way to go, he added. The secretary said he looks at sexual assault as an internal attack that must be dealt with. Were finding pretty dramatic results in places like Great Lakes, where weve rolled out these programs, he said. Our job is to get them fleet-wide.Navy Secretary describes progress in combating sexual assaults 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013

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Burials in Arlington National Cemetery Arlington National Cemetery does not make pre-arrangements or take reservations before the time of death. Therefore, the surviving spouse or parent of the child should go to the local funeral home to make arrangements for any services. The funeral home director should contact Arlington National Cemetery to make burial arrangements. Normally, a copy of the last discharge or retirement DD-214 is all the documentation that is neces sary. After calling, a case file number will be issued for further reference and use. The funeral home director will coordinate with a funeral home in the Washington, DC area for pick up, storage, and transportation to the cemetery of the service members remains. While there is no charge for internment at Arlington, the deceased family will be respon sible for paying any and all transportation and storage charges. Expect upwards of three to four months delay after being assigned a block time for burial. There are six funeral times (9, 10, or 11 a.m. and 1, 2 and 3 p.m.) with four to five funerals com menced daily at the same time from the administration building. The ideal requested funeral time is 1 p.m. to avoid out-of-town guests having to come the night before the ceremony. Internment/inurnment services and military honors are provided on a first-come, first-served basis. For enlisted personnel, honors will be provided by the appropriate military service branch and consists of pallbearers, firing party and a bugler. The caisson, if available, as well as a chaplain, can be requested by the family at the time of burial arrangement. For commissioned and warrant officers, in addition to standard honors, the caisson, band, and escort troops are scheduled as requested by the family. The rid erless (caparisoned) horse is used for Army and Marine colonels and above rank. Only one set of official military honors is provided. If a surviving spouse/family desires to have military honors at a memorial service in the home town or where the deceased lived, contact the local military repre sentatives (i.e. ROTC or Junior ROTC unit, Fleet Reserve Unit, veterans group and volunteer groups) to perform at the service. Additional information can be found at the Arlington National Cemetery web site at: http://www.arlingtoncem etery.mil/FuneralInformation/ SchedulingServices.aspx or by calling the Consolidated Customer Service Center at (877) 907-8585 or e-mailing anc.isb@ army.conus.mil The fax number is (571) 2563334. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 20, 2013 Furlough letters are already in the mail. Are you financially prepared? Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) financial educators are offering a presentation regarding the financial health of furloughed federal workers. They will provide financial infor mation in order for personnel to make informed decisions. Visit FFSCs Facebook page for infor mation on training regarding the sequestration and furlough situation. If you are interested in FFSCs Personal Financial Manager visiting your command or department to pro vide training, call 542-5745. The presentation, Personal Finances, Before and After a Furlough, is avail able to civilians, active duty and family members.Personal finances: Surviving the furlough U.S. Southern Command and its predecessors have played a critical, sta bilizing role since the the Caribbean Defense Command was established in 1941 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Deputy Defense Secretary Ash Carter said today in Miami. Southcoms area of responsibility is immense, Carter told the audience at a ceremony marking the 50th anniver sary of the commands founding. The more than 40 countries it contains represent a sixth of the worlds landmass, he noted. Its a region from which millions of American immigrants trace their roots, Carter said, and a region of growing importance to both U.S. national secu rity and the worlds economy. President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Bidens recent trips to Central America underscore U.S. com mitment to being a strong and reliable partner to our regional allies, Carter said. And thats not going to change, he added. Southcoms motto, Partnership for the Americas, is fitting, the deputy defense secretary said, given the com mands range of responsibilities and activities. Your commitment to working with partners, both in the region and throughout the U.S. government -the military to the rest of our government -is helping build an integrated network of defense in the Western Hemisphere, based on shared responsibility and shared values, Carter told the audi ence. We recognize that, and our commitment is to you, to help you carry out that commitment, he added. Through initiatives such as Operation Martillo, Southcom and its partners are dismantling transnational crimi nal networks and disrupting illicit drug trafficking, Carter said. Operation Martillo is a multinational, interagency and joint military operation combatting aerial and maritime drug trafficking off Central Americas coasts. According to Southcoms website, more than 67 percent of interdictions were supported by partner nations. In 2012, the operation stopped 152 metric tons of cocaine and 21 metric tons of mari juana from reaching the U.S. and $7 million in bulk cash from reaching drug traffickers in Central and South America. Through engagements with nations like Brazil, Colombia, Chile and El Salvador, youre energizing collabora tion on peacekeeping and multination al security operations throughout the world, Carter said. Southcoms humanitarian and disas ter relief assistance efforts enhance regional security and improve the ability of U.S. allies to respond in times of crisis, the deputy secretary said. Few would have predicted the remarkable progress made by the region in the 50 years since President John F. Kennedy established Southcom, Carter said. Today, though challenges remain, the Americas are more stable, more democratic and more prosperous, he said. And Southcoms engagement and investment in the region has been an important part of that kind of success. Once again, its time for the 101 Critical Days of Summer campaign that runs from Memorial Day weekend to after Labor Day corresponding with the largest vacation period of the year. The sun is shining and people are out swimming, boating, visiting family and friends far away, playing and having a good time. With all those fun sum mer activities there is a potential for increased risk. Heat-related deaths and illness are preventable yet annually many people succumb to extreme heat. People suffer heat-related illness when their bodies are unable to compensate and properly cool themselves. The body normally cools itself by sweating. But under some conditions, sweating just isnt enough. In such cases, a persons body tem perature rises rapidly. Very high body temperatures may damage the brain or other vital organs. Because heat-related deaths are preventable, people need to be aware of who is at greatest risk and what actions can be taken to prevent a heat-related illness or death. The elderly, the very young, and people with mental illness and chronic diseases are at highest risk. However, even young and healthy individuals can succumb to heat if they participate in strenuous physical activities during hot weather. Summertime activity, whether on the playing field or the construction site, must be balanced with measures that aid the bodys cooling mechanisms and prevent heat-related illness. Naval Hospital Jacksonville has a website that tracks the local weather conditions and issues the flag warning for exercising and working outdoors: http://www.med.navy.mil/sites/naval hospitaljax/pages/nasjax%20weather. aspx Heat Cramps Occur after several hours of physical exertion in the heat. Symptoms: Painful muscle spasms usually in the legs or abdomen. Treatment: Get out of the heat and into the shade, hydrate with water or sports drink, and stretch/massage the muscle. Prevention: Acclimatize to the environment so your body adapts to the heat, hydrate with water or sports drink before & during exercise, avoid exercising during hottest part of the day, and wear light, loose clothing & use sun screen. Heat Exhaustion Due to loss of water & salt through sweat. Symptoms: Headache, nausea, dizziness, weakness, and cool/clammy skin. Treatment: Stop and rest, hydrate and get into a cool room or shade, and loosen clothing and apply cool wet towels or pour cool water over the head. Prevention: Same as heat cramp pre vention Heat Stroke A serious condition when the bodys cooling system stops working and core temperature rises to dangerous levels. If ignored, heat stroke can lead to death. Symptoms: Red, hot and dry skin, rapid but weak pulse, rapid but shallow breathing, confusion, faintness, stag gering, hallucinations, and unusual agitation or coma. Treatment: Reduce body temper ature by cooling the body, remove unnecessary clothing, apply water, cool air, wet sheets or ice on the neck, groin & armpits to accelerate cooling, and seek medical attention immediately. Prevention: same procedure con cerning heat cramps or heat exhaustion. Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Robert Bianchi presented a cer emonial check to Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) President and CEO Steve Abbot June 10, symbolizing the record breaking $357,690 donated to NMCRS by NEX customers during a promotional event held in the spring. We are happy once again to repre sent the thousands of Navy Exchange (NEX) patrons who chose to donate to this Navy and Marine Corps focused cause and we are proud to present this check on behalf of our customers, said Bianchi. This is the third year customers have been able to purchase benefit tickets to support the Navy Marine Corps Relief Society. Each year, NEX customers have responded with greater generosity and enthusiasm than the year before. Beginning in March, NEX customers were able to purchase a $5 card to benefit the NMCRS. The ticket entitled customers to spe cific discounts for a one-time purchase on either April 22 or 23. We are grateful for this strategic partnership with the Navy Exchange Command, said Abbot. This generous donation will make a significant, positive impact on the Societys ability to provide emergency financial assistance for active duty and retired Sailors, Marines and their families. Thank you to all those who contributed! Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown has created a Summer Basketball League for youth ages 10 to 18 years old. Browns Summer Basketball League will have its first games July 8 and will culminate with the championship games at the Jacksonville Veterans Memorial Arena Aug. 8. This initiative is to help keep the youth in our community focused on doing great things and being fit, Brown said. There are so many lessons that the game of basketball teaches, and creating this league in the summer fills a void that can keep children focused on goals and teamwork. The league will feature four age groups: Under 12, Under 14, Under 16, and Under 18. Teams will sign up through the City of Jacksonville Parks & Recreation Department (JaxParks); the fee is $75 per team. League registration will continue through June 30. Anyone looking to join or create a team can contact the Parks & Recreation Department or visit JaxParks.com. Southcoms engagement critical to stabilityHospital Summer safety campaign begins NEX customers make record donations to Navy Marine Corps Relief SocietyNew summer basketball league slated

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