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Jax air news ( May 30, 2013 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA SLAF
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012

Material Information

Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 30, 2013
Publication Date: 06-13-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02046

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012

Material Information

Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 30, 2013
Publication Date: 06-13-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02046


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THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 2013 WWII VETS HOME AT LAST FACTORY FRES H Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) hosted Jacksonvilles mayor June 5 for a familiarization tour of the Navys aviation main tenance, repair, modification and overhaul depot the largest indus trial employer in the region. Mayor Alvin Brown, who ran on his vision of taking Jacksonville to the next level through job creation, toured FRCSE to learn about the depots mis sion in support of the warfighter. Accompanying the mayor were retired Rear Adm. Victor Guillory, the citys director for Military Affairs, Veterans and Disabled Services (MAVDS) and Harrison Conyers, Veterans and Community Outreach Manager. MAVDS advo cates for the expansion of mili tary infrastructure and jobs in Northeast Florida. The visitors had a unique oppor tunity to see artisans working on aircraft and fabricating scarce aeronautical parts and compo nents for legacy aircraft during their tour of the F/A-18 Hornet and P-3 Orion aircraft production lines, as well as the industrial manufacturing division. Brown said it is easy to see how the Navy presence in Jacksonville makes the military one of our strongest and most sustainable economic drivers. FRCSE creates many positives for our city by helping to refine the skills of our workforce and provid ing good-paying work that creates a ripple effect for the betterment of the Northeast Florida economy, said the mayor. Im proud of what these men and women do not just in the name of Americas defense, but to support our standard of liv ing on the homefront every day. Capt. Robert Caldwell, FRCSE commanding officer, said it was a great opportunity to show Mayor Broadarrows launch historic Japan missionNearly 40 aircrew and maintenance members of the VP-62 Broadarrows headed to Japan June 4 as part of the Navys first mobilization of a Reserve P-3C Orion squadron. The squadronwhich has been flying the Lockheed P-3 Orion aircraft since the height of the Cold War, and is prepared to conduct anti-subma rine warfare (ASW) and other maritime patrol mis sionswill join the VP-26 Tridents with several detachments in the Western Pacific. In recent years, the Broadarrows have gone on detachments to El Salvador where they flew many counter-narcotics missions in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico. Now, as the active-duty VP squadrons transition from flying the propeller-driven P-3C to the new jet-powered Boeing P-8A Poseidon, the Reservists will provide crucial support in conducting mari time patrol and reconnaissance missions globally while the active-duty squadrons come up to speed with their new aircraft. One of the Reservists going on deployment is AWCM Spence Cunningham, the last P-3 acoustic sensor operator to have flown during the Cold War. Cunningham joined the Navy in 1981 and tracked Soviet submarines in the Mediterranean Sea and western Atlantic Ocean. My expectations are what any acoustic operator worth his or her salt should betracking subma rines. Being primarily an Atlantic Fleet operator, I look forward to working in the western Pacific against some very challenging submarines found in that part of the world. I relish the challenge and look forward to sharing my experience with some FRCSE hosts Jacksonville mayor for tour of Navy depot The VP-10 Red Lancers returned home last week from their six-month tri-site deployment in support of the Navys 4th and 7th Fleets. While on deployment, VP-10 safely executed more than 250 sorties and flew more than 2,900 hours with an astounding 97 percent mission com pletion rate. Driven by thoughts of home and duty to country, the Red Lancers contin ued their tradition of excellence, fly ing anti-submarine, littoral surveil lance and counter-narcotics missions throughout the 4th and 7th Fleet areas of responsibility. Operating out of Forward Operating Location Comalapa, El Salvador, the Red Lancer team flew missions in sup port of joint, interagency Operation Martillo. Their mission was the detec tion, interdiction, and seizure of illegal narcotics in both the Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea. VP-10 directly contrib uted to the interdiction of more than 18,000 kilos of illegal narcotics as well as the detention of 28 suspected nar cotics smugglers. The Red Lancer maintenance team was equally busy, completing 10 engine and 16 propeller changes over the course of the deployment. When they werent interdicting sus pected smugglers, VP-10 personnel were enthusiastically engaged in com munity outreach and support, volun The VP-45 Pelicans returned home last week to their eagerly awaiting fam ilies and friends at NAS Jacksonville after a six-month deployment to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. Following a turnover with the VP-26 Tridents, the final group of VP-45 Pelicans arrived home June 8, complet ing the squadrons last flight in a P-3C Orion before beginning its transition to the P-8A Poseidon next month. The deployment proved very suc cessful and rewarding on many lev els. From a maintenance perspective, AT1(AW) Tiffani Travis, the 2013Senior Chief Sydney Smith Leadership Awardrecipient, noted that, what the maintenance department accom plished as a whole is more than anyone could have expected. From the mechanics changing engines, airframers completing fuel cell maintenance, aviation electronic technicians constantly battling to keep the Single Advanced Signal Processor System and the radar up, to the avia tion ordnancemen loading thousands of buoys -we all came together to get the job done. Thanks to the support of these main tenance professionals, VP-45 combat aircrews flew 3,026 mishap-free flight hours and launched 18 ready alert air craft in support of search and rescue, intelligence reconnaissance, and antisubmarine warfare operations. Despite a high ops-tempo, the Pelicans still found time for profession al development, with 11 Sailors earning naval aircrew wings and more than 40 personnel earning their enlisted avia tion warfare specialist wings. In addition to operating out of Kadena, VP-45 also operated out of numerous detachment sites around the 7th Fleet area of responsibility (AOR), including the Philippines, Malaysia, Thailand, Australia and Indonesia. The detachments covered a wide range of missions, including search VP-45Pelicans return home from deploymentVP-10 Red Lancers complete successful deployment

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 13, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS June 13 1881 USS Jeannette crushed in Arctic ice pack. 1967 Operation Great Bend begins in Rung Sat Zone, Vietnam. June 14 1777 John Paul Jones takes command of Ranger. 1777 Continental Congress adopts design of present U.S. Flag. (Flag Day) 1847 Commodore Matthew Perry launches amphibious river operations by Sailors and Marines on Tabasco River, Mexico. 1940 Franklin D. Roosevelt signs Naval Expansion Act to con struct ships to increase Navy ton nage by 11 percent. 1985 SW2 Robert Stethem of Underwater Construction Team 1 was killed by terrorist hijackers of TWA Flight 847. He later received a Bronze Star for his heroism. June 15 1944 Fifth Fleet lands Marines on Saipan, under the cover of naval gunfire, in conquest of Marianas. 1963 Launching of combat store ship, Mars (AFS-1), first of new class of underway replenishment ships. 1991 Two battle groups and amphibious ships evacuate depen dents and Air Force personnel from Clark Air Force Base in the Philippines after Mount Pinatubo erupts. June 16 1898 U.S. squadron bombards Santiago, Cuba. 1942 Congress authorized an increase in the airship strength of the Navy to 200 lighter-than-air craft. 1958 The Pacific Missile Range in Point Mugu,Calif., is estab lished under Navy management to provide range support to the Department of Defense and other government agencies in guided missiles, satellite and space vehicle development and training. 1965 Navy Department sched ules reactivation of hospital ship Repose (AH-16), the first hospi tal ship activated for Vietnam Conflict. June 17 1833 USS Delaware enters dry dock at Gosport Navy Yard in Norfolk, Va., the first warship to enter a public dry dock in the United States. 1870 USS Mohican burns Mexican pirate ship Forward. 1898 Navy Hospital Corps established. 1940 Chief of Naval Operations asks Congress for money to build two-ocean Navy. June 18 1812 U.S. declares war on Great Britain for impressments of Sailors and interference with commerce. 1942 First African-American officer, Bernard Robinson, com missioned in Naval Reserve. 1951 The ZPN-1 airship makes its first flight. 1957 CNO approves ship char acteristics of the Fleet Ballistic Missile submarine. June 19 1864 USS Kearsarge sinks Confederate raider Alabama off France. 1944 Battle of the Philippine Sea begins (The Marianas Turkey Shoot). 1948 Chief of Naval Operations assigns three destroyers to U.N. mediator for the Palestine truce. 1959 ZPG-3W, the largest nonrigid airship ever built, was the first of four airships designed for use in air warning patrol. It was delivered to NAS Lakehurst, N.J. They are calling it Ketchup Gate, and it has mili tary wives seeing red. Last week, Rajiv Chandrasekaran wrote an article for the Washington Post that, on its surface, seemed to suggest that military families take advantage of tax payers. Yes, I cringed, too. Then I read it again. What Chandrasekaran is actually calling for is smarter use of taxpayers dollars, and therefore, more and better benefits for service members. This is becoming a problem: we military wives cant hear a message because weve grown accustomed to defending our benefits. For good reason. In the past, some journalists have been overtly offensive, and in many cases entirely inaccurate, when criticizing mili tary pay and benefits. Indeed, just a few months ago, I wrote a response to a Huffington Post article that also rattled cages. But that columnist got his facts and his tone wrong. Chandrasekaran, on the other hand, makes a few good points, and if we can just see beyond our past wounds, wed realize that sometimes its okay to call off the dogs in order for rational ideas that benefit all of us to make their way into the discussion. Some of Chandrasekarans better points that have been buried beneath the silliness of too-many-bottlesof-ketchup include: Shutting down military commissaries based in the United States and allowing families to shop at civilian stores (and receive the same discount) would save $1 billion a year. Some benefits, like retirement pay and health care, cant be scrimped. Others, like the commissary, should be sacrificed if combat readiness is at stake. Allowing family members to shop at civilian stores for the same discount provided by the commissary would actually be a greater benefit for retirees and reservists who often dont live near a military base and have to travel great distances to find a commissary. Originally implemented in the 1800s as a means to support families stationed at rural bases, mili tary commissaries in the United States are less criti cal today because transformations in the military and civilian society over the following decades including the expansion of large discount retailers near remote bases obviated the original reason for them. Trust me, Ive been shopping at a military commis sary since I was an infant in a stroller. I have (mostly) fond memories of following my mom up and down the aisles and marveling at the way she could pack two carts full of food and maneuver both around tight turns. Commissaries are part of the military family cul ture. Inside, its always Veterans Day, Memorial Day and the Fourth of July thanks to patriotic advertise ments aimed at service families. But taxpayers and the government arent in the business of supporting our culture. They are in the business of supporting the mission. And if commis saries need to be cut in order to do that, Im okay with it. In fact, I think our military spouse culture of exclu sivity is becoming a detriment, and perhaps sending us out into the larger consumer world would help oth ers understand who we are and what we do. Over the course of last year, I hosted 250 people, most of them civilian, to Dinner with the Smileys and what I found was that even after all our public outreach, most people still dont understand what military families go through. I wonder: is it partly because we are hidden away in our commissaries, spouse groups and bases with armed guards out front? Some outsiders are beginning to view us negatively, and it doesnt help that we have what feels to them like a secret world of special stores and discounts. We know these benefits are valid and well earned, but when we wont let civilians ask hard questions, we put them on the offensive. When we blast them for ketchup instead of hear ing their idea, Im afraid we come across as unreason able. In our fight to defend ourselves, we have put our fingers in our ears over rational questions like, Are commissaries the most critical benefit we have? and mocked with ketchup memes those who dared to ask. This is no way to work together and ask for support. If we want civilians to take us seriously when we tell them that things like healthcare and retirement pay are but a small sacrifice (for them) for what service men and women do for our country, then we need to walk away from the ketchup and listen when they come up with other ways to save money. Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of any agency of the U.S. govern ment or NAS Jacksonville. Put down the ketchup and hear the question VP-5 transition spotlightEvery week, as part of its transition to the P-8A Poseidon, Patrol Squadron (VP) 5 is shining the transition spotlight on a talented Mad Fox. This weeks spotlight shines on AT1(AW/ SW) Geoffrey Bird. In addition to transitioning to the P-8A, Bird is responsible for standing up the AT laser program at the squadron. In order to safely work on these sys tems, Geoffrey attended a class at Naval Station Mayport and requalified as an administrative laser safety officer (ALSO). Currently, the ATs are finishing all their qualifi cations at VP-30 in preparation for the acceptance inspection of VP-5s first P-8A Poseidon. This is the third time AT1 Bird has transitioned to a new plat form while in the Navy. He previously transitioned to MH-60 Sierras and Romeos in the rotary wing community. Out of the three transitions I have been a part of, the Poseidon transition has been the smoothest, praised Bird. VP-30 has done a great job teaching us the electronics that are completely different than anything seen in the P-3C Orion. Aviation electronic technicians are responsible for the maintenance and repair of electronics and avionics aboard the aircraft including, navigation, radio and radar systems. A native of Cliffton Park, N.Y., Bird is married with three children. He joined the Navy in 1998 and has served tours with VP-10, HSL-46, HSM Weapons School, HSC-25, HSM-40 and VP-5. He is the current Mad Fox Senior Sailor of the Quarter. VP-5 began its transition to the P-8A Poseidon in January 2013.

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The Mayport Florida Council of the Navy League hosted the 16th annual Battle of Midway commemoration dinner at the World Golf Village June 1 with more than 800 people in atten dance, including 15 Midway vet erans. Its good to get together like this, said Marlin Crider, a Radioman 2nd Class during the Battle of Midway. I wish that high school students and more people knew about the Battle of Midway. Considered by some to be the most influential conflict dur ing World War II, the Battle of Midway was a three-day con flict on the Pacific Ocean between the U.S. and Japanese navies from June 4-7, 1942, in which the U.S. defeated Japan by serving them their worst naval defeat in over 350 years. I think it was one of the greatest battles in the history of naval warfare and I was proud to be part of it, said retired Lt. Cmdr. William Roy. We turned the Japanese tide from winning to losing, and that was the turning point of the war in the Pacific. Guest speaker for the evening, Adm. Bill Gortney, commander, Fleet Forces Command, spoke about the amazing efforts of all the brave men who served dur ing the Battle of Midway. There are countless stories of those who ran into burning or flooding spaces to save a ship mate, and some of those who did are here with us this eve ning, said Gortney. Let us never forget those brave veterans and their legacy. We must preserve and celebrate our rich history. Gortney also provided his State of the Navy an over view of the current operations and how our brave warriors are doing more with less and con tinuing to be ready anywhere in the world. Following Gortneys speech, a special memento was presented to each Midway veteran as each biography was read. Notable hero in attendance was Medal of Honor recipient Robert Ingram, whose Medal of Honor of citation was read aloud. Other highlights of the event included a joint service color guard presentation by members of all six services, including the Merchant Marines and a cer emonial presentation of the sixperson POW/MIA table. Midway veterans honored at annual event JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 13, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 13, 2013 teering more than 600 hours at a local orphan age. During their weekly trips to the orphanage, squadron personnel played games with the children and performed minor repairs, includ ing assisting with the painting of walls which provided much needed assistance to the staff. The squadron also donated 1,200 pounds of food and clothing and made a monetary dona tion of more than $1,500 to the orphanage. The Red Lancers were exem plary ambassadors of the Navys humanitar ian efforts abroad. Operating out of Misawa Air Base in northern Japan and Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, VP-10 supported 7th Fleet efforts around the Asian-Pacific region. The squad ron successfully executed multiple detachments to the Republic of Korea, Australia and Guam. During their detachment to this region, they flew in support of multinational exercises Fleet Concentration Period 2013, GUAMEX 13-1, Foal Eagle, Key Resolve, Ssang Yong and SHAREM. Primarily stationed at Misawa AB, VP-10 maintenance contin ued their exemplary performance, expertly handling the day-today maintenance oper ations of a deployed squadron. They also flaw lessly managed the rigorous Integrated Maintenance Concept (IMC) evolutions for eight theater P-3C Orions. In addition to the numerous squad ron successes that were attained on this deployment, includ ing surpassing 40 years and more than 239,000 mishap-free flight hours, VP-10 person nel also achieved numerous individual career milestones. The squadron had 56 personnel qualify and receive the Enlisted Aviation Warfare Specialist pin, 36 Sailors were advanced dur ing the most recent exam cycle and 15 Sailors reenlisted. VP-10

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 13, 2013 5 VP-45and rescue and international exercis es. Often working side-by-side with the host countries military, these detach ments not only strengthened inter national relations, but also provided the Pelicans with a chance to act as American ambassadors. Overall, the Sailors of VP-45 were the cornerstone that attributed to the suc cessful deployment. Over the past six months, the Pelicans have been working really hard to support 7th Fleet in one of the most dynamic AORs in the world, said VP-45 Executive Officer Cmdr. T.J. Grady. Grady added that, it has been a true team effort thanks to VP-5, VP-10 and Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven assets that augmented VP-45 during the deployment. With the deployment now in the rear view mirror, the Pelicans will pause to commemorate the squadrons heritage with a dinner June 21. The Pelican family will pay a special tribute to the flight engineer and inflight technician ratings that, after more than 70 years as a part of VP-45, will be leaving the squadron as the Pelicans transition to the Boeing P-8A Poseidon.

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young fleet operators out there. Another Reservist deploying is AD3 Scott Woodward of Savannah, Ga. Woodward joined the Navy Reserve six years ago after talking to a recruiter during his lunch break. I chose to join the Reserves rather than going active duty because I wanted to go to school at the same time, said Woodward, who completed his degree in criminal justice last December. This will be my first deployment with a squadron. I was deployed to Iraq in 2009, but after six years in the Navy, its pretty exciting to finally go on the road, working in my rate, with my own unit. Other than going to Iraq, this will be the first time Ive traveled outside the country, said Woodward. Ive always wanted to go to Japan, to be able to do some sightseeing. I have a friend from Tokyo who showed me some pictures of his hometown, and I would also like to see some of the museums. VP-16 is now transitioning to the P-8 Poseidon. They are the first activeduty squadron to get the new aircraft and that is what creates the demand for VP-62 and VP-69 to deploy, said Cmdr. Jon Townsend, VP-62 command ing officer. We are taking their place on deployment while they transition. We are scheduled to deploy three more times as the rest of the active-duty mar itime patrol squadrons transition. As they transition, we fill their place. The Reserves will not transition to the P-8 until all active-duty squad rons have made the change, added Townsend. I believe the eventual transition to P-8 will be easier for the Reserves than the active component because of the many Reserve pilots who fly for the air lines already fly the Boeing737. The P-3 has served the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF) for more than 50 years. While mission gear has been updated over the years, the airframe itself is rapidly approaching the end of its service life. The new P-8A, a military variant of the Boeing 737, features improved airframe reliability, high-altitude surveillance and reconnaissance capability, openarchitecture mission systems, in-flight refueling capability and many other modern features. The MPRF transition to the P-8A basically involves six-month FIT (Fleet Introduction Training), plus a one-year IDRC (Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle). While the IDRC is always there, its the six-month FIT that causes the gap in deployment coverage. Its these gaps were mobilizing to cover, said Townsend. Maintaining crew readiness and completing all the requirements for deployment has its own challenges for a Reserve squadron, said CMDCM Mike Heisler, VP-62s senior enlisted leader. A combat aircrew cannot be qualified individually. Each member of the team must be present for each evolution. When they launch a weapon or fly a mission, every member of the team, from the pilots and flight engi neers to the tactical officer and the sen sor operators must be on the plane and performing their roles flawlessly or the crew qualification isnt earned or main tained. In an active duty squadron, every member of the crew is available every day to train together. In a Reserve squadron, we have one or two week ends a month, said Heisler. If some one gets sick and misses a drill week end that could delay qualification as a crew, which impacts the training plan for the following month. To deal with this, we went to two drill weekends and everyone is giving their all to make sure everything goes right. VP-62 is one team, one fight. Our Reservists and our full-time-support members are willing to give up two weekends a month with their families to make sure we are 100 percent ready to do our jobs. That is the spirit and execution of Active-Reserve integration. The squadron has complet ed Advanced Readiness Program, Operational Readiness Evaluation, Fleet NATOPS Evaluation Team inspec tion, Conventional Weapons Refresher Training, Conventional Weapons Technical Proficiency Inspection and then begins the first iteration of VP Reserve mobilization and deployment cycles. The preparations for mobilization started last year, when VP-62 partici pated in the 23rd biennial Rim of the Pacific exercise, where they flew near ly 50 hours and achieved more than a dozen advanced readiness qualifica tions, including a live-fire exercise. We successfully fired a live Maverick missile against a decommissioned tar get ship, said Cmdr. Kris Moorhead, one of VP-62s mission commanders at RIMPAC. It is a very rare opportunity for us to get live ordnance in a training environment, so this was a fantastic training exercise for both aircrew and maintenance personnel. We also dropped a torpedo on an undersea target sled, Moorhead added. Most of our events were focused on ASW and it was great training. We coor dinated our ASW efforts with P-3s from several countries, ASW helicopters, and the newest ASW patrol aircraft, the P-8 Poseidon. VP-62 As VP-62 begins the first mobilization of a Navy Reserve P-3 Orion squadron, one of the Reservists heading to Japan is also one of the last Cold War anti-sub marine warfare operators still serving in the Navy AWCM(NAC/AW) Spence Cunningham. Before boarding the plane, he took time to look back on his 32 years of naval aviation experience. He joined the Navy via the Delayed Entry Program and went to boot camp in Orlando, Fla. in August 1981. After completing the anti-submarine war fare operator pipeline (non-acoustic) in 1982, he received orders to the VP-45 Pelicans. After being screened for instructor duty at VP-30, he taught the Update 2, 2.5 and 3 versions of the P-3C Orion. When I completed my shore tour at VP-30 I took an opportunity to work on the P-7 program, so I separated from active duty as an AW1 in August of 1990 with orders to the Broadarrows of VP-62, he said. At that time, the annual training periods consisted of the squadron set ting up shop in Bermuda to cover that ASW sector until all the Reservists com pleted their two-week requirements. The Broadarrows were the last Reserve VP squadron to operate fully out of NAS Bermuda in 1991. After that, operations moved to a detachment form of annual training where crew and maintenance formed small units and went forward to vari ous sites like Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico; Sigonella, Sicily; Manta, Ecuador; Keflavik, Iceland and Comalapa, El Salvador to name a few. While attached to VP-62, Ive held many positions from NATOPS Bluecard instructor to detachment CPO and up to Command Master Chief. All the while, maintaining combat air crew qualifications to answer the call if needed. I reached the 30-year high year ten Last Cold War warrior deploying to WESTPAC 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 13, 2013

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MAYORBrown the scope and reach that FRCSE has on its warfighting customer. FRCSEs federal civilian payroll of $220 million for its nearly 3,000 workers and $48 million payroll for its 900 military personnel contributes signifi cantly to local tax bases. Many of the federal civil ian workers are former or retired military veterans. Caldwell said the FRCSE workforce is also engaged in the community. Federal civilian employees contributed more than $170,000 to the 2012 Combined Federal Campaign, a work place drive that supports local, state, and national charities. Further, FRCSE was recognized with the 2012 Highest Number of Donations to The Blood Alliance, Military Category Award with employees donating more than 1,000 units. At the conclusion of the tour, Caldwell presented Brown with a command coin bearing the FRCSE emblem in recognition of the mayors first visit to the Navy aviation maintenance depot. The mayor extended his thanks on behalf of the city to Caldwell and the many men and women of the Navy for their dedication and service. Prior to the mayors election, he served as an Executive in Residence at Jacksonville Universitys Davis School of Business. He is the past president and CEO of the Willie Gary Classic Foundation, an organization that helps provide scholarships for historically black colleges. Balfour Beatty Communities and Switch4Good pre sented a $500 check community reward to residents of NAS Jacksonville recently. The $500 grant was awarded to residents for achiev ing a 20 percent participation in the Switch4Good pro gram and will be used to install doggie post stations and picnic tables on base. The Switch4Good program is designed to help resi dents of Balfour Beatty Communities conserve energy and earn money back for low utility bills. Funded by the Department of Energy, Switch4Good provides conservation tips via email and text. The pro gram is voluntary for all residents who are included in the Resident Energy Conservation Program initiated by the Department of the Navy. Additional community rewards will be given for increased participation and energy savings. Balfour Beatty Communities is also eligible for anoth er grant from Switch4Good. If 80 percent of homes enrolled in S4G use 10 percent less energy than other homes on the base, the community will receive another $500.The challenge runs through June. For more energy savings information, like the Switch4Good Facebook page. The National Naval Officers Association (NNOA) Jacksonville Chapter hosted their fourth annual scholarship banquet May 17. NNOA Jacksonville Chapter presented schol arship checks in amounts of $750 and $1,000, totaling $13,000 to 15 area graduating high school students from Clay, Duval, St. Johns and Camden County, Ga. This event represented a sincere effort on the part of the NNOA organi zation to positively impact our com munity and to represent the sea ser vices. Without the support of the commu nity, partners, donors and members, NNOA Jax would not have been able to provide $30,000 in scholarships over the past three years to deserving high school seniors throughout the southeast region. There were 64 participants at the event with Dr. Richard Danford, CEO of the Jacksonville Urban League, serving as the keynote speaker. Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander, 4th Fleet/U.S. Navy Forces Southern Command was NNOAs special guest, who presented a command coin to each scholarship recipient. An event such as this requires a great deal of commitment to plan and organize. A special thanks to Lt. Cmdr. Brian Martin and retired Lt. Harold Jones, this years scholarship committee chair and co-chair, for their hard work. A special thanks also goes out to the NNOA Scholarship Committee retired Rear Adm. Gene Kendal, retired Lt. Cmdr. Herlena Washington and retired CWO4 Herman McCrary. For more information on NNOA Jacksonville Chapter, visit their Facebook page. Furlough letters are already in the mail. Are you financially prepared? Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) financial educators are offering a presentation regarding the financial health of furloughed federal workers. They will provide financial information in order for person nel to make informed decisions. Visit FFSCs Facebook page for information on train ing regarding the sequestration and furlough situa tion. If you are interested in FFSCs Personal Financial Manager visiting your command or department to provide training, call 542-5745. The presentation, Personal Finances, Before and After a Furlough, is available to civilians, active duty and family members.Community reward enhances housing areas NNOA Jacksonville hosts annual scholarship banquetPersonal finances surviving the furlough 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 13, 2013

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VP-5 Mad Foxes ordnance men recently completed their Conventional Weapons Training Proficiency Inspection (CWTPI) at Hangar 511 aboard NAS Jacksonville. This inspection certifies VP-5 as independent weapons handlers for the P-8A Poseidon. CWTPI evaluates the squad ron AOs ability to safely oper ate the specific ground support equipment, perform release and control checks, load chaff and flares, as well as build-up and load the MK 54 torpedo. For the past two months, VP-5 ordies have been working 12-hour days, including week ends, to prepare for their inspection. Their outstanding perfor mance demonstrated that VP-5 is safe to handle and load ord nance for the P-8A Poseidon. CWTPI is typically a five-day inspection, commented VP-5 Gunner CWO3 Joseph Doyle. Our ordnancemen passed it with flying colors in three days and now, were ready for the arrival of our first Poseidon. Day one of the event involved administrative inspections of ordnance certifications and qualifications. Days two and three tested load team procedur al compliance. Load Team One consists of AO1 Robert Massard, AO2 Patrick Williams, AO2 Bryce Warde, AO1 Ruben Rivera, AO1 Joshua Christenson, and AO2 Rumiel Benson. Load Team Two consists of AO1 Dennis Yearty, AO2 Kelcina Jackson, AO3 Jasmine Banks, AO2 Christopher Howard, AO3 Michael McKenzie, and AO3 Mallory Burton. The Support Team members include AT1 Abolo Meba and AM3 Theodore Skrypiec. Mad Foxes complete P-8A ordnance inspection JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 13, 2013 9

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On June 4, AA Jessica Diaz recovered P-8A number 436, the first P-8A Poseidon assigned to the VP-5 Mad Foxes. The aircraft was flown directly to NAS Jacksonville from Boeing facilities in Seattle, Wash. by a team of mil itary acceptance pilots. VP-5s acceptance of 436 is unique as it is the first time a fleet squadron is directly accepting its own Poseidon. Mad Fox maintenance personnel were training hard since January for this process which will take a little under a week. With the help of sup port team experts from Boeing, each maintenance work center will perform their own inspections on their respective areas of expertise for aircraft 436. When they are completed, the aircraft will be put through release and control checks, ground turns, and finally, functional check flights by VP-5 pilots. Every Mad Fox is extremely excited about their very first P-8A Poseidon and look for ward to writing a new chapter in the long history of VP-5. Mad Foxes receive first P-8A Poseidon NAS Jacksonville traditionally sees its highest elec trical bills in the summer. With our governments cur rent financial situation, saving money on utilities has never been more important. HVAC, lights, water heat ing, building envelope and process loads constitute the majority of the consumptive loads in our places of work and residences. Through building energy monitors and projects NAS Jacksonville is having success reducing its con sumption from year to year, but we are always looking at additional ways to save. Public Works Department. New Commander, Navy Region Southeast guidance establishes a cooling set point of 78 degrees during occupied hours and an 85 degree setback temperature during unoccupied times. ditioning (or heat) is on. Report any air leaks to the outside to your Public Works facility manager (missing weather stripping or improperly closing windows and doors). possible in place of overhead lights. Turn off overhead lights when you leave a room. Often times no one takes ownership of lighting over an area used by more than one person. Step up to that responsibility or talk to your building energy monitor about it. Works facility manager so that the lighting levels can be adjusted. Reducing the lighting not only saves the energy used to power the lights, it also saves on the heat introduced to the space from those same lights. This in turn reduces the load on the air conditioner. ability to correct to your Public Works facility man ager. As an occupant of your building you are aware of when something is broken or leaking sooner than anyone. The sooner that issue is identified, the sooner it will be fixed. that dont have to be left on are turned off. Examples of electronics that should be turned off are computer monitors, speakers, copiers, printers, scanners, shred ders, fax machines and coffee makers. The best way to save energy is to turn the device off. The stand by features on all these devices save energy with varying effectiveness. To be sure you are maximizing the sav ings, simply turn the device off. If your building/unit does not already have a build ing energy monitor, let the installation energy man ager know by calling 542-1811. Building energy moni tors are individuals who receive specific training on energy conservation and help to keep an eye on how a building is performing in order to maximize the energy efficiency of that building. The biggest point to take away is for everyone to take responsibility for their workspace the way you do for your home. We dont leave our lights or electronics on when we leave for the day, so we shouldnt do that in our workspace. If a toilet was malfunctioning and running con stantly at home we wouldnt continue to let it do so. If all of us can keep the above items in mind, NAS Jacksonville will be in great shape to meet its energy reduction goals.Summer months mean higher energy bills Sunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 11 a.m. Protestant Worship 11:15 a.m. Catholic CCD Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study Wednesdays, 7 p.m. at Chapel Complex Building 749 and Thursdays at 7 p.m. in the barracksNAS Jacksonville Chapel CenterCorner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road542-3051 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 13, 2013 11

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ure mark for master chief in February 2011. I decided to transfer to the Volunteer Training Unit, versus retirement, so I could continue to serve the P-3 community and give the benefit of my experience to junior operators who are the future of maritime patrol. Im fortunate that my civilian positions had direct relationships to my Navy Reserve job. I worked with several Jacksonville defense contractors involved with training the P-3 force, including curricu lum development and ASUW Improvement Programs. I also man aged the Revision and Maintenance effort for VP-30. Presently, I am the lead instructor for the Acoustic Track Contract Instructor cadre at the Pros Nest. We are responsible for all ground phase require ments that include class room instruction, air craft demonstrations, part-task trainer periods and Tactical Operational Readiness Trainers (TORT), that are full tac tical crew scenarios. This is my first mobi lization as a Reservist. My expectations are what any acoustic opera tor worth his or her salt should be targeting and tracking subma rines. Being primarily an Atlantic Fleet operator, I look forward to work ing in the western Pacific against some very chal lenging submarines oper ating in that part of the world. I relish the chal lenge and look forward to sharing my experience with some young fleet operators out there. Not to mention, getting to experience liberty in the exotic countries of the western Pacific. I am the last of the Cold War operators who are actively flying in the P-3C Orion. My acous tic sensor experience runs the gamut from AN/AQA-7 paper grams to the current AN-USQ78B Acoustic Processor Technical Refresh. I have hours upon hours of ontop time with a multi tude of submarines. Ive certainly had an excep tional 30-year run and I have to give a lions share of credit to the Navy Reserves who enabled me to enjoy the best of both my worlds. It is time for me to hang my flight suit up after this deployment and I will miss the flying. But most of all I will miss those Sailors in VP-62. I am grateful to serve among such a group of dedicated professionals. I am humbled and appre ciative for the privilege, concluded Cunningham. CUNNINGHAM I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and jus tice for all. The first national observance of Flag Day took place in 1877 on the centennial of June 14, 1777 when the Stars and Stripes was officially recog nized as the symbol of a new nation and authorized by the Second Continental Congress. According to the National Flag Day Foundation, Flag Day was officially established by proclamation of President Woodrow Wilson on May 30, 1916. While Flag Day was celebrat ed in various communities for years after Wilsons proclama tion, it was not until August 3, 1949 that President Truman signed an Act of Congress des ignating June 14 as National Flag Day. Respect for our flag. According to United States Code, Title 36, Chapter 10: No disrespect should be shown to the flag of the United States of America; the flag should not be dipped to any person or thing. Regimental colors, state flags, and orga nization or institutional flags are to be dipped as a mark of honor. (a) The flag should never be displayed with the union down, except as a signal of dire distress in instances of extreme danger to life or property. (b) The flag should never touch anything beneath it, such as the ground, the floor, water, or merchandise. (c) The flag should never be carried flat or horizontally, but always aloft and free. (d) The flag should never be used as wearing apparel, bed ding, or drapery. It should never be festooned, drawn back, nor up, in folds, but always allowed to fall free. Bunting of blue, white, and red, always arranged with the blue above, the white in the middle, and the red below, should be used for covering a speakers desk, draping the front of the platform, and for decoration in general. (e) The flag should never be fastened, displayed, used or stored in such a manner as to permit it to be easily torn, soiled, or damaged in any way. (f) The flag should never be used as a covering for a ceiling. (g) The flag should never have placed upon it, nor on any part of it, nor attached to it any mark, insignia, letter, word, fig ure, design, picture, or drawing of any nature. (h) The flag should never be used as a receptacle for receiv ing, holding, carrying, or deliv ering anything. (i) The flag should never be used for advertising purpos es in any manner whatsoever. It should not be embroidered on such articles as cushions or handkerchiefs and the like, printed or otherwise impressed on paper napkins or boxes or anything that is designed for temporary use and discard. Advertising signs should not be fastened to a staff or halyard from which the flag is flown. (j) No part of the flag should ever be used as a costume or athletic uniform. However, a flag patch may be affixed to the uniform of military personnel, firemen, policemen and mem bers of patriotic organizations. The flag represents a living country and is itself considered a living thing. Therefore, the lapel flag pin being a replica, should be worn on the left lapel near the heart. (k) The flag, when it is in such condition that it is no lon ger a fitting emblem for display, should be destroyed in a digni fied way, preferably by burning. Did you know? nations are displayed, they are to be flown from separate staffs of the same height. The flags should be of approximately equal size. International usage forbids the display of the flag of one nation above that of anoth er nation in time of peace. Philip Sousa entitled, The Stars and Stripes Forever is designated as the national march of the United States of America. Flag Day celebrates the birthday of Old Glory The Department of Defense (DoD) announced May 30, the launch of The Safe HelpRoom created in response to Safe Helpline users who identified a need for peer support services. The new service allows victims of sexual assault to participate in group chat sessions to connect with and support one another in a moderated secure online environment at SafeHelpline.org. The moderator is also available to provide referrals as necessary and ensure all ground rules are adhered to prior to chat postings. Survivors of sexual assault have told us that being able to discuss their concerns with peers can pro vide a level of support not available through other means, said Acting Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness Jessica L. Wright. The Safe HelpRoom is a groundbreaking development in the departments commitment to support military vic tims of sexual assault. Safe HelpRoom sessions will begin immediately and are available twice weekly in two-hour sessions. The session schedule can be found at SafeHelpline. org, along with polls to determine session topics to address specific concerns. The Safe HelpRoom and Safe Helpline are admin istered by DoD and operated by the non-profit Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN), the nations largest anti-sexual violence organization, through a contractual agreement with DoD Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office (SAPRO). Safe HelpRoom was designed with unique safe guards to ensure a safe and welcoming place for sur vivors to connect, said Maj. Gen. Gary Patton, direc tor, DoD Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office. Safe HelpRoom is the first of its kind to require participants to commit to a series of ground rules of acceptable behavior before entering a session. Additionally, each participant comment is reviewed to ensure it complies with the ground rules prior to posting for the group to see. The Safe HelpRoom provides a secure and private environment for positive and supportive discus sions. When users visit Safe Helpline, the staff provides one-on-one tailored assistance and offers a variety of up-to-date service referrals for resources on and off military bases and installations. Service referrals include information for sexual assault response coordinators, along with legal, med ical, mental health, and spiritual military resources. The referral database also houses information for local civilian and the Department of Veterans Affairs resources for helpline users seeking information and crisis support away from the military response sys tem.DOD expands safe helpline for sexual assault victims 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 13, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment June 7 Karaoke with Randy delete June 14 Piece in Harmony June 21 Pam Affronti June 28 Jason LamarFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 510 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 16 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer Going on now through Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 years and younger receive one free game of bowling every day until 5 p.m. Win prizes all summer long!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Lap Swim (water park, water slide and conces sions are not open) Monday Friday 6 8 a.m. & 6 7 p.m. Recreational Swim (water park, waterslide and concessions are open) Monday Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. 2013 Learn to Swim Program Session 1: June 1020 Session 2 July 8-18 Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1 Summer Splash Outdoor Pool Party June 29, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free food, games and prizes! Private pool parties can be reserved at the fit ness center Parties are not available during regular busi ness hours of operation and occur in the eve nings when the pool is closed. Parties must be reserved 10 days prior to party date, payment due at time of reservation For information, call 542-3518I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Jacksonville Jaguars tickets on sale July 13 $70 section 147 Legoland Free ticket for active duty military through Oct. 27 Wet n Wild Orlando $37 adult, $45 adult w/ meal, $40 child w/ meal Disney Cruise Lines will be at ITT June 11, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. delete Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Daytona International Speedway Subway Firecracker July 5 and Coke 400 July 6 Tickets on sale now! Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Amelia Island Museum of History $10 family pass, Ghost tour $8 adult, $4 child Florida Ecosafaris in St. Cloud EcoPark $119, Coach safari adult $28, child $25, Zipline safari $75, Cypress canopy cycle $40 for one hour Gatorland Free admission for active duty and retired military until the end of the year. Family tickets can be purchased at ITT. $19.95 adult, $12.50 child, zip line $54.25The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. North Florida Speedway Trip June 15 at 5 p.m. $5 per person Country Rocks the Beach Trip June 22 at 4 p.m. NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees June 11 and 25 for active duty June 13 and 27 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not appli cable on holidays. Loudmouth Thursday Any golfer wearing a pair of loudmouth shorts or pants plays 18 holes with cart for $20 Open to military, DoD and guests Junior Golf Clinic Session 1, June 1721, ages 1117 Session 2, July 1519, ages 610 Session 3, July 29 Aug. 2, ages 1117 $110 per child, per sessionMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina June 15, 16, 22 & 23 July 20, 21, 27 & 28 Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Movie Under the Stars Featuring Escape From Planet Earth June 21 at 8:30 p.m. Patriots Grove Americas Kids Run June 28 at 9 a.m. Ages 5 12 Sign-up at the youth centerFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School June 3 July 10 $500 per person For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 13, 2013 13

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Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville its hospital and branch health clinics is chang ing its approach to appoint ment scheduling, to offer more same-day, urgent-care appointments and better sup port patients Medical Home Port teams. To make an appointment or get clinical advice, patients call the same appointment line they always have. The hospi tals appointment line has a new greeting with options for each care team, while the branch health clinics process remains the same. Knowing which team theyre on helps patients quickly connect with an appointment clerk who is physically located in their care team. The hospital has six teams: Family Medicine (green, red, white and yellow teams), Internal Medicine blue team and Pediatrics purple team. Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville (Primary Care) has one team: silver team. There are 14 teams in total across the command. Each Medical Home Port care team is laser-focused on meeting all of their patients preventive, routine and urgent care needs, said NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer. And by locating our appoint ing staff in the care teams, we get better real-time com municationwhich enhanc es our ability to make use of any openings in the schedule to offer same-day, urgent-care appointments. The teamby taking a whole-person approach to healthaims for total health and wellness and is bet ter positioned than an emer gency room to manage urgent care. Urgent care includes things like a minor cut, sprain, migraine, earache, rising fever or urinary tract infection. (For emergencies, patients should call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room.) Each team includes an appointing clerk, front desk staff, medical assistants, corps men, nurses, a case manager and a pharmacistled by the primary care managers (PCMs): physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitio ners. Navy Medicine clinicians have the same education and training as their private-sector colleaguesand also have experience on battlefields, at sea and on humanitarian mis sions. To meet the PCMs on each Medical Home Port team, visit the commands website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/nav alhospitaljax. Patients can reach their team by secure email (for nonurgent issues) by signing up for Medical Home Port Online on the commands website or at www.relayhealth.com. At the hospital, patients call the appointment line at 5424677 or (800) 529-4677, week days from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Patients with a referral from their PCM to a specialty clin ic at the hospital can call the appointment line, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Afterhours nurse advice is available via the appointment line on evenings, weekends and holidays. At Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville, patients call 5427094/7095, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Patients with a referral from their PCM to a specialty clinic at the hospi tal can call the appointment line at 542-4677 or (800) 5294677, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. After-hours nurse advice is available via the appoint ment line at 542-4677 or (800) 529-4677 on evenings, week ends and holidays. New appointment scheduling at hospital, branch health clinic 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 13, 2013

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Introduced in February 2013, by the Naval Hospital Jacksonville Wellness Center, Sail A Weigh is a six-week pro gram created to assist people who may struggle with maintaining a healthy lifestyle. The overall goal of Sail A Weigh is to help family members and retirees live vigorous lifestyles and maintain healthy body composition through nutrition education and weight loss. The Sail A Weigh idea originated from the current ShipShape program, the Navys official intervention program for weight management. After observing the positive impact ShipShape had on active duty military, I envisioned military families and retir ees benefitting from a similar class, said Cheryl Masters, NH Jacksonville Wellness Center health promotion spe cialist and registered dietician. The Sail A Weigh program is two weeks shorter than ShipShape yet includes all of the information. We wanted to ensure we could accommodate partici pants whose work schedules may pre vent them from attending a longer pro gram. During the course, participants learn and practice healthy diet tech niques such as self-monitoring of per sonal progress and the use of food diary sheets and exercise logs. The program also assists with setting indi vidual goals, dealing with emotional and social situations, behavior change assessments and the development of problem solving techniques. The program provides continued pro fessional contact through a structured follow-up program. These techniques are individual building blocks to help people not only lose weight while involved in the class, but to continue that success after the class is completed, says Masters. Janet Mullins, NH Jacksonville Mental Health and Wellness clinical psychologist, addresses psychological barriers that many face while attempt ing to lose weight and increase fitness. Mullins classifies one of these obstacles as emotional (stress) eating, in which she actively teaches coping skills that help prevent participants from turn ing to food for comfort and preventing relapses, ultimately allowing partici pants to break their weight loss plateau. I learned how to take charge of my life and to be honest about being a food addict, recalls Brenda McCoy, a former Navy Exchange employee and inaugural Sail A Weigh class member who lost 260 pounds. Before, I never really thought about what I was putting into my body. Sail A Weigh taught me how to properly read food labels and be more conscious of what I am eating. Each class includes a field trip to the Defense Commissary, where partici pants learn valuable information about food ingredients, additives, preserva tives and mealtime ideas. Upon completion of the course, par ticipants understand healthy grocery shopping, ingredient label, accurate calorie counting and healthy meal planning techniques. Additionally, the Sail A Weigh group learns about physical fitness. NAS Jacksonville Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) fitness instruc tors, give guidelines for strength train ing, flexibility and safety instructions throughout the class. Participants are encouraged to consult with their physi cian before starting an exercise pro gram. Sail A Weigh class times are flex ible to accommodate work sched ules. Morning and afternoon classes are available Monday through Friday between 7:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. For more information or to sign up, contact the NH Jacksonville Wellness Center at 5425292. Approximately 65 percent of all Department of Defense (DoD) house hold goods moves occur between May 15 and Aug. 1. What can you do to ensure a smooth move? Plan! With the decline in moving compa nies capacity and DoD budget cuts, the sooner you start working with the local Personal Property Office the greater your chance of getting the desired pack out date. Dont wait until a week or two before the desired pack out date to complete the process in www.move.mil enter all your data and paperwork now. For Navy information on getting started with the move process, go to www.navsup.navy. mil/household Another tip is to organize your house and belongings. Go through all your rooms and boxes from the last move to make sure you still need the items. If it hasnt been worn or used in the last year, do you still need it? Sort your items by the type of shipment: house hold shipment; unaccompanied bag gage, if authorized; professional gear and what is going in your suitcase or car. By sorting you may find out what needs to be sold, donated or disposed of. Keep in mind, if you exceed your authorized weight allowance it can be expensive. Household goods terms and what they mean: Household shipment is your main shipment: furniture, dishes, washer/ dryer, BBQ grill, outdoor furniture, chil drens play furniture, majority of your clothes, etc. Unaccompanied baggage if autho rized: this is the small shipment of items that you will need to survive until your big household good shipment arrives. This is normally only autho rized with overseas orders. Items to include would be enough kitchen ware/ dishes to use daily (not your china), crib, clothes, some uniforms, some DVDs not your entire library, etc. Professional gear : Professional books and equipment includes Household goods in a members possession needed for the performance of official duties at the next or a later destination. Service members items could be: work manuals, awards, specialty work uniforms (Band uniforms, navy divers, flight suits, helmets, chaplains vest ments and other specialized apparel), reference materials, instruments, tools, and equipment peculiar to technicians, mechanics. Spouse: may be authorized for a licensed profession, i.e. doctor, dentist, lawyer or community support activities at the next or a later destination, exam ple would be a command ombudsman. Any other profession may be considered if the appropriate documentation can be provided. Selling Avon or Pamper Chef does not count as licensed profes sion. Excluded items are: commercial products for sale/resale used in con ducting business, sports equipment, and office, household, or shop fixtures or furniture (such as bookcases, study/ computer desks, file cabinets, and racks). Wellness Center introduces Sail A Weigh program Household goods summer peak moving system begins 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 13, 2013

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THURSDAY, JUNE 13, 2013 WWII VETS HOME AT LAST FACTORY FRES H Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) hosted Jacksonvilles mayor June 5 for a familiarization tour of the Navys aviation main tenance, repair, modification and overhaul depot the largest industrial employer in the region. Mayor Alvin Brown, who ran on his vision of taking Jacksonville to the next level through job creation, toured FRCSE to learn about the depots mis sion in support of the warfighter. Accompanying the mayor were retired Rear Adm. Victor Guillory, the citys director for Military Affairs, Veterans and Disabled Services (MAVDS) and Harrison Conyers, Veterans and Community Outreach Manager. MAVDS advo cates for the expansion of mili tary infrastructure and jobs in Northeast Florida. The visitors had a unique opportunity to see artisans working on aircraft and fabricating scarce aeronautical parts and compo nents for legacy aircraft during their tour of the F/A-18 Hornet and P-3 Orion aircraft production lines, as well as the industrial manufacturing division. Brown said it is easy to see how the Navy presence in Jacksonville makes the military one of our strongest and most sustainable economic drivers. FRCSE creates many positives for our city by helping to refine the skills of our workforce and providing good-paying work that creates a ripple effect for the betterment of the Northeast Florida economy, said the mayor. Im proud of what these men and women do not just in the name of Americas defense, but to support our standard of liv ing on the homefront every day. Capt. Robert Caldwell, FRCSE commanding officer, said it was a great opportunity to show Mayor Broadarrows launch historic Japan missionNearly 40 aircrew and maintenance members of the VP-62 Broadarrows headed to Japan June 4 as part of the Navys first mobilization of a Reserve P-3C Orion squadron. The squadronwhich has been flying the Lockheed P-3 Orion aircraft since the height of the Cold War, and is prepared to conduct anti-subma rine warfare (ASW) and other maritime patrol missionswill join the VP-26 Tridents with several detachments in the Western Pacific. In recent years, the Broadarrows have gone on detachments to El Salvador where they flew many counter-narcotics missions in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico. Now, as the active-duty VP squadrons transition from flying the propeller-driven P-3C to the new jet-powered Boeing P-8A Poseidon, the Reservists will provide crucial support in conducting mari time patrol and reconnaissance missions globally while the active-duty squadrons come up to speed with their new aircraft. One of the Reservists going on deployment is AWCM Spence Cunningham, the last P-3 acoustic sensor operator to have flown during the Cold War. Cunningham joined the Navy in 1981 and tracked Soviet submarines in the Mediterranean Sea and western Atlantic Ocean. My expectations are what any acoustic operator worth his or her salt should betracking subma rines. Being primarily an Atlantic Fleet operator, I look forward to working in the western Pacific against some very challenging submarines found in that part of the world. I relish the challenge and look forward to sharing my experience with some FRCSE hosts Jacksonville mayor for tour of Navy depot The VP-10 Red Lancers returned home last week from their six-month tri-site deployment in support of the Navys 4th and 7th Fleets. While on deployment, VP-10 safely executed more than 250 sorties and flew more than 2,900 hours with an astounding 97 percent mission com pletion rate. Driven by thoughts of home and duty to country, the Red Lancers contin ued their tradition of excellence, fly ing anti-submarine, littoral surveil lance and counter-narcotics missions throughout the 4th and 7th Fleet areas of responsibility. Operating out of Forward Operating Location Comalapa, El Salvador, the Red Lancer team flew missions in support of joint, interagency Operation Martillo. Their mission was the detection, interdiction, and seizure of illegal narcotics in both the Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea. VP-10 directly contributed to the interdiction of more than 18,000 kilos of illegal narcotics as well as the detention of 28 suspected nar cotics smugglers. The Red Lancer maintenance team was equally busy, completing 10 engine and 16 propeller changes over the course of the deployment. When they werent interdicting sus pected smugglers, VP-10 personnel were enthusiastically engaged in com munity outreach and support, volun The VP-45 Pelicans returned home last week to their eagerly awaiting families and friends at NAS Jacksonville after a six-month deployment to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. Following a turnover with the VP-26 Tridents, the final group of VP-45 Pelicans arrived home June 8, completing the squadrons last flight in a P-3C Orion before beginning its transition to the P-8A Poseidon next month. The deployment proved very suc cessful and rewarding on many lev els. From a maintenance perspective, AT1(AW) Tiffani Travis, the 2013Senior Chief Sydney Smith Leadership Awardrecipient, noted that, what the maintenance department accom plished as a whole is more than anyone could have expected. From the mechanics changing engines, airframers completing fuel cell maintenance, aviation electronic technicians constantly battling to keep the Single Advanced Signal Processor System and the radar up, to the avia tion ordnancemen loading thousands of buoys -we all came together to get the job done. Thanks to the support of these maintenance professionals, VP-45 combat aircrews flew 3,026 mishap-free flight hours and launched 18 ready alert air craft in support of search and rescue, intelligence reconnaissance, and antisubmarine warfare operations. Despite a high ops-tempo, the Pelicans still found time for professional development, with 11 Sailors earning naval aircrew wings and more than 40 personnel earning their enlisted avia tion warfare specialist wings. In addition to operating out of Kadena, VP-45 also operated out of numerous detachment sites around the 7th Fleet area of responsibility (AOR), including the Philippines, Malaysia, Thailand, Australia and Indonesia. The detachments covered a wide range of missions, including search VP-45Pelicans return home from deploymentVP-10 Red Lancers complete successful deployment

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 13, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS June 13 1881 USS Jeannette crushed in Arctic ice pack. 1967 Operation Great Bend begins in Rung Sat Zone, Vietnam. June 14 1777 John Paul Jones takes command of Ranger. 1777 Continental Congress adopts design of present U.S. Flag. (Flag Day) 1847 Commodore Matthew Perry launches amphibious river operations by Sailors and Marines on Tabasco River, Mexico. 1940 Franklin D. Roosevelt signs Naval Expansion Act to con struct ships to increase Navy ton nage by 11 percent. 1985 SW2 Robert Stethem of Underwater Construction Team 1 was killed by terrorist hijackers of TWA Flight 847. He later received a Bronze Star for his heroism. June 15 1944 Fifth Fleet lands Marines on Saipan, under the cover of naval gunfire, in conquest of Marianas. 1963 Launching of combat store ship, Mars (AFS-1), first of new class of underway replenishment ships. 1991 Two battle groups and amphibious ships evacuate dependents and Air Force personnel from Clark Air Force Base in the Philippines after Mount Pinatubo erupts. June 16 1898 U.S. squadron bombards Santiago, Cuba. 1942 Congress authorized an increase in the airship strength of the Navy to 200 lighter-than-air craft. 1958 The Pacific Missile Range in Point Mugu,Calif., is estab lished under Navy management to provide range support to the Department of Defense and other government agencies in guided missiles, satellite and space vehicle development and training. 1965 Navy Department sched ules reactivation of hospital ship Repose (AH-16), the first hospi tal ship activated for Vietnam Conflict. June 17 1833 USS Delaware enters dry dock at Gosport Navy Yard in Norfolk, Va., the first warship to enter a public dry dock in the United States. 1870 USS Mohican burns Mexican pirate ship Forward. 1898 Navy Hospital Corps established. 1940 Chief of Naval Operations asks Congress for money to build two-ocean Navy. June 18 1812 U.S. declares war on Great Britain for impressments of Sailors and interference with commerce. 1942 First African-American officer, Bernard Robinson, com missioned in Naval Reserve. 1951 The ZPN-1 airship makes its first flight. 1957 CNO approves ship char acteristics of the Fleet Ballistic Missile submarine. June 19 1864 USS Kearsarge sinks Confederate raider Alabama off France. 1944 Battle of the Philippine Sea begins (The Marianas Turkey Shoot). 1948 Chief of Naval Operations assigns three destroyers to U.N. mediator for the Palestine truce. 1959 ZPG-3W, the largest nonrigid airship ever built, was the first of four airships designed for use in air warning patrol. It was delivered to NAS Lakehurst, N.J. They are calling it Ketchup Gate, and it has mili tary wives seeing red. Last week, Rajiv Chandrasekaran wrote an article for the Washington Post that, on its surface, seemed to suggest that military families take advantage of tax payers. Yes, I cringed, too. Then I read it again. What Chandrasekaran is actually calling for is smarter use of taxpayers dollars, and therefore, more and better benefits for service members. This is becoming a problem: we military wives cant hear a message because weve grown accustomed to defending our benefits. For good reason. In the past, some journalists have been overtly offensive, and in many cases entirely inaccurate, when criticizing military pay and benefits. Indeed, just a few months ago, I wrote a response to a Huffington Post article that also rattled cages. But that columnist got his facts and his tone wrong. Chandrasekaran, on the other hand, makes a few good points, and if we can just see beyond our past wounds, wed realize that sometimes its okay to call off the dogs in order for rational ideas that benefit all of us to make their way into the discussion. Some of Chandrasekarans better points that have been buried beneath the silliness of too-many-bottlesof-ketchup include: Shutting down military commissaries based in the United States and allowing families to shop at civilian stores (and receive the same discount) would save $1 billion a year. Some benefits, like retirement pay and health care, cant be scrimped. Others, like the commissary, should be sacrificed if combat readiness is at stake. Allowing family members to shop at civilian stores for the same discount provided by the commissary would actually be a greater benefit for retirees and reservists who often dont live near a military base and have to travel great distances to find a commissary. Originally implemented in the 1800s as a means to support families stationed at rural bases, mili tary commissaries in the United States are less critical today because transformations in the military and civilian society over the following decades including the expansion of large discount retailers near remote bases obviated the original reason for them. Trust me, Ive been shopping at a military commissary since I was an infant in a stroller. I have (mostly) fond memories of following my mom up and down the aisles and marveling at the way she could pack two carts full of food and maneuver both around tight turns. Commissaries are part of the military family cul ture. Inside, its always Veterans Day, Memorial Day and the Fourth of July thanks to patriotic advertise ments aimed at service families. But taxpayers and the government arent in the business of supporting our culture. They are in the business of supporting the mission. And if commis saries need to be cut in order to do that, Im okay with it. In fact, I think our military spouse culture of exclusivity is becoming a detriment, and perhaps sending us out into the larger consumer world would help others understand who we are and what we do. Over the course of last year, I hosted 250 people, most of them civilian, to Dinner with the Smileys and what I found was that even after all our public outreach, most people still dont understand what military families go through. I wonder: is it partly because we are hidden away in our commissaries, spouse groups and bases with armed guards out front? Some outsiders are beginning to view us negatively, and it doesnt help that we have what feels to them like a secret world of special stores and discounts. We know these benefits are valid and well earned, but when we wont let civilians ask hard questions, we put them on the offensive. When we blast them for ketchup instead of hear ing their idea, Im afraid we come across as unreasonable. In our fight to defend ourselves, we have put our fingers in our ears over rational questions like, Are commissaries the most critical benefit we have? and mocked with ketchup memes those who dared to ask. This is no way to work together and ask for support. If we want civilians to take us seriously when we tell them that things like healthcare and retirement pay are but a small sacrifice (for them) for what service men and women do for our country, then we need to walk away from the ketchup and listen when they come up with other ways to save money. Disclaimer: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of any agency of the U.S. government or NAS Jacksonville. Put down the ketchup and hear the question VP-5 transition spotlightEvery week, as part of its transition to the P-8A Poseidon, Patrol Squadron (VP) 5 is shining the transition spotlight on a talented Mad Fox. This weeks spotlight shines on AT1(AW/ SW) Geoffrey Bird. In addition to transitioning to the P-8A, Bird is responsible for standing up the AT laser program at the squadron. In order to safely work on these sys tems, Geoffrey attended a class at Naval Station Mayport and requalified as an administrative laser safety officer (ALSO). Currently, the ATs are finishing all their qualifi cations at VP-30 in preparation for the acceptance inspection of VP-5s first P-8A Poseidon. This is the third time AT1 Bird has transitioned to a new platform while in the Navy. He previously transitioned to MH-60 Sierras and Romeos in the rotary wing community. Out of the three transitions I have been a part of, the Poseidon transition has been the smoothest, praised Bird. VP-30 has done a great job teaching us the electronics that are completely different than anything seen in the P-3C Orion. Aviation electronic technicians are responsible for the maintenance and repair of electronics and avionics aboard the aircraft including, navigation, radio and radar systems. A native of Cliffton Park, N.Y., Bird is married with three children. He joined the Navy in 1998 and has served tours with VP-10, HSL-46, HSM Weapons School, HSC-25, HSM-40 and VP-5. He is the current Mad Fox Senior Sailor of the Quarter. VP-5 began its transition to the P-8A Poseidon in January 2013.

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The Mayport Florida Council of the Navy League hosted the 16th annual Battle of Midway commemoration dinner at the World Golf Village June 1 with more than 800 people in atten dance, including 15 Midway veterans. Its good to get together like this, said Marlin Crider, a Radioman 2nd Class during the Battle of Midway. I wish that high school students and more people knew about the Battle of Midway. Considered by some to be the most influential conflict dur ing World War II, the Battle of Midway was a three-day con flict on the Pacific Ocean between the U.S. and Japanese navies from June 4-7, 1942, in which the U.S. defeated Japan by serving them their worst naval defeat in over 350 years. I think it was one of the greatest battles in the history of naval warfare and I was proud to be part of it, said retired Lt. Cmdr. William Roy. We turned the Japanese tide from winning to losing, and that was the turning point of the war in the Pacific. Guest speaker for the evening, Adm. Bill Gortney, commander, Fleet Forces Command, spoke about the amazing efforts of all the brave men who served dur ing the Battle of Midway. There are countless stories of those who ran into burning or flooding spaces to save a ship mate, and some of those who did are here with us this eve ning, said Gortney. Let us never forget those brave veterans and their legacy. We must preserve and celebrate our rich history. Gortney also provided his State of the Navy an over view of the current operations and how our brave warriors are doing more with less and con tinuing to be ready anywhere in the world. Following Gortneys speech, a special memento was presented to each Midway veteran as each biography was read. Notable hero in attendance was Medal of Honor recipient Robert Ingram, whose Medal of Honor of citation was read aloud. Other highlights of the event included a joint service color guard presentation by members of all six services, including the Merchant Marines and a cer emonial presentation of the sixperson POW/MIA table. Midway veterans honored at annual event JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 13, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 13, 2013 teering more than 600 hours at a local orphanage. During their weekly trips to the orphanage, squadron personnel played games with the children and performed minor repairs, includ ing assisting with the painting of walls which provided much needed assistance to the staff. The squadron also donated 1,200 pounds of food and clothing and made a monetary donation of more than $1,500 to the orphanage. The Red Lancers were exemplary ambassadors of the Navys humanitar ian efforts abroad. Operating out of Misawa Air Base in northern Japan and Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, VP-10 supported 7th Fleet efforts around the Asian-Pacific region. The squad ron successfully executed multiple detachments to the Republic of Korea, Australia and Guam. During their detachment to this region, they flew in support of multinational exercises Fleet Concentration Period 2013, GUAMEX 13-1, Foal Eagle, Key Resolve, Ssang Yong and SHAREM. Primarily stationed at Misawa AB, VP-10 maintenance contin ued their exemplary performance, expertly handling the day-today maintenance oper ations of a deployed squadron. They also flaw lessly managed the rigorous Integrated Maintenance Concept (IMC) evolutions for eight theater P-3C Orions. In addition to the numerous squad ron successes that were attained on this deployment, includ ing surpassing 40 years and more than 239,000 mishap-free flight hours, VP-10 person nel also achieved numerous individual career milestones. The squadron had 56 personnel qualify and receive the Enlisted Aviation Warfare Specialist pin, 36 Sailors were advanced dur ing the most recent exam cycle and 15 Sailors reenlisted. VP-10

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 13, 2013 5 VP-45and rescue and international exercis es. Often working side-by-side with the host countries military, these detach ments not only strengthened inter national relations, but also provided the Pelicans with a chance to act as American ambassadors. Overall, the Sailors of VP-45 were the cornerstone that attributed to the suc cessful deployment. Over the past six months, the Pelicans have been working really hard to support 7th Fleet in one of the most dynamic AORs in the world, said VP-45 Executive Officer Cmdr. T.J. Grady. Grady added that, it has been a true team effort thanks to VP-5, VP-10 and Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing Eleven assets that augmented VP-45 during the deployment. With the deployment now in the rear view mirror, the Pelicans will pause to commemorate the squadrons heritage with a dinner June 21. The Pelican family will pay a special tribute to the flight engineer and inflight technician ratings that, after more than 70 years as a part of VP-45, will be leaving the squadron as the Pelicans transition to the Boeing P-8A Poseidon.

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young fleet operators out there. Another Reservist deploying is AD3 Scott Woodward of Savannah, Ga. Woodward joined the Navy Reserve six years ago after talking to a recruiter during his lunch break. I chose to join the Reserves rather than going active duty because I wanted to go to school at the same time, said Woodward, who completed his degree in criminal justice last December. This will be my first deployment with a squadron. I was deployed to Iraq in 2009, but after six years in the Navy, its pretty exciting to finally go on the road, working in my rate, with my own unit. Other than going to Iraq, this will be the first time Ive traveled outside the country, said Woodward. Ive always wanted to go to Japan, to be able to do some sightseeing. I have a friend from Tokyo who showed me some pictures of his hometown, and I would also like to see some of the museums. VP-16 is now transitioning to the P-8 Poseidon. They are the first activeduty squadron to get the new aircraft and that is what creates the demand for VP-62 and VP-69 to deploy, said Cmdr. Jon Townsend, VP-62 commanding officer. We are taking their place on deployment while they transition. We are scheduled to deploy three more times as the rest of the active-duty maritime patrol squadrons transition. As they transition, we fill their place. The Reserves will not transition to the P-8 until all active-duty squad rons have made the change, added Townsend. I believe the eventual transition to P-8 will be easier for the Reserves than the active component because of the many Reserve pilots who fly for the airlines already fly the Boeing737. The P-3 has served the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF) for more than 50 years. While mission gear has been updated over the years, the airframe itself is rapidly approaching the end of its service life. The new P-8A, a military variant of the Boeing 737, features improved airframe reliability, high-altitude surveillance and reconnaissance capability, openarchitecture mission systems, in-flight refueling capability and many other modern features. The MPRF transition to the P-8A basically involves six-month FIT (Fleet Introduction Training), plus a one-year IDRC (Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle). While the IDRC is always there, its the six-month FIT that causes the gap in deployment coverage. Its these gaps were mobilizing to cover, said Townsend. Maintaining crew readiness and completing all the requirements for deployment has its own challenges for a Reserve squadron, said CMDCM Mike Heisler, VP-62s senior enlisted leader. A combat aircrew cannot be qualified individually. Each member of the team must be present for each evolution. When they launch a weapon or fly a mission, every member of the team, from the pilots and flight engi neers to the tactical officer and the sensor operators must be on the plane and performing their roles flawlessly or the crew qualification isnt earned or maintained. In an active duty squadron, every member of the crew is available every day to train together. In a Reserve squadron, we have one or two week ends a month, said Heisler. If some one gets sick and misses a drill week end that could delay qualification as a crew, which impacts the training plan for the following month. To deal with this, we went to two drill weekends and everyone is giving their all to make sure everything goes right. VP-62 is one team, one fight. Our Reservists and our full-time-support members are willing to give up two weekends a month with their families to make sure we are 100 percent ready to do our jobs. That is the spirit and execution of Active-Reserve integration. The squadron has complet ed Advanced Readiness Program, Operational Readiness Evaluation, Fleet NATOPS Evaluation Team inspection, Conventional Weapons Refresher Training, Conventional Weapons Technical Proficiency Inspection and then begins the first iteration of VP Reserve mobilization and deployment cycles. The preparations for mobilization started last year, when VP-62 partici pated in the 23rd biennial Rim of the Pacific exercise, where they flew near ly 50 hours and achieved more than a dozen advanced readiness qualifica tions, including a live-fire exercise. We successfully fired a live Maverick missile against a decommissioned tar get ship, said Cmdr. Kris Moorhead, one of VP-62s mission commanders at RIMPAC. It is a very rare opportunity for us to get live ordnance in a training environment, so this was a fantastic training exercise for both aircrew and maintenance personnel. We also dropped a torpedo on an undersea target sled, Moorhead added. Most of our events were focused on ASW and it was great training. We coordinated our ASW efforts with P-3s from several countries, ASW helicopters, and the newest ASW patrol aircraft, the P-8 Poseidon. VP-62 As VP-62 begins the first mobilization of a Navy Reserve P-3 Orion squadron, one of the Reservists heading to Japan is also one of the last Cold War anti-submarine warfare operators still serving in the Navy AWCM(NAC/AW) Spence Cunningham. Before boarding the plane, he took time to look back on his 32 years of naval aviation experience. He joined the Navy via the Delayed Entry Program and went to boot camp in Orlando, Fla. in August 1981. After completing the anti-submarine war fare operator pipeline (non-acoustic) in 1982, he received orders to the VP-45 Pelicans. After being screened for instructor duty at VP-30, he taught the Update 2, 2.5 and 3 versions of the P-3C Orion. When I completed my shore tour at VP-30 I took an opportunity to work on the P-7 program, so I separated from active duty as an AW1 in August of 1990 with orders to the Broadarrows of VP-62, he said. At that time, the annual training periods consisted of the squadron set ting up shop in Bermuda to cover that ASW sector until all the Reservists completed their two-week requirements. The Broadarrows were the last Reserve VP squadron to operate fully out of NAS Bermuda in 1991. After that, operations moved to a detachment form of annual training where crew and maintenance formed small units and went forward to vari ous sites like Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico; Sigonella, Sicily; Manta, Ecuador; Keflavik, Iceland and Comalapa, El Salvador to name a few. While attached to VP-62, Ive held many positions from NATOPS Bluecard instructor to detachment CPO and up to Command Master Chief. All the while, maintaining combat air crew qualifications to answer the call if needed. I reached the 30-year high year ten Last Cold War warrior deploying to WESTPAC 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 13, 2013

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MAYORBrown the scope and reach that FRCSE has on its warfighting customer. FRCSEs federal civilian payroll of $220 million for its nearly 3,000 workers and $48 million payroll for its 900 military personnel contributes signifi cantly to local tax bases. Many of the federal civilian workers are former or retired military veterans. Caldwell said the FRCSE workforce is also engaged in the community. Federal civilian employees contributed more than $170,000 to the 2012 Combined Federal Campaign, a work place drive that supports local, state, and national charities. Further, FRCSE was recognized with the 2012 Highest Number of Donations to The Blood Alliance, Military Category Award with employees donating more than 1,000 units. At the conclusion of the tour, Caldwell presented Brown with a command coin bearing the FRCSE emblem in recognition of the mayors first visit to the Navy aviation maintenance depot. The mayor extended his thanks on behalf of the city to Caldwell and the many men and women of the Navy for their dedication and service. Prior to the mayors election, he served as an Executive in Residence at Jacksonville Universitys Davis School of Business. He is the past president and CEO of the Willie Gary Classic Foundation, an organization that helps provide scholarships for historically black colleges. Balfour Beatty Communities and Switch4Good pre sented a $500 check community reward to residents of NAS Jacksonville recently. The $500 grant was awarded to residents for achiev ing a 20 percent participation in the Switch4Good program and will be used to install doggie post stations and picnic tables on base. The Switch4Good program is designed to help resi dents of Balfour Beatty Communities conserve energy and earn money back for low utility bills. Funded by the Department of Energy, Switch4Good provides conservation tips via email and text. The program is voluntary for all residents who are included in the Resident Energy Conservation Program initiated by the Department of the Navy. Additional community rewards will be given for increased participation and energy savings. Balfour Beatty Communities is also eligible for another grant from Switch4Good. If 80 percent of homes enrolled in S4G use 10 percent less energy than other homes on the base, the community will receive another $500.The challenge runs through June. For more energy savings information, like the Switch4Good Facebook page. The National Naval Officers Association (NNOA) Jacksonville Chapter hosted their fourth annual scholarship banquet May 17. NNOA Jacksonville Chapter presented schol arship checks in amounts of $750 and $1,000, totaling $13,000 to 15 area graduating high school students from Clay, Duval, St. Johns and Camden County, Ga. This event represented a sincere effort on the part of the NNOA organization to positively impact our com munity and to represent the sea ser vices. Without the support of the community, partners, donors and members, NNOA Jax would not have been able to provide $30,000 in scholarships over the past three years to deserving high school seniors throughout the southeast region. There were 64 participants at the event with Dr. Richard Danford, CEO of the Jacksonville Urban League, serving as the keynote speaker. Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander, 4th Fleet/U.S. Navy Forces Southern Command was NNOAs special guest, who presented a command coin to each scholarship recipient. An event such as this requires a great deal of commitment to plan and organize. A special thanks to Lt. Cmdr. Brian Martin and retired Lt. Harold Jones, this years scholarship committee chair and co-chair, for their hard work. A special thanks also goes out to the NNOA Scholarship Committee retired Rear Adm. Gene Kendal, retired Lt. Cmdr. Herlena Washington and retired CWO4 Herman McCrary. For more information on NNOA Jacksonville Chapter, visit their Facebook page. Furlough letters are already in the mail. Are you financially prepared? Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) financial educators are offering a presentation regarding the financial health of furloughed federal workers. They will provide financial information in order for personnel to make informed decisions. Visit FFSCs Facebook page for information on training regarding the sequestration and furlough situa tion. If you are interested in FFSCs Personal Financial Manager visiting your command or department to provide training, call 542-5745. The presentation, Personal Finances, Before and After a Furlough, is available to civilians, active duty and family members.Community reward enhances housing areas NNOA Jacksonville hosts annual scholarship banquetPersonal finances surviving the furlough 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 13, 2013

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VP-5 Mad Foxes ordnance men recently completed their Conventional Weapons Training Proficiency Inspection (CWTPI) at Hangar 511 aboard NAS Jacksonville. This inspection certifies VP-5 as independent weapons handlers for the P-8A Poseidon. CWTPI evaluates the squad ron AOs ability to safely oper ate the specific ground support equipment, perform release and control checks, load chaff and flares, as well as build-up and load the MK 54 torpedo. For the past two months, VP-5 ordies have been working 12-hour days, including week ends, to prepare for their inspection. Their outstanding perfor mance demonstrated that VP-5 is safe to handle and load ord nance for the P-8A Poseidon. CWTPI is typically a five-day inspection, commented VP-5 Gunner CWO3 Joseph Doyle. Our ordnancemen passed it with flying colors in three days and now, were ready for the arrival of our first Poseidon. Day one of the event involved administrative inspections of ordnance certifications and qualifications. Days two and three tested load team procedural compliance. Load Team One consists of AO1 Robert Massard, AO2 Patrick Williams, AO2 Bryce Warde, AO1 Ruben Rivera, AO1 Joshua Christenson, and AO2 Rumiel Benson. Load Team Two consists of AO1 Dennis Yearty, AO2 Kelcina Jackson, AO3 Jasmine Banks, AO2 Christopher Howard, AO3 Michael McKenzie, and AO3 Mallory Burton. The Support Team members include AT1 Abolo Meba and AM3 Theodore Skrypiec. Mad Foxes complete P-8A ordnance inspection JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 13, 2013 9

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On June 4, AA Jessica Diaz recovered P-8A number 436, the first P-8A Poseidon assigned to the VP-5 Mad Foxes. The aircraft was flown directly to NAS Jacksonville from Boeing facilities in Seattle, Wash. by a team of military acceptance pilots. VP-5s acceptance of 436 is unique as it is the first time a fleet squadron is directly accepting its own Poseidon. Mad Fox maintenance personnel were training hard since January for this process which will take a little under a week. With the help of sup port team experts from Boeing, each maintenance work center will perform their own inspections on their respective areas of expertise for aircraft 436. When they are completed, the aircraft will be put through release and control checks, ground turns, and finally, functional check flights by VP-5 pilots. Every Mad Fox is extremely excited about their very first P-8A Poseidon and look for ward to writing a new chapter in the long history of VP-5. Mad Foxes receive first P-8A Poseidon NAS Jacksonville traditionally sees its highest elec trical bills in the summer. With our governments current financial situation, saving money on utilities has never been more important. HVAC, lights, water heating, building envelope and process loads constitute the majority of the consumptive loads in our places of work and residences. Through building energy monitors and projects NAS Jacksonville is having success reducing its con sumption from year to year, but we are always looking at additional ways to save. Public Works Department. New Commander, Navy Region Southeast guidance establishes a cooling set point of 78 degrees during occupied hours and an 85 degree setback temperature during unoccupied times. ditioning (or heat) is on. Report any air leaks to the outside to your Public Works facility manager (missing weather stripping or improperly closing windows and doors). possible in place of overhead lights. Turn off overhead lights when you leave a room. Often times no one takes ownership of lighting over an area used by more than one person. Step up to that responsibility or talk to your building energy monitor about it. Works facility manager so that the lighting levels can be adjusted. Reducing the lighting not only saves the energy used to power the lights, it also saves on the heat introduced to the space from those same lights. This in turn reduces the load on the air conditioner. ability to correct to your Public Works facility man ager. As an occupant of your building you are aware of when something is broken or leaking sooner than anyone. The sooner that issue is identified, the sooner it will be fixed. that dont have to be left on are turned off. Examples of electronics that should be turned off are computer monitors, speakers, copiers, printers, scanners, shredders, fax machines and coffee makers. The best way to save energy is to turn the device off. The stand by features on all these devices save energy with varying effectiveness. To be sure you are maximizing the savings, simply turn the device off. If your building/unit does not already have a building energy monitor, let the installation energy man ager know by calling 542-1811. Building energy monitors are individuals who receive specific training on energy conservation and help to keep an eye on how a building is performing in order to maximize the energy efficiency of that building. The biggest point to take away is for everyone to take responsibility for their workspace the way you do for your home. We dont leave our lights or electronics on when we leave for the day, so we shouldnt do that in our workspace. If a toilet was malfunctioning and running con stantly at home we wouldnt continue to let it do so. If all of us can keep the above items in mind, NAS Jacksonville will be in great shape to meet its energy reduction goals.Summer months mean higher energy bills Sunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 11 a.m. Protestant Worship 11:15 a.m. Catholic CCD Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study Wednesdays, 7 p.m. at Chapel Complex Building 749 and Thursdays at 7 p.m. in the barracksNAS Jacksonville Chapel CenterCorner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road542-3051 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 13, 2013 11

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ure mark for master chief in February 2011. I decided to transfer to the Volunteer Training Unit, versus retirement, so I could continue to serve the P-3 community and give the benefit of my experience to junior operators who are the future of maritime patrol. Im fortunate that my civilian positions had direct relationships to my Navy Reserve job. I worked with several Jacksonville defense contractors involved with training the P-3 force, including curricu lum development and ASUW Improvement Programs. I also man aged the Revision and Maintenance effort for VP-30. Presently, I am the lead instructor for the Acoustic Track Contract Instructor cadre at the Pros Nest. We are responsible for all ground phase require ments that include class room instruction, air craft demonstrations, part-task trainer periods and Tactical Operational Readiness Trainers (TORT), that are full tac tical crew scenarios. This is my first mobi lization as a Reservist. My expectations are what any acoustic opera tor worth his or her salt should be targeting and tracking subma rines. Being primarily an Atlantic Fleet operator, I look forward to work ing in the western Pacific against some very chal lenging submarines operating in that part of the world. I relish the chal lenge and look forward to sharing my experience with some young fleet operators out there. Not to mention, getting to experience liberty in the exotic countries of the western Pacific. I am the last of the Cold War operators who are actively flying in the P-3C Orion. My acous tic sensor experience runs the gamut from AN/AQA-7 paper grams to the current AN-USQ78B Acoustic Processor Technical Refresh. I have hours upon hours of ontop time with a multi tude of submarines. Ive certainly had an excep tional 30-year run and I have to give a lions share of credit to the Navy Reserves who enabled me to enjoy the best of both my worlds. It is time for me to hang my flight suit up after this deployment and I will miss the flying. But most of all I will miss those Sailors in VP-62. I am grateful to serve among such a group of dedicated professionals. I am humbled and appre ciative for the privilege, concluded Cunningham. CUNNINGHAM I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. The first national observance of Flag Day took place in 1877 on the centennial of June 14, 1777 when the Stars and Stripes was officially recog nized as the symbol of a new nation and authorized by the Second Continental Congress. According to the National Flag Day Foundation, Flag Day was officially established by proclamation of President Woodrow Wilson on May 30, 1916. While Flag Day was celebrated in various communities for years after Wilsons proclama tion, it was not until August 3, 1949 that President Truman signed an Act of Congress designating June 14 as National Flag Day. Respect for our flag. According to United States Code, Title 36, Chapter 10: No disrespect should be shown to the flag of the United States of America; the flag should not be dipped to any person or thing. Regimental colors, state flags, and orga nization or institutional flags are to be dipped as a mark of honor. (a) The flag should never be displayed with the union down, except as a signal of dire distress in instances of extreme danger to life or property. (b) The flag should never touch anything beneath it, such as the ground, the floor, water, or merchandise. (c) The flag should never be carried flat or horizontally, but always aloft and free. (d) The flag should never be used as wearing apparel, bed ding, or drapery. It should never be festooned, drawn back, nor up, in folds, but always allowed to fall free. Bunting of blue, white, and red, always arranged with the blue above, the white in the middle, and the red below, should be used for covering a speakers desk, draping the front of the platform, and for decoration in general. (e) The flag should never be fastened, displayed, used or stored in such a manner as to permit it to be easily torn, soiled, or damaged in any way. (f) The flag should never be used as a covering for a ceiling. (g) The flag should never have placed upon it, nor on any part of it, nor attached to it any mark, insignia, letter, word, figure, design, picture, or drawing of any nature. (h) The flag should never be used as a receptacle for receiving, holding, carrying, or delivering anything. (i) The flag should never be used for advertising purpos es in any manner whatsoever. It should not be embroidered on such articles as cushions or handkerchiefs and the like, printed or otherwise impressed on paper napkins or boxes or anything that is designed for temporary use and discard. Advertising signs should not be fastened to a staff or halyard from which the flag is flown. (j) No part of the flag should ever be used as a costume or athletic uniform. However, a flag patch may be affixed to the uniform of military personnel, firemen, policemen and mem bers of patriotic organizations. The flag represents a living country and is itself considered a living thing. Therefore, the lapel flag pin being a replica, should be worn on the left lapel near the heart. (k) The flag, when it is in such condition that it is no longer a fitting emblem for display, should be destroyed in a dignified way, preferably by burning. Did you know? nations are displayed, they are to be flown from separate staffs of the same height. The flags should be of approximately equal size. International usage forbids the display of the flag of one nation above that of another nation in time of peace. Philip Sousa entitled, The Stars and Stripes Forever is designated as the national march of the United States of America. Flag Day celebrates the birthday of Old Glory The Department of Defense (DoD) announced May 30, the launch of The Safe HelpRoom created in response to Safe Helpline users who identified a need for peer support services. The new service allows victims of sexual assault to participate in group chat sessions to connect with and support one another in a moderated secure online environment at SafeHelpline.org. The moderator is also available to provide referrals as necessary and ensure all ground rules are adhered to prior to chat postings. Survivors of sexual assault have told us that being able to discuss their concerns with peers can pro vide a level of support not available through other means, said Acting Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness Jessica L. Wright. The Safe HelpRoom is a groundbreaking development in the departments commitment to support military vic tims of sexual assault. Safe HelpRoom sessions will begin immediately and are available twice weekly in two-hour sessions. The session schedule can be found at SafeHelpline. org, along with polls to determine session topics to address specific concerns. The Safe HelpRoom and Safe Helpline are administered by DoD and operated by the non-profit Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN), the nations largest anti-sexual violence organization, through a contractual agreement with DoD Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office (SAPRO). Safe HelpRoom was designed with unique safe guards to ensure a safe and welcoming place for survivors to connect, said Maj. Gen. Gary Patton, director, DoD Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office. Safe HelpRoom is the first of its kind to require participants to commit to a series of ground rules of acceptable behavior before entering a session. Additionally, each participant comment is reviewed to ensure it complies with the ground rules prior to posting for the group to see. The Safe HelpRoom provides a secure and private environment for positive and supportive discus sions. When users visit Safe Helpline, the staff provides one-on-one tailored assistance and offers a variety of up-to-date service referrals for resources on and off military bases and installations. Service referrals include information for sexual assault response coordinators, along with legal, medical, mental health, and spiritual military resources. The referral database also houses information for local civilian and the Department of Veterans Affairs resources for helpline users seeking information and crisis support away from the military response sys tem.DOD expands safe helpline for sexual assault victims 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 13, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment June 7 Karaoke with Randy delete June 14 Piece in Harmony June 21 Pam Affronti June 28 Jason LamarFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 510 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 16 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer Going on now through Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 years and younger receive one free game of bowling every day until 5 p.m. Win prizes all summer long!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Lap Swim (water park, water slide and concessions are not open) Monday Friday 6 8 a.m. & 6 7 p.m. Recreational Swim (water park, waterslide and concessions are open) Monday Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. 2013 Learn to Swim Program Session 1: June 1020 Session 2 July 8-18 Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1 Summer Splash Outdoor Pool Party June 29, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free food, games and prizes! Private pool parties can be reserved at the fitness center Parties are not available during regular business hours of operation and occur in the evenings when the pool is closed. Parties must be reserved 10 days prior to party date, payment due at time of reservation For information, call 542-3518I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Jacksonville Jaguars tickets on sale July 13 $70 section 147 Legoland Free ticket for active duty military through Oct. 27 Wet n Wild Orlando $37 adult, $45 adult w/ meal, $40 child w/ meal Disney Cruise Lines will be at ITT June 11, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. delete Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Daytona International Speedway Subway Firecracker July 5 and Coke 400 July 6 Tickets on sale now! Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Amelia Island Museum of History $10 family pass, Ghost tour $8 adult, $4 child Florida Ecosafaris in St. Cloud EcoPark $119, Coach safari adult $28, child $25, Zipline safari $75, Cypress canopy cycle $40 for one hour Gatorland Free admission for active duty and retired military until the end of the year. Family tickets can be purchased at ITT. $19.95 adult, $12.50 child, zip line $54.25The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. North Florida Speedway Trip June 15 at 5 p.m. $5 per person Country Rocks the Beach Trip June 22 at 4 p.m. NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees June 11 and 25 for active duty June 13 and 27 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Loudmouth Thursday Any golfer wearing a pair of loudmouth shorts or pants plays 18 holes with cart for $20 Open to military, DoD and guests Junior Golf Clinic Session 1, June 1721, ages 1117 Session 2, July 1519, ages 610 Session 3, July 29 Aug. 2, ages 1117 $110 per child, per sessionMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina June 15, 16, 22 & 23 July 20, 21, 27 & 28 Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Movie Under the Stars Featuring Escape From Planet Earth June 21 at 8:30 p.m. Patriots Grove Americas Kids Run June 28 at 9 a.m. Ages 5 12 Sign-up at the youth centerFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School June 3 July 10 $500 per person For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 13, 2013 13

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Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville its hospital and branch health clinics is chang ing its approach to appoint ment scheduling, to offer more same-day, urgent-care appointments and better sup port patients Medical Home Port teams. To make an appointment or get clinical advice, patients call the same appointment line they always have. The hospi tals appointment line has a new greeting with options for each care team, while the branch health clinics process remains the same. Knowing which team theyre on helps patients quickly connect with an appointment clerk who is physically located in their care team. The hospital has six teams: Family Medicine (green, red, white and yellow teams), Internal Medicine blue team and Pediatrics purple team. Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville (Primary Care) has one team: silver team. There are 14 teams in total across the command. Each Medical Home Port care team is laser-focused on meeting all of their patients preventive, routine and urgent care needs, said NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer. And by locating our appoint ing staff in the care teams, we get better real-time com municationwhich enhanc es our ability to make use of any openings in the schedule to offer same-day, urgent-care appointments. The teamby taking a whole-person approach to healthaims for total health and wellness and is bet ter positioned than an emer gency room to manage urgent care. Urgent care includes things like a minor cut, sprain, migraine, earache, rising fever or urinary tract infection. (For emergencies, patients should call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room.) Each team includes an appointing clerk, front desk staff, medical assistants, corpsmen, nurses, a case manager and a pharmacistled by the primary care managers (PCMs): physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitio ners. Navy Medicine clinicians have the same education and training as their private-sector colleaguesand also have experience on battlefields, at sea and on humanitarian missions. To meet the PCMs on each Medical Home Port team, visit the commands website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/nav alhospitaljax. Patients can reach their team by secure email (for nonurgent issues) by signing up for Medical Home Port Online on the commands website or at www.relayhealth.com. At the hospital, patients call the appointment line at 5424677 or (800) 529-4677, week days from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Patients with a referral from their PCM to a specialty clin ic at the hospital can call the appointment line, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Afterhours nurse advice is available via the appointment line on evenings, weekends and holidays. At Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville, patients call 5427094/7095, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Patients with a referral from their PCM to a specialty clinic at the hospi tal can call the appointment line at 542-4677 or (800) 5294677, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. After-hours nurse advice is available via the appointment line at 542-4677 or (800) 529-4677 on evenings, weekends and holidays. New appointment scheduling at hospital, branch health clinic 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 13, 2013

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Introduced in February 2013, by the Naval Hospital Jacksonville Wellness Center, Sail A Weigh is a six-week program created to assist people who may struggle with maintaining a healthy lifestyle. The overall goal of Sail A Weigh is to help family members and retirees live vigorous lifestyles and maintain healthy body composition through nutrition education and weight loss. The Sail A Weigh idea originated from the current ShipShape program, the Navys official intervention program for weight management. After observing the positive impact ShipShape had on active duty military, I envisioned military families and retirees benefitting from a similar class, said Cheryl Masters, NH Jacksonville Wellness Center health promotion specialist and registered dietician. The Sail A Weigh program is two weeks shorter than ShipShape yet includes all of the information. We wanted to ensure we could accommodate partici pants whose work schedules may pre vent them from attending a longer program. During the course, participants learn and practice healthy diet tech niques such as self-monitoring of per sonal progress and the use of food diary sheets and exercise logs. The program also assists with setting indi vidual goals, dealing with emotional and social situations, behavior change assessments and the development of problem solving techniques. The program provides continued professional contact through a structured follow-up program. These techniques are individual building blocks to help people not only lose weight while involved in the class, but to continue that success after the class is completed, says Masters. Janet Mullins, NH Jacksonville Mental Health and Wellness clinical psychologist, addresses psychological barriers that many face while attempt ing to lose weight and increase fitness. Mullins classifies one of these obstacles as emotional (stress) eating, in which she actively teaches coping skills that help prevent participants from turn ing to food for comfort and preventing relapses, ultimately allowing partici pants to break their weight loss plateau. I learned how to take charge of my life and to be honest about being a food addict, recalls Brenda McCoy, a former Navy Exchange employee and inaugural Sail A Weigh class member who lost 260 pounds. Before, I never really thought about what I was putting into my body. Sail A Weigh taught me how to properly read food labels and be more conscious of what I am eating. Each class includes a field trip to the Defense Commissary, where partici pants learn valuable information about food ingredients, additives, preserva tives and mealtime ideas. Upon completion of the course, par ticipants understand healthy grocery shopping, ingredient label, accurate calorie counting and healthy meal planning techniques. Additionally, the Sail A Weigh group learns about physical fitness. NAS Jacksonville Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) fitness instruc tors, give guidelines for strength training, flexibility and safety instructions throughout the class. Participants are encouraged to consult with their physician before starting an exercise pro gram. Sail A Weigh class times are flex ible to accommodate work sched ules. Morning and afternoon classes are available Monday through Friday between 7:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. For more information or to sign up, contact the NH Jacksonville Wellness Center at 5425292. Approximately 65 percent of all Department of Defense (DoD) house hold goods moves occur between May 15 and Aug. 1. What can you do to ensure a smooth move? Plan! With the decline in moving compa nies capacity and DoD budget cuts, the sooner you start working with the local Personal Property Office the greater your chance of getting the desired pack out date. Dont wait until a week or two before the desired pack out date to complete the process in www.move.mil enter all your data and paperwork now. For Navy information on getting started with the move process, go to www.navsup.navy. mil/household Another tip is to organize your house and belongings. Go through all your rooms and boxes from the last move to make sure you still need the items. If it hasnt been worn or used in the last year, do you still need it? Sort your items by the type of shipment: household shipment; unaccompanied bag gage, if authorized; professional gear and what is going in your suitcase or car. By sorting you may find out what needs to be sold, donated or disposed of. Keep in mind, if you exceed your authorized weight allowance it can be expensive. Household goods terms and what they mean: Household shipment is your main shipment: furniture, dishes, washer/ dryer, BBQ grill, outdoor furniture, childrens play furniture, majority of your clothes, etc. Unaccompanied baggage, if autho rized: this is the small shipment of items that you will need to survive until your big household good shipment arrives. This is normally only autho rized with overseas orders. Items to include would be enough kitchen ware/ dishes to use daily (not your china), crib, clothes, some uniforms, some DVDs not your entire library, etc. Professional gear: Professional books and equipment includes Household goods in a members possession needed for the performance of official duties at the next or a later destination. Service members items could be: work manuals, awards, specialty work uniforms (Band uniforms, navy divers, flight suits, helmets, chaplains vest ments and other specialized apparel), reference materials, instruments, tools, and equipment peculiar to technicians, mechanics. Spouse: may be authorized for a licensed profession, i.e. doctor, dentist, lawyer or community support activities at the next or a later destination, example would be a command ombudsman. Any other profession may be considered if the appropriate documentation can be provided. Selling Avon or Pamper Chef does not count as licensed profession. Excluded items are: commercial products for sale/resale used in con ducting business, sports equipment, and office, household, or shop fixtures or furniture (such as bookcases, study/ computer desks, file cabinets, and racks). 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