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Jax air news ( May 30, 2013 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA SLAF
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012

Material Information

Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 30, 2013
Publication Date: 06-06-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02045

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012

Material Information

Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 30, 2013
Publication Date: 06-06-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02045


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THURSDAY, JUNE 6, 2013 HSM-72 GYMNASIUM INSIDE Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com A crew from VR-62 helped rescue a boat with five people who were adrift and lost at sea May 25. The Nomads crew and their C-130T logistics aircraft were diverted from mission Convoy 3744 and became Rescue 313 while transiting through Guam. The Nomads were on a sched uled overnight stop in Guam when they were contacted by U.S. Coast Guard Sector Guam and asked to assist with a search and rescue mission off the coast of Chuuk Island, Micronesia. The crew launched at 5 a.m. Guam local time on May 25, and proceeded to the search area 550 miles southeast of Guam. Rescue 313 arrived on scene at 7 a.m. and began flying the search pattern. Three hours later, the aircraft commander noticed a flash of light about five miles ahead and direct ed all eyes in the flight station to the area. The crew flew towards the area and descended to an alti tude of 500 feet for a closer look. They soon realized this was the vessel they were looking for and all five occupants were aboard and alive after drifting for seven days. Rescue 313 stayed on station The Defense Department con tinues to look at ways to reduce or avoid furloughs, the acting under secretary of defense for personnel and readiness said, but she added that right now, unfortunately, the department will furlough civilian employees for up to 11 days. The decision to furlough the civilian employees was a very hard, arduous decision, Jessica L. Wright said, but it was based on preserving the readiness of the force. About 85 percent of our [civil ian] force will be furloughed, Wright said, including teachers at Department of Defense Education Activity schools. But preserving the integrity of the academic year was the central concern for the department, she added. Teachers will be furloughed Lt. Cmdr. Devon Hockaday of the HSM-70 Spartans was selected as 2012 Pilot of the Year by the Naval Helicopter Association (NHA) at its 65th annual sym posium May 13-16 in San Diego. The selection of Hockaday was based upon his consistent performance while executing demanding duties in a highly professional manner. In addition to demonstrating superior aeronautical ability, Hockaday standard ized tactical employment of the MH-60R Seahawk helicopter by creating a series of squadron playbooks that demonstrated exceptional tactical acumen throughout the year. He also worked to improve the MH-60Rs Electronic Support Measures system and was integral to advancing the tactical application of the HSM commu nity at large. Hockadays previous assignments included a three-year tour with HSL-44 as Detachment Operations officer, and a three-year tour at the HSM Weapons School where he qualified as a Seahawk Weapons and Tactics Instructor (SWTI) and served as the program manager for multiple tactical phases. Vice Adm. David Buss, command er, Naval Air Forces, said the 2013 NHA Symposium as a whole is designed to exchange experiences and engage leaders, professionals and friends in uniform and in industry. Based at NAS Jacksonville, Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 70s pri mary mission is to employ the versatil ity of the MH-60R helicopter across mul tiple missions sets to deploy combat ready elements onboard an aircraft carrier and her accompanying ships in support of the strike group commanders objectives. NHA was founded in 1976 as a nonprofit professional organization to promote the development and use of naval vertical lift aircraft in the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. Navy Surgeon General delivers keynote at patient safety conferenceDuring a two-day visit to the Jacksonville area, U.S. Navy Surgeon General and Chief, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery Vice Adm. Matthew Nathan visited Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville its hos pital and branch health clinics May 29 and deliv ered a keynote address at the Center for Global Health and Medical Diplomacy at the University of North Floridas annual Quality & Safety Forum May 30. Together with NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer, Nathan kicked-off day one of his visit by participating in the hospitals morning colors and awards ceremony to recognize more than a dozen outstanding staff. Nathan then met with members of NH Jacksonvilles most senior leadership, including the commanding officer and directors of medicine, nursing, surgery, clinical support, public health, healthcare business, resource management and administration. Navy Medicines number one job is to support the warfighter, he said during interactive discus sions focused on patients health outcomes and the role of performance metrics in improving quality of care. Supporting NH Jacksonvilles current oppor tunity to increase primary care enrollment from 57,000 to 63,000 patients, Nathan commented that military families love that Navy Medicine doesnt get paid based on procedures that instead, care decisions are driven by whats right for the patient. At the same time, good stewardship of tax dollars is important, especially with the rising cost of the military health system. He pointed out that care in the TRICARE network costs taxpayers twice the money: the cost to run the military treatment facility and the cost of care in the network. And with nine general surgeons (two of which are fellowship-trained joint special ists in arthroplasty), an award-winning Family Medicine Residency Program (the Navys oldest and largest), state-of-the-art renovated facilities and expert staff, its never been a better time to get care at NH Jacksonville. Medical Home Port, Navy Medicines team approach to health care, was another important topic, as it supports continuity of care by placing patients in the center of a team of caregivers led by their primary care managers. Nathan envisions a day when military patients are able to talk directly to a provider after-hours for urgent care that doesnt HSM-70 flier recognized as NHA Pilot of the Year VR-62 finds group lost at seaFurlough decision arduous, official says

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS June 6 1944 In Operation Overlord, Allied invasion fleet (more than 2,700 ships and craft) land troops on Normandy beaches the largest amphibious landing in history. June 7 1819 Lt. John White on merchant ship Franklin, anchored off Vung Tau, is first U.S. naval officer to visit Vietnam. 1917 U.S. sub-chasers arrive at Corfu, Greece for anti-submarine patrols. 1942 Battle of Midway ends with loss of aircraft carrier USS Yorktown (CV-5). 1944 Construction of artificial harbors and shel tered anchorages begins off Normandy coast. 1991 Joint Task Force Sea Angel ends relief opera tions in Bangladesh after Cyclone Marian. June 8 1830 Sloop-of-war Vincennes becomes first U.S. warship to circle the globe. 1853 Commodore Matthew Perry arrives at Uraga, Japan to begin negotiations for a treaty with Japan. 1880 Congress authorizes the Office of Judge Advocate General. 1937 Observation of total eclipse of the sun by U.S. Navy detachment commanded by Capt. J. F. Hellweg and participating in the National Geographic Society United States Navy Eclipse Expedition at Canton Island in the Phoenix Islands, Pacific Ocean. 1958 Navy and U.S. Post Office deliver first offi cial missile mail when USS Barbero (SS-317) fired Regulus II missile with 3,000 letters 100 miles east of Jacksonville, Fla. to NS Mayport, Fla. 1960 Helicopters from USS Yorktown (CVS-10) res cue 54 crewmen of British SS Shunlee, grounded on Pratus Reef in South China Sea. 1962 Medical team from Naval Hospital Bethesda, Md.; Naval Medical Research Institute, Bethesda, Md; and Naval Preventative Medicine Unit No. 2 Norfolk, Va. sent to San Pedro Sula, Honduras to fight epidemic of infectious gastroenteritis. 1967 USS Liberty (AGTR-5) attacked by Israeli forc es in Mediterranean. June 9 1882 Establishment of Office of Naval Records of the War of the Rebellion (became part of Naval Historical Center). 1942 First Navy photographic interpretation unit set up for the Atlantic. 1959 Launching of USS George Washington (SSBN598), first nuclear-powered fleet ballistic missile sub marine, at Groton, Conn. June 10 1854 U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md., holds first formal graduation exercises. Previous classes graduated without ceremony. 1896 Authorization of first experimental ship model tank. June 11 1853 Five Navy ships leave Norfolk, Va. on threeyear exploring expedition to survey the far Pacific. 1927 USS Memphis arrives at Washington, D.C., with Charles Lindbergh and his plane, Spirit of St. Louis, after his non-stop flight across the Atlantic. 1944 U.S. battleships off Normandy provide gun fire support. 1953 Navy ships evacuate 20,000 Koreans from West Coast Islands to safety south of 17th parallel. June 12 1944 Four U.S. Carrier Groups (15 carriers) begin attack on Japanese positions in the Marianas. 1948 The Womens Armed Forces Integration Act provides for enlistment and appointment of women in the Naval Reserve. 1970 After earthquake in Peru, USS Guam begins 11 days of relief flights to transport medical teams and supplies, as well as rescue victims. 1990 Cmdr. Rosemary Mariner becomes first Navy woman to command fleet jet aircraft squadron. My husband cant throw anything away. I realize this could be viewed as a good thing (I guess hell keep me around, too), but sometimes his closet and bathroom drawers look like an episode of Hoarders Dustins favorite item to hoard is . (drumroll) . shoes. Not just any shoes, and certainly not designer or stylish shoes, but shoes for mowing the lawn. Note: I have never seen my husband wear more than one pair of shoes to mow the lawn. Lets back up, though, and talk about how Dustin buys a new pair of shoes, because thats important. It is a long, tedious process that involves visiting multiple stores, from high-end to low-end, trying on a variety of sizes and widths, and ultimately returning to the lowest of low-end stores and buying something super cheap. Our mid-shop discussion goes something like this: Me: What will the next store have that the first three stores did not? Dustin: A pair that fits my feet, hopefully. Me: The five you tried on back there didnt fit? Dustin: I have really wide feet. Me: What exactly are you looking for? Dustin: Comfort, quality, a good fit, durability. Me (as we pull into super-cheap shoe store): If your feet hurt so much, maybe we should invest in good shoes that will last. Dustin: We dont have money for that. We leave the super cheap store with shoes that are tied together and seem like they will crack they are so stiff. I cant get back those hours I spent shoe shopping. When we get home, we have the same argument: I want to throw away his old shoes to make room for the new ones, but Dustin thinks that is a waste. I cant let you throw out a perfectly good pair of shoes, he says. If these are so good, why did you get new ones? Because those hurt my feet. So why didnt we invest in good shoes this time? Well, I need shoes for mowing the lawn, so put the old ones in the basement, at least. In our basement, there are no less than 10 pairs of shoes saved for mowing the lawn. This is how hoarding begins. Today its the shoes; tomorrow its the half eaten can of tuna. When Dustin was on deployment last year, I threw out every pair of lawn-mowing shoes I could find in the base ment. I took a whole sack to the Goodwill and never felt a moment of remorse until last week. Dustin wanted to work in the yard. He needed shoes. He also wanted to wear flip-flops to the lake, and as it turns out, I threw away all of those, too. Luckily, Dustin had another hidden stash in the garage. In a back corner, behind old sleds and lawn mower parts, there is a Hoarders -worthy pile of golf shoes, water shoes and grassstained shoes. As an intervention, I made Dustin watch an episode of Hoarders that night. He fell asleep just before the woman hoarding cats opened her freezer and revealed a gruesome secret: she keeps the dead ones in there. This made me wonder where else I might find old shoes. Because the crazy thing is, my husband has approximately five shirts, three pairs of jeans and one pair of shoes (that he wears). He is a very simple man and has no fashion sense at all. So why does he need piles of old sneakers? I am not exaggerating when I tell you that the very next day, Dustin woke up and said he needed to get a new pair of shoes. The soles of his old ones were falling apart and flapping under the toe, just like every other pair of old shoes hes had. I need something that fits better and feels more comfort able, he said. I dont think I got the right size for these. So I followed him around department stores and athletic stores, and, yes, the same super cheap store where he bought the last pair. I thought I was losing my mind. I reminded him of the dead cats in the womans freezer that he didnt see. Dustin just laughed. Hes not putting shoes in the freezer. Geez. Finally, though, I talked him into investing in a really good pair of shoes. I took him to the kind of store where they mea sure your feet and help you make a selection. Dustin felt good about his selection. When we got home, I told him that I was proud of him. He now owned a pair of shoes that would last. And, Id throw out the old ones with next weeks trash. Dustin stared at me with big, round eyes. No, Ill need those for mowing the lawn, he said.Dustin hoards shoes . for mowing the lawn MoneyChic sez: We may be young, but it is never too early to prepare for the just in case of the future. I am going to hop on my soapbox for this installment of Hey, MoneyChic! We never want to think the worst about what may happen to us in the future. We never want to plan for the just in case. Life in unpredict able and can throw us a curve ball at any moment. Summer is a time for enjoying the sun, taking vaca tions, having parties, but it is also the season of an increased number of drunk driving accidents. Would you know what to do in case of an emergency? A will is only useful if you pass away. What happens if you are ill or hurt, but are still alive? Would your wife know where the impor tant paperwork is kept? Would your husband know which bills are due soon? Would your family know your childs schedule and if they need to be picked up from school? Many families divide the duties of the household and complete their tasks without involvement from the other spouse. This is an efficient way to get things accomplished, but that also leaves each spouse only knowing half of what is going on. Sit down with your spouse and discuss the information that would be necessary to carry on daily life as usual is the other person was in the hospital. Compile all of your bills and write down when they are usually due and how they are paid. Make sure each spouse has access to the bank accounts and savings accounts, and that all accounts have

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Q1.) Why is the Navy eliminating the require ment for vehicle decals? A1.) Since Sept. 11, 2001, 100 percent I.D. card checks have been implemented at all Department of Defense (DoD) installations. Authorization to access any DoD installation is based on verification of a valid credential or I.D. card. Vehicle decals were used to ensure vehicles on Navy installations complied with state requirements for vehicle registration and insur ance. State programs have become more uniform and efficient and uni form, eliminating one of the main reasons for vehicle decals. Other issues prompt ing the change in pol icy include: Expense in administering the program; decals being moved from vehicle to vehicle and are eas ily counterfeited and cars sold to non-Department of the Navy (DoN) per sonnel with current decal still attached, all posed additional security risks to Navy installations. Q2.) Will this elimina tion change the require ment for proper licens ing and registration for personnel entering the installation? A2.) Persons using pri vately-owned vehicles on Navy installations will still be required to meet state and local require ments including valid insurance, vehicle safety inspections, registration, proof of motorcycle safety training (where applica ble), etc. Q3.) When will the elimination of these decals take place? A3.) The elimination of the requirement for base decals will be effective July 1, 2013. Q4.) How will this affect contractors com ing on the base? A4.) Contractors are managed separately. Contractors either receive a temporary pass for a one trip visit or register under the Navy Commercial Access Control System that pro vides background checks and periodic reviews to allow them to be issued an annual valid creden tial for access for official business. Q5.) Will this affect visiting procedures? A5.) No. Visitors will continue to use the nor mal visitor procedures established by the instal lation commanding offi cer. Q6.) What should driv ers do with the decals currently on their cars once the change is implemented? A6.) For frequent visi tors to installations requiring decals, the cur rent decal may be left on the vehicle until the expi ration date. Otherwise, it is recommended that the decal be removed. Q7.) How will the elim ination of decals affect security on Navy instal lations? A7.) In addition to our policy of conducting random anti-terrorism checks, we will conduct command authorized administrative checks, similar to the way secu rity departments conduct driving-under-the-influ ence checks. These administrative checks will check iden tification, vehicle licens ing, etc. We will also continue to rely on the assistance of the mili tary community to report suspicious or abandoned cars, etc. Q8.) Without the vehi cle decal, how will secu rity identify individu als who are eligible to park in reserved park ing spaces (CO, CMC, 06, flag officer, etc.)? A8.) Parking will be managed at the local level using a CNICgen erated template based on current color coding sys tem (Blue: officers; Red: enlisted; Green: DoN civilians). The template provides for some standardization at all Commander, Navy Installations Command installations, but allows for minor changes to accommodate unique local circumstances. Q9.) How will I be able to enter military bases that require decals if I dont have a vehicle decal? A9.) This depends on the requirements of that particular service. You may be required to obtain a visitors pass. If you frequently visit installations that still require decals, you may wish to check and see if that installation will allow you to register your vehicle (and obtain a decal) for that particular base. Q10.) Will commis sioned officers still be saluted? A10.) Yes. After check ing the I.D. card, the active duty Sailor gate sentry will render the proper salute, assuming traffic conditions and force protection condi tions permit. As done currently, Navy civil ian police and guards will render appropriate respect and deference. Q11.) How will Clean Air Act Requirements for privately owned vehicles be verified? A11.) Compliance with Clean Air Act require ments for privately owned vehicles will be verified upon registration of the vehicle on-base in the Consolidated Law Enforcement Operations Center (CLEOC). The length of registra tion is determined by the length of time the state the installation is physi cally located in requires emission checks. At the end of that time the individual and their supervisor will be sent an e-mail for the individual to re-register their vehicle with their emissions cer tificate. Additionally Clean Air Act requirements will be verified by periodic administrative checks utilizing the Selective Traffic Enforcement and Random Antiterrorism Programs where it will be verified that they are reg istered in CLEOC. Navy to eliminate all base decals July 1 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013 The $2.4 million NAS Jax Gymnasium renovation project that began last December is nearing completion at the end of this month. According to NAS Jax MWR Fitness Director Tanya Henigman, the gym grand opening cer emony will be scheduled in mid-July after new fitness equipment is installed in the gyms workout rooms. This building built in the early 1940s needed a lot of work, said Cape Design Engineering Company Superintendent Joseph DeBlasio. It smelled bad due to moisture build-up. When we ripped up the rubber flooring, there was moisture everywhere. The building was close to falling apart. DeBlasio added, There were con struction issues we found in the build ing that we addressed as we worked. So its a much safer building now and the HVAC system we installed will keep the building moisture free. The project includes a ductless, energy efficient Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system that demands less electricity to main tain good indoor air quality through improved ventilation and filtration. The renovated gym features newly refurbished floors, restrooms and lock er areas, painted walls, new electrical systems, lighting sensors as well as new doors and windows. I think the most beneficial thing is a clean and sanitary building, said DeBlasio. Once Sailors and civilians experience the new building, it will get a lot more people coming here for fit ness training and recreation. Additionally, a PRT (Physical Readiness Test) Pavilion was added to the contract. Located behind the gym nasium and MWR Fitness Center, the PRT Pavilion will provide a sheltered place for Sailors to do their PRT work outs during hot, cold or rainy days. Henigman said, Sailors will not only benefit from the new gym, but also with the PRT Pavilion that is designed for commands to conduct physical train ing. The PRT Pavilion area will help enable our Sailors stay healthy, stay fit and stay Navy because they will be able to continue physical training even dur ing inclement weather, she said. There are few places to PT on base because we have very limited space. The two small gyms we have are not big enough to accommodate the number of Sailors on this base, she explained. According to Henigman, the fit ness center accommodates more than 280 patrons a day, which is not nearly enough room to accommodate all the Sailors, spouses, reservists and civilians on base. The refurbished gym will add capac ity to serve more patrons and relieve crowding at the fitness center. The renovated gym will have new fit ness equipment and a designated PRT room where Sailors can train for their bi-annual PRT on the bike and ellipti cal, according to Henigman. Its not always what you can provide physically, but what you can provide for the morale, said Henigman. A lot of working out and exercise does not just depend on your physical capabilities, but it also depends on your mental capabilities. And when you are working out at a facility that has been upgraded, it can uplift your spirit and boost the morale of the patrons utilizing the facility. Your mental attitude about fitness is half of a good workout, she added. NAS JA X GYM RE N OV A TIO NS N E A R COMPLETIO N

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013 5 Photos by MC2 Amanda Cabasos and Clark Pierce

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Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Family Readiness hosted a tri-base Emergency Family Assistance Center (EFAC) exercise on board NAS Jacksonville May 30. The exercise, designed to test the regions ability to establish and sustain EFAC operations in the days and weeks follow ing the landfall of a hurricane, involved more than 30 Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) representatives from NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay, Ga., as well as installation and training officers and emergency man agement personnel from all three bases. Our ability to take care of our families after a natural disaster is critical to our abil ity to carry out our mission and support the fleet, said Rear Adm. John C. Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast. Our Sailors and civilians need to be assured their loved ones are safe so they can focus on their duties in the event a hurricane actually does hit one of our installations. The exercise came one week after the completion of HURREX 2013, which tested the regions hurricane pre paredness through a scenario involving multiple, simulated storms that made landfall near installations throughout the Southeast Region. The EFAC exercise was essentially a continuation of that scenario, and its focus was on the recovery phase of Disaster Response. In this scenario, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay residents were evacuated prior to land fall and each base suffered extensive flooding as the simu lated storm passed. Afterward, FFSC personnel from all three participating bases worked with emergency management and training per sonnel to establish an EFAC on board NAS Jacksonville. After a real disaster, the EFAC would function as a hub for FFSC case workers and emergency response personnel to provide a wide range of sup port services for affected fam ily members.According to Carol Lucius, CNRSE Family Readiness pro gram Work and Family Life Coordinator, much of that sup port is managed through the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System (NFAAS).After a disaster, people can go into the Needs Assessment portion of NFAAS and specify what they need, then our case managers can go in and see what those needs are. We will then call them back and get them the resources they need, she said. Although NFAAS is one of the primary methods for EFAC personnel to assess needs after a disaster, it is not the only one. People can also come direct ly to the EFAC for assistance, Lucius added. During the exercise, partici pants simulated what kind of EFAC services would be neces sary at two days after a hurri cane, one week after, and two weeks after. The circumstances in the days and weeks following a major storm can change quick ly and EFAC personnel and services need to be adjusted accordingly, Lucius said. We need to decide who we should have in the EFAC based on what we think peo ples needs are because its not staffed only with FFSC person nel its chaplains, medical, legal, housing and many oth ers, she said. After an actual hurricane, EFAC personnel would also coordinate with a number of civilian agencies and local offi cials in order to get people the help they need. Lucius said most people who seek help are in need of food, shelter, clothes or some other physical need, which makes it important to conduct this kind of exercise in order to be better prepared for recovery efforts when a real-world scenario occurs. An emergency is a crisis event and it never really hap pens the way you exercise it, but we at least need to have a plan in place. We are going to be providing services and need to be sure that our people have confidence in themselves, con fidence in their leadership and confidence in the plan, she said. Lucius said training like this is essential for preparing emer gency management and FFSC personnel for an actual event, but it is equally as important for family members and depen dents to know what to do in the event of an emergency. They really need to know about NFAAS. They need to know that it is essential for them to have their personal contact information updated in NFAAS so that when a disaster strikes, they can be contacted and they know how to contact somebody for help, she said. The exercise was phase one of a three-phase process. While this phase included only play ers from installation FFSCs, training and emergency man agement personnel, participa tion will be expanded in phase two and three. Phase two will include addi tional participants from onbase organizations, such as the base housing office and legal. Phase three will expand even further to include players from outside the fenceline, includ ing the American Red Cross, Salvation Army and others. Sailors, dependents and gov ernment civilians can log into NFAAS at https://navyfam ily.navy.mil where they can update their contact informa tion, report their status or sub mit a needs assessment. For more information about hurricane readiness or NFAAC, contact your local FFSC. Region Family Readiness Program conducts emergency response exercise 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013 7

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VISITrequire an emergency room visit. He characterized the scenario by saying, When you need help, call home your Medical Home Port team. NH Jacksonville has 14 Medical Home Port teams across the command. Nathan followed the leader ship meeting with two Surgeon General Calls, with participa tion from around 2,000 of the commands 2,500 military, civilian and contract staff at the hospital and five branch health clinics (via video confer ence). During his Surgeon General Call with junior military and civilian staff, he applauded the job that the Navy and Marine Corps team is doing. We form a Naval and Marine Corps maritime team that does some amazing things around the world, said Nathan. We work in any dynamic across the world, whether its above the sea with naval avia tion medicine; on the sea with surface medicine; below the sea with submarine medi cine; or on land, supporting the Marine Corps and special operations, as evident for the last 10 to 12 years in Iraq and Afghanistanas major mili tary combat support players. In his address to senior staff, Nathan continued to discuss Navy Medicines portfolio of combat casualty care in all environmentsand the criti cal role of staff in being ready to go anytime, anywhere. You chose to be a part of an orga nization that is bigger than yourself, that gives back and that makes a difference, stated Nathan. As for our civilians, who are amazing in their resilience and ability to get things done, its a pleasure working next to you each day. Taking place between the scheduled Surgeon General Calls, NH Jacksonville Sailors, civilians and contractors of the quarter and year as well as a few other hand-selected, hard-charging hospital corps men had the unique oppor tunity to lunch with Nathan, Shaffer, Force Master Chief Sherman Boss, NH Jacksonville Command Master Chief Bennora Simmons and other leaders. Breaking bread together offered the opportu nity for meaningful exchange. The first day wrapped up with Nathans tour of hospi tal spaces to meet staff and patients. Underscoring one of Navy Medicines strategic goals to collaborate on shared visions for health care and interoper ability (jointness), day two of Nathans visit was his keynote address to about 200 leaders from regional health organiza tions at the fifth annual Quality & Safety Forum hosted by the Center for Global Health and Medical Diplomacy at the University of North Florida. Discussions throughout the day were aimed at creating a culture of safety in medical institutions across the region. In health care, its every ones job to make the patients life better when they leave the facility than it was when they came in, observed Nathan. He concluded his remarks to the northeast Florida audience, saying, We heal patients as a community private-sector, military, VA and thank you for embracing Naval Hospital Jacksonville staff, not only as citizens but as members of the medical community. Along with Nathans keynote, speakers throughout the day included Shaffer; Capt. Joseph McQuade, NH Jacksonville director for public health; Cmdr. Jamie Oberman, NH Jacksonville surgeon; Cmdr. Andrea Petrovanie, officerin-charge of Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville; and lead ers from UNF, Duval County Medical Society, Institute for Healthcare Improvement, Mayo Clinic, Nemours Childrens Clinic, UF Health, Brooks College of Health, St. Vincents Healthcare, Baptist Health, Mission Health and Wake Med Health. From its award-winning Family Medicine Residency Program to its more than 100 training agreements with universities, colleges and medical organizations, NH Jacksonvilleas a member of Navy Medicines global net work understands the value collaboration plays in ensur ing its physicians, nurses and technicians are able to provide the most sophisticated care available in any environment. Through its professional edu cation and research programs, NH Jacksonville has built an infrastructure to support evi dence-based practices across its facilities and in medicine nationwide. Whether NH Jacksonville is partnering to enhance patient safety through participation in patient safety conferences, tackling regional issues, or nurturing health care experts, the commands ongoing col laboration remains focused on ensuring its enrolled patients active duty and retired Sailors, soldiers, airmen, Marines and guardsmen and their fami liesreceive the highest qual ity care. Were here to heal our nations heroes our warfight ers and their families, said Shaffer. And our partnerships, with organizations like the Center for Global Health and Medical Diplomacy at the University of North Florida, are one of the important ways we ensure each and every one of our patients gets the best care. NAS Jacksonville and Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) are working together to provide electronic material recycling to station departments and tenant commands. Instead of taking electronic material to NAS Jax Environmental at Building 1948 on Thursdays, please contact DLA at 542-3411, Ext. 102 to schedule a day and time to take materials to DLA on Roosevelt Boulevard near Collins Road. DLA will assist commands with requirements, including submitting the necessary paperwork (DD Form 1348) for turn-in of items. Remember that electronic material is regulated, so please ensure that no recyclable materials are disposed of in station dumpsters. NAS Jax is subject to significant fines and penalties when electronic items are found in station dumpsters. Anyone finding electronic items in dumpsters should call NAS Jax Environmental at 542-5251/5789. Electronic material now being recycled at DLA NAS Jax will be hosting the Navy Ortega Lakeshore Little League 2013 District 11 All Star Tournament June 27 through July 13 at Blue Angel Field. The teams consist of 9and 10-year-old players. This is a double elimination tourna ment with approximately 12 teams that could encompass up to 500 guests visiting the base. The games will be played from approximately 4-10:30 p.m. nightly except during the 4th of July weekend when games will be played from 9 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Volunteers are needed to help with a variety of different jobs to support this event.If you can help, please e-mail noljax@ gmail.com .NAS Jax to host Little League All Star tournament 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013

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until Zeus Leader, a transport ship, was directed to the scene for rescue. Five-and-one-half hours later Zeus Leader arrived and rescued five people. Rescue 313 was low on fuel and diverted to Chuuk Island for refueling. While on the ground, Lt. Cmdr Todd Nichols, Rescue 313s aircraft commander, called the Coast Guard for an update. All five souls alive and well. Once the mission was complete, Rescue 313 returned to Guam for some much needed rest before resuming their convoy mission. Based at NAS Jacksonville, VR-62 is one of five Navy Reserve C-130 squadrons serving the U.S. Navys high priority logistics needs around the globe. VR-62for five days at the beginning of the 2013-2014 school year, she explained, but it is up to each superintendent to decide what days will be furlough days. Schools will be closed to students on those days, she said, and extracurricu lar activities scheduled for a furlough day will not be held that day. But, its important to note that our summer school will be held this year, and that children will get a good aca demic year, Wright added. The department has about 767,000 appropriated fund employees, said Navy Cmdr. Leslie Hull-Ryde, a Pentagon spokeswoman. About 652,000 are scheduled to be furloughed, she said, but that total will change as employees respond to furlough notic es and final determinations are made. Appropriated fund employees include those employees who are not appoint ed by Congress or the president and who are paid by funds designated by Congress. As the possibility of a furlough draws near, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders number one con cern continues to be the 22,000+ mili tary and civilians who work hard every day to ensure the mission of supporting the warfighters is met. According to the Defense Civilian Personnel Advisory Service Web site, nonappropriated fund employees may be furloughed for business-based rea sons if the reduction in appropriated fund resources leads to a curtailment in [morale, welfare and recreation] or exchange business operations . . Furloughs of NAF employees are pro cessed under DoD NAF human resourc es policies and component procedures. Furlough notices started going out to appropriated fund employees May 28, Wright said. They will either be hand-delivered, she said, because the employee must sign that theyve received the furlough notice, or, if the employee is on leave, it could be sent [via] certified mail. Civilians exempted from furloughs generally fall into specific categories, Wright said. Examples include civil ians working in combat zones, per sonnel with safety-of-life responsibili ties, wounded warrior caregivers and full-time sexual assault prevention and response coordinators and sexual assault victim advocates for the active and reserve components. Employees who receive a furlough notice will have seven days to respond if they believe their duties fall into one of the excepted categories, Hull-Ryde said. Otherwise, furloughs will start no later than July 8. The furlough days will be spread over the remainder of the fiscal year, which ends Sept. 30. Wright said she urges employees with furlough questions to reach out to their human resources department and to read the detailed guidance about fur loughs on the Office of Professional Managements website. The Web sites for the Labor Department and OPM can assist employees with questions about eligi bility for unemployment compensation, Wright said. Those eligibility require ments differ from state to state, HullRyde noted. Not all states will be affected equally, Wright said. The majority of our work ers work outside the Washington, D.C., area, she noted. More than 80 percent of the fed eral workforce is based outside the national capital region, Wright said. According to Defense Department fig ures, in the five states with the most federal employees California, Georgia, Maryland, Texas and Virginia workers will lose $819 million in wages due to furloughs. Every employees situation is unique, Wright said, but the bottom line is this decision was made to preserve readi ness of the military force as a whole. Readiness is not a service-specific thing, she said, Its a joint, depart mental thing. We made a very collec tive decision to be collective on this furlough -that we would furlough the department as a whole. Senior defense officials have stated that the effects of sequestration will be long-lasting. Uncertainty over whether sequestration will continue has made it difficult to know whether furloughs will continue into fiscal year 2014, Wright said. I think that next year is going to be a difficult year, she said. We are in the process the department as a whole of working through some of the options for next years budget . . If sequestration is in effect, it will be very difficult, but we have not made a decision. Pentagon officials will do everything in our power not to have to furlough employees, she added. NAS Jacksonville has 6,153 DoD civil ians that could be impacted if the fur lough goes into effect July 8. FURLOUGH JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013 9

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The frocking ceremony for NAS Jax Sailors selected for advancement from the March Navy wide examina tion was held May 31 at Hanger 117. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders told those in attendance, This is a testament to all your hard work and dedication. Congratulations on your advancement and achievement in our Navy. Sailors frocked included: As VP-5 transitions to the P-8A Poseidon the squadron is proud to highlight a transi tioning Mad Fox each week. This weeks spot light shines on AO1(AW) Dennis Yearty. Yearty is from Peach Tree City, Ga. He is the father of two and married to VP-5s Ombudsman Selena Yearty. The ombudsman serves as the direct link between the commanding officer and family members. Mad Fox ordnancemen continue working hard as they near the end of the P-8A transition. For the past two months they have been preparing 12 hours a day, including weekends, for their Conventional Weapons Technical Proficiency Inspection (CWTPI). As the quality assur ance (QA) leading petty officer, AO1 Yearty has been working as the QA Safety Observer while ordnancemen practice uploading and down loading weapons on the P-8A. VP-5s CWTPI is next week and will cer tify the Mad Foxes safe as independent Poseidon weapons handlers. When AO1 Yearty isnt busy learning this new platform, he spends his free time working as the Oakleaf High School Head Junior Varsity base ball coach and Oakleaf Junior High School foot ball defensive coordina tor. VP-5 has been tran sitioning to the P-8A Poseidon since Jan. 4. VP-5 transition spotlight NAS Jax petty officers frockeda payable on death form on file with each financial institution. If there are kids, talk about your childrens sched ule. Discuss what routine maintenance is done on your cars, when, and where you would recommend taking them. Gather important paperwork such as: marriage certificate, social security cards, birth certificates, titles to vehi cles, wills, passports, etc. and put them in a secure location (preferably a lock box with fire protection). Make a list of important people that you would like to know about your situation if something happens and how to contact them. If a spouse or family member has monthly prescriptions that need to be filled, let the other know when and where to do that. It is important to have a doctors contact information on hand for all members of the family so you are able to access a persons medical history. When you have written down your list of important information, let a trusted individual not living I your household know where you keep this information so they may be able to get to it if necessary. It is best to keep every thing in one secure location that is eas ily accessible to family members, but not to intruders! Discussing the just in case is not an easy thing to do. It is better to be pre pared than to be left feeling as though you have no idea how to handle your life if your spouse in unavailable. Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society can help you plan financially for your future, stop by the office outside the NAS Jax Main Gate or call 542-2832. Have questions for Hey, MoneyChic? Drop me an e-mail at megan.stolle@ nmcrs.org. MONEYCHIC Drivers check your licenses expired? that issued the license? the rules and laws of the state you are from and state you are in? If you are active duty, your license may be valid after it expires but this is not automat ic and varies from state to state. Go to www.dmvdepartment-of-motorvehicles.com/index. html to your states DMV where most ques tions can be answered. License extensions, if offered, are for active duty members only and do not pertain to spouses or other family members. 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013

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NAS Jax recognizes Asian Pacific Americans The annual NAS Jacksonville Asian Pacific Heritage Luncheon was held at the NAS Jax River Cove Catering and Conference Center May 29. The event was sponsored by the base Multi-Cultural Awareness Committee (MCAC). More than 70 NAS Jax Sailors and civilians attended the event. The theme of this years celebration is: Building leadership: Embracing Cultural Values and Inclusion. The event kicked off with the sing ing of the national anthem by PR3(AW) Kristina Thomas of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast and the innovation by NAS Jax Chaplain (Lt.) Hylanie ChanWilliams. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob said, Asian Pacific Heritage Month originated in October 1978 when President Jimmy Carter signed a joint resolution designating the annual celebration. The month of May was chosen to commemorate the immigration of the first Japanese to the United States back in 1843 to mark the anniversary of the completion of the transcontinental railroad on May 10, 1869. Sanders continued, Throughout history Asian Pacific Americans have fought in every U.S. conflict since the War of 1812. Today, many Asian Pacific Americans serve in the Navy, including eight flag officers. Master of Ceremonies, ABH2(AW) Calvin Davis, assigned to NAS Jax Air Operations Transient Line introduced guest speaker ABH2(AW/SW) James Paul Viar, assigned to NAS Jax Air Mobility Command Terminal. In October 2005, my family and I migrated to Norfolk, Va. to reunite with my mothers brothers and sisters and to also fulfill our American dreams, said Viar. On January 2007, I decided to enlist in the United States Navy to serve oth ers and our country, he stated. Ever since I was young, my father and mother taught us how to help peo ple who are in need and by volunteering to the community. It made me who I am today and it feels good helping others. One of the best and most unique things about our Navy today is the rich cul ture, diversity and equality. Everywhere I go, I always see different ethnic back grounds. A musical selection was also pre sented by ABH3(AW) Yvan Azucena, assigned to NAS Jax Air Operations Transit Line, who played some Hawaiian Island Reggae on the ukulele, a Hawaiian instrument The luncheon ended with an awards presentation during which Sanders pre sented Viar a plaque in appreciation of his participation in the event. An Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Luncheon event was held May 30 at the Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP) Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville command. Today, we will take some time to honor some of our Asian and Pacific Islander leaders and their contributions to the Armed Forces, said Cmdr. Tom Dailey, NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, executive offi cer. This month is a celebration, not only of the services legacy of valuing culture and diversity, but it is also a testament to a diversified workforce of the future. This is especially apparent in this years theme Building Leaders: Embracing cultural values and inclusion. Dailey went on to introduce AAPI Heritage Month celebration keynote speaker, Lt. Cmdr. Palmo Barrera, who is currently serving as the FLC Jacksonville deputy director of the Supply Management Department. Barrera thanked the audience for par taking in what he considered to be an honorable occasion. He then described the historical background of AAPI month and recognized some exceptional con tributions of leaders of Asian ethnicity in their fields of expertise. He talked to how each of the leaders had to make tough choices in order to be where they were at in their careers. Barrera then recount ed the day that he had to make a tough choice when taking the U.S. Navy exam ination over 30 years ago. He recollected how surprised he was that the U.S. Navy would accept him, who at the time was a struggling second year college student studying civil engineering, in Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines. I remember the day that changed my life, said Barrera. It was in August 1983, when I reported to the Subic Naval Base to take my examination. I was nervous, yet excited and even more excited when I later learned that I was one of the lucky seven from 200 applicants that had been selected. I was then faced with a tough decision, do I stay and continue in my current path, or do I make a change in my life, grab this opportunity and go? Barrera recollected how, he knew that if he continued in his current path, that civil engineering in the Philippines was not an easy occupation to get hired into, nor did it pay as well as it did in other countries. He knew that it would be dif ficult to find a job that would afford him opportunities to take care of his family. It was a tough decision, but I decid ed I needed to leave the Philippines and so I did. And here I am now, 30 years lateran officer in the great United States Navy and a part of the team here at FLC Jacksonville that honors cultural values and inclusion. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville personnel continued the celebration and enjoyed activities celebrating AAPI month throughout the rest of the day including a cake cutting ceremony, cultural outfit contest, origami station, and a potluck unique food dish contest. Fleet Logistics Center celebrates Asian Pacific heritage JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013 11

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In preparation of the 2013 hurricane season, Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeasts Contingency Engineering Response Team (CERT) responds to a simulated hurricane (Hurricane Lay) May 22. The team prepares for damage that could be caused by a Category 2 storm at NAS Pensacola deploying as part of the exer cise to NS Mayport. NS Mayport provided a perfect deployed location for CERT and disaster assessment team (DAT) training. Each year NAVFAC Southeast prepares their teams for the upcoming hurricane sea son to be ready for any storm or nat ural disaster. This training is part of the annual plan to maintain skills and readiness for both new and experienced CERT members. As we prepare for the 2013 hurricane season, we conduct a CERT exercise as part of the Navys annual hurricane exercise. We exercise command and control (C2) from a central Emergency Operations Center at headquarters (NAS Jacksonville) and in the field (NS Mayport standing in for NAS Pensacola this year), said Lt. Cmdr. Kenneth Vargas, NAVFAC Southeast disaster pre paredness officer. NAVFAC CERTs are a key part of the overall base recovery efforts after a storm. CERTs consist of one or more DATs as well as Construction Support Teams to administer contingency contracts, if any. DATs are made up of personnel who enable installation facility repair efforts. The teams consist of active-duty civil engineer corps officers, civilian engineers, architects, project manag ers, facilities managers and contract specialists. The CERT is a compilation of experts and capabilities resident within NAVFAC Southeast. All the business lines, support lines and integrated product teams provide expertise and manpower to the CERT, said Vargas. Before the assembled team deployed to NS Mayport, NAVFAC Southeast commanding officer, Capt. Christopher Kiwus, offered words of encouragement and focus to the CERT members. When you deploy, chances are you are going to a more dangerous place than most people encounter. I worry about you getting hurt. I dont worry about your vehicle or your equipment I worry about you, said Kiwus. Safety is the most important thing as you go about accomplishing your mission. The entire team was told to watch out for each other and that they were all safety officers. The most important piece in this exercise is the knowledge each of you bring to the team. You all bring different expertise to the team. Learn what each of you offer and learn from each other, said Kiwus. The CERT deploys with some pretty high tech equipment including hand held repeater radios, GPS enabled dig ital cameras and a bus outfitted as a Mobile Command Post (MCP) filled with laptops, a fax machine, weather equipment and other sundries. We use several communications means through our MCP to relay criti cal damage assessment information, said Vargas. We have satellite abilities, wireless communications, facsimile, scanning, Navy Marine Corps Internet and commercial Internet and email capabilities. The C2 features streamline the pro cess of getting engineering assessment data of damage to headquarters offi cials allowing NAVFAC leadership to make engineering recommendations to the Commander, Navy Installations Command with the end goal of getting the damaged base repaired and fully mission capable in short order. Kiwus commented about the technol ogy available to the team. Try to use all the equipment you are issued as a team but dont make the equipment your focus. Shake out every bit of knowledge you can thats the benefits of an exer cise so you can use those skills at a later time and place, learning now what to do to solve a problem in advance of a real emergency. Thats the capacity we want to grow. As CERT members, we are charged with the responsibility to support installation and combatant command ers response efforts and work to ensure the affected installation can return to normal operations as quick as possible, said Don Maconi, NAVFAC Southeast contingency engineer. These tools help us complete our mission. This is a very select group, said Kiwus. In our region it is not a matter of if, but when we will deploy. If there is one group in the command to send to solve a problem, youre it. This is the group I would send to solve the prob lem. CERT capabilities have been dem onstrated as teams were sent to Navy installations in the Gulf Coast Region after Hurricanes Katrina and Gustav. Members of the team also deployed to assist with disaster assessments in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake and after Hurricane Isaac impacted Louisiana in August 2012. Contingency Engineering Response Team readies for hurricane season 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment June 7 Karaoke with Randy June 14 Piece in Harmony June 21 Pam Affronti June 28 Jason LamarFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Night Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 510 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 1 6 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer June 1 Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 years and younger receive one free game of bowling every day until 5 p.m. Win prizes all summer long.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Open Monday Friday (lap swim only) During lap swim only the waterslide, water park and concessions will not be open. 6 a.m. 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 7 p.m. Saturday & Sunday (recreation swim ming) 11 a.m. 6 p.m. June 10 pool opens daily for recreational swimming 2013 Learn to Swim Program Session 1: June 1020 Session 2 July 8-18 Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1 Summer Splash Outdoor Pool Party June 29, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free food, games and prizes!I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Jacksonville Jaguars tickets on sale July 13 $70 section 147 Legoland Florida Free ticket for active duty military through Oct. 27 Wet-n-Wild Orlando $37 adult, $45 adult w/ meal, $40 child w/ meal Disney Cruise Lines will be at ITT June 11, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Learn more about exciting 2013/2014 trips. Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Daytona International Speedway Subway Firecracker July 5 and Coke 400 July 6 Tickets on sale now! Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Legoland Kids go FREE with an adult ticket purchase from ITT Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3. Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7. Amelia Island Museum of History $10 family pass, Ghost tour $8 adult, $4 child Florida Ecosafaris in St. Cloud EcoPark $119, Coach safari adult $28, child $25, Zipline safari $75, Cypress canopy cycle $40 for one hourThe Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Jax Suns Baseball Game June 6 at 6 p.m. Free admission and transportation I Love Music Concert Tour Featuring Red Jumpsuit Apparatus and New Boyz! June 8 at 2 p.m. Longest Drive Contest NAS Jax Golf Course June 12 at 7 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees June 11 and 25 for active duty June 13 and 27 for retirees, DoD person nel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Loudmouth Thursday Any golfer wearing a pair of loudmouth shorts or slacks plays 18 holes with cart for $20 Open to military, DoD and guests Junior Golf Clinic Session 1, June 1721, ages 1117 Session 2, July 1519, ages 610 Session 3, July 29 Aug. 2, ages 1117 $110 per child, per sessionMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina June 15, 16, 22 & 23 July 20, 21, 27 & 28 Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Movie Under the Stars June 21 at 8:30 p.m. Patriots Grove Americas Kids Run June 28 at 9 a.m. Ages 5 12 Sign-up at the youth centerFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School June 3 July 10 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013 13

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The crew of the German sub marine U-32 hosted the HSM72 Proud Warriors wardroom on board their U-boat at Naval Station Mayport for an interna tional exchange that gave both units an opportunity for some rare interaction and education. U-32 is a German Type 212 non-nuclear, diesel-electric submarine and its knowl edgeable complement of offi cers and enlisted personnel were eager to show off their impressive vessel. This occa sion marks both the first time a Type 212 U-boat has transited the Atlantic Ocean and the first time the U.S. Navy has partici pated in an exercise with the Type 212. Anti-submarine warfare (ASW) is a primary mission of HSM-72 and its MH-60R Seahawk helicopters. So the pier-side tour was of particular interest to the Proud Warriors pilots who went on to square off with U-32 in a recent ASW exercise in the Atlantic. After being greeted by the German Sailors at the Mayport Basin, the German watch officers walked small groups of pilots through the subma rine, giving them a glimpse into the technically and physi cally demanding world of the German submariner. HSM-72 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Derek Fleck, was among the tour participants. Touring this advanced sub marine was an amazing expe rience. It allowed us to view our mission from a different perspective. It certainly made the exercise a more personally rewarding event, he said. When the tours conclud ed, the Proud Warriors host ed the German Submariners at a reception in Jacksonville Beach. Among the crew of U-32 present was Electronics Petty Officer Daniel Bleu, who spoke of the many responsibilities required of such a small (24) crew including extensive technical training, demand ing physical standards, and the family like relationship the crew develops during their underway period. The Proud Warriors ultimately learned that regardless of whether they operate below, upon, or above the sea, naval warfighters have more in common than meets the eye, through similarities that span even international borders. After the formalities con cluded ashore, the crew of U-32 sailed from the Mayport Basin to Atlantic waters off the coast of Jacksonville where the U-boat and the local naval aviation communities partici pated in a weeklong training exercise. ASWEX 13-02 included squadrons from the VP, HSL and HSM squadrons based at NAS Jacksonville and NS Mayport. The wing-wide train ing exercise afforded all partic ipants an opportunity to hone tactics and increase readiness to improve their warfighting capabilities. More important ly, the exercise gave American participants a rare opportunity to work together with other avi ation communities against the quiet and highly evasive Type 212 submarine. HSM-72 flew 18 sorties against U-32 in both SH-60B and MH-60R Seahawks. This exercise marked the first time the Proud Warriors were able to conduct anti-sub marine warfare training with a live submarine in their new MH-60R Romeo helicopters. The Proud Warriors are building upon the legacy tac tics of the SH-60B variant with the upgraded mission systems and dipping sonar capabil ity of the new MH-60R. ASWEX 13-02 marked a small step in a long training process the command is embarked on dur ing their transition to the car rier air wing environment for future deployments. HSM-72 wardroom visits German submarine Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) held a speed mentoring event May 30 that partnered less experienced employees or protgs with experienced mentors who shared their insights and knowledge learned through the years. The first ever event sponsored by the commands Workforce Engagement and Inclusion (WEI) Team, paired five mentors one on one with five protgs for a nine-minute session before being signaled to rotate to the next mentor. Francine Juhlin, a WEI Team co-chair, said the pilot program was inspired by speed dating, a match making process where singles meet face-to-face for short conversations before moving on to the next pair ing. It is the same concept as speed dating, said Juhlin. It introduces protgs to a variety of professionals for quick-hit information, suggestions and ideas that may enhance their job performance and career develop ment. It can also help the protg overcome work place challenges by providing a variety of viewpoints from knowledgeable mentors. Eduardo Esquivias, an aircraft mechanic who attended the pilot speed mentoring event, said his mentors were eager to share their experiences and impart tidbits of knowledge to helpnavigate through the quagmire. The WEI Team is comprised of about 25 federal FRCSE holds first speed mentoring event on Hornet line 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013

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See something wrong? Do something rightDid you know there are three ways to report a crime to NCIS? We understand the concerns facing todays military community. The TEXT, WEB and APP Tip Line is a partnership between Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) and the military community, and pro vides service members and civilians a safe, discreet and anonymous option to report criminal and force protection threats within the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps without concerns of retaliation. What type of information does NCIS need? The NCIS mission is to investigate and defeat crimi nal, terrorist and foreign intelligence threats to the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. Types of crimes inves tigated by NCIS include rape, narcotics, child physi cal and sexual abuse, burglary and robbery, theft of government and personal property, fraud, and homi cide. Within the Department of the Navy, NCIS also has exclusive investigative jurisdiction into actual, potential or suspected acts of espionage or sabotage. If you have information pertaining to these or any other serious crime, please let us know. Anonymous Text Tips Anonymous Smartphone App Based Tips Anonymous Web Tips YNC(SW/AW) Roshell Booker of the NAS Jax Executive Department was commissioned to a chief war rant officer during a ceremony at the NAS Jax Chapel May 31 as numerous family members, coworkers and friends attended the event. NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Roy Undersander was the guest speaker. During the traditional ceremony, Bookers chief anchors and cover were officially retired before she was given the administration of oath by CWO3 Michael Carter, offi cer in charge, Food Management Team Mayport. Booker was then presented her warrant officer shoulder boards, jacket and cover by her hus band, Staff Sgt. Anthony Booker, sons, Malik Jordan and Marcus Robinson Jr., daughter Kennedy Rose Booker and CWO4 Wanda Trammell. Booker, a native of Dermott, Ark., joined the Navy in 1992 as an undesignated airman. Her duty assignments include HM-12, Norfolk Va.; HSL-40 at NS Mayport; VP-45 where she was advanced to yeoman second class; Commander, Personnel Command; USS Thomas S. Gates (CG 51) where she was selected for chief petty officer; NROTC Jacksonville University; Individual Augmentee deploy ment to Kabul, Afghanistan as a convoy commander for CounterImprovised Explosive Device Unit; Commander, Naval Forces Europe/ Commander, Naval Forces Africa and Commander, U.S. 6th Fleet as the assistant flag support officer. She reported to the NAS Jax Executive Department as the Administration leading chief petty officer in July 2012. Im grateful for the Navy because its all I know. Its all about taking care of the Sailors and look ing out for them because they are the future and will follow in my footsteps, she said. Im also grateful for my family and for supporting me along the way and for everything that Ive had to endure through my life because its made me who I am today. Chief commissioned to warrant officer JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013 15

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For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil Nominations are currently being sought from the Navys chief petty officer (CPO) com munity for the Inaugural Bob Feller Act of Valor award. Established by the Bob Feller Act of Valor Foundation, the prestigious award is named in honor of Major League Baseball pitcher, National Baseball Hall of Fame induct ee, and Navy veteran Bob Feller. This unique award is intend ed to recognize a representa tive from three critical areas of Fellers life: his baseball career, his service as a Navy CPO, and his enshrinement in the Hall of Fame. As such, the award will be presented to one Major League baseball player, one Navy CPO, and one member of the Hall of Fame on Veterans Day, Nov. 11, 2013, at the Navy Memorial in Washington, D.C. It is important to recognize Bob Fellers unselfish devo tion to our nation and Navy, said MCPON(AW/NAC) Mike Stevens. He made the personal choice to give up money and fame for the service of others and placed himself in harms way with his shipmates during a time of war. The chief petty officer selected for the Bob Feller Act of Valor Award will embody these same traits. In recognition of Fellers significant accomplishment in attaining the rank of CPO, nominees must be a CPO (E-7 only), active or reserve, must be outstanding military pro fessionals, and must embody the Navys core values of honor, courage, and commitment. Feller enlisted in the Navy shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor while he was with the Cleveland Indians, becom ing the first American pro fessional athlete to enlist. He served on the battleship USS Alabama (BB-60), and while doing so, the ship fought in both World War II theaters and earned eight battle stars. Feller was released from active duty achieving the rank of CPO, and is the only CPO in the Hall of Fame. Nominations must be sub mitted to the Navy Office of Community Outreach by June 17. For more information on eligibility requirements and the selection process, see NAVADMIN 138/13.Nominations sought for Bob Feller Act of Valor Award 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013

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18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013 civilian personnel including General Schedule (GS) and Wage Grade (WG) employees and mili tary members who represent a cross section of the FRCSE workforce. Jose Mendoza, an F/A-18 Hornet aircraft WG worker, serves on the WEI Team as the F/A-18 production line representative. This was a reluctant group, but they became engaged immediately, he said of the protgs. We got such favorable feedback from both the mentors and protgs. It was gratifying to see that level of interest. The mentors enjoyed sharing their experi ences and asked to be invited back. Metalsmith Royce Burt was very skeptical about attending the session, but he said he left very impressed. Some artisans feel trapped working on the floor, and I was one of them. But after talking with some of the managers, I learned there were ways to advance. That is good news, and the fact that the managers were there and wanted to help gave me hope. I would like to see more folks attend. I was pleasantly surprised. The WEI Team plans on holding more speed mentoring events in the near future based on the initial participant responses. The team is char tered to identify and remove workplace barriers that undermine employee morale and professional development. MENTORING The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) returned to its homeport of Norfolk, Va. May 24 after a successful completion of new defense testing during a two-week underway period. The ship tested a new torpedo self defense system, completed more than 115 launches and landings in assess ing a precision landing system, as well as launching the first carrier-based unmanned aircraft in naval aviation history. The X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System (UCAS) was successfully launched from the ship as the Navy/ Northrop Grumman team looked on, May 14. The UCAS aircraft flew over Marylands Eastern Shore before land ing safely at NAS Patuxent River, Md. We saw a small, but significant pixel in the future picture of our Navy as we begin integration of unmanned systems into arguably the most complex warf ighting environment that exists today the flight deck of a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, said Vice Adm. David Buss, commander, Naval Air Forces. The X-47B returned to the ship three days later to conduct its first touch-andgo landing on an aircraft carrier. Capt. Jaime Engdahl, the UCAS pro gram manager, took time to thank the crew during an all-hands call May 23, the night before the ship arrived into port. I hope all of you are proud of where youre standing, said Engdahl. Its a changed world now. We launched a few naval aviation firsts and you were all there. USS George H.W. Bush is in port con ducting training operations in prepara tion for the upcoming underway sched ule. USS George H.W. Bush completes historic underway

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THURSDAY, JUNE 6, 2013 HSM-72 GYMNASIUM INSIDE Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com 013 Emergency Preparedness Guide uval County Emergency Management A crew from VR-62 helped rescue a boat with five people who were adrift and lost at sea May 25. The Nomads crew and their C-130T logistics aircraft were diverted from mission Convoy 3744 and became Rescue 313 while transiting through Guam. The Nomads were on a sched uled overnight stop in Guam when they were contacted by U.S. Coast Guard Sector Guam and asked to assist with a search and rescue mission off the coast of Chuuk Island, Micronesia. The crew launched at 5 a.m. Guam local time on May 25, and proceeded to the search area 550 miles southeast of Guam. Rescue 313 arrived on scene at 7 a.m. and began flying the search pattern. Three hours later, the aircraft commander noticed a flash of light about five miles ahead and direct ed all eyes in the flight station to the area. The crew flew towards the area and descended to an alti tude of 500 feet for a closer look. They soon realized this was the vessel they were looking for and all five occupants were aboard and alive after drifting for seven days. Rescue 313 stayed on station The Defense Department con tinues to look at ways to reduce or avoid furloughs, the acting undersecretary of defense for personnel and readiness said, but she added that right now, unfortunately, the department will furlough civilian employees for up to 11 days. The decision to furlough the civilian employees was a very hard, arduous decision, Jessica L. Wright said, but it was based on preserving the readiness of the force. About 85 percent of our [civil ian] force will be furloughed, Wright said, including teachers at Department of Defense Education Activity schools. But preserving the integrity of the academic year was the central concern for the department, she added. Teachers will be furloughed Lt. Cmdr. Devon Hockaday of the HSM-70 Spartans was selected as 2012 Pilot of the Year by the Naval Helicopter Association (NHA) at its 65th annual symposium May 13-16 in San Diego. The selection of Hockaday was based upon his consistent performance while executing demanding duties in a highly professional manner. In addition to demonstrating superior aeronautical ability, Hockaday standard ized tactical employment of the MH-60R Seahawk helicopter by creating a series of squadron playbooks that demonstrated exceptional tactical acumen throughout the year. He also worked to improve the MH-60Rs Electronic Support Measures system and was integral to advancing the tactical application of the HSM commu nity at large. Hockadays previous assignments included a three-year tour with HSL-44 as Detachment Operations officer, and a three-year tour at the HSM Weapons School where he qualified as a Seahawk Weapons and Tactics Instructor (SWTI) and served as the program manager for multiple tactical phases. Vice Adm. David Buss, command er, Naval Air Forces, said the 2013 NHA Symposium as a whole is designed to exchange experiences and engage leaders, professionals and friends in uniform and in industry. Based at NAS Jacksonville, Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 70s primary mission is to employ the versatil ity of the MH-60R helicopter across mul tiple missions sets to deploy combat ready elements onboard an aircraft carrier and her accompanying ships in support of the strike group commanders objectives. NHA was founded in 1976 as a nonprofit professional organization to promote the development and use of naval vertical lift aircraft in the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. Navy Surgeon General delivers keynote at patient safety conferenceDuring a two-day visit to the Jacksonville area, U.S. Navy Surgeon General and Chief, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery Vice Adm. Matthew Nathan visited Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville its hospital and branch health clinics May 29 and delivered a keynote address at the Center for Global Health and Medical Diplomacy at the University of North Floridas annual Quality & Safety Forum May 30. Together with NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer, Nathan kicked-off day one of his visit by participating in the hospitals morning colors and awards ceremony to recognize more than a dozen outstanding staff. Nathan then met with members of NH Jacksonvilles most senior leadership, including the commanding officer and directors of medicine, nursing, surgery, clinical support, public health, healthcare business, resource management and administration. Navy Medicines number one job is to support the warfighter, he said during interactive discus sions focused on patients health outcomes and the role of performance metrics in improving quality of care. Supporting NH Jacksonvilles current oppor tunity to increase primary care enrollment from 57,000 to 63,000 patients, Nathan commented that military families love that Navy Medicine doesnt get paid based on procedures that instead, care decisions are driven by whats right for the patient. At the same time, good stewardship of tax dollars is important, especially with the rising cost of the military health system. He pointed out that care in the TRICARE network costs taxpayers twice the money: the cost to run the military treatment facility and the cost of care in the network. And with nine general surgeons (two of which are fellowship-trained joint special ists in arthroplasty), an award-winning Family Medicine Residency Program (the Navys oldest and largest), state-of-the-art renovated facilities and expert staff, its never been a better time to get care at NH Jacksonville. Medical Home Port, Navy Medicines team approach to health care, was another important topic, as it supports continuity of care by placing patients in the center of a team of caregivers led by their primary care managers. Nathan envisions a day when military patients are able to talk directly to a provider after-hours for urgent care that doesnt HSM-70 flier recognized as NHA Pilot of the Year VR-62 finds group lost at seaFurlough decision arduous, official says

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS June 6 1944 In Operation Overlord, Allied invasion fleet (more than 2,700 ships and craft) land troops on Normandy beaches the largest amphibious landing in history. June 7 1819 Lt. John White on merchant ship Franklin, anchored off Vung Tau, is first U.S. naval officer to visit Vietnam. 1917 U.S. sub-chasers arrive at Corfu, Greece for anti-submarine patrols. 1942 Battle of Midway ends with loss of aircraft carrier USS Yorktown (CV-5). 1944 Construction of artificial harbors and shel tered anchorages begins off Normandy coast. 1991 Joint Task Force Sea Angel ends relief operations in Bangladesh after Cyclone Marian. June 8 1830 Sloop-of-war Vincennes becomes first U.S. warship to circle the globe. 1853 Commodore Matthew Perry arrives at Uraga, Japan to begin negotiations for a treaty with Japan. 1880 Congress authorizes the Office of Judge Advocate General. 1937 Observation of total eclipse of the sun by U.S. Navy detachment commanded by Capt. J. F. Hellweg and participating in the National Geographic Society United States Navy Eclipse Expedition at Canton Island in the Phoenix Islands, Pacific Ocean. 1958 Navy and U.S. Post Office deliver first official missile mail when USS Barbero (SS-317) fired Regulus II missile with 3,000 letters 100 miles east of Jacksonville, Fla. to NS Mayport, Fla. 1960 Helicopters from USS Yorktown (CVS-10) rescue 54 crewmen of British SS Shunlee, grounded on Pratus Reef in South China Sea. 1962 Medical team from Naval Hospital Bethesda, Md.; Naval Medical Research Institute, Bethesda, Md; and Naval Preventative Medicine Unit No. 2 Norfolk, Va. sent to San Pedro Sula, Honduras to fight epidemic of infectious gastroenteritis. 1967 USS Liberty (AGTR-5) attacked by Israeli forces in Mediterranean. June 9 1882 Establishment of Office of Naval Records of the War of the Rebellion (became part of Naval Historical Center). 1942 First Navy photographic interpretation unit set up for the Atlantic. 1959 Launching of USS George Washington (SSBN598), first nuclear-powered fleet ballistic missile sub marine, at Groton, Conn. June 10 1854 U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md., holds first formal graduation exercises. Previous classes graduated without ceremony. 1896 Authorization of first experimental ship model tank. June 11 1853 Five Navy ships leave Norfolk, Va. on threeyear exploring expedition to survey the far Pacific. 1927 USS Memphis arrives at Washington, D.C., with Charles Lindbergh and his plane, Spirit of St. Louis, after his non-stop flight across the Atlantic. 1944 U.S. battleships off Normandy provide gun fire support. 1953 Navy ships evacuate 20,000 Koreans from West Coast Islands to safety south of 17th parallel. June 12 1944 Four U.S. Carrier Groups (15 carriers) begin attack on Japanese positions in the Marianas. 1948 The Womens Armed Forces Integration Act provides for enlistment and appointment of women in the Naval Reserve. 1970 After earthquake in Peru, USS Guam begins 11 days of relief flights to transport medical teams and supplies, as well as rescue victims. 1990 Cmdr. Rosemary Mariner becomes first Navy woman to command fleet jet aircraft squadron. My husband cant throw anything away. I realize this could be viewed as a good thing (I guess hell keep me around, too), but sometimes his closet and bathroom drawers look like an episode of Hoarders Dustins favorite item to hoard is . (drumroll) . shoes. Not just any shoes, and certainly not designer or stylish shoes, but shoes for mowing the lawn. Note: I have never seen my husband wear more than one pair of shoes to mow the lawn. Lets back up, though, and talk about how Dustin buys a new pair of shoes, because thats important. It is a long, tedious process that involves visiting multiple stores, from high-end to low-end, trying on a variety of sizes and widths, and ultimately returning to the lowest of low-end stores and buying something super cheap. Our mid-shop discussion goes something like this: Me: What will the next store have that the first three stores did not? Dustin: A pair that fits my feet, hopefully. Me: The five you tried on back there didnt fit? Dustin: I have really wide feet. Me: What exactly are you looking for? Dustin: Comfort, quality, a good fit, durability. Me (as we pull into super-cheap shoe store): If your feet hurt so much, maybe we should invest in good shoes that will last. Dustin: We dont have money for that. We leave the super cheap store with shoes that are tied together and seem like they will crack they are so stiff. I cant get back those hours I spent shoe shopping. When we get home, we have the same argument: I want to throw away his old shoes to make room for the new ones, but Dustin thinks that is a waste. I cant let you throw out a perfectly good pair of shoes, he says. If these are so good, why did you get new ones? Because those hurt my feet. So why didnt we invest in good shoes this time? Well, I need shoes for mowing the lawn, so put the old ones in the basement, at least. In our basement, there are no less than 10 pairs of shoes saved for mowing the lawn. This is how hoarding begins. Today its the shoes; tomorrow its the half eaten can of tuna. When Dustin was on deployment last year, I threw out every pair of lawn-mowing shoes I could find in the basement. I took a whole sack to the Goodwill and never felt a moment of remorse until last week. Dustin wanted to work in the yard. He needed shoes. He also wanted to wear flip-flops to the lake, and as it turns out, I threw away all of those, too. Luckily, Dustin had another hidden stash in the garage. In a back corner, behind old sleds and lawn mower parts, there is a Hoarders -worthy pile of golf shoes, water shoes and grassstained shoes. As an intervention, I made Dustin watch an episode of Hoarders that night. He fell asleep just before the woman hoarding cats opened her freezer and revealed a gruesome secret: she keeps the dead ones in there. This made me wonder where else I might find old shoes. Because the crazy thing is, my husband has approximately five shirts, three pairs of jeans and one pair of shoes (that he wears). He is a very simple man and has no fashion sense at all. So why does he need piles of old sneakers? I am not exaggerating when I tell you that the very next day, Dustin woke up and said he needed to get a new pair of shoes. The soles of his old ones were falling apart and flapping under the toe, just like every other pair of old shoes hes had. I need something that fits better and feels more comfort able, he said. I dont think I got the right size for these. So I followed him around department stores and athletic stores, and, yes, the same super cheap store where he bought the last pair. I thought I was losing my mind. I reminded him of the dead cats in the womans freezer that he didnt see. Dustin just laughed. Hes not putting shoes in the freezer. Geez. Finally, though, I talked him into investing in a really good pair of shoes. I took him to the kind of store where they measure your feet and help you make a selection. Dustin felt good about his selection. When we got home, I told him that I was proud of him. He now owned a pair of shoes that would last. And, Id throw out the old ones with next weeks trash. Dustin stared at me with big, round eyes. No, Ill need those for mowing the lawn, he said.Dustin hoards shoes . for mowing the lawn MoneyChic sez: We may be young, but it is never too early to prepare for the just in case of the future. I am going to hop on my soapbox for this installment of Hey, MoneyChic! We never want to think the worst about what may happen to us in the future. We never want to plan for the just in case. Life in unpredict able and can throw us a curve ball at any moment. Summer is a time for enjoying the sun, taking vaca tions, having parties, but it is also the season of an increased number of drunk driving accidents. Would you know what to do in case of an emergency? A will is only useful if you pass away. What happens if you are ill or hurt, but are still alive? Would your wife know where the impor tant paperwork is kept? Would your husband know which bills are due soon? Would your family know your childs schedule and if they need to be picked up from school? Many families divide the duties of the household and complete their tasks without involvement from the other spouse. This is an efficient way to get things accomplished, but that also leaves each spouse only knowing half of what is going on. Sit down with your spouse and discuss the information that would be necessary to carry on daily life as usual is the other person was in the hospital. Compile all of your bills and write down when they are usually due and how they are paid. Make sure each spouse has access to the bank accounts and savings accounts, and that all accounts have

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Q1.) Why is the Navy eliminating the requirement for vehicle decals? A1.) Since Sept. 11, 2001, 100 percent I.D. card checks have been implemented at all Department of Defense (DoD) installations. Authorization to access any DoD installation is based on verification of a valid credential or I.D. card. Vehicle decals were used to ensure vehicles on Navy installations complied with state requirements for vehicle registration and insur ance. State programs have become more uniform and efficient and uni form, eliminating one of the main reasons for vehicle decals. Other issues prompt ing the change in pol icy include: Expense in administering the program; decals being moved from vehicle to vehicle and are eas ily counterfeited and cars sold to non-Department of the Navy (DoN) per sonnel with current decal still attached, all posed additional security risks to Navy installations. Q2.) Will this elimination change the requirement for proper licens ing and registration for personnel entering the installation? A2.) Persons using pri vately-owned vehicles on Navy installations will still be required to meet state and local require ments including valid insurance, vehicle safety inspections, registration, proof of motorcycle safety training (where applica ble), etc. Q3.) When will the elimination of these decals take place? A3.) The elimination of the requirement for base decals will be effective July 1, 2013. Q4.) How will this affect contractors com ing on the base? A4.) Contractors are managed separately. Contractors either receive a temporary pass for a one trip visit or register under the Navy Commercial Access Control System that pro vides background checks and periodic reviews to allow them to be issued an annual valid creden tial for access for official business. Q5.) Will this affect visiting procedures? A5.) No. Visitors will continue to use the nor mal visitor procedures established by the instal lation commanding offi cer. Q6.) What should drivers do with the decals currently on their cars once the change is implemented? A6.) For frequent visi tors to installations requiring decals, the current decal may be left on the vehicle until the expiration date. Otherwise, it is recommended that the decal be removed. Q7.) How will the elimination of decals affect security on Navy instal lations? A7.) In addition to our policy of conducting random anti-terrorism checks, we will conduct command authorized administrative checks, similar to the way secu rity departments conduct driving-under-the-influ ence checks. These administrative checks will check iden tification, vehicle licens ing, etc. We will also continue to rely on the assistance of the mili tary community to report suspicious or abandoned cars, etc. Q8.) Without the vehi cle decal, how will security identify individu als who are eligible to park in reserved park ing spaces (CO, CMC, 06, flag officer, etc.)? A8.) Parking will be managed at the local level using a CNICgen erated template based on current color coding system (Blue: officers; Red: enlisted; Green: DoN civilians). The template provides for some standardization at all Commander, Navy Installations Command installations, but allows for minor changes to accommodate unique local circumstances. Q9.) How will I be able to enter military bases that require decals if I dont have a vehicle decal? A9.) This depends on the requirements of that particular service. You may be required to obtain a visitors pass. If you frequently visit installations that still require decals, you may wish to check and see if that installation will allow you to register your vehicle (and obtain a decal) for that particular base. Q10.) Will commis sioned officers still be saluted? A10.) Yes. After check ing the I.D. card, the active duty Sailor gate sentry will render the proper salute, assuming traffic conditions and force protection condi tions permit. As done currently, Navy civil ian police and guards will render appropriate respect and deference. Q11.) How will Clean Air Act Requirements for privately owned vehicles be verified? A11.) Compliance with Clean Air Act require ments for privately owned vehicles will be verified upon registration of the vehicle on-base in the Consolidated Law Enforcement Operations Center (CLEOC). The length of registra tion is determined by the length of time the state the installation is physi cally located in requires emission checks. At the end of that time the individual and their supervisor will be sent an e-mail for the individual to re-register their vehicle with their emissions cer tificate. Additionally Clean Air Act requirements will be verified by periodic administrative checks utilizing the Selective Traffic Enforcement and Random Antiterrorism Programs where it will be verified that they are registered in CLEOC. Navy to eliminate all base decals July 1 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013 The $2.4 million NAS Jax Gymnasium renovation project that began last December is nearing completion at the end of this month. According to NAS Jax MWR Fitness Director Tanya Henigman, the gym grand opening ceremony will be scheduled in mid-July after new fitness equipment is installed in the gyms workout rooms. This building built in the early 1940s needed a lot of work, said Cape Design Engineering Company Superintendent Joseph DeBlasio. It smelled bad due to moisture build-up. When we ripped up the rubber flooring, there was moisture everywhere. The building was close to falling apart. DeBlasio added, There were con struction issues we found in the building that we addressed as we worked. So its a much safer building now and the HVAC system we installed will keep the building moisture free. The project includes a ductless, energy efficient Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system that demands less electricity to main tain good indoor air quality through improved ventilation and filtration. The renovated gym features newly refurbished floors, restrooms and lock er areas, painted walls, new electrical systems, lighting sensors as well as new doors and windows. I think the most beneficial thing is a clean and sanitary building, said DeBlasio. Once Sailors and civilians experience the new building, it will get a lot more people coming here for fit ness training and recreation. Additionally, a PRT (Physical Readiness Test) Pavilion was added to the contract. Located behind the gym nasium and MWR Fitness Center, the PRT Pavilion will provide a sheltered place for Sailors to do their PRT work outs during hot, cold or rainy days. Henigman said, Sailors will not only benefit from the new gym, but also with the PRT Pavilion that is designed for commands to conduct physical train ing. The PRT Pavilion area will help enable our Sailors stay healthy, stay fit and stay Navy because they will be able to continue physical training even during inclement weather, she said. There are few places to PT on base because we have very limited space. The two small gyms we have are not big enough to accommodate the number of Sailors on this base, she explained. According to Henigman, the fit ness center accommodates more than 280 patrons a day, which is not nearly enough room to accommodate all the Sailors, spouses, reservists and civilians on base. The refurbished gym will add capac ity to serve more patrons and relieve crowding at the fitness center. The renovated gym will have new fitness equipment and a designated PRT room where Sailors can train for their bi-annual PRT on the bike and ellipti cal, according to Henigman. Its not always what you can provide physically, but what you can provide for the morale, said Henigman. A lot of working out and exercise does not just depend on your physical capabilities, but it also depends on your mental capabilities. And when you are working out at a facility that has been upgraded, it can uplift your spirit and boost the morale of the patrons utilizing the facility. Your mental attitude about fitness is half of a good workout, she added. NAS JAX GYM RE N OV A TIO NS NEAR COMPLETIO N

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013 5 Photos by MC2 Amanda Cabasos and Clark Pierce

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Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) Family Readiness hosted a tri-base Emergency Family Assistance Center (EFAC) exercise on board NAS Jacksonville May 30. The exercise, designed to test the regions ability to establish and sustain EFAC operations in the days and weeks follow ing the landfall of a hurricane, involved more than 30 Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) representatives from NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay, Ga., as well as installation and training officers and emergency man agement personnel from all three bases. Our ability to take care of our families after a natural disaster is critical to our abil ity to carry out our mission and support the fleet, said Rear Adm. John C. Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast. Our Sailors and civilians need to be assured their loved ones are safe so they can focus on their duties in the event a hurricane actually does hit one of our installations. The exercise came one week after the completion of HURREX 2013, which tested the regions hurricane pre paredness through a scenario involving multiple, simulated storms that made landfall near installations throughout the Southeast Region. The EFAC exercise was essentially a continuation of that scenario, and its focus was on the recovery phase of Disaster Response. In this scenario, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay residents were evacuated prior to land fall and each base suffered extensive flooding as the simulated storm passed. Afterward, FFSC personnel from all three participating bases worked with emergency management and training personnel to establish an EFAC on board NAS Jacksonville. After a real disaster, the EFAC would function as a hub for FFSC case workers and emergency response personnel to provide a wide range of support services for affected fam ily members.According to Carol Lucius, CNRSE Family Readiness pro gram Work and Family Life Coordinator, much of that sup port is managed through the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System (NFAAS).After a disaster, people can go into the Needs Assessment portion of NFAAS and specify what they need, then our case managers can go in and see what those needs are. We will then call them back and get them the resources they need, she said. Although NFAAS is one of the primary methods for EFAC personnel to assess needs after a disaster, it is not the only one. People can also come directly to the EFAC for assistance, Lucius added. During the exercise, partici pants simulated what kind of EFAC services would be necessary at two days after a hurri cane, one week after, and two weeks after. The circumstances in the days and weeks following a major storm can change quickly and EFAC personnel and services need to be adjusted accordingly, Lucius said. We need to decide who we should have in the EFAC based on what we think peo ples needs are because its not staffed only with FFSC personnel its chaplains, medical, legal, housing and many oth ers, she said. After an actual hurricane, EFAC personnel would also coordinate with a number of civilian agencies and local officials in order to get people the help they need. Lucius said most people who seek help are in need of food, shelter, clothes or some other physical need, which makes it important to conduct this kind of exercise in order to be better prepared for recovery efforts when a real-world scenario occurs. An emergency is a crisis event and it never really hap pens the way you exercise it, but we at least need to have a plan in place. We are going to be providing services and need to be sure that our people have confidence in themselves, confidence in their leadership and confidence in the plan, she said. Lucius said training like this is essential for preparing emergency management and FFSC personnel for an actual event, but it is equally as important for family members and dependents to know what to do in the event of an emergency. They really need to know about NFAAS. They need to know that it is essential for them to have their personal contact information updated in NFAAS so that when a disaster strikes, they can be contacted and they know how to contact somebody for help, she said. The exercise was phase one of a three-phase process. While this phase included only play ers from installation FFSCs, training and emergency man agement personnel, participa tion will be expanded in phase two and three. Phase two will include addi tional participants from onbase organizations, such as the base housing office and legal. Phase three will expand even further to include players from outside the fenceline, includ ing the American Red Cross, Salvation Army and others. Sailors, dependents and government civilians can log into NFAAS at https://navyfam ily.navy.mil where they can update their contact informa tion, report their status or submit a needs assessment. For more information about hurricane readiness or NFAAC, contact your local FFSC. Region Family Readiness Program conducts emergency response exercise 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013

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VISITrequire an emergency room visit. He characterized the scenario by saying, When you need help, call home your Medical Home Port team. NH Jacksonville has 14 Medical Home Port teams across the command. Nathan followed the leader ship meeting with two Surgeon General Calls, with participa tion from around 2,000 of the commands 2,500 military, civilian and contract staff at the hospital and five branch health clinics (via video conference). During his Surgeon General Call with junior military and civilian staff, he applauded the job that the Navy and Marine Corps team is doing. We form a Naval and Marine Corps maritime team that does some amazing things around the world, said Nathan. We work in any dynamic across the world, whether its above the sea with naval avia tion medicine; on the sea with surface medicine; below the sea with submarine medi cine; or on land, supporting the Marine Corps and special operations, as evident for the last 10 to 12 years in Iraq and Afghanistanas major mili tary combat support players. In his address to senior staff, Nathan continued to discuss Navy Medicines portfolio of combat casualty care in all environmentsand the criti cal role of staff in being ready to go anytime, anywhere. You chose to be a part of an orga nization that is bigger than yourself, that gives back and that makes a difference, stated Nathan. As for our civilians, who are amazing in their resilience and ability to get things done, its a pleasure working next to you each day. Taking place between the scheduled Surgeon General Calls, NH Jacksonville Sailors, civilians and contractors of the quarter and year as well as a few other hand-selected, hard-charging hospital corps men had the unique oppor tunity to lunch with Nathan, Shaffer, Force Master Chief Sherman Boss, NH Jacksonville Command Master Chief Bennora Simmons and other leaders. Breaking bread together offered the opportu nity for meaningful exchange. The first day wrapped up with Nathans tour of hospi tal spaces to meet staff and patients. Underscoring one of Navy Medicines strategic goals to collaborate on shared visions for health care and interoper ability (jointness), day two of Nathans visit was his keynote address to about 200 leaders from regional health organiza tions at the fifth annual Quality & Safety Forum hosted by the Center for Global Health and Medical Diplomacy at the University of North Florida. Discussions throughout the day were aimed at creating a culture of safety in medical institutions across the region. In health care, its every ones job to make the patients life better when they leave the facility than it was when they came in, observed Nathan. He concluded his remarks to the northeast Florida audience, saying, We heal patients as a community private-sector, military, VA and thank you for embracing Naval Hospital Jacksonville staff, not only as citizens but as members of the medical community. Along with Nathans keynote, speakers throughout the day included Shaffer; Capt. Joseph McQuade, NH Jacksonville director for public health; Cmdr. Jamie Oberman, NH Jacksonville surgeon; Cmdr. Andrea Petrovanie, officerin-charge of Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville; and lead ers from UNF, Duval County Medical Society, Institute for Healthcare Improvement, Mayo Clinic, Nemours Childrens Clinic, UF Health, Brooks College of Health, St. Vincents Healthcare, Baptist Health, Mission Health and Wake Med Health. From its award-winning Family Medicine Residency Program to its more than 100 training agreements with universities, colleges and medical organizations, NH Jacksonvilleas a member of Navy Medicines global net work understands the value collaboration plays in ensur ing its physicians, nurses and technicians are able to provide the most sophisticated care available in any environment. Through its professional edu cation and research programs, NH Jacksonville has built an infrastructure to support evi dence-based practices across its facilities and in medicine nationwide. Whether NH Jacksonville is partnering to enhance patient safety through participation in patient safety conferences, tackling regional issues, or nurturing health care experts, the commands ongoing col laboration remains focused on ensuring its enrolled patients active duty and retired Sailors, soldiers, airmen, Marines and guardsmen and their fami liesreceive the highest qual ity care. Were here to heal our nations heroes our warfighters and their families, said Shaffer. And our partnerships, with organizations like the Center for Global Health and Medical Diplomacy at the University of North Florida, are one of the important ways we ensure each and every one of our patients gets the best care. NAS Jacksonville and Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) are working together to provide electronic material recycling to station departments and tenant commands. Instead of taking electronic material to NAS Jax Environmental at Building 1948 on Thursdays, please contact DLA at 542-3411, Ext. 102 to schedule a day and time to take materials to DLA on Roosevelt Boulevard near Collins Road. DLA will assist commands with requirements, including submitting the necessary paperwork (DD Form 1348) for turn-in of items. Remember that electronic material is regulated, so please ensure that no recyclable materials are disposed of in station dumpsters. NAS Jax is subject to significant fines and penalties when electronic items are found in station dumpsters. Anyone finding electronic items in dumpsters should call NAS Jax Environmental at 542-5251/5789. Electronic material now being recycled at DLA NAS Jax will be hosting the Navy Ortega Lakeshore Little League 2013 District 11 All Star Tournament June 27 through July 13 at Blue Angel Field. The teams consist of 9and 10-year-old players. This is a double elimination tourna ment with approximately 12 teams that could encompass up to 500 guests visiting the base. The games will be played from approximately 4-10:30 p.m. nightly except during the 4th of July weekend when games will be played from 9 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Volunteers are needed to help with a variety of different jobs to support this event.If you can help, please e-mail noljax@ gmail.com.NAS Jax to host Little League All Star tournament 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013

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until Zeus Leader, a transport ship, was directed to the scene for rescue. Five-and-one-half hours later Zeus Leader arrived and rescued five people. Rescue 313 was low on fuel and diverted to Chuuk Island for refueling. While on the ground, Lt. Cmdr Todd Nichols, Rescue 313s aircraft commander, called the Coast Guard for an update. All five souls alive and well. Once the mission was complete, Rescue 313 returned to Guam for some much needed rest before resuming their convoy mission. Based at NAS Jacksonville, VR-62 is one of five Navy Reserve C-130 squadrons serving the U.S. Navys high priority logistics needs around the globe. VR-62for five days at the beginning of the 2013-2014 school year, she explained, but it is up to each superintendent to decide what days will be furlough days. Schools will be closed to students on those days, she said, and extracurricular activities scheduled for a furlough day will not be held that day. But, its important to note that our summer school will be held this year, and that children will get a good aca demic year, Wright added. The department has about 767,000 appropriated fund employees, said Navy Cmdr. Leslie Hull-Ryde, a Pentagon spokeswoman. About 652,000 are scheduled to be furloughed, she said, but that total will change as employees respond to furlough notic es and final determinations are made. Appropriated fund employees include those employees who are not appoint ed by Congress or the president and who are paid by funds designated by Congress. As the possibility of a furlough draws near, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders number one con cern continues to be the 22,000+ mili tary and civilians who work hard every day to ensure the mission of supporting the warfighters is met. According to the Defense Civilian Personnel Advisory Service Web site, nonappropriated fund employees may be furloughed for business-based rea sons if the reduction in appropriated fund resources leads to a curtailment in [morale, welfare and recreation] or exchange business operations . . Furloughs of NAF employees are pro cessed under DoD NAF human resources policies and component procedures. Furlough notices started going out to appropriated fund employees May 28, Wright said. They will either be hand-delivered, she said, because the employee must sign that theyve received the furlough notice, or, if the employee is on leave, it could be sent [via] certified mail. Civilians exempted from furloughs generally fall into specific categories, Wright said. Examples include civil ians working in combat zones, per sonnel with safety-of-life responsibili ties, wounded warrior caregivers and full-time sexual assault prevention and response coordinators and sexual assault victim advocates for the active and reserve components. Employees who receive a furlough notice will have seven days to respond if they believe their duties fall into one of the excepted categories, Hull-Ryde said. Otherwise, furloughs will start no later than July 8. The furlough days will be spread over the remainder of the fiscal year, which ends Sept. 30. Wright said she urges employees with furlough questions to reach out to their human resources department and to read the detailed guidance about fur loughs on the Office of Professional Managements website. The Web sites for the Labor Department and OPM can assist employees with questions about eligi bility for unemployment compensation, Wright said. Those eligibility require ments differ from state to state, HullRyde noted. Not all states will be affected equally, Wright said. The majority of our workers work outside the Washington, D.C., area, she noted. More than 80 percent of the fed eral workforce is based outside the national capital region, Wright said. According to Defense Department fig ures, in the five states with the most federal employees California, Georgia, Maryland, Texas and Virginia workers will lose $819 million in wages due to furloughs. Every employees situation is unique, Wright said, but the bottom line is this decision was made to preserve readi ness of the military force as a whole. Readiness is not a service-specific thing, she said, Its a joint, depart mental thing. We made a very collec tive decision to be collective on this furlough -that we would furlough the department as a whole. Senior defense officials have stated that the effects of sequestration will be long-lasting. Uncertainty over whether sequestration will continue has made it difficult to know whether furloughs will continue into fiscal year 2014, Wright said. I think that next year is going to be a difficult year, she said. We are in the process the department as a whole of working through some of the options for next years budget . . If sequestration is in effect, it will be very difficult, but we have not made a decision. Pentagon officials will do everything in our power not to have to furlough employees, she added. NAS Jacksonville has 6,153 DoD civilians that could be impacted if the fur lough goes into effect July 8. FURLOUGH JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013 9

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The frocking ceremony for NAS Jax Sailors selected for advancement from the March Navy wide examination was held May 31 at Hanger 117. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders told those in attendance, This is a testament to all your hard work and dedication. Congratulations on your advancement and achievement in our Navy. Sailors frocked included: As VP-5 transitions to the P-8A Poseidon the squadron is proud to highlight a transi tioning Mad Fox each week. This weeks spot light shines on AO1(AW) Dennis Yearty. Yearty is from Peach Tree City, Ga. He is the father of two and married to VP-5s Ombudsman Selena Yearty. The ombudsman serves as the direct link between the commanding officer and family members. Mad Fox ordnancemen continue working hard as they near the end of the P-8A transition. For the past two months they have been preparing 12 hours a day, including weekends, for their Conventional Weapons Technical Proficiency Inspection (CWTPI). As the quality assur ance (QA) leading petty officer, AO1 Yearty has been working as the QA Safety Observer while ordnancemen practice uploading and down loading weapons on the P-8A. VP-5s CWTPI is next week and will cer tify the Mad Foxes safe as independent Poseidon weapons handlers. When AO1 Yearty isnt busy learning this new platform, he spends his free time working as the Oakleaf High School Head Junior Varsity baseball coach and Oakleaf Junior High School foot ball defensive coordina tor. VP-5 has been tran sitioning to the P-8A Poseidon since Jan. 4. VP-5 transition spotlight NAS Jax petty officers frockeda payable on death form on file with each financial institution. If there are kids, talk about your childrens sched ule. Discuss what routine maintenance is done on your cars, when, and where you would recommend taking them. Gather important paperwork such as: marriage certificate, social security cards, birth certificates, titles to vehi cles, wills, passports, etc. and put them in a secure location (preferably a lock box with fire protection). Make a list of important people that you would like to know about your situation if something happens and how to contact them. If a spouse or family member has monthly prescriptions that need to be filled, let the other know when and where to do that. It is important to have a doctors contact information on hand for all members of the family so you are able to access a persons medical history. When you have written down your list of important information, let a trusted individual not living I your household know where you keep this information so they may be able to get to it if necessary. It is best to keep everything in one secure location that is easily accessible to family members, but not to intruders! Discussing the just in case is not an easy thing to do. It is better to be pre pared than to be left feeling as though you have no idea how to handle your life if your spouse in unavailable. Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society can help you plan financially for your future, stop by the office outside the NAS Jax Main Gate or call 542-2832. Have questions for Hey, MoneyChic? Drop me an e-mail at megan.stolle@ nmcrs.org. MONEYCHIC Drivers check your licenses expired? that issued the license? the rules and laws of the state you are from and state you are in? If you are active duty, your license may be valid after it expires but this is not automatic and varies from state to state. Go to www.dmvdepartment-of-motorvehicles.com/index. html to your states DMV where most questions can be answered. License extensions, if offered, are for active duty members only and do not pertain to spouses or other family members. 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013

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NAS Jax recognizes Asian Pacific Americans The annual NAS Jacksonville Asian Pacific Heritage Luncheon was held at the NAS Jax River Cove Catering and Conference Center May 29. The event was sponsored by the base Multi-Cultural Awareness Committee (MCAC). More than 70 NAS Jax Sailors and civilians attended the event. The theme of this years celebration is: Building leadership: Embracing Cultural Values and Inclusion. The event kicked off with the sing ing of the national anthem by PR3(AW) Kristina Thomas of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast and the innovation by NAS Jax Chaplain (Lt.) Hylanie ChanWilliams. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob said, Asian Pacific Heritage Month originated in October 1978 when President Jimmy Carter signed a joint resolution designating the annual celebration. The month of May was chosen to commemorate the immigration of the first Japanese to the United States back in 1843 to mark the anniversary of the completion of the transcontinental railroad on May 10, 1869. Sanders continued, Throughout history Asian Pacific Americans have fought in every U.S. conflict since the War of 1812. Today, many Asian Pacific Americans serve in the Navy, including eight flag officers. Master of Ceremonies, ABH2(AW) Calvin Davis, assigned to NAS Jax Air Operations Transient Line introduced guest speaker ABH2(AW/SW) James Paul Viar, assigned to NAS Jax Air Mobility Command Terminal. In October 2005, my family and I migrated to Norfolk, Va. to reunite with my mothers brothers and sisters and to also fulfill our American dreams, said Viar. On January 2007, I decided to enlist in the United States Navy to serve others and our country, he stated. Ever since I was young, my father and mother taught us how to help people who are in need and by volunteering to the community. It made me who I am today and it feels good helping others. One of the best and most unique things about our Navy today is the rich cul ture, diversity and equality. Everywhere I go, I always see different ethnic backgrounds. A musical selection was also pre sented by ABH3(AW) Yvan Azucena, assigned to NAS Jax Air Operations Transit Line, who played some Hawaiian Island Reggae on the ukulele, a Hawaiian instrument The luncheon ended with an awards presentation during which Sanders presented Viar a plaque in appreciation of his participation in the event. An Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Luncheon event was held May 30 at the Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP) Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville command. Today, we will take some time to honor some of our Asian and Pacific Islander leaders and their contributions to the Armed Forces, said Cmdr. Tom Dailey, NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville, executive officer. This month is a celebration, not only of the services legacy of valuing culture and diversity, but it is also a testament to a diversified workforce of the future. This is especially apparent in this years theme Building Leaders: Embracing cultural values and inclusion. Dailey went on to introduce AAPI Heritage Month celebration keynote speaker, Lt. Cmdr. Palmo Barrera, who is currently serving as the FLC Jacksonville deputy director of the Supply Management Department. Barrera thanked the audience for par taking in what he considered to be an honorable occasion. He then described the historical background of AAPI month and recognized some exceptional con tributions of leaders of Asian ethnicity in their fields of expertise. He talked to how each of the leaders had to make tough choices in order to be where they were at in their careers. Barrera then recount ed the day that he had to make a tough choice when taking the U.S. Navy examination over 30 years ago. He recollected how surprised he was that the U.S. Navy would accept him, who at the time was a struggling second year college student studying civil engineering, in Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines. I remember the day that changed my life, said Barrera. It was in August 1983, when I reported to the Subic Naval Base to take my examination. I was nervous, yet excited and even more excited when I later learned that I was one of the lucky seven from 200 applicants that had been selected. I was then faced with a tough decision, do I stay and continue in my current path, or do I make a change in my life, grab this opportunity and go? Barrera recollected how, he knew that if he continued in his current path, that civil engineering in the Philippines was not an easy occupation to get hired into, nor did it pay as well as it did in other countries. He knew that it would be dif ficult to find a job that would afford him opportunities to take care of his family. It was a tough decision, but I decid ed I needed to leave the Philippines and so I did. And here I am now, 30 years lateran officer in the great United States Navy and a part of the team here at FLC Jacksonville that honors cultural values and inclusion. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville personnel continued the celebration and enjoyed activities celebrating AAPI month throughout the rest of the day including a cake cutting ceremony, cultural outfit contest, origami station, and a potluck unique food dish contest. Fleet Logistics Center celebrates Asian Pacific heritage JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013 11

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In preparation of the 2013 hurricane season, Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeasts Contingency Engineering Response Team (CERT) responds to a simulated hurricane (Hurricane Lay) May 22. The team prepares for damage that could be caused by a Category 2 storm at NAS Pensacola deploying as part of the exercise to NS Mayport. NS Mayport provided a perfect deployed location for CERT and disaster assessment team (DAT) training. Each year NAVFAC Southeast prepares their teams for the upcoming hurricane sea son to be ready for any storm or nat ural disaster. This training is part of the annual plan to maintain skills and readiness for both new and experienced CERT members. As we prepare for the 2013 hurricane season, we conduct a CERT exercise as part of the Navys annual hurricane exercise. We exercise command and control (C2) from a central Emergency Operations Center at headquarters (NAS Jacksonville) and in the field (NS Mayport standing in for NAS Pensacola this year), said Lt. Cmdr. Kenneth Vargas, NAVFAC Southeast disaster preparedness officer. NAVFAC CERTs are a key part of the overall base recovery efforts after a storm. CERTs consist of one or more DATs as well as Construction Support Teams to administer contingency contracts, if any. DATs are made up of personnel who enable installation facility repair efforts. The teams consist of active-duty civil engineer corps officers, civilian engineers, architects, project manag ers, facilities managers and contract specialists. The CERT is a compilation of experts and capabilities resident within NAVFAC Southeast. All the business lines, support lines and integrated product teams provide expertise and manpower to the CERT, said Vargas. Before the assembled team deployed to NS Mayport, NAVFAC Southeast commanding officer, Capt. Christopher Kiwus, offered words of encouragement and focus to the CERT members. When you deploy, chances are you are going to a more dangerous place than most people encounter. I worry about you getting hurt. I dont worry about your vehicle or your equipment I worry about you, said Kiwus. Safety is the most important thing as you go about accomplishing your mission. The entire team was told to watch out for each other and that they were all safety officers. The most important piece in this exercise is the knowledge each of you bring to the team. You all bring different expertise to the team. Learn what each of you offer and learn from each other, said Kiwus. The CERT deploys with some pretty high tech equipment including hand held repeater radios, GPS enabled dig ital cameras and a bus outfitted as a Mobile Command Post (MCP) filled with laptops, a fax machine, weather equipment and other sundries. We use several communications means through our MCP to relay criti cal damage assessment information, said Vargas. We have satellite abilities, wireless communications, facsimile, scanning, Navy Marine Corps Internet and commercial Internet and email capabilities. The C2 features streamline the pro cess of getting engineering assessment data of damage to headquarters offi cials allowing NAVFAC leadership to make engineering recommendations to the Commander, Navy Installations Command with the end goal of getting the damaged base repaired and fully mission capable in short order. Kiwus commented about the technology available to the team. Try to use all the equipment you are issued as a team but dont make the equipment your focus. Shake out every bit of knowledge you can thats the benefits of an exercise so you can use those skills at a later time and place, learning now what to do to solve a problem in advance of a real emergency. Thats the capacity we want to grow. As CERT members, we are charged with the responsibility to support installation and combatant command ers response efforts and work to ensure the affected installation can return to normal operations as quick as possible, said Don Maconi, NAVFAC Southeast contingency engineer. These tools help us complete our mission. This is a very select group, said Kiwus. In our region it is not a matter of if, but when we will deploy. If there is one group in the command to send to solve a problem, youre it. This is the group I would send to solve the prob lem. CERT capabilities have been dem onstrated as teams were sent to Navy installations in the Gulf Coast Region after Hurricanes Katrina and Gustav. Members of the team also deployed to assist with disaster assessments in Haiti after the 2010 earthquake and after Hurricane Isaac impacted Louisiana in August 2012. Contingency Engineering Response Team readies for hurricane season 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Free Live Entertainment June 7 Karaoke with Randy June 14 Piece in Harmony June 21 Pam Affronti June 28 Jason LamarFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Night Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 510 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 1 6 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer June 1 Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 years and younger receive one free game of bowling every day until 5 p.m. Win prizes all summer long.Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Open Monday Friday (lap swim only) During lap swim only the waterslide, water park and concessions will not be open. 6 a.m. 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 7 p.m. Saturday & Sunday (recreation swimming) 11 a.m. 6 p.m. June 10 pool opens daily for recreational swimming 2013 Learn to Swim Program Session 1: June 1020 Session 2 July 8-18 Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1 Summer Splash Outdoor Pool Party June 29, 11 a.m. 6 p.m. Free food, games and prizes!I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Jacksonville Jaguars tickets on sale July 13 $70 section 147 Legoland Florida Free ticket for active duty military through Oct. 27 Wet-n-Wild Orlando $37 adult, $45 adult w/ meal, $40 child w/ meal Disney Cruise Lines will be at ITT June 11, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Learn more about exciting 2013/2014 trips. Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Daytona International Speedway Subway Firecracker July 5 and Coke 400 July 6 Tickets on sale now! Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Legoland Kids go FREE with an adult ticket purchase from ITT Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3. Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7. Amelia Island Museum of History $10 family pass, Ghost tour $8 adult, $4 child Florida Ecosafaris in St. Cloud EcoPark $119, Coach safari adult $28, child $25, Zipline safari $75, Cypress canopy cycle $40 for one hourThe Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Jax Suns Baseball Game June 6 at 6 p.m. Free admission and transportation I Love Music Concert Tour Featuring Red Jumpsuit Apparatus and New Boyz! June 8 at 2 p.m. Longest Drive Contest NAS Jax Golf Course June 12 at 7 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees June 11 and 25 for active duty June 13 and 27 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Loudmouth Thursday Any golfer wearing a pair of loudmouth shorts or slacks plays 18 holes with cart for $20 Open to military, DoD and guests Junior Golf Clinic Session 1, June 1721, ages 1117 Session 2, July 1519, ages 610 Session 3, July 29 Aug. 2, ages 1117 $110 per child, per sessionMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina June 15, 16, 22 & 23 July 20, 21, 27 & 28 Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Movie Under the Stars June 21 at 8:30 p.m. Patriots Grove Americas Kids Run June 28 at 9 a.m. Ages 5 12 Sign-up at the youth centerFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School June 3 July 10 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013 13

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The crew of the German submarine U-32 hosted the HSM72 Proud Warriors wardroom on board their U-boat at Naval Station Mayport for an international exchange that gave both units an opportunity for some rare interaction and education. U-32 is a German Type 212 non-nuclear, diesel-electric submarine and its knowl edgeable complement of offi cers and enlisted personnel were eager to show off their impressive vessel. This occa sion marks both the first time a Type 212 U-boat has transited the Atlantic Ocean and the first time the U.S. Navy has participated in an exercise with the Type 212. Anti-submarine warfare (ASW) is a primary mission of HSM-72 and its MH-60R Seahawk helicopters. So the pier-side tour was of particular interest to the Proud Warriors pilots who went on to square off with U-32 in a recent ASW exercise in the Atlantic. After being greeted by the German Sailors at the Mayport Basin, the German watch officers walked small groups of pilots through the subma rine, giving them a glimpse into the technically and physi cally demanding world of the German submariner. HSM-72 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Derek Fleck, was among the tour participants. Touring this advanced sub marine was an amazing expe rience. It allowed us to view our mission from a different perspective. It certainly made the exercise a more personally rewarding event, he said. When the tours conclud ed, the Proud Warriors host ed the German Submariners at a reception in Jacksonville Beach. Among the crew of U-32 present was Electronics Petty Officer Daniel Bleu, who spoke of the many responsibilities required of such a small (24) crew including extensive technical training, demand ing physical standards, and the family like relationship the crew develops during their underway period. The Proud Warriors ultimately learned that regardless of whether they operate below, upon, or above the sea, naval warfighters have more in common than meets the eye, through similarities that span even international borders. After the formalities con cluded ashore, the crew of U-32 sailed from the Mayport Basin to Atlantic waters off the coast of Jacksonville where the U-boat and the local naval aviation communities partici pated in a weeklong training exercise. ASWEX 13-02 included squadrons from the VP, HSL and HSM squadrons based at NAS Jacksonville and NS Mayport. The wing-wide training exercise afforded all participants an opportunity to hone tactics and increase readiness to improve their warfighting capabilities. More important ly, the exercise gave American participants a rare opportunity to work together with other aviation communities against the quiet and highly evasive Type 212 submarine. HSM-72 flew 18 sorties against U-32 in both SH-60B and MH-60R Seahawks. This exercise marked the first time the Proud Warriors were able to conduct anti-sub marine warfare training with a live submarine in their new MH-60R Romeo helicopters. The Proud Warriors are building upon the legacy tac tics of the SH-60B variant with the upgraded mission systems and dipping sonar capabil ity of the new MH-60R. ASWEX 13-02 marked a small step in a long training process the command is embarked on during their transition to the car rier air wing environment for future deployments. HSM-72 wardroom visits German submarine Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) held a speed mentoring event May 30 that partnered less experienced employees or protgs with experienced mentors who shared their insights and knowledge learned through the years. The first ever event sponsored by the commands Workforce Engagement and Inclusion (WEI) Team, paired five mentors one on one with five protgs for a nine-minute session before being signaled to rotate to the next mentor. Francine Juhlin, a WEI Team co-chair, said the pilot program was inspired by speed dating, a match making process where singles meet face-to-face for short conversations before moving on to the next pairing. It is the same concept as speed dating, said Juhlin. It introduces protgs to a variety of professionals for quick-hit information, suggestions and ideas that may enhance their job performance and career develop ment. It can also help the protg overcome work place challenges by providing a variety of viewpoints from knowledgeable mentors. Eduardo Esquivias, an aircraft mechanic who attended the pilot speed mentoring event, said his mentors were eager to share their experiences and impart tidbits of knowledge to helpnavigate through the quagmire. The WEI Team is comprised of about 25 federal FRCSE holds first speed mentoring event on Hornet line 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013

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See something wrong? Do something rightDid you know there are three ways to report a crime to NCIS? We understand the concerns facing todays military community. The TEXT, WEB and APP Tip Line is a partnership between Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) and the military community, and provides service members and civilians a safe, discreet and anonymous option to report criminal and force protection threats within the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps without concerns of retaliation. What type of information does NCIS need? The NCIS mission is to investigate and defeat criminal, terrorist and foreign intelligence threats to the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. Types of crimes inves tigated by NCIS include rape, narcotics, child physi cal and sexual abuse, burglary and robbery, theft of government and personal property, fraud, and homicide. Within the Department of the Navy, NCIS also has exclusive investigative jurisdiction into actual, potential or suspected acts of espionage or sabotage. If you have information pertaining to these or any other serious crime, please let us know. Anonymous Text Tips Anonymous Smartphone App Based Tips Anonymous Web Tips YNC(SW/AW) Roshell Booker of the NAS Jax Executive Department was commissioned to a chief war rant officer during a ceremony at the NAS Jax Chapel May 31 as numerous family members, coworkers and friends attended the event. NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Roy Undersander was the guest speaker. During the traditional ceremony, Bookers chief anchors and cover were officially retired before she was given the administration of oath by CWO3 Michael Carter, officer in charge, Food Management Team Mayport. Booker was then presented her warrant officer shoulder boards, jacket and cover by her hus band, Staff Sgt. Anthony Booker, sons, Malik Jordan and Marcus Robinson Jr., daughter Kennedy Rose Booker and CWO4 Wanda Trammell. Booker, a native of Dermott, Ark., joined the Navy in 1992 as an undesignated airman. Her duty assignments include HM-12, Norfolk Va.; HSL-40 at NS Mayport; VP-45 where she was advanced to yeoman second class; Commander, Personnel Command; USS Thomas S. Gates (CG 51) where she was selected for chief petty officer; NROTC Jacksonville University; Individual Augmentee deploy ment to Kabul, Afghanistan as a convoy commander for CounterImprovised Explosive Device Unit; Commander, Naval Forces Europe/ Commander, Naval Forces Africa and Commander, U.S. 6th Fleet as the assistant flag support officer. She reported to the NAS Jax Executive Department as the Administration leading chief petty officer in July 2012. Im grateful for the Navy because its all I know. Its all about taking care of the Sailors and looking out for them because they are the future and will follow in my footsteps, she said. Im also grateful for my family and for supporting me along the way and for everything that Ive had to endure through my life because its made me who I am today. Chief commissioned to warrant officer JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013 15

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For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil Nominations are currently being sought from the Navys chief petty officer (CPO) com munity for the Inaugural Bob Feller Act of Valor award. Established by the Bob Feller Act of Valor Foundation, the prestigious award is named in honor of Major League Baseball pitcher, National Baseball Hall of Fame induct ee, and Navy veteran Bob Feller. This unique award is intended to recognize a representa tive from three critical areas of Fellers life: his baseball career, his service as a Navy CPO, and his enshrinement in the Hall of Fame. As such, the award will be presented to one Major League baseball player, one Navy CPO, and one member of the Hall of Fame on Veterans Day, Nov. 11, 2013, at the Navy Memorial in Washington, D.C. It is important to recognize Bob Fellers unselfish devo tion to our nation and Navy, said MCPON(AW/NAC) Mike Stevens. He made the personal choice to give up money and fame for the service of others and placed himself in harms way with his shipmates during a time of war. The chief petty officer selected for the Bob Feller Act of Valor Award will embody these same traits. In recognition of Fellers significant accomplishment in attaining the rank of CPO, nominees must be a CPO (E-7 only), active or reserve, must be outstanding military pro fessionals, and must embody the Navys core values of honor, courage, and commitment. Feller enlisted in the Navy shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor while he was with the Cleveland Indians, becom ing the first American pro fessional athlete to enlist. He served on the battleship USS Alabama (BB-60), and while doing so, the ship fought in both World War II theaters and earned eight battle stars. Feller was released from active duty achieving the rank of CPO, and is the only CPO in the Hall of Fame. Nominations must be sub mitted to the Navy Office of Community Outreach by June 17. For more information on eligibility requirements and the selection process, see NAVADMIN 138/13.Nominations sought for Bob Feller Act of Valor Award 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013

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18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, June 6, 2013 civilian personnel including General Schedule (GS) and Wage Grade (WG) employees and mili tary members who represent a cross section of the FRCSE workforce. Jose Mendoza, an F/A-18 Hornet aircraft WG worker, serves on the WEI Team as the F/A-18 production line representative. This was a reluctant group, but they became engaged immediately, he said of the protgs. We got such favorable feedback from both the mentors and protgs. It was gratifying to see that level of interest. The mentors enjoyed sharing their experiences and asked to be invited back. Metalsmith Royce Burt was very skeptical about attending the session, but he said he left very impressed. Some artisans feel trapped working on the floor, and I was one of them. But after talking with some of the managers, I learned there were ways to advance. That is good news, and the fact that the managers were there and wanted to help gave me hope. I would like to see more folks attend. I was pleasantly surprised. The WEI Team plans on holding more speed mentoring events in the near future based on the initial participant responses. The team is char tered to identify and remove workplace barriers that undermine employee morale and professional development. MENTORING The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) returned to its homeport of Norfolk, Va. May 24 after a successful completion of new defense testing during a two-week underway period. The ship tested a new torpedo self defense system, completed more than 115 launches and landings in assess ing a precision landing system, as well as launching the first carrier-based unmanned aircraft in naval aviation history. The X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System (UCAS) was successfully launched from the ship as the Navy/ Northrop Grumman team looked on, May 14. The UCAS aircraft flew over Marylands Eastern Shore before land ing safely at NAS Patuxent River, Md. We saw a small, but significant pixel in the future picture of our Navy as we begin integration of unmanned systems into arguably the most complex warf ighting environment that exists today the flight deck of a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, said Vice Adm. David Buss, commander, Naval Air Forces. The X-47B returned to the ship three days later to conduct its first touch-andgo landing on an aircraft carrier. Capt. Jaime Engdahl, the UCAS pro gram manager, took time to thank the crew during an all-hands call May 23, the night before the ship arrived into port. I hope all of you are proud of where youre standing, said Engdahl. Its a changed world now. We launched a few naval aviation firsts and you were all there. USS George H.W. Bush is in port conducting training operations in preparation for the upcoming underway schedule. USS George H.W. Bush completes historic underway

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