<%BANNER%>

Jax air news ( May 30, 2013 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA SLAF
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012

Material Information

Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 30, 2013
Publication Date: 05-30-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02044

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012

Material Information

Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 30, 2013
Publication Date: 05-30-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02044


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

THURSDAY, MAY 30, 2013 FLC COC COP CLASS HURREXCheck us out Online! jaxairnews.com The Navys newest unmanned Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) aircraft platform, the MQ-4C Triton Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS), completed its first flight at Palmdale, Calif. May 22, marking the start of tests that will validate the Northrop Grumman-built system for future fleet operations. During the 80-minute flight in restricted airspace, the MQ-4C Triton unmanned aircraft, controlled by ground-based Navy and Northrop Grumman personnel, reached 20,000 feet altitude. This flight represents a sig nificant milestone for the Triton team, said Rear Adm. Mat Winter, who leads the Program Executive Office for Unmanned Aviation and Strike Weapons at Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md. The work they have done and will continue to do is critical to the future of naval aviation, particularly to our maritime patrol and reconnaissance community. The MQ-4C Triton provides the fleet with a game-changing persistent mari time and littoral ISR data collection and dissemination capability, said Winter. It will be a key component of the Navys Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force family of systems. As an adjunct to the manned P-8A Poseidon, the MQ-4C Triton will be a major part of the militarys surveillance strategy for the Asia and Pacific regions. The Triton will fly missions for 24 hours at altitudes greater than 10 miles, allow ing the system to monitor 2,000 nautical miles of ocean and littoral areas. The P-8A Poseidon is the Navys new multi-mission maritime aircraft that is replacing the P-3C Orion anti-subma rine warfare aircraft. When operational, the MQ-4C will complement our manned P-8 because it can fly for long periods, transmit its information in real-time to units in the air and on the ground, as well as use fewer resources than previous surveil lance aircraft, said Rear Adm. Sean Buck, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group commander, who also witnessed the test flight. Triton will bring an unprecedented ISR capability to the warfighter. Buck added, The arrival of Triton, With hurricane season fast approaching on June 1, the NAS Jax Emergency Management Team is busy ensuring station personnel and tenant commands know their disaster plan requirements not only at work, but also at home. Hurricane season runs June 1 through Nov. 30. We continually monitor tropical systems watching for signs of development and project ed track, said NAS Emergency Management Officer Ray Edmond. As a tropical storm or hurricane develops and it looks like our area falls into that cone of uncertainty, thats when we begin making those preparations and set our conditions of readiness (COR). According to Edmond, its not just the hur ricane force winds that cause destruction, but tornadoes and flooding due to storm surge that can have leave devastating effects. Edmond strongly recommends reviewing your home insurance policy because many plans dont cover damage caused by flooding unless you specifically purchase flood insurance. Make sure your insurance policy says what you think it says. Many people may have hur ricane insurance but that doesnt always cover flooding. Unfortunately, many people have learned this lesson the hard way after their homes were flooded, he said. The only hurricane on record that hit Jacksonville directly was Hurricane Dora in 1964. It caused substantial damage from wind and flooding. In south Florida, Hurricane Andrew, a category five storm, devastated the area. Hurricane season starts June 1, prepare now Navy Triton unmanned aircraft completes first flight Tri-base Sailors from NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay, Ga. participated in sev eral Memorial Day events in Northeast Florida May 27. Downtown Jacksonville At the Duval County Veterans Memorial Wall near Everbank Field, Commander U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris declared, The names on the wall behind me are the real heroes here. This is a fantas tic Memorial Day tribute to the fallen and we will always remember those who paid the ultimate sacrifice. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders and NS Mayport Commanding Officer Capt. Douglas Cochrane, along with other military representatives, par ticipated in wreath laying cer emonies to honor those killed while on active duty. Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown spoke about the citys unique military makeup and why we should forever honor those who lost their lives while serving. On Memorial Day we gather to renew our nations spirit; to honor those who have invested their lives, not only in our free dom but in the lives of our chil dren and grandchildren, said Brown. In a city like Jacksonville, where nearly a quarter of the population is tied to the mili tary, we understand this unlike anywhere else and we honor those men and women not just today, but every day. During the ceremony, each military branch dedicated a wreath to those who gave their lives from their respective organizations, followed by a 21-gun salute and the playing of taps. Its nice to be invited and that theyre honoring my hus Jacksonville honors fallen heroes

PAGE 2

2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS May 30 1814 Navy gunboats cap ture three British boats on Lake Ontario near Sandy Creek, N.Y. May 31 1900 Sailors and Marines from USS Newark and USS Oregon arrive at Peking, China with other Sailors and Marines from Britain, France, Russia, Italy and Japan to protect U.S. and foreign diplomatic lega tions from the Boxers. 1919 The Navy NC-4 transatlantic mission ends at Plymouth, England. 1944 USS England (DE-635) sank a record sixth Japanese submarine in 13 days. June 1 1813 HMS Shannon cap tures USS Chesapeake. As Capt. James Lawrence was car ried below, he ordered, Tell the men to fire faster! Dont give up the ship! These words would live on in naval history. Oliver Hazard Perry honored his dead friend Lawrence when he had the motto sewn onto his private battle flag flown during the Battle of Lake Erie. 1871 Rear Adm. Rodgers lands in Korea with a party of Sailors and Marines and cap tures five forts to secure pro tection for U.S. citizens after Americans were fired upon and murdered. 1914 General Order 99 pro hibits alcohol on board naval vessels, at navy yards or at naval stations. 1915 First contract for Navy lighter-than-air aircraft. 1939 Director of the Naval Research Laboratory, Capt. Hollis Cooley, proposes research in atomic energy for future use in nuclear powered submarine. 1944 ZP-14 airships com plete first crossing of Atlantic by non-rigid lighter-than-air aircraft. 1954 First test of steam cat apult on board USS Hancock (CV-19). June 2 1861 USS Perry cap tures Confederate privateer Savannah. 1941 First aircraft escort vessel, USS Long Island (ACG1), commissioned, then reclas sified as an auxiliary aircraft carrier (AVC-1) and finally reclassified in 1943 as an escort carrier (CVE-1). June 3 1785 Order to sell last ship remaining in Continental Navy, frigate Alliance No other Navy ships were autho rized until 1794. 1898 Collier Merrimac sunk in channel leading to Santiago, Cuba in unsuccessful attempt to trap Spanish fleet. The crew was captured and later received the Medal of Honor. 1949 Wesley Brown becomes the first AfricanAmerican to graduate from the U.S. Naval Academy. 1966 Launch of Gemini 9, piloted by Lt. Cmdr. Eugene Cernan. The mission includ ed 45 orbits over three days. Recovery was by USS Wasp (CVS-18). June 4 1934 USS Ranger (CV-4), first ship designed from the keel up as a carrier, is commis sioned at Norfolk, Va. 1942 Battle of Midway (June 4-6) begins. During battle, the four Japanese carriers that attacked Pearl Harbor were sunk. This decisive U.S. victory is a turning point in the Pacific war. 1944 Hunter-killer group USS Guadalcanal (CVE-60) captures German submarine, U-505. June 5 1794 First officers of the U.S. Navy under the United States Constitution are appointed. The first six captains appointed to superintend the construc tion of new ships were John Barry, Samuel Nicholson, Silas Talbot, Joshua Barney, Richard Dale and Thomas Truxtun. 1917 The first military unit is sent to Europe, the Naval Aeronautical Detachment, reaches France on board the collier USS Jupiter (AC-3). In 1920, Jupiter was converted and commissioned as USS Langley (CV-1), the Navys first aircraft carrier. 1945 Typhoon off Okinawa damages many U.S. Navy ships. Hey, MoneyChic! I am thinking about hurricane season and want to know what I should do to prepare financially for the storms to come. Any advice? MoneyChic sez: Hurricane season is fast approaching and having a plan is a great idea. A question to ask yourself to start your hurri cane preparation is will you stay or will you go? If you stay, there are a number of essentials you should plan to purchase ahead of time so you are not fighting the crowd to clear the local grocery store shelves. Purchasing ahead of time also allows you to spread the cost over a few months so it is not depleting your bank account in one month. These essentials include: Bottled water (it is recommended 3 gallons per person) paper goods (plates, toilet paper, wet wipes) baby items if children are in your household pet supplies if there are animals in your household all of your important documents preferably sealed in a waterproof container (bank account information, social security cards, birth certificates, etc.) flashlights or battery operated lights batteries cash non-perishable food medications (stock up on refills now) and medical supplies a working cell phone and car charger first aid kit gas can filled with gas and a full tank of gas in the car full propane tank if you own a grill to have a way to prepare food if electricity is out If you leave, it is still a good idea to pack a few essentials. Besides packing clothes and personal items for family members, including pets, it is important to have all of your paper documents with you for safekeeping. The financial cost of leaving the area for a storm will be greater than staying. The main expenses would be gas and hotel costs. Think about where relatives live and if it would be more cost effec tive to drive there. No one can predict how long you will need to stay away if a storm makes landfall and damages the area. Locate military bases around the area and utilize their hotels if possible. Another key item to think about when traveling with a pet is which hotel will accept a pet with no additional fee. If you are on the road and need assistance, remember any military aid society or the American Red Cross can help. It is always a good idea to keep cash on hand when a storm is pre dicted to hit. You never know when the electricity may go out and backup generators in stores stop working. Would you have the cash to make an essential purchase? Start saving now to be able to supply your family with the items that will keep them safe or help them be safe while evacuating. The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society can help you plan for emer gencies. Stop by the office outside the Yorktown Gate or call 5422832. Have questions for Hey, MoneyChic? Drop me an e-mail at megan. stolle@nmcrs.org There is no better place to understand the true meaning of Memorial Day than at Arlington National Cemeterys Tomb of the Unknowns. This is one of the few places in America where Memorial Day does not automatically equal barbecue and pic nics, or worse, mattress sale. The boys and I were able to visit Arlington National Cemetery in April while Dustin was working at the Pentagon. (As an aside, there are spectacular views of the Pentagon and the rest of Washington, D.C., from the cem etery.) I was a little nervous about bringing my youngest, Lindell, because he is seldom quiet or appropriate. But no one not even a spotlight-loving 6-year-old can help but feel the solemnity of the rolling green fields dotted with white headstones. They are per fectly spaced in neat rows that seem to ride on the hills like a wave. For one of the first times in Lindells life, he was speechless. Ive been a military dependent since the day I was born, but this was my first time to see Arlington National Cemetery, too. Like Lindell, I was moved to silence. Because the cemetery is a major tourist destination, there are parts of the grounds that feel like most other attractions: peo ple enter and exit beside the gift shop, lines form for well-timed trams that move visi tors across the 624-acre cemetery, and a tour guide relays facts and information through an intercom on the tram. Yet once you get past these necessary trappings, which keep nearly 4 million yearly visitors mov ing through the grounds in an orderly fash ion, there is silence. And even farther away still, tucked between some of the 8,000 trees many of which, according to the cem eterys Web site, are more than 200 years old there is the Tomb of the Unknowns. Here, there is near total silence. The Tomb of the Unknowns, a white mar ble sarcophagus, is on a hill that overlooks most of the cemetery and Washington, D.C. Engraved in the marble is: Here rests in honored glory an American soldier known but to God. Directly beneath the sarcopha gus lies the remains of an unidentified sol dier from WWI who was buried there in 1921. Later, the remains of unidentified soldiers from WWII and the Korean and Vietnam wars were laid to rest at the Tomb as well. Every day of the year, no matter the weath er (yes, even during hurricanes), and for all hours of the day, a sentinel from Company E of the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment guards the tomb. Despite this regiment already being prestigious (they escort the president), only a select few can volunteer for and be accepted as a Tomb Guard. The sentinel must: inches tall condition Arlington National Cemetery history veterans graves exam of facts Since 1958, only 400 individuals have been awarded the Tomb Guard badge. If you go to see the Changing of the Guards at the Tomb of the Unknowns, you will see at least three of these soldiers. In a hushed ceremony where you can hear a pin drop (even with a six-year-old by your side), one sentinel is relieved by another while a relief command er oversees them. The ceremony is precise, yet fluid. Once the new sentinel is in position, he begins his watch. This includes walking in an exact, 90 steps-per-minute cadence, marching 21 steps behind the Tomb, turn ing, facing east for 21 seconds, turning, fac ing north for 21 seconds, and then walking 21 steps to the other side. For decades, this same path has been walked every hour of the day and night on a quiet hill in Arlington National Cemetery overlooking our capi tol. The cement in front of the Tomb even has worn places where each careful step has been taken never too far to one side or the other, but always in the exact step of the sen tinel before. Much like Memorial Days that are clut tered with sales and barbecues, Arlington National Cemetery is increasingly encroached upon by a modern, capitalistic world filled with gift shops, trinkets and a me attitude. But on that hill, no matter the weather or the time of day (even as you read this), someone is watching over the Tomb of the Unknowns. They are walking 21 steps, turn ing, waiting, turning again and walking another 21 steps. They havent forgotten. They never will. Every day is Memorial Day for them.The Tomb of the Unknowns

PAGE 3

As the weather gets warmer and the citizens of Jacksonville get ready for summer, the ser vice members and families of VP-26 are hard at work prepar ing to deploy to Kadena and Misawa Air bases in Japan to conduct multi-mission opera tions in the Pacific Command area of responsibility (PACOM AOR). As their Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle (IDRC) comes to a close, every member of Team Trident is dedicated to supporting Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mark Sohaneys assumption of Commander, Task Group 72.2/72.4 and to ensure seamless turn overs with both VP-45s Commanding Officer, Cmdr. John Brabazon and VP-10s Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Charles Stickney, who will be bringing their squadrons back to NAS Jacksonville. Whether hard at work around the han gar or spending time with families on pre-overseas move ment (POM) leave, no minute is wasted. Recently Team Trident con ducted their operational readi ness evaluation (ORE), a cul mination of the IDRC, which tested the squadrons ability to execute its mission on deploy ment. ORE is conducted in four phases: (1) Written and verbal examinations of enlisted and officer aircrew members; (2) A flight phase of at least one tac tical mission per crew, evaluat ing tactical proficiency; (3) A weapon systems trainer phase for each crew; and (4) the con ventional weapons techni cal proficiency inspection (CWTPI), wherein ordnance teams display their ability to load sonobuoys and weapons safely. Team Trident passed with flying colors. Completion of ORE did not signal a time of rest for Team Trident, however. Until the squadron leaves for the PACOM AOR in late May, a steady oper ational pace is required in order to optimize the squad rons combat readiness as well as to integrate reserve air crews and maintenance per sonnel from other squadrons, including VP-62, the reserve unit from CPRW-11 at NAS Jacksonville, as well as active duty aircrews from VP-1 and reserve aircrews from VP-69 based out of CPRW-10 at NAS Whidbey Island, Wash. Team Trident families are preparing as well. In order to ensure home front readi ness, personnel have attended deployment preparation meet ings and are currently taking their POM leave. The VP-26 Ombudsmen and Family Readiness Group in conjunc tion with the NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center, Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, TRICARE health services, and Morale, Welfare and Recreation provided a squadron-wide pre-deploy ment informational brief at Deweys in April. This combined effort focuses on ensuring squadron mem bers and families receive the support they need before, dur ing and even upon return from deployment. As the Team Tridents time at home grows short, the oppor tunity to showcase their abili ties, execute the mission and represent the United States throughout the Asia Pacific grows near. VP-26 is ready, excited and proud to cash in on the huge investments of time and hard work while operating across the PACOM AOR during this deployment.VP-26 preparing for deployment to Japan In a May 24 change of command ceremo ny, Capt. Duke Heinz relieved Capt. Kevin Head as the command ing officer (CO) of the Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP) Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville. The event took place aboard NAS Jacksonville with more than 100 guests in attendance. Twenty musicians from Navy Band Southeast pro vided music throughout the time-honored cer emony. Following the invoca tion by NAS Jacksonville Command Chaplain (Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore, keynote speak er, Rear Adm. Jonathan Yuen, commander of NAVSUP Global Logistics Support, highlighted FLC Jacksonvilles achieve ments under Capt. Heads command. Head, a U.S. Naval Academy graduate who took the helm of NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville in November 2011, had tri umphed in leading some of the commands most monumental accom plishments in the past 18 months. In particular, Yuen praised FLC Jacksonvilles opera tional flexibility in sup porting the warfighter through the strengthen ing of relationships with the Fleet, Allied and Joint Logistics partners, and other leading com mands in the area includ ing: Commander U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command; Commander 4th Fleet; Commander Navy Region Southeast; and Fleet Readiness Center Southeast. Capt. Heads team awarded nearly 22,000 contracting actions dur ing Fiscal Year 2012 alone and provided direct con tracting support to the leading commands in the area which includes mul tiple aviation squadrons, ships, and submarines, said Yuen. Capt. Head is bound for San Diego, where he will be chief of staff for NAVSUP GLS. As NAVSUP FLC Jackson-villes new CO, Capt. Heinz will lead over 900 military, civilian and contractor personnel pro viding premier regional logistics support to 17 sites, 49 fleet units, and two industrial activities in seven Southeastern states and the Caribbean. FLC Jacksonville has a rich heritage of strong leadership, outstanding teamwork and outstand ing customer support, said Heinz. I am extremely hon ored and excited for the opportunity to lead this absolutely superb team of professionals. Heinz comes to NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville from Philadelphia, Pa., where he was director of aviation operations at NAVSUP Weapons Systems Support. Throughout his career, he has served in key lead ership positions. At sea, Heinz served as sup ply officer aboard USS Bergall (SSN 667). He also served as S-1, S-6, and readiness officer on USS Enterprise (CVN 65) during Operation Desert Fox. Most recently, he was supply officer on board USS Nimitz (CVN 68), deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Ashore, Heinz was assigned to NAS Lemoore, Calif.; the U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Team Blue Angels; Naval Supply Systems Command; Office of Personnel, Millington, Tenn.; NAVSUP Weapons System Support, Philadelphia, Pa.; and to the staff of Chief of Naval Operations, Programming Division (N80). NAVSUP Global Logistics Support, pro vides operational logis tics, business and support services to the fleet, shore and industrial commands of the Navy, Coast Guard, Military Sealift com mand, and other Joint Allied Forces. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville holds change of command JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013 3

PAGE 4

4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013 Auxiliary Security Force academy students endure four weeks of trainingNumerous Sailors from NAS Jacksonville volun teered and were selected by their tenant commands to complete training in the Auxiliary Security Force (ASF) academy, a four-week course held during the month of May, at the NAS Jax Police Department designed to shape them into an efficient security force for the base. The Sailors were exposed to specialized train ing, with each week bringing new challenges. Week one consisted of both classroom and field exercises, with subjects such as use of deadly force, operation al risk management, the Uniform Code of Military Justice, and base-specific instructions being covered. Subsequent weeks involved a wide array of training ranging from weapons familiarization, the use of Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) or pepper spray, special ized close quarters combat referred to as mechanical advantage control hold (MACH) takedowns, vehicle inspections and tactical team movements. We cover a huge range of subjects for these Sailors in a short time, and this training is highly special ized, explained Maj. Jerry Syrek, training officer with the NAS Jax Police Department. When people see these Sailors they tend think that they just guard the gate, but its so much more than that. To get qualified for ASF, they have to endure some pretty rough train ing and show an ability to think through a potentially dangerous situation while utilizing all their resources in a responsible manner. Syrek acknowledged the rigors of the training, and made sure to expose the students to situations that fully tested their decision-making skills. This was most evident when the ASF students engaged in tac tical team movements during their last week, being subjected to a simulated exercise at the Navy Gateway Inn and Suites that involved active shooters, clearing rooms of the building, and coordinating their com munication skills. With the short amount of time we have to train these Sailors, it is imperative that we expose them to many different types of scenarios they could encoun ter. If a dangerous situation develops that securi ty needs to be there for, I want to make sure that I can rely on every Sailor who passes through the ASF Academy to use their training effectively, Syrek remarked. The Sailors themselves were excited for the train ing and being able to serve the base. AS3 Michael Williams of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast stated, I volunteered to join the ASF course not only because I wanted to learn something new, but because its very important that our base is fully secure at all times. So many bad things have happened at various bases around the country, and the better we can be at deal ing with potential threats, the more confidence I will have that NAS Jax will be fully equipped to complete its missions. So the next time you pass through the gate of NAS Jax, remember that those gate guards are ASF Sailors who are highly trained and fully equipped to protect you from a wide array of threats.

PAGE 5

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013 5

PAGE 6

DLA Information Operations improves infrastructure in JacksonvilleAs part of Defense Logistics Agency Aviations goals to improve support and productiv ity for industrial customers, DLA Information Operations continues to improve the computer infrastructure used by DLA Aviation employees in Jacksonville. DLA Aviation Commander Brig. Gen. Mark Johnson traveled to Jacksonville April 16 to rec ognize and meet with DLA employees, interface with Navy senior leaders, and learn firsthand about proactive improvements being made prior to Inventory Management and Stock Positioning Spiral 2 software implementation in the first quar ter of fiscal 2014. We have been working on the transition since January and as of April have moved roughly 90 percent of DLA Aviation employees to the DLA network, said Daniel Hudson, who works in New Cumberland, Pa., as the DLA Information Operations project manager for the Navy Marine Corps Intranet to DLA network transition. There are approximately 140 end users at DLA Aviation in Jacksonville, made up of government and contractor personnel. Hudson said the tran sition has been going on since 2008, but recent changes will result in greater productivity by allowing employees access to many systems from one desktop computer, freeing them from the need to have two computers on their desktops and minimizing the number of computers we have to maintain by creating shared work areas to access Navy specific software they need. Navy employees at Jacksonville transitioned as is where is to DLA Aviation when Base Realignment and Closure 2005 was implemented in 2008. Since that time, most users have been primarily operating computers hooked up to Navy Marine Corps Intranet for daily workload, links to Office of Personnel Management, other gov ernment websites, and email. DLA computers were primarily used for research activities in DLA Enterprise Business Systems, human resources, and training applications. Today, almost every DLA Aviation user in Jacksonville has been fully transitioned to the DLA network. The final step of migrat ing data and reports from shared Navy net work drives to DLA shared drives took place the week of May 6, according to Nora Zulich, chief, Planning and Support Division and IMSP Spiral 2 Implementation Team co-lead in Jacksonville. DLA Aviation employees still need access to some Navy systems, like the Navys Uniform Automated Data Processing System II and Hazardous Material Management Systems, which arent available on the DLA network. We have moved those computers strictly on the Navy intranet off Aviation employees desktops and placed them in strategically placed kiosks for shared use, said Hudson. While the computer hardware infrastructure is being improved, DLA Aviations Business Process Support Directorate is ensuring employees have the latest, most up-to-date training in DLAs Enterprise Business Systems to prepare or in some cases refresh employees on the agencys business systems, as well as changes to the Navys applica tions used by DLA employees. The entire work force has so far been trained in Enterprise Business Systems Basic Navigation (January 2013) and Windows 7 (April 2013). Upcoming training by job role will be conducted for users needing access to Naval Air Systems Command Depot Maintenance Systems and DLAs EBS and Distribution Standard System applica tions. DLA Information Operations is making similar improvements for operations at DLA Aviations industrial support activities in San Diego and Cherry Point while employees there prepare for their scheduled implementation of IMSP Spiral 2 June 3 and during the second quarter of fiscal 2014, respectively. 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013

PAGE 7

The Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) instructed 55 students from 17 countries as part of the fifth annual Certificate in Emerging Infectious Disease Research (CEIDR) program hosted by the University of Florida, Emerging Pathogens Institute, May 20-24. The primary aim of this certificate program is to offer world-class graduate educa tion and training to interna tional public health profession als sponsored by organizations such as Department of Defense (DoD) Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response Systems, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, United States Department of State, United States Agency for International Development, and the Fogarty International Center. Training includes lectures, tutorials, field experiences, lab oratory exercises, public health demonstrations, and written examinations, with the goal of introducing students to the many facets of studying emerg ing infectious diseases, said Dr. Gregory Gray, professor at University of Florida. In addition to the knowl edge individual students gain, the Certificate will increase the professional capacities of their organizations and often improve their organizations international relationships. NECE sent 11 military and civilian personnel to lecture on topics covering tick and mos quito biology, surveillance and control, all of which are critical in ensuring war-fighter readi ness. One of the best aspects of this course is we get to bring our equipment and provide critical hands on training, said Lt. James Harwood, NECE entomologist. It is extremely rewarding knowing that not only are we teaching public health pro fessionals but the training we provided will have a global impact. NECEs involvement in the program is an example of the centers success through numerous collaborations formed with, state, federal, industry and academic organi zations. Being responsive to our cus tomers, reducing their risk of exposure to insect-borne dis ease, is our focus, said Cmdr. Eric Hoffman NECE officer-incharge. To be successful, we must take advantage of every oppor tunity to engage international public health partners, devel oping lasting and productive professional relationships. The University of Floridas Certificate program affords us such an opportunity, allowing our staff to learn more about disease treatments and control challenges while building part ner capacity through training, added Hoffman. More information on the UF Certificate in Emerging Infectious Disease Research Program can be found at their Web site: http://egh.phhp.ufl. edu/certificate/. NECE trains public health professionals from around the globe The NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club is sponsoring two $1,000 scholar ships based on scholarship merit and community service. Eligibility: U.S. Navy active/reserve duty and active/reserve duty depen dents who are currently in their senior year of high school or a high school graduate, attached to NAS Jacksonville and planning to attend an accredited college in the fall of 2013 or spring of 2014. To request the scholarship applica tion, visit https://www.fcef.com/ Application deadline is June 15. You may submit the application by mail to: NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club, 4109 Eagle Landing Pkwy, Orange Park, FL 32065.Neither the NAS Jacksonville, U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal govern ment officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services.$1,000 college scholarship opportunity JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013 7

PAGE 8

accompanied by two other unmanned systems the MQ-8B/C Fire Scout and the X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System mark a new chapter in naval aviation. The MQ-4C Triton UAS will be based at five loca tions around the globe. Triton operators will dissemi nate data in real-time to fleet units to support surface warfare, intelligence operations, strike warfare and search and rescue. Our goal is to mature the Triton UAS before sup porting the Navys maritime ISR mission, said Capt. Jim Hoke, program manager for the Persistent Maritime UAS office (PMA-262), which oversees the Triton program. The data we collect the next few years is essential to certify the system for operational use. Flight tests will continue in California for the next several months before the team transitions the air craft to Patuxent River in the fall. The first of two Triton command centers is under construction at NAS Jacksonville, where the Navy will stand up Unmanned Patrol Squadron (VUP) 19 on Oct. 1, 2013. VUP-19 willfall under the administrative control ofCommander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 11 and initially operate theTriton UAS on reconnaissance missions in the 5th, 6th and 7th fleets, as well as U.S. Fleet Forces Command Atlantic Operations. In 2014, the Navy willactivateanother Triton squadron, VUP-11,at NAS Whidbey Island, Wash. to assume operations in the Pacific. TRITON HURRICANEWeve had several other close calls since then Tropical Storm Floyd in 1999 which triggered major evacua tions from the area and Tropical Storm Fay in 2008 which hit Florida four times and spawned numerous tornadoes, Edmond stated. So its not a question of if we will be hit, its more when we will be hit. Edmond also discussed the five dif ferent COR levels. We will stay in COR Five throughout hurricane season. Each COR level requires commands to conduct specific preparation tasking based on the intensity of the storm and where it is predicted to make landfall, Edmond stated. We may also issue an evacuation order or go to essential or critical personnel only. This is where that family preparation comes into play make sure your family is taken care of. Keep in mind that when we set CORs, everyone outside the base is working on their emergency plans as well and it will be traffic nightmare if many areas of the state are evacuated. In the event of a base evacuation, only specific critical personnel would be authorized to stay aboard the station. These include personnel such as fire fighters, security personnel and public works representatives. Once the storm passes, they will assess the damage and determine when essential and nonessential personnel can return. This can take weeks or even months depend ing on the damage. Military members and civil service employees are also reminded to ensure their data is current in the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System (NFAAS). This is the system the Navy uses in case of disasters to muster its personnel all over the world. It will dis play information regarding the specific disaster area and personnel can access it from any computer to muster, said Edmond. Everyone should also have a fam ily plan in place. This includes have a specific meeting place in case you are separated one near the home and one outside the neighborhood if you cant return home. And, have an outof-state contact someone everyone in the family knows and knows how to contact. Families should also have an evacuation plan and know what to take and where to go. A plan should also be made for family pets. If you plan to ride the storm out at home, make sure you have a disaster survival kit. The key to hurricane season is being prepared. It doesnt take long to check your supplies and replenish what you need. And, there is nothing I can stress more than to check your insurance pol icy. Its better to make changes ahead of time, than find out after a disaster that you didnt have enough coverage, con cluded Edmond. The following cases were recently heard during courts-martial in Navy Region Southeast: NAS Pensacola, a hospitalman was found guilty of assault and driving under the influence. The mili tary judge sentenced the accused to 446 days con finement, reduction in rate to E-1, and a bad conduct discharge. Mayport, a Fireman was found guilty of larceny. The military judge sentenced the accused to five months confinement, reduction in rate to E-1, and a bad con duct discharge. Jacksonville, an airman was found guilty of unau thorized absence and wrongfully using oxycodone, a Scheduled II controlled substance. The military judge sentenced the accused to 94 days confine ment, reduction in rate to E-1, and a bad conduct discharge. Jacksonville, a first class petty officer was found guilty of fraternization and living with a married woman who was not his wife. The military judge sentenced the accused to 45 days hard labor without confinement, 45 days restriction, reduction in rate to E-4, forfeiture of $1,000 pay per month for two months, and a reprimand. Jacksonville, a corporal was found not guilty of com mitting indecent conduct. Jacksonville, a first class petty officer was found guilty of committing indecent conduct. The military judge sentenced the accused to 110 days confine ment, reduction in rate to E-3, and a bad conduct discharge. Jacksonville, a first class petty officer was found guilty of false official statement, larceny, and know ingly executing a scheme to obtain moneys owned by or under the custody or control of a financial institution. The military judge sentenced the accused to 60 days confinement and reduction in rate to E-5. Jacksonville, a third class petty officer was found guilty of false official statement, wrongfully using amphetamines, wrongfully possessing amphet amines and methadone, a Schedule II controlled substance, and larceny. The military judge sen tenced the accused to one-year confinement, forfei ture of $1,010 pay per month for 10 months, reduc tion in rate to E-1, and a bad conduct discharge. Courts-martial in Navy Region Southeast are tried with few exceptions at NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport, and NAS Pensacola. Therefore, the loca tion of where a court-martial described above was convened does not necessarily correlate to the com mand that convened the court-martial. Adjudged sentences may be modified by pre-trial agreement or clemency. As VP-5 transitions to the P-8A Poseidon the squadron is high lighting a transitioning Mad Fox each week. This weeks spotlight shines on Lt. j.g. Jason Cromwell. Cromwell is from Chesapeake, Va. He attended Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech) where he received a Bachelor of Science in Biology. He earned his com mission through the Navy Reserve Officer Training Corps and was part of Virginia Techs Prestigious Corps of Cadets. Cromwell is currently one of the newest naval flight officers (NFO) at VP-5. VP-5 NFOs have been transition ing since the beginning of February through a series of interactive courseware, tabletop device sessions, and partial task trainers. Each training event is designed to incorpo rate VP-30s philosophy of crawl, walk, run training in regards to the P-8A transition and provides NFOs multiple software interaction opportunities. Recently, NFOs returned to their crews of acoustic and electronic warfare operators for the WTT simulator phase. These simulators offer crews an opportunity to work together, as they will on the plane, facing real world scenarios. On tactical P-8A flights two NFOs are part of the crew. Cromwell is the junior NFO known as the cotactical coordinator. His responsibilities involve communicating on any of the eight radios aboard the aircraft and managing tactical infor mation sent out from the aircraft over either the LINK-11 or LINK-16 network. While transi tioning he has also been studying to upgrade to the senior NFO position on the aircraft of tactical coordinator (TACCO). The TACCO manages the tactical aspects of the mission including sono buoy deployment for submarine prosecution, search patterns during surface warfare, or intel ligence collection tactics. On the P-8A all the tactical operators sit next to one another on a rail, Cromwell explained. This is different than the P-3C and allows us to much more easily devel op the tactical picture among one another. When Cromwell isnt working hard to learn the new P-8A Poseidon he enjoys playing bas ketball, riding his motor cycle, working out, and spending time with his German Shepherd Achilles. VP-5 transition spotlight 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013

PAGE 9

band, said Jazmin Oliver, whose husband, MA3 Johnny Oliver was killed less than a month ago in Bahrain. Its unfortunate that I have to be here for this reason, but its for great support. Also in attendance, was American Idol finalist and Jacksonville native, Phil Stacey, who sang the national anthem and other treasured American selections with Navy Band Southeast. Wreaths were placed in front of the wall for of the two new names etched on the black granite wall. Those names included: Army Sgt. Derek Smith and USMC 2nd Lt. Kim Weller (Vietnam Era). Jacksonville National Cemetery A short ceremony was held at Jacksonville National Cemetery, located north of the city, to pay tribute to veterans who served our nation. U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, civilian and mili tary officials listened to keynote speaker Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet, who spoke of how deserv ing Jacksonvilles military families are of a national cemetery for their loved ones to be laid to rest with honor. Unlike other holidays, Memorial Day brings Americans together to honor those who have given their last full measure of devotion to our country, said NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Roy Undersander at the cemeterys Memorial Day observance. I want to pay my respect and honor to those who have done their duty courageously, who have val iantly served our country and paid the ultimate sacrifice. Green Cove Springs Hundreds of military veterans, citizens and civic leaders observed Memorial Day at Historic Spring Park in Green Cove Springs May 27 as part of the 25th River Fest cel ebration. Green Cove Springs Mayor Mitch Timberlake said, Its always a somber honor to recognize our fallen service members, as well as to salute local veterans of our armed forces. When you hear the stories of these men and women, a humble thank-you for their effort in protecting our freedoms just doesnt seem to be enough. Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Rob Caldwell, said it was good to see so many people show support for those who made the ultimate sac rifice. Today we pay tribute to the men and women who gave their lives to defend our nation, said Caldwell. We honor Americans from every generation who shed their blood in the fight for freedom from Valley Forge to Vietnam, from Kuwait to Kandahar, from Berlin to Baghdad. NAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM) Brad Shepherd added, On Memorial Day it is our duty and privilege to reflect on the sac rifices that have been paid for our freedom. But liberty must be earned and each generation must pay its dues. So, let us remember the free dom and peace thats been paid for by American blood. And then, let us pass along to a new generation, their fascinating accounts of honor and courage, he said. Veterans from each military service, the Coast Guard and Merchant Marine, were called from the crowd to receive an American flag, as well as robust applause from those in attendance. MEMORIAL DAY JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013 9

PAGE 10

Navy Region Southeast completed participation in the annual hurricane preparedness exercise HURREX/Citadel Gale 2013 on May 23. The U.S. Fleet Forces Command/Commander, Navy Installations Command exercise tested the regions abil ity to track, prepare for and respond to hurri canes should they threat en installations in the Southeast. In the Southeast Region, its not a mat ter of if a hurricane will strike, its a matter of when and where, said Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast. Since last years HURREX, we have had five named storms impact our region, so it is imperative that we train so we are ready when they strike. Each year, this exer cise gives us an excellent opportunity to test our skills through authentic, challenging scenarios that go a long way to ensure we are ready in the event of an actual hurricane, Scorby added. A number of major storms have affected installations throughout the region in recent years. Anyone on board Joint Reserve Base New Orleans in 2005 would remember the damage caused by Katrina. More recently, Hurricane Sandy made landfall just west of NS Guantanamo Bay, Cuba last year before moving toward the northeast. During this years HURREX scenario, the NRSE Crisis Action Team (CAT) tracked two ficti tious hurricanes, Kirk and Lay, from the Regional Operations Center at NAS Jacksonville. Kirk crossed over NS Guantanamo Bay and eventually made landfall as a category two hurricane near the Georgia-South Carolina border, and Lay made landfall as a category four hurricane near NAS Pensacola. The CAT consists of nearly 50 personnel, each with specific roles ranging from planning and logis tics to family support ser vices. In addition to the CAT, the region also deploys a Contingency Engineering Response Team (CERT)/ Damage Assessment Team (DAT), led by Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast, which assesses dam age after the storm, as well as an Emergency Family Assistance Center, which provides support to families. Throughout HURREX, these teams coordinated their efforts with local authorities and civilian agencies as they would in the event of a real hurricane. HURREX is essen tial training, said Scott Crossley, NRSE regional emergency manager. We get lots of tropi cal storms, but as often as we get landfall, we still see far too many casual ties from people forget ting some of the lessons weve learned in the past. Weve learned that too many injuries occur, even with lesser storms, after the storm has passed because people are trying to drive through flooded roads or trying to repair storm damage. By doing these exercises, it helps reinforce the message that this is a real hazard. During an actual storm, NRSE personnel coordi nate with Fleet Weather Center Norfolk to track potential hurricanes and tropical storms from the beginning stages of the weather system. We have a very good working relationship with the Fleet Weather Center, Crossley said. We watch tropical weather year round, but as we approach the hurricane season, we really start watching closely. The public will start seeing hurricane alerts and warnings from the National Hurricane Center once a tropical storm is established, but for us, we have to see it as soon as it happens so we can get moving. A storm can pop up with little notice. The Navy classi fies storms in terms of Conditions of Readiness (COR), which indicate the proximity of a storm and the likelihood that it will hit a given installation. At the beginning of the hurricane season, each installation is set to COR five. As storms approach, that condition will change at an installation based on when destructive winds are projected to hit. Installations set COR four when onset of destruc tive force winds is within 72 hours, COR three at 48 hours, COR two at 24 hours and COR one at 12 hours. Once a storm is project ed to make landfall at an installation, the decision must be made to evacuate or shelter in place. That decision is made based on a number of factors relat ed to the intensity of the storm, Crossley said. We look at things like the maximum forecasted wind. Thats the initial criteria to estimate what the impact will be on peo ple and missions, he said. But the thing we are most concerned about, espe cially for coastal installa tions, is storm surge and water. According to Crossley, it is essential for both per sonnel and dependents to be aware of advisories and instructions as a storm approaches. One of the objectives of HURREX for the installa tions is to ensure that not only the Sailors, but all of the residents on an instal lation are plugged into the hurricane process, he said. That means being aware of how to muster if evacuated, which varies from command to com mand. Also, making sure you have the correct num ber to call. In addition, installa tions will also communi cate through their com mand web pages and social media, so residents can look to these sources for the latest information, Crossley said. Once a storm passes, the CAT shifts its focus to providing whatever kind of support is needed to get the installation running at full capacity based on reports from the CERT and DAT. The first step is a health and welfare check to make sure that every one is safe and accounted for, Crossley said. Step two is initial dam age assessment of the installation. We need to ensure we have main tained command and control capability and find out if the installation utilities are still function ing or if they are affected to some degree. We try to start with mission-critical facilities, utilities and fleet support requirements and we go on from there. According to Crossley, one of the most impor tant things for people to keep in mind about the hurricane process is to be prepared for a storm well before it even happens. Some important prepa rations include ensuring important documents are in a safe location, mak ing sure family members have contact information in case of an evacuation, making sure prescription medications are read ily available, and ensur ing that any special need family members can be properly taken care of, Crossley said. We absolutely need to be ready, Crossley said. Its not a matter of if one of our installations is going to be affected; its a matter of when. For more informa tion, visit https://www. cnic.navy.mil/cnrse/ RegionOperationsand Services/Operationsand Management/Emergency Management/index.htm. Navy Region Southeast prepares for hurricane season Cmdr. William Pennington relieved Cmdr. Molly Boron as commanding officer of VP-16 May 23 in Hangar 117 at NAS Jacksonville. Capt. Heidi Fleming, executive officer of Naval Air Station Patuxent River, was the guest speaker. A native of Dallas, Texas, Pennington graduat ed from the United States Naval Academy in 1996 with a Bachelor of Science in Weapons and Systems Engineering. He wasawarded his naval aviator wings ofgold in July 1998 and has completed flying tours at NAF Washington D.C., VP-4 in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville and VP-40 at NAS Whidbey Island, Wash. Additional tours include assignment to Commander, U.S. 7th Fleet staff on board USS Blue Ridge (LCC-19), home ported in Yokosuka, Japan, Naval Personnel Command, and as deputy executive assistant to the Director, Air Warfare (OPNAV N88) on the Chief of Naval Operations Staff at the Pentagon. He assumed executive officer duties at VP-16 in May 2012. He commended the War Eagles former command ing officer. I want to congratulate skipper Boron on an impressive tour leading the War Eagle team. Her unmatched commitment to her Sailors and aircrew elevated her command to new heights as she success fully led them through the historic transition to the P-8A, said Pennington. Boron took control of the War Eagles in 2012 as they were finishing their last deployment at Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. The War Eagles are the first operational Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Squadron to transition from the P-3C Orion to the P-8A Poseidon. Borons infectious confidence and superb leadership steered the War Eagles through the rigorous transition syllabus and helped overcome unforeseen obstacles encountered in bringing a new type model online. Her guidance and direction result ed in the squadron receiving outstand ing marks during their safe for flight inspection earlier this year. During the ceremo ny, Boron imparted some words of wisdom and encouragement to her former squadron. President Roosevelt made famous an old African proverb Speak softly and carry a big stick. You will go far, stated Boron. As VP-16 pre pares to take the P-8 on deployment at the end of the year, I see them continuing to be the quiet profes sionals, dutifully learning their trades, honing new skills and capabilities. When those six Poseidons and 12 combat air crews head west, their warfighter skills and hidden power projection will become Americas big stick in the Pacific. Boron joined the War Eagle leadership team in April 2011, serving first as executive officer. She is transfer ring to PMA-290 in Patuxent River, Md. Pennington assumes command of VP-16 in the midst of a 12-month inter-deployment readiness cycle preparing to lead the squadron on the first P-8A oper ational deployment to Kadena Air Base. He is joined by new executive officer Cmdr. Daniel Papp. VP-16 War Eagles change command 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013

PAGE 11

The Japanese Midway attack force was divided three ways. First, the aircraft carriers would approach from the northwest and knock out the islands defenses. Coming in from the west and southwest, the Japanese 2nd Fleet would invade and capture Midway. Admiral Yamamotos battleships would remain 300 miles to the west, awaiting the U. S. Pacific Fleet. Thanks to the work of American code breakers, the United States knew Yamamotos plans in detail by the middle of May his target, his order of battle and his schedule. When the battle opened, the U.S. had three carriers waiting in ambush, 200 miles to the east of Midway. The two opposing fleets sent out search planes the Americans to locate an enemy they knew was there and the Japanese as a matter of ordinary prudence. Seaplanes from Midway also were looking for the expected enemy fleet. One of the planes spotted the Japanese carrier force at 5:30 a.m. on June 4. The plane also reported Japanese aircraft heading for the atoll. Marine Corps planes from Midway soon intercepted the enemy formation. However, the Marines were hopelessly outnum bered and their planes were no match for the Japanese Zero fighter planes. They were able to shoot down only a few of the enemy bombers, while suffering great losses themselves. The torpedo boats and anti-aircraft fire from Midways guns were somewhat more successful in disrupting the Japanese attack. A force of 108 Japanese planes hit Midways two islands at 6:30 a.m. Twenty minutes of bombing and machine-gun fire knocked out some facilities on Eastern Island, but did not disable the airfield there. Sand Islands oil tanks, seaplane hangar and other buildings were set afire. The commander of the Japanese attack radioed that another air strike was required to soften up Midways defenses for invasion. The Japanese carriers fought off several counter strikes from Midways torpedo planes and bombers. Faced with overwhelming fighter opposition, these uncoordinated efforts suffered severe losses and hit nothing but seawater. Meanwhile, a Japanese scout plane spotted the U.S. fleet and reported the presence of a carrier. Japanese commander Nagumo had already begun loading bombs into his second group of planes for another strike on Midway. This news forced him to rethink his strategy. He decided to wait for the planes returning from Midway and re-arm all the planes with torpe does for an attack on the U.S. ships. He almost had enough time. Beginning about 9:30 a.m., torpedo planes from the U.S. carriers Hornet, Enterprise and Yorktown made a series of attacks that despite nearly total losses made no hits. Then, at 10:25, everything changed. Three squadrons of dive bombers, two from Enterprise and one from Yorktown, almost simulta neously dove on three of the four Japanese carriers whose decks were crowded with fully armed and fueled planes. By 10:30 a.m., Akagi, Kaga, and Soryu were ablaze and out of action. Of the once overwhelming Japanese carrier force, only Hiryu remained operational. Shortly before 11 a.m. she launched 18 of her own dive-bombers. At about noon, as these planes approached Yorktown, they were intercepted by U.S. fight er planes, which shot down most of the bombers. Seven survived, however, hitting Yorktown with three bombs, stopping her dead in the water. The Yorktowns crew managed to get their ship underway, as two more groups of torpedo planes and fighters from Hiryu spotted the Yorktown, which they mistook for a second U.S. carrier. Despite losses to the defending fighters and heavy anti-aircraft fire, the Japanese planes pushed on to deliver a beautifully coordinated torpedo attack. The stricken ship again went dead in the water. Concerned that the severely listing vessel was about to capsize, her captain ordered his crew to abandon ship. Late on June 4, U.S. carrier planes found and bombed Hiryu, which sank the next day. Two days later, a Japanese submarine located the Yorktown and the U.S. destroyer Hammann, which was helping the Yorktown return to Pearl Harbor for repairs. The submarine torpedoed both vessels. The Hammann sank immediately, and the Yorktown final ly sank the following morning. By the end of the battle, the perseverance, sacrifice and skill of American pilots plus a great deal of good luck cost Japan four irreplaceable aircraft carriers. Only one of the three U.S. carriers was sunk. The Japanese lost 332 of their finest aircraft and more than 200 of their most experienced pilots. Deprived of useful air cover, and after several hours of shocked indecision, Yamamoto called off the Midway operation and retreated. The Japanese navy never fully recovered from its losses. Six months after it began, the great Japanese Pacific War offensive was over. From June 1942 to the end of the war three years later, it was the Americans who were on the offense.Midway the defining battle Out of state drivers check your license are from and the state you are in? If you are active duty, your license may be valid after it expires but this is not automatic and varies from state to state. Go to http://www.dmv-department-of-motor-vehi cles.com/index.html to see your states DMV where most questions can be answered. License extensions, if offered, are for active duty members only and do not pertain to spouses or other licensed members of the family. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013 11

PAGE 12

Troops, families can visit museums free for summerDuring the busy season of military transfers, adjust ing to new communities and registering children for school, more than 2,000 museums across the nation will open their doors, free of charge, to service members and their families as a break from the summer challenges, a Defense Department official said today. From Memorial Day, May 27, through Labor Day, Sept. 2, all active duty service members, National Guardsmen and reservists and their families can take advantage of this cultural and educational opportunity in all 50 states. Its an exciting, inspiring, educational and economi cal activity for our families to enjoy this summer, said Navy Cmdr. Leslie Hull-Ryde, a Pentagon spokeswoman. Launching its fourth year in a news conference today at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the 2013 Blue Star Museums Program is a collaboration among the Defense Department, Blue Star Families, the National Endowment for the Arts and the museums to give service members and their families a way to spend time together in their local museums. After long deployments, rigorous training schedules and very long hours, our time with our families is very limited and extremely precious to us, Hull-Ryde said. We are so grateful [to have] these programs. This pro gram is an investment in our families. A record number of museums are participating this year. The program began in 2010 with free access to about 600 museums, while this years 2,000 is a figure thats still growing, Blue Star Families and NEA officials said. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Disabled American Veterans and the American Legion announced a new partnership May 21 to help reduce the compensation claims backlog for veterans. The effort called the Fully Developed Claims Community of Practice is a key part of VAs overall transformation plan to end the backlog in 2015 and process claims within 125 days at 98 percent accuracy, VA officials said. VA can process fully developed claims in half the time it takes for a tra ditionally filed claim, officials noted. VA prides itself on our ongoing part nership with organizations that rep resent veterans throughout the claims process, said Undersecretary for Benefits Allison Hickey. A fully devel oped claim is the most effective way to ensure a veterans claim never reach es the backlog and is the basis for this new initiative between VA and what we expect will be an ever-increasing num ber of veteran service organizations and others who represent veterans at vari ous points of the claims process. The new initiative takes a commonsense approach to working smarter to better serve injured and ill veterans, said Barry Jesinoski, Washington Headquarters executive director for Disabled American Veterans. DAV is pleased to be working with the VA to help improve the disability compensation system, Jesinoski added. The American Legion has been work ing with VA since December on its fully developed claims process, said James Koutz, the American Legions national commander. Teams of our experts have already gone to VA regional offices in Denver, Pittsburgh, Baltimore and other cities to help identify best practices for [fully developed claims], and to further train our own service officers, Koutz said. Claims are considered to be fully developed when veterans submit all available supporting evidence, such as private treatment records and notice of federal treatment records, to VA at the time they first file a formal claim and certify they have no more evidence to submit. This is the information that VA needs to make a determination on a dis ability claim, VA officials said. The fully developed claims program supports the sharing of best practices across veteran service organizations that help thousands of veterans each year with their compensation claims, to identify up front all evidence neces sary to support a veterans claim, offi cials explained. Veterans then certify that they have no additional evidence to submit, and VA can process the claim in half the time it takes for a traditionally filed claim, they added. Veteran service organizations have long played an integral role in sub mitting veterans claims often with representatives working within VA regional offices. VA has consulted with them throughout the development and implementation of its plan to end the backlog in 2015 to ensure best practices and their unique insights were incorpo rated, officials said. The American Legion and DAV are the first to step forward to work with VA on the program, officials added, and that program has led to a much more efficient process. This is the latest effort in support of the plan to reduce the backlog. Last month, VA announced an initiative to expedite compensation claims deci sions for veterans who have waited one year or longer. On April 19, VA began prioritizing claims decisions for veterans who have been waiting the longest by providing provisional decisions that allow eligible veterans to begin collecting compensa tion benefits quickly. With a provisional decision, a veteran has a year to sub mit additional information to support a claim before the decision becomes final. On May 15, VA officials announced that the department is mandating over time for claims processors in its 56 regional benefits offices through the end of fiscal year 2013 to help eliminate the backlog, with continued emphasis on high-priority claims for homeless veterans and those claiming financial hardship, the terminally ill, former pris oners of war, Medal of Honor recipi ents, and veterans filing fully developed claims. As of May 17, the paperless claims processing system known as the Veterans Benefits Management System, or VBMS, has been deployed to 46 out of 56 regional office locations, and about 18 percent of VAs current claim inven tory is in an electronic format, officials said. Claims for Wounded Warriors sep arating from the military for medical reasons will continue to be handled separately and on a priority basis with the Defense Department through the Integrated Disability Evaluation System, officials said. On average, they noted, wounded warriors separating through IDES currently receive VA com pensation benefits in two months fol lowing their separation from service. VA, Vet groups announce initiative to reduce claims backlog Cmdr. William Pennington at a 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013

PAGE 13

The Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department is hosting the 80 Days of Summer program through Aug. 31 at NAS Freedom Lanes. Just in time for summer vaca tion youth bowlers 17 years and younger can bowl one game for free daily until 5 p.m. all sum mer long. This program also includes daily, weekly and grand prize drawings for all patrons. Patrons are entered into the drawings every time a game is bowled. Daily prize drawings include food, beverages, games of bowling and more. The weekly drawings are held on Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and prizes are sponsored by Comfort Inn Destin, Dave & Busters, Adventure Landing, Wild Florida Airboats, County Inn & Suites Jacksonville, Old Town Trolley Tours St. Augustine, LEGOLAND Florida, Fun Spot Attractions, Sleuths Mystery Dinner Show Orlando, CoCo Key Water Resort Orlando, Clarion Suites Main Gate Orlando, Ramada Main Gate West Orlando, Gatorland, Seraloago Hotel & Suites Main Gate East Orlando, Wonderworks Orlando, Pirates Dinner Adventure Orlando, Inn at Ellis Square Savannah, World Quest Resort Orlando, Wild Adventures Theme Park, La Quinta Inn & Suites Valdosta, Georgia, Crowne Plaza Tampa Westshore, Wet n Wild Orlando and Clarion Inn & Suites Orlando. The grand prize and run ner up drawings are Sept. 7 at 7:30 p.m. Grand prize includes an Orlando family vacation package featuring a two-night stay at World Quest Resort in a two bedroom suite, Sea World admission for two and Sea Worlds water park Aquatica admission for two. First runner-up includes a two-night stay at La Quinta Inn & Suites in Valdosta, Ga and Wild Adventures theme park admission for four. Second runner-up includes a two-night stay at the Crowne Plaza Tampa Westshore and Busch Gardens admission for two. Third runner-up includes a two-night stay at Clarion Inn & Suites in Orlando, Fl and Wet n Wild admission for four. The 80 Days of Summer pro gram is open to all authorized MWR patrons. For official rules and more information call 542-3493. Weekly Prize Drawing Schedule Two drawings each week, one prize drawing per person. Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. Online survey goes live June 1Your commissary wants to hear from youWhether you shop at your local commissary or not, the Defense Commissary Agency wants to hear from you. From June 1 through Aug. 1, an online survey will be available on www.commissaries.com by clicking on the take our survey link or accessing the survey directly at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/DeCAShopping-Survey. Were asking for input from our regular shoppers, occasional shoppers and non-shoppers alike, said Tracie Russ, director of DeCAs business development directorate. The responses will be analyzed and used to improve the commissary for all our patrons. The survey takes only 8-12 minutes to complete, and Russ said the time spent will have meaningful impact on future improvements at commissaries worldwide. Cool off at NAS Freedom Lanes this summer JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013 13

PAGE 14

DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 510 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 1 6 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer June 1 Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 years and younger receive one free game of bowling every day until 5 p.m. Win prizes all summer long!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Open Monday Friday (lap swim only) During lap swim only the waterslide, water park and concessions will not be open. 6 a.m. 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 7 p.m. Saturday & Sunday (recreation swim ming) 11 a.m. 6 p.m. June 10 pool opens daily for recreational swimming 2013 Learn to Swim Program Session 1: June 1020 Session 2 July 8-18 Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Disney Cruise Lines will be at ITT June 11, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Learn more about exciting 2013/2014 trips. Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Daytona International Speedway Subway Firecracker July 5 and Coke 400 July 6 Tickets on sale now! Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Legoland Kids go FREE with an adult ticket purchase from ITT Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3. Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7. 2013 Live Broadway Series Cesar Millan June 1 $42 $52 Amelia Island Museum of History $10 family pass, Ghost tour $8 adult, $4 child Florida Ecosafaris in St. Cloud EcoPark $119, Coach safari adult $28, child $25, Zipline safari $75, Cypress canopy cycle $40 for one hour St. Augustine Scenic Cruise June 8, $20 per personThe Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Paintball Trip June 1 at 9 a.m. Jax Suns Baseball Game June 6 at 6 p.m. Free admission and transportation I Love Music Concert Tour Featuring Red Jumpsuit Apparatus and New Boyz! June 8 at 2 p.m. NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees June 11 and 25 for active duty June 13 and 27 for retirees, DoD person nel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Loudmouth Thursday Any golfer wearing a pair of loudmouth shorts or pants plays 18 holes with cart for $20 Open to military, DoD and guests Junior Golf Clinic Session 1, June 1721, ages 1117 Session 2, July 1519, ages 610 Session 3, July 29 Aug. 2, ages 1117 $110 per child, per sessionMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina June 15, 16, 22 & 23 July 20, 21, 27 & 28 Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772Drop-in care and open recreation available!Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information.Flying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School June 3 July 10 $500 per person For more information about any of the sports, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. Visit the MWR Web site at www.cnic.navy.mil or www.facebook.com nasjaxmwr. 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013

PAGE 15

The Defense and Veterans Affairs departments should be able to create a seamless health records system by the end of the year, Undersecretary of Defense Frank Kendall told reporters May 22. The undersecretary for acquisition, technology and logistics led a review of the health care records system. The idea is to create a system in which health care records can move from DOD to VA or other health care providers. The two departments are building on President Barack Obamas national standards for health care records. This will enable records to move more easily between DOD and the VA, Kendall said during a Pentagon news con ference. DOD has been sending electronic medical records to VA for years, the undersecre tary noted. Those read only records are used by VA to determine eligibility for ben efits and disability. But records are also necessary for medical care, he said. Its there that were really trying to improve the records used by doctors and clini cians, he added. The first step in that is to get in compliance with the standard data format so it can move in a seamless way. We expect to have inte grated, seamless records with the VA by the end of this year. A separate effort is to mod ernize the systems used within the Defense Department and VA to provide health care. Theres no requirement that we use the same software to do that, Kendall said. VA officials elected to modernize using the departments existing Vista system. It was a reasonable decision for VA, Kendall said. They had a solid base in Vista, had a lot of people trained in it, had the program ming in-house, and their physi cians were familiar with it. Veterans Affairs will con tinue to build for the future on the Vista system, and DOD may use Vista or it may use another software altogether, Kendall said. The question is how to pro vide the best value for our peo ple and the best possible health care for our people, he said. The conclusion after the review is the best possible approach taps into the com mercial market and brings commercial systems in as can didates, along with Vista-based systems as well. DOD reached out to indus try and received 20 proposals, including three based on Vista. We think we have a rich field to pick from, and we can make a best value determina tion for DOD, the undersecre tary said. Kendall said the next task moving forward is going to be understanding whats afford able, given the budget stream. Modernization is probably going to take place . in an incremental fashion, he said. The bottom line for service members is that they will have a single integrated record, Kendall said. The record is the data, he said, and once we have that data in the standardized form and we have converted the data we have now into that architecture, then were positioned to whatever lies ahead whatever software we buy, to wherever we move it. DOD, VA move ahead with seamless medical record JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013 15

PAGE 16

16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013 The Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast (NAVFAC SE), Public Works Department (PWD), as the NAS Jacksonville (Station) water utility service provider, is very pleased to provide you with the 2012 annual Water Quality Report. PWD provides a safe and dependable supply of drinking water through three deep wells which draw from the Floridian aquifer. In 2009, the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) performed a source water assessment that identi fied no potential sources of con tamination near NAS Jax wells. Assessment results are on the DEP Source Water Assessment and Protection Program Web site at www.dep.state.fl.us/swapp Treatment of the water supply includes aeration for odor control and chlorination for disinfection. In 2003, the station began receiv ing potable water from JEA, therefore, some of the data in this report is from JEA testing.PWD Jacksonville routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to federal and state laws and regu lations. Except where indicated otherwise, this report is based on the results of our monitoring for the period Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 2012. Data obtained before Jan. 1, 2012, and presented in this report are from the most recent testing done in accordance with the laws, rules, and regulations. Below are the definitions of terms and abbreviations used in the report: NAS Jacksonville 2012 Water Quality ReportFecal Coliform/E. coli. Fecal coliforms and E. coli are bacteria whose presence indicates that the water may be contaminated with human or animal wastes. Microbes in these wastes can cause short-term effects, such as diarrhea, cramps, nausea, headaches, or other symptoms. They may pose a special health risk for infants, young children, some of the elderly, and people with severely compromised immune systems. The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Treatment of your water supply includes aeration for odor control and chlorination for disinfection. Contaminants that may be present in source water include: In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) prescribes regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water that must provide the same protection for public health. MCLs are set at very stringent levels: to understand the possible health effects described for many regulated contaminants, a person would have to drink two liters of water every day at the MCL for a lifetime to have a onein-a-million chance of having the described health effect. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/ AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPAs Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791. If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. NAVFAC SE is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to two minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www. epa.gov/safewater/lead. For more information or questions concerning this report, contact PWD Water Utilities at 542-6440.

PAGE 17

Yellow Water Housing 2012 Water Quality Report The NAS Jacksonville Safety Office is offering a driver improvement class spe cifically for dependent young drivers between the age of 15 and 21 years old June 14 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. The class will be held in the Safety Conference Room in Building 1. Participants do not have to have a drivers license to attend. The class will offer safety tips such as how to respond to driving emergencies and distracted driving while bringing awareness to risks of driving and much more. The class consists of videos, chapter quizzes and concludes with a multiple choice question test. There will not be any time behind the wheel; this is classroom only. The teens will receive an AAA Driver Improvement Class completion certificate. If you feel your teen could benefit from this class, sign them up by calling Linda at 542-3082, Cindy at 542-2584 or Kristen at 542-8810. Approximately 16,000 randomly selected female officers and enlisted personnel are being asked to partic ipate in the online survey on the fit, design and durability of Navy uniforms in a fleet-wide survey announced in NAVADMIN 127/13. Letters were mailed April 30 to partic ipants, notifying them of their selection and providing instructions on accessing and completing the survey. The online survey will be open for approximately 90 days. The decision to do the fleet-wide survey was made after interviews and focus groups determined that there was a need to gather more feedback on womens uniform concerns and recom mendations. Survey questions address levels of satisfaction with service dress, service and working uniforms and compo nents. The survey will also ask about fit and hip-to-waist ratio of slacks; the comfort of shirt collars; and preference for shirt lining, shoulder stitching and yoke on service uniform shirts. Teen driving class offered by NAS Jax SafetyNavy announces fleet-wide womens uniform survey After little more than just six months of service, the Commissary Rewards Card continues winning promi nence in customer wallets and purses worldwide. The card gives custom ers access to digital coupons redeemable at any of the Defense Commissary Agencys 247 stores. Our customers love the Commissary Rewards Card, said Acting Director of Sales Joyce Chandler. Its hard not to! It saves you time, effort and money, plus reduces the num ber of paper coupons you have to clip and carry. More than 600,000 cards have been registered by shop pers, who have downloaded more than 4.5 million coupons so far. That means bigger sav ings for them, on top of the commissarys usual savings of 30 percent or more. Were averaging more than 120 coupons available at any given time, said Marye Carr, DeCAs Rewards Card pro gram manager. New coupons are loaded almost daily! Our industry partners are stepping up with great coupons on all kinds of items everyone uses every day. If youre not using your card, you could be throw ing away significant savings. One of the first rewards being offered by manufac turers to Rewards Card users is the posting of two different coupons each week for a free item, Carr said. The free item coupons remain available for redemp tion for only one week from the posting date. A limited number of coupons are available; when the coupon reaches the maximum allowed electronic clips, the coupon disappears from the website. The free item rewards run through May 26. Carr said many customers find it handy to print a list of their coupons before making the trip to the commissary to help them keep track of their savings. The card provides a new way to save, in addition to your paper coupons, she said. Commissary shoppers love coupons, so this is another way to increase buying power. Using the card is simple. Once patrons pick up a card at their commissary, they visit DeCAs Web site to register it, and then load digital coupons directly to their account. Then, when the cashier scans the card, the coupons are matched to items purchased, and savings are automatically deducted from the total bill. Rewards Card digital cou pons disappear from your account when they expire. Like paper coupons, they cant be combined with other coupons on the same item, and they have expiration dates and other redemption terms and condi tions. Overseas, digital coupons will not be accepted for up to six months after expiration, as paper coupons are, because the coupons are instantly available to all customers worldwide. That means overseas cus tomers dont need extra time to use the coupons. To learn more about the card or sign up to be notified of updates, including new coupon alerts, go to http://www.com missaries.com/rewards_sub scribe.cfm A customer service hotline can be reached at 855-829-6219 or through e-mail at commis sarysupport@inmar.com .Customers pass six months, 4.5 million mark in downloads of Commissary Rewards Card coupons JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013 17

PAGE 18

18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013

PAGE 19

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013 19

PAGE 20

20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013



PAGE 1

THURSDAY, MAY 30, 2013 FLC COC COP CLASS HURREXCheck us out Online! jaxairnews.com The Navys newest unmanned Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) aircraft platform, the MQ-4C Triton Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS), completed its first flight at Palmdale, Calif. May 22, marking the start of tests that will validate the Northrop Grumman-built system for future fleet operations. During the 80-minute flight in restricted airspace, the MQ-4C Triton unmanned aircraft, controlled by ground-based Navy and Northrop Grumman personnel, reached 20,000 feet altitude. This flight represents a sig nificant milestone for the Triton team, said Rear Adm. Mat Winter, who leads the Program Executive Office for Unmanned Aviation and Strike Weapons at Naval Air Systems Command, Patuxent River, Md. The work they have done and will continue to do is critical to the future of naval aviation, particularly to our maritime patrol and reconnaissance community. The MQ-4C Triton provides the fleet with a game-changing persistent maritime and littoral ISR data collection and dissemination capability, said Winter. It will be a key component of the Navys Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force family of systems. As an adjunct to the manned P-8A Poseidon, the MQ-4C Triton will be a major part of the militarys surveillance strategy for the Asia and Pacific regions. The Triton will fly missions for 24 hours at altitudes greater than 10 miles, allowing the system to monitor 2,000 nautical miles of ocean and littoral areas. The P-8A Poseidon is the Navys new multi-mission maritime aircraft that is replacing the P-3C Orion anti-subma rine warfare aircraft. When operational, the MQ-4C will complement our manned P-8 because it can fly for long periods, transmit its information in real-time to units in the air and on the ground, as well as use fewer resources than previous surveil lance aircraft, said Rear Adm. Sean Buck, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group commander, who also witnessed the test flight. Triton will bring an unprecedented ISR capability to the warfighter. Buck added, The arrival of Triton, With hurricane season fast approaching on June 1, the NAS Jax Emergency Management Team is busy ensuring station personnel and tenant commands know their disaster plan requirements not only at work, but also at home. Hurricane season runs June 1 through Nov. 30. We continually monitor tropical systems watching for signs of development and projected track, said NAS Emergency Management Officer Ray Edmond. As a tropical storm or hurricane develops and it looks like our area falls into that cone of uncertainty, thats when we begin making those preparations and set our conditions of readiness (COR). According to Edmond, its not just the hur ricane force winds that cause destruction, but tornadoes and flooding due to storm surge that can have leave devastating effects. Edmond strongly recommends reviewing your home insurance policy because many plans dont cover damage caused by flooding unless you specifically purchase flood insurance. Make sure your insurance policy says what you think it says. Many people may have hur ricane insurance but that doesnt always cover flooding. Unfortunately, many people have learned this lesson the hard way after their homes were flooded, he said. The only hurricane on record that hit Jacksonville directly was Hurricane Dora in 1964. It caused substantial damage from wind and flooding. In south Florida, Hurricane Andrew, a category five storm, devastated the area. Hurricane season starts June 1, prepare now Navy Triton unmanned aircraft completes first flight Tri-base Sailors from NAS Jax, NS Mayport and NSB Kings Bay, Ga. participated in sev eral Memorial Day events in Northeast Florida May 27. Downtown Jacksonville At the Duval County Veterans Memorial Wall near Everbank Field, Commander U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris declared, The names on the wall behind me are the real heroes here. This is a fantas tic Memorial Day tribute to the fallen and we will always remember those who paid the ultimate sacrifice. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders and NS Mayport Commanding Officer Capt. Douglas Cochrane, along with other military representatives, par ticipated in wreath laying cer emonies to honor those killed while on active duty. Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown spoke about the citys unique military makeup and why we should forever honor those who lost their lives while serving. On Memorial Day we gather to renew our nations spirit; to honor those who have invested their lives, not only in our freedom but in the lives of our children and grandchildren, said Brown. In a city like Jacksonville, where nearly a quarter of the population is tied to the mili tary, we understand this unlike anywhere else and we honor those men and women not just today, but every day. During the ceremony, each military branch dedicated a wreath to those who gave their lives from their respective organizations, followed by a 21-gun salute and the playing of taps. Its nice to be invited and that theyre honoring my hus Jacksonville honors fallen heroes

PAGE 2

2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS May 30 1814 Navy gunboats cap ture three British boats on Lake Ontario near Sandy Creek, N.Y. May 31 1900 Sailors and Marines from USS Newark and USS Oregon arrive at Peking, China with other Sailors and Marines from Britain, France, Russia, Italy and Japan to protect U.S. and foreign diplomatic lega tions from the Boxers. 1919 The Navy NC-4 transatlantic mission ends at Plymouth, England. 1944 USS England (DE-635) sank a record sixth Japanese submarine in 13 days. June 1 1813 HMS Shannon cap tures USS Chesapeake. As Capt. James Lawrence was carried below, he ordered, Tell the men to fire faster! Dont give up the ship! These words would live on in naval history. Oliver Hazard Perry honored his dead friend Lawrence when he had the motto sewn onto his private battle flag flown during the Battle of Lake Erie. 1871 Rear Adm. Rodgers lands in Korea with a party of Sailors and Marines and cap tures five forts to secure pro tection for U.S. citizens after Americans were fired upon and murdered. 1914 General Order 99 prohibits alcohol on board naval vessels, at navy yards or at naval stations. 1915 First contract for Navy lighter-than-air aircraft. 1939 Director of the Naval Research Laboratory, Capt. Hollis Cooley, proposes research in atomic energy for future use in nuclear powered submarine. 1944 ZP-14 airships com plete first crossing of Atlantic by non-rigid lighter-than-air aircraft. 1954 First test of steam catapult on board USS Hancock (CV-19). June 2 1861 USS Perry cap tures Confederate privateer Savannah. 1941 First aircraft escort vessel, USS Long Island (ACG1), commissioned, then reclassified as an auxiliary aircraft carrier (AVC-1) and finally reclassified in 1943 as an escort carrier (CVE-1). June 3 1785 Order to sell last ship remaining in Continental Navy, frigate Alliance No other Navy ships were autho rized until 1794. 1898 Collier Merrimac sunk in channel leading to Santiago, Cuba in unsuccessful attempt to trap Spanish fleet. The crew was captured and later received the Medal of Honor. 1949 Wesley Brown becomes the first AfricanAmerican to graduate from the U.S. Naval Academy. 1966 Launch of Gemini 9, piloted by Lt. Cmdr. Eugene Cernan. The mission includ ed 45 orbits over three days. Recovery was by USS Wasp (CVS-18). June 4 1934 USS Ranger (CV-4), first ship designed from the keel up as a carrier, is commissioned at Norfolk, Va. 1942 Battle of Midway (June 4-6) begins. During battle, the four Japanese carriers that attacked Pearl Harbor were sunk. This decisive U.S. victory is a turning point in the Pacific war. 1944 Hunter-killer group USS Guadalcanal (CVE-60) captures German submarine, U-505. June 5 1794 First officers of the U.S. Navy under the United States Constitution are appointed. The first six captains appointed to superintend the construc tion of new ships were John Barry, Samuel Nicholson, Silas Talbot, Joshua Barney, Richard Dale and Thomas Truxtun. 1917 The first military unit is sent to Europe, the Naval Aeronautical Detachment, reaches France on board the collier USS Jupiter (AC-3). In 1920, Jupiter was converted and commissioned as USS Langley (CV-1), the Navys first aircraft carrier. 1945 Typhoon off Okinawa damages many U.S. Navy ships. Hey, MoneyChic! I am thinking about hurricane season and want to know what I should do to prepare financially for the storms to come. Any advice? MoneyChic sez: Hurricane season is fast approaching and having a plan is a great idea. A question to ask yourself to start your hurricane preparation is will you stay or will you go? If you stay, there are a number of essentials you should plan to purchase ahead of time so you are not fighting the crowd to clear the local grocery store shelves. Purchasing ahead of time also allows you to spread the cost over a few months so it is not depleting your bank account in one month. These essentials include: Bottled water (it is recommended 3 gallons per person) paper goods (plates, toilet paper, wet wipes) baby items if children are in your household pet supplies if there are animals in your household all of your important documents preferably sealed in a waterproof container (bank account information, social security cards, birth certificates, etc.) flashlights or battery operated lights batteries cash non-perishable food medications (stock up on refills now) and medical supplies a working cell phone and car charger first aid kit gas can filled with gas and a full tank of gas in the car full propane tank if you own a grill to have a way to prepare food if electricity is out If you leave, it is still a good idea to pack a few essentials. Besides packing clothes and personal items for family members, including pets, it is important to have all of your paper documents with you for safekeeping. The financial cost of leaving the area for a storm will be greater than staying. The main expenses would be gas and hotel costs. Think about where relatives live and if it would be more cost effective to drive there. No one can predict how long you will need to stay away if a storm makes landfall and damages the area. Locate military bases around the area and utilize their hotels if possible. Another key item to think about when traveling with a pet is which hotel will accept a pet with no additional fee. If you are on the road and need assistance, remember any military aid society or the American Red Cross can help. It is always a good idea to keep cash on hand when a storm is predicted to hit. You never know when the electricity may go out and backup generators in stores stop working. Would you have the cash to make an essential purchase? Start saving now to be able to supply your family with the items that will keep them safe or help them be safe while evacuating. The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society can help you plan for emergencies. Stop by the office outside the Yorktown Gate or call 5422832. Have questions for Hey, MoneyChic? Drop me an e-mail at megan. stolle@nmcrs.org There is no better place to understand the true meaning of Memorial Day than at Arlington National Cemeterys Tomb of the Unknowns. This is one of the few places in America where Memorial Day does not automatically equal barbecue and pic nics, or worse, mattress sale. The boys and I were able to visit Arlington National Cemetery in April while Dustin was working at the Pentagon. (As an aside, there are spectacular views of the Pentagon and the rest of Washington, D.C., from the cemetery.) I was a little nervous about bringing my youngest, Lindell, because he is seldom quiet or appropriate. But no one not even a spotlight-loving 6-year-old can help but feel the solemnity of the rolling green fields dotted with white headstones. They are perfectly spaced in neat rows that seem to ride on the hills like a wave. For one of the first times in Lindells life, he was speechless. Ive been a military dependent since the day I was born, but this was my first time to see Arlington National Cemetery, too. Like Lindell, I was moved to silence. Because the cemetery is a major tourist destination, there are parts of the grounds that feel like most other attractions: peo ple enter and exit beside the gift shop, lines form for well-timed trams that move visi tors across the 624-acre cemetery, and a tour guide relays facts and information through an intercom on the tram. Yet once you get past these necessary trappings, which keep nearly 4 million yearly visitors mov ing through the grounds in an orderly fashion, there is silence. And even farther away still, tucked between some of the 8,000 trees many of which, according to the cem eterys Web site, are more than 200 years old there is the Tomb of the Unknowns. Here, there is near total silence. The Tomb of the Unknowns, a white mar ble sarcophagus, is on a hill that overlooks most of the cemetery and Washington, D.C. Engraved in the marble is: Here rests in honored glory an American soldier known but to God. Directly beneath the sarcopha gus lies the remains of an unidentified sol dier from WWI who was buried there in 1921. Later, the remains of unidentified soldiers from WWII and the Korean and Vietnam wars were laid to rest at the Tomb as well. Every day of the year, no matter the weather (yes, even during hurricanes), and for all hours of the day, a sentinel from Company E of the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment guards the tomb. Despite this regiment already being prestigious (they escort the president), only a select few can volunteer for and be accepted as a Tomb Guard. The sentinel must: inches tall condition Arlington National Cemetery history veterans graves exam of facts Since 1958, only 400 individuals have been awarded the Tomb Guard badge. If you go to see the Changing of the Guards at the Tomb of the Unknowns, you will see at least three of these soldiers. In a hushed ceremony where you can hear a pin drop (even with a six-year-old by your side), one sentinel is relieved by another while a relief commander oversees them. The ceremony is precise, yet fluid. Once the new sentinel is in position, he begins his watch. This includes walking in an exact, 90 steps-per-minute cadence, marching 21 steps behind the Tomb, turn ing, facing east for 21 seconds, turning, fac ing north for 21 seconds, and then walking 21 steps to the other side. For decades, this same path has been walked every hour of the day and night on a quiet hill in Arlington National Cemetery overlooking our capi tol. The cement in front of the Tomb even has worn places where each careful step has been taken never too far to one side or the other, but always in the exact step of the sentinel before. Much like Memorial Days that are clut tered with sales and barbecues, Arlington National Cemetery is increasingly encroached upon by a modern, capitalistic world filled with gift shops, trinkets and a me attitude. But on that hill, no matter the weather or the time of day (even as you read this), someone is watching over the Tomb of the Unknowns. They are walking 21 steps, turning, waiting, turning again and walking another 21 steps. They havent forgotten. They never will. Every day is Memorial Day for them.The Tomb of the Unknowns

PAGE 3

As the weather gets warmer and the citizens of Jacksonville get ready for summer, the ser vice members and families of VP-26 are hard at work preparing to deploy to Kadena and Misawa Air bases in Japan to conduct multi-mission opera tions in the Pacific Command area of responsibility (PACOM AOR). As their Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle (IDRC) comes to a close, every member of Team Trident is dedicated to supporting Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mark Sohaneys assumption of Commander, Task Group 72.2/72.4 and to ensure seamless turn overs with both VP-45s Commanding Officer, Cmdr. John Brabazon and VP-10s Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Charles Stickney, who will be bringing their squadrons back to NAS Jacksonville. Whether hard at work around the han gar or spending time with families on pre-overseas movement (POM) leave, no minute is wasted. Recently Team Trident con ducted their operational readiness evaluation (ORE), a cul mination of the IDRC, which tested the squadrons ability to execute its mission on deploy ment. ORE is conducted in four phases: (1) Written and verbal examinations of enlisted and officer aircrew members; (2) A flight phase of at least one tactical mission per crew, evaluating tactical proficiency; (3) A weapon systems trainer phase for each crew; and (4) the con ventional weapons techni cal proficiency inspection (CWTPI), wherein ordnance teams display their ability to load sonobuoys and weapons safely. Team Trident passed with flying colors. Completion of ORE did not signal a time of rest for Team Trident, however. Until the squadron leaves for the PACOM AOR in late May, a steady operational pace is required in order to optimize the squad rons combat readiness as well as to integrate reserve air crews and maintenance per sonnel from other squadrons, including VP-62, the reserve unit from CPRW-11 at NAS Jacksonville, as well as active duty aircrews from VP-1 and reserve aircrews from VP-69 based out of CPRW-10 at NAS Whidbey Island, Wash. Team Trident families are preparing as well. In order to ensure home front readi ness, personnel have attended deployment preparation meet ings and are currently taking their POM leave. The VP-26 Ombudsmen and Family Readiness Group in conjunc tion with the NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center, Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, TRICARE health services, and Morale, Welfare and Recreation provided a squadron-wide pre-deploy ment informational brief at Deweys in April. This combined effort focuses on ensuring squadron mem bers and families receive the support they need before, during and even upon return from deployment. As the Team Tridents time at home grows short, the oppor tunity to showcase their abili ties, execute the mission and represent the United States throughout the Asia Pacific grows near. VP-26 is ready, excited and proud to cash in on the huge investments of time and hard work while operating across the PACOM AOR during this deployment.VP-26 preparing for deployment to Japan In a May 24 change of command ceremo ny, Capt. Duke Heinz relieved Capt. Kevin Head as the command ing officer (CO) of the Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP) Fleet Logistics Center (FLC) Jacksonville. The event took place aboard NAS Jacksonville with more than 100 guests in attendance. Twenty musicians from Navy Band Southeast pro vided music throughout the time-honored cer emony. Following the invoca tion by NAS Jacksonville Command Chaplain (Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore, keynote speak er, Rear Adm. Jonathan Yuen, commander of NAVSUP Global Logistics Support, highlighted FLC Jacksonvilles achieve ments under Capt. Heads command. Head, a U.S. Naval Academy graduate who took the helm of NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville in November 2011, had tri umphed in leading some of the commands most monumental accom plishments in the past 18 months. In particular, Yuen praised FLC Jacksonvilles opera tional flexibility in sup porting the warfighter through the strengthen ing of relationships with the Fleet, Allied and Joint Logistics partners, and other leading com mands in the area including: Commander U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command; Commander 4th Fleet; Commander Navy Region Southeast; and Fleet Readiness Center Southeast. Capt. Heads team awarded nearly 22,000 contracting actions dur ing Fiscal Year 2012 alone and provided direct con tracting support to the leading commands in the area which includes mul tiple aviation squadrons, ships, and submarines, said Yuen. Capt. Head is bound for San Diego, where he will be chief of staff for NAVSUP GLS. As NAVSUP FLC Jackson-villes new CO, Capt. Heinz will lead over 900 military, civilian and contractor personnel pro viding premier regional logistics support to 17 sites, 49 fleet units, and two industrial activities in seven Southeastern states and the Caribbean. FLC Jacksonville has a rich heritage of strong leadership, outstanding teamwork and outstand ing customer support, said Heinz. I am extremely hon ored and excited for the opportunity to lead this absolutely superb team of professionals. Heinz comes to NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville from Philadelphia, Pa., where he was director of aviation operations at NAVSUP Weapons Systems Support. Throughout his career, he has served in key leadership positions. At sea, Heinz served as sup ply officer aboard USS Bergall (SSN 667). He also served as S-1, S-6, and readiness officer on USS Enterprise (CVN 65) during Operation Desert Fox. Most recently, he was supply officer on board USS Nimitz (CVN 68), deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Ashore, Heinz was assigned to NAS Lemoore, Calif.; the U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Team Blue Angels; Naval Supply Systems Command; Office of Personnel, Millington, Tenn.; NAVSUP Weapons System Support, Philadelphia, Pa.; and to the staff of Chief of Naval Operations, Programming Division (N80). NAVSUP Global Logistics Support, pro vides operational logis tics, business and support services to the fleet, shore and industrial commands of the Navy, Coast Guard, Military Sealift com mand, and other Joint Allied Forces. NAVSUP FLC Jacksonville holds change of command JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013 3

PAGE 4

4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013 Auxiliary Security Force academy students endure four weeks of trainingNumerous Sailors from NAS Jacksonville volun teered and were selected by their tenant commands to complete training in the Auxiliary Security Force (ASF) academy, a four-week course held during the month of May, at the NAS Jax Police Department designed to shape them into an efficient security force for the base. The Sailors were exposed to specialized train ing, with each week bringing new challenges. Week one consisted of both classroom and field exercises, with subjects such as use of deadly force, operation al risk management, the Uniform Code of Military Justice, and base-specific instructions being covered. Subsequent weeks involved a wide array of training ranging from weapons familiarization, the use of Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) or pepper spray, special ized close quarters combat referred to as mechanical advantage control hold (MACH) takedowns, vehicle inspections and tactical team movements. We cover a huge range of subjects for these Sailors in a short time, and this training is highly special ized, explained Maj. Jerry Syrek, training officer with the NAS Jax Police Department. When people see these Sailors they tend think that they just guard the gate, but its so much more than that. To get qualified for ASF, they have to endure some pretty rough training and show an ability to think through a potentially dangerous situation while utilizing all their resources in a responsible manner. Syrek acknowledged the rigors of the training, and made sure to expose the students to situations that fully tested their decision-making skills. This was most evident when the ASF students engaged in tac tical team movements during their last week, being subjected to a simulated exercise at the Navy Gateway Inn and Suites that involved active shooters, clearing rooms of the building, and coordinating their com munication skills. With the short amount of time we have to train these Sailors, it is imperative that we expose them to many different types of scenarios they could encounter. If a dangerous situation develops that securi ty needs to be there for, I want to make sure that I can rely on every Sailor who passes through the ASF Academy to use their training effectively, Syrek remarked. The Sailors themselves were excited for the train ing and being able to serve the base. AS3 Michael Williams of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast stated, I volunteered to join the ASF course not only because I wanted to learn something new, but because its very important that our base is fully secure at all times. So many bad things have happened at various bases around the country, and the better we can be at dealing with potential threats, the more confidence I will have that NAS Jax will be fully equipped to complete its missions. So the next time you pass through the gate of NAS Jax, remember that those gate guards are ASF Sailors who are highly trained and fully equipped to protect you from a wide array of threats.

PAGE 5

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013 5

PAGE 6

DLA Information Operations improves infrastructure in JacksonvilleAs part of Defense Logistics Agency Aviations goals to improve support and productiv ity for industrial customers, DLA Information Operations continues to improve the computer infrastructure used by DLA Aviation employees in Jacksonville. DLA Aviation Commander Brig. Gen. Mark Johnson traveled to Jacksonville April 16 to rec ognize and meet with DLA employees, interface with Navy senior leaders, and learn firsthand about proactive improvements being made prior to Inventory Management and Stock Positioning Spiral 2 software implementation in the first quarter of fiscal 2014. We have been working on the transition since January and as of April have moved roughly 90 percent of DLA Aviation employees to the DLA network, said Daniel Hudson, who works in New Cumberland, Pa., as the DLA Information Operations project manager for the Navy Marine Corps Intranet to DLA network transition. There are approximately 140 end users at DLA Aviation in Jacksonville, made up of government and contractor personnel. Hudson said the tran sition has been going on since 2008, but recent changes will result in greater productivity by allowing employees access to many systems from one desktop computer, freeing them from the need to have two computers on their desktops and minimizing the number of computers we have to maintain by creating shared work areas to access Navy specific software they need. Navy employees at Jacksonville transitioned as is where is to DLA Aviation when Base Realignment and Closure 2005 was implemented in 2008. Since that time, most users have been primarily operating computers hooked up to Navy Marine Corps Intranet for daily workload, links to Office of Personnel Management, other gov ernment websites, and email. DLA computers were primarily used for research activities in DLA Enterprise Business Systems, human resources, and training applications. Today, almost every DLA Aviation user in Jacksonville has been fully transitioned to the DLA network. The final step of migrat ing data and reports from shared Navy net work drives to DLA shared drives took place the week of May 6, according to Nora Zulich, chief, Planning and Support Division and IMSP Spiral 2 Implementation Team co-lead in Jacksonville. DLA Aviation employees still need access to some Navy systems, like the Navys Uniform Automated Data Processing System II and Hazardous Material Management Systems, which arent available on the DLA network. We have moved those computers strictly on the Navy intranet off Aviation employees desktops and placed them in strategically placed kiosks for shared use, said Hudson. While the computer hardware infrastructure is being improved, DLA Aviations Business Process Support Directorate is ensuring employees have the latest, most up-to-date training in DLAs Enterprise Business Systems to prepare or in some cases refresh employees on the agencys business systems, as well as changes to the Navys applications used by DLA employees. The entire work force has so far been trained in Enterprise Business Systems Basic Navigation (January 2013) and Windows 7 (April 2013). Upcoming training by job role will be conducted for users needing access to Naval Air Systems Command Depot Maintenance Systems and DLAs EBS and Distribution Standard System applica tions. DLA Information Operations is making similar improvements for operations at DLA Aviations industrial support activities in San Diego and Cherry Point while employees there prepare for their scheduled implementation of IMSP Spiral 2 June 3 and during the second quarter of fiscal 2014, respectively. 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013

PAGE 7

The Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) instructed 55 students from 17 countries as part of the fifth annual Certificate in Emerging Infectious Disease Research (CEIDR) program hosted by the University of Florida, Emerging Pathogens Institute, May 20-24. The primary aim of this certificate program is to offer world-class graduate educa tion and training to interna tional public health professionals sponsored by organizations such as Department of Defense (DoD) Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response Systems, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, United States Department of State, United States Agency for International Development, and the Fogarty International Center. Training includes lectures, tutorials, field experiences, laboratory exercises, public health demonstrations, and written examinations, with the goal of introducing students to the many facets of studying emerging infectious diseases, said Dr. Gregory Gray, professor at University of Florida. In addition to the knowl edge individual students gain, the Certificate will increase the professional capacities of their organizations and often improve their organizations international relationships. NECE sent 11 military and civilian personnel to lecture on topics covering tick and mos quito biology, surveillance and control, all of which are critical in ensuring war-fighter readi ness. One of the best aspects of this course is we get to bring our equipment and provide critical hands on training, said Lt. James Harwood, NECE entomologist. It is extremely rewarding knowing that not only are we teaching public health pro fessionals but the training we provided will have a global impact. NECEs involvement in the program is an example of the centers success through numerous collaborations formed with, state, federal, industry and academic organizations. Being responsive to our customers, reducing their risk of exposure to insect-borne dis ease, is our focus, said Cmdr. Eric Hoffman NECE officer-incharge. To be successful, we must take advantage of every opportunity to engage international public health partners, devel oping lasting and productive professional relationships. The University of Floridas Certificate program affords us such an opportunity, allowing our staff to learn more about disease treatments and control challenges while building partner capacity through training, added Hoffman. More information on the UF Certificate in Emerging Infectious Disease Research Program can be found at their Web site: http://egh.phhp.ufl. edu/certificate/. NECE trains public health professionals from around the globe The NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club is sponsoring two $1,000 scholar ships based on scholarship merit and community service. Eligibility: U.S. Navy active/reserve duty and active/reserve duty depen dents who are currently in their senior year of high school or a high school graduate, attached to NAS Jacksonville and planning to attend an accredited college in the fall of 2013 or spring of 2014. To request the scholarship applica tion, visit https://www.fcef.com/ Application deadline is June 15. You may submit the application by mail to: NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club, 4109 Eagle Landing Pkwy, Orange Park, FL 32065.Neither the NAS Jacksonville, U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal govern ment officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services.$1,000 college scholarship opportunity JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013 7

PAGE 8

accompanied by two other unmanned systems the MQ-8B/C Fire Scout and the X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System mark a new chapter in naval aviation. The MQ-4C Triton UAS will be based at five loca tions around the globe. Triton operators will disseminate data in real-time to fleet units to support surface warfare, intelligence operations, strike warfare and search and rescue. Our goal is to mature the Triton UAS before sup porting the Navys maritime ISR mission, said Capt. Jim Hoke, program manager for the Persistent Maritime UAS office (PMA-262), which oversees the Triton program. The data we collect the next few years is essential to certify the system for operational use. Flight tests will continue in California for the next several months before the team transitions the air craft to Patuxent River in the fall. The first of two Triton command centers is under construction at NAS Jacksonville, where the Navy will stand up Unmanned Patrol Squadron (VUP) 19 on Oct. 1, 2013. VUP-19 willfall under the administrative control ofCommander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 11 and initially operate theTriton UAS on reconnaissance missions in the 5th, 6th and 7th fleets, as well as U.S. Fleet Forces Command Atlantic Operations. In 2014, the Navy willactivateanother Triton squadron, VUP-11,at NAS Whidbey Island, Wash. to assume operations in the Pacific. TRITON HURRICANEWeve had several other close calls since then Tropical Storm Floyd in 1999 which triggered major evacua tions from the area and Tropical Storm Fay in 2008 which hit Florida four times and spawned numerous tornadoes, Edmond stated. So its not a question of if we will be hit, its more when we will be hit. Edmond also discussed the five dif ferent COR levels. We will stay in COR Five throughout hurricane season. Each COR level requires commands to conduct specific preparation tasking based on the intensity of the storm and where it is predicted to make landfall, Edmond stated. We may also issue an evacuation order or go to essential or critical personnel only. This is where that family preparation comes into play make sure your family is taken care of. Keep in mind that when we set CORs, everyone outside the base is working on their emergency plans as well and it will be traffic nightmare if many areas of the state are evacuated. In the event of a base evacuation, only specific critical personnel would be authorized to stay aboard the station. These include personnel such as fire fighters, security personnel and public works representatives. Once the storm passes, they will assess the damage and determine when essential and nonessential personnel can return. This can take weeks or even months depending on the damage. Military members and civil service employees are also reminded to ensure their data is current in the Navy Family Accountability and Assessment System (NFAAS). This is the system the Navy uses in case of disasters to muster its personnel all over the world. It will display information regarding the specific disaster area and personnel can access it from any computer to muster, said Edmond. Everyone should also have a fam ily plan in place. This includes have a specific meeting place in case you are separated one near the home and one outside the neighborhood if you cant return home. And, have an outof-state contact someone everyone in the family knows and knows how to contact. Families should also have an evacuation plan and know what to take and where to go. A plan should also be made for family pets. If you plan to ride the storm out at home, make sure you have a disaster survival kit. The key to hurricane season is being prepared. It doesnt take long to check your supplies and replenish what you need. And, there is nothing I can stress more than to check your insurance policy. Its better to make changes ahead of time, than find out after a disaster that you didnt have enough coverage, concluded Edmond. The following cases were recently heard during courts-martial in Navy Region Southeast: NAS Pensacola, a hospitalman was found guilty of assault and driving under the influence. The mili tary judge sentenced the accused to 446 days con finement, reduction in rate to E-1, and a bad conduct discharge. Mayport, a Fireman was found guilty of larceny. The military judge sentenced the accused to five months confinement, reduction in rate to E-1, and a bad conduct discharge. Jacksonville, an airman was found guilty of unauthorized absence and wrongfully using oxycodone, a Scheduled II controlled substance. The military judge sentenced the accused to 94 days confine ment, reduction in rate to E-1, and a bad conduct discharge. Jacksonville, a first class petty officer was found guilty of fraternization and living with a married woman who was not his wife. The military judge sentenced the accused to 45 days hard labor without confinement, 45 days restriction, reduction in rate to E-4, forfeiture of $1,000 pay per month for two months, and a reprimand. Jacksonville, a corporal was found not guilty of committing indecent conduct. Jacksonville, a first class petty officer was found guilty of committing indecent conduct. The military judge sentenced the accused to 110 days confine ment, reduction in rate to E-3, and a bad conduct discharge. Jacksonville, a first class petty officer was found guilty of false official statement, larceny, and knowingly executing a scheme to obtain moneys owned by or under the custody or control of a financial institution. The military judge sentenced the accused to 60 days confinement and reduction in rate to E-5. Jacksonville, a third class petty officer was found guilty of false official statement, wrongfully using amphetamines, wrongfully possessing amphet amines and methadone, a Schedule II controlled substance, and larceny. The military judge sen tenced the accused to one-year confinement, forfeiture of $1,010 pay per month for 10 months, reduc tion in rate to E-1, and a bad conduct discharge. Courts-martial in Navy Region Southeast are tried with few exceptions at NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport, and NAS Pensacola. Therefore, the loca tion of where a court-martial described above was convened does not necessarily correlate to the command that convened the court-martial. Adjudged sentences may be modified by pre-trial agreement or clemency. As VP-5 transitions to the P-8A Poseidon the squadron is high lighting a transitioning Mad Fox each week. This weeks spotlight shines on Lt. j.g. Jason Cromwell. Cromwell is from Chesapeake, Va. He attended Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech) where he received a Bachelor of Science in Biology. He earned his com mission through the Navy Reserve Officer Training Corps and was part of Virginia Techs Prestigious Corps of Cadets. Cromwell is currently one of the newest naval flight officers (NFO) at VP-5. VP-5 NFOs have been transition ing since the beginning of February through a series of interactive courseware, tabletop device sessions, and partial task trainers. Each training event is designed to incorpo rate VP-30s philosophy of crawl, walk, run training in regards to the P-8A transition and provides NFOs multiple software interaction opportunities. Recently, NFOs returned to their crews of acoustic and electronic warfare operators for the WTT simulator phase. These simulators offer crews an opportunity to work together, as they will on the plane, facing real world scenarios. On tactical P-8A flights two NFOs are part of the crew. Cromwell is the junior NFO known as the cotactical coordinator. His responsibilities involve communicating on any of the eight radios aboard the aircraft and managing tactical infor mation sent out from the aircraft over either the LINK-11 or LINK-16 network. While transi tioning he has also been studying to upgrade to the senior NFO position on the aircraft of tactical coordinator (TACCO). The TACCO manages the tactical aspects of the mission including sono buoy deployment for submarine prosecution, search patterns during surface warfare, or intelligence collection tactics. On the P-8A all the tactical operators sit next to one another on a rail, Cromwell explained. This is different than the P-3C and allows us to much more easily develop the tactical picture among one another. When Cromwell isnt working hard to learn the new P-8A Poseidon he enjoys playing bas ketball, riding his motorcycle, working out, and spending time with his German Shepherd Achilles. VP-5 transition spotlight 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013

PAGE 9

band, said Jazmin Oliver, whose husband, MA3 Johnny Oliver was killed less than a month ago in Bahrain. Its unfortunate that I have to be here for this reason, but its for great support. Also in attendance, was American Idol finalist and Jacksonville native, Phil Stacey, who sang the national anthem and other treasured American selections with Navy Band Southeast. Wreaths were placed in front of the wall for of the two new names etched on the black granite wall. Those names included: Army Sgt. Derek Smith and USMC 2nd Lt. Kim Weller (Vietnam Era). Jacksonville National Cemetery A short ceremony was held at Jacksonville National Cemetery, located north of the city, to pay tribute to veterans who served our nation. U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, civilian and mili tary officials listened to keynote speaker Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet, who spoke of how deserv ing Jacksonvilles military families are of a national cemetery for their loved ones to be laid to rest with honor. Unlike other holidays, Memorial Day brings Americans together to honor those who have given their last full measure of devotion to our country, said NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Roy Undersander at the cemeterys Memorial Day observance. I want to pay my respect and honor to those who have done their duty courageously, who have val iantly served our country and paid the ultimate sacrifice. Green Cove Springs Hundreds of military veterans, citizens and civic leaders observed Memorial Day at Historic Spring Park in Green Cove Springs May 27 as part of the 25th River Fest cel ebration. Green Cove Springs Mayor Mitch Timberlake said, Its always a somber honor to recognize our fallen service members, as well as to salute local veterans of our armed forces. When you hear the stories of these men and women, a humble thank-you for their effort in protecting our freedoms just doesnt seem to be enough. Fleet Readiness Center Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Rob Caldwell, said it was good to see so many people show support for those who made the ultimate sac rifice. Today we pay tribute to the men and women who gave their lives to defend our nation, said Caldwell. We honor Americans from every generation who shed their blood in the fight for freedom from Valley Forge to Vietnam, from Kuwait to Kandahar, from Berlin to Baghdad. NAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM) Brad Shepherd added, On Memorial Day it is our duty and privilege to reflect on the sac rifices that have been paid for our freedom. But liberty must be earned and each generation must pay its dues. So, let us remember the freedom and peace thats been paid for by American blood. And then, let us pass along to a new generation, their fascinating accounts of honor and courage, he said. Veterans from each military service, the Coast Guard and Merchant Marine, were called from the crowd to receive an American flag, as well as robust applause from those in attendance. MEMORIAL DAY JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013 9

PAGE 10

Navy Region Southeast completed participation in the annual hurricane preparedness exercise HURREX/Citadel Gale 2013 on May 23. The U.S. Fleet Forces Command/Commander, Navy Installations Command exercise tested the regions abil ity to track, prepare for and respond to hurri canes should they threat en installations in the Southeast. In the Southeast Region, its not a mat ter of if a hurricane will strike, its a matter of when and where, said Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast. Since last years HURREX, we have had five named storms impact our region, so it is imperative that we train so we are ready when they strike. Each year, this exer cise gives us an excellent opportunity to test our skills through authentic, challenging scenarios that go a long way to ensure we are ready in the event of an actual hurricane, Scorby added. A number of major storms have affected installations throughout the region in recent years. Anyone on board Joint Reserve Base New Orleans in 2005 would remember the damage caused by Katrina. More recently, Hurricane Sandy made landfall just west of NS Guantanamo Bay, Cuba last year before moving toward the northeast. During this years HURREX scenario, the NRSE Crisis Action Team (CAT) tracked two ficti tious hurricanes, Kirk and Lay, from the Regional Operations Center at NAS Jacksonville. Kirk crossed over NS Guantanamo Bay and eventually made landfall as a category two hurricane near the Georgia-South Carolina border, and Lay made landfall as a category four hurricane near NAS Pensacola. The CAT consists of nearly 50 personnel, each with specific roles ranging from planning and logis tics to family support ser vices. In addition to the CAT, the region also deploys a Contingency Engineering Response Team (CERT)/ Damage Assessment Team (DAT), led by Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast, which assesses dam age after the storm, as well as an Emergency Family Assistance Center, which provides support to families. Throughout HURREX, these teams coordinated their efforts with local authorities and civilian agencies as they would in the event of a real hurricane. HURREX is essen tial training, said Scott Crossley, NRSE regional emergency manager. We get lots of tropi cal storms, but as often as we get landfall, we still see far too many casual ties from people forget ting some of the lessons weve learned in the past. Weve learned that too many injuries occur, even with lesser storms, after the storm has passed because people are trying to drive through flooded roads or trying to repair storm damage. By doing these exercises, it helps reinforce the message that this is a real hazard. During an actual storm, NRSE personnel coordi nate with Fleet Weather Center Norfolk to track potential hurricanes and tropical storms from the beginning stages of the weather system. We have a very good working relationship with the Fleet Weather Center, Crossley said. We watch tropical weather year round, but as we approach the hurricane season, we really start watching closely. The public will start seeing hurricane alerts and warnings from the National Hurricane Center once a tropical storm is established, but for us, we have to see it as soon as it happens so we can get moving. A storm can pop up with little notice. The Navy classi fies storms in terms of Conditions of Readiness (COR), which indicate the proximity of a storm and the likelihood that it will hit a given installation. At the beginning of the hurricane season, each installation is set to COR five. As storms approach, that condition will change at an installation based on when destructive winds are projected to hit. Installations set COR four when onset of destruc tive force winds is within 72 hours, COR three at 48 hours, COR two at 24 hours and COR one at 12 hours. Once a storm is projected to make landfall at an installation, the decision must be made to evacuate or shelter in place. That decision is made based on a number of factors relat ed to the intensity of the storm, Crossley said. We look at things like the maximum forecasted wind. Thats the initial criteria to estimate what the impact will be on people and missions, he said. But the thing we are most concerned about, espe cially for coastal installa tions, is storm surge and water. According to Crossley, it is essential for both personnel and dependents to be aware of advisories and instructions as a storm approaches. One of the objectives of HURREX for the installa tions is to ensure that not only the Sailors, but all of the residents on an installation are plugged into the hurricane process, he said. That means being aware of how to muster if evacuated, which varies from command to com mand. Also, making sure you have the correct number to call. In addition, installa tions will also communi cate through their com mand web pages and social media, so residents can look to these sources for the latest information, Crossley said. Once a storm passes, the CAT shifts its focus to providing whatever kind of support is needed to get the installation running at full capacity based on reports from the CERT and DAT. The first step is a health and welfare check to make sure that every one is safe and accounted for, Crossley said. Step two is initial damage assessment of the installation. We need to ensure we have main tained command and control capability and find out if the installation utilities are still function ing or if they are affected to some degree. We try to start with mission-critical facilities, utilities and fleet support requirements and we go on from there. According to Crossley, one of the most impor tant things for people to keep in mind about the hurricane process is to be prepared for a storm well before it even happens. Some important prepa rations include ensuring important documents are in a safe location, mak ing sure family members have contact information in case of an evacuation, making sure prescription medications are read ily available, and ensur ing that any special need family members can be properly taken care of, Crossley said. We absolutely need to be ready, Crossley said. Its not a matter of if one of our installations is going to be affected; its a matter of when. For more informa tion, visit https://www. cnic.navy.mil/cnrse/ RegionOperationsand Services/Operationsand Management/Emergency Management/index.htm. Navy Region Southeast prepares for hurricane season Cmdr. William Pennington relieved Cmdr. Molly Boron as commanding officer of VP-16 May 23 in Hangar 117 at NAS Jacksonville. Capt. Heidi Fleming, executive officer of Naval Air Station Patuxent River, was the guest speaker. A native of Dallas, Texas, Pennington graduat ed from the United States Naval Academy in 1996 with a Bachelor of Science in Weapons and Systems Engineering. He wasawarded his naval aviator wings ofgold in July 1998 and has completed flying tours at NAF Washington D.C., VP-4 in Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville and VP-40 at NAS Whidbey Island, Wash. Additional tours include assignment to Commander, U.S. 7th Fleet staff on board USS Blue Ridge (LCC-19), home ported in Yokosuka, Japan, Naval Personnel Command, and as deputy executive assistant to the Director, Air Warfare (OPNAV N88) on the Chief of Naval Operations Staff at the Pentagon. He assumed executive officer duties at VP-16 in May 2012. He commended the War Eagles former command ing officer. I want to congratulate skipper Boron on an impressive tour leading the War Eagle team. Her unmatched commitment to her Sailors and aircrew elevated her command to new heights as she successfully led them through the historic transition to the P-8A, said Pennington. Boron took control of the War Eagles in 2012 as they were finishing their last deployment at Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan. The War Eagles are the first operational Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Squadron to transition from the P-3C Orion to the P-8A Poseidon. Borons infectious confidence and superb leadership steered the War Eagles through the rigorous transition syllabus and helped overcome unforeseen obstacles encountered in bringing a new type model online. Her guidance and direction resulted in the squadron receiving outstand ing marks during their safe for flight inspection earlier this year. During the ceremo ny, Boron imparted some words of wisdom and encouragement to her former squadron. President Roosevelt made famous an old African proverb Speak softly and carry a big stick. You will go far, stated Boron. As VP-16 pre pares to take the P-8 on deployment at the end of the year, I see them continuing to be the quiet profes sionals, dutifully learning their trades, honing new skills and capabilities. When those six Poseidons and 12 combat air crews head west, their warfighter skills and hidden power projection will become Americas big stick in the Pacific. Boron joined the War Eagle leadership team in April 2011, serving first as executive officer. She is transferring to PMA-290 in Patuxent River, Md. Pennington assumes command of VP-16 in the midst of a 12-month inter-deployment readiness cycle preparing to lead the squadron on the first P-8A operational deployment to Kadena Air Base. He is joined by new executive officer Cmdr. Daniel Papp. VP-16 War Eagles change command 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013

PAGE 11

The Japanese Midway attack force was divided three ways. First, the aircraft carriers would approach from the northwest and knock out the islands defenses. Coming in from the west and southwest, the Japanese 2nd Fleet would invade and capture Midway. Admiral Yamamotos battleships would remain 300 miles to the west, awaiting the U. S. Pacific Fleet. Thanks to the work of American code breakers, the United States knew Yamamotos plans in detail by the middle of May his target, his order of battle and his schedule. When the battle opened, the U.S. had three carriers waiting in ambush, 200 miles to the east of Midway. The two opposing fleets sent out search planes the Americans to locate an enemy they knew was there and the Japanese as a matter of ordinary prudence. Seaplanes from Midway also were looking for the expected enemy fleet. One of the planes spotted the Japanese carrier force at 5:30 a.m. on June 4. The plane also reported Japanese aircraft heading for the atoll. Marine Corps planes from Midway soon intercepted the enemy formation. However, the Marines were hopelessly outnum bered and their planes were no match for the Japanese Zero fighter planes. They were able to shoot down only a few of the enemy bombers, while suffering great losses themselves. The torpedo boats and anti-aircraft fire from Midways guns were somewhat more successful in disrupting the Japanese attack. A force of 108 Japanese planes hit Midways two islands at 6:30 a.m. Twenty minutes of bombing and machine-gun fire knocked out some facilities on Eastern Island, but did not disable the airfield there. Sand Islands oil tanks, seaplane hangar and other buildings were set afire. The commander of the Japanese attack radioed that another air strike was required to soften up Midways defenses for invasion. The Japanese carriers fought off several counter strikes from Midways torpedo planes and bombers. Faced with overwhelming fighter opposition, these uncoordinated efforts suffered severe losses and hit nothing but seawater. Meanwhile, a Japanese scout plane spotted the U.S. fleet and reported the presence of a carrier. Japanese commander Nagumo had already begun loading bombs into his second group of planes for another strike on Midway. This news forced him to rethink his strategy. He decided to wait for the planes returning from Midway and re-arm all the planes with torpe does for an attack on the U.S. ships. He almost had enough time. Beginning about 9:30 a.m., torpedo planes from the U.S. carriers Hornet, Enterprise and Yorktown made a series of attacks that despite nearly total losses made no hits. Then, at 10:25, everything changed. Three squadrons of dive bombers, two from Enterprise and one from Yorktown, almost simulta neously dove on three of the four Japanese carriers whose decks were crowded with fully armed and fueled planes. By 10:30 a.m., Akagi, Kaga, and Soryu were ablaze and out of action. Of the once overwhelming Japanese carrier force, only Hiryu remained operational. Shortly before 11 a.m. she launched 18 of her own dive-bombers. At about noon, as these planes approached Yorktown, they were intercepted by U.S. fight er planes, which shot down most of the bombers. Seven survived, however, hitting Yorktown with three bombs, stopping her dead in the water. The Yorktowns crew managed to get their ship underway, as two more groups of torpedo planes and fighters from Hiryu spotted the Yorktown, which they mistook for a second U.S. carrier. Despite losses to the defending fighters and heavy anti-aircraft fire, the Japanese planes pushed on to deliver a beautifully coordinated torpedo attack. The stricken ship again went dead in the water. Concerned that the severely listing vessel was about to capsize, her captain ordered his crew to abandon ship. Late on June 4, U.S. carrier planes found and bombed Hiryu, which sank the next day. Two days later, a Japanese submarine located the Yorktown and the U.S. destroyer Hammann, which was helping the Yorktown return to Pearl Harbor for repairs. The submarine torpedoed both vessels. The Hammann sank immediately, and the Yorktown finally sank the following morning. By the end of the battle, the perseverance, sacrifice and skill of American pilots plus a great deal of good luck cost Japan four irreplaceable aircraft carriers. Only one of the three U.S. carriers was sunk. The Japanese lost 332 of their finest aircraft and more than 200 of their most experienced pilots. Deprived of useful air cover, and after several hours of shocked indecision, Yamamoto called off the Midway operation and retreated. The Japanese navy never fully recovered from its losses. Six months after it began, the great Japanese Pacific War offensive was over. From June 1942 to the end of the war three years later, it was the Americans who were on the offense.Midway the defining battle Out of state drivers check your license are from and the state you are in? If you are active duty, your license may be valid after it expires but this is not automatic and varies from state to state. Go to http://www.dmv-department-of-motor-vehi cles.com/index.html to see your states DMV where most questions can be answered. License extensions, if offered, are for active duty members only and do not pertain to spouses or other licensed members of the family. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013 11

PAGE 12

Troops, families can visit museums free for summerDuring the busy season of military transfers, adjust ing to new communities and registering children for school, more than 2,000 museums across the nation will open their doors, free of charge, to service members and their families as a break from the summer challenges, a Defense Department official said today. From Memorial Day, May 27, through Labor Day, Sept. 2, all active duty service members, National Guardsmen and reservists and their families can take advantage of this cultural and educational opportunity in all 50 states. Its an exciting, inspiring, educational and economical activity for our families to enjoy this summer, said Navy Cmdr. Leslie Hull-Ryde, a Pentagon spokeswoman. Launching its fourth year in a news conference today at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the 2013 Blue Star Museums Program is a collaboration among the Defense Department, Blue Star Families, the National Endowment for the Arts and the museums to give service members and their families a way to spend time together in their local museums. After long deployments, rigorous training schedules and very long hours, our time with our families is very limited and extremely precious to us, Hull-Ryde said. We are so grateful [to have] these programs. This pro gram is an investment in our families. A record number of museums are participating this year. The program began in 2010 with free access to about 600 museums, while this years 2,000 is a figure thats still growing, Blue Star Families and NEA officials said. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Disabled American Veterans and the American Legion announced a new partnership May 21 to help reduce the compensation claims backlog for veterans. The effort called the Fully Developed Claims Community of Practice is a key part of VAs overall transformation plan to end the backlog in 2015 and process claims within 125 days at 98 percent accuracy, VA officials said. VA can process fully developed claims in half the time it takes for a traditionally filed claim, officials noted. VA prides itself on our ongoing partnership with organizations that rep resent veterans throughout the claims process, said Undersecretary for Benefits Allison Hickey. A fully devel oped claim is the most effective way to ensure a veterans claim never reach es the backlog and is the basis for this new initiative between VA and what we expect will be an ever-increasing num ber of veteran service organizations and others who represent veterans at vari ous points of the claims process. The new initiative takes a commonsense approach to working smarter to better serve injured and ill veterans, said Barry Jesinoski, Washington Headquarters executive director for Disabled American Veterans. DAV is pleased to be working with the VA to help improve the disability compensation system, Jesinoski added. The American Legion has been working with VA since December on its fully developed claims process, said James Koutz, the American Legions national commander. Teams of our experts have already gone to VA regional offices in Denver, Pittsburgh, Baltimore and other cities to help identify best practices for [fully developed claims], and to further train our own service officers, Koutz said. Claims are considered to be fully developed when veterans submit all available supporting evidence, such as private treatment records and notice of federal treatment records, to VA at the time they first file a formal claim and certify they have no more evidence to submit. This is the information that VA needs to make a determination on a disability claim, VA officials said. The fully developed claims program supports the sharing of best practices across veteran service organizations that help thousands of veterans each year with their compensation claims, to identify up front all evidence necessary to support a veterans claim, offi cials explained. Veterans then certify that they have no additional evidence to submit, and VA can process the claim in half the time it takes for a traditionally filed claim, they added. Veteran service organizations have long played an integral role in sub mitting veterans claims often with representatives working within VA regional offices. VA has consulted with them throughout the development and implementation of its plan to end the backlog in 2015 to ensure best practices and their unique insights were incorporated, officials said. The American Legion and DAV are the first to step forward to work with VA on the program, officials added, and that program has led to a much more efficient process. This is the latest effort in support of the plan to reduce the backlog. Last month, VA announced an initiative to expedite compensation claims deci sions for veterans who have waited one year or longer. On April 19, VA began prioritizing claims decisions for veterans who have been waiting the longest by providing provisional decisions that allow eligible veterans to begin collecting compensation benefits quickly. With a provisional decision, a veteran has a year to sub mit additional information to support a claim before the decision becomes final. On May 15, VA officials announced that the department is mandating overtime for claims processors in its 56 regional benefits offices through the end of fiscal year 2013 to help eliminate the backlog, with continued emphasis on high-priority claims for homeless veterans and those claiming financial hardship, the terminally ill, former prisoners of war, Medal of Honor recipi ents, and veterans filing fully developed claims. As of May 17, the paperless claims processing system known as the Veterans Benefits Management System, or VBMS, has been deployed to 46 out of 56 regional office locations, and about 18 percent of VAs current claim inventory is in an electronic format, officials said. Claims for Wounded Warriors sep arating from the military for medical reasons will continue to be handled separately and on a priority basis with the Defense Department through the Integrated Disability Evaluation System, officials said. On average, they noted, wounded warriors separating through IDES currently receive VA compensation benefits in two months fol lowing their separation from service. VA, Vet groups announce initiative to reduce claims backlog Cmdr. William Pennington at a 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013

PAGE 13

The Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department is hosting the 80 Days of Summer program through Aug. 31 at NAS Freedom Lanes. Just in time for summer vacation youth bowlers 17 years and younger can bowl one game for free daily until 5 p.m. all sum mer long. This program also includes daily, weekly and grand prize drawings for all patrons. Patrons are entered into the drawings every time a game is bowled. Daily prize drawings include food, beverages, games of bowling and more. The weekly drawings are held on Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and prizes are sponsored by Comfort Inn Destin, Dave & Busters, Adventure Landing, Wild Florida Airboats, County Inn & Suites Jacksonville, Old Town Trolley Tours St. Augustine, LEGOLAND Florida, Fun Spot Attractions, Sleuths Mystery Dinner Show Orlando, CoCo Key Water Resort Orlando, Clarion Suites Main Gate Orlando, Ramada Main Gate West Orlando, Gatorland, Seraloago Hotel & Suites Main Gate East Orlando, Wonderworks Orlando, Pirates Dinner Adventure Orlando, Inn at Ellis Square Savannah, World Quest Resort Orlando, Wild Adventures Theme Park, La Quinta Inn & Suites Valdosta, Georgia, Crowne Plaza Tampa Westshore, Wet n Wild Orlando and Clarion Inn & Suites Orlando. The grand prize and run ner up drawings are Sept. 7 at 7:30 p.m. Grand prize includes an Orlando family vacation package featuring a two-night stay at World Quest Resort in a two bedroom suite, Sea World admission for two and Sea Worlds water park Aquatica admission for two. First runner-up includes a two-night stay at La Quinta Inn & Suites in Valdosta, Ga and Wild Adventures theme park admission for four. Second runner-up includes a two-night stay at the Crowne Plaza Tampa Westshore and Busch Gardens admission for two. Third runner-up includes a two-night stay at Clarion Inn & Suites in Orlando, Fl and Wet n Wild admission for four. The 80 Days of Summer program is open to all authorized MWR patrons. For official rules and more information call 542-3493. Weekly Prize Drawing Schedule Two drawings each week, one prize drawing per person. Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. Online survey goes live June 1Your commissary wants to hear from youWhether you shop at your local commissary or not, the Defense Commissary Agency wants to hear from you. From June 1 through Aug. 1, an online survey will be available on www.commissaries.com by clicking on the take our survey link or accessing the survey directly at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/DeCAShopping-Survey. Were asking for input from our regular shoppers, occasional shoppers and non-shoppers alike, said Tracie Russ, director of DeCAs business development directorate. The responses will be analyzed and used to improve the commissary for all our patrons. The survey takes only 8-12 minutes to complete, and Russ said the time spent will have meaningful impact on future improvements at commissaries worldwide. Cool off at NAS Freedom Lanes this summer JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013 13

PAGE 14

DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 510 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 1 6 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer June 1 Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 years and younger receive one free game of bowling every day until 5 p.m. Win prizes all summer long!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours Open Monday Friday (lap swim only) During lap swim only the waterslide, water park and concessions will not be open. 6 a.m. 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 7 p.m. Saturday & Sunday (recreation swimming) 11 a.m. 6 p.m. June 10 pool opens daily for recreational swimming 2013 Learn to Swim Program Session 1: June 1020 Session 2 July 8-18 Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Disney Cruise Lines will be at ITT June 11, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Learn more about exciting 2013/2014 trips. Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Daytona International Speedway Subway Firecracker July 5 and Coke 400 July 6 Tickets on sale now! Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Legoland Kids go FREE with an adult ticket purchase from ITT Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3. Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7. 2013 Live Broadway Series Cesar Millan June 1 $42 $52 Amelia Island Museum of History $10 family pass, Ghost tour $8 adult, $4 child Florida Ecosafaris in St. Cloud EcoPark $119, Coach safari adult $28, child $25, Zipline safari $75, Cypress canopy cycle $40 for one hour St. Augustine Scenic Cruise June 8, $20 per personThe Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Paintball Trip June 1 at 9 a.m. Jax Suns Baseball Game June 6 at 6 p.m. Free admission and transportation I Love Music Concert Tour Featuring Red Jumpsuit Apparatus and New Boyz! June 8 at 2 p.m. NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees June 11 and 25 for active duty June 13 and 27 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Loudmouth Thursday Any golfer wearing a pair of loudmouth shorts or pants plays 18 holes with cart for $20 Open to military, DoD and guests Junior Golf Clinic Session 1, June 1721, ages 1117 Session 2, July 1519, ages 610 Session 3, July 29 Aug. 2, ages 1117 $110 per child, per sessionMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina June 15, 16, 22 & 23 July 20, 21, 27 & 28 Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772Drop-in care and open recreation available!Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information.Flying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School June 3 July 10 $500 per person For more information about any of the sports, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. Visit the MWR Web site at www.cnic.navy.mil or www.facebook.com nasjaxmwr. 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013

PAGE 15

The Defense and Veterans Affairs departments should be able to create a seamless health records system by the end of the year, Undersecretary of Defense Frank Kendall told reporters May 22. The undersecretary for acquisition, technology and logistics led a review of the health care records system. The idea is to create a system in which health care records can move from DOD to VA or other health care providers. The two departments are building on President Barack Obamas national standards for health care records. This will enable records to move more easily between DOD and the VA, Kendall said during a Pentagon news con ference. DOD has been sending electronic medical records to VA for years, the undersecre tary noted. Those read only records are used by VA to determine eligibility for ben efits and disability. But records are also necessary for medical care, he said. Its there that were really trying to improve the records used by doctors and clini cians, he added. The first step in that is to get in compliance with the standard data format so it can move in a seamless way. We expect to have inte grated, seamless records with the VA by the end of this year. A separate effort is to mod ernize the systems used within the Defense Department and VA to provide health care. Theres no requirement that we use the same software to do that, Kendall said. VA officials elected to modernize using the departments existing Vista system. It was a reasonable decision for VA, Kendall said. They had a solid base in Vista, had a lot of people trained in it, had the programming in-house, and their physicians were familiar with it. Veterans Affairs will con tinue to build for the future on the Vista system, and DOD may use Vista or it may use another software altogether, Kendall said. The question is how to provide the best value for our people and the best possible health care for our people, he said. The conclusion after the review is the best possible approach taps into the com mercial market and brings commercial systems in as candidates, along with Vista-based systems as well. DOD reached out to indus try and received 20 proposals, including three based on Vista. We think we have a rich field to pick from, and we can make a best value determina tion for DOD, the undersecre tary said. Kendall said the next task moving forward is going to be understanding whats afford able, given the budget stream. Modernization is probably going to take place . in an incremental fashion, he said. The bottom line for service members is that they will have a single integrated record, Kendall said. The record is the data, he said, and once we have that data in the standardized form and we have converted the data we have now into that architecture, then were positioned to whatever lies ahead whatever software we buy, to wherever we move it. DOD, VA move ahead with seamless medical record JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013 15

PAGE 16

16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013 The Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast (NAVFAC SE), Public Works Department (PWD), as the NAS Jacksonville (Station) water utility service provider, is very pleased to provide you with the 2012 annual Water Quality Report. PWD provides a safe and dependable supply of drinking water through three deep wells which draw from the Floridian aquifer. In 2009, the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) performed a source water assessment that identi fied no potential sources of con tamination near NAS Jax wells. Assessment results are on the DEP Source Water Assessment and Protection Program Web site at www.dep.state.fl.us/swapp Treatment of the water supply includes aeration for odor control and chlorination for disinfection. In 2003, the station began receiving potable water from JEA, therefore, some of the data in this report is from JEA testing.PWD Jacksonville routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to federal and state laws and regu lations. Except where indicated otherwise, this report is based on the results of our monitoring for the period Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 2012. Data obtained before Jan. 1, 2012, and presented in this report are from the most recent testing done in accordance with the laws, rules, and regulations. Below are the definitions of terms and abbreviations used in the report: NAS Jacksonville 2012 Water Quality ReportFecal Coliform/E. coli. Fecal coliforms and E. coli are bacteria whose presence indicates that the water may be contaminated with human or animal wastes. Microbes in these wastes can cause short-term effects, such as diarrhea, cramps, nausea, headaches, or other symptoms. They may pose a special health risk for infants, young children, some of the elderly, and people with severely compromised immune systems. The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally-occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Treatment of your water supply includes aeration for odor control and chlorination for disinfection. Contaminants that may be present in source water include: In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) prescribes regulations that limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water that must provide the same protection for public health. MCLs are set at very stringent levels: to understand the possible health effects described for many regulated contaminants, a person would have to drink two liters of water every day at the MCL for a lifetime to have a onein-a-million chance of having the described health effect. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/ AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPAs Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791. If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. NAVFAC SE is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to two minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www. epa.gov/safewater/lead. For more information or questions concerning this report, contact PWD Water Utilities at 542-6440.

PAGE 17

Yellow Water Housing 2012 Water Quality Report The NAS Jacksonville Safety Office is offering a driver improvement class spe cifically for dependent young drivers between the age of 15 and 21 years old June 14 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. The class will be held in the Safety Conference Room in Building 1. Participants do not have to have a drivers license to attend. The class will offer safety tips such as how to respond to driving emergencies and distracted driving while bringing awareness to risks of driving and much more. The class consists of videos, chapter quizzes and concludes with a multiple choice question test. There will not be any time behind the wheel; this is classroom only. The teens will receive an AAA Driver Improvement Class completion certificate. If you feel your teen could benefit from this class, sign them up by calling Linda at 542-3082, Cindy at 542-2584 or Kristen at 542-8810. Approximately 16,000 randomly selected female officers and enlisted personnel are being asked to partic ipate in the online survey on the fit, design and durability of Navy uniforms in a fleet-wide survey announced in NAVADMIN 127/13. Letters were mailed April 30 to participants, notifying them of their selection and providing instructions on accessing and completing the survey. The online survey will be open for approximately 90 days. The decision to do the fleet-wide survey was made after interviews and focus groups determined that there was a need to gather more feedback on womens uniform concerns and recommendations. Survey questions address levels of satisfaction with service dress, service and working uniforms and compo nents. The survey will also ask about fit and hip-to-waist ratio of slacks; the comfort of shirt collars; and preference for shirt lining, shoulder stitching and yoke on service uniform shirts. Teen driving class offered by NAS Jax SafetyNavy announces fleet-wide womens uniform survey After little more than just six months of service, the Commissary Rewards Card continues winning promi nence in customer wallets and purses worldwide. The card gives custom ers access to digital coupons redeemable at any of the Defense Commissary Agencys 247 stores. Our customers love the Commissary Rewards Card, said Acting Director of Sales Joyce Chandler. Its hard not to! It saves you time, effort and money, plus reduces the number of paper coupons you have to clip and carry. More than 600,000 cards have been registered by shop pers, who have downloaded more than 4.5 million coupons so far. That means bigger sav ings for them, on top of the commissarys usual savings of 30 percent or more. Were averaging more than 120 coupons available at any given time, said Marye Carr, DeCAs Rewards Card pro gram manager. New coupons are loaded almost daily! Our industry partners are stepping up with great coupons on all kinds of items everyone uses every day. If youre not using your card, you could be throwing away significant savings. One of the first rewards being offered by manufac turers to Rewards Card users is the posting of two different coupons each week for a free item, Carr said. The free item coupons remain available for redemp tion for only one week from the posting date. A limited number of coupons are available; when the coupon reaches the maximum allowed electronic clips, the coupon disappears from the website. The free item rewards run through May 26. Carr said many customers find it handy to print a list of their coupons before making the trip to the commissary to help them keep track of their savings. The card provides a new way to save, in addition to your paper coupons, she said. Commissary shoppers love coupons, so this is another way to increase buying power. Using the card is simple. Once patrons pick up a card at their commissary, they visit DeCAs Web site to register it, and then load digital coupons directly to their account. Then, when the cashier scans the card, the coupons are matched to items purchased, and savings are automatically deducted from the total bill. Rewards Card digital cou pons disappear from your account when they expire. Like paper coupons, they cant be combined with other coupons on the same item, and they have expiration dates and other redemption terms and condi tions. Overseas, digital coupons will not be accepted for up to six months after expiration, as paper coupons are, because the coupons are instantly available to all customers worldwide. That means overseas cus tomers dont need extra time to use the coupons. To learn more about the card or sign up to be notified of updates, including new coupon alerts, go to http://www.com missaries.com/rewards_sub scribe.cfm A customer service hotline can be reached at 855-829-6219 or through e-mail at commis sarysupport@inmar.com .Customers pass six months, 4.5 million mark in downloads of Commissary Rewards Card coupons JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013 17

PAGE 18

18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013

PAGE 19

JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013 19

PAGE 20

20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 30, 2013