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Jax air news ( May 23, 2013 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA SLAF
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012

Material Information

Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 23, 2013
Publication Date: 05-23-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02043

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012

Material Information

Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 23, 2013
Publication Date: 05-23-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02043


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THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013 MAD FOXES SPILL DRILL WWP Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com NAS Jacksonville and the Northeast Florida Navy League Council hosted their 11th bi-annual Individual Augmentee (IA) Appreciation luncheon May 16 at the NAS Jax River Cove Catering and Conference Center. More than 90 IAs from the base, tenant commands, Blount Island Command and several spouses were recognized at the event. The event was sponsored by the Northeast Florida Navy League, Rotary Club of Orange Park and Rotary of Orange Park Sunrise. The luncheon kicked off with the singing of the national anthem by country western singer Paul Stewart, a work and family life consultant for Navy Fleet and Family Support Programs. The invocation was delivered by NAS Jax Command Chaplain (Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore. Music was provided by Navy Band Southeast. As awardees and command representatives enjoyed their lunch, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders welcomed and thanked the IAs for their dedi cated service. He then introduced Naval Hospital Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer as the guest speaker. Shaffer offered a brief perspective on what it was like working in a hospital in Africa during her IA tour. During the deployment there I realized that med icine is a language all nations understand, said Shaffer. NAS Jax Sailors participate in Never Quit More than 4,000 par ticipants, including NAS Jax Sailors, civilian per sonnel and famed pro fessional surfer Bethany Hamilton, who lost her arm to a shark attack in 2003 while surfing in Hawaii and Navy Lt. Brad Snyder, who was blind ed by an explosion while deployed in Afghanistan in 2011, enjoyed the vari ous Never Quit Never beach events Sunday at Jacksonville Beach. Snyder was a former Naval Academy swim mer and won gold in the first Paralympic Games in London in 2012. The beach event is held every year as a tribute to the former Jacksonville The VR-62 Nomads returned last week from European Command (EUCOM) after a very successful detachment. Flying a C-130T logistics aircraft with 21 maintainers and air crew, theVR-62 detachment flew 31 missions from 19 unique airfields dur ing 11 weeks ofdetached operations. The Nomads personnel include Selected Reserve and Full Time Support Sailors.The detachment Individual Augmentees recognized during luncheon Service members from NAS Jax, Blount Island Command and the Florida National Guard were honored during the annual Clay County Military Appreciation Luncheon presented by the Clay County Chamber of Commerce and VyStar Credit Union May 17 at the Thrasher-Horne Conference Center. The luncheon began with presenta tion of the colors by the Marine Corps League, singing of the national anthem, invocation and a short tribute to POW/ MIAs. Sen. Marco Rubio then gave a short message via video praising the service members in attendance. The military has long played an important role in Clay County history and in the Northeast Florida region. All across Florida, military installations and families are a strong part of our community backbone. Id like to thank all of our military members and their families for your continued support and for what you do every day for our great nation, said Rubio. Clay County Chamber of Commerce Chairman of the Board George Egan also thanked those in attendance for their service. Today we honor the service of not only the great men and women who currently serve in our armed forces from the Northeast Florida region, but also those who have served our country so boldly and so honorably at pivotal moments in our history, said Egan. He then asked all veterans and those who serve publicly to stand for a round of applause. VyStar Credit Union President and CEO Terry West also offered his grati Clay County chamber honors service members Nomads home from EUCOM detachment

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS May 23 1850 Navy sends USS Advance and USS Rescue to attempt rescue of Sir John Franklins expedition, lost in Arctic. 1939 USS Squalus (SS-92) sinks off Postsmouth, N.H., with loss of 26 lives. May 24 1917 First U.S. merchant marine convoy to cross North Atlantic during World War I leaves Hampton Roads, Va. 1918 USS Olympia anchors at Kola Inlet, Murmansk, Russia, to protect refugees during Russian Revolution. 1939 First and only use of Vice Adm. Allan McCanns rescue chamber brings up 33 men from sunken USS Squalus (SS-192). 1945 Fast carrier task force aircraft attack airfields in southern Kyushu, Japan. 1945 Nine navy ships damaged by concentrated kamikaze attack off Okinawa. 1961 USS Gurke (DD 783) notices signals from 12 men near Truk who were caught in a storm, drifted at sea for two months before being stranded on an island for one month. USS Southerland (DD743) investigated, notified Truk, and provided provisions and supplies to repair their outrigger canoe. The men would be picked up on 7 June by the motor launch Kaselehlia. 1962 Launch of Mercury 7, piloted by Lt. Cmdr. Malcolm Scott Carpenter, who completed three orbits in 4 hours, 56 minutes at an altitude up to 166.8 statute miles at 17,549 mph. He was picked up by HSS-2 heli copters from USS Intrepid (CVS-11). The capsule was recovered by USS John R. Pierce (DD-753). May 25 1952 USS Iowa (BB-61) bombards Chongjin, Korea. 1973 Launch of Skylab 2 mission, which was first U.S. manned orbiting space station. It had an all-Navy crew of Capt. Charles Conrad Jr., Cmdr. Joseph Kerwin, and Cmdr. Paul Weitz. During the 28-day mission of 404 orbits, the craft rendezvoused with Skylab to make repairs and conduct science experiments. Recovery by USS Ticonderoga (CVS-14). May 26 1944 USS England sinks fifth Japanese submarine in one week. 1952 Tests from 26-29 May demonstrate feasibil ity of the angled-deck concept conducted on simulated angled deck on board USS Midway (CV 41). 1990 USS Beaufort (ATS-2) rescues 24 Vietnamese refugees in South China Sea. May 27 1805 Naval forces capture Derne, Tripoli; raise U.S. flag over foreign soil. 1813 American joint operations against Fort George, Canada. 1919 Navy NC-4 seaplane completes trans-Atlantic flight from Newfoundland to Lisbon, Portugal. May 28 1813 Frigate Essex and prize capture five British whalers. 1917 First underway fueling in U.S. Navy, as USS Maumee (AO-2) fuels six destroyers in North Atlantic. Lt. Cmdr. Chester Nimitz served as Maumees execu tive officer and chief engineer. 1957 First of 24 detonations during Operation Plumbbob nuclear test. 1980 55 women among graduates from the U.S. Naval Academy. May 29 1781 Frigate Alliance captures HMS Atalanta and Trepassy off Nova Scotia. 1991 Amphibious Task Force in Bangladesh for cyclone relief is redeployed. When I first saw the resurrected news of Abercrombie and Fitch CEO Mike Jeffries 2006 comments about cool kids and why they are the only ones who should wear his brand, I thought it was an article from The Onion but I was wrong. (The Onion is a satirical site with mostly fake news, and I thought that no other entity, except those in the vein of Saturday Night Live, would seriously allow their front man to tell the press that they dont sell to fat or un-cool kids.) Lets review: In 2006, Jeffries told a reporter from Salon.com that A&F does not make any clothing beyond a size 10 or Large for women. In every school there are the cool and popular kids, and then there are the not-so-cool kids. Candidly, we go after the cool kids. We go after the attractive all-American kid with a great attitude and a lot of friends. A lot of peo ple dont belong [in A&F] and they cant belong. Are we exclusionary? Absolutely . companies that are in trouble are trying to target everybody: young, old, fat, skinny. But then you become totally vanilla. You dont alienate anybody, but you dont excite anybody, either, said Jeffries. Abercrombie and Fitch does, howev er, make XL and XXL for men because, presumably, athletic and sexy men need larger clothing to accommodate their muscles. Putting aside the fact that the aver age American woman wears a size 12 or 14 (just how small no pun intended of a market is Abercrombie target ing, anyway?) and that labeling a dress with Size 0 says metaphorically, Do I really want to be a zero? Does that mean invisible? Does that mean having no substance? Jeffries comments add fuel to the growing fire of bullying and violence in our schools. While teachers and guidance coun selors work tirelessly to promote acceptance, compassion and the fact that beauty really is on the inside, Abercrombie and Fitch pushes against them by basically telling a large portion of the teenage population, You dont belong. Youre not cool. You are fat. I dont belong in Abercrombie and Fitch either. First, by their standards, Im old. I can hardly read my iPhone without hold ing it in front of my face, so I certainly couldnt read the tags on clothes inside the dimly lit A&F stores. Also, the music gives me a headache, and I feel uncomfortable being waited on, as is the case at the New York City A&F, by shirtless men (well, unless its my shirtless man). But even if I wasnt old, or if I had good vision and less sensitive ears, I couldnt shop at Jeffries stores because I dont fit into the clothes. Im one of those women who need something big ger than a size 10. It hasnt always been this way. In fact, when I was four months pregnant with my first child, I did wear A&F. Im sure pregnant women are not on Jeffries list of coveted customers, but if hes basing everything on out ward appearances, well then, on paper I belonged. I weighed 113 pounds. I was 22 years old. I had long blonde hair, tan skin and zero wrinkles. I wore a size 2. Yet, as we all know (or should know by now), everything that we are the entirety of our worth does not show up on paper, and it certainly does not show up on a scale. I wasnt cool back then. I was awk ward and self conscious. (I mean, why else does a pregnant woman wear tight A&F pants except to be something shes not?) I shopped at certain stores in order to have a certain look. I wanted to fit in. Im probably not cool now, accord ing to Jeffries. But I dont need a certain brand or weight to make me feel impor tant anymore. Im comfortable in my own skin, and I wish Jeffries, and others like him, would move out of the way and help todays teenagers get to this point of confidence quicker than my generation. Hey, what is Jeffries (in his 60s) known for except making ignorant comments to the press and selling clothes? Does anyone take him seri ously? I doubt it. So instead, lets listen to one of his peers who has been successful for something other than being cool. You may not agree with a woman, but to criticize her appearance as opposed to her ideas or actions isnt doing anyone any favors, least of all you. Insulting a womans looks when they have nothing to do with the issue at hand implies a lack of comprehension on your part, an inability to engage in high-level thinking. You may think shes ugly, but everyone else thinks youre an idiot, said Hillary Clinton. Too fat for Abercrombie and Fitch As VP-5 transitions to the P-8A Poseidon, the squadron is highlighting a transitioning Mad Fox each week. This weeks spotlight shines on AZAN Jessica Clackum. Clackum is from Cumming, Ga. She is from a small family with one younger sister. She was origi nally inspired to join the service by her grandfather who was in the United States Army. When she found out the tank driving position she desired was currently not available to women she decided to join the Navy. This eventually brought her to VP-5 for her first tour. AZs are responsible for maintaining the logs of all work done on the aircraft by the various maintenance shops in the squadron. Where the P-3C utilized paper bound aircraft discrepancy books, the P-8A has moved to an all-digital version. This allows maintainers and aircrew to access aircraft maintenance records from a variety of locations. One of the tools that allow AZs to accomplish this is the Optimized Organizational Maintenance Activity (OOMA) system. OOMA is an automated information management system that assists AZs. As a new AZ, Clackum has been learning this sys tem along with P-8A specific log keeping training at VP-30. VP-30 has been doing a great job teaching us this aircraft, Clackum praised. So far this transi tion has been very smooth. When Jessica isnt learning the art of maintenance log keeping on the P-8A she enjoys swimming, reading, and spending time at Jacksonvilles beaches. VP-5 has been transitioning to the P-8A Poseidon since Jan. 4, 2013. VP-5 transition spotlight: AZAN Jessica Clackum

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013 The clean shop in building 794 at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) was the site of a chemical spill drill May 14, where a simulated drum of sulfuric acid was accidentally punctured as it was being moved to a storage area spilling about five gallons and exposing DOD employees to hazardous fumes. The drill began when a fire alarm was activated in response to the vapor cloud generated by the leaking chemi cal drum. First responders included First Coast Navy Fire and Emergency Services, Naval Hospital Jacksonville and NAS Jacksonville Police Department, as well as environmental and safety managers from base public works and FRCSE. First and foremost, the drill tested the ability of FRCSE personnel to imme diately vacate the building when the alarm sounded. The key is to muster outside, away from the incident and make sure all personnel are accounted for, said NAS Jax Installation Training Officer Jim Butters. Next, the hazardous chemical should be identified and information about the situation relayed to the NAS Jax command duty officer. The NAS Jax emergency operations center was also activated. To enter the chemical containment area, two firefighters geared up with full-body level A protective suits that allowed them to verify identification of the spilled chemical, isolate the spill, and stop the drum leak with a wooden damage control plug. The drill also tested the emergen cy room response at Naval Hospital Jacksonville for treating survivors with compromised breathing symptoms. They knew that the ER would be short of ventilators needed to treat the total number of injured so their plan to obtain additional ventilators from medical facilities outside the gate was simulated. Injured role players were scattered outside building 794 and escorted by firefighters to an impromptu decon tamination site. After decon, role play ers were transported to the hospital where they were subjected to yet anoth er decontamination process before entering the ER. FRCSE Environmental Director Bruce Mobley worked with Butters to incor porate the spill drill with a previously scheduled fire evacuation drill. So, as NAS Jax Fire Prevention Officer Robert Winchester activated the fire pull box, FRCSE personnel were observed and accounted for as respond ing firefighters made their way to the scene. Butters said, By incorporating both drills together, it limited the time FRCSE personnel were away from their work. Once the fire drill met its objec tives, employees were given a safe route back to their workspaces. Overall, Butters was satisfied with the event. This was an eye-opener for everyone involved because they assumed that attacking the chemical spill was the top priority. In fact, our top priority was triage and treatment of medical casualties because the build ing was evacuated and the spill was contained. The clean shop is where FRCSE arti sans are responsible for chemically cleaning engine and aircraft parts to remove oil, corrosion and debris before they are sandblasted. At the incident command post, NAS Jax Assistant Hazardous Waste Manager Jody Smith reviewed the Material Safety Data Sheet that provided the hazards identification and potential acute health effects of sulfuric acid: contact (corrosive, irritant) or ingestion and inhalation. tissue damage, particularly on mucous membranes of eyes and mouth. produce severe irritation of respiratory tract characterized by coughing, chok ing or shortness of breath. Severe overexposure can result in death. Overall, the drill supported the vari ous commands in working together to enhance their hazardous materials con tainment and life-saving skills. EM E RG E NCY PR E PAR E DN E SS T E ST E D AT F RCS E E NGIN E F ACILITY

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CLAY IA LUNCHEONIts one of the best ways to help people in need. Medicine builds bridges, builds trust, builds cooperation and enhances our ability to work together with other nations, she added. Shaffer continued, The medical, surgical and den tal care that my team provid ed to our personnel at Camp Lemmonier, home to more than 20 tenant commands, was vital to the sustainability of our missions around that part of the world. Camp Lemmonier also served as a receiving and evac facility for the Horn of Africa. Djiboutis host nation support enabled us to provide routine and immediate care, preventive health care and 24/7 emergency and mass casualty support. According to Shaffer, IA deployments are a life chang ing and career defining experi ences and the work performed impacts more than just the IA Sailor or Marine. You, our IAs, are saving, healing and enriching lives and livelihoods, she said. Your work has lasting impact, not only to the local populace, but with our sister services who now rely on Navy and Marine Corps IAs for vital support to global operations. IA guest speaker, LSC Sandra Mock of Commander, Navy Region Southeast, shared her deployment experiences dur ing the luncheon. The hardest thing for any service member is to come home from work and tell their family they received IA orders. I was issued orders on Dec 6, 2011 and departed February 2012. As expected, my family was upset; we worked through the anger, tears and anxiety, said Mock. We knew we had to move forward and come up with a game plan for while I was gone, just as we had so many times through our career. Im so lucky to have a supportive hus band and two amazing daugh ters to help keep things togeth er, she said. Mock, spent her first IA tour in Kabul, Afghanistan and her second tour at Bagram Air Base, Afghanistan. Despite the challenges she faced, Mock expressed her accomplish ments. She ran her first mara thon and earned her personal trainer certificate. IA tours are challenging and rewarding. Both of mine have helped me improve my leader ship skills and enabled me to experience a different level of cooperation and diversity by working with other uniformed services and other nations armed forces, said Mock. I have met some wonderful people, worked alongside some incredibly talented and hardcharging Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen, she added. To close out the lun cheon, each IA was present ed with a special plaque and Boots on the Ground coin by the Northeast Florida Navy League Council and thankyou letters from Senators Bill Nelson and Marco Rubio, and Congressman Ander Crenshaw. Each spouse received a rose courtesy of the Navy Exchange. The IA Recognition Luncheon was first held at NAS Jax in 2008 and initiated by the Northeast Florida Navy League Council. The Navy League has been privileged to honor more than 1,800 IAs over the past six years. Our IAs have left their families to take on a mission that was not expected of them, met the challenge and served honorably, said Bill Dudley, national director, Navy League of the United States. We feel very privileged to honor our IAs and their spouses for their sacrifice in the con tinuing War on Terrorism, added Dudley. tude to the service members. We are honored to be part of this event to rec ognize the contributions you make. We truly appreciate everything you do, every day, to make our lives better. Thank you for your service, he said. West then introduced the keynote speaker, Jacksonville Jaguars President Mark Lamping to the podium. Lamping, who moved to Jacksonville in January, stressed the importance of realizing what a huge impact the mili tary plays on the Jacksonville commu nity. Our organization strives to give back to the community, especially to our military members. The military draws people here for a lot of reasons to serve, to support those who serve and those who retire in the area, he said. When new Jacksonville Jaguars owner Shad Khan came to Jacksonville, he looked at our team branding because NFL teams are a reflection of the com munity. After thinking about it for a couple of moments, he decided that nothing defines Jacksonville more than the military. So weve incorporated that into our new uniforms with a patch over the heart that serves as a tribute to our citys military service members. We also love to pay tribute to the military by holding surprise homecomings for ser vice members with their families and the annual military appreciation game in November. Its important to us and we are proud to host these events, he added. After Lamping concluded his remarks, Clay County Chamber of Commerce Chairman of the Board George Egan and West announced PS1(AW/SW) Solomon Marshall of VP-5 as the recipient of this years VyStar Award for Military Excellence. They also recognized another 16 Sailors from NAS Jacksonville and its tenant commands, as well as several Marines from Blount Island Command and a Soldier from Camp Blanding Joint Training Center. Each was presented plaques and gifts from Clay County area businesses recognizing their outstand ing service. I would really like to thank Clay County Chamber of Commerce, VyStar Credit Union and all the other sponsors for recognizing us today. It was a real shocker to be selected for this award. Im extremely grateful, said Marshall, after the event. MU1 Robert Booker of Navy Band Southeast added, I think its great how Clay County supports the military. I live here so its nice to see that they are recognizing us for our service to the Navy and community. 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013

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On May 17, the VP-5 Mad Foxes paused from their tran sition to the P-8A Poseidon to observe the time-honored change of command cer emony at NAS Jacksonville as Cmdr. Matthew Pottenburgh assumed command from Cmdr. Erin Osborne. Pottenburgh is from Galena, Ohio, and graduated from Ohio State University with a Bachelor of Science in Industrial Design. He also earned a Master of Science in Operations Management from the University of Arkansas. His previous tours include instructor tactical coordina tor in VP-40, instructor naval flight officer at VP-30, flag aide to Commander, U.S. 6th Fleet and Strike Forces NATO, VP officer detailer with Navy Personnel Command, depart ment head in VP-47, branch chief and chief of staff for the C4/Cyberspace Functional Capabilities Board at the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and executive officer of VP-5. In the coming year, Pottenburgh will finish tran sitioning to the P-8A Poseidon with the Mad Foxes. Afterwards, he will lead them through a demanding interdeployment readiness cycle as they prepare to become the second squadron to take the Poseidon to the 7th Fleet area of responsibility in Okinawa, Japan. Osborne previously served as VP-5s executive officer before becoming the first woman to assume command of a patrol squadron on May 4, 2012. She led the Mad Foxes through a challenging 7th Fleet deployment which included a total of 22 exercises, operation al detachments, and typhoon evacuations. At the conclusion of this deployment she flew home VP-5s last P-3C Orion ending the Mad Foxes 39 years in the airframe and setting them forward on the transition to the P-8A Poseidon. Osbornes next assignment will be executive assistant to Commander Naval Air Forces. The incoming VP-5 executive officer is Cmdr. Greg Petrovic. Womens Expo set Balfour Beatty Communities is sponsoring a Womens Expo May 23 from 5-7 p.m. at the Chapel Complex Building 749. More than 25 vendors will be in attendance. The event is open to all military spouses and women who have base access. VP-5 Mad Foxes hold change of command JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013 7

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8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013

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The NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club is sponsoring two $1,000 scholarships based on scholarship merit and community ser vice. Eligibility: U.S. Navy active/reserve duty and active/reserve duty dependents who are currently in their senior year of high school or a high school graduate, attached to NAS Jacksonville and planning to attend an accredited college in the fall of 2013 or spring of 2014. To request the scholarship application, visit https://www.fcef.com/. Application deadline is June 15. You may submit the application by mail to: NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club, 4109 Eagle Landing Pkwy, Orange Park, FL 32065. Neither the NAS Jacksonville, U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. resident Navy Capt. Gerard Jerry Petroni, who battled hyperten sion, brain bleeds and several strokes and ulti mately died in 2009. Just before dying, Petroni related a strong message to his son, Erik, in a writ ten note that read, never quit never. The event drew many performers and Navy Band Southeast was one of the crowd favorites. NEVER $1,000 college scholarship deadline June 15 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013

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Teen driving class offeredThe NAS Jacksonville Safety Office is offering a driver improvement class specifically for depen dent young drivers between the age of 15 and 21 years old June 14 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. The class will be held in the Safety Conference Room in Building 1. Participants do not have to have a drivers license to attend. The class will offer safety tips such as how to respond to driving emergencies and distracted driving while bringing awareness to risks of driv ing and much more. The class consists of videos, chapter quizzes and concludes with a multiple choice question test. There will not be any time behind the wheel; this is classroom only. The teens will receive an AAA Driver Improvement Class completion certificate. If you feel your teen could benefit from this class, sign them up by calling Linda at 542-3082, Cindy at 542-2584 or Kristen at 542-8810. VR-62flew high-priority missions supporting Combined Task Force 63 (CTF-63) They provided fast and flexibletransport inthe short-fused, high-stress environ ment of the EUCOM AOR delivering more than 700,000 pounds of high-pri ority cargo while flying 360 plus hours. The Nomads flew missions supporting units such as Naval Mobile Construction Battalions One and Four, Explosive Ordinance Disposal Mobile Unit Eight, and Underwater Construction Team One, to name a few. We were very busy, but busy is good for us said AZCM Karen Quinn, opera tions master chief. In addition to sup porting Navy and Marine Corps units, the Nomads also supported units from the Air Force and Army. VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Tony Scarpino said, We are provid ing flexible, responsive and effective air logistics capability to our Navy cus tomers and other branches while sup porting Combined Task Force 63. I am really proud of the work we are doing in EUCOM supporting CTF-63. VR-62 is one of five Navy Reserve C-130 squadrons serving the Navys global logistics needs and is based at NAS Jacksonville. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013 11

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Approximately 1,800 Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast pub lic works professionals are celebrating National Public Works Week May 1925. Started in 1960 by the American Public Works Association, the week long event seeks to raise awareness about public works employees who are dedicated to improv ing the quality of life for future generations. This years theme is Because of Public Works... When you think of this years theme, it relates to every Navy installation we touch, said NAVFAC Southeasts Public Works Business Line Coordinator Jeff Killian. One never has to ask how clean the water is, has the grass been mowed, or does the air conditioning system work? The public works team manages things like this every day on every base. NAVFAC has provided management and lead ership of Navy public works for over 170 years. Globally, the Navys Civil Engineer Corps officers lead 68 Navy and Marine Corps public works departments (PWD) pro viding comprehensive shore installation facil ity engineering, acquisi tion, environmental and transportation services to many supported com mands and missions. In the Southeast, our team works hard to maintain the short infra structure at 22 Navy and Marine Corps installa tions in the southeast ern United States, said Killian. They are vital in mak ing sure the homefront is maintained for Navy families as well as ensur ing our Warfighters are ready to serve. The essential work of our public works depart ment usually goes unno ticed but the behindthe-scenes work per formed in providing vital public works services such as electricity, water and wastewater man agement is the lifeblood of our base and tenant commands, said NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders. He added, Our public works professionals are at the forefront of cuttingedge energy projects that help meet the Secretary of the Navys energy goals. Advanced meter ing, renewable energy, and residential energy conservation projects are helping to reduce the demand for energy both on and off base. Our public works team supports the fleet, fight er and family with the highest possible shore installation capability and quality of life within the frameworks of mis sion effectiveness, safety, environmental steward ship and resource man agement, said Killian. NAS Jacksonville and Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) are working together to provide electronic material recycling to station departments and tenant commands. Instead of taking electronic material to NAS Jax Environmental at Building 1948 on Thursdays, please contact DLA at 542-3411, Ext. 102 to schedule a day and time to take materials to DLA on Roosevelt Boulevard near Collins Road. DLA will assist commands with requirements, including submitting the necessary paperwork (DD Form 1348) for turn-in of items. Remember that electronic material is regulated, so please ensure that no recyclable materials are disposed of in station dumpsters. NAS Jax is subject to significant fines and penalties when electronic items are found in station dumpsters. Anyone finding electronic items in dumpsters should call NAS Jax Environmental at 542-5251/5789. Every lifetime is marked by a series of milestones, per sonal and professional, that are forever held in the memory of those that experienced them. For many high school students one of these rites of pas sage is the prom, but for some students the cost of the for mal outfits worn at prom can be prohibitive. With this in mind, a few Sailors from VR-58 chose to help some local high school students participate in their prom by starting the VR-58 Prom Dress Drive. The idea began when VR-58 Selected Reservist AWFCS Deyaniris Santiago, was spring-cleaning her house. I was looking at all of these dresses my daughters wore, just sit ting in my closet, and I thought that I could do something good with them. When Santiago brought this idea to VR-58, it was quickly taken up by several other Sailors in the command, who expanded it into a prom dress drive. Prom is a once-in-a-lifetime experience, said PS2 Shanna Tripp. I didnt want to see someone miss out on that. For three months donations consisting of dresses, acces sories and other formal wear were accepted at VR-58. Fifty dresses and various other items were then delivered to the students of The Foundation Academy in Jacksonville. Foundation Academy is an arts-based private school with an enrollment of approximately 250 students, 85 percent of which are on needs-based scholarships. The dresses were happily accepted by the students and giving back to the community proved to be a rewarding event for the Sailors of VR-58. We were excited to deliver the dresses, said PS2 Wendy Tetreault. They were very appreciative for the opportunity to try on dresses and find something they liked. Santiago already has plans for the prom in 2014. We are making this a yearly event. Next year, we are going to expand it to include suits and tuxedos for the guys. It was a lot of fun for everyone and I cant wait to do it again, she said. Save the last dressVR-58 Sailors give back to local school Navys public works pros celebrate contributions to readinessElectronic material now being recycled at DLA 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013

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Amid a spate of allegations of criminal behavior by military recruiters and service members involved in the Defense Departments efforts to prevent sex ual assaults and help that crimes victims, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel ordered May 15 that the ser vices retrain, re-credential and rescreen all sexual assault prevention and response personnel and mili tary recruiters. In a statement, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said Hagel was informed yesterday about allega tions of criminal behavior against an Army sergeant first class who was a sexual assault prevention and response coordinator at Fort Hood, Texas. I cannot convey strongly enough his frustration, anger and disappointment over these troubling alle gations and the breakdown in discipline and stan dards they imply, Little said. Hagel met with Army Secretary John M. McHugh and directed him to fully investigate the matter rap idly, to discover the extent of the allegations, and to ensure that all of those who might be involved are dealt with appropriately, the press secretary added. Little said Hagel directed the retraining, re-cre dentialing and rescreening to address the broader concerns that have arisen out of these allegations and other recent events. Sexual assault is a crime, and will be treated as such, the press secretary said. The safety, integrity, and well-being of every service member and the suc cess of our mission hang in the balance. Secretary Hagel is looking urgently at every course of action to stamp out this deplorable conduct and ensure that those individuals up and down the chain of command who tolerate or engage in this behavior are appropri ately held accountable. Army officials announced yesterday that the Army Criminal Investigation Command is investigating the Fort Hood soldier for pandering, abusive sexual con tact, assault and maltreatment of subordinates. In a statement, Defense Department officials said the soldier had been assigned as an equal opportu nity advisor and sexual harassment and sexual assault response and prevention program coordinator with a 3rd Corps battalion at Fort Hood when the allegations surfaced. The soldier was immediately suspended from all duties by the chain of command once the allegations were brought to the commands attention, officials said, adding that charges had so far not been filed or preferred. During testimony last week before the House Appropriations Committees defense subcommittee, McHugh expressed anger over sexual assaults and sex abuse crimes in the military. This is so contrary to everything upon which the Army was built, he said. To see this kind of activity happening in our ranks is really heart wrenching and sickening. McHugh told members of Congress that Army lead ers are focused on efforts to prevent sexual assaults. As I said to our new brigadier general corps when I spoke to them about two weeks ago, You can do everything from this point forward in your military career perfectly, but if you fail on this, you have failed the Army, he said.Hagel orders retraining of recruiters, sexual assault responders Household goods summer peak moving system beginsApproximately 65 percent of all Department of Defense (DoD) household goods moves occur between May 15 and Aug. 1. What can you do to ensure a smooth move? Plan! With the decline in moving companies capacity and DoD budget cuts, the sooner you start working with the local Personal Property Office the greater your chance of getting the desired pack out date. Dont wait until a week or two before the desired pack out date to complete the process in www.move. mil enter all your data and paperwork now. For Navy information on getting started with the move process, go to www.navsup.navy.mil/household Another tip is to organize your house and belong ings. Go through all your rooms and boxes from the last move to make sure you still need the items. If it hasnt been worn or used in the last year, do you still need it? Sort your items by the type of ship ment: household shipment; unaccompanied baggage, if authorized; professional gear and what is going in your suitcase or car. By sorting you may find out what needs to be sold, donated or disposed of. Keep in mind, if you exceed your authorized weight allowance it can be expensive. Household goods terms and what they mean: Household shipment is your main shipment: fur niture, dishes, washer/dryer, BBQ grill, outdoor fur niture, childrens play furniture, majority of your clothes, etc. Unaccompanied baggage if authorized: this is the small shipment of items that you will need to survive until your big household good shipment arrives. This is normally only authorized with overseas orders. Items to include would be enough kitchen ware/dishes to use daily (not your china), crib, clothes, some uni forms, some DVDs not your entire library, etc. Professional gear : Professional books and equip ment includes Household goods in a members pos session needed for the performance of official duties at the next or a later destination. Service members items could be: work manuals, awards, specialty work uniforms (Band uniforms, navy divers, flight suits, helmets, chaplains vestments and other specialized apparel), reference materials, instruments, tools, and equipment peculiar to techni cians, mechanics. Spouse: may be authorized for a licensed profes sion, i.e. doctor, dentist, lawyer or community support activities at the next or a later destination, example would be a command ombudsman. Any other profes sion may be considered if the appropriate documen tation can be provided. Selling Avon or Pamper Chef does not count as licensed profession. Excluded items are: commercial products for sale/ resale used in conducting business, sports equipment, and office, household, or shop fixtures or furniture (such as bookcases, study/computer desks, file cabi nets, and racks). JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013 13

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 12 6 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer June 1 Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 and younger receive one free game of bowling every day until 5 p.m. Win prizes all summer long!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 The outdoor pool hours Open Monday Friday (lap swim only) During lap swim only the waterslide, water park and concessions will not be open. 6 a.m. 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday & Sunday (recreation swim ming) 11 a.m. 6 p.m. 2013 Learn to Swim Program Session 1: June 1020 Session 2 July 8-18 Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Disney Cruise Lines will be at ITT June 11, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Learn more about exciting 2013/14 trips. Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Daytona International Speedway Subway Firecracker July 5 and Coke 400 July 6 Tickets on sale now! Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3 Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7 2013 Live Broadway Series Cesar Millan June 1 $42 $52 New Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute 4-day hopper $153.25 Wild Adventures Theme Park One day pass $30, Gold pass $71The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Jacksonville Suns Baseball Game May 23 at 6 p.m. Paintball Trip June 1 at 9 a.m. Jax Suns Baseball Game June 6 at 6 p.m. Free admission and transportationNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees June 11 and 25 for active duty June 13 and 27 for retirees, DoD person nel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not appli cable on holidays. Loudmouth Thursday Any golfer wearing a pair of loudmouth shorts or pants plays 18 holes with cart for $20 Open to military, DoD and guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina June 15, 16, 22 & 23 July 20, 21, 27 & 28 Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Movie Under the Stars Featuring The Croods May 24 at 8:30 p.m. Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School June 3 July 10 $500 per person 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013

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Twenty-three members of Team Navy Jax par ticipated in the eighth annual Jacksonville Tour de Cure, which is held each year to benefit the Jacksonville Chapter of the American Diabetes Association (ADA). The cyclists braved the 80-plus degree tempera tures; pedaling 30, 50, 71 or 100 miles during the event. Wearing jerseys and shorts courtesy of VyStar Credit Union, the team gathered early Saturday morning with about 550 other riders to participate in the event. This is my third year serving in the capacity of team captain. The team spirit that Ive seen this year has far exceeded past years. The riders were all concerned with every one doing the ride safely and returning to the fin ish line with their group. No one was left behind, said Team Navy Jax cap tain Jerry Dryden. I rode sweep for the team and was able to lead a (nonteam rider) back to the finish line safely. A young guy about 13 years old, was stranded at the sec ond rest stop. I was asked to bring him home safe ly. Several times I would correct his riding ability, but we had a successful 30-mile ride. Team Navy Jax cyclists spend numerous hours preparing for events by participating in team rides and attending spin ning classes at the NAS Jax Morale Welfare and Recreation Departments Fitness Source. Many spend their free time rais ing funds to participate in the events. For team member AE3 Tracie Burrows of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, this ride was much more than just another ride on her bicy cle. I have several family members who have dia betes. Its really an awful disease. I think there is there is a stigma of being overweight for those who have diabetes but in real ity, anyone can have this disease. So Im here today to support the cause in an effort to find a cure, she said before setting out for a 30-mile ride. New Team Navy Jax member AN Stewart Touchton of VP-26, along with his dad, Paul Touchton, were each planning to ride 100 miles in support of a cure for diabetes. We have sev eral family members who have diabetes and we love to ride so thats why we are here today, said AN Touchton, who was invit ed to join the team after meeting Dryden during a ride on the Rail Trail. This really is a great team. Its well organized, there are a lot of opportu nities to ride together and everyone is so support ive. According to Tour de Cure Coordinator Kimberly Lewis, Team Navy Jax members are a huge part of the annu al event. We love Team Navy Jax! I think they are our longest participating team since we started this event in 2005. They have stuck with us through the years and do an amazing job not only with their service to our country but in our fight to stop diabe tes, she said. The Tour de Cure staff and volunteers would like to thank Team Navy Jax for all they do, she added. The Tour de Cure is a series of cycling events held in more than 80 cit ies nationwide to ben efit the ADA. The tour is a ride, not a race, with routes designed for every one from the occasional rider to the experienced cyclist.For more information about Team Navy Jax, email Jed2004@bellsouth.net. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the fed eral government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services.Team Navy Jax rides for annual charity event See more photos from Team Navy Jax and the Jacksonville Tour de Cure on Page 17. 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013

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More photos from Team Navy Jax and the Jacksonville Tour de Cure The NAS Jacksonville Police Department will participate in the 2013 nationwide annual Click-It or Ticket Campaign which runs May 24 June 3. NAS Jax police officers will be staged at numerous locations throughout the installation to check for seatbelt viola tions. Wearing a seatbelt is one of the safest things you can do while driving a vehicle. Most fatal crashes occur at speeds below 40 mph and within 25 miles of an individuals home. If youre in a crash and are thrown from the vehicle you have a 75 percent chance of being killed. When worn correctly, seatbelts reduce the risk of moderate to critical injury by 50 percent. Death rates are more than eight times higher when the occupant is not buckled or restrained inside the vehicle. Statistics show that in 60 percent of all fatal crashes, the victim was not properly buckled in the vehicle. When worn, seatbelts can reduce the risk of fatal injury to front seat occupants by over 45 percent. It all adds up to one overwhelming decision your personal and families safety. Everyone is safer in a car when theyre properly buckled up. A seat belt is the best defense against reckless, impaired or distracted drivers. Adults who dont buckle up are sending chil dren the message that it is all right to not wear a seatbelt. Remember children model adult behavior. Another grave statistic is that 70 percent of the time when a driver isnt buckled in, you can bet the children riding in that vehicle arent buckled up either. Wearing a seatbelt is required by law in the State of Florida and aboard NAS Jax for the simple reason It Saves Lives. Drivers are also reminded that is ille gal to text or talk on a cell phone while driving aboard NAS Jacksonville. Click-It or Ticket Campaign starts May 24 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013 17

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Wounded Warrior Project(WWP) recently placed a disabled army vet eran with First Coast Navy Fire and Emergency Services for 90 days, to pro vide an inside view of what being a fire fighter or paramedic is all about. WWP serves veterans who incurred a physical or mental injury associated with their military service. Rhode Island native and infantry veteran Paul Marsolais explained, If you were hurt overseas, the Wounded Warrior Project, headquartered here in Jacksonville, can help you get reinte grated into civilian life including col lege. The program Im doing right now is called WPP TRACK and Im currently in the externship phase at NAS Jax and NS Mayport. Its cool because this externship gives me the chance to work shoulderto-shoulder with firefighting and EMS professionals. Its training that will help me decide if this profession is a good fit for me in the future. I especially like the emergency medical part of this pro gram. I administered first aid to a num ber of my comrades in Afghanistan, so I know I can stay calm and focused when dealing with trauma situations, he said. Marsolais, 24, enlisted in the Army fresh out of high school when he was 17. Trained as a front-line infantryman, he deployed with the 2nd Infantry Division to Iraq in 2007-08 (Operation Iraqi Freedom). He later deployed with the 4th Infantry Division to Afghanistan in 2009-10 (Operation Enduring Freedom). While in Afghanistan, I was tossed pretty good by an IED (improvised explosive device) but, fortunately, I was not hit by any shrapnel, said Marsolais. Assistant Fire Chief Jamie Sherer said, Paul is the first WWP TRACK program enrollee that First Coast Navy Fire and Emergency Services has hosted so this will be a learning process for everyone involved. We worked with WWP to determine firefighting and EMS activities that Paul could safely take part in with our crews. Hes expressed an interest in the fire fighter/paramedic career track, so were providing lots of exposure for that over his 90-day stay with us. Marsolais will spend his first month at NAS Jax working regular shifts, fol lowed by two weeks training with our fire prevention inspectors, and end ing with four weeks of shift work at NS Mayport, said Sherer. If we can help this veteran get back into Americas workforce and be productive that makes it a win/win for everybody. Chris Rick is the WWP TRACK man ager in Jacksonville. This program stood up in 2008 to serve warriors with various types of injuries ranging from the physical to the invisible wounds of war. Our job is to guide warriors on an educational pathway to earn their degree and pursue a successful civil ian career. Paul is our first placement at First Coast Navy Fire and Emergency Services. Previously, we placed two other veterans at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast and they were both hired after they completed the TRACK pro gram. Training Chief David Rickel, along with the assistant fire chiefs and cap tains, is responsible for guiding the hands-on training of Marsolais. Well make sure he gets the required classes and knowledge. And were proud to help out a former warfighter who gets that adrenalin rush when the station bell sounds for an emergency call, said Rickel. On May 7, First Coast Navy Fire and Emergency Services conducted semiannual crash crew training with live fire in a Mobile Aircraft Fire Trainer that offers several training scenarios, from simple to more complex. It allows the operator to inject only fire, fire and smoke, or only smoke from a combina tion of locations. Marsolais was present during the training and found it very realistic. Paul observed what we do and how we do it, so he can decide if firefighting or emergency medical services would be a favorable career path for him. If he says yes then weve given him a bit of a head start. Many of our crew are retired military so we may have an understanding some of the stuff he went through in Iraq and Afghanistan, said Rickel. When I complete my TRACK pro gram, I plan on moving back north and enrolling in a college where I can earn my associate of science degree and get certified as an EMS, said Marsolais. Army reservists conduct yellow ribbon program Members of the 257th Transportation Battalion from Gainesville, Fla., pre sented a yellow ribbon reintegration program for 68 soldiers and family members of the 993rd Transportation Company that recently returned from deployment. This event offers information and answers questions about all the resources available to make a smooth transition for returning warfighters, said Sonya Clemmons, family readiness support assistant for the battalion. We scheduled this event for NAS Jacksonville because we have many ser vice members family members who live and work in Northeast Florida. Yellow ribbon presenters include a military chaplain, the American Red Cross, TRICARE, legal assistance, child and youth services, and family advo cacy counselors. Firefighters show career opportunity to wounded warrior JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013 19

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013 May is motorcycle safety month It can be quite frustrating and distressing for motorcy clists when other motorists dont see them. Near-miss events leave many riders with the idea that motorists dont look or respect motorcyclists. Some riders organizations have even tried to be proactive and educate car and truck drivers through advertising. Ever notice the bumper sticker asking motorists to, Look twice motorcycles are everywhere? Its a wonderful notion that we motorcyclists hope other motorists will take to heart but is it realistic? The truth is, there are many rea sons, both physical and men tal, why drivers may not per ceive a motorcyclists presence. What can a rider can do to keep from being hit? Perhaps, but first we need to understand why they may not see us. Lets consider how often a motor ist has the opportunity to see a motorcycle. Recent U.S. Department of Transportation data show more than 246 million non-motor cycle vehicles registered in the U.S. versus almost 8 million motorcycles. That averages out to one motorcycle for every 31 other vehicles. So, even if all registered motorcycles were on the road at the same time, would they be visible to other motorists? Not if we ride in the motorists blind spot. Blind spots are caused by mirror settings and the physi cal design of vehicles. Many set their side-view mirrors so that they can see the side of their vehicle but this setting actu ally increases the blind spot. Note: Learn how to set your car or truck mirrors properly at this website: http://tinyurl. com/7ob3mlm. A tractor-trailer blind spot is huge. If youve ever taken a look at an illustration of what the trucking industry calls the no zone you could see that a group of motorcycles could be hidden from the drivers view. Mirrors arent the only things that contribute to blind spots. Physical obstructions such as the roof pillars can completely mask your presence at a given moment. Anything hanging from rear view mirrors, decals on win dows, cargo inside cars, as well as GPS placement can all hin der a drivers visibility. Given the narrow visibility profiles of motorcycles, they can com pletely disappear behind these obstructions. In the Navy Basic Rider Course, students are advised to pick a lane position that affords the ability to see and be seen. Buildings, trees and other vehicles can hide your presence, too. You cant reposition them; you can only reposition yourself or ride cautiously past them. When the sun is behind you and your shadow extends in front, beware! Your headlight will be dwarfed the sun and motorists facing the sun will likely not see you until the last second. Darkness doesnt help either. Most motorcycles have only one taillight and one headlight to compete with the other vehi cles on the road. Rain only serves to make a bad visibility situation worse, both day and night. So, motorcyclists relatively small numbers, narrow pro file, limited lighting, as well as physical obstructions all contribute to not being easily seen by car and truck drivers. Im sure some of you experi enced a situation where a motorist looked straight at you and violated your path of travel anyway. Surely if theyre looking straight at you, they shouldve seen you right? If only it were that simple. The things previously mentioned are only half of the reasons that a driver may not notice you. If you graduated from a Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) Rider Course, you learned that motorcycling is more a skill of the eyes and mind than of the hands and feet. Nevertheless, the eyes and mind can also fail to perceive critical information. Physically, our eyes are sub ject to macular degeneration as we get older. It is a condition that attacks your central vision which pro vides you detail, and occurs gradually so that that a person may not even be savvy to it. Its the leading cause of vision loss in older adults, most whom drive. To understand the sig nificance of optic nerves blind spot, visit this website for a fun test to show the influence of the blind spots on your vision: http://www.blindspottest. com/. When you take the blind spot test, you discover an interest ing phenomenon the brain will fill in what it believes should be there, whether or not it actually is. The eyes only relay visual information to the brain which then processes it. The mind can fail to accurately analyze that data, and it can happen at precisely the worst moment in traffic. Of course, fatigue, alcohol and medica tion can affect the mind and contribute significantly to diminished visual acuity. Even if you are awake and sober, you can still fall victim to boredom. Vigilance reduction is basi cally the decline in our abil ity to remain alert during prolonged activities. Can you recall times when you zoned out and couldnt remember driving the last X-number of miles? Experienced drivers are more susceptible to vigi lance reduction than begin ners. Think of how hyper-alert/ paranoid you were as a student driver. However, most drivers edu cation courses do not discuss sharing the road with motor cycles to student drivers, and that can be a problem too. Blindness caused by inat tentive drivers is a growing problem thats also known as distracted driving because the drivers attention is engaged on another task besides driving. Driving a vehicle is compli cated enough, without people treating their vehicles like phone booths and fast-food restaurants. It can happen to anyone regardless of their driv ing skills and familiarity with motorcycling. So, is a slogan on a bumper sticker likely to make a differ ence? I wouldnt count on it. After all, a motorcycle that is larger and louder with a stateof-the-art lighting system can still be unseen by other motorists for a variety of rea sons. In MSF Rider Courses, youll learn that accidents happen due to a combination of factors mostly by inattentive drivers who fail to perceive motorcy cles. There are many more car and truck motorists than motorcy clists on the road, and all of us must contend with the many reasons blind spots occur. So whats a rider left to do? Time and space the more you give yourself, the better off youll be. Mandarin Middle School held an eighth-grade career fair May 7 before they graduate soon and begin their journey through high school. Lt. Eric Frank, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 public affairs officer, had the opportunity to represent the professionals of naval avi ation at this career fair by setting up an informational exhibit. Alongside many other professionals from the Jacksonville area, this career fair was deemed highly successful by the schools principal and teaching staff. Throughout the day, more than 500 students attended the career fair to learn about some of their potential career opportunities. The main questions asked by the chil dren included, What are the potential earnings in your career? and Do you think your job will be in demand when I am ready in enter the workforce? Naval aviation offers positive answers to both questions and the students were very open to learning about careers in this field because of the job prospects it offers. As the school day progressed, it became obvious to some of the other professionals representing their fields that naval aviation was one of the main interests of the students. Naval aviation provides a healthy balance of school, advanced degrees, monetary compensation and job oppor tunities and the students appreciated the opportunity to learn all of the facts about naval aviation. Apply by May 31 The American Red CrossNortheast Florida Chapter at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville is currently recruiting for this summers Junior Red Cross volun teers. This offers an excellent oppor tunity for students interested in health careers to train with highly skilled Navy Medicine professionalsphysicians, nurses, pharmacists, therapists and techniciansas well as contribute to a positive experience for patients. The program is open to a limited number of high school students age 16 to 18 who have base access. Volunteers work four to 20 hours per week in loca tions throughout the hospital, and receive CPR training. Apply onlineby May 31at www.nefloridaredcross.org. At the website, click on volunteer, join us, youth volunteer application (or adult volunteer application for 18 year-old students). Fill out the applica tion, select Northeast Florida Chapter, and create a Volunteer Connection account. After submitting the applica tion, complete the online orientation. All applicants are required to attend a kick-off event (which includes an inter view) June 8 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the hospitals 2nd deck conference room in the central tower (next to the chapel). For more about this opportunity, con tact Junior Red Cross volunteer coor dinators Terry Miles or Mary Miciano at 542-7525 or jaxredcrossoffice@med. navy.mil.Look twice? Better think twice! Naval aviator participates in Mandarin Middle School career day Experience Navy Medicine as a Junior Red Cross volunteer

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After the first recorded landing on the atoll in 1859, Midway became a United States possession in 1867. A trans-Pacif ic cable station was established in 1903. In 1935, Pan American Airways used Sand Island as a stopover on its new seaplane route between the U.S. and Asia. In 1939, a study of U.S. defense needs recommended Midway as a base for Navy patrol planes and submarines. Soon thereafter, construction began on a seaplane hangar and other facilities on Sand Island and an airfield on the smaller Eastern Island. Midway occupied an important place in Japanese military planning. According to plans made before Pearl Harbor, the Japanese fleet would attack and occupy Midway and the Aleutian Islands in Alaska as soon as their posi tion in South Asia was stabilized. Two Japanese destroyers bombarded the Navy base on Midway on December 7, 1941, damaging buildings and destroy ing one patrol plane. In the spring of 1942, flush with victory after victory in the Pacific, Japan prepared to establish a toehold in the Aleutians; to occupy Midway and convert it into an air base and jumping off point for an invasion of Hawaii and to lure what was left of the U.S. Pacific Fleet into the Midway area for a decisive battle that would finish it off. The Americans had their own plans for the atoll. With the fall of Wake Island to the Japanese in late December 1941, Midway became the westernmost U.S. outpost in the central Pacific. Defenses on the atoll were strengthened between December and April. Land-based bombers and fighters were stationed on Eastern Island. U.S. Marines pro vided defensive artillery and infantry. Operating from the atolls lagoon, sea planes patrolled toward the Japaneseheld Marshall Islands and Wake, check ing on enemy activities and guarding against further attacks on Hawaii. There were occasional clashes when planes from Midway and those from the Japanese islands met over the Pacific. Adm. Chester Nimitz, Commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, inspected Midway in early May 1942, conferring with the local commanders, Navy Capt. Cyril Simard and Marine Col. Harold Shannon. Based on U.S. intelligence reports, Nimitz believed the Japanese were planning an attack on Midway. Top Naval officers in Washington were not so sure. They could not believe that the Japanese would send a huge fleet to take a small atoll. It would be like fishing for minnows with a harpoon. Nimitz asked Simard and Shannon what they needed to hold the islands. They reeled off a long list. He asked Shannon: If I get you all these things you say you need, then can you hold Midway against a major amphibious assault? The reply was a simple Yes, sir. Within a week, anti-aircraft guns, rifles, and other war materiel arrived at Midway. Eastern Island was crowded with Marine Corps, Navy, and Army Air Force planes fighters, dive bomb ers and larger B-17 and B-26 bomb ers. Every piece of land bristled with barbed wire entanglements and guns, the beaches and waters were studded with mines. Eleven torpedo boats were ready to circle the reefs, patrol the lagoon, pick up ditched airmen, and assist ground forces with anti-aircraft fire. Nineteen submarines guarded the approaches from 100 to 200 miles northwest and north. By June 4, 1942, Midway was ready to face the approach ing Japanese. Nearly 40 years after their operation al tour in the Vietnam War, members of VA-37 Ragin Bulls reunited April 26 at the NAS Jax River Cove Catering and Conference Center to share fond memories and honor fallen friends and heroes. Originally established on July 1, 1966 at Cecil Field to fly the new A-7 Corsair II, VA-37 became operational in 1967, going on to support operations in the Mediterranean as well as their notable tours during the Vietnam War, flying nearly 2,800 missions and dropping over 3,100 tons of ordnance. In 1972, VA-37 was also the first squadron to use an A-7 to establish a sonobuoy field off the coast of North Vietnam. The reunion was extremely heartfelt, with members recalling stories of their times together. Retired Rear Adm. Mike Johnson explained the significance of VA-37 and recalled his experiences on board USS Kitty Hawk during his time with the squadron. We were a tight knit group, always supporting each other. While we lost good friends during that time, its phe nomenal to be here with this group again. Everyone here has gone on to become real estate agents, lawyers, CEOs, you name it. We reunited here from all walks of life, from all around the country, Johnson commented. The experience being close to 40 years ago, we thought this was the most appropriate time to host this reunion. Midway before the battle VA-37 Ragin Bulls hold reunion JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013 21

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While staying dedicated to maintaining the highest stan dards of fitness, which is a requirement for all U.S. Armed Forces, AWO1(NAC/AW) Mark Anthony Sanchez continues to chase his passion in competi tive cycling. Born and raised in Colorado Springs, Colo., Sanchez joined the Navy right out of high school as an aircrewmen in 2002. I first started riding a bike as a toddler, said Sanchez. When he reached school age, he added, I used to ride my Diamondback mountain bike on the Santa Fe Trail 15 miles to and from school every day. Throughout his childhood, Sanchez implied he had always been very active and competi tive in sports, especially track and field and cross-country. I seem to excel more at lon ger distances, said Sanchez. The longer they are and the harder they are, I seem to do better. According to Sanchez, his engaging thrill and inter est for competitive cycling was influenced by his uncle, Kevin Apodaca, an instruc tor and competitive rider for Trek Bicycle Corporation in Wisconsin. Sanchez started his cycling career in 2012 peddling first for the Velo Brew Cycling Club in Jacksonville, and in 2011, he was selected to ride for the U.S. Military Team. The U.S. Military Cycling Team con sists service members from all branches of the armed forces who are on active duty, National Guard or reserve sta tus. According to Sanchez, the U.S. Military Team has two categories, the Elite and Development (Devo) programs. There are only six cyclists on the elite level and 24 on the Devo. I hope to get on the elite squad next year, said Sanchez. Its my goal before I retire from the Navy. Along with a full-time work schedule as a Poseidon Fleet Replacement Squadron instructor for VP-30, Sanchez trains year-round with his coach, Jeb Stewart, in prepa ration for racing. The intense endurance training consist of two to three hours of cycling combined with strength train ing at the gym during the week and four to five hours of brisk riding on weekends. Sanchez added that he runs 10-15 miles a week to maintain his eightminute 1.5-mile run when the Navys biannual fitness test comes around. Sanchez has participated in more than 30 cycling com petitions ranging from 60-100 miles including various ter rains and weather conditions. Cycling speeds vary between 25-32 miles per hour, depend ing on the condition of the trails and weather. Competitions can be fairly dangerous due to accidents at high speeds, said Sanchez. I like going fast. I like feeling human performance, human being creating that speed and power, said Sanchez. Anyone can step into a car and step on a gas peddle, but its something else when youre creating that much speed. Wind going over you and just racing is fun. Its a nice adrena lin rush, he added. According to Sanchez, he will be participating in the Tour of Americas Dairyland at the end of June, an 11-day race in Wisconsin. Despite a schedule filled with working hours and a cycling career, Sanchez man ages to participate in as many charity rides as he can and currently has engaged in more than eight. He was inspired to become involved with char ity rides after losing his best friend, Cody Bloise, to multiple sclerosis. MS-150, a two-day ride, was his first ride. Other charity events he has partici pated in are the Bike 26.2 with Donna and the 100-mile Tour De Cure. Sanchez has won two medals for the Bike 26.2 with Donna race and anticipates winning a third time this year. I like doing the charity rides because its a way for me to connect with the community through sports and raise funds for a good cause, said Sanchez. Spare time is limited for Sanchez, however, during his leisure time he spends it with his girlfriend and hangs out with his dogs. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy. mil. Cyclist strives to become elite 22 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013 23 The X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System demonstra tor (UCAS-D) completed its first carrier-based catapult launch May 14 from USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) off the coast of Virginia. Today we saw a small, but significant pixel in the future picture of our Navy as we begin integration of unmanned systems into arguably the most complex warfighting environ ment that exists today the flight deck of a nuclear-pow ered aircraft carrier, said Vice Adm. David Buss, commander, Naval Air Forces, the Navys Air Boss. The unmanned aircraft launched from the deck of George H.W. Bush at 11:18 a.m. It executed several planned low approaches to the carrier and safely transited across the Chesapeake Bay to land at NAS Patuxent River, Md., after a 65-minute flight. Buss called the launch a watershed event in naval avi ation and said he expects that decades from now, a future Air Boss will have a picture of the X-47B launching from Bush behind his or her desk just as he has a picture of aviation pioneer Eugene Elys first-ever landing on the deck of a ship in 1911 behind his desk today. Completing another impor tant first for the UCAS-D pro gram, the team demonstrated the ability to precisely navigate the X-47B within the controlled airspace around an aircraft car rier at sea and seamlessly pass control of the air vehicle from a mission operator aboard the carrier to one located in the Mission Test Control Center at NAS Patuxent River for landing. The flight today demon strated that the X-47B is capa ble of operation from a carri er, hand-off from one mission control station to another, flight through the national airspace, and recovery at another loca tion without degradation in safety or precision, said Matt Funk, lead test engineer for the Navy UCAS program. Prior to the catapult launch, the UCAS test team also con ducted deck-handling and ship-integration testing to demonstrate the capability to safely operate the X-47B in the dynamic, unforgiving environ ment of an aircraft carrier flight deck. This event is a testament to the teamwork, professional ism and expertise of everyone involved with X-47B program, said Rear Adm. Mat Winter, program executive officer for Unmanned Aviation and Strike Weapons. Their work will positively impact future unmanned avia tion development for years to come. Over the next few weeks, the X-47B will fly approaches to the ship multiple times and eventually land on the pitch ing flight deck, said Navy UCAS Program Manager Capt. Jaime Engdahl. The UCAS team will conduct additional shore-based testing with the X-47B at NAS Patuxent River in the coming months before its final carrier-based arrested landing demonstra tion later this summer. As the state braces for the 2013 Hurricane Season and families create disaster preparedness plans, it is also a good time to make sure police know who to notify if you are in an emer gency. This is especially true for military families, who may relocate often or have family members deployed. The Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles (DHSMV) offers Emergency Contact Information registration online for free at https:// services.flhsmv.gov/eci/ and in driv er license offices (to include driver license offices operated by county tax collectors). Floridians who hold a current driver license or identification card can enter up to two contacts into the ECI data base. Even if you have registered your information previously, it is a good idea to update your contacts periodi cally. It takes only a few minutes, and there is no fee to register. The information you register is only available to law enforcement officers in the event of an emergency, such as a crash. Registering your emergency con tact information can provide fami lies and loved ones with added peace of mind, said DHSMV Executive Director Julie Jones. We are pleased that more than 7 million Floridians have registered their contacts, but that leaves 10 mil lion whose contact information is not available to police. The Florida Highway Patrol has run into situations where a motor ist involved in a crash had registered their emergency contact informa tion but failed to update it, said FHP Director Col. David Brierton. Outdated information can sig nificantly delay our efforts to provide quick notification to families and loved ones. The Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles provides highway safety and security through excellence in service, education and enforcement. The Department is lead ing the way to a safer Florida through the efficient and professional execu tion of its core mission: the issuance of driver licenses, vehicle tags and titles and operation of the Florida Highway Patrol. To learn more about DHSMV and the services offered, visit www. flhsmv.gov. Hurricane season runs June 1 Nov. 30. Now is the time to check make a preparedness kit that contains extra batteries, water, nonperishable food and first aid kits. For those customers who are thinking of purchasing a generator, from May 29 June 11, purchase any generator val ued at $299 or more with a Military Star Card and make no down payment, no interest and no payments for one year. The Military Star Card offers many benefits including 10 percent off the first days purchases (up to the cus tomers credit limit), no annual fee, low interest rate and 24-hour customer ser vice including online access. Military Star Card applications are available at any NEX. The application can be processed the same day at the NEX customer service desk. The Navy released new guidance to commanders May 16 suspending the expenditure of official funds on pre sentos those presentation items such as plaques, ball caps, coins, etc. We have significantly reduced our rate of expenditure of appropriated funds to preserve mission-essential operations, said Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mark Ferguson in NAVADMIN 128/13 that suspends authority to purchase presentation items until further notice. According to the NAVADMIN, previ ously purchased items may be distrib uted in accordance with existing policy. Additionally, the new guidance does not apply to items purchased with per sonal funds or to the purchase of items with the use of official representation funds, following appropriate review and approval. Ferguson expressed his appreciation for the continued support of command ers as the Navy looks for ways to reduce expenses while maintaining readiness. He also said he would provide updated guidance as the situation warrants. X-47B catapult launch is pivotal moment in naval aviation Make sure police know who to notify when disaster strikes Navy suspends official spending on presentosGet ready for hurricane season at your NEXCustomers pass six months, 4.5 million mark in downloads of Commissary Rewards Card coupons Six months of service, the Commissary Rewards Card continues winning prominence in customer wal lets and purses worldwide. The card gives customers access to digital cou pons redeemable at any of the Defense Commissary Agencys 247 stores. Our customers love the Commissary Rewards Card, said Acting Director of Sales Joyce Chandler. Its hard not to! It saves you time, effort and money, plus reduces the number of paper coupons you have to clip and carry. More than 600,000 cards have been registered by shoppers, who have downloaded more than 4.5 mil lion coupons so far. That means bigger savings for them, on top of the commissarys usual savings of 30 percent or more. Were averaging more than 120 coupons available at any given time, said Marye Carr, DeCAs Rewards Card program manager. New coupons are loaded almost daily! Our industry partners are stepping up with great coupons on all kinds of items everyone uses every day. If youre not using your card, you could be throwing away significant savings. One of the first rewards being offered by manu facturers to Rewards Card users is the posting of two different coupons each week for a free item, Carr said. The free item coupons remain available for redemp tion for one week from the posting date. A limited number of coupons are available; when the coupon reaches the maximum allowed electronic clips, the coupon disappears from the website. The free item rewards run through May 26. Carr said many customers find it handy to print a list of their coupons before making the trip to the commissary to help them keep track of their savings. Using the card is simple. Once patrons pick up a card at their commissary, they visit DeCAs website to register it, and then load digital coupons directly to their account. When the cashier scans the card, the coupons are matched to items purchased, and savings are auto matically deducted from the total bill. Rewards Card digital coupons disappear from your account when they expire. Like paper coupons, they cant be combined with other coupons on the same item, and they have expiration dates and other redemption terms and conditions. To learn more about the card or sign up to be noti fied of updates, including new coupon alerts, go to http://www.commissaries.com/rewards_subscribe. cfm. A customer service hotline can be reached at 855829-6219 or through email at commissarysupport@ inmar.com. Dear Switch4Good, Do fans increase cooling in my house? Signed, Cool Home Dear Cool Home, Although it may not be completely intuitive, fans cool people, not homes. Fans move air to create a cool breeze but they do not lower the temperature of the air in the room. Use fans to cool the people in a room, but remember to turn them off when you leave the room. Whether you have standing, window or ceiling fans, they provide a great energy efficient way to cool people. Use fans with your air-conditioner and turn up the AC temperature in order to use less energy. Signed, Switch4GoodAsk Switch4Good is presented by Balfour Beatty Communities and WattzOn as a way to help military resi dents save energy & money. Balfour Beatty Communities has partnered with WattzOn to establish the Switch4Good program to sup port energy consciousness as an attempt to switch behaviors and make a difference. Switch4Good is an energy savings program, funded by the Department of Energy and Balfour Beatty Communities, for residents on selected military bases. To learn more about the program, visit http://switch4good.org/ Ask Switch4Good: The scoop about fans

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24 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013 Financial advice for those facing income loss during sequestration Navy Federal Credit Union (NFCU) is shar ing financial advice for members and U.S. federal government employees facing a loss of income due to sequestration. Being prepared as early as possible and making sure your finances are in order can help you adjust to a reduced paycheck, says Claudia Warszawski, personal finance man ager at NFCU. Its so important to follow a sound budget plan. It wont be easy, but every dollar saved can help you live comfortably within your new means. NFCU offers the following expert advice for individuals and families faced with a sudden loss of income in the upcoming weeks and months: 1. Set a budget and cut unnecessary expenses The first step when anticipating a loss of income is to assess your current financial situation. Review your new monthly income and subtract all anticipated, recurring liv ing expenses, including credit payments. Adjustments are necessary if the resulting number is negative or too low for your com fort. Examine your weekly expenditures for areas where you can cut expenses such as dining out or entertainment, says Warszawski. Eliminating daily coffee trips, cable subscriptions and take-out lunches can put more money back into your wallet. For necessities such as groceries, cut costs by buying generic items, eliminating junk food and shopping at discount stores. Look for other areas that can be trimmed, too, like refinancing major loans and lowering monthly payments. 2. Adjust your means of transportation With gas prices hovering near $4 per gal lon (depending on your location), your com mute to work can be costly. Taking public transportation or finding a carpooling part ner can help you save, says Warszawski. For instance, paying $40 a week in gas totals $160 each month. Cutting the weekly cost in half to $20 by taking public trans portation or carpooling amounts to $80 per month. Over six months, thats a sav ing of $480. Over a year, youll save $960. Additionally, less driving also means less wear and tear on your vehicle and fewer trips for costly maintenance and repairs. If carpooling or public transportation is not an option, seek out ways to get better mileage on your current vehicle or trade for a more fuel-efficient one. The U.S. Department of Energys website fea tures a variety of fuel economy tips and vehi cle comparisons. 3. Make it a family goal Teaching the value of a dollar can be more meaningful when the entire family gets involved. If you have a spouse and children, its extremely important that they under stand and assist in the new savings goal. Share with them your new financial chal lenges, stressing that everyone can play an important role. Bringing bag lunches to school, game nights at home, and free out door activities can all help the family save, says Warszawski. If there are teenagers in the house, their involvement is even easier. With summer approaching, help them find a part-time job where a portion of their income can be con tributed to family expenses. Additionally, everyone can participate in organizing a yard sale. Plan one, and youll end up reducing clutter and getting paid in the end. Having a family discussion about finances isnt easy. But, it will be a valuable lesson especially for younger children in teaching solid money habits. 4. Talk to creditors If in the end you find yourself still unable to pay some or all of your bills, contact your creditors immediately. Explain to them your financial situation and request information about their hardship programs where you may be eligible for temporary deferment or payment reductions. NFCU understands the difficulty that a federal government furlough could pose to families. To better serve our own mem bers during this period of uncertainty, weve been asking them to call us on our special Sequestration Hotline at 1-877-874-0042, said Warszawski. Neither the NAS Jacksonville, U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government offi cially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. The Public Broadcasting Service will feature the docu mentary, The Flintlock Disaster based on the worst aviation disaster in the history of the U.S. Marine Corps. The documentary will air May 24 at 9 a.m. and offers a historical perspective of VMF-422s 23 F4U Corsair aircraft which arrived at Tarawa Atoll in January 1944. Fearing an attack by the Japanese, the squadron was directed to fly the island of Funafiti, 469 miles away. A failure in pre-flight planning led them to fly directly into a major storm. Ten of the aircraft were lost during the flight and the remaining 13 were forced to crash land in the ocean. The survivors spent three days at sea in life rafts before being spotted by a Navy PBY Catalina from Patrol Squadron 59. After taking on survivors, the patrol boat was too heavy and had to radio for help. Later that evening, they were met by the destroyer USS Hobby (DD-610) who ushered the men to safety. In all, the squadron lost 22 aircraft and six pilots were killed. Four pilots are still living including retired Col. John Hansen of Fleming Island and retired Lt. Cmdr. George Davidson who helped rescue the pilots lost at sea. To access the film, go to: https://vimeo.com/53437571. Enter the following password: flintlock (all lower case). The Navy Exchange (NEX) is committed to offering its customers low prices every day. As part of that pledge, the NEX has made a big change to its price match policy. The NEX will now match prices to Walmart.com, Target. com, Amazon.com, BestBuy.com, Sears.com, ToysRUs. com and BabiesRUs.com. We expanded our Price Match Policy to be more responsive to our customers, said Robert Bianchi, chief executive officer, Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM). More people are shopping online for their purchases and we want to assure them that they can get the same price at their NEX, so we are now matching major online retailers. The qualifying competitive online price may be pre sented on a mobile device such as a tablet computer or smartphone. If the price difference is $10 or less, the price will be matched on the spot. No proof is required. If the lower price on one of the online sites listed above is more than $10, the price may be verified by a NEX asso ciate or supervisor. As before, the NEX will continue to match the regular, everyday shelf price or advertised price in a local com petitors current advertisement. Customers should pres ent the advertised price in the form of a printed adver tisement or displayed on a mobile marketing device such as a tablet computer or smartphone. The NEX also has a 14-day price guarantee, so if you find the identical item for less at the NEX within 14 days of the original purchase we will match the lower price. The same 14-day price guarantee applies to a local com petitors advertisement or at a qualifying on line retailer; the NEX will match the price. Items already on layaway also qualify for a price reduction due to a competitors lower price or the NEX 14-day price guarantee. This new and improved price match policy is the best in the retail business, said Tess Paquette, senior vice president, chief merchandising officer, NEXCOM. The NEX is the only retailer to match everyday shelf prices and major online retailers as well as offer the 14-day price guarantee. We want our customers to know they will find the products they need at the best possible price when they shop our stores. We are excited to offer this new policy which will help ensure that they do. For details and more information about the price matching policy and all NEX policies, log onto www.mynavyexchange.com/command/customer_ service/price_match.html or stop in and speak with a NEX associate. NEX expands price match policy to now include major online retailersDocumentary portrays Marine Corps aviation disaster

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THURSDAY, MAY 23, 2013 MAD FOXES SPILL DRILL WWP Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com NAS Jacksonville and the Northeast Florida Navy League Council hosted their 11th bi-annual Individual Augmentee (IA) Appreciation luncheon May 16 at the NAS Jax River Cove Catering and Conference Center. More than 90 IAs from the base, tenant commands, Blount Island Command and several spouses were recognized at the event. The event was sponsored by the Northeast Florida Navy League, Rotary Club of Orange Park and Rotary of Orange Park Sunrise. The luncheon kicked off with the singing of the national anthem by country western singer Paul Stewart, a work and family life consultant for Navy Fleet and Family Support Programs. The invocation was delivered by NAS Jax Command Chaplain (Cmdr.) Shannon Skidmore. Music was provided by Navy Band Southeast. As awardees and command representatives enjoyed their lunch, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders welcomed and thanked the IAs for their dedicated service. He then introduced Naval Hospital Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer as the guest speaker. Shaffer offered a brief perspective on what it was like working in a hospital in Africa during her IA tour. During the deployment there I realized that medicine is a language all nations understand, said Shaffer. NAS Jax Sailors participate in Never Quit More than 4,000 par ticipants, including NAS Jax Sailors, civilian per sonnel and famed pro fessional surfer Bethany Hamilton, who lost her arm to a shark attack in 2003 while surfing in Hawaii and Navy Lt. Brad Snyder, who was blind ed by an explosion while deployed in Afghanistan in 2011, enjoyed the vari ous Never Quit Never beach events Sunday at Jacksonville Beach. Snyder was a former Naval Academy swim mer and won gold in the first Paralympic Games in London in 2012. The beach event is held every year as a tribute to the former Jacksonville The VR-62 Nomads returned last week from European Command (EUCOM) after a very successful detachment. Flying a C-130T logistics aircraft with 21 maintainers and air crew, theVR-62 detachment flew 31 missions from 19 unique airfields during 11 weeks ofdetached operations. The Nomads personnel include Selected Reserve and Full Time Support Sailors.The detachment Individual Augmentees recognized during luncheon Service members from NAS Jax, Blount Island Command and the Florida National Guard were honored during the annual Clay County Military Appreciation Luncheon presented by the Clay County Chamber of Commerce and VyStar Credit Union May 17 at the Thrasher-Horne Conference Center. The luncheon began with presenta tion of the colors by the Marine Corps League, singing of the national anthem, invocation and a short tribute to POW/ MIAs. Sen. Marco Rubio then gave a short message via video praising the service members in attendance. The military has long played an important role in Clay County history and in the Northeast Florida region. All across Florida, military installations and families are a strong part of our community backbone. Id like to thank all of our military members and their families for your continued support and for what you do every day for our great nation, said Rubio. Clay County Chamber of Commerce Chairman of the Board George Egan also thanked those in attendance for their service. Today we honor the service of not only the great men and women who currently serve in our armed forces from the Northeast Florida region, but also those who have served our country so boldly and so honorably at pivotal moments in our history, said Egan. He then asked all veterans and those who serve publicly to stand for a round of applause. VyStar Credit Union President and CEO Terry West also offered his grati Clay County chamber honors service members Nomads home from EUCOM detachment

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS May 23 1850 Navy sends USS Advance and USS Rescue to attempt rescue of Sir John Franklins expedition, lost in Arctic. 1939 USS Squalus (SS-92) sinks off Postsmouth, N.H., with loss of 26 lives. May 24 1917 First U.S. merchant marine convoy to cross North Atlantic during World War I leaves Hampton Roads, Va. 1918 USS Olympia anchors at Kola Inlet, Murmansk, Russia, to protect refugees during Russian Revolution. 1939 First and only use of Vice Adm. Allan McCanns rescue chamber brings up 33 men from sunken USS Squalus (SS-192). 1945 Fast carrier task force aircraft attack airfields in southern Kyushu, Japan. 1945 Nine navy ships damaged by concentrated kamikaze attack off Okinawa. 1961 USS Gurke (DD 783) notices signals from 12 men near Truk who were caught in a storm, drifted at sea for two months before being stranded on an island for one month. USS Southerland (DD743) investigated, notified Truk, and provided provisions and supplies to repair their outrigger canoe. The men would be picked up on 7 June by the motor launch Kaselehlia. 1962 Launch of Mercury 7, piloted by Lt. Cmdr. Malcolm Scott Carpenter, who completed three orbits in 4 hours, 56 minutes at an altitude up to 166.8 statute miles at 17,549 mph. He was picked up by HSS-2 heli copters from USS Intrepid (CVS-11). The capsule was recovered by USS John R. Pierce (DD-753). May 25 1952 USS Iowa (BB-61) bombards Chongjin, Korea. 1973 Launch of Skylab 2 mission, which was first U.S. manned orbiting space station. It had an all-Navy crew of Capt. Charles Conrad Jr., Cmdr. Joseph Kerwin, and Cmdr. Paul Weitz. During the 28-day mission of 404 orbits, the craft rendezvoused with Skylab to make repairs and conduct science experiments. Recovery by USS Ticonderoga (CVS-14). May 26 1944 USS England sinks fifth Japanese submarine in one week. 1952 Tests from 26-29 May demonstrate feasibil ity of the angled-deck concept conducted on simulated angled deck on board USS Midway (CV 41). 1990 USS Beaufort (ATS-2) rescues 24 Vietnamese refugees in South China Sea. May 27 1805 Naval forces capture Derne, Tripoli; raise U.S. flag over foreign soil. 1813 American joint operations against Fort George, Canada. 1919 Navy NC-4 seaplane completes trans-Atlantic flight from Newfoundland to Lisbon, Portugal. May 28 1813 Frigate Essex and prize capture five British whalers. 1917 First underway fueling in U.S. Navy, as USS Maumee (AO-2) fuels six destroyers in North Atlantic. Lt. Cmdr. Chester Nimitz served as Maumees execu tive officer and chief engineer. 1957 First of 24 detonations during Operation Plumbbob nuclear test. 1980 55 women among graduates from the U.S. Naval Academy. May 29 1781 Frigate Alliance captures HMS Atalanta and Trepassy off Nova Scotia. 1991 Amphibious Task Force in Bangladesh for cyclone relief is redeployed. When I first saw the resurrected news of Abercrombie and Fitch CEO Mike Jeffries 2006 comments about cool kids and why they are the only ones who should wear his brand, I thought it was an article from The Onion but I was wrong. (The Onion is a satirical site with mostly fake news, and I thought that no other entity, except those in the vein of Saturday Night Live, would seriously allow their front man to tell the press that they dont sell to fat or un-cool kids.) Lets review: In 2006, Jeffries told a reporter from Salon.com that A&F does not make any clothing beyond a size 10 or Large for women. In every school there are the cool and popular kids, and then there are the not-so-cool kids. Candidly, we go after the cool kids. We go after the attractive all-American kid with a great attitude and a lot of friends. A lot of people dont belong [in A&F] and they cant belong. Are we exclusionary? Absolutely . companies that are in trouble are trying to target everybody: young, old, fat, skinny. But then you become totally vanilla. You dont alienate anybody, but you dont excite anybody, either, said Jeffries. Abercrombie and Fitch does, howev er, make XL and XXL for men because, presumably, athletic and sexy men need larger clothing to accommodate their muscles. Putting aside the fact that the aver age American woman wears a size 12 or 14 (just how small no pun intended of a market is Abercrombie target ing, anyway?) and that labeling a dress with Size 0 says metaphorically, Do I really want to be a zero? Does that mean invisible? Does that mean having no substance? Jeffries comments add fuel to the growing fire of bullying and violence in our schools. While teachers and guidance coun selors work tirelessly to promote acceptance, compassion and the fact that beauty really is on the inside, Abercrombie and Fitch pushes against them by basically telling a large portion of the teenage population, You dont belong. Youre not cool. You are fat. I dont belong in Abercrombie and Fitch either. First, by their standards, Im old. I can hardly read my iPhone without hold ing it in front of my face, so I certainly couldnt read the tags on clothes inside the dimly lit A&F stores. Also, the music gives me a headache, and I feel uncomfortable being waited on, as is the case at the New York City A&F, by shirtless men (well, unless its my shirtless man). But even if I wasnt old, or if I had good vision and less sensitive ears, I couldnt shop at Jeffries stores because I dont fit into the clothes. Im one of those women who need something bigger than a size 10. It hasnt always been this way. In fact, when I was four months pregnant with my first child, I did wear A&F. Im sure pregnant women are not on Jeffries list of coveted customers, but if hes basing everything on out ward appearances, well then, on paper I belonged. I weighed 113 pounds. I was 22 years old. I had long blonde hair, tan skin and zero wrinkles. I wore a size 2. Yet, as we all know (or should know by now), everything that we are the entirety of our worth does not show up on paper, and it certainly does not show up on a scale. I wasnt cool back then. I was awk ward and self conscious. (I mean, why else does a pregnant woman wear tight A&F pants except to be something shes not?) I shopped at certain stores in order to have a certain look. I wanted to fit in. Im probably not cool now, accord ing to Jeffries. But I dont need a certain brand or weight to make me feel important anymore. Im comfortable in my own skin, and I wish Jeffries, and others like him, would move out of the way and help todays teenagers get to this point of confidence quicker than my generation. Hey, what is Jeffries (in his 60s) known for except making ignorant comments to the press and selling clothes? Does anyone take him seri ously? I doubt it. So instead, lets listen to one of his peers who has been successful for something other than being cool. You may not agree with a woman, but to criticize her appearance as opposed to her ideas or actions isnt doing anyone any favors, least of all you. Insulting a womans looks when they have nothing to do with the issue at hand implies a lack of comprehension on your part, an inability to engage in high-level thinking. You may think shes ugly, but everyone else thinks youre an idiot, said Hillary Clinton. Too fat for Abercrombie and Fitch As VP-5 transitions to the P-8A Poseidon, the squadron is highlighting a transitioning Mad Fox each week. This weeks spotlight shines on AZAN Jessica Clackum. Clackum is from Cumming, Ga. She is from a small family with one younger sister. She was originally inspired to join the service by her grandfather who was in the United States Army. When she found out the tank driving position she desired was currently not available to women she decided to join the Navy. This eventually brought her to VP-5 for her first tour. AZs are responsible for maintaining the logs of all work done on the aircraft by the various maintenance shops in the squadron. Where the P-3C utilized paper bound aircraft discrepancy books, the P-8A has moved to an all-digital version. This allows maintainers and aircrew to access aircraft maintenance records from a variety of locations. One of the tools that allow AZs to accomplish this is the Optimized Organizational Maintenance Activity (OOMA) system. OOMA is an automated information management system that assists AZs. As a new AZ, Clackum has been learning this system along with P-8A specific log keeping training at VP-30. VP-30 has been doing a great job teaching us this aircraft, Clackum praised. So far this transition has been very smooth. When Jessica isnt learning the art of maintenance log keeping on the P-8A she enjoys swimming, reading, and spending time at Jacksonvilles beaches. VP-5 has been transitioning to the P-8A Poseidon since Jan. 4, 2013. VP-5 transition spotlight: AZAN Jessica Clackum

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013 The clean shop in building 794 at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) was the site of a chemical spill drill May 14, where a simulated drum of sulfuric acid was accidentally punctured as it was being moved to a storage area spilling about five gallons and exposing DOD employees to hazardous fumes. The drill began when a fire alarm was activated in response to the vapor cloud generated by the leaking chemi cal drum. First responders included First Coast Navy Fire and Emergency Services, Naval Hospital Jacksonville and NAS Jacksonville Police Department, as well as environmental and safety managers from base public works and FRCSE. First and foremost, the drill tested the ability of FRCSE personnel to imme diately vacate the building when the alarm sounded. The key is to muster outside, away from the incident and make sure all personnel are accounted for, said NAS Jax Installation Training Officer Jim Butters. Next, the hazardous chemical should be identified and information about the situation relayed to the NAS Jax command duty officer. The NAS Jax emergency operations center was also activated. To enter the chemical containment area, two firefighters geared up with full-body level A protective suits that allowed them to verify identification of the spilled chemical, isolate the spill, and stop the drum leak with a wooden damage control plug. The drill also tested the emergen cy room response at Naval Hospital Jacksonville for treating survivors with compromised breathing symptoms. They knew that the ER would be short of ventilators needed to treat the total number of injured so their plan to obtain additional ventilators from medical facilities outside the gate was simulated. Injured role players were scattered outside building 794 and escorted by firefighters to an impromptu decon tamination site. After decon, role play ers were transported to the hospital where they were subjected to yet another decontamination process before entering the ER. FRCSE Environmental Director Bruce Mobley worked with Butters to incor porate the spill drill with a previously scheduled fire evacuation drill. So, as NAS Jax Fire Prevention Officer Robert Winchester activated the fire pull box, FRCSE personnel were observed and accounted for as responding firefighters made their way to the scene. Butters said, By incorporating both drills together, it limited the time FRCSE personnel were away from their work. Once the fire drill met its objec tives, employees were given a safe route back to their workspaces. Overall, Butters was satisfied with the event. This was an eye-opener for everyone involved because they assumed that attacking the chemical spill was the top priority. In fact, our top priority was triage and treatment of medical casualties because the building was evacuated and the spill was contained. The clean shop is where FRCSE arti sans are responsible for chemically cleaning engine and aircraft parts to remove oil, corrosion and debris before they are sandblasted. At the incident command post, NAS Jax Assistant Hazardous Waste Manager Jody Smith reviewed the Material Safety Data Sheet that provided the hazards identification and potential acute health effects of sulfuric acid: contact (corrosive, irritant) or ingestion and inhalation. tissue damage, particularly on mucous membranes of eyes and mouth. produce severe irritation of respiratory tract characterized by coughing, choking or shortness of breath. Severe overexposure can result in death. Overall, the drill supported the vari ous commands in working together to enhance their hazardous materials containment and life-saving skills. EME RG E NCY PR E PAR E DN E SS TE ST ED AT F RCS E E NGIN E F ACILITY

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CLAY IA LUNCHEONIts one of the best ways to help people in need. Medicine builds bridges, builds trust, builds cooperation and enhances our ability to work together with other nations, she added. Shaffer continued, The medical, surgical and den tal care that my team provid ed to our personnel at Camp Lemmonier, home to more than 20 tenant commands, was vital to the sustainability of our missions around that part of the world. Camp Lemmonier also served as a receiving and evac facility for the Horn of Africa. Djiboutis host nation support enabled us to provide routine and immediate care, preventive health care and 24/7 emergency and mass casualty support. According to Shaffer, IA deployments are a life chang ing and career defining experiences and the work performed impacts more than just the IA Sailor or Marine. You, our IAs, are saving, healing and enriching lives and livelihoods, she said. Your work has lasting impact, not only to the local populace, but with our sister services who now rely on Navy and Marine Corps IAs for vital support to global operations. IA guest speaker, LSC Sandra Mock of Commander, Navy Region Southeast, shared her deployment experiences dur ing the luncheon. The hardest thing for any service member is to come home from work and tell their family they received IA orders. I was issued orders on Dec 6, 2011 and departed February 2012. As expected, my family was upset; we worked through the anger, tears and anxiety, said Mock. We knew we had to move forward and come up with a game plan for while I was gone, just as we had so many times through our career. Im so lucky to have a supportive husband and two amazing daughters to help keep things together, she said. Mock, spent her first IA tour in Kabul, Afghanistan and her second tour at Bagram Air Base, Afghanistan. Despite the challenges she faced, Mock expressed her accomplish ments. She ran her first mara thon and earned her personal trainer certificate. IA tours are challenging and rewarding. Both of mine have helped me improve my leadership skills and enabled me to experience a different level of cooperation and diversity by working with other uniformed services and other nations armed forces, said Mock. I have met some wonderful people, worked alongside some incredibly talented and hardcharging Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen, she added. To close out the lun cheon, each IA was present ed with a special plaque and Boots on the Ground coin by the Northeast Florida Navy League Council and thankyou letters from Senators Bill Nelson and Marco Rubio, and Congressman Ander Crenshaw. Each spouse received a rose courtesy of the Navy Exchange. The IA Recognition Luncheon was first held at NAS Jax in 2008 and initiated by the Northeast Florida Navy League Council. The Navy League has been privileged to honor more than 1,800 IAs over the past six years. Our IAs have left their families to take on a mission that was not expected of them, met the challenge and served honorably, said Bill Dudley, national director, Navy League of the United States. We feel very privileged to honor our IAs and their spouses for their sacrifice in the continuing War on Terrorism, added Dudley. tude to the service members. We are honored to be part of this event to rec ognize the contributions you make. We truly appreciate everything you do, every day, to make our lives better. Thank you for your service, he said. West then introduced the keynote speaker, Jacksonville Jaguars President Mark Lamping to the podium. Lamping, who moved to Jacksonville in January, stressed the importance of realizing what a huge impact the mili tary plays on the Jacksonville commu nity. Our organization strives to give back to the community, especially to our military members. The military draws people here for a lot of reasons to serve, to support those who serve and those who retire in the area, he said. When new Jacksonville Jaguars owner Shad Khan came to Jacksonville, he looked at our team branding because NFL teams are a reflection of the community. After thinking about it for a couple of moments, he decided that nothing defines Jacksonville more than the military. So weve incorporated that into our new uniforms with a patch over the heart that serves as a tribute to our citys military service members. We also love to pay tribute to the military by holding surprise homecomings for service members with their families and the annual military appreciation game in November. Its important to us and we are proud to host these events, he added. After Lamping concluded his remarks, Clay County Chamber of Commerce Chairman of the Board George Egan and West announced PS1(AW/SW) Solomon Marshall of VP-5 as the recipient of this years VyStar Award for Military Excellence. They also recognized another 16 Sailors from NAS Jacksonville and its tenant commands, as well as several Marines from Blount Island Command and a Soldier from Camp Blanding Joint Training Center. Each was presented plaques and gifts from Clay County area businesses recognizing their outstand ing service. I would really like to thank Clay County Chamber of Commerce, VyStar Credit Union and all the other sponsors for recognizing us today. It was a real shocker to be selected for this award. Im extremely grateful, said Marshall, after the event. MU1 Robert Booker of Navy Band Southeast added, I think its great how Clay County supports the military. I live here so its nice to see that they are recognizing us for our service to the Navy and community. 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013

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On May 17, the VP-5 Mad Foxes paused from their tran sition to the P-8A Poseidon to observe the time-honored change of command cer emony at NAS Jacksonville as Cmdr. Matthew Pottenburgh assumed command from Cmdr. Erin Osborne. Pottenburgh is from Galena, Ohio, and graduated from Ohio State University with a Bachelor of Science in Industrial Design. He also earned a Master of Science in Operations Management from the University of Arkansas. His previous tours include instructor tactical coordina tor in VP-40, instructor naval flight officer at VP-30, flag aide to Commander, U.S. 6th Fleet and Strike Forces NATO, VP officer detailer with Navy Personnel Command, depart ment head in VP-47, branch chief and chief of staff for the C4/Cyberspace Functional Capabilities Board at the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and executive officer of VP-5. In the coming year, Pottenburgh will finish tran sitioning to the P-8A Poseidon with the Mad Foxes. Afterwards, he will lead them through a demanding interdeployment readiness cycle as they prepare to become the second squadron to take the Poseidon to the 7th Fleet area of responsibility in Okinawa, Japan. Osborne previously served as VP-5s executive officer before becoming the first woman to assume command of a patrol squadron on May 4, 2012. She led the Mad Foxes through a challenging 7th Fleet deployment which included a total of 22 exercises, operational detachments, and typhoon evacuations. At the conclusion of this deployment she flew home VP-5s last P-3C Orion ending the Mad Foxes 39 years in the airframe and setting them forward on the transition to the P-8A Poseidon. Osbornes next assignment will be executive assistant to Commander Naval Air Forces. The incoming VP-5 executive officer is Cmdr. Greg Petrovic. Womens Expo set Balfour Beatty Communities is sponsoring a Womens Expo May 23 from 5-7 p.m. at the Chapel Complex Building 749. More than 25 vendors will be in attendance. The event is open to all military spouses and women who have base access. VP-5 Mad Foxes hold change of command JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013 7

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The NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club is sponsoring two $1,000 scholarships based on scholarship merit and community ser vice. Eligibility: U.S. Navy active/reserve duty and active/reserve duty dependents who are currently in their senior year of high school or a high school graduate, attached to NAS Jacksonville and planning to attend an accredited college in the fall of 2013 or spring of 2014. To request the scholarship application, visit https://www.fcef.com/. Application deadline is June 15. You may submit the application by mail to: NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club, 4109 Eagle Landing Pkwy, Orange Park, FL 32065. Neither the NAS Jacksonville, U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. resident Navy Capt. Gerard Jerry Petroni, who battled hyperten sion, brain bleeds and several strokes and ulti mately died in 2009. Just before dying, Petroni related a strong message to his son, Erik, in a written note that read, never quit never. The event drew many performers and Navy Band Southeast was one of the crowd favorites. NEVER $1,000 college scholarship deadline June 15 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013

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Teen driving class offeredThe NAS Jacksonville Safety Office is offering a driver improvement class specifically for depen dent young drivers between the age of 15 and 21 years old June 14 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. The class will be held in the Safety Conference Room in Building 1. Participants do not have to have a drivers license to attend. The class will offer safety tips such as how to respond to driving emergencies and distracted driving while bringing awareness to risks of driv ing and much more. The class consists of videos, chapter quizzes and concludes with a multiple choice question test. There will not be any time behind the wheel; this is classroom only. The teens will receive an AAA Driver Improvement Class completion certificate. If you feel your teen could benefit from this class, sign them up by calling Linda at 542-3082, Cindy at 542-2584 or Kristen at 542-8810. VR-62flew high-priority missions supporting Combined Task Force 63 (CTF-63) They provided fast and flexibletransport inthe short-fused, high-stress environ ment of the EUCOM AOR delivering more than 700,000 pounds of high-pri ority cargo while flying 360 plus hours. The Nomads flew missions supporting units such as Naval Mobile Construction Battalions One and Four, Explosive Ordinance Disposal Mobile Unit Eight, and Underwater Construction Team One, to name a few. We were very busy, but busy is good for us said AZCM Karen Quinn, operations master chief. In addition to sup porting Navy and Marine Corps units, the Nomads also supported units from the Air Force and Army. VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Tony Scarpino said, We are provid ing flexible, responsive and effective air logistics capability to our Navy cus tomers and other branches while sup porting Combined Task Force 63. I am really proud of the work we are doing in EUCOM supporting CTF-63. VR-62 is one of five Navy Reserve C-130 squadrons serving the Navys global logistics needs and is based at NAS Jacksonville. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013 11

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Approximately 1,800 Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast public works professionals are celebrating National Public Works Week May 1925. Started in 1960 by the American Public Works Association, the week long event seeks to raise awareness about public works employees who are dedicated to improv ing the quality of life for future generations. This years theme is Because of Public Works... When you think of this years theme, it relates to every Navy installation we touch, said NAVFAC Southeasts Public Works Business Line Coordinator Jeff Killian. One never has to ask how clean the water is, has the grass been mowed, or does the air conditioning system work? The public works team manages things like this every day on every base. NAVFAC has provided management and lead ership of Navy public works for over 170 years. Globally, the Navys Civil Engineer Corps officers lead 68 Navy and Marine Corps public works departments (PWD) pro viding comprehensive shore installation facil ity engineering, acquisi tion, environmental and transportation services to many supported com mands and missions. In the Southeast, our team works hard to maintain the short infrastructure at 22 Navy and Marine Corps installa tions in the southeast ern United States, said Killian. They are vital in making sure the homefront is maintained for Navy families as well as ensuring our Warfighters are ready to serve. The essential work of our public works depart ment usually goes unno ticed but the behindthe-scenes work per formed in providing vital public works services such as electricity, water and wastewater man agement is the lifeblood of our base and tenant commands, said NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders. He added, Our public works professionals are at the forefront of cuttingedge energy projects that help meet the Secretary of the Navys energy goals. Advanced meter ing, renewable energy, and residential energy conservation projects are helping to reduce the demand for energy both on and off base. Our public works team supports the fleet, fight er and family with the highest possible shore installation capability and quality of life within the frameworks of mis sion effectiveness, safety, environmental steward ship and resource man agement, said Killian. NAS Jacksonville and Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) are working together to provide electronic material recycling to station departments and tenant commands. Instead of taking electronic material to NAS Jax Environmental at Building 1948 on Thursdays, please contact DLA at 542-3411, Ext. 102 to schedule a day and time to take materials to DLA on Roosevelt Boulevard near Collins Road. DLA will assist commands with requirements, including submitting the necessary paperwork (DD Form 1348) for turn-in of items. Remember that electronic material is regulated, so please ensure that no recyclable materials are disposed of in station dumpsters. NAS Jax is subject to significant fines and penalties when electronic items are found in station dumpsters. Anyone finding electronic items in dumpsters should call NAS Jax Environmental at 542-5251/5789. Every lifetime is marked by a series of milestones, per sonal and professional, that are forever held in the memory of those that experienced them. For many high school students one of these rites of passage is the prom, but for some students the cost of the formal outfits worn at prom can be prohibitive. With this in mind, a few Sailors from VR-58 chose to help some local high school students participate in their prom by starting the VR-58 Prom Dress Drive. The idea began when VR-58 Selected Reservist AWFCS Deyaniris Santiago, was spring-cleaning her house. I was looking at all of these dresses my daughters wore, just sitting in my closet, and I thought that I could do something good with them. When Santiago brought this idea to VR-58, it was quickly taken up by several other Sailors in the command, who expanded it into a prom dress drive. Prom is a once-in-a-lifetime experience, said PS2 Shanna Tripp. I didnt want to see someone miss out on that. For three months donations consisting of dresses, accessories and other formal wear were accepted at VR-58. Fifty dresses and various other items were then delivered to the students of The Foundation Academy in Jacksonville. Foundation Academy is an arts-based private school with an enrollment of approximately 250 students, 85 percent of which are on needs-based scholarships. The dresses were happily accepted by the students and giving back to the community proved to be a rewarding event for the Sailors of VR-58. We were excited to deliver the dresses, said PS2 Wendy Tetreault. They were very appreciative for the opportunity to try on dresses and find something they liked. Santiago already has plans for the prom in 2014. We are making this a yearly event. Next year, we are going to expand it to include suits and tuxedos for the guys. It was a lot of fun for everyone and I cant wait to do it again, she said. Save the last dressVR-58 Sailors give back to local school Navys public works pros celebrate contributions to readinessElectronic material now being recycled at DLA 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013

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Amid a spate of allegations of criminal behavior by military recruiters and service members involved in the Defense Departments efforts to prevent sex ual assaults and help that crimes victims, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel ordered May 15 that the ser vices retrain, re-credential and rescreen all sexual assault prevention and response personnel and military recruiters. In a statement, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said Hagel was informed yesterday about allegations of criminal behavior against an Army sergeant first class who was a sexual assault prevention and response coordinator at Fort Hood, Texas. I cannot convey strongly enough his frustration, anger and disappointment over these troubling allegations and the breakdown in discipline and stan dards they imply, Little said. Hagel met with Army Secretary John M. McHugh and directed him to fully investigate the matter rap idly, to discover the extent of the allegations, and to ensure that all of those who might be involved are dealt with appropriately, the press secretary added. Little said Hagel directed the retraining, re-cre dentialing and rescreening to address the broader concerns that have arisen out of these allegations and other recent events. Sexual assault is a crime, and will be treated as such, the press secretary said. The safety, integrity, and well-being of every service member and the success of our mission hang in the balance. Secretary Hagel is looking urgently at every course of action to stamp out this deplorable conduct and ensure that those individuals up and down the chain of command who tolerate or engage in this behavior are appropri ately held accountable. Army officials announced yesterday that the Army Criminal Investigation Command is investigating the Fort Hood soldier for pandering, abusive sexual contact, assault and maltreatment of subordinates. In a statement, Defense Department officials said the soldier had been assigned as an equal opportu nity advisor and sexual harassment and sexual assault response and prevention program coordinator with a 3rd Corps battalion at Fort Hood when the allegations surfaced. The soldier was immediately suspended from all duties by the chain of command once the allegations were brought to the commands attention, officials said, adding that charges had so far not been filed or preferred. During testimony last week before the House Appropriations Committees defense subcommittee, McHugh expressed anger over sexual assaults and sex abuse crimes in the military. This is so contrary to everything upon which the Army was built, he said. To see this kind of activity happening in our ranks is really heart wrenching and sickening. McHugh told members of Congress that Army leaders are focused on efforts to prevent sexual assaults. As I said to our new brigadier general corps when I spoke to them about two weeks ago, You can do everything from this point forward in your military career perfectly, but if you fail on this, you have failed the Army, he said.Hagel orders retraining of recruiters, sexual assault responders Household goods summer peak moving system beginsApproximately 65 percent of all Department of Defense (DoD) household goods moves occur between May 15 and Aug. 1. What can you do to ensure a smooth move? Plan! With the decline in moving companies capacity and DoD budget cuts, the sooner you start working with the local Personal Property Office the greater your chance of getting the desired pack out date. Dont wait until a week or two before the desired pack out date to complete the process in www.move. mil enter all your data and paperwork now. For Navy information on getting started with the move process, go to www.navsup.navy.mil/household. Another tip is to organize your house and belong ings. Go through all your rooms and boxes from the last move to make sure you still need the items. If it hasnt been worn or used in the last year, do you still need it? Sort your items by the type of ship ment: household shipment; unaccompanied baggage, if authorized; professional gear and what is going in your suitcase or car. By sorting you may find out what needs to be sold, donated or disposed of. Keep in mind, if you exceed your authorized weight allowance it can be expensive. Household goods terms and what they mean: Household shipment is your main shipment: fur niture, dishes, washer/dryer, BBQ grill, outdoor fur niture, childrens play furniture, majority of your clothes, etc. Unaccompanied baggage if authorized: this is the small shipment of items that you will need to survive until your big household good shipment arrives. This is normally only authorized with overseas orders. Items to include would be enough kitchen ware/dishes to use daily (not your china), crib, clothes, some uniforms, some DVDs not your entire library, etc. Professional gear : Professional books and equip ment includes Household goods in a members pos session needed for the performance of official duties at the next or a later destination. Service members items could be: work manuals, awards, specialty work uniforms (Band uniforms, navy divers, flight suits, helmets, chaplains vestments and other specialized apparel), reference materials, instruments, tools, and equipment peculiar to technicians, mechanics. Spouse: may be authorized for a licensed profes sion, i.e. doctor, dentist, lawyer or community support activities at the next or a later destination, example would be a command ombudsman. Any other profession may be considered if the appropriate documentation can be provided. Selling Avon or Pamper Chef does not count as licensed profession. Excluded items are: commercial products for sale/ resale used in conducting business, sports equipment, and office, household, or shop fixtures or furniture (such as bookcases, study/computer desks, file cabi nets, and racks). JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013 13

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m.Freedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 12 6 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included 80 Days of Summer June 1 Aug. 31 Youth bowlers 17 and younger receive one free game of bowling every day until 5 p.m. Win prizes all summer long!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 The outdoor pool hours Open Monday Friday (lap swim only) During lap swim only the waterslide, water park and concessions will not be open. 6 a.m. 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday & Sunday (recreation swimming) 11 a.m. 6 p.m. 2013 Learn to Swim Program Session 1: June 1020 Session 2 July 8-18 Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Disney Cruise Lines will be at ITT June 11, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Learn more about exciting 2013/14 trips. Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Daytona International Speedway Subway Firecracker July 5 and Coke 400 July 6 Tickets on sale now! Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3 Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7 2013 Live Broadway Series Cesar Millan June 1 $42 $52 New Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute 4-day hopper $153.25 Wild Adventures Theme Park One day pass $30, Gold pass $71The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Jacksonville Suns Baseball Game May 23 at 6 p.m. Paintball Trip June 1 at 9 a.m. Jax Suns Baseball Game June 6 at 6 p.m. Free admission and transportationNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees June 11 and 25 for active duty June 13 and 27 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Loudmouth Thursday Any golfer wearing a pair of loudmouth shorts or pants plays 18 holes with cart for $20 Open to military, DoD and guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina June 15, 16, 22 & 23 July 20, 21, 27 & 28 Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Movie Under the Stars Featuring The Croods May 24 at 8:30 p.m. Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School June 3 July 10 $500 per person 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013

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Twenty-three members of Team Navy Jax par ticipated in the eighth annual Jacksonville Tour de Cure, which is held each year to benefit the Jacksonville Chapter of the American Diabetes Association (ADA). The cyclists braved the 80-plus degree tempera tures; pedaling 30, 50, 71 or 100 miles during the event. Wearing jerseys and shorts courtesy of VyStar Credit Union, the team gathered early Saturday morning with about 550 other riders to participate in the event. This is my third year serving in the capacity of team captain. The team spirit that Ive seen this year has far exceeded past years. The riders were all concerned with every one doing the ride safely and returning to the fin ish line with their group. No one was left behind, said Team Navy Jax cap tain Jerry Dryden. I rode sweep for the team and was able to lead a (nonteam rider) back to the finish line safely. A young guy about 13 years old, was stranded at the sec ond rest stop. I was asked to bring him home safe ly. Several times I would correct his riding ability, but we had a successful 30-mile ride. Team Navy Jax cyclists spend numerous hours preparing for events by participating in team rides and attending spin ning classes at the NAS Jax Morale Welfare and Recreation Departments Fitness Source. Many spend their free time raising funds to participate in the events. For team member AE3 Tracie Burrows of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, this ride was much more than just another ride on her bicy cle. I have several family members who have dia betes. Its really an awful disease. I think there is there is a stigma of being overweight for those who have diabetes but in real ity, anyone can have this disease. So Im here today to support the cause in an effort to find a cure, she said before setting out for a 30-mile ride. New Team Navy Jax member AN Stewart Touchton of VP-26, along with his dad, Paul Touchton, were each planning to ride 100 miles in support of a cure for diabetes. We have sev eral family members who have diabetes and we love to ride so thats why we are here today, said AN Touchton, who was invit ed to join the team after meeting Dryden during a ride on the Rail Trail. This really is a great team. Its well organized, there are a lot of opportunities to ride together and everyone is so support ive. According to Tour de Cure Coordinator Kimberly Lewis, Team Navy Jax members are a huge part of the annu al event. We love Team Navy Jax! I think they are our longest participating team since we started this event in 2005. They have stuck with us through the years and do an amazing job not only with their service to our country but in our fight to stop diabetes, she said. The Tour de Cure staff and volunteers would like to thank Team Navy Jax for all they do, she added. The Tour de Cure is a series of cycling events held in more than 80 cit ies nationwide to ben efit the ADA. The tour is a ride, not a race, with routes designed for everyone from the occasional rider to the experienced cyclist.For more information about Team Navy Jax, email Jed2004@bellsouth.net. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the fed eral government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services.Team Navy Jax rides for annual charity event See more photos from Team Navy Jax and the Jacksonville Tour de Cure on Page 17. 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013

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More photos from Team Navy Jax and the Jacksonville Tour de Cure The NAS Jacksonville Police Department will participate in the 2013 nationwide annual Click-It or Ticket Campaign which runs May 24 June 3. NAS Jax police officers will be staged at numerous locations throughout the installation to check for seatbelt viola tions. Wearing a seatbelt is one of the safest things you can do while driving a vehicle. Most fatal crashes occur at speeds below 40 mph and within 25 miles of an individuals home. If youre in a crash and are thrown from the vehicle you have a 75 percent chance of being killed. When worn correctly, seatbelts reduce the risk of moderate to critical injury by 50 percent. Death rates are more than eight times higher when the occupant is not buckled or restrained inside the vehicle. Statistics show that in 60 percent of all fatal crashes, the victim was not properly buckled in the vehicle. When worn, seatbelts can reduce the risk of fatal injury to front seat occupants by over 45 percent. It all adds up to one overwhelming decision your personal and families safety. Everyone is safer in a car when theyre properly buckled up. A seat belt is the best defense against reckless, impaired or distracted drivers. Adults who dont buckle up are sending chil dren the message that it is all right to not wear a seatbelt. Remember children model adult behavior. Another grave statistic is that 70 percent of the time when a driver isnt buckled in, you can bet the children riding in that vehicle arent buckled up either. Wearing a seatbelt is required by law in the State of Florida and aboard NAS Jax for the simple reason It Saves Lives. Drivers are also reminded that is illegal to text or talk on a cell phone while driving aboard NAS Jacksonville. Click-It or Ticket Campaign starts May 24 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013 17

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Wounded Warrior Project(WWP) recently placed a disabled army vet eran with First Coast Navy Fire and Emergency Services for 90 days, to provide an inside view of what being a firefighter or paramedic is all about. WWP serves veterans who incurred a physical or mental injury associated with their military service. Rhode Island native and infantry veteran Paul Marsolais explained, If you were hurt overseas, the Wounded Warrior Project, headquartered here in Jacksonville, can help you get reinte grated into civilian life including col lege. The program Im doing right now is called WPP TRACK and Im currently in the externship phase at NAS Jax and NS Mayport. Its cool because this externship gives me the chance to work shoulderto-shoulder with firefighting and EMS professionals. Its training that will help me decide if this profession is a good fit for me in the future. I especially like the emergency medical part of this program. I administered first aid to a number of my comrades in Afghanistan, so I know I can stay calm and focused when dealing with trauma situations, he said. Marsolais, 24, enlisted in the Army fresh out of high school when he was 17. Trained as a front-line infantryman, he deployed with the 2nd Infantry Division to Iraq in 2007-08 (Operation Iraqi Freedom). He later deployed with the 4th Infantry Division to Afghanistan in 2009-10 (Operation Enduring Freedom). While in Afghanistan, I was tossed pretty good by an IED (improvised explosive device) but, fortunately, I was not hit by any shrapnel, said Marsolais. Assistant Fire Chief Jamie Sherer said, Paul is the first WWP TRACK program enrollee that First Coast Navy Fire and Emergency Services has hosted so this will be a learning process for everyone involved. We worked with WWP to determine firefighting and EMS activities that Paul could safely take part in with our crews. Hes expressed an interest in the fire fighter/paramedic career track, so were providing lots of exposure for that over his 90-day stay with us. Marsolais will spend his first month at NAS Jax working regular shifts, fol lowed by two weeks training with our fire prevention inspectors, and end ing with four weeks of shift work at NS Mayport, said Sherer. If we can help this veteran get back into Americas workforce and be productive that makes it a win/win for everybody. Chris Rick is the WWP TRACK man ager in Jacksonville. This program stood up in 2008 to serve warriors with various types of injuries ranging from the physical to the invisible wounds of war. Our job is to guide warriors on an educational pathway to earn their degree and pursue a successful civil ian career. Paul is our first placement at First Coast Navy Fire and Emergency Services. Previously, we placed two other veterans at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast and they were both hired after they completed the TRACK pro gram. Training Chief David Rickel, along with the assistant fire chiefs and cap tains, is responsible for guiding the hands-on training of Marsolais. Well make sure he gets the required classes and knowledge. And were proud to help out a former warfighter who gets that adrenalin rush when the station bell sounds for an emergency call, said Rickel. On May 7, First Coast Navy Fire and Emergency Services conducted semiannual crash crew training with live fire in a Mobile Aircraft Fire Trainer that offers several training scenarios, from simple to more complex. It allows the operator to inject only fire, fire and smoke, or only smoke from a combina tion of locations. Marsolais was present during the training and found it very realistic. Paul observed what we do and how we do it, so he can decide if firefighting or emergency medical services would be a favorable career path for him. If he says yes then weve given him a bit of a head start. Many of our crew are retired military so we may have an understanding some of the stuff he went through in Iraq and Afghanistan, said Rickel. When I complete my TRACK pro gram, I plan on moving back north and enrolling in a college where I can earn my associate of science degree and get certified as an EMS, said Marsolais. Army reservists conduct yellow ribbon program Members of the 257th Transportation Battalion from Gainesville, Fla., pre sented a yellow ribbon reintegration program for 68 soldiers and family members of the 993rd Transportation Company that recently returned from deployment. This event offers information and answers questions about all the resources available to make a smooth transition for returning warfighters, said Sonya Clemmons, family readiness support assistant for the battalion. We scheduled this event for NAS Jacksonville because we have many service members family members who live and work in Northeast Florida. Yellow ribbon presenters include a military chaplain, the American Red Cross, TRICARE, legal assistance, child and youth services, and family advo cacy counselors. Firefighters show career opportunity to wounded warrior JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013 19

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013 May is motorcycle safety month It can be quite frustrating and distressing for motorcy clists when other motorists dont see them. Near-miss events leave many riders with the idea that motorists dont look or respect motorcyclists. Some riders organizations have even tried to be proactive and educate car and truck drivers through advertising. Ever notice the bumper sticker asking motorists to, Look twice motorcycles are everywhere? Its a wonderful notion that we motorcyclists hope other motorists will take to heart but is it realistic? The truth is, there are many rea sons, both physical and men tal, why drivers may not per ceive a motorcyclists presence. What can a rider can do to keep from being hit? Perhaps, but first we need to understand why they may not see us. Lets consider how often a motor ist has the opportunity to see a motorcycle. Recent U.S. Department of Transportation data show more than 246 million non-motor cycle vehicles registered in the U.S. versus almost 8 million motorcycles. That averages out to one motorcycle for every 31 other vehicles. So, even if all registered motorcycles were on the road at the same time, would they be visible to other motorists? Not if we ride in the motorists blind spot. Blind spots are caused by mirror settings and the physi cal design of vehicles. Many set their side-view mirrors so that they can see the side of their vehicle but this setting actu ally increases the blind spot. Note: Learn how to set your car or truck mirrors properly at this website: http://tinyurl. com/7ob3mlm. A tractor-trailer blind spot is huge. If youve ever taken a look at an illustration of what the trucking industry calls the no zone you could see that a group of motorcycles could be hidden from the drivers view. Mirrors arent the only things that contribute to blind spots. Physical obstructions such as the roof pillars can completely mask your presence at a given moment. Anything hanging from rear view mirrors, decals on win dows, cargo inside cars, as well as GPS placement can all hin der a drivers visibility. Given the narrow visibility profiles of motorcycles, they can com pletely disappear behind these obstructions. In the Navy Basic Rider Course, students are advised to pick a lane position that affords the ability to see and be seen. Buildings, trees and other vehicles can hide your presence, too. You cant reposition them; you can only reposition yourself or ride cautiously past them. When the sun is behind you and your shadow extends in front, beware! Your headlight will be dwarfed the sun and motorists facing the sun will likely not see you until the last second. Darkness doesnt help either. Most motorcycles have only one taillight and one headlight to compete with the other vehicles on the road. Rain only serves to make a bad visibility situation worse, both day and night. So, motorcyclists relatively small numbers, narrow pro file, limited lighting, as well as physical obstructions all contribute to not being easily seen by car and truck drivers. Im sure some of you experi enced a situation where a motorist looked straight at you and violated your path of travel anyway. Surely if theyre looking straight at you, they shouldve seen you right? If only it were that simple. The things previously mentioned are only half of the reasons that a driver may not notice you. If you graduated from a Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) Rider Course, you learned that motorcycling is more a skill of the eyes and mind than of the hands and feet. Nevertheless, the eyes and mind can also fail to perceive critical information. Physically, our eyes are subject to macular degeneration as we get older. It is a condition that attacks your central vision which pro vides you detail, and occurs gradually so that that a person may not even be savvy to it. Its the leading cause of vision loss in older adults, most whom drive. To understand the sig nificance of optic nerves blind spot, visit this website for a fun test to show the influence of the blind spots on your vision: http://www.blindspottest. com/. When you take the blind spot test, you discover an interest ing phenomenon the brain will fill in what it believes should be there, whether or not it actually is. The eyes only relay visual information to the brain which then processes it. The mind can fail to accurately analyze that data, and it can happen at precisely the worst moment in traffic. Of course, fatigue, alcohol and medica tion can affect the mind and contribute significantly to diminished visual acuity. Even if you are awake and sober, you can still fall victim to boredom. Vigilance reduction is basi cally the decline in our abil ity to remain alert during prolonged activities. Can you recall times when you zoned out and couldnt remember driving the last X-number of miles? Experienced drivers are more susceptible to vigi lance reduction than begin ners. Think of how hyper-alert/ paranoid you were as a student driver. However, most drivers edu cation courses do not discuss sharing the road with motor cycles to student drivers, and that can be a problem too. Blindness caused by inat tentive drivers is a growing problem thats also known as distracted driving because the drivers attention is engaged on another task besides driving. Driving a vehicle is compli cated enough, without people treating their vehicles like phone booths and fast-food restaurants. It can happen to anyone regardless of their driving skills and familiarity with motorcycling. So, is a slogan on a bumper sticker likely to make a differ ence? I wouldnt count on it. After all, a motorcycle that is larger and louder with a stateof-the-art lighting system can still be unseen by other motorists for a variety of rea sons. In MSF Rider Courses, youll learn that accidents happen due to a combination of factors mostly by inattentive drivers who fail to perceive motorcy cles. There are many more car and truck motorists than motorcy clists on the road, and all of us must contend with the many reasons blind spots occur. So whats a rider left to do? Time and space the more you give yourself, the better off youll be. Mandarin Middle School held an eighth-grade career fair May 7 before they graduate soon and begin their journey through high school. Lt. Eric Frank, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11 public affairs officer, had the opportunity to represent the professionals of naval aviation at this career fair by setting up an informational exhibit. Alongside many other professionals from the Jacksonville area, this career fair was deemed highly successful by the schools principal and teaching staff. Throughout the day, more than 500 students attended the career fair to learn about some of their potential career opportunities. The main questions asked by the children included, What are the potential earnings in your career? and Do you think your job will be in demand when I am ready in enter the workforce? Naval aviation offers positive answers to both questions and the students were very open to learning about careers in this field because of the job prospects it offers. As the school day progressed, it became obvious to some of the other professionals representing their fields that naval aviation was one of the main interests of the students. Naval aviation provides a healthy balance of school, advanced degrees, monetary compensation and job opportunities and the students appreciated the opportunity to learn all of the facts about naval aviation. Apply by May 31 The American Red CrossNortheast Florida Chapter at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville is currently recruiting for this summers Junior Red Cross volun teers. This offers an excellent oppor tunity for students interested in health careers to train with highly skilled Navy Medicine professionalsphysicians, nurses, pharmacists, therapists and techniciansas well as contribute to a positive experience for patients. The program is open to a limited number of high school students age 16 to 18 who have base access. Volunteers work four to 20 hours per week in locations throughout the hospital, and receive CPR training. Apply onlineby May 31at www.nefloridaredcross.org. At the website, click on volunteer, join us, youth volunteer application (or adult volunteer application for 18 year-old students). Fill out the application, select Northeast Florida Chapter, and create a Volunteer Connection account. After submitting the application, complete the online orientation. All applicants are required to attend a kick-off event (which includes an inter view) June 8 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the hospitals 2nd deck conference room in the central tower (next to the chapel). For more about this opportunity, contact Junior Red Cross volunteer coor dinators Terry Miles or Mary Miciano at 542-7525 or jaxredcrossoffice@med. navy.mil.Look twice? Better think twice! Naval aviator participates in Mandarin Middle School career day Experience Navy Medicine as a Junior Red Cross volunteer

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After the first recorded landing on the atoll in 1859, Midway became a United States possession in 1867. A trans-Pacific cable station was established in 1903. In 1935, Pan American Airways used Sand Island as a stopover on its new seaplane route between the U.S. and Asia. In 1939, a study of U.S. defense needs recommended Midway as a base for Navy patrol planes and submarines. Soon thereafter, construction began on a seaplane hangar and other facilities on Sand Island and an airfield on the smaller Eastern Island. Midway occupied an important place in Japanese military planning. According to plans made before Pearl Harbor, the Japanese fleet would attack and occupy Midway and the Aleutian Islands in Alaska as soon as their posi tion in South Asia was stabilized. Two Japanese destroyers bombarded the Navy base on Midway on December 7, 1941, damaging buildings and destroying one patrol plane. In the spring of 1942, flush with victory after victory in the Pacific, Japan prepared to establish a toehold in the Aleutians; to occupy Midway and convert it into an air base and jumping off point for an invasion of Hawaii and to lure what was left of the U.S. Pacific Fleet into the Midway area for a decisive battle that would finish it off. The Americans had their own plans for the atoll. With the fall of Wake Island to the Japanese in late December 1941, Midway became the westernmost U.S. outpost in the central Pacific. Defenses on the atoll were strengthened between December and April. Land-based bombers and fighters were stationed on Eastern Island. U.S. Marines pro vided defensive artillery and infantry. Operating from the atolls lagoon, sea planes patrolled toward the Japaneseheld Marshall Islands and Wake, checking on enemy activities and guarding against further attacks on Hawaii. There were occasional clashes when planes from Midway and those from the Japanese islands met over the Pacific. Adm. Chester Nimitz, Commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, inspected Midway in early May 1942, conferring with the local commanders, Navy Capt. Cyril Simard and Marine Col. Harold Shannon. Based on U.S. intelligence reports, Nimitz believed the Japanese were planning an attack on Midway. Top Naval officers in Washington were not so sure. They could not believe that the Japanese would send a huge fleet to take a small atoll. It would be like fishing for minnows with a harpoon. Nimitz asked Simard and Shannon what they needed to hold the islands. They reeled off a long list. He asked Shannon: If I get you all these things you say you need, then can you hold Midway against a major amphibious assault? The reply was a simple Yes, sir. Within a week, anti-aircraft guns, rifles, and other war materiel arrived at Midway. Eastern Island was crowded with Marine Corps, Navy, and Army Air Force planes fighters, dive bombers and larger B-17 and B-26 bomb ers. Every piece of land bristled with barbed wire entanglements and guns, the beaches and waters were studded with mines. Eleven torpedo boats were ready to circle the reefs, patrol the lagoon, pick up ditched airmen, and assist ground forces with anti-aircraft fire. Nineteen submarines guarded the approaches from 100 to 200 miles northwest and north. By June 4, 1942, Midway was ready to face the approaching Japanese. Nearly 40 years after their operation al tour in the Vietnam War, members of VA-37 Ragin Bulls reunited April 26 at the NAS Jax River Cove Catering and Conference Center to share fond memories and honor fallen friends and heroes. Originally established on July 1, 1966 at Cecil Field to fly the new A-7 Corsair II, VA-37 became operational in 1967, going on to support operations in the Mediterranean as well as their notable tours during the Vietnam War, flying nearly 2,800 missions and dropping over 3,100 tons of ordnance. In 1972, VA-37 was also the first squadron to use an A-7 to establish a sonobuoy field off the coast of North Vietnam. The reunion was extremely heartfelt, with members recalling stories of their times together. Retired Rear Adm. Mike Johnson explained the significance of VA-37 and recalled his experiences on board USS Kitty Hawk during his time with the squadron. We were a tight knit group, always supporting each other. While we lost good friends during that time, its phenomenal to be here with this group again. Everyone here has gone on to become real estate agents, lawyers, CEOs, you name it. We reunited here from all walks of life, from all around the country, Johnson commented. The experience being close to 40 years ago, we thought this was the most appropriate time to host this reunion. Midway before the battle VA-37 Ragin Bulls hold reunion JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013 21

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While staying dedicated to maintaining the highest stan dards of fitness, which is a requirement for all U.S. Armed Forces, AWO1(NAC/AW) Mark Anthony Sanchez continues to chase his passion in competi tive cycling. Born and raised in Colorado Springs, Colo., Sanchez joined the Navy right out of high school as an aircrewmen in 2002. I first started riding a bike as a toddler, said Sanchez. When he reached school age, he added, I used to ride my Diamondback mountain bike on the Santa Fe Trail 15 miles to and from school every day. Throughout his childhood, Sanchez implied he had always been very active and competi tive in sports, especially track and field and cross-country. I seem to excel more at longer distances, said Sanchez. The longer they are and the harder they are, I seem to do better. According to Sanchez, his engaging thrill and inter est for competitive cycling was influenced by his uncle, Kevin Apodaca, an instruc tor and competitive rider for Trek Bicycle Corporation in Wisconsin. Sanchez started his cycling career in 2012 peddling first for the Velo Brew Cycling Club in Jacksonville, and in 2011, he was selected to ride for the U.S. Military Team. The U.S. Military Cycling Team con sists service members from all branches of the armed forces who are on active duty, National Guard or reserve sta tus. According to Sanchez, the U.S. Military Team has two categories, the Elite and Development (Devo) programs. There are only six cyclists on the elite level and 24 on the Devo. I hope to get on the elite squad next year, said Sanchez. Its my goal before I retire from the Navy. Along with a full-time work schedule as a Poseidon Fleet Replacement Squadron instructor for VP-30, Sanchez trains year-round with his coach, Jeb Stewart, in prepa ration for racing. The intense endurance training consist of two to three hours of cycling combined with strength train ing at the gym during the week and four to five hours of brisk riding on weekends. Sanchez added that he runs 10-15 miles a week to maintain his eightminute 1.5-mile run when the Navys biannual fitness test comes around. Sanchez has participated in more than 30 cycling com petitions ranging from 60-100 miles including various ter rains and weather conditions. Cycling speeds vary between 25-32 miles per hour, depend ing on the condition of the trails and weather. Competitions can be fairly dangerous due to accidents at high speeds, said Sanchez. I like going fast. I like feeling human performance, human being creating that speed and power, said Sanchez. Anyone can step into a car and step on a gas peddle, but its something else when youre creating that much speed. Wind going over you and just racing is fun. Its a nice adrenalin rush, he added. According to Sanchez, he will be participating in the Tour of Americas Dairyland at the end of June, an 11-day race in Wisconsin. Despite a schedule filled with working hours and a cycling career, Sanchez man ages to participate in as many charity rides as he can and currently has engaged in more than eight. He was inspired to become involved with char ity rides after losing his best friend, Cody Bloise, to multiple sclerosis. MS-150, a two-day ride, was his first ride. Other charity events he has partici pated in are the Bike 26.2 with Donna and the 100-mile Tour De Cure. Sanchez has won two medals for the Bike 26.2 with Donna race and anticipates winning a third time this year. I like doing the charity rides because its a way for me to connect with the community through sports and raise funds for a good cause, said Sanchez. Spare time is limited for Sanchez, however, during his leisure time he spends it with his girlfriend and hangs out with his dogs. For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy. mil. Cyclist strives to become elite 22 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013 23 The X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System demonstrator (UCAS-D) completed its first carrier-based catapult launch May 14 from USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) off the coast of Virginia. Today we saw a small, but significant pixel in the future picture of our Navy as we begin integration of unmanned systems into arguably the most complex warfighting environ ment that exists today the flight deck of a nuclear-pow ered aircraft carrier, said Vice Adm. David Buss, commander, Naval Air Forces, the Navys Air Boss. The unmanned aircraft launched from the deck of George H.W. Bush at 11:18 a.m. It executed several planned low approaches to the carrier and safely transited across the Chesapeake Bay to land at NAS Patuxent River, Md., after a 65-minute flight. Buss called the launch a watershed event in naval aviation and said he expects that decades from now, a future Air Boss will have a picture of the X-47B launching from Bush behind his or her desk just as he has a picture of aviation pioneer Eugene Elys first-ever landing on the deck of a ship in 1911 behind his desk today. Completing another impor tant first for the UCAS-D pro gram, the team demonstrated the ability to precisely navigate the X-47B within the controlled airspace around an aircraft car rier at sea and seamlessly pass control of the air vehicle from a mission operator aboard the carrier to one located in the Mission Test Control Center at NAS Patuxent River for landing. The flight today demon strated that the X-47B is capa ble of operation from a carri er, hand-off from one mission control station to another, flight through the national airspace, and recovery at another loca tion without degradation in safety or precision, said Matt Funk, lead test engineer for the Navy UCAS program. Prior to the catapult launch, the UCAS test team also con ducted deck-handling and ship-integration testing to demonstrate the capability to safely operate the X-47B in the dynamic, unforgiving environ ment of an aircraft carrier flight deck. This event is a testament to the teamwork, professional ism and expertise of everyone involved with X-47B program, said Rear Adm. Mat Winter, program executive officer for Unmanned Aviation and Strike Weapons. Their work will positively impact future unmanned avia tion development for years to come. Over the next few weeks, the X-47B will fly approaches to the ship multiple times and eventually land on the pitch ing flight deck, said Navy UCAS Program Manager Capt. Jaime Engdahl. The UCAS team will conduct additional shore-based testing with the X-47B at NAS Patuxent River in the coming months before its final carrier-based arrested landing demonstra tion later this summer. As the state braces for the 2013 Hurricane Season and families create disaster preparedness plans, it is also a good time to make sure police know who to notify if you are in an emer gency. This is especially true for military families, who may relocate often or have family members deployed. The Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles (DHSMV) offers Emergency Contact Information registration online for free at https:// services.flhsmv.gov/eci/ and in driv er license offices (to include driver license offices operated by county tax collectors). Floridians who hold a current driver license or identification card can enter up to two contacts into the ECI data base. Even if you have registered your information previously, it is a good idea to update your contacts periodi cally. It takes only a few minutes, and there is no fee to register. The information you register is only available to law enforcement officers in the event of an emergency, such as a crash. Registering your emergency con tact information can provide fami lies and loved ones with added peace of mind, said DHSMV Executive Director Julie Jones. We are pleased that more than 7 million Floridians have registered their contacts, but that leaves 10 mil lion whose contact information is not available to police. The Florida Highway Patrol has run into situations where a motor ist involved in a crash had registered their emergency contact informa tion but failed to update it, said FHP Director Col. David Brierton. Outdated information can sig nificantly delay our efforts to provide quick notification to families and loved ones. The Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles provides highway safety and security through excellence in service, education and enforcement. The Department is leading the way to a safer Florida through the efficient and professional execu tion of its core mission: the issuance of driver licenses, vehicle tags and titles and operation of the Florida Highway Patrol. To learn more about DHSMV and the services offered, visit www. flhsmv.gov. Hurricane season runs June 1 Nov. 30. Now is the time to check make a preparedness kit that contains extra batteries, water, nonperishable food and first aid kits. For those customers who are thinking of purchasing a generator, from May 29 June 11, purchase any generator val ued at $299 or more with a Military Star Card and make no down payment, no interest and no payments for one year. The Military Star Card offers many benefits including 10 percent off the first days purchases (up to the cus tomers credit limit), no annual fee, low interest rate and 24-hour customer ser vice including online access. Military Star Card applications are available at any NEX. The application can be processed the same day at the NEX customer service desk. The Navy released new guidance to commanders May 16 suspending the expenditure of official funds on pre sentos those presentation items such as plaques, ball caps, coins, etc. We have significantly reduced our rate of expenditure of appropriated funds to preserve mission-essential operations, said Vice Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mark Ferguson in NAVADMIN 128/13 that suspends authority to purchase presentation items until further notice. According to the NAVADMIN, previ ously purchased items may be distrib uted in accordance with existing policy. Additionally, the new guidance does not apply to items purchased with per sonal funds or to the purchase of items with the use of official representation funds, following appropriate review and approval. Ferguson expressed his appreciation for the continued support of commanders as the Navy looks for ways to reduce expenses while maintaining readiness. He also said he would provide updated guidance as the situation warrants. X-47B catapult launch is pivotal moment in naval aviation Make sure police know who to notify when disaster strikes Navy suspends official spending on presentosGet ready for hurricane season at your NEXCustomers pass six months, 4.5 million mark in downloads of Commissary Rewards Card coupons Six months of service, the Commissary Rewards Card continues winning prominence in customer wallets and purses worldwide. The card gives customers access to digital cou pons redeemable at any of the Defense Commissary Agencys 247 stores. Our customers love the Commissary Rewards Card, said Acting Director of Sales Joyce Chandler. Its hard not to! It saves you time, effort and money, plus reduces the number of paper coupons you have to clip and carry. More than 600,000 cards have been registered by shoppers, who have downloaded more than 4.5 mil lion coupons so far. That means bigger savings for them, on top of the commissarys usual savings of 30 percent or more. Were averaging more than 120 coupons available at any given time, said Marye Carr, DeCAs Rewards Card program manager. New coupons are loaded almost daily! Our industry partners are stepping up with great coupons on all kinds of items everyone uses every day. If youre not using your card, you could be throwing away significant savings. One of the first rewards being offered by manufacturers to Rewards Card users is the posting of two different coupons each week for a free item, Carr said. The free item coupons remain available for redemption for one week from the posting date. A limited number of coupons are available; when the coupon reaches the maximum allowed electronic clips, the coupon disappears from the website. The free item rewards run through May 26. Carr said many customers find it handy to print a list of their coupons before making the trip to the commissary to help them keep track of their savings. Using the card is simple. Once patrons pick up a card at their commissary, they visit DeCAs website to register it, and then load digital coupons directly to their account. When the cashier scans the card, the coupons are matched to items purchased, and savings are auto matically deducted from the total bill. Rewards Card digital coupons disappear from your account when they expire. Like paper coupons, they cant be combined with other coupons on the same item, and they have expiration dates and other redemption terms and conditions. To learn more about the card or sign up to be notified of updates, including new coupon alerts, go to http://www.commissaries.com/rewards_subscribe. cfm. A customer service hotline can be reached at 855829-6219 or through email at commissarysupport@ inmar.com. Dear Switch4Good, Do fans increase cooling in my house? Signed, Cool Home Dear Cool Home, Although it may not be completely intuitive, fans cool people, not homes. Fans move air to create a cool breeze but they do not lower the temperature of the air in the room. Use fans to cool the people in a room, but remember to turn them off when you leave the room. Whether you have standing, window or ceiling fans, they provide a great energy efficient way to cool people. Use fans with your air-conditioner and turn up the AC temperature in order to use less energy. Signed, Switch4GoodAsk Switch4Good is presented by Balfour Beatty Communities and WattzOn as a way to help military residents save energy & money. Balfour Beatty Communities has partnered with WattzOn to establish the Switch4Good program to sup port energy consciousness as an attempt to switch behaviors and make a difference. Switch4Good is an energy savings program, funded by the Department of Energy and Balfour Beatty Communities, for residents on selected military bases. To learn more about the program, visit http://switch4good.org/ Ask Switch4Good: The scoop about fans

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24 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 23, 2013 Financial advice for those facing income loss during sequestration Navy Federal Credit Union (NFCU) is sharing financial advice for members and U.S. federal government employees facing a loss of income due to sequestration. Being prepared as early as possible and making sure your finances are in order can help you adjust to a reduced paycheck, says Claudia Warszawski, personal finance manager at NFCU. Its so important to follow a sound budget plan. It wont be easy, but every dollar saved can help you live comfortably within your new means. NFCU offers the following expert advice for individuals and families faced with a sudden loss of income in the upcoming weeks and months: 1. Set a budget and cut unnecessary expenses The first step when anticipating a loss of income is to assess your current financial situation. Review your new monthly income and subtract all anticipated, recurring liv ing expenses, including credit payments. Adjustments are necessary if the resulting number is negative or too low for your com fort. Examine your weekly expenditures for areas where you can cut expenses such as dining out or entertainment, says Warszawski. Eliminating daily coffee trips, cable subscriptions and take-out lunches can put more money back into your wallet. For necessities such as groceries, cut costs by buying generic items, eliminating junk food and shopping at discount stores. Look for other areas that can be trimmed, too, like refinancing major loans and lowering monthly payments. 2. Adjust your means of transportation With gas prices hovering near $4 per gallon (depending on your location), your com mute to work can be costly. Taking public transportation or finding a carpooling partner can help you save, says Warszawski. For instance, paying $40 a week in gas totals $160 each month. Cutting the weekly cost in half to $20 by taking public trans portation or carpooling amounts to $80 per month. Over six months, thats a sav ing of $480. Over a year, youll save $960. Additionally, less driving also means less wear and tear on your vehicle and fewer trips for costly maintenance and repairs. If carpooling or public transportation is not an option, seek out ways to get better mileage on your current vehicle or trade for a more fuel-efficient one. The U.S. Department of Energys website fea tures a variety of fuel economy tips and vehicle comparisons. 3. Make it a family goal Teaching the value of a dollar can be more meaningful when the entire family gets involved. If you have a spouse and children, its extremely important that they under stand and assist in the new savings goal. Share with them your new financial challenges, stressing that everyone can play an important role. Bringing bag lunches to school, game nights at home, and free out door activities can all help the family save, says Warszawski. If there are teenagers in the house, their involvement is even easier. With summer approaching, help them find a part-time job where a portion of their income can be contributed to family expenses. Additionally, everyone can participate in organizing a yard sale. Plan one, and youll end up reducing clutter and getting paid in the end. Having a family discussion about finances isnt easy. But, it will be a valuable lesson especially for younger children in teaching solid money habits. 4. Talk to creditors If in the end you find yourself still unable to pay some or all of your bills, contact your creditors immediately. Explain to them your financial situation and request information about their hardship programs where you may be eligible for temporary deferment or payment reductions. NFCU understands the difficulty that a federal government furlough could pose to families. To better serve our own mem bers during this period of uncertainty, weve been asking them to call us on our special Sequestration Hotline at 1-877-874-0042, said Warszawski. Neither the NAS Jacksonville, U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government offi cially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. The Public Broadcasting Service will feature the documentary, The Flintlock Disaster based on the worst aviation disaster in the history of the U.S. Marine Corps. The documentary will air May 24 at 9 a.m. and offers a historical perspective of VMF-422s 23 F4U Corsair aircraft which arrived at Tarawa Atoll in January 1944. Fearing an attack by the Japanese, the squadron was directed to fly the island of Funafiti, 469 miles away. A failure in pre-flight planning led them to fly directly into a major storm. Ten of the aircraft were lost during the flight and the remaining 13 were forced to crash land in the ocean. The survivors spent three days at sea in life rafts before being spotted by a Navy PBY Catalina from Patrol Squadron 59. After taking on survivors, the patrol boat was too heavy and had to radio for help. Later that evening, they were met by the destroyer USS Hobby (DD-610) who ushered the men to safety. In all, the squadron lost 22 aircraft and six pilots were killed. Four pilots are still living including retired Col. John Hansen of Fleming Island and retired Lt. Cmdr. George Davidson who helped rescue the pilots lost at sea. To access the film, go to: https://vimeo.com/53437571. Enter the following password: flintlock (all lower case). The Navy Exchange (NEX) is committed to offering its customers low prices every day. As part of that pledge, the NEX has made a big change to its price match policy. The NEX will now match prices to Walmart.com, Target. com, Amazon.com, BestBuy.com, Sears.com, ToysRUs. com and BabiesRUs.com. We expanded our Price Match Policy to be more responsive to our customers, said Robert Bianchi, chief executive officer, Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM). More people are shopping online for their purchases and we want to assure them that they can get the same price at their NEX, so we are now matching major online retailers. The qualifying competitive online price may be pre sented on a mobile device such as a tablet computer or smartphone. If the price difference is $10 or less, the price will be matched on the spot. No proof is required. If the lower price on one of the online sites listed above is more than $10, the price may be verified by a NEX associate or supervisor. As before, the NEX will continue to match the regular, everyday shelf price or advertised price in a local competitors current advertisement. Customers should present the advertised price in the form of a printed advertisement or displayed on a mobile marketing device such as a tablet computer or smartphone. The NEX also has a 14-day price guarantee, so if you find the identical item for less at the NEX within 14 days of the original purchase we will match the lower price. The same 14-day price guarantee applies to a local competitors advertisement or at a qualifying on line retailer; the NEX will match the price. Items already on layaway also qualify for a price reduction due to a competitors lower price or the NEX 14-day price guarantee. This new and improved price match policy is the best in the retail business, said Tess Paquette, senior vice president, chief merchandising officer, NEXCOM. The NEX is the only retailer to match everyday shelf prices and major online retailers as well as offer the 14-day price guarantee. We want our customers to know they will find the products they need at the best possible price when they shop our stores. We are excited to offer this new policy which will help ensure that they do. For details and more information about the price matching policy and all NEX policies, log onto www.mynavyexchange.com/command/customer_ service/price_match.html or stop in and speak with a NEX associate. NEX expands price match policy to now include major online retailersDocumentary portrays Marine Corps aviation disaster

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