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Jax air news ( May 16, 2013 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA SLAF
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012

Material Information

Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 16, 2013
Publication Date: 05-16-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02042

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012

Material Information

Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 16, 2013
Publication Date: 05-16-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02042


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More than 500 people attended a ceremony at Green Cove Springs Junior High School May 11 to honor service members who lost their lives during the Vietnam Conflict. The ceremony, hosted by the Green Cove Springs Junior High School Beta Club students, used the 300feet long, six-feet tall Vietnam Traveling Memorial Wall as a backdrop for the ceremony. I can stand here and tell you that the wall is six feet at the apex, I can tell you that the east wing is 144 feet but thats not what this wall is about, said Greg Welsh, Vietnam Traveling Wall manager. This wall is about a young child; a boy or girl com ing out for the first time seeing the name of an uncle or a grandfather that they only heard about at family events. Or maybe its Gold Star parents coming out and sharing some time with their son or daughter who life was taken so many years ago. One highlight of the ceremony was when guest speaker, Rear Adm. Jack Scorby, commander, Navy Region Southeast, presented retired Warrant Officer Ernesto Serna with the Purple Heart for his bravery and efforts during the Vietnam War. Vietnam veterans remembered with traveling memorial wall THURSDAY, MAY 16, 2013 NEW LEADERS RECYCLING FRCSE Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 14 held its annual Killed in Action Memorial Ceremony at NAS Jacksonville May 4 to remem ber fallen shipmates. In 2004, seven Seabees of NMCB-14 were killed and 33 were injured in two attacks in Al Anbar Province, Iraq, while in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Their loved ones certainly served in a brave capacity that most dont, said retired CECS Benjamin Slaughter. They stepped forward leaned into the danger zone, and forever all of us, the Navy, the Seabees and this country will remem ber them and their families. Those lost in the attacks were; SW2 Jason Dwelley, EO3 Christopher Dickerson, BU2 Michael Anderson, EO2 Trace Dossett, CM2 Scott McHugh, BU2 Robert Jenkins and SW3 Ronald Ginther. Its been nine years since the tragic events that hap pened in 2004 took the lives of our fellow brothers and Seabees remember fallen heroes The Spartans of HSM-70 sent Detachment Four to sea in preparation for their upcom ing deployment on board USS Roosevelt (DDG 80). The detachment, comprised of six pilots, four aircrewmen and 18 maintenance personnel, flew two MH-60R helicopters, the Navys premier and most capa ble anti-submarine and antisurface warfare helicopter. Led by the Officer in Charge Lt. Cmdr. Kevin Lucas, Detachment Four met all goals for the two-week underway period by safely completing integration training and gain ing valuable operational experi ence. The detachments first five days at sea fulfilled require ments of the new Integrated Ship Air Training Team (ISATT) syllabus. Every flight event and mission was scripted, to include events such as low visibility or smoke light approaches, simu lated aircraft ditching drills, inflight refueling, and extensive day and night landing qualifica tions. We maintained a pretty high pace for the first few days, reported Lt. Donny Safford, one of the aircraft command ers embarked. But it was good to get back out to sea and work with the Sailors whom well be deploying with. Immediately upon comple tion of ISATT requirements, Detachment Four was tasked with the MH-60Rs primary mis sion of anti-submarine warfare (ASW). Two German surface ships, one German diesel sub marine and one American fastattack submarine were stand ing by to rendezvous with USS Roosevelt for a high-visibility ASW exercise. The rigorous 24-hour schedule over a 9-day period which followed for the ASW exercise provided unique challenges to a detachment with limited operating experience amongst both the multiple air crew and maintainers. All in all, Im glad the newer guys got to see how it all worked at sea. Its definitely differ ent than being ashore, differ ent challenges, noted Leading Chief Petty Officer ADCS Mark HSM-70 Detachment Four heads to sea

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS May 16 1820 Congress becomes first U.S. warship to visit China. 1919 Three Navy flying boats begin first trans-Atlantic flight from Newfoundland. 1965 First U.S. gunfire support in Vietnam by USS Henry W. Tucker (DD875). May 17 1940 President Roosevelt announces plans to re-commission 35 destroyers. 1942 USS Tautog (SS-199) sinks Japanese sub, I-28; while USS Triton (SS201) sinks I-164. 1951 Aircraft from carriers attack bridges between Wonsan and Hamhung, Korea. 1962 Naval amphibious ready group lands Marines to guard Thailands bor ders from Communist probes. 1966 Naval Support Activity Saigon established. 1973 First woman to hold a major Navy command, Capt. Robin Lindsay Quigley assumes command of Navy Service School, San Diego. 1987 USS Stark (FFG-31) struck by Iraqi Exocet missile in Persian Gulf, killing 37 Sailors wounding 21. May 18 1775 Benedict Arnold cap tures British sloop and renames her Enterprise, first of many famous ships with that name. 1798 Appointment of Benjamin Stoddert as first Secretary of the Navy. 1969 Launch of Apollo 10, dress rehearsal for first lunar landing mis sion. Cmdr. John Young was the Command Module Pilot and Cmdr. Eugene Cernan was the Lunar Module Pilot. During the 8-day mission, the craft made 31 lunar orbits in 61.6 hours. Recovery was by HS-4 helicopters from USS Princeton (LPH-5). May 19 1882 Commodore Shufeldt (USS Swatara) lands in Korea to negotiate first treaty between Korea and Western power. 1912 Navy establishes North Atlantic Ice Patrol following RMS Titanic disas ter. 1965 30th Naval Construction Regiment activated at Danang, Vietnam. May 20 1801 Four warships sent to Mediterranean to protect American commerce. 1815 Commodore Stephen Decatur ( Frigate Guerriere) sails with 10 ships to suppress Mediterranean pirate raids on U.S. shipping. 1844 USS Constitution sails from New York on round the world cruise. 1943 Establishment of 10th Fleet in Washington, D.C., under command of Adm. King to coordinate U.S. antisub marine operations in Atlantic. May 21 1850 Washington Navy Yard begins work on first castings for the Dahlgren gun. 1917 USS Ericsson fires first torpedo of war. 1944 During preparations for the invasion of Saipan, an accidental ord nance blast on LST 353 sets off cata clysmic ammunition explosions at West Loch, Pearl Harbor, killing 163 and injuring 396. Six tank landing ships, three tank landing craft, and 17 tracked landing vehicles are destroyed in explo sions and fires. 1964 The initiation of the standing carrier presence at Yankee Station in the South China Sea. May 22 1958 Naval aircraft F4D-1 Sky Ray sets five world speed-to-climb records. 1967 New York City reaches agree ment to purchase Brooklyn Navy Yard, ending 166 years of construction and repair of naval vessels. 1968 USS Scorpion (SSN-589) lost with all hands. Last week, from his windowless cubicle at the Pentagon, Dustin forwarded me an essay our friend Frank, whom we know from flightschool days, wrote for the U.S. Navy War College Web site. I spend my days sequestered in a dismal pooka only to churn out mindless reports of barely readable administrivia, Frank writes. [At the end of the day], I proceed to my truck to enjoy at least an hour and a half of bumper-to-bumper traffic . . I will be get ting up at 0600 the next morning to repeat the rinse cycle I call duty in Washington, D.C. I can absolutely hear Franks voice as I read. I can also hear his laugh loud, from the belly, and totally infectious. However, despite the brilliant and amusing descriptions, the reality is that I dont recog nize this man who just 14 years ago played a major part in many of my favorite memories. It seems like yesterday when Frank leaped out of his apartment wearing only sweatpants and a old T-shirt, with a broom raised above his head like an ax to get rid of a snake on our front steps. Dustin was on base finish ing up a flight. Later that night, the three of us went down to Flounders on the beach for drinks and a late dinner. Franks laugh echoed through the bar as he and I recounted for Dustin our run-in with the snake. This is how I remember our time in Pensacola. The guys were in the best shape of their lives, and we were all young and without a routine. Sometimes, Dustin flew at night, sometimes early in the morning or in the afternoon. We spent his days off at the beach. Often, I went to an open field in nearby Pace, Florida, to watch his T-34 fly overhead. Back then, I pitied the older commanders who had to leave Flounders early to relieve babysitters. I didnt envy their monotony or the beaten down looks on their faces. Their bellies had grown wider and their steps slight ly less eager. It was as if timedeployments, power-points, pookashad sucked the life out of them. But Dustin and Frankwell, they were a spitting image of Zack Mayo in An Officer and a Gentleman. There was so much ahead of them. They were living off the adrenaline of flight and an insatiable desire to serve their country. Now Im reading about Franks hamster wheel of reality and his anger at morning rush-hour traffic? This is largely Franks point in the article. Hes gone from the enviable and exciting life of an active Navy pilot to a mid-career lieuten ant commander stationed in the beltway. In other words, Frank is flying a desk. So is Dustin. I cant remember the last time either of them flew an airplane, and they are not yet 40 years old. Theyve become the older com manders. Until my dad retired from the Navy in 2004, I said that he was a Navy pilot, too. But the fact is, he hadnt piloted an airplane since prob ably 1990. Hed been flying a desk, and some times driving an aircraft carrier, for a much longer time. In February, when he took my boys to the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C., he showed them the actual A-4 he used to fly, which is on display there. But I dont think my youngest son, Lindell, who is named after my dad, fully understood. For as long as Lindell has known Pop, hes had an office, a desk and a cell phone clipped to his belt. Lindell told me, Pop showed us an airplane at the museum. Yes, I said. Its the actual plane he used to fly. Lindell looked confused. Its the plane that who used to fly? he asked. It made no sense to him that the pilot was Pop. In other words, the window for being an exciting Navy pilot is exceptionally short and narrow. I wonder how well recruiters relay this fact? Soon enough, the reality of a differ ent type of military sacrifice and commitment becomes clear, with less perks and more dedi cation required. There is beauty in this, too. In his essay, Frank says that his 3-yearold son wants to be in the Navy, too, despite never having known his father during what we would call his more glamorous Navy days. Suddenly my station in life improves, Frank writes as he reflects on his sons desire. The grey windowless box I work in trans forms into a nerve center of naval intelligence, and I am now an integral cog in the wheel of the machine that drives this global force for good. But Frank is also puzzled. How can his son ultimately want this 9-to-5 grind at a window less pooka? Perhaps, he writes, the one percent of the country serving in uniform [passes] the tradi tion down like a shop owner, and the aroma of service permeates through the offspring of Americas fighting men and women like the odor of the boat clings to a flight suit. I dont remember Frank being so grown-up and mature. Airplane pilot or desk pilot, hes still one of my favorites. Hey, MoneyChic! Im turning 19 next month and am trying to buy a car. I dont have any credit cards or pay any bills. How am I supposed to get a loan for a car if I dont have any credit? How do I establish cred it? Money Chic sez: This topic was recently discussed at length in our office. Our relief services assistant wrote a great article about establishing credit. Here is an excerpt. With a good, established credit score, you can walk into a bank or credit union and, in minutes, walk out with a preapproved loan to purchase a vehicle. With no credit history, this is a different story. You can for get about it only taking a few minutes. You are also not going to be offered the lowest interest rate. Without a history of credit, you will be expected to show proof of employment and some history of paying bills over con secutive months. The bank or credit union will use this information to fill out a scorecard which will help decide your interest rate. It is because of this scenario that we see the importance of establish ing good credit as soon as you turn 18. Here are the suggested steps for establishing credit to buy a car: Step 1: Establish at least one savings and checking account. Step 2: Acquire a secured credit card. Secured credit cards give you a credit line and your payment activity will be reported to the major consumer reporting agencies. Funds you deposit, usually $250 or more, are used as collateral by the bank or credit union for the credit card. You use the card like any credit card, allowing you to build credit history when you make on-time monthly payments to all of your credi tors and maintain your balance under the credit limit. Step 3: After you build your initial credit file, you can switch to a traditional credit card. Select a secured card that reports to all three of the main credit bureaus (Equifax, Experian and TransUnion). Credit cards are safer against fraud than debit cards and pro vide greater consumer protec tion on purchases. You want to use the credit card like a debit card and pay it off as you make purchases. You will not pay interest when paying in this manner because you never carry a balance. Step 4: After you have mas tered the use of the credit card for a few months, its time to work on another line of credit. A secured loan is one that has col lateral attached to it. This type of loan generally has a lower interest rate because the bank is taking a lower risk because it can collect the collateral if you default on payments. It takes six months to a year to establish your credit. You have established preferably two savings accounts, one check ing account, one secured credit card, one secured loan, and one unsecured credit card. Now it is time to see what interest rate your bank or credit union will offer you for the pur chase of a vehicle. You should also have your bank or credit union pre-approval prior to walking into a dealership. Additionally, you want to avoid lenders that appear to tar get the military and/or primar ily provide their services online. To read the full article titled Establishing Credit, head on over to http://www.afcpe.org/ blog/. To find out exactly how NavyMarine Corps Relief Society can help you, stop by our office out side the Yorktown Gate or give us a call at 542-2832. Have questions for Hey, Money Chic? Drop me an e-mail at megan. stolle@nmcrs.org. Flying a desk: Less glamour, more reality

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VP-45 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Michael Vitali was relieved May 1 by Cmdr. John Brabazon at a ceremony aboard Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan, where the Pelicans of VP-45 are cur rently deployed. Guests at the ceremony included the officers spous es, both of whom arrived from Jacksonville, as well as Rear Adm. Matthew Carter, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Force 7th Fleet. Vitali assumed command of VP-45 in May 2012 dur ing the squadrons InterDeployment Readiness Cycle at NAS Jacksonville. Under his command, the Pelicans have had a very successful deploy ment to the 7th Fleet Area Of Responsibility. The squadron has main tained a forward presence in the Western Pacific while pro viding anti-submarine war fare (ASW) and intelligence, surveillance and reconnais sance (ISR) support throughout the region, flying more than 2,100 hours on over 400 sor ties. Successful detachments to the Philippines, Australia, Malaysia and Thailand were also executed. Brabazon assumes com mand of VP-45 with over a month remaining in its deploy ment to Okinawa. When the Pelicans return to NAS Jacksonville, he will over see the squadrons transition from the legacy P-3C Orion to the new P-8A Poseidon, the fourth aircraft transition in the Pelicans illustrious 71-year history. The new executive offi cer, Cmdr. T.J. Grady, joined the Pelican team in Kadena after qualifying in the P-8A Poseidon at VP-30 aboard NAS Jacksonville. Brabazon relieves Vitali at VP-45 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013 Recycling center vastly improves efficiencyThe NAS Jacksonville Recycling Center, located next to the MWR Auto Skills Center on Birmingham Avenue, recently implemented programs that have dramatically increased its efficiency and monetary return in processing recyclable mate rials. Headed up by MUCS Patrick Detroit and supported by numerous Sailors, the center has transformed into a shin ing example of leadership in improving the bases green footprint. One of the major changes we made is separating out pre cious metals from the items we receive here, explained Detroit. In the past, we had one bin for all scrap metal that was col lected and shipped off to a pro cessing center which would yield a relatively low profit. We found that as we sepa rate out pure metals such as copper and aluminum, there is an exponential increase in profits. It may be a lot more work, but as all the proceeds are donated to MWR (Morale, Welfare and Recreation), its definitely worth it. Detroit added that during the last quarter, the amount of scrap metal the recycling cen ter collected would have yield ed a profit of $290.10 if just sold in bulk. By breaking down and sepa rating out the precious metals to be sold separately, the center was able to increase the mon etary gain to $4,129, represent ing a 1,352 percent increase. In addition to collecting and separating scrap metal, the center also processes paper, cardboard, plastic, car batter ies, and even used sonobuoys from VP squadrons. Tenant commands and Sailors alike are highly encour aged to bring their recyclable materials to the center that opens at 9 a.m. However, Detroit stressed that people bring only materi als that can be recycled, as the center is not a garbage dump. We have had some people dump clothes, electronics and hazardous materials that we are not equipped to deal with at this center. We ask that peo ple call when they are in doubt about the suitability of their potential recyclables. Despite minor issues, Detroit was highly enthusiastic about the recycling centers evolving improvements and praised his Sailors for their hard work and devotion to improving the NAS Jax environment. We are proud that what we do here supports the base MWR. The amount we gained just by making these changes was more than enough to cover Club 2000 and then some, Detroit remarked. This is really a testament to the Sailors who work here every day. They consistently promote a teamwork-driven, positive environment and are committed to taking care of business in the most efficient way possible. For more information on the NAS Jax Recycling Center or the materials it can receive, contact 542-5959.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013 5 Photos by Lt. Kevin Wendt

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President Barack Obama, command er in chief of the U.S. armed forces, said sexual assault is an outrage, and anyone within the military who commits the crimeis betraying the uniform that theyre wearing. The president, speaking May 7 at a White House press conference, said the problem of sexual assault in the mili tary is neither new nor easy to solve, but leaders have to do everything we can to root this out. Obama noted he worked with former Defense Secretary Leon Panetta on the issue, and spoke about it most recently with current Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel. He said the Defense Department is working to gather accurate reporting of assaults and is building a system of accountability and transparency up and down the chain of command. The president added that he told Hagel, Were gonna have to, you know, not just step up our game, we have to exponentially step up our game to go at this thing hard. Obama offered a personal message to those in uniform who have experienced sexual assault. I want them to hear directly from their commander in chief that Ive got their backs, Obama said. I will sup port them, and were not gonna tolerate this stuff. And there will be account ability. If people have engaged in this behavior, they should be prosecuted. Everyone in the military should understand, this is not who we are, this is not what the U.S. military is about, and it dishonors the vast major ity of men and women in uniform who carry out their responsibilities and obligations with honor and dignity and incredible courage every single day, Obama said. The president said he has no toler ance for sexual assault, and he expects consequences for those who commit the crime. I dont want just more speeches or, you know, awareness programs or training -but ultimately folks look the other way, he said. [When] we find out somebodys engaging in this stuff, theyve got to be held accountable; prosecuted, stripped out of their positions, court martialed, fired, dishonorably discharged. Period. Its not acceptable.Obama to military sexual assault victims: Ive got your backs 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013

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Commander, Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) visited Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), the larg est tenant command on NAS Jacksonville, to meet with lead ers, address the workforce, and tour the military depot May 10. NAVAIR Commander Vice Adm. David Dunaway addressed about 500 Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) civilian federal workers gathered in the P-3 Production Hangar to discuss the impacts of federal budget cuts, sequestration and the way forward. FRCSE employs the largest Department of Defense (DOD) civilian workforce (2,800) on the installation; all facing the possibility of being furloughed without pay in the remainder of Fiscal Year 2013 due to budget ary shortfalls. Dunaway said he understood the financial burden furloughs would place not only on the federal workforce but also the impact on mission effective ness and efficiency in support ing the warfighter. He said officially, the number of furlough days still stands at up to 14 days, but would like ly be fewer, as the Command has not yet received direction to notify workers. He urged the audience to be bureaucracy busters and use Lean methodologies to link improvement efforts for reducing operating expenses, increasing throughput and improving reliability to the Fleet. He surprised the crowd with the announcement that FRCSE earned the Chief of Naval Operations 2012 Aviation Safety Award for FRCSEs stel lar record of 46 years and near ly 30,000 flight hours of Class A/B mishap-free flying. Dunaway cited the integra tion of workplace safety with aviation safety and FRCSEs efforts in fostering a climate of safety awareness to achieve such continued success. The admiral toured the Industrial Manufacturing Division where Angello Evans, the division director, pointed to aircraft parts machinists were fabricating in-house to keep the legacy aircraft ready for tasking. In the Crinkley Engine Facility, Don Dunlap, the engine program director, explained how engine mechanics maintained and repaired some of the most sophisticated engines in the Navy and Marine Corps inven tories. Time Postemski, the avion ics lead, conducted a tour of the avionics building where artisans repair the Advanced Targeting Forward Looking InfraRed systems for defense industry partners. On his last stop at the F/A18 Hornet Production Line, Dunaway learned from Lt. Cmdr. Joshua Filbey, a Hornet pilot, and Bill Murray, the F/A18 division director, about some of the engineering, logis tics and aircraft condition challenges the artisans face when adding service life to aging naval aircraft. NAVAIR commander visits FRCSE The NAS Jacksonville Safety Office is offering a driver improvement class specifically for dependent young drivers between the age of 15 and 21 years old June 14 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. The class will be held in the Safety Conference Room in Building 1. Participants do not have to have a drivers license to attend. The class will offer safety tips such as how to respond to driving emergencies and distracted driving while bringing awareness to risks of driving and much more. The class consists of videos, chapter quizzes and concludes with a multiple choice question test. There will not be any time behind the wheel; this is classroom only. The teens will receive an AAA Driver Improve-ment Class completion certificate. If you feel your teen could benefit from this class, sign them up by calling Linda at 542-3082, Cindy at 542-2584 or Kristen at 542-8810.Safety Office offers teen driving class June 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013 7

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HSM-70Hudson. Over the course of 13 flying days, the Spartans exe cuted 103 hours flight hours, no small feat with only three aircrews. The detachment really rose to the occasion while faced with a rigorous change of pace, stated Lucas. During the exercise, more than 150 sonobuoys were expended to track the submarines both actively and passively. Many of the pilots experienced their first night dipping operations while on night vision goggles using the MH-60Rs AQS-22 dipping sonar, requiring the pilots to maintain a hover and lower the sonar transducer into the ocean. By the conclusion of the exercise, over 50 hours of dedicated ASW time had been conducted. While ASW remained the priority, crews found themselves unexpectedly re-tasked with missions as diverse as surface warfare, subsurface communications, and airborne imagery relay. Having gained invaluable operational experience, the Spartans were both happy to be home and eager to implement their newly acquired skills in their upcom ing underway periods. A two-plane F-21 Kfir fighter detachment operated by Airborne Tactical Advantage Company (ATAC), as well as electronic warfare aircraft from Phoenix Air and L-3, operated from NAS Jacksonville recently to provide adversity threat training to naval forces oper ating in the Atlantic off the southeastern U.S. coast. These aggressor aircraft present a variety of threat profiles against naval surface ships and/or aircraft, said NAS Jax Air Operations Officer Cmdr. Mark McManus. According to daily tasking from Commander, Strike Force Training Atlantic, these specialized aircraft may fly joint missions in a series of training scenarios focused on the combat certification of a single vessel or a carrier strike group. Supporting warfighter training over the Atlantic 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013

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injured others. We pause to remem ber those who gave the ultimate sac rifice and their families, said NMCB14 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Todd Smith during the ceremony. Smith continued addressing those in attendance, Ill simply say this thank you, on behalf of this battalion, the Navy and the nation for their service and sacrifice. One of the veterans who was wound ed during the attacks was BU2 Peter Herrick who attended with his wife, Diana. Its a great honor to be here with everybody, said Herrick. Its our plea sure to be with the NMCB-14 brother hood again. Even though the Veterans Affairs has me listed as catastrophically disabled, I still look at life as a big puz zle, and I always look for some humor in every part of it. NMCB-14 holds this memorial ser vice to honor and remember the coura geous Seabees and all service members who made the ultimate sacrifice for the nation. NMCB-14 The NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club is sponsoring two $1,000 scholar ships based on scholarship merit and community service. Eligibility: U.S. Navy active/reserve duty and active/reserve duty depen dents who are currently in their senior year of high school or a high school graduate, attached to NAS Jacksonville and planning to attend an accredited college in the fall of 2013 or spring of 2014. To request the scholarship applica tion, email nco.jacksonville@navy.mil or stop by the NAS Jax Navy College Office in Building 110. Application deadline is June 15. Submit by mail to: NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club, 4109 Eagle Landing Pkwy, Orange Park, FL 32065. $1,000 college scholarship opportunity JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013 9

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NAS Jax Barracks Bash caters to junior SailorsHundreds of Sailors and Marines enjoyed a sunny afternoon May 9 at the Spring Barracks Bash presented by NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department and the Liberty Program. The free event featured picnic-style food, T-shirts and prizes that included gift packages from the Jacksonville Suns, a wireless speaker set, area restau rant gift cards, local attraction passes and much more! The purpose of the Barracks Bash is to provide an event that is alcohol-free and targeted to the junior enlisted Sailors who reside in the barracks, said Liberty Program Manager Tom Kubalewski. We moved the location this year due to construc tion at our previous location. We chose the large grass field at the corner of Mustin Road and Enterprise Avenue. The highly visible larger field gave us more space for activity and improved our event attendance, continued Kubalewski. Entertainment included Disc Jockey 357 YN3 Calvin Dawson of VP-26 and local Ska band 20WT, who kept the music playing non-stop. Barracks Bashers looking for competitive entertain ment could choose from the climbing wall, bungee run, Sumo wrestling, volleyball, slip n slide, bag toss and jousting. MWR thanks everyone who participated in or volun teered for this event. Sponsor included: GEICO, EmbryRiddle Aeronautical University, University of Phoenix, USAA, VyStar Credit Union, Jacksonville Suns, Allied American University and USA Discounters.Neither NAS Jax MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any com pany, sponsor or its products or services. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013 11

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Financial aid available for veteransThe J. Wayne and Delores Barr Weaver Veterans Emergency and Transition Services Fund provides emergency financial assistance and resources to veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom that will help to support their transition into civilian life and stabilization into the community.This financial assistance is provided directly to the veterans of these wars.The geographic service area is: Duval, Clay, Nassau, Baker and St. Johns counties. Types of emergency needs we help with but not strictly limited too: ment or repair, insurance work or learn a life skill For more information, contact a Red Cross Military Services caseworker at 246-1395. 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Deweys Free Spring Concert Series 7 p.m. on the outdoor stage May 17 Zero-NFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 5 10 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 126 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not includedFitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 The outdoor pool hours Open Monday Friday (lap swim only) During lap swim only the waterslide, water park and concessions will not be open. 6-8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday & Sunday (recreation swim ming) 11 a.m. 6 p.m. 2013 Learn to Swim Program Session 1: June 1020 Session 2: July 8-18 Session 3: July 22 Aug. 1I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Disney Cruise Lines will be at ITT June 11 from 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Learn more about exciting 2013/2014 trips sailing from Port Canaveral, Miami, Galveston, Barcelona, San Juan and Vancouver. Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Daytona International Speedway Subway Firecracker July 5 and Coke 400 July 6 Tickets on sale now! Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Funkfest Metropolitan Park May 10-11 2-day ticket $52 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3 Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7 Call for pricing Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline 2013 Live Broadway Series Dream Girls May 21 Cesar Millan June 1 $42 $52 MOSH $7 $12 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through May 15 and must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about our special discounted tick ets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park One day pass $30, Gold pass $71 Book Shade of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Paintball Trip May 18 at 9 a.m. Universal Studios Weekend Trip May 25-26 Jacksonville Suns Baseball Game May 23 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees May 21 for active duty May 23 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Loudmouth Thursday Any golfer wearing a pair of loudmouth shorts or pants plays 18 holes with cart for $20 Open to military, DoD and guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina May 18, 19, 25 & 26 June 15, 16, 22 & 23 July 20, 21, 27 & 28 Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Movie Under the Stars Featuring The Croods May 24 at 8:30 p.m. Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School June 3 July 10 $500 per person For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy. mil. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013 13

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14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013 VP-5 qualifies first Poseidon plane captainPatrol Squadron (VP) 5 recently qualified AT3(AW) Asa Mull as the squadrons first P-8A Poseidon plane captain. The plane captain qualifi cation is a new addition to the previous P-3C Orion squadron that utilized linemen or yel low shirts who direct aircraft as they leave and return from missions. The P-8A plane captain holds a great deal more responsibil ity. Each is assigned a specific aircraft and signs acceptance forms, daily inspections, turn arounds, checklists and releas es the aircraft for flight. It is a great honor to be the first to obtain this qualifica tion, commented Mull. I am now one of three peo ple who sign for one of the Navys newest maritime patrol aircraft, including the patrol plane commander and mainte nance control. Mull completed this quali fication while simultaneously attending classes and handson training for his aviation electronics technician rate. He currently trains other aspir ing Mad Fox plane captains each time he launches and recovers a P-8A Poseidon. AT3 Mull is a native of Rockville Center, N.Y. and one of seven chil dren including three brothers and three sisters. One of his brothers is also an aviation elec tronics technician, and works on F/A18 Hornets. VP-5 has been transitioning to the P-8A Poseidon since Jan. 4. DOD continues TBI research, education, treatmentThe Defense Department is commit ted to providing the best medical care and recovery for service members with traumatic brain injury, DODs top doc tor said in a statement issued May 8. Following a 60 Minutes segment on the treatment of traumatic brain injury that aired May 5, Dr. Jonathan Woodson, assistant secretary of defense for health affairs, said all service mem bers will receive specialized care for any type of TBI, from mild concussions to severe head injuries that require extensive specialized care at one of our research facilities for the rare instanc es. Woodson said DOD is grateful to military and private sector leaders who understand TBIs impact on ser vice members, help identify appropriate treatment, and help the military obtain the resources to build and sustain additional world-class medical treat ment and research facilities. Woodson also said the department appreciates the relationships we have cultivated with members of academia, philanthropic efforts and within our Military Health System, which have ensured that DODs National Intrepid Center of Excellence is an additional highlight to our long line of exceptional medical research facilities. NICoE was constructed with philan thropic donations and is staffed by DOD personnel, which represents an impor tant new model in public-private part nership, Woodson said. Located on the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center campus in Bethesda, Md., NICoE brings in lead ing academic and military research ers to collaborate on the nexus of TBI and psychological health conditions that affect military readiness and public health, Woodson said. Coming initiatives will further broad en TBI research, treatment and educa tion as facilities and programs come online, he said. These initiatives include: lite clinics situated on military instal lations at: Camp Lejeune, S.C.; Camp Pendleton, Calif.; Fort Campbell, Ky.; Fort Belvoir, Va.; Joint Base LewisMcChord, Wash.; Fort Bragg, N.C.; Fort Carson, Colo.; and Fort Hood and Fort Bliss, Texas. colleagues in the Veterans Affairs Department, National Institutes of Health, and the civilian medical com munity. Woodson said such collabora tions help the military better under stand how to prevent, mitigate, detect and treat our people who suffer from TBI. translated into clinical policy to ensure service members receive the most upto-date, evidence-based medical care following a concussion. ma of TBI through partnerships, such as the formalized agreement made in August 2012 between the Army and NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell. The agreement pledges work on both sides to improve awareness of brain injuries, reduce the stigma of TBI, and change the culture surrounding such inju ries on the battlefield and in the locker room. been created to address the underly ing mechanisms that cause brain inju ry and disabilities in service members with TBI. The repository is kept at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, also on the Walter Reed campus. Although our work has been under way for years, we are still in the early stages of beginning to unlock the mys teries of how the brain responds to trau matic events, Woodson said.

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Sunseekers judge students science fair projectsMembers of the VR-58 Sunseekers Chiefs Mess participated in the Jacksonville Science Festival April 25-27 at Florida State College at Jacksonville (FSCJ). The event was coordinated by The Foundation Academy, based in Jacksonville. During the event, the chiefs evalu ated students in three specific catego ries such as booth presentation, which included efficiency, high energy team, eye catching booths and engagement to children and adults. They also evalu ated the groups products; to include hands-on activity, cost-effective materi als, student-generated with community involvement, and user-friendly product. The third and final category that the chiefs judged was on scientific Inquiry. This category included research-based information, innovation, and wheth er the group address their driving or essential question. After judging 15 booths, the chiefs entered a room to deliberate their find ings. Witnessing the deliberation and trying to stay as neutral as possible to avoid any bias, it was much like a Sailor of the Quarter/Year board. The chiefs were highly energized and fought for the candidates that they truly believed out-performed others. The winning student earned a $2,000 scholarship to Jacksonville University. The first runner-up received a $1,000 college scholarship to attend FSCJ. VR-58 CMDCM Charles Slaton present ed the scholarships during the award ceremony April 27. Sailor shows wife special recognitionWith May 10 deemed Military Spouse Appreciation Day, ET1 Tyler Kirkland of Navy Computer and Telecommunications Station (NCTS) Jax wanted to do something special for his wife, Honey. He heard about a special promotion First Coast News Anchor/Reporter Jeannie Blaylock was offering to recognize military spouses and quickly sent her an email praising his wife of five years. Blaylock responded that she had chosen Honey to be recognized and a plan was quickly hatched to sur prise her at Kirklands workplace aboard NAS Jacksonville. As Honey and the Kirkland children, Leilana (3) and Sophia (1) arrived at NCTS Jax, they were seated in the waiting room thinking they were going to a military spouse appreciation luncheon. Much to their surprise, Kirkland and several co-workers and friends walked out of an office singing, Youve Lost that Lovin Feeling as Kirkland pre sented his wife with a dozen red roses. While Honey sat looking a bit stunned, Blaylock introduced herself and her team from First Coast News, and explained that she had been selected for an afternoon of pamper ing in recognition of Military Spouse Appreciation Day which was May 10. The family was quickly whisked away to San Marco where Honey was treated to a new outfit, a complete makeover (going from a dirty blonde to a redhead) and a dinner with her husband at a local restaurant. I just wanted to do something spe cial for my wife and show her how much I appreciate her. Military spous es are the pillars that service mem bers need to be successful and they all deserve to be recognized for all they do, said Kirkland, who has been in the Navy for seven years and plans to make it a career. After the initial surprise, she was beaming all day. Seeing her smile means the world to me and the gen erosity of Jeannie Blaylock and First Coast News is astounding, he added. As for Honey, it was a day she will never forget. It was absolutely amaz ing because like the hairdresser said, Im always taking care of the kids and my husband first and dont ever do anything for myself. Ive never really had the opportunity to do any thing like this, she stated. I would really like to thank First Coast News, Kimberly Clark Salon and most of all my husband for making this happen. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government official ly endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013 15

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Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) is utiliz ing effective, environmen tally friendly technology to locate potential fuel leaks on the Navys P-3 Orion maritime patrol aircraft in response to stricter federal regulations and standards for gas leak detec tion. FRCSE artisans are using hydrogen leak detection to identify leaks in fuel tanks as a replacement for chloro-fluo ro carbon (CFC) 113, an ozone depleting substance that was banned in 1996. Prior to 1996, CFC-113 was the principal method used to locate potential fuel leaks in aviation fuel tanks, said Tom Cowherd, a logistics engineer and pollution prevention man ager. Cowherd said pressure decay testing continues to be the Navys primary method to prove the integrity of fuel tanks; however, it is inadequate for locating specific leaks to be repaired. A fuel tank or cell is pressur ized with air and then the pres sure source is isolated, he said. A pressure gage is moni tored for pressure drop. Zero drop over a specified time period corrected for tank vol ume and ambient temperature change is the go-no-go criteria for acceptance. A quick pressure drop indi cates the presence of a large leak. A slow pressure drop over time indicates a small leak. In either case, a soapy solution is then applied to the outer tank surface to locate the source. Escaping air or the formation of air bubbles indicates a leak. After repairs are completed, artisans again perform the pressure drop test to ensure all leaks have been sealed. Unfortunately, fuel leaks fre quently occur at levels well below the point of soap bubble formation and are a common reason for a failed pressure drop test. Since the ban of CFC-113, existing methods of fuel leak detection have not proven ade quate to identify all potential fuel leaks nor ensure the integ rity of fuel systems. The result is frequent, unnecessary rework and retest of fuel tanks. Identifying and repair ing fuel leaks continues to be a significant issue that regu larly impacts maintenance and repair schedules, said Cowherd. Small fuel leaks continue to have a strong potential to down critical Navy assets and impact Fleet readiness. Additionally, rework due to leaks increases personnel exposures to fuel, is costly and causes harm to the environ ment if leaks go undetected or if fuel is not properly contained on airfields. Since 2007, the Navy Environmental Sustainability Development to Integration (NESDI) program has sup ported FRCSE with investigat ing alternative fuel leak detection technologies and restoring capabilities lost with the ban of CFC-113. Subsequently, commercial leak detection technologies have advanced and a variety of potential alternatives are avail able including ultrasonic and infrared thermography, and several trace gas leak detection technologies, the most promising being hydrogen and helium leak detection. In collaboration with the U.S. Air Force, FRCSE and com mercial vendors conducted technology demonstrations on several P-3 wing tanks and determined the hydrogen trace gas technology was more userfriendly, accurate and reliable than the helium trace gas tech nology. Further, the hydrogen tech nology was less costly, and the gas more readily available than helium, a limited resource. Hydrogen leak detection tech nology uses a 95 percent nitro gen to 5 percent hydrogen mix trace gas that is non-flamma ble and inherently safe. The hydrogen leak detec tor uses a sniffer probe that has the capability to detect extremely small leaks. A pressure decay test deter mines the presence of a fuel leak but not the location, said Kellie Carney, an FRCSE chem ist and author of Local Process Specification (LPS) 1640 that eliminates more than half of the leak detection process steps while saving time and money. If a leak is discovered, arti sans can use hydrogen leak detection to pinpoint the source and size of the leak. The sniffer probe is very sensitive and can detect very small con centrations of gas; however, it doesnt necessarily indicate the fuel will leak. Carney said the P-3 pro grams success was in part due to the efforts of Bryan Swafford and Jason Jones, both sheet metal mechanics who received trace gas detection training from the vendor in March 2012. We have taught them the science, said Carney, but they know the aircraft and that knowledge gives them a leg up on interpreting the readings. It is as much a science as it is an art. Through these efforts, FRCSE has substantially reduced potential hazardous waste streams associated with avia tion fuel tank repair and leak testing, and the risk associat ed with potential water runoff contamination due to leaking aircraft fuel tanks on mainte nance airfields. To date, FRCSE has reported a 15 percent reduction in P-3 turnaround time and real ized a cost avoidance of nearly $20,000 per aircraft. FRCSE locates potential fuel leaks with earth-friendly technology Navy Lodges add value to vacation plans Save money this sum mer, stay at a Navy Lodge during your vaca tion. With savings up to 45 percent over civilian hotels, Navy Lodges are a great value. Staying at a Navy Lodges during your vaca tion is a great way to keep expenses down, said Mike Bockelman, vice president, Navy Exchange Service Commands (NEXCOM) Navy Lodge Program. Staying at a Navy Lodge also offers the con venience of other base amenities, such as the NEX, the ITT ticket office and MWR facilities. Plus, Navy Lodges are located in great vacation spots throughout the world, he added. Navy Lodge guests will find oversized rooms and family suites, free internet access, cable TV with DVD player and a kitchenette with micro wave and utensils as well as video rental service, guest laundry facilities and handicapped acces sible and non-smoking rooms. Navy Lodges also offer guests free Wi-Fi, a light breakfast and morning newspaper. As an added conve nience, d ogs and cats up to 50 pounds in weight can stay at many Navy Lodges when traveling with its owners. For reservations, call 1-800-NAVY INN (1-800628-9466) or go on line at www.navy-lodge.com or www.dodlodging.com Experience Navy Medicine as a Junior Red Cross volunteer: Apply by May 31 The American Red Cross Northeast Florida Chapter at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville is currently recruiting for this sum mers Junior Red Cross volunteers. This offers an excel lent opportunity for students interested in health careers to train with highly skilled Navy Medicine profession als physicians, nurses, pharmacists, therapists and technicians as well as contribute to a positive experience for patients. The program is open to a limited number of high school students age 16 to 18 who have base access. Volunteers work four to 20 hours per week in locations throughout the hospital, and receive CPR training. Apply online by May 31at www. nefloridaredcross.org. At the website, click on volunteer, join us, youth volunteer applica tion (or adult volunteer application for 18 yearold students). Fill out the application, select Northeast Florida Chapter, and create a Volunteer Connection account. After submitting the application, complete the online orientation. All applicants are required to attend a kickoff event (which includes an interview) June 8 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the hospitals 2nd deck conference room in the central tower (next to the chapel). For more about this opportunity, contact Junior Red Cross volun teer coordinators Terry Miles or Mary Miciano at 542-7525 or jaxredcros soffice@med.navy.mil. 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013

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FWC trains at NAS JaxDozens of law enforcement officers from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) conducted training May 910 on the St. Johns River in the vicinity of NAS Jacksonvilles Mulberry Cove Marina. Training Officer Lt. Scott Kihei of the FWC North Central Region described their activities as reality based train ing that includes weapons that shoot marking cartridges similar to paint balls. For safety, officers and role play ers (officers in plain clothes playing bad guys)) must wear helmets, eye protec tion, chest and groin protection. Other available weapons include non-operational Tasers, batons, pepper spray and the marking-cartridge hand gun. This morning were running two scenarios on the waterway, explained Kihei. The first is an anchored vessel with one role player aboard where the FWC officer must execute a warrant by tying up and making an arrest by controlling the subject. If control is not properly established by handcuffing, the role player may present some kind of weap on. Regaining control may include the use of deadly force. The second scenario was a contact and cover operation by two FWC offi cers in one patrol boat who have spot ted two role players in a vessel that was reported stolen. When the responding officers hit their lights and siren, the bad guys take off at high speed. This is a high-risk felony vessel stop that can involve gunplay if its not done right. When officers get the ves sel stopped, the contact officer has his or her gun drawn to establish control. In most cases, its best to bring up one suspect at a time and seat them on the gunwale for handcuffing. After both suspects are searched and transferred to the FWC craft, the officers will trans port them to jail, said Kihei. On board every boat is an evalua tor wearing a red shirt, whose job is to maintain safety and monitor the pro cedures. If an officer makes a mistake, such as improper handcuffing, the eval uator may call a time out to discuss the process. In the event of an unsafe action that could hurt an officer or a role player there is a safety word that we can yell and everything stops. This training is as real as we can make it without firing a bullet, said Kihei. The FWC Law Enforcement Division enforces rules to protect fish and wildlife, keep waterways safe for millions of boaters, and cooperate with other law enforcement agencies providing home land security. Duval and Clay counties are in the FWC North Central Region, which has about 150 law enforcement officers. Statewide, the FWC employs more than two thousand persons who protect and manage more than 575 species of wildlife, more than 200 native species of freshwater fish, and more than 500 native species of saltwater fish. WALLI am incredibly honored to present a Purple Heart to Warrant Officer Serna, who earned 34 Air Medals throughout his distinguished career, said Scorby. Im especially honored to be here with the heroes who witnessed some of the defining moments of our nations history. I want to thank all of our Vietnam veterans for their amazing service to our country. As the ceremony ended, the crowd that included many Vietnam veterans and family members of those lost dur ing the Vietnam War scrolled the wall and found and traced the name of their loved ones. Its kind of touching to come out here and actually get to touch the wall and see them in some form, Its very moving, said Lynn Burgess, friend of William Stalnecker. The boys who didnt come back and the ones that did, deserve a lot more than what they got when they returned. So this is a good reminder of what the Vietnam War really was. The Vietnam Traveling Memorial Wall was brought to the school after a student traveled to Washington, D.C. where he walked along the actual wall and was moved by the many names of those who never came home. When he returned to school, he mentioned that he wanted everyone to have the expe rience he had and a plan was hatched by the Beta Club members to bring the wall to Green Cove Springs. This is great for our community. It truly has been a community effort to bring the wall here. We raised near ly $10,000 through various fundrais ers and speaking engagements. And, many of the businesses here pitched in by donating goods and their time to make this happen, said Rachel Thompson, an eighth grader at the school and member of the Beta Club. Also helping out were members of VP-62 at NAS Jacksonville who spend hours landscaping the football field grounds, painting the stadium and participating in the ceremony. It truly has been a collaboration of many, many people over many, many hours to make this all hap pen. But what a great experi ence for our community and these stu dents, said AECS(AW) Jeannette Wright of VP-62, who coordinated the community service events for the Sailors. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013 17

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More than 500 people attended a ceremony at Green Cove Springs Junior High School May 11 to honor service members who lost their lives during the Vietnam Conflict. The ceremony, hosted by the Green Cove Springs Junior High School Beta Club students, used the 300feet long, six-feet tall Vietnam Traveling Memorial Wall as a backdrop for the ceremony. I can stand here and tell you that the wall is six feet at the apex, I can tell you that the east wing is 144 feet but thats not what this wall is about, said Greg Welsh, Vietnam Traveling Wall manager. This wall is about a young child; a boy or girl coming out for the first time seeing the name of an uncle or a grandfather that they only heard about at family events. Or maybe its Gold Star parents coming out and sharing some time with their son or daughter who life was taken so many years ago. One highlight of the ceremony was when guest speaker, Rear Adm. Jack Scorby, commander, Navy Region Southeast, presented retired Warrant Officer Ernesto Serna with the Purple Heart for his bravery and efforts during the Vietnam War. Vietnam veterans remembered with traveling memorial wall THURSDAY, MAY 16, 2013 NEW LEADERS RECYCLING FRCSE Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Naval Mobile Construction Battalion (NMCB) 14 held its annual Killed in Action Memorial Ceremony at NAS Jacksonville May 4 to remem ber fallen shipmates. In 2004, seven Seabees of NMCB-14 were killed and 33 were injured in two attacks in Al Anbar Province, Iraq, while in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Their loved ones certainly served in a brave capacity that most dont, said retired CECS Benjamin Slaughter. They stepped forward leaned into the danger zone, and forever all of us, the Navy, the Seabees and this country will remem ber them and their families. Those lost in the attacks were; SW2 Jason Dwelley, EO3 Christopher Dickerson, BU2 Michael Anderson, EO2 Trace Dossett, CM2 Scott McHugh, BU2 Robert Jenkins and SW3 Ronald Ginther. Its been nine years since the tragic events that hap pened in 2004 took the lives of our fellow brothers and Seabees remember fallen heroes The Spartans of HSM-70 sent Detachment Four to sea in preparation for their upcom ing deployment on board USS Roosevelt (DDG 80). The detachment, comprised of six pilots, four aircrewmen and 18 maintenance personnel, flew two MH-60R helicopters, the Navys premier and most capa ble anti-submarine and antisurface warfare helicopter. Led by the Officer in Charge Lt. Cmdr. Kevin Lucas, Detachment Four met all goals for the two-week underway period by safely completing integration training and gain ing valuable operational experience. The detachments first five days at sea fulfilled require ments of the new Integrated Ship Air Training Team (ISATT) syllabus. Every flight event and mission was scripted, to include events such as low visibility or smoke light approaches, simu lated aircraft ditching drills, inflight refueling, and extensive day and night landing qualifications. We maintained a pretty high pace for the first few days, reported Lt. Donny Safford, one of the aircraft command ers embarked. But it was good to get back out to sea and work with the Sailors whom well be deploying with. Immediately upon comple tion of ISATT requirements, Detachment Four was tasked with the MH-60Rs primary mission of anti-submarine warfare (ASW). Two German surface ships, one German diesel sub marine and one American fastattack submarine were stand ing by to rendezvous with USS Roosevelt for a high-visibility ASW exercise. The rigorous 24-hour schedule over a 9-day period which followed for the ASW exercise provided unique challenges to a detachment with limited operating experience amongst both the multiple air crew and maintainers. All in all, Im glad the newer guys got to see how it all worked at sea. Its definitely differ ent than being ashore, differ ent challenges, noted Leading Chief Petty Officer ADCS Mark HSM-70 Detachment Four heads to sea

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS May 16 1820 Congress becomes first U.S. warship to visit China. 1919 Three Navy flying boats begin first trans-Atlantic flight from Newfoundland. 1965 First U.S. gunfire support in Vietnam by USS Henry W. Tucker (DD875). May 17 1940 President Roosevelt announces plans to re-commission 35 destroyers. 1942 USS Tautog (SS-199) sinks Japanese sub, I-28; while USS Triton (SS201) sinks I-164. 1951 Aircraft from carriers attack bridges between Wonsan and Hamhung, Korea. 1962 Naval amphibious ready group lands Marines to guard Thailands borders from Communist probes. 1966 Naval Support Activity Saigon established. 1973 First woman to hold a major Navy command, Capt. Robin Lindsay Quigley assumes command of Navy Service School, San Diego. 1987 USS Stark (FFG-31) struck by Iraqi Exocet missile in Persian Gulf, killing 37 Sailors wounding 21. May 18 1775 Benedict Arnold cap tures British sloop and renames her Enterprise, first of many famous ships with that name. 1798 Appointment of Benjamin Stoddert as first Secretary of the Navy. 1969 Launch of Apollo 10, dress rehearsal for first lunar landing mis sion. Cmdr. John Young was the Command Module Pilot and Cmdr. Eugene Cernan was the Lunar Module Pilot. During the 8-day mission, the craft made 31 lunar orbits in 61.6 hours. Recovery was by HS-4 helicopters from USS Princeton (LPH-5). May 19 1882 Commodore Shufeldt (USS Swatara) lands in Korea to negotiate first treaty between Korea and Western power. 1912 Navy establishes North Atlantic Ice Patrol following RMS Titanic disaster. 1965 30th Naval Construction Regiment activated at Danang, Vietnam. May 20 1801 Four warships sent to Mediterranean to protect American commerce. 1815 Commodore Stephen Decatur ( Frigate Guerriere) sails with 10 ships to suppress Mediterranean pirate raids on U.S. shipping. 1844 USS Constitution sails from New York on round the world cruise. 1943 Establishment of 10th Fleet in Washington, D.C., under command of Adm. King to coordinate U.S. antisub marine operations in Atlantic. May 21 1850 Washington Navy Yard begins work on first castings for the Dahlgren gun. 1917 USS Ericsson fires first torpedo of war. 1944 During preparations for the invasion of Saipan, an accidental ord nance blast on LST 353 sets off cata clysmic ammunition explosions at West Loch, Pearl Harbor, killing 163 and injuring 396. Six tank landing ships, three tank landing craft, and 17 tracked landing vehicles are destroyed in explosions and fires. 1964 The initiation of the standing carrier presence at Yankee Station in the South China Sea. May 22 1958 Naval aircraft F4D-1 Sky Ray sets five world speed-to-climb records. 1967 New York City reaches agree ment to purchase Brooklyn Navy Yard, ending 166 years of construction and repair of naval vessels. 1968 USS Scorpion (SSN-589) lost with all hands. Last week, from his windowless cubicle at the Pentagon, Dustin forwarded me an essay our friend Frank, whom we know from flightschool days, wrote for the U.S. Navy War College Web site. I spend my days sequestered in a dismal pooka only to churn out mindless reports of barely readable administrivia, Frank writes. [At the end of the day], I proceed to my truck to enjoy at least an hour and a half of bumper-to-bumper traffic . . I will be get ting up at 0600 the next morning to repeat the rinse cycle I call duty in Washington, D.C. I can absolutely hear Franks voice as I read. I can also hear his laugh loud, from the belly, and totally infectious. However, despite the brilliant and amusing descriptions, the reality is that I dont recog nize this man who just 14 years ago played a major part in many of my favorite memories. It seems like yesterday when Frank leaped out of his apartment wearing only sweatpants and a old T-shirt, with a broom raised above his head like an ax to get rid of a snake on our front steps. Dustin was on base finish ing up a flight. Later that night, the three of us went down to Flounders on the beach for drinks and a late dinner. Franks laugh echoed through the bar as he and I recounted for Dustin our run-in with the snake. This is how I remember our time in Pensacola. The guys were in the best shape of their lives, and we were all young and without a routine. Sometimes, Dustin flew at night, sometimes early in the morning or in the afternoon. We spent his days off at the beach. Often, I went to an open field in nearby Pace, Florida, to watch his T-34 fly overhead. Back then, I pitied the older commanders who had to leave Flounders early to relieve babysitters. I didnt envy their monotony or the beaten down looks on their faces. Their bellies had grown wider and their steps slightly less eager. It was as if timedeployments, power-points, pookashad sucked the life out of them. But Dustin and Frankwell, they were a spitting image of Zack Mayo in An Officer and a Gentleman. There was so much ahead of them. They were living off the adrenaline of flight and an insatiable desire to serve their country. Now Im reading about Franks hamster wheel of reality and his anger at morning rush-hour traffic? This is largely Franks point in the article. Hes gone from the enviable and exciting life of an active Navy pilot to a mid-career lieuten ant commander stationed in the beltway. In other words, Frank is flying a desk. So is Dustin. I cant remember the last time either of them flew an airplane, and they are not yet 40 years old. Theyve become the older commanders. Until my dad retired from the Navy in 2004, I said that he was a Navy pilot, too. But the fact is, he hadnt piloted an airplane since prob ably 1990. Hed been flying a desk, and sometimes driving an aircraft carrier, for a much longer time. In February, when he took my boys to the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C., he showed them the actual A-4 he used to fly, which is on display there. But I dont think my youngest son, Lindell, who is named after my dad, fully understood. For as long as Lindell has known Pop, hes had an office, a desk and a cell phone clipped to his belt. Lindell told me, Pop showed us an airplane at the museum. Yes, I said. Its the actual plane he used to fly. Lindell looked confused. Its the plane that who used to fly? he asked. It made no sense to him that the pilot was Pop. In other words, the window for being an exciting Navy pilot is exceptionally short and narrow. I wonder how well recruiters relay this fact? Soon enough, the reality of a differ ent type of military sacrifice and commitment becomes clear, with less perks and more dedication required. There is beauty in this, too. In his essay, Frank says that his 3-yearold son wants to be in the Navy, too, despite never having known his father during what we would call his more glamorous Navy days. Suddenly my station in life improves, Frank writes as he reflects on his sons desire. The grey windowless box I work in trans forms into a nerve center of naval intelligence, and I am now an integral cog in the wheel of the machine that drives this global force for good. But Frank is also puzzled. How can his son ultimately want this 9-to-5 grind at a windowless pooka? Perhaps, he writes, the one percent of the country serving in uniform [passes] the tradition down like a shop owner, and the aroma of service permeates through the offspring of Americas fighting men and women like the odor of the boat clings to a flight suit. I dont remember Frank being so grown-up and mature. Airplane pilot or desk pilot, hes still one of my favorites. Hey, MoneyChic! Im turning 19 next month and am trying to buy a car. I dont have any credit cards or pay any bills. How am I supposed to get a loan for a car if I dont have any credit? How do I establish credit? Money Chic sez: This topic was recently discussed at length in our office. Our relief services assistant wrote a great article about establishing credit. Here is an excerpt. With a good, established credit score, you can walk into a bank or credit union and, in minutes, walk out with a preapproved loan to purchase a vehicle. With no credit history, this is a different story. You can for get about it only taking a few minutes. You are also not going to be offered the lowest interest rate. Without a history of credit, you will be expected to show proof of employment and some history of paying bills over consecutive months. The bank or credit union will use this information to fill out a scorecard which will help decide your interest rate. It is because of this scenario that we see the importance of establishing good credit as soon as you turn 18. Here are the suggested steps for establishing credit to buy a car: Step 1: Establish at least one savings and checking account. Step 2: Acquire a secured credit card. Secured credit cards give you a credit line and your payment activity will be reported to the major consumer reporting agencies. Funds you deposit, usually $250 or more, are used as collateral by the bank or credit union for the credit card. You use the card like any credit card, allowing you to build credit history when you make on-time monthly payments to all of your credi tors and maintain your balance under the credit limit. Step 3: After you build your initial credit file, you can switch to a traditional credit card. Select a secured card that reports to all three of the main credit bureaus (Equifax, Experian and TransUnion). Credit cards are safer against fraud than debit cards and provide greater consumer protec tion on purchases. You want to use the credit card like a debit card and pay it off as you make purchases. You will not pay interest when paying in this manner because you never carry a balance. Step 4: After you have mas tered the use of the credit card for a few months, its time to work on another line of credit. A secured loan is one that has collateral attached to it. This type of loan generally has a lower interest rate because the bank is taking a lower risk because it can collect the collateral if you default on payments. It takes six months to a year to establish your credit. You have established preferably two savings accounts, one check ing account, one secured credit card, one secured loan, and one unsecured credit card. Now it is time to see what interest rate your bank or credit union will offer you for the purchase of a vehicle. You should also have your bank or credit union pre-approval prior to walking into a dealership. Additionally, you want to avoid lenders that appear to target the military and/or primar ily provide their services online. To read the full article titled Establishing Credit, head on over to http://www.afcpe.org/ blog/. To find out exactly how NavyMarine Corps Relief Society can help you, stop by our office outside the Yorktown Gate or give us a call at 542-2832. Have questions for Hey, Money Chic? Drop me an e-mail at megan. stolle@nmcrs.org. Flying a desk: Less glamour, more reality

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VP-45 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Michael Vitali was relieved May 1 by Cmdr. John Brabazon at a ceremony aboard Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan, where the Pelicans of VP-45 are cur rently deployed. Guests at the ceremony included the officers spous es, both of whom arrived from Jacksonville, as well as Rear Adm. Matthew Carter, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Force 7th Fleet. Vitali assumed command of VP-45 in May 2012 dur ing the squadrons InterDeployment Readiness Cycle at NAS Jacksonville. Under his command, the Pelicans have had a very successful deploy ment to the 7th Fleet Area Of Responsibility. The squadron has main tained a forward presence in the Western Pacific while pro viding anti-submarine war fare (ASW) and intelligence, surveillance and reconnais sance (ISR) support throughout the region, flying more than 2,100 hours on over 400 sor ties. Successful detachments to the Philippines, Australia, Malaysia and Thailand were also executed. Brabazon assumes com mand of VP-45 with over a month remaining in its deployment to Okinawa. When the Pelicans return to NAS Jacksonville, he will over see the squadrons transition from the legacy P-3C Orion to the new P-8A Poseidon, the fourth aircraft transition in the Pelicans illustrious 71-year history. The new executive offi cer, Cmdr. T.J. Grady, joined the Pelican team in Kadena after qualifying in the P-8A Poseidon at VP-30 aboard NAS Jacksonville. Brabazon relieves Vitali at VP-45 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013 Recycling center vastly improves efficiencyThe NAS Jacksonville Recycling Center, located next to the MWR Auto Skills Center on Birmingham Avenue, recently implemented programs that have dramatically increased its efficiency and monetary return in processing recyclable mate rials. Headed up by MUCS Patrick Detroit and supported by numerous Sailors, the center has transformed into a shin ing example of leadership in improving the bases green footprint. One of the major changes we made is separating out precious metals from the items we receive here, explained Detroit. In the past, we had one bin for all scrap metal that was collected and shipped off to a processing center which would yield a relatively low profit. We found that as we sepa rate out pure metals such as copper and aluminum, there is an exponential increase in profits. It may be a lot more work, but as all the proceeds are donated to MWR (Morale, Welfare and Recreation), its definitely worth it. Detroit added that during the last quarter, the amount of scrap metal the recycling cen ter collected would have yield ed a profit of $290.10 if just sold in bulk. By breaking down and sepa rating out the precious metals to be sold separately, the center was able to increase the mon etary gain to $4,129, representing a 1,352 percent increase. In addition to collecting and separating scrap metal, the center also processes paper, cardboard, plastic, car batter ies, and even used sonobuoys from VP squadrons. Tenant commands and Sailors alike are highly encouraged to bring their recyclable materials to the center that opens at 9 a.m. However, Detroit stressed that people bring only materi als that can be recycled, as the center is not a garbage dump. We have had some people dump clothes, electronics and hazardous materials that we are not equipped to deal with at this center. We ask that people call when they are in doubt about the suitability of their potential recyclables. Despite minor issues, Detroit was highly enthusiastic about the recycling centers evolving improvements and praised his Sailors for their hard work and devotion to improving the NAS Jax environment. We are proud that what we do here supports the base MWR. The amount we gained just by making these changes was more than enough to cover Club 2000 and then some, Detroit remarked. This is really a testament to the Sailors who work here every day. They consistently promote a teamwork-driven, positive environment and are committed to taking care of business in the most efficient way possible. For more information on the NAS Jax Recycling Center or the materials it can receive, contact 542-5959.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013 5 Photos by Lt. Kevin Wendt

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President Barack Obama, commander in chief of the U.S. armed forces, said sexual assault is an outrage, and anyone within the military who commits the crimeis betraying the uniform that theyre wearing. The president, speaking May 7 at a White House press conference, said the problem of sexual assault in the mili tary is neither new nor easy to solve, but leaders have to do everything we can to root this out. Obama noted he worked with former Defense Secretary Leon Panetta on the issue, and spoke about it most recently with current Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel. He said the Defense Department is working to gather accurate reporting of assaults and is building a system of accountability and transparency up and down the chain of command. The president added that he told Hagel, Were gonna have to, you know, not just step up our game, we have to exponentially step up our game to go at this thing hard. Obama offered a personal message to those in uniform who have experienced sexual assault. I want them to hear directly from their commander in chief that Ive got their backs, Obama said. I will sup port them, and were not gonna tolerate this stuff. And there will be account ability. If people have engaged in this behavior, they should be prosecuted. Everyone in the military should understand, this is not who we are, this is not what the U.S. military is about, and it dishonors the vast majority of men and women in uniform who carry out their responsibilities and obligations with honor and dignity and incredible courage every single day, Obama said. The president said he has no toler ance for sexual assault, and he expects consequences for those who commit the crime. I dont want just more speeches or, you know, awareness programs or training -but ultimately folks look the other way, he said. [When] we find out somebodys engaging in this stuff, theyve got to be held accountable; prosecuted, stripped out of their positions, court martialed, fired, dishonorably discharged. Period. Its not acceptable.Obama to military sexual assault victims: Ive got your backs 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013

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Commander, Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) visited Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), the larg est tenant command on NAS Jacksonville, to meet with leaders, address the workforce, and tour the military depot May 10. NAVAIR Commander Vice Adm. David Dunaway addressed about 500 Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) civilian federal workers gathered in the P-3 Production Hangar to discuss the impacts of federal budget cuts, sequestration and the way forward. FRCSE employs the largest Department of Defense (DOD) civilian workforce (2,800) on the installation; all facing the possibility of being furloughed without pay in the remainder of Fiscal Year 2013 due to budgetary shortfalls. Dunaway said he understood the financial burden furloughs would place not only on the federal workforce but also the impact on mission effective ness and efficiency in support ing the warfighter. He said officially, the number of furlough days still stands at up to 14 days, but would likely be fewer, as the Command has not yet received direction to notify workers. He urged the audience to be bureaucracy busters and use Lean methodologies to link improvement efforts for reducing operating expenses, increasing throughput and improving reliability to the Fleet. He surprised the crowd with the announcement that FRCSE earned the Chief of Naval Operations 2012 Aviation Safety Award for FRCSEs stel lar record of 46 years and nearly 30,000 flight hours of Class A/B mishap-free flying. Dunaway cited the integra tion of workplace safety with aviation safety and FRCSEs efforts in fostering a climate of safety awareness to achieve such continued success. The admiral toured the Industrial Manufacturing Division where Angello Evans, the division director, pointed to aircraft parts machinists were fabricating in-house to keep the legacy aircraft ready for tasking. In the Crinkley Engine Facility, Don Dunlap, the engine program director, explained how engine mechanics maintained and repaired some of the most sophisticated engines in the Navy and Marine Corps inventories. Time Postemski, the avion ics lead, conducted a tour of the avionics building where artisans repair the Advanced Targeting Forward Looking InfraRed systems for defense industry partners. On his last stop at the F/A18 Hornet Production Line, Dunaway learned from Lt. Cmdr. Joshua Filbey, a Hornet pilot, and Bill Murray, the F/A18 division director, about some of the engineering, logistics and aircraft condition challenges the artisans face when adding service life to aging naval aircraft. NAVAIR commander visits FRCSE The NAS Jacksonville Safety Office is offering a driver improvement class specifically for dependent young drivers between the age of 15 and 21 years old June 14 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. The class will be held in the Safety Conference Room in Building 1. Participants do not have to have a drivers license to attend. The class will offer safety tips such as how to respond to driving emergencies and distracted driving while bringing awareness to risks of driving and much more. The class consists of videos, chapter quizzes and concludes with a multiple choice question test. There will not be any time behind the wheel; this is classroom only. The teens will receive an AAA Driver Improve-ment Class completion certificate. If you feel your teen could benefit from this class, sign them up by calling Linda at 542-3082, Cindy at 542-2584 or Kristen at 542-8810.Safety Office offers teen driving class June 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013 7

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HSM-70Hudson. Over the course of 13 flying days, the Spartans executed 103 hours flight hours, no small feat with only three aircrews. The detachment really rose to the occasion while faced with a rigorous change of pace, stated Lucas. During the exercise, more than 150 sonobuoys were expended to track the submarines both actively and passively. Many of the pilots experienced their first night dipping operations while on night vision goggles using the MH-60Rs AQS-22 dipping sonar, requiring the pilots to maintain a hover and lower the sonar transducer into the ocean. By the conclusion of the exercise, over 50 hours of dedicated ASW time had been conducted. While ASW remained the priority, crews found themselves unexpectedly re-tasked with missions as diverse as surface warfare, subsurface communications, and airborne imagery relay. Having gained invaluable operational experience, the Spartans were both happy to be home and eager to implement their newly acquired skills in their upcoming underway periods. A two-plane F-21 Kfir fighter detachment operated by Airborne Tactical Advantage Company (ATAC), as well as electronic warfare aircraft from Phoenix Air and L-3, operated from NAS Jacksonville recently to provide adversity threat training to naval forces operating in the Atlantic off the southeastern U.S. coast. These aggressor aircraft present a variety of threat profiles against naval surface ships and/or aircraft, said NAS Jax Air Operations Officer Cmdr. Mark McManus. According to daily tasking from Commander, Strike Force Training Atlantic, these specialized aircraft may fly joint missions in a series of training scenarios focused on the combat certification of a single vessel or a carrier strike group. Supporting warfighter training over the Atlantic 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013

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injured others. We pause to remem ber those who gave the ultimate sac rifice and their families, said NMCB14 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Todd Smith during the ceremony. Smith continued addressing those in attendance, Ill simply say this thank you, on behalf of this battalion, the Navy and the nation for their service and sacrifice. One of the veterans who was wounded during the attacks was BU2 Peter Herrick who attended with his wife, Diana. Its a great honor to be here with everybody, said Herrick. Its our pleasure to be with the NMCB-14 brother hood again. Even though the Veterans Affairs has me listed as catastrophically disabled, I still look at life as a big puzzle, and I always look for some humor in every part of it. NMCB-14 holds this memorial ser vice to honor and remember the courageous Seabees and all service members who made the ultimate sacrifice for the nation. NMCB-14 The NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club is sponsoring two $1,000 scholar ships based on scholarship merit and community service. Eligibility: U.S. Navy active/reserve duty and active/reserve duty depen dents who are currently in their senior year of high school or a high school graduate, attached to NAS Jacksonville and planning to attend an accredited college in the fall of 2013 or spring of 2014. To request the scholarship applica tion, email nco.jacksonville@navy.mil or stop by the NAS Jax Navy College Office in Building 110. Application deadline is June 15. Submit by mail to: NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club, 4109 Eagle Landing Pkwy, Orange Park, FL 32065. $1,000 college scholarship opportunity JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013 9

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NAS Jax Barracks Bash caters to junior SailorsHundreds of Sailors and Marines enjoyed a sunny afternoon May 9 at the Spring Barracks Bash presented by NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department and the Liberty Program. The free event featured picnic-style food, T-shirts and prizes that included gift packages from the Jacksonville Suns, a wireless speaker set, area restau rant gift cards, local attraction passes and much more! The purpose of the Barracks Bash is to provide an event that is alcohol-free and targeted to the junior enlisted Sailors who reside in the barracks, said Liberty Program Manager Tom Kubalewski. We moved the location this year due to construc tion at our previous location. We chose the large grass field at the corner of Mustin Road and Enterprise Avenue. The highly visible larger field gave us more space for activity and improved our event attendance, continued Kubalewski. Entertainment included Disc Jockey 357 YN3 Calvin Dawson of VP-26 and local Ska band 20WT, who kept the music playing non-stop. Barracks Bashers looking for competitive entertain ment could choose from the climbing wall, bungee run, Sumo wrestling, volleyball, slip n slide, bag toss and jousting. MWR thanks everyone who participated in or volunteered for this event. Sponsor included: GEICO, EmbryRiddle Aeronautical University, University of Phoenix, USAA, VyStar Credit Union, Jacksonville Suns, Allied American University and USA Discounters.Neither NAS Jax MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013 11

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Financial aid available for veteransThe J. Wayne and Delores Barr Weaver Veterans Emergency and Transition Services Fund provides emergency financial assistance and resources to veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom that will help to support their transition into civilian life and stabilization into the community.This financial assistance is provided directly to the veterans of these wars.The geographic service area is: Duval, Clay, Nassau, Baker and St. Johns counties. Types of emergency needs we help with but not strictly limited too: ment or repair, insurance work or learn a life skill For more information, contact a Red Cross Military Services caseworker at 246-1395. 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Deweys Free Spring Concert Series 7 p.m. on the outdoor stage May 17 Zero-NFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 5 10 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 126 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not includedFitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 The outdoor pool hours Open Monday Friday (lap swim only) During lap swim only the waterslide, water park and concessions will not be open. 6-8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday & Sunday (recreation swimming) 11 a.m. 6 p.m. 2013 Learn to Swim Program Session 1: June 1020 Session 2: July 8-18 Session 3: July 22 Aug. 1I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Disney Cruise Lines will be at ITT June 11 from 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Learn more about exciting 2013/2014 trips sailing from Port Canaveral, Miami, Galveston, Barcelona, San Juan and Vancouver. Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Daytona International Speedway Subway Firecracker July 5 and Coke 400 July 6 Tickets on sale now! Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Funkfest Metropolitan Park May 10-11 2-day ticket $52 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3 Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7 Call for pricing Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline 2013 Live Broadway Series Dream Girls May 21 Cesar Millan June 1 $42 $52 MOSH $7 $12 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through May 15 and must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about our special discounted tickets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park One day pass $30, Gold pass $71 Book Shade of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Paintball Trip May 18 at 9 a.m. Universal Studios Weekend Trip May 25-26 Jacksonville Suns Baseball Game May 23 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees May 21 for active duty May 23 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Loudmouth Thursday Any golfer wearing a pair of loudmouth shorts or pants plays 18 holes with cart for $20 Open to military, DoD and guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina May 18, 19, 25 & 26 June 15, 16, 22 & 23 July 20, 21, 27 & 28 Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Movie Under the Stars Featuring The Croods May 24 at 8:30 p.m. Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School June 3 July 10 $500 per person For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy. mil. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013 13

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14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013 VP-5 qualifies first Poseidon plane captainPatrol Squadron (VP) 5 recently qualified AT3(AW) Asa Mull as the squadrons first P-8A Poseidon plane captain. The plane captain qualifi cation is a new addition to the previous P-3C Orion squadron that utilized linemen or yel low shirts who direct aircraft as they leave and return from missions. The P-8A plane captain holds a great deal more responsibil ity. Each is assigned a specific aircraft and signs acceptance forms, daily inspections, turnarounds, checklists and releases the aircraft for flight. It is a great honor to be the first to obtain this qualifica tion, commented Mull. I am now one of three peo ple who sign for one of the Navys newest maritime patrol aircraft, including the patrol plane commander and maintenance control. Mull completed this quali fication while simultaneously attending classes and handson training for his aviation electronics technician rate. He currently trains other aspir ing Mad Fox plane captains each time he launches and recovers a P-8A Poseidon. AT3 Mull is a native of Rockville Center, N.Y. and one of seven chil dren including three brothers and three sisters. One of his brothers is also an aviation elec tronics technician, and works on F/A18 Hornets. VP-5 has been transitioning to the P-8A Poseidon since Jan. 4. DOD continues TBI research, education, treatmentThe Defense Department is commit ted to providing the best medical care and recovery for service members with traumatic brain injury, DODs top doctor said in a statement issued May 8. Following a 60 Minutes segment on the treatment of traumatic brain injury that aired May 5, Dr. Jonathan Woodson, assistant secretary of defense for health affairs, said all service members will receive specialized care for any type of TBI, from mild concussions to severe head injuries that require extensive specialized care at one of our research facilities for the rare instanc es. Woodson said DOD is grateful to military and private sector leaders who understand TBIs impact on ser vice members, help identify appropriate treatment, and help the military obtain the resources to build and sustain additional world-class medical treat ment and research facilities. Woodson also said the department appreciates the relationships we have cultivated with members of academia, philanthropic efforts and within our Military Health System, which have ensured that DODs National Intrepid Center of Excellence is an additional highlight to our long line of exceptional medical research facilities. NICoE was constructed with philan thropic donations and is staffed by DOD personnel, which represents an important new model in public-private part nership, Woodson said. Located on the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center campus in Bethesda, Md., NICoE brings in lead ing academic and military research ers to collaborate on the nexus of TBI and psychological health conditions that affect military readiness and public health, Woodson said. Coming initiatives will further broaden TBI research, treatment and educa tion as facilities and programs come online, he said. These initiatives include: lite clinics situated on military instal lations at: Camp Lejeune, S.C.; Camp Pendleton, Calif.; Fort Campbell, Ky.; Fort Belvoir, Va.; Joint Base LewisMcChord, Wash.; Fort Bragg, N.C.; Fort Carson, Colo.; and Fort Hood and Fort Bliss, Texas. colleagues in the Veterans Affairs Department, National Institutes of Health, and the civilian medical com munity. Woodson said such collabora tions help the military better under stand how to prevent, mitigate, detect and treat our people who suffer from TBI. translated into clinical policy to ensure service members receive the most upto-date, evidence-based medical care following a concussion. ma of TBI through partnerships, such as the formalized agreement made in August 2012 between the Army and NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell. The agreement pledges work on both sides to improve awareness of brain injuries, reduce the stigma of TBI, and change the culture surrounding such inju ries on the battlefield and in the locker room. been created to address the underly ing mechanisms that cause brain inju ry and disabilities in service members with TBI. The repository is kept at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, also on the Walter Reed campus. Although our work has been under way for years, we are still in the early stages of beginning to unlock the mys teries of how the brain responds to traumatic events, Woodson said.

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Sunseekers judge students science fair projectsMembers of the VR-58 Sunseekers Chiefs Mess participated in the Jacksonville Science Festival April 25-27 at Florida State College at Jacksonville (FSCJ). The event was coordinated by The Foundation Academy, based in Jacksonville. During the event, the chiefs evalu ated students in three specific catego ries such as booth presentation, which included efficiency, high energy team, eye catching booths and engagement to children and adults. They also evaluated the groups products; to include hands-on activity, cost-effective materials, student-generated with community involvement, and user-friendly product. The third and final category that the chiefs judged was on scientific Inquiry. This category included research-based information, innovation, and wheth er the group address their driving or essential question. After judging 15 booths, the chiefs entered a room to deliberate their findings. Witnessing the deliberation and trying to stay as neutral as possible to avoid any bias, it was much like a Sailor of the Quarter/Year board. The chiefs were highly energized and fought for the candidates that they truly believed out-performed others. The winning student earned a $2,000 scholarship to Jacksonville University. The first runner-up received a $1,000 college scholarship to attend FSCJ. VR-58 CMDCM Charles Slaton presented the scholarships during the award ceremony April 27. Sailor shows wife special recognitionWith May 10 deemed Military Spouse Appreciation Day, ET1 Tyler Kirkland of Navy Computer and Telecommunications Station (NCTS) Jax wanted to do something special for his wife, Honey. He heard about a special promotion First Coast News Anchor/Reporter Jeannie Blaylock was offering to recognize military spouses and quickly sent her an email praising his wife of five years. Blaylock responded that she had chosen Honey to be recognized and a plan was quickly hatched to sur prise her at Kirklands workplace aboard NAS Jacksonville. As Honey and the Kirkland children, Leilana (3) and Sophia (1) arrived at NCTS Jax, they were seated in the waiting room thinking they were going to a military spouse appreciation luncheon. Much to their surprise, Kirkland and several co-workers and friends walked out of an office singing, Youve Lost that Lovin Feeling as Kirkland pre sented his wife with a dozen red roses. While Honey sat looking a bit stunned, Blaylock introduced herself and her team from First Coast News, and explained that she had been selected for an afternoon of pamper ing in recognition of Military Spouse Appreciation Day which was May 10. The family was quickly whisked away to San Marco where Honey was treated to a new outfit, a complete makeover (going from a dirty blonde to a redhead) and a dinner with her husband at a local restaurant. I just wanted to do something special for my wife and show her how much I appreciate her. Military spouses are the pillars that service mem bers need to be successful and they all deserve to be recognized for all they do, said Kirkland, who has been in the Navy for seven years and plans to make it a career. After the initial surprise, she was beaming all day. Seeing her smile means the world to me and the gen erosity of Jeannie Blaylock and First Coast News is astounding, he added. As for Honey, it was a day she will never forget. It was absolutely amaz ing because like the hairdresser said, Im always taking care of the kids and my husband first and dont ever do anything for myself. Ive never really had the opportunity to do any thing like this, she stated. I would really like to thank First Coast News, Kimberly Clark Salon and most of all my husband for making this happen. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government official ly endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013 15

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Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) is utiliz ing effective, environmen tally friendly technology to locate potential fuel leaks on the Navys P-3 Orion maritime patrol aircraft in response to stricter federal regulations and standards for gas leak detec tion. FRCSE artisans are using hydrogen leak detection to identify leaks in fuel tanks as a replacement for chloro-fluo ro carbon (CFC) 113, an ozone depleting substance that was banned in 1996. Prior to 1996, CFC-113 was the principal method used to locate potential fuel leaks in aviation fuel tanks, said Tom Cowherd, a logistics engineer and pollution prevention manager. Cowherd said pressure decay testing continues to be the Navys primary method to prove the integrity of fuel tanks; however, it is inadequate for locating specific leaks to be repaired. A fuel tank or cell is pressurized with air and then the pressure source is isolated, he said. A pressure gage is moni tored for pressure drop. Zero drop over a specified time period corrected for tank vol ume and ambient temperature change is the go-no-go criteria for acceptance. A quick pressure drop indi cates the presence of a large leak. A slow pressure drop over time indicates a small leak. In either case, a soapy solution is then applied to the outer tank surface to locate the source. Escaping air or the formation of air bubbles indicates a leak. After repairs are completed, artisans again perform the pressure drop test to ensure all leaks have been sealed. Unfortunately, fuel leaks fre quently occur at levels well below the point of soap bubble formation and are a common reason for a failed pressure drop test. Since the ban of CFC-113, existing methods of fuel leak detection have not proven adequate to identify all potential fuel leaks nor ensure the integrity of fuel systems. The result is frequent, unnecessary rework and retest of fuel tanks. Identifying and repair ing fuel leaks continues to be a significant issue that regu larly impacts maintenance and repair schedules, said Cowherd. Small fuel leaks continue to have a strong potential to down critical Navy assets and impact Fleet readiness. Additionally, rework due to leaks increases personnel exposures to fuel, is costly and causes harm to the environ ment if leaks go undetected or if fuel is not properly contained on airfields. Since 2007, the Navy Environmental Sustainability Development to Integration (NESDI) program has sup ported FRCSE with investigat ing alternative fuel leak detection technologies and restoring capabilities lost with the ban of CFC-113. Subsequently, commercial leak detection technologies have advanced and a variety of potential alternatives are available including ultrasonic and infrared thermography, and several trace gas leak detection technologies, the most promising being hydrogen and helium leak detection. In collaboration with the U.S. Air Force, FRCSE and com mercial vendors conducted technology demonstrations on several P-3 wing tanks and determined the hydrogen trace gas technology was more userfriendly, accurate and reliable than the helium trace gas technology. Further, the hydrogen tech nology was less costly, and the gas more readily available than helium, a limited resource. Hydrogen leak detection tech nology uses a 95 percent nitrogen to 5 percent hydrogen mix trace gas that is non-flamma ble and inherently safe. The hydrogen leak detec tor uses a sniffer probe that has the capability to detect extremely small leaks. A pressure decay test deter mines the presence of a fuel leak but not the location, said Kellie Carney, an FRCSE chemist and author of Local Process Specification (LPS) 1640 that eliminates more than half of the leak detection process steps while saving time and money. If a leak is discovered, arti sans can use hydrogen leak detection to pinpoint the source and size of the leak. The sniffer probe is very sensitive and can detect very small concentrations of gas; however, it doesnt necessarily indicate the fuel will leak. Carney said the P-3 pro grams success was in part due to the efforts of Bryan Swafford and Jason Jones, both sheet metal mechanics who received trace gas detection training from the vendor in March 2012. We have taught them the science, said Carney, but they know the aircraft and that knowledge gives them a leg up on interpreting the readings. It is as much a science as it is an art. Through these efforts, FRCSE has substantially reduced potential hazardous waste streams associated with avia tion fuel tank repair and leak testing, and the risk associat ed with potential water runoff contamination due to leaking aircraft fuel tanks on mainte nance airfields. To date, FRCSE has reported a 15 percent reduction in P-3 turnaround time and real ized a cost avoidance of nearly $20,000 per aircraft. FRCSE locates potential fuel leaks with earth-friendly technology Navy Lodges add value to vacation plans Save money this sum mer, stay at a Navy Lodge during your vaca tion. With savings up to 45 percent over civilian hotels, Navy Lodges are a great value. Staying at a Navy Lodges during your vacation is a great way to keep expenses down, said Mike Bockelman, vice president, Navy Exchange Service Commands (NEXCOM) Navy Lodge Program. Staying at a Navy Lodge also offers the convenience of other base amenities, such as the NEX, the ITT ticket office and MWR facilities. Plus, Navy Lodges are located in great vacation spots throughout the world, he added. Navy Lodge guests will find oversized rooms and family suites, free internet access, cable TV with DVD player and a kitchenette with micro wave and utensils as well as video rental service, guest laundry facilities and handicapped acces sible and non-smoking rooms. Navy Lodges also offer guests free Wi-Fi, a light breakfast and morning newspaper. As an added conve nience, d ogs and cats up to 50 pounds in weight can stay at many Navy Lodges when traveling with its owners. For reservations, call 1-800-NAVY INN (1-800628-9466) or go on line at www.navy-lodge.com or www.dodlodging.com Experience Navy Medicine as a Junior Red Cross volunteer: Apply by May 31 The American Red Cross Northeast Florida Chapter at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville is currently recruiting for this sum mers Junior Red Cross volunteers. This offers an excel lent opportunity for students interested in health careers to train with highly skilled Navy Medicine profession als physicians, nurses, pharmacists, therapists and technicians as well as contribute to a positive experience for patients. The program is open to a limited number of high school students age 16 to 18 who have base access. Volunteers work four to 20 hours per week in locations throughout the hospital, and receive CPR training. Apply online by May 31at www. nefloridaredcross.org. At the website, click on volunteer, join us, youth volunteer application (or adult volunteer application for 18 yearold students). Fill out the application, select Northeast Florida Chapter, and create a Volunteer Connection account. After submitting the application, complete the online orientation. All applicants are required to attend a kickoff event (which includes an interview) June 8 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the hospitals 2nd deck conference room in the central tower (next to the chapel). For more about this opportunity, contact Junior Red Cross volun teer coordinators Terry Miles or Mary Miciano at 542-7525 or jaxredcros soffice@med.navy.mil. 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013

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FWC trains at NAS JaxDozens of law enforcement officers from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) conducted training May 910 on the St. Johns River in the vicinity of NAS Jacksonvilles Mulberry Cove Marina. Training Officer Lt. Scott Kihei of the FWC North Central Region described their activities as reality based train ing that includes weapons that shoot marking cartridges similar to paint balls. For safety, officers and role players (officers in plain clothes playing bad guys)) must wear helmets, eye protec tion, chest and groin protection. Other available weapons include non-operational Tasers, batons, pepper spray and the marking-cartridge hand gun. This morning were running two scenarios on the waterway, explained Kihei. The first is an anchored vessel with one role player aboard where the FWC officer must execute a warrant by tying up and making an arrest by controlling the subject. If control is not properly established by handcuffing, the role player may present some kind of weapon. Regaining control may include the use of deadly force. The second scenario was a contact and cover operation by two FWC officers in one patrol boat who have spot ted two role players in a vessel that was reported stolen. When the responding officers hit their lights and siren, the bad guys take off at high speed. This is a high-risk felony vessel stop that can involve gunplay if its not done right. When officers get the ves sel stopped, the contact officer has his or her gun drawn to establish control. In most cases, its best to bring up one suspect at a time and seat them on the gunwale for handcuffing. After both suspects are searched and transferred to the FWC craft, the officers will transport them to jail, said Kihei. On board every boat is an evalua tor wearing a red shirt, whose job is to maintain safety and monitor the pro cedures. If an officer makes a mistake, such as improper handcuffing, the evaluator may call a time out to discuss the process. In the event of an unsafe action that could hurt an officer or a role player there is a safety word that we can yell and everything stops. This training is as real as we can make it without firing a bullet, said Kihei. The FWC Law Enforcement Division enforces rules to protect fish and wildlife, keep waterways safe for millions of boaters, and cooperate with other law enforcement agencies providing homeland security. Duval and Clay counties are in the FWC North Central Region, which has about 150 law enforcement officers. Statewide, the FWC employs more than two thousand persons who protect and manage more than 575 species of wildlife, more than 200 native species of freshwater fish, and more than 500 native species of saltwater fish. WALLI am incredibly honored to present a Purple Heart to Warrant Officer Serna, who earned 34 Air Medals throughout his distinguished career, said Scorby. Im especially honored to be here with the heroes who witnessed some of the defining moments of our nations history. I want to thank all of our Vietnam veterans for their amazing service to our country. As the ceremony ended, the crowd that included many Vietnam veterans and family members of those lost during the Vietnam War scrolled the wall and found and traced the name of their loved ones. Its kind of touching to come out here and actually get to touch the wall and see them in some form, Its very moving, said Lynn Burgess, friend of William Stalnecker. The boys who didnt come back and the ones that did, deserve a lot more than what they got when they returned. So this is a good reminder of what the Vietnam War really was. The Vietnam Traveling Memorial Wall was brought to the school after a student traveled to Washington, D.C. where he walked along the actual wall and was moved by the many names of those who never came home. When he returned to school, he mentioned that he wanted everyone to have the expe rience he had and a plan was hatched by the Beta Club members to bring the wall to Green Cove Springs. This is great for our community. It truly has been a community effort to bring the wall here. We raised nearly $10,000 through various fundrais ers and speaking engagements. And, many of the businesses here pitched in by donating goods and their time to make this happen, said Rachel Thompson, an eighth grader at the school and member of the Beta Club. Also helping out were members of VP-62 at NAS Jacksonville who spend hours landscaping the football field grounds, painting the stadium and participating in the ceremony. It truly has been a collaboration of many, many people over many, many hours to make this all hap pen. But what a great experi ence for our community and these stu dents, said AECS(AW) Jeannette Wright of VP-62, who coordinated the community service events for the Sailors. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 16, 2013 17

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