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Jax air news ( May 9, 2013 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA SLAF
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012

Material Information

Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 9, 2013
Publication Date: 05-09-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02041

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012

Material Information

Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 9, 2013
Publication Date: 05-09-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02041


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THURSDAY, MAY 9, 2013 NEW LEADER PUBLIC SERVICE ALL-HANDS CALL Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com On April 25, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville held a Take Back the Night event in recognition of Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Take Back the Night is a time to come together as a community to speak out against sexual assault, domestic vio lence, sexual abuse and all forms of sex ual violence. The evening ceremony, at the hospital flagpole, included NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer, Executive Officer Capt. Christine Sears, NAS Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Roy Undersander and victim advocates from NAS Jacksonville. Dozens of people participated, hold ing candles in honor of survivors. The event included music, poetry, a silent tribute to victims and sexual assault awareness information. According to the U.S. Department of Justices National Crime Victimization Survey, someone in the U.S. is sexually assaulted every two minutes. These sta tistics dont include survivors who dont seek help. The U.S. military is far from immune to sexual violence. An estimated 19,000 sexual assaults occur in the military each year, but only about 2,500 are reported. It has no place in the United States military, and certainly not at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, declared Shaffer. It is a violation of everything we stand for and it is an affront to the val ues we defend. I want every victim to know that the Navy is here to care for you and to support you. We are commit ted to showing you our solidarity as you heal and become a survivor. An assault victims life is forever changed by violence. Also it causes a ripple effect that can touch the victims family, friends and his or her whole community. Too often, the abused remain silentashamed to speak out about their expe riences. Take Back the Night empowers victims to alter their trauma by rever encing the survivor experience while educating the community. In her remarks, NAS Jacksonville Naval Hospital Jacksonville celebrates Take Back The Night In a communication to staff on May 1, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer proclaimed May 5-11 as Public Service Recognition Week (PSRW) in honor of the more than 670 men and women who serve as civil ian staff throughout the commands hospital the Navys fourth largest and five branch health clinics in Florida and Georgia. I call upon all Naval Hospital Jacksonville staff to observe this week by acknowledging the impor tant contributions of our civil service employees, Shaffer stated. Our ability to care for our 57,000 enrolled patients depends in no small degree on the work by those who make up our civil service team. The theme for PSRW 2013 is Why I Serve. This serves as a reminder of how each govern ment employee is important to NH Jacksonvilles ability to achieve its mission to pro vide force health protection through readiness, operation al support, health promotion and quality family centered care. Shaffer emphasized the commitment of the civil ser vice employees who work dili gently alongside uniformed staff in every capacity from healing patients as part of a Medical Home Port team to ensuring the proper supplies are available. The federal workforce provides much-needed con tinuity when our active duty staff change duty stations or deploy, said Shaffer. Unfortunately, not many Americans get to see and experience all the great things our federal employees do to guarantee the United States NH Jacksonville honors civil service staff Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert spent May 3 with Sailors and military supporters from northeast Florida to inform them how the current budget and other fiscal challenges may impact the Navys future. Despite rain and gale force winds, the CNOs entourage kept to its sched ule. Following an all-hands call at NS Mayport, they traveled to NAS Jacksonville where Greenert shared the podium with U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw (R-Fla.) at a luncheon hosted by region al councils of the Navy League, a civil ian organization that supports men and women of the sea services. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders welcomed Crenshaw and Greenert, as well as Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet; Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo, commander Submarine Group 10; Rear Adm. Jack Scorby, commander Navy Region Southeast; Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON)(AW/NAC) Mike Stevens; and retired Rear Adm. George Huchting, president, Mayport Navy League. The CNO reiterated that the Navy is focused on rebalancing the AsiaPacific and Mid-East regions. Were undergoing a deliberate metamorpho sis of ship delivery to the Asia-Pacific region that will take place over the next 10 years. That means changes in force structure and capabilities. Antisubmarine warfare will improve soon, when NAS Jacksonvilles VP-16 War Eagles become the first P-8A Poseidon squadron to deploy in support of Pacific Command. Greenert said the P-8As at NAS Jacksonville are on schedule. The Navy plans on having 42 P-8As here by 2019. Change can spur growth, and in our case, were asking congress to fund a net increase of 4,600 Sailors for our next budget, Greenert added. He also assured the audience that, despite the ongoing federal budget crunch, the Navy still plans to move the amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD-21) from NS Norfolk, Va. to NS Mayport by December. The New York is one of three ships that comprise its amphibious ready group (ARG). The other two vessels the amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) and the dock landing ship USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43) are slat ed to arrive at Mayport by early 2015. The CNO said, This first phase of the ARG move to Mayport underscores the Navys commitment to a strategic dispersal of assets a strategy that your congressman Crenshaw has long advo cated on Capitol Hill. He said, The strategic dispersal of aircraft carriers on the east coast is important. As for the homeporting of an aircraft carrier at NS Mayport, we still want to see that come to fruition but we dont have the money right now. In the meantime, were making sure the Mayport facilities are fully aircraft car CNO talks about future at area bases

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JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS May 9 1926 Lt. Cmdr. Richard Byrd and ADC Floyd Bennett make first flight over North Pole. Both receive Congressional Medal of Honor. 1942 USS Wasp (CV-7) in Mediterranean launches 47 Spitfire fighter aircraft to help defend Malta. May 10 1775 Force under Ethan Allan and Benedict Arnold crosses Lake Champlain and captures British fort at Ticonderoga, N.Y. 1800 USS Constitution captures Letter of Marque Sandwich. 1862 Confederates destroy Norfolk and Pensacola Navy Yards. 1949 First shipboard launching of LARK guided missile by USS Norton Sound (AVM-1). 1960 USS Triton (SSRN-586) completes submerged circumnavigation of world in 84 days following many of the routes taken by Magellan and cruising 46,000 miles. May 11 1862 CSS Virginia blown up by Confederates to prevent capture. 1898 Sailors and Marines from USS Marblehead cut trans-oceanic cable near Cienfuegos, Cuba iso lating Cuba from Spain. 1943 Naval task force lands Army troops on Attu, Aleutians. 1965 U.S. destroyers deliver first shore bombard ment of Vietnam War. May 12 1780 Fall of Charleston, S.C. with three Continental Navy frigates (Boston, Providence and Ranger) cap tured; and one American frigate (Queen of France) sunk to prevent capture. 1846 U.S. declares war against Mexico. 1975 American container ship SS Mayaguez is seized by Cambodian Khmer Rouge forces and escort ed to Koh Tang Island. 1986 Destroyer USS David R. Ray (DD-971) deters an Iranian Navy attempt to board a U.S. merchant ship. May 13 1908 Navy Nurse Corps established. 1908 Pearl Harbor Navy Yard, later called Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard, was officially established in the Territory of Hawaii as a coaling station for U.S. Navy ships transiting the Pacific Ocean. 1943 Bureau of Navigation renamed Bureau of Naval Personnel. 1945 Aircraft from fast carrier task force begin twoday attack on Kyushu airfields, Japan. 1964 Organization and deployment of worlds first all-nuclear-powered task group (USS Enterprise (CVN-65, USS Long Beach (CGN-9) and USS Bainbridge (CGN-25) to 6th Fleet. May 14 1801 Tripoli declares war against the United States. 1836 U.S. Exploring Expedition authorized to con duct exploration of Pacific Ocean and South Seas, first major scientific expedition overseas. Lt. Charles Wilkes led the expedition in surveying South America, Antarctica, Far East and North Pacific. 1845 First U.S. warship visits Vietnam. While anchored in Danang for provisioning, Capt. John Percival, commanding USS Constitution, conducts a show of force against Vietnamese authorities in an effort to obtain the release of a French priest held pris oner by Emperor of Annam at Hue. 1975 Marines recapture the American merchant ship SS Mayaguez, then go ashore on Koh Tang Island and release the crew. May 15 1800 Capt. Preble, commanding the 32-gun frigate Essex, arrives in Batavia, Java, to escort U.S. merchant ships. 1942 First Naval Air Transport Service flight across Pacific. 1969 Sinking of USSGuitarro (SSN-665). 1991 Amphibious Task Force arrives at Chittagong, Bangladesh, for relief operations after Cyclone Marian. Out of necessity, military spouses have devised creative ways to mark the timepaper chains, journals, jars of M&Msbut last year, while Dustin was deployed overseas for 13 months, I knew I couldnt do this time-honored ritual of counting down the days to his homecoming. I did the countdown thing during Dustins first deployments, and it made me feel like a prisoner etching out the days and weeks on a concrete wall. It was as if my life was in a holding pattern, just waiting (and waiting and waiting and waiting) for my husband to return. But this time, as Dustin boarded an airplane in November 2011, leaving me with three young boys (then ages 10, 8 and 4), I didnt have time to wait. Dustin would miss nine family birth days, two Thanksgivings, one Christmas and our anniversary. Life had to go on without him. This is when and how Dinner with the Smileys came about. For the boys, the most concrete evidence of life going on with out their father was seeing his empty chair at the dinner table. So I said, Lets fill it, even though, at that time, I wasnt sure what I meant by it. The concept evolved and took shape as we went along. We invited a new guest to fill Dustins place at the dinner table for each week that he was gone. The act was both meta phorical and ironic: We were, in fact, counting the weeks something I said I wouldnt dobut at the same time, we were filling up Dustins chair and our lives. We werent in a holding pattern. Very quicklyas in by, basically, Dinner Number One with Senator Susan Collinsit became clear to me that we werent just passing the time. Rather, the boys and I were making memories. What I couldnt see yet, however, was that we were also building a community. Each week, a new role model for the boys sat in their fathers chair and shared stories about their lives and their work. The guests werent replacing Dustin. No one could do that. But they were filling the gaps until he returned, and many of them were becoming significant parts of our lives. Then, about five months into the deployment, something happened which made me realize that the lessons the boys and I were learning were bigger than our family and broader than our community here in Maine. Our 17th dinner was supposed to be with our elderly neigh bor who had moved to an assisted living facility after Dustin left. I rescheduled the dinner multiple times because other guests with fast-paced lives seemed to take priority. My neigh bor, I figured, wasnt going anywhere. She didnt have a work or travel schedule to maneuver. Dinner with her could be at our convenience. I was wrong. Something happened two weeks before our dinner that would change everything, and Dinner Seventeen became a turning point. Dustin likes to tell me there are no coincidences, and Ive always tried to understand what he means. Then, this one dinner and the events which followed made me a believer. In fact, its when I knew I had to write the book, Dinner with the Smileys, which will be released by Hyperion this week. Briefly, and without doing it much justice, what I can tell you about the dinner is this: We never got to have dinner with our neighbor, and the sad ness of that caused my boys to ask if we could spend the after noon with our other neighbor, then 93-years-old. It would be the last time we saw him as well. Because of Dinner 17, we also met a beautiful couple, Frank and Anita, who would teach us about love, marriage and the many different ways in which someone can be lonely. And (heres where I might start to sound crazy) its fitting that all of this happened at a dinner numbered and named seven teen, because Dustin and I were married on July 17, and we like to claim the number as ours. Silly? Maybe. Until I you read the story about Dustins lost wedding bandfrozen underwater at Mt. Katahdin for 13 monthsand Dinner Number 44. Sometimes I feel like I want back the years my husband was gone during his first deployments. This time, I can honestly say I wouldnt trade the 52 weeks for anything. The things we learned, the experiences the boys and I shared, the people we met these werent coincidences. They were lessons we will carry with us for a lifetime. This week, I hope you will have the opportunity to read Dinner with the Smileys and feel similarly blessed. I look forward to hearing your reactions, and I hope you will also be moved to invite someone to the dinner table.Dinner with the Smileys: A year of unforgettable lessons VP-5 transition spotlightAs VP-5 transitions to the P-8A Poseidon the squadron is high lighting a transitioning Mad Fox each week. This weeks spotlight shines on AM2(AW) Steven Zeiger. Zeiger is from Marlton, N.J. He has two sisters and is recently married. As an aviation structur al mechanic, he is responsible for the entire outside structure of the aircraft including flight controls, tires, and brakes. VP-5 AMs began their tran sition at the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit on Jan. 11 with a fourweek course taught by Boeing instructors. At the conclusion of this course they began onthe-job training on VP-30 P-8A Poseidons. Zeiger was a previously quali fied collateral duty inspector on 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 9, 2013

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the P-3C and was leaned upon to gain the same quali fication with the P-8A. This qualification allows him to sign off work done by the AM shop on a Poseidon. Our responsibilities remain mostly the same with the P-8 with one difference, said Zeiger. Until we receive a manual, structural repairs to the P-8s panels must be completed by qualified civilian contractors on base. Depending on the damage done to the panels this can be both a costly and time-consuming process. He emphasized that they take this added responsi bility very seriously to keep the Poseidons in the air. VP-5 has been transitioning to the P-8A Poseidon since Jan. 4, 2013. SPOTLIGHT Fighting Tigers change of command ThursdayVP-8 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Michael Marston will transfer command of the Fighting Tigers to Cmdr. Todd Libby May 9 at 10 a.m. in NAS Jacksonville Hangar 117. Libby, the current executive officer of VP-8, hails from Newburgh, Maine. His previous sea assignments include a tour on board USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) and tours with VP-10 and VP-8 in Brunswick, Maine. He served on shore duty at the Naval War College, the Bureau of Personnel, and on the staff of Commander, Fleet Air Keflavik, Iceland. As commanding officer, Marston led the Fighting Tigers through a highly successful tri-site deploy ment across two Combatant Commanders Areas of Responsibility. Employing the P-3C Orion against surface, subsurface, overland, and counter-drug threats, his Fighting Tiger team flew more than 650 missions and 3,065 hours. Since returning from deployment last December, Cmdr. Marstons squadron has supported two Presidential detachments and three exercises critical to carrier or expeditionary strike group deployments. NAS Jacksonville and the Northeast Florida Navy League Councils will host the Individual Augmentee (IA) Recognition Luncheon May 16 at 11 a.m. at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center. During this luncheon, all NAS Jax and tenant command Sailors who have returned from an IA assignment within the last six months will be recognized. There is no cost for IAs and their spouses. The cost for other military and civilian guests is $10. Tickets may be purchased at the Fleet and Family Support Center, Monday-Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. The deadline to purchase tickets is May 8. Childcare will be provided at the Child Development Center for children of IAs in attendance. Please call 542-8667 to reserve childcare. Pre-registration is required. To RSVP, contact your command Command Individual Augmentee Coordinator or Bobby Johns at bobby.johns.ctr@navy.mil or 542-5745.Individual Augmentee luncheon set for May 16 Volunteers needed for Never Quit eventNavy Recruiting District Jacksonville needs 30 vol unteers to assist with the Warrior Challenge and an additional 75 officers and chief petty officers to facili tate the red carpet awards during the 2013 Never Quit Beach event May 19 from 5:45 a.m. to 3 p.m. All volunteers will receive a free Never Quit run ning shirt. For more information, call or email MC1 Brianna Dandridge at 396-5909, Ext 1150. May 10 is military spouse appreciation day, a day when we officially recognize the contributions of the husbands and wives who serve their country along side us. Please take a moment to reflect on the love and care our spouses generously offer and reaffirm your gratitude for their tireless support. Our loved ones volunteer for the formidable task of waiting for us and managing the home while we answer the call of service to our nation. Their sacri fice and devotion to the navy family are invaluable in keeping our families and Sailors on course and on speed. And so on Military Spouse Appreciation Day, please make it a priority to demonstrate your appre ciation and show your spouses how much they are treasured. Never discount the personal sacrifices they make each day for our families and nation to ensure we remain the worlds greatest Navy. To all of you, Darleen and I thank you for your service.Military Spouse Appreciation Day is May 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 9, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 9, 2013 Honoring public servants DoD civilians shineIn my naval career so far, Ive been stationed at a number of outstanding bases, so I can definitely say that Ive never worked with Department of Defense (DoD) civil service employees who are so focused on and sup portive of our military members, as those aboard our installation, said NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders, during an April 30 interview in his headquarters office. He said that Public Service Recognition Week (May 511) is a great time to call attention to the important contributions of NAS Jacksonville civil service employees. Our skilled and resource ful DoD civilian personnel are invaluable when it comes to pro viding continuity for an array of services that support the warfighter, maintain base infra structure, and assist Sailors and their families with quality of life issues, said Sanders. He added, I know that the leaders of our tenant commands agree with me when I say our civilian workforce deserves thanks throughout the year especially during Public Service Recognition Week so we invite service members and others to honor our DoD civilians for the vital work they do each and every day. More than 7,000 civilian employees pass through the gates of NAS Jacksonville daily to bring their skills to commands such as Naval Hospital Jacksonville, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, Naval Supply Systems Command Fleet Logistics Center, Navy Region Southeast, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11, Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing Atlantic detach ments, and VP-30, the Navys maritime patrol fleet replacement squadron where the P-3C Orion aircraft is being transitioned to the P-8A Poseidon.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 9, 2013 5 government remains unsurpassed. Thank you to each of our civilian staff for your selfless service to Naval Hospital Jacksonville and our nation. As Theodore Roosevelt who led the reform of the civil service system stated, The government is us; we are the government, you and I. PUBLIC SERVICE

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Sexual Assault Response Coordinator Tina Vaughn recalled how she began as a volunteer with the Womens Center of Jacksonvilles Rape Crisis Program. She has witnessed the renaissance of many victimstheir self and their spirit. I do not believe trauma, specifically sexual vio lence, has to mean that one moves forward as less than what they have known themselves to be, she said. I do this work because I am honored and privileged to hold space for what becomes a spiritual, physical, emotional and mental reckoning; because I do not believe in ends. I believe in cycles, because I have witnessed enough women and men stand up after sex ual violence, taller than they themselves ever imag ined, Vaughn concluded. Sexual violence is a widespread issue affecting all populations regardless of gender, race, age or socio economic status. Most often, the offender is not a criminal in a dark alley, but rather a shipmate, neigh bor, acquaintance, family member or intimate part ner. According to the Department of Defense Safe Helpline, there are many steps to reduce the risk of sexual assault. To practice risk reduction, both women and men can: be moderate if using alcohol, dont leave a beverage unattended or accept open drinks from others, communicate limits clearly from the begin ning, tell a close friend about plans if going out with a new person, have extra money to get home, end a situation if its uncomfortable, travel with friends and watch out for each other, be aware of surroundings, dont get isolated with someone unknown, walk in lighted areas and keep doors and cars locked. And everyone has the right to say no even if they first say yes, have been kissing, have had sex before, and regardless of clothing type. Every person in the United States Navy must be committed to eliminating sexual assault from our ranks, affirms Shaffer. Together, our goal is to pre vent and respond to this crime in order to enable mili tary readiness and to reduce-with a goal to eliminatesexual assault from the military. Anyone in immediate danger should call 911 (in the U.S.). For confidential help, support or to learn how to intervene or help (any time of day or night from any location) contact DoDs Safe Helpline at www.safe helpline.org or (877) 995-5247 (DSN 94 + 877-995-5247) or text 55247. For NAS Jacksonville, contact (912) 467-1979 or 5424717. For NH Jacksonville, contact 542-9030. TAKE BACK Teen driving class offeredThe NAS Jacksonville Safety Office is offering a driv er improvement class specifically for dependent young drivers between the age of 15 and 21 years old June 14 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. The class will be held in the Safety Conference Room in Building 1. Participants do not have to have a drivers license to attend. The class will offer safety tips such as how to respond to driving emergencies and distracted driving while bringing awareness to risks of driving and much more. The class consists of videos, chapter quizzes and concludes with a multiple choice question test. There will not be any time behind the wheel; this is class room only. The teens will receive an AAA Driver Improvement Class completion certificate. If you feel your teen could benefit from this class, sign them up by calling Linda at 542-3082, Cindy at 542-2584 or Kristen at 542-8810. 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 9, 2013

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Celebrated during the first week of May since 1985, Public Service Recognition Week is time set aside to honor the men and women who serve our nation as federal, state, county and local government employ ees and ensure that our government is the best in the world. Here are some of Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles staff stories about why they answered the call to serve in government and what accomplishments they are most proud of in their time as public servants: The Navy Exchange (NEX) wants to help its customers finance their childrens college education through its A-OK Student Reward Program. All qualified students will participate in a quarterly drawing for monetary awards of $2,500, $1,500, $1,000 or $500 for a total of $5,500 per quarter. The next drawing will be held at the end of May 2013. Any eligible full-time student that has a B-grade point average equivalent or better, as determined by their school system, may enter the drawing. Eligible students include dependent children of active duty military members, reservists and military retirees enrolled in first through 12th grade. Dependent children without an individ ual Dependent Identification Card must be accompanied by their sponsor to submit their entry. Each student may enter only once each grading period and must re-enter with each qualifying report card. To enter the drawing, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have a NEX associ ate verify the minimum grade average. Then fill out an entry card and obtain an A-OK ID, which entitles the student to discount cou pons for NEX products and services. The Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) has been offering students a chance to pay for college through its A-OK Student Reward Program since 1997. Since the program began, NEXCOM has awarded over $600,000 in Series EE U.S. sav ings bonds and monetary awards with the help of its generous vendor partners. NEX rewards students with A-OK Student Reward ProgramWhat does public service mean to you?Naval Hospital Jacksonville offers some thoughts The J. Wayne and Delores Barr Weaver Veterans Emergency and Transition Services Fund provides emergency financial assistance and resources to vet erans of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom that will help to sup port their transition into civil ian life and stabilization into the community. This financial assistance is provided directly to the veterans of these wars.The geographic service area is: Duval, Clay, Nassau, Baker and St. Johns counties. Types of emergency needs we help with but not strictly limited too: Emergency travel Temporary lodging Essential transportation/ needs/vehicle payment or repair, insurance Urgent medical/dental needs Food/rent Utility deposits/payments Moving expenses Childcare for a veteran par ent needing to find work or learn a life skill For more information, contact a Red Cross Military Services caseworker at 246-1395.Financial aid available for veterans 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 9, 2013

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Some 290,000 veterans and mili tary spouses have been hired since the inception of the Joining Forces initia tive two years ago, nearly tripling the initial goal, first lady Michelle Obama announced April 30. Numerous businesses also have vowed to hire or train an additional 435,000 people during the next five years, she added during a White House briefing. The first lady and Dr. Jill Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden, established Joining Forces in June 2011 to mobilize support from every sector of American society to help service members, their families and veterans. [Michelle and Jill] identify so deeply with these military families because they understand the sacrifices that theyre making, President Barack Obama said at the announcement event. The president acknowledged Cabinet members, the Joint Chiefs of Staff and other top military leaders in the audi ence. We appreciate all the great work that [youre] doing, he said, and your pres ence reflects our commitment to this cause across the entire government. I applaud the first ladys and Dr. Bidens leadership in challenging U.S. businesses to employ Americas vet erans and military spouses, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said in a state ment released after the event. Their announcement today demonstrates that American companies can bene fit greatly from the highly skilled and hard-working members of our military family. Hagel also said he welcomes the com mitment of businesses to hire or train an additional 435,000 individuals dur ing the next five years, and he pledged that the Defense Department will do its part. [I] am committed to ensuring that our service members transitioning to civilian life and our military spouses have the support they richly deserve when it comes to finding a job, pursuing an education, or starting a business, Hagel said. Noting that more remains to be done, the president said employment contin ues to lag behind the national average for post-9/11 veterans, especially for the youngest veterans. This does not make any sense, he said. If you can save a life on the battle field, then you sure as heck can save one in an ambulance in a state-of-the-art hospital. If you can oversee a convoy of equipment and track millions of dollars of assets, then you can run a compa nys supply chain or you can balance its books. If you can lead a platoon in a war zone, then I think you can lead a team in a conference center. The vice president said the nation owes much to those who have served. Theres only one truly sacred obli gation in my view, and thats to equip those we send to war and care for those who come home from war and their families, he said. And quoting the pres ident, he added, No one who fights for this country overseas should have to come home and fight for a job when they come back home. Dr. Biden said she and the first lady have had the incredible honor of meeting military spouses all around the country. Im always amazed by their strength, their commitment, and, most impor tantly, by their resilience, she said. She added that shes learned a lot about the strength of military fami lies. What stands out the most [is] they never complain, she said. Whatever the situation, they keep on serv ing, doing whatever needs to be done. Military spouses have so much to offer -their skills, their incredible work ethic, and perhaps most of all, their endless energy. The first lady said Joining Forces began with a challenge to every seg ment of society to commit to support ing military families, and since then, the nation has joined forces in many amazing ways. We have seen doctors and nurses take bold new steps to care for the fami lies affected by [post-traumatic stress disorder] and traumatic brain injuries, she said. Weve seen colleges sign up to train teachers to be more respon sive to the needs of our military chil dren in their classrooms. Weve seen community groups and houses of wor ship and citizens from every walk of life show their appreciation for our military families, not just with words, but with deeds. Todays event provided a chance to recognize the tremendous efforts of business across the country, the first lady said. These efforts are about so much more than a paycheck, she added. This is about giving these men and women a source of identity and pur pose. Its about providing thousands of families with financial security, and giving our veterans and military spous es the confidence that they can provide a better future for their children. Today is simply just a mile marker, and were not going to stop until every single veteran or military spouse that is searching for a job has found one, she added. We will stand with you now and for decades to come.Employment numbers nearly triple initial Joining Forces goal JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 9, 2013 9

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rier capable. During the Q&A session, Greenert was asked about the status of the Navys next generation of shipboard weapons the electromagnetic railgun and the highenergy laser. Railguns are capable of sending projectiles a dis tance of 100+ nautical miles at speeds of up to 5,600 mph almost eight times farther and two times faster than conventional guns. Recent tests proved that ship-mounted electric lasers can be integrated into a navy ships radar and navigation system to target and incinerate enemy ves sels at sea. Development teams from the Office of Naval Research have successfully test-fired both weap on systems at targets in a maritime environment, Greenert told the audience. The prototype laser system will be deployed in 2014 for additional tests aboard the afloat forward staging base USS Ponce (AFSB(I)15). By the way, the cost of one blast of direct ed energy from a laser is estimated at just 85 cents a real budget helper. As of today, the railgun and the laser will augment, but not replace, traditional shipboard weapon sys tems, said Greenert. He added that another technological advance ment is countering the wake-homing torpedo used against high-value ships, such as aircraft carriers, to detect torpedoes well before impact. He explained that wake-homing torpedoes detect the turbulence of a ships wake and follow it to the ships stern before detonation. Many navies, including those of China, North Korea and Iran, arm their submarines with wakehoming torpedoes, Greenert said. We now have a prototype system to defeat the wake-homing torpedo that will deploy later this year with the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). After the luncheon, Crenshaw and Greenert attend ed a media-availability with reporters. Greenert was asked about President Barack Obamas 2014 defense budget that includes a proposed round of additional base closures and realignments by 2015. While I support the BRAC concept of operating most efficiently, as chief of the Navy, I look around and dont see any dramatic need or area that requires clo sure at this time, said Greenert. The congressman also responded to the question, saying that he did not believe there was much of an appetite in Congress to close military bases or facili ties. Crenshaw, a member of the House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, concluded, Its been a pleasure for me to welcome the CNO to our region. He made it clear today that installations in northeast Florida and southeast Georgia are very much a part of the Navys future. From the new littoral combat ships that will call Mayport home, to the new P-8 Poseidon aircraft that are already flying from NAS Jacksonville, our region provides unparalleled support of Americas military. Adm. Greenert is a great friend and partner as we work together to meet our national security requirements. CNO VISIT Nearly 2,500 Sailors from NAS Jacksonville and ten ant commands attended an all-hands call with Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON)(AW/NAC) Mike Stevens May 3. Before addressing numerous questions from local Sailors and from around the world via live streaming, Greenert proudly gave the oath to 16 petty officers who chose to be reenlisted by the CNO during the event. After swearing them in, the CNO and MCPON greet ed each of the Sailors and pre sented them with coins. First, I want to thank all the family members here today and want to reassure that we will continue to support the Navys family programs, said Greenert. Many of you have concerns about the budget so I want to clarify a few things. We now have a budget for this year which means we are pay ing our previous debts and are reengaging ship deployments. Training and maintenance for next years deployments is also set. Greenert continued, We are also currently looking at the 2014 budget which could mean more reductions, but we have time to work on reshaping our military and have a much bet ter understanding on how to prioritize to get the job done. As the floor opened up for questions and answers, Sailors discussed such topics as bud get cuts due to sequestration, Navy entitlements, Individual Augmentee (IA) deployments, ship deployment rotations, promotion opportunities, tuition assistance, retirement reform and changes to uniform regulations. IAs will continue to draw down in the future and be filled by Reservists. There are certain skill sets that will still be deployed like those in the medical, logistics, intel ligence and Seabee fields but we are filling more of these bil lets with volunteers from the Reserves, stated Greenert. Stevens took on several ques tions such as, Is the Navy happy with the number of enlisted members, specifically in the different ranks and how is retention going to be affected in the future. We are working very hard to get the right people in the right jobs, said Stevens. We are finding that about 20 percent of the enlisted rates are more challenging to fill right now. As for managing enlisted careers, we are creating a single source a new program that should roll-out in June that should help all of us to better manage our careers. Ensign Winston Massey of VP-30 told the CNO that his dream was to become an astro naut and wondered about the future of the Navys space pro gram. We have a need for payloads in space and have a program developing to replace the con stellation (payloads/satellites) currently up there. Its cur rently under discussion what branch should operate the program. But good luck with your dream, Greenert told the young ensign. To close out the all-hands call, Stevens reminded the Sailors to treat one another with decency and respect. I am confident that we will see ourselves through these chal lenging times and continue to CNO, MCPON hold all-hands call at NAS Jax 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 9, 2013

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be the greatest Navy in the world. Greenert added, Thank you for your time. You are all doing a great job. Keep up the good work. After the all-hands call, Greenert gathered with the Sailors he reenlisted and their families for a group photo and thanked them for their dedicated ser vice. ALL HANDS DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Deweys Free Spring Concert Series 7 p.m. on the outdoor stage May 10 7th Street Band May 17 Zero-NFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 510 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 12 6 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor Pool Hours Open Monday Friday (lap swim only) During lap swim only the waterslide, water park and concessions will not be open. 6 a.m. 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 7 p.m. Saturday & Sunday (recreation swim ming) 11 a.m. 6 p.m. 2013 Learn to Swim Program Sign-up at the Gym (the Zone) May 11, 8 a.m. 3 p.m. Session 1: June 1020 Session 2 July 8-18 Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Disney Cruise Lines will be at ITT June 11, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Learn more about exciting 2013/14 trips sailing from Port Canaveral, Miami, Galveston, Barcelona, San Juan and Vancouver. Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Daytona International Speedway Subway Firecracker July 5 and Coke 400 July 6 Tickets on sale now! Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Funkfest Metropolitan Park May 10-11 Two-day ticket $52 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3, 2013 Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7, 2013 Blockout Dates: March 23 April 5, 2013 Call for pricing Jacksonville Symphony $27.50Gatorland military member is free, tick ets available for family members at ITT$19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline 2013 Live Broadway Series American Idiot May 14 & 15 $25 $62 Dream Girls May 21 Cesar Millan June 1 $42 $52 MOSH $7 $12 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through May 15 and must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about our special discounted tick ets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park One day pass $30, Gold pass $71 Book Shade of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Barracks Bash May 9, 4 8 p.m. Free food, entertainment and prizes! The Players Championship May 11 at 11 a.m. Paintball Trip May 18 at 9 a.m. Universal Studios Weekend Trip May 25-26NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees May 21 for active duty May 9 & 23 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Loudmouth Thursday Any golfer wearing a pair of loudmouth shorts or pants plays 18 holes with cart for $20 Open to military, DoD and guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina May 18, 19, 25 & 26 June 15, 16, 22 & 23 July 20, 21, 27 & 28 Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Movie Under the Stars Featuring The Croods May 24 at 8:30 p.m. Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School June 3 July 10 $500 per person For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy. mil. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 9, 2013 13

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All 40 Navy Lodges worldwide now offer free Wi-Fi to its guests. Guests can now access the free Wi-Fi in their rooms as well as the common areas within the Navy Lodge. We want our guests to have all the amenities they come to expect when theyre away from home, said Michael Bockelman, vice president, Navy Exchange Service Commands (NEXCOM) Navy Lodge Program. By offering free Wi-Fi, guests will be able to keep in touch with loved ones back home or do work on the road much easier. This is anoth er great value Navy Lodge guests receive when they stay with us. Navy Lodges offer family suites and oversized guest rooms that fea ture a kitchenette complete with microwave and utensils, cable TV with premium channels and DVD player. Navy Lodges offer guests house keeping service, vending machines, DVD rental service and laundry facilities as well as handicapped accessible rooms. Guests also have in-room coffee, breakfast in the lobby and newspa per as well as convenient on-base parking while staying at a Navy Lodge. Most Navy Lodges also accept cats and dogs up to 50 pounds. Having access to the Navy Lodge is so important for our military members on permanent change of station orders, said Robert Bianchi, chief executive officer, NEXCOM. Navy Lodges are an important quality of life benefit for our men and women in uniform. We are always looking for ways we can enhance our guests stay at one of our Navy Lodges. Offering free Wi-Fi to our guests makes staying at a Navy Lodge an even greater value for our guests. To make a reservation at a Navy Lodge, call 800-628-9466 (800-NAVY-INN), 24 hours a day, seven days a week or go online at www.navy-lodge.com For other military lodging options go to www.dodlodging.com Pentagon officials yesterday approved the security technical implementation guides for BlackBerry 10 smartphones and BlackBerry PlayBook tablets with BlackBerry Enterprise Service 10, as well as Samsungs Android Knox, to be used on Defense Department networks. This is a significant step towards establishing a multivendor environ ment that supports a variety of stateof-the-art devices and operating systems, Air Force Lt. Col. Damien Pickart, a Pentagon spokesman, said in a statement announcing the approval. Several mobile devices and oper ating systems are going through the Defense Information Systems Agencys review and approval pro cess. A security technical implemen tation guide approval establishes a configuration that allows a secure connection to DOD networks, which facilitates the process by eliminating the need for security reviews at the individual organization level, Pickart explained. However, he added, yesterdays decision does not result in product orders. The level of security necessary throughout the department does not rest solely on any one mobile device, Pickart said, adding that the network and software also must be secured and managed appropriately. An integral part of the secure mobility framework will be the Mobility Device Management and Mobile Application Store, which is in source selection now and anticipated for award in early summer, he said. We are pleased to add Blackberry 10 and the Samsung Knox version of Android to our family of mobile devices supporting the Department of Defense, the spokesman said. We look forward to additional ven dors also participating in this process, further enabling a diversity of mobile devices for use within the depart ment. Navy Lodges now offer free Wi-Fi to guestsOfficials approve implementation guides for mobile devices 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 9, 2013

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 9, 2013 Navy accepting STA-21 applications The Seaman-to-Admiral (STA-21) commissioning program, which provides an opportunity for qualified Sailors to receive college educations and Navy com missions, is soliciting applications for fiscal year 2014, as announced in NAVADMIN 102/13 April 23. The deadline for submitting application packages is July 1. We are proud of the STA-21 program and the amaz ing Sailors who receive their commissions through it, said Rear Adm. Dee Mewbourne, commander, Naval Service Training Command (NSTC). STA-21 officer candidates and their families ben efit from the educational opportunity afforded them at our nations premier universities. Completing their degree in 36 months, they remain on active duty with full pay and allowances and the Navy pays up to $10,000 per year in support of their tuition, fees and books. STA-21 is truly an investment in Sailors as it shapes our future officer corps. Application packages must be postmarked on or before the July 1 deadline date. Early submission is preferred, as this will allow feedback to the Sailor for submission of missing or illegible documents. The deadline for submission of additional documentation to an applicants package is August 1. Before earning their degrees, STA-21 applicants must attend the Naval Science Institute (NSI) course at Officer Training Command (OTC), Naval Station Newport, R.I., prior to beginning college studies at an NROTC-affiliated college or university. STA-21/NSI is an eight-week course of intense offi cer preparation and indoctrination. Course enroll ment is timed to allow college entrance during sum mer or fall semesters/quarters after selection. I assessed what I could do in my rate as a Machinists Mate compared to what I could do as an officer and I felt I could contribute the most to the Navy by joining the officer ranks, said officer can didate and former Machinists Mate 3rd Class Joseph Page, 21, from Indianapolis. I thought becoming an officer would maximize my qualities and my potential and thats how I could give the most to the Navy. Page, who came from Nuclear Prototype School in Charleston, S. C., plans on attend ing the Citadel Military College in Charleston and then join the Navys submarine community. This has been a great learning experience for me, said Page. I havent been out in the fleet yet but STA21 and NSI has been a great place to gather informa tion from those in my class that came from the fleet. I received a lot of valuable input from my classmates and got a feel for what Ill need to do once I get to the fleet as an officer. Both Page and ET3 and Officer Candidate Brianna Smith, 22, from Erie, Pa., were put in charge of their class of 50 officer candidates. It was an amazing opportunity and has been a great experience and will help prepare us for whats to come, said Smith. You get your college education while learning about leadership roles. Smith plans on attending North Carolina State University in Raleigh, N.C., and then looks to be a Nuclear Warfare Officer on a ship or submarine out of Naval Station Norfolk, Va. Smith also attended Nuclear Prototype School but in Ballston Spa, N. Y., before attending STA-21/NSI in Newport. The STA-21 program benefits Sailors as well as the Navy. The average candidate has at least two years and in most cases more than four years of observed performance which assists in the process of selecting the most qualified Sailors to receive a commission. Additionally, STA-21 candidates are on average older than most midshipmen, bringing a maturity directly reflected in the more than 90 percent comple tion rate STA-21 program candidates boast. Many Sailors involved in the STA-21 program already have some college credit, and some candidates finish ahead of the three years allotted to earn a degree. Students reporting for NSI should expect an intense academic program, said Lt. Jason Gilmore, assistant operations officer and head of this years STA-21/NSI class. In eight short weeks they will complete six cur riculum modules. It would be real easy for a student to fall behind if they dont arrive ready to hit the books. Our intent at NSI is not only to provide these students with a solid basis in Naval Science, but to also estab lish a foundation of good study habits in an intense academic environment as these students adjust from life in the fleet to life at a University. In the STA-21 pro gram, as it is in many competitive selection processes, it is often a candidates extra efforts which can result in selection. Lt. Justin Neff, a division officer and NSI instruc tor at OTC, called the STA-21 program an awesome opportunity for motivated Sailors that are looking to get an education, and advance their career. Neff, who was in one of the first STA-21 class at OTC Newport in March 2003 and commissioned after grad uating from Old Dominion University in May 2006 also said, One of the best things about STA-21 is that it is your job to go to school. You dont have to worry about pay or housing or standing watches on a ship or sub. You go to school and in three years (or less) you can earn your degree and a commission. Neff was a Gas Turbine Systems Technician (Electrical) 1st Class when he applied for STA-21. I wanted to get the most out of my Navy career and for me, Seaman-to-Admiral was the best way to go, said Neff. STA-21 has opened the door for a wealth of oppor tunities for me. Selectees will be announced by a NAVADMIN in October. Questions concerning this program should be directed to command career counselors or to the NSTC Officer Development directorate at (850) 4529563. Three U.S. Navy Seabee Mobile Utilities Support Equipment (MUSE) technicians arrived in Virginia April 29 to assist the final dry-docking for USS Enterprise (CVN 65). The technicians will utilize three recently com pleted 2500kVA substations to aid the shipyard in this process for the Navys oldest and largest nuclear powered aircraft carrier. After more than 50 years of service, the Enterprise will undergo her final de-fueling availability in June at Newport News Shipbuilding (NNS), Newport News, Va. We are humbled to support the Enterprise final dry-docking, said Naval Facilities Engineering Command EXWC Commanding Officer Capt. Brant Pickrell. EXWC MUSE transformers will provide the ship with 450 VAC (volts, alternating current) shore power as the shipyard is wired to use only 4160 VAC supply. These substations will support pier-side berth ing of Enterprises supporting fleet operations and provide cold iron support. The technicians began substation installation on April 29, with an expected completion date of May 3. EXWCs MUSE is a specialized unit based at Port Hueneme, Calif. All MUSE technicians are selected from Seabee rates to attend the Army Prime Power School located at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. The year long school is dedicated to teaching power pro duction and transformation. The Mobile Utilities Support Equipment serves a number of supported commanders throughout the Navy and Department of Defense. The equipment specializes in filling short term utility shortfalls, whether they are production (Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, Guantanamo Bay, etc.) or transformation. MUSE deploys in support of USS Enterprises final dry-docking Leveraging credit cards to strengthen your credit score A strong credit score can be an integral part of staying financially secure, whatever the economic climate. But for many U.S. service members, deter mining exactly what has an impact on their score can be a daunting task. One thing is for sure: credit cards can and do impact your credit score positively or negatively depending upon how you use them. In fact, credit cards can be one of your best friends or your worst enemies when it comes to your score. So, how can you make your plastic work for you in the quest for strong credit? Below are some tips on how to use your cards to strengthen or maintain your credit and avoid some pitfalls that may lower your score in a hurry. Manage your debt to credit ratio: Closely watch your credit card balance relative to your credit limit, called your debt to credit ratio. Experts differ about the ideal ratio, but all agree that keeping your debt below 30 percent of your available credit line is key to ensuring your credit score isnt negatively impacted. Check your statement regularly to make sure that your credit line hasnt been reduced by your card company, thus raising your debt to credit ratio. Consider a balance transfer: If youre trying to pay down your balance, explore the option of a balance transfer. A balance transfer at a low rate makes it eas ier to pay down your balance, improving your debt to credit ratio as your balance decreases. Keep an eye out for balance transfers with no fees, zero percent interest during the introductory period and a low rate after the intro period expires. Know that the APR on these offers can jump to above 20 percent after the introductory window though all credit union interest rates are capped at 18 percent. Make all your payments on time: Timely payments establish a track record of reliability and boost credit. If possible, set up automatic monthly payments along with text and email alerts to remind you of your due date. For controlled spending and easy qualification, go with a secured card: If youre wary that a new credit card may make it more difficult to control spend ing, secured cards may be a great solution for you. Theyre also a good option if you have little to no credit or your credit standing is below average. Secured cards require that you provide an up-front deposit, which then equals your credit line. Because secured card limits cannot exceed what you have deposited and tend to be lower than other cards, they help you control your spending. Secured cards also aid you in establishing a track record of on-time pay ments. Be smart about opening and closing accounts: As a general rule, avoid closing any card accounts. Having a higher average age on your credit accounts posi tively impacts your credit score. Beware not to open a large number of credit cards in a short span of time doing so can indicate to lenders that you are overly eager for credit. Pay down your balance as much as possible each month: Fully paying your balance helps you main tain a healthy debt to credit ratio. If its not possible to pay down your entire balance, try to at least pay down some portion to manage your debt and mini mize interest payments. Maintain some level of activity: Make regular pur chases with each of your cards, even if minimal. Complete inactivity can lead to the account being closed. Your credit can even be adversely impacted by inactive cards before the account is shut down. Dont rely on debit or prepaid cards to build credit: Debit and prepaid cards are great additions to your wallet for convenience. However, these cards draw on available funds from an account instead of a line of credit. So using them will not boost your credit. Keeping these tips in mind, you can move forward with a sense of confidence about how to put your cards to work for you. Just remember that credit cards are one of several tools in your toolbelt when it comes to building that solid credit score.Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 9, 2013 17 HSM-35 became the first composite expeditionary heli copter squadron to include both the worlds most techno logically advanced helicop ter; the MH-60R Seahawk and the MQ-8B Fire Scout Vertical Take-off and Landing Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (VTUAV); during an establish ment ceremony today on Naval Air Station North Island. As the Navys first operation al squadron with both manned and unmanned aircraft, HSM35 heralds a new era for Naval Aviation. The squadron, designated the Magicians, adopted the call sign of HSL-35, which was decommissioned at NAS North Island in 1992, after 19 years of service. The reestablishment of this squadron is exceptional as it points toward the future for our Naval Aviation forces, said Commander, Naval Air Forces, Vice Adm. David Buss. The actions today represent a clear line dividing what Naval Aviation once was and what it will be. As the next generation sub marine hunter and anti-sur face warfare helicopter, the MH-60R is the cornerstone of the Navys Helicopter Concept of Operations. The Fire Scout (VTUAV) system provides unique situation awareness and precision target support for the Navy, said Buss. Both new aircraft will embark with the Navys new high speed, agile, shallow-draft Littoral Combat Ship (LCS), which was also recently intro duced to the fleet. The establishment cere mony included the reading of orders by the squadrons first commanding officer, Cmdr. Christopher Hewlett. More than 100 Sailors stood in formation as their unit became an official part of the Navys Pacific Fleet Air Forces. Today we give birth to our new squadron while celebrat ing the legacy of our past, said Hewlett. We honor all the former Magicians of HSL-35, and will continue in the same spirit of war-fighting excellence to pro vide extraordinary support to the fleet. Sixty former HSL-35 mem bers were in attendance, including one command ing officer, retired Capt. George Powell and an original Magicians pilot, retired Capt. Rob Moore. Both shared their enthusi asm about the rebirth of their old squadron. I think the reestablishment is awesome, because almost every single unit I was a part of during my time in the Navy has been decommissioned, said Powell. But now this squadron is coming back, and I think its really neat. The Magicians first mission, beginning this summer, will be to undergo training and devel op guidelines for what will be the Navys standards of opera tion for the expeditionary Fire Scout. According to Buss, the pro cedures set by the Magicians will chart the course for Naval Aviations operating future. The Center for Personal and Professional Development (CPPD) announced April 30 that the American Council on Education (ACE) now recommends college credits for four CPPD courses. A team of academic experts evaluated the following CPPD activities and granted ACE recommended credits for: Task-Based Curriculum Development Course; and the Personal Development Instructor Skills Training, which grants Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) 9518. Both Navy Instructor Training Course, which grants NEC 9502 for Navy Instructor; and Master Training Specialist, were reac credited. According to the ACE website, the purpose of an installation site visit is to review and evalu ate military training (courses) and experiences (occupations). The evaluation team analyzes materials, identifies learning outcomes, and recommends postsecondary credit based on its findings. CPPD Evaluations Manager Swanson Brown hosted and coordinated the teams visit to CPPD in February. An ACE credit review is a thorough process, said Brown. Courses and examina tions are reviewed by carefully selected teams of faculty evalu ators from relevant academic disciplines. If the content, scope and rigor of the course or examination are equivalent to a college-level course, the teams recommend appropriate college credit. According to the ACE website, ACE military reviews bridge the gap between professional military education and post secondary curricula and pro vide parallels for the transfer of the service members acquired learning to current college cur ricula. This facilitates access to academic degrees. Students can use these cred it recommendations to satisfy general education or degree requirements or to demonstrate knowledge and proficiency in a particular subject, said Brown. ACE credit recommenda tions are used as guidelines by colleges and universities, which make their own decisions about awarding credit. The minimum requirement is that the course we want evaluated must be at least 45 hours in length. The benefits of ACE academ ic reviews for military train ing organizations are that they validate the quality of training, create an alignment and consis tency in documenting training across the services and reduce Department of Defense tuition assistance funds. Having ACE recommend college credits for CPPD cours es and curriculum develop ment is a direct reflection of the hard work and dedication of the CPPD active duty and civil ian team, said CPPD CMDCM Kenneth Schmidt. Our team spends long hours refining each module of each course to ensure the informa tion is provided to the fleet is accurate and up to date. Sailors who pass these courses are not only receiving college cred its, they take with them solid foundational teaching skills to implement at their command. To take advantage of ACE rec ommended credits for a specific rating, Sailors should visit the nearest Navy College Office or Educational Service Officer to review their Joint Services Transcript (JST). CPPD is responsible for pro viding a wide range of personal and professional development courses and materials, includ ing General Military Training, Navy instructor training, alco hol and drug awareness pro gram training, suicide and sex ual assault prevention, bystand er intervention, and personal responsibility classes. CPPDs required leadership training is delivered multiple times throughout a Sailors career via command-delivered enlisted leadership training material and officer leadership courses in a schoolhouse set ting. CPPD also administers the Navys voluntary educa tion program, which pro vides Sailors with the oppor tunity to earn college degrees. CPPD additionally manages the United Services Military Apprenticeship Program (USMAP), which offers Sailors the opportunity to earn civilian apprenticeship certifications. Magicians reborn as Navys first squadron to operate manned and unmanned aircraft CPPD courses recommended for ACE accreditation The American Red Cross Northeast Florida Chapter at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville is recruiting for this summers Junior Red Cross volunteers. This offers an opportunity for students inter ested in health careers to train with highly skilled Navy Medicine professionalsphy sicians, nurses, pharmacists, therapists and techniciansas well as contribute to a positive experience for patients. The program is open to high school students age 16-18 who have base access. Volunteers work four to 20 hours per week in the hospital and receive CPR training. Apply online by May 31 at www.neflori daredcross.org Click on volunteer, join us, youth volunteer application (or adult volun teer application for 18 year-old students). Fill out the application, select Northeast Florida Chapter, and create a Volunteer Connection account. After submitting the application, complete the online orientation. All applicants are required to attend a kickoff event (which includes an interview) June 8 at 10 a.m. in the hospitals 2nd deck conference room. For more information, call 542-7525.Junior Red Cross volunteers for summer program

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THURSDAY, MAY 9, 2013 NEW LEADER PUBLIC SERVICE ALL-HANDS CALL Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com On April 25, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville held a Take Back the Night event in recognition of Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Take Back the Night is a time to come together as a community to speak out against sexual assault, domestic vio lence, sexual abuse and all forms of sexual violence. The evening ceremony, at the hospital flagpole, included NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer, Executive Officer Capt. Christine Sears, NAS Jacksonville Executive Officer Capt. Roy Undersander and victim advocates from NAS Jacksonville. Dozens of people participated, hold ing candles in honor of survivors. The event included music, poetry, a silent tribute to victims and sexual assault awareness information. According to the U.S. Department of Justices National Crime Victimization Survey, someone in the U.S. is sexually assaulted every two minutes. These statistics dont include survivors who dont seek help. The U.S. military is far from immune to sexual violence. An estimated 19,000 sexual assaults occur in the military each year, but only about 2,500 are reported. It has no place in the United States military, and certainly not at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, declared Shaffer. It is a violation of everything we stand for and it is an affront to the values we defend. I want every victim to know that the Navy is here to care for you and to support you. We are committed to showing you our solidarity as you heal and become a survivor. An assault victims life is forever changed by violence. Also it causes a ripple effect that can touch the victims family, friends and his or her whole community. Too often, the abused remain silentashamed to speak out about their experiences. Take Back the Night empowers victims to alter their trauma by rever encing the survivor experience while educating the community. In her remarks, NAS Jacksonville Naval Hospital Jacksonville celebrates Take Back The Night In a communication to staff on May 1, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer proclaimed May 5-11 as Public Service Recognition Week (PSRW) in honor of the more than 670 men and women who serve as civil ian staff throughout the commands hospital the Navys fourth largest and five branch health clinics in Florida and Georgia. I call upon all Naval Hospital Jacksonville staff to observe this week by acknowledging the impor tant contributions of our civil service employees, Shaffer stated. Our ability to care for our 57,000 enrolled patients depends in no small degree on the work by those who make up our civil service team. The theme for PSRW 2013 is Why I Serve. This serves as a reminder of how each government employee is important to NH Jacksonvilles ability to achieve its mission to provide force health protection through readiness, operational support, health promotion and quality family centered care. Shaffer emphasized the commitment of the civil ser vice employees who work diligently alongside uniformed staff in every capacity from healing patients as part of a Medical Home Port team to ensuring the proper supplies are available. The federal workforce provides much-needed con tinuity when our active duty staff change duty stations or deploy, said Shaffer. Unfortunately, not many Americans get to see and experience all the great things our federal employees do to guarantee the United States NH Jacksonville honors civil service staff Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert spent May 3 with Sailors and military supporters from northeast Florida to inform them how the current budget and other fiscal challenges may impact the Navys future. Despite rain and gale force winds, the CNOs entourage kept to its sched ule. Following an all-hands call at NS Mayport, they traveled to NAS Jacksonville where Greenert shared the podium with U.S. Rep. Ander Crenshaw (R-Fla.) at a luncheon hosted by regional councils of the Navy League, a civil ian organization that supports men and women of the sea services. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders welcomed Crenshaw and Greenert, as well as Rear Adm. Sinclair Harris, commander U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet; Rear Adm. Joseph Tofalo, commander Submarine Group 10; Rear Adm. Jack Scorby, commander Navy Region Southeast; Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON)(AW/NAC) Mike Stevens; and retired Rear Adm. George Huchting, president, Mayport Navy League. The CNO reiterated that the Navy is focused on rebalancing the AsiaPacific and Mid-East regions. Were undergoing a deliberate metamorpho sis of ship delivery to the Asia-Pacific region that will take place over the next 10 years. That means changes in force structure and capabilities. Antisubmarine warfare will improve soon, when NAS Jacksonvilles VP-16 War Eagles become the first P-8A Poseidon squadron to deploy in support of Pacific Command. Greenert said the P-8As at NAS Jacksonville are on schedule. The Navy plans on having 42 P-8As here by 2019. Change can spur growth, and in our case, were asking congress to fund a net increase of 4,600 Sailors for our next budget, Greenert added. He also assured the audience that, despite the ongoing federal budget crunch, the Navy still plans to move the amphibious transport dock ship USS New York (LPD-21) from NS Norfolk, Va. to NS Mayport by December. The New York is one of three ships that comprise its amphibious ready group (ARG). The other two vessels the amphibious assault ship USS Iwo Jima (LHD 7) and the dock landing ship USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43) are slated to arrive at Mayport by early 2015. The CNO said, This first phase of the ARG move to Mayport underscores the Navys commitment to a strategic dispersal of assets a strategy that your congressman Crenshaw has long advo cated on Capitol Hill. He said, The strategic dispersal of aircraft carriers on the east coast is important. As for the homeporting of an aircraft carrier at NS Mayport, we still want to see that come to fruition but we dont have the money right now. In the meantime, were making sure the Mayport facilities are fully aircraft car CNO talks about future at area bases

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JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS May 9 1926 Lt. Cmdr. Richard Byrd and ADC Floyd Bennett make first flight over North Pole. Both receive Congressional Medal of Honor. 1942 USS Wasp (CV-7) in Mediterranean launches 47 Spitfire fighter aircraft to help defend Malta. May 10 1775 Force under Ethan Allan and Benedict Arnold crosses Lake Champlain and captures British fort at Ticonderoga, N.Y. 1800 USS Constitution captures Letter of Marque Sandwich. 1862 Confederates destroy Norfolk and Pensacola Navy Yards. 1949 First shipboard launching of LARK guided missile by USS Norton Sound (AVM-1). 1960 USS Triton (SSRN-586) completes submerged circumnavigation of world in 84 days following many of the routes taken by Magellan and cruising 46,000 miles. May 11 1862 CSS Virginia blown up by Confederates to prevent capture. 1898 Sailors and Marines from USS Marblehead cut trans-oceanic cable near Cienfuegos, Cuba isolating Cuba from Spain. 1943 Naval task force lands Army troops on Attu, Aleutians. 1965 U.S. destroyers deliver first shore bombard ment of Vietnam War. May 12 1780 Fall of Charleston, S.C. with three Continental Navy frigates (Boston, Providence and Ranger) cap tured; and one American frigate (Queen of France) sunk to prevent capture. 1846 U.S. declares war against Mexico. 1975 American container ship SS Mayaguez is seized by Cambodian Khmer Rouge forces and escorted to Koh Tang Island. 1986 Destroyer USS David R. Ray (DD-971) deters an Iranian Navy attempt to board a U.S. merchant ship. May 13 1908 Navy Nurse Corps established. 1908 Pearl Harbor Navy Yard, later called Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard, was officially established in the Territory of Hawaii as a coaling station for U.S. Navy ships transiting the Pacific Ocean. 1943 Bureau of Navigation renamed Bureau of Naval Personnel. 1945 Aircraft from fast carrier task force begin twoday attack on Kyushu airfields, Japan. 1964 Organization and deployment of worlds first all-nuclear-powered task group (USS Enterprise (CVN-65, USS Long Beach (CGN-9) and USS Bainbridge (CGN-25) to 6th Fleet. May 14 1801 Tripoli declares war against the United States. 1836 U.S. Exploring Expedition authorized to conduct exploration of Pacific Ocean and South Seas, first major scientific expedition overseas. Lt. Charles Wilkes led the expedition in surveying South America, Antarctica, Far East and North Pacific. 1845 First U.S. warship visits Vietnam. While anchored in Danang for provisioning, Capt. John Percival, commanding USS Constitution, conducts a show of force against Vietnamese authorities in an effort to obtain the release of a French priest held prisoner by Emperor of Annam at Hue. 1975 Marines recapture the American merchant ship SS Mayaguez, then go ashore on Koh Tang Island and release the crew. May 15 1800 Capt. Preble, commanding the 32-gun frigate Essex, arrives in Batavia, Java, to escort U.S. merchant ships. 1942 First Naval Air Transport Service flight across Pacific. 1969 Sinking of USSGuitarro (SSN-665). 1991 Amphibious Task Force arrives at Chittagong, Bangladesh, for relief operations after Cyclone Marian. Out of necessity, military spouses have devised creative ways to mark the timepaper chains, journals, jars of M&Msbut last year, while Dustin was deployed overseas for 13 months, I knew I couldnt do this time-honored ritual of counting down the days to his homecoming. I did the countdown thing during Dustins first deployments, and it made me feel like a prisoner etching out the days and weeks on a concrete wall. It was as if my life was in a holding pattern, just waiting (and waiting and waiting and waiting) for my husband to return. But this time, as Dustin boarded an airplane in November 2011, leaving me with three young boys (then ages 10, 8 and 4), I didnt have time to wait. Dustin would miss nine family birthdays, two Thanksgivings, one Christmas and our anniversary. Life had to go on without him. This is when and how Dinner with the Smileys came about. For the boys, the most concrete evidence of life going on without their father was seeing his empty chair at the dinner table. So I said, Lets fill it, even though, at that time, I wasnt sure what I meant by it. The concept evolved and took shape as we went along. We invited a new guest to fill Dustins place at the dinner table for each week that he was gone. The act was both metaphorical and ironic: We were, in fact, counting the weeks something I said I wouldnt dobut at the same time, we were filling up Dustins chair and our lives. We werent in a holding pattern. Very quicklyas in by, basically, Dinner Number One with Senator Susan Collinsit became clear to me that we werent just passing the time. Rather, the boys and I were making memories. What I couldnt see yet, however, was that we were also building a community. Each week, a new role model for the boys sat in their fathers chair and shared stories about their lives and their work. The guests werent replacing Dustin. No one could do that. But they were filling the gaps until he returned, and many of them were becoming significant parts of our lives. Then, about five months into the deployment, something happened which made me realize that the lessons the boys and I were learning were bigger than our family and broader than our community here in Maine. Our 17th dinner was supposed to be with our elderly neighbor who had moved to an assisted living facility after Dustin left. I rescheduled the dinner multiple times because other guests with fast-paced lives seemed to take priority. My neighbor, I figured, wasnt going anywhere. She didnt have a work or travel schedule to maneuver. Dinner with her could be at our convenience. I was wrong. Something happened two weeks before our dinner that would change everything, and Dinner Seventeen became a turning point. Dustin likes to tell me there are no coincidences, and Ive always tried to understand what he means. Then, this one dinner and the events which followed made me a believer. In fact, its when I knew I had to write the book, Dinner with the Smileys, which will be released by Hyperion this week. Briefly, and without doing it much justice, what I can tell you about the dinner is this: We never got to have dinner with our neighbor, and the sadness of that caused my boys to ask if we could spend the afternoon with our other neighbor, then 93-years-old. It would be the last time we saw him as well. Because of Dinner 17, we also met a beautiful couple, Frank and Anita, who would teach us about love, marriage and the many different ways in which someone can be lonely. And (heres where I might start to sound crazy) its fitting that all of this happened at a dinner numbered and named seventeen, because Dustin and I were married on July 17, and we like to claim the number as ours. Silly? Maybe. Until I you read the story about Dustins lost wedding bandfrozen underwater at Mt. Katahdin for 13 monthsand Dinner Number 44. Sometimes I feel like I want back the years my husband was gone during his first deployments. This time, I can honestly say I wouldnt trade the 52 weeks for anything. The things we learned, the experiences the boys and I shared, the people we met these werent coincidences. They were lessons we will carry with us for a lifetime. This week, I hope you will have the opportunity to read Dinner with the Smileys and feel similarly blessed. I look forward to hearing your reactions, and I hope you will also be moved to invite someone to the dinner table.Dinner with the Smileys: A year of unforgettable lessons VP-5 transition spotlightAs VP-5 transitions to the P-8A Poseidon the squadron is high lighting a transitioning Mad Fox each week. This weeks spotlight shines on AM2(AW) Steven Zeiger. Zeiger is from Marlton, N.J. He has two sisters and is recently married. As an aviation structur al mechanic, he is responsible for the entire outside structure of the aircraft including flight controls, tires, and brakes. VP-5 AMs began their tran sition at the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit on Jan. 11 with a fourweek course taught by Boeing instructors. At the conclusion of this course they began onthe-job training on VP-30 P-8A Poseidons. Zeiger was a previously quali fied collateral duty inspector on 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 9, 2013

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the P-3C and was leaned upon to gain the same qualification with the P-8A. This qualification allows him to sign off work done by the AM shop on a Poseidon. Our responsibilities remain mostly the same with the P-8 with one difference, said Zeiger. Until we receive a manual, structural repairs to the P-8s panels must be completed by qualified civilian contractors on base. Depending on the damage done to the panels this can be both a costly and time-consuming process. He emphasized that they take this added responsi bility very seriously to keep the Poseidons in the air. VP-5 has been transitioning to the P-8A Poseidon since Jan. 4, 2013. SPOTLIGHT Fighting Tigers change of command ThursdayVP-8 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Michael Marston will transfer command of the Fighting Tigers to Cmdr. Todd Libby May 9 at 10 a.m. in NAS Jacksonville Hangar 117. Libby, the current executive officer of VP-8, hails from Newburgh, Maine. His previous sea assignments include a tour on board USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) and tours with VP-10 and VP-8 in Brunswick, Maine. He served on shore duty at the Naval War College, the Bureau of Personnel, and on the staff of Commander, Fleet Air Keflavik, Iceland. As commanding officer, Marston led the Fighting Tigers through a highly successful tri-site deploy ment across two Combatant Commanders Areas of Responsibility. Employing the P-3C Orion against surface, subsurface, overland, and counter-drug threats, his Fighting Tiger team flew more than 650 missions and 3,065 hours. Since returning from deployment last December, Cmdr. Marstons squadron has supported two Presidential detachments and three exercises critical to carrier or expeditionary strike group deployments. NAS Jacksonville and the Northeast Florida Navy League Councils will host the Individual Augmentee (IA) Recognition Luncheon May 16 at 11 a.m. at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center. During this luncheon, all NAS Jax and tenant command Sailors who have returned from an IA assignment within the last six months will be recognized. There is no cost for IAs and their spouses. The cost for other military and civilian guests is $10. Tickets may be purchased at the Fleet and Family Support Center, Monday-Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. The deadline to purchase tickets is May 8. Childcare will be provided at the Child Development Center for children of IAs in attendance. Please call 542-8667 to reserve childcare. Pre-registration is required. To RSVP, contact your command Command Individual Augmentee Coordinator or Bobby Johns at bobby.johns.ctr@navy.mil or 542-5745.Individual Augmentee luncheon set for May 16 Volunteers needed for Never Quit eventNavy Recruiting District Jacksonville needs 30 volunteers to assist with the Warrior Challenge and an additional 75 officers and chief petty officers to facilitate the red carpet awards during the 2013 Never Quit Beach event May 19 from 5:45 a.m. to 3 p.m. All volunteers will receive a free Never Quit run ning shirt. For more information, call or email MC1 Brianna Dandridge at 396-5909, Ext 1150. May 10 is military spouse appreciation day, a day when we officially recognize the contributions of the husbands and wives who serve their country along side us. Please take a moment to reflect on the love and care our spouses generously offer and reaffirm your gratitude for their tireless support. Our loved ones volunteer for the formidable task of waiting for us and managing the home while we answer the call of service to our nation. Their sacrifice and devotion to the navy family are invaluable in keeping our families and Sailors on course and on speed. And so on Military Spouse Appreciation Day, please make it a priority to demonstrate your appreciation and show your spouses how much they are treasured. Never discount the personal sacrifices they make each day for our families and nation to ensure we remain the worlds greatest Navy. To all of you, Darleen and I thank you for your service.Military Spouse Appreciation Day is May 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 9, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 9, 2013 Honoring public servants DoD civilians shineIn my naval career so far, Ive been stationed at a number of outstanding bases, so I can definitely say that Ive never worked with Department of Defense (DoD) civil service employees who are so focused on and sup portive of our military members, as those aboard our installation, said NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders, during an April 30 interview in his headquarters office. He said that Public Service Recognition Week (May 511) is a great time to call attention to the important contributions of NAS Jacksonville civil service employees. Our skilled and resource ful DoD civilian personnel are invaluable when it comes to providing continuity for an array of services that support the warfighter, maintain base infrastructure, and assist Sailors and their families with quality of life issues, said Sanders. He added, I know that the leaders of our tenant commands agree with me when I say our civilian workforce deserves thanks throughout the year especially during Public Service Recognition Week so we invite service members and others to honor our DoD civilians for the vital work they do each and every day. More than 7,000 civilian employees pass through the gates of NAS Jacksonville daily to bring their skills to commands such as Naval Hospital Jacksonville, Fleet Readiness Center Southeast, Naval Supply Systems Command Fleet Logistics Center, Navy Region Southeast, Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11, Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing Atlantic detach ments, and VP-30, the Navys maritime patrol fleet replacement squadron where the P-3C Orion aircraft is being transitioned to the P-8A Poseidon.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 9, 2013 5 government remains unsurpassed. Thank you to each of our civilian staff for your selfless service to Naval Hospital Jacksonville and our nation. As Theodore Roosevelt who led the reform of the civil service system stated, The government is us; we are the government, you and I. PUBLIC SERVICE

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Sexual Assault Response Coordinator Tina Vaughn recalled how she began as a volunteer with the Womens Center of Jacksonvilles Rape Crisis Program. She has witnessed the renaissance of many victimstheir self and their spirit. I do not believe trauma, specifically sexual vio lence, has to mean that one moves forward as less than what they have known themselves to be, she said. I do this work because I am honored and privileged to hold space for what becomes a spiritual, physical, emotional and mental reckoning; because I do not believe in ends. I believe in cycles, because I have witnessed enough women and men stand up after sexual violence, taller than they themselves ever imag ined, Vaughn concluded. Sexual violence is a widespread issue affecting all populations regardless of gender, race, age or socio economic status. Most often, the offender is not a criminal in a dark alley, but rather a shipmate, neighbor, acquaintance, family member or intimate part ner. According to the Department of Defense Safe Helpline, there are many steps to reduce the risk of sexual assault. To practice risk reduction, both women and men can: be moderate if using alcohol, dont leave a beverage unattended or accept open drinks from others, communicate limits clearly from the begin ning, tell a close friend about plans if going out with a new person, have extra money to get home, end a situation if its uncomfortable, travel with friends and watch out for each other, be aware of surroundings, dont get isolated with someone unknown, walk in lighted areas and keep doors and cars locked. And everyone has the right to say no even if they first say yes, have been kissing, have had sex before, and regardless of clothing type. Every person in the United States Navy must be committed to eliminating sexual assault from our ranks, affirms Shaffer. Together, our goal is to pre vent and respond to this crime in order to enable military readiness and to reduce-with a goal to eliminatesexual assault from the military. Anyone in immediate danger should call 911 (in the U.S.). For confidential help, support or to learn how to intervene or help (any time of day or night from any location) contact DoDs Safe Helpline at www.safe helpline.org or (877) 995-5247 (DSN 94 + 877-995-5247) or text 55247. For NAS Jacksonville, contact (912) 467-1979 or 5424717. For NH Jacksonville, contact 542-9030. TAKE BACK Teen driving class offeredThe NAS Jacksonville Safety Office is offering a driver improvement class specifically for dependent young drivers between the age of 15 and 21 years old June 14 from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. The class will be held in the Safety Conference Room in Building 1. Participants do not have to have a drivers license to attend. The class will offer safety tips such as how to respond to driving emergencies and distracted driving while bringing awareness to risks of driving and much more. The class consists of videos, chapter quizzes and concludes with a multiple choice question test. There will not be any time behind the wheel; this is class room only. The teens will receive an AAA Driver Improvement Class completion certificate. If you feel your teen could benefit from this class, sign them up by calling Linda at 542-3082, Cindy at 542-2584 or Kristen at 542-8810. 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 9, 2013

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Celebrated during the first week of May since 1985, Public Service Recognition Week is time set aside to honor the men and women who serve our nation as federal, state, county and local government employ ees and ensure that our government is the best in the world. Here are some of Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles staff stories about why they answered the call to serve in government and what accomplishments they are most proud of in their time as public servants: The Navy Exchange (NEX) wants to help its customers finance their childrens college education through its A-OK Student Reward Program. All qualified students will participate in a quarterly drawing for monetary awards of $2,500, $1,500, $1,000 or $500 for a total of $5,500 per quarter. The next drawing will be held at the end of May 2013. Any eligible full-time student that has a B-grade point average equivalent or better, as determined by their school system, may enter the drawing. Eligible students include dependent children of active duty military members, reservists and military retirees enrolled in first through 12th grade. Dependent children without an individ ual Dependent Identification Card must be accompanied by their sponsor to submit their entry. Each student may enter only once each grading period and must re-enter with each qualifying report card. To enter the drawing, stop by any NEX with a current report card and have a NEX associate verify the minimum grade average. Then fill out an entry card and obtain an A-OK ID, which entitles the student to discount cou pons for NEX products and services. The Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) has been offering students a chance to pay for college through its A-OK Student Reward Program since 1997. Since the program began, NEXCOM has awarded over $600,000 in Series EE U.S. sav ings bonds and monetary awards with the help of its generous vendor partners. NEX rewards students with A-OK Student Reward ProgramWhat does public service mean to you?Naval Hospital Jacksonville offers some thoughts The J. Wayne and Delores Barr Weaver Veterans Emergency and Transition Services Fund provides emergency financial assistance and resources to vet erans of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom that will help to sup port their transition into civil ian life and stabilization into the community. This financial assistance is provided directly to the veterans of these wars.The geographic service area is: Duval, Clay, Nassau, Baker and St. Johns counties. Types of emergency needs we help with but not strictly limited too: Emergency travel Temporary lodging Essential transportation/ needs/vehicle payment or repair, insurance Urgent medical/dental needs Food/rent Utility deposits/payments Moving expenses Childcare for a veteran par ent needing to find work or learn a life skill For more information, contact a Red Cross Military Services caseworker at 246-1395.Financial aid available for veterans 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 9, 2013

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Some 290,000 veterans and mili tary spouses have been hired since the inception of the Joining Forces initiative two years ago, nearly tripling the initial goal, first lady Michelle Obama announced April 30. Numerous businesses also have vowed to hire or train an additional 435,000 people during the next five years, she added during a White House briefing. The first lady and Dr. Jill Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden, established Joining Forces in June 2011 to mobilize support from every sector of American society to help service members, their families and veterans. [Michelle and Jill] identify so deeply with these military families because they understand the sacrifices that theyre making, President Barack Obama said at the announcement event. The president acknowledged Cabinet members, the Joint Chiefs of Staff and other top military leaders in the audi ence. We appreciate all the great work that [youre] doing, he said, and your presence reflects our commitment to this cause across the entire government. I applaud the first ladys and Dr. Bidens leadership in challenging U.S. businesses to employ Americas vet erans and military spouses, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said in a state ment released after the event. Their announcement today demonstrates that American companies can bene fit greatly from the highly skilled and hard-working members of our military family. Hagel also said he welcomes the commitment of businesses to hire or train an additional 435,000 individuals dur ing the next five years, and he pledged that the Defense Department will do its part. [I] am committed to ensuring that our service members transitioning to civilian life and our military spouses have the support they richly deserve when it comes to finding a job, pursuing an education, or starting a business, Hagel said. Noting that more remains to be done, the president said employment continues to lag behind the national average for post-9/11 veterans, especially for the youngest veterans. This does not make any sense, he said. If you can save a life on the battlefield, then you sure as heck can save one in an ambulance in a state-of-the-art hospital. If you can oversee a convoy of equipment and track millions of dollars of assets, then you can run a compa nys supply chain or you can balance its books. If you can lead a platoon in a war zone, then I think you can lead a team in a conference center. The vice president said the nation owes much to those who have served. Theres only one truly sacred obli gation in my view, and thats to equip those we send to war and care for those who come home from war and their families, he said. And quoting the president, he added, No one who fights for this country overseas should have to come home and fight for a job when they come back home. Dr. Biden said she and the first lady have had the incredible honor of meeting military spouses all around the country. Im always amazed by their strength, their commitment, and, most impor tantly, by their resilience, she said. She added that shes learned a lot about the strength of military fami lies. What stands out the most [is] they never complain, she said. Whatever the situation, they keep on serv ing, doing whatever needs to be done. Military spouses have so much to offer -their skills, their incredible work ethic, and perhaps most of all, their endless energy. The first lady said Joining Forces began with a challenge to every seg ment of society to commit to support ing military families, and since then, the nation has joined forces in many amazing ways. We have seen doctors and nurses take bold new steps to care for the families affected by [post-traumatic stress disorder] and traumatic brain injuries, she said. Weve seen colleges sign up to train teachers to be more respon sive to the needs of our military chil dren in their classrooms. Weve seen community groups and houses of wor ship and citizens from every walk of life show their appreciation for our military families, not just with words, but with deeds. Todays event provided a chance to recognize the tremendous efforts of business across the country, the first lady said. These efforts are about so much more than a paycheck, she added. This is about giving these men and women a source of identity and pur pose. Its about providing thousands of families with financial security, and giving our veterans and military spouses the confidence that they can provide a better future for their children. Today is simply just a mile marker, and were not going to stop until every single veteran or military spouse that is searching for a job has found one, she added. We will stand with you now and for decades to come.Employment numbers nearly triple initial Joining Forces goal JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 9, 2013 9

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rier capable. During the Q&A session, Greenert was asked about the status of the Navys next generation of shipboard weapons the electromagnetic railgun and the highenergy laser. Railguns are capable of sending projectiles a dis tance of 100+ nautical miles at speeds of up to 5,600 mph almost eight times farther and two times faster than conventional guns. Recent tests proved that ship-mounted electric lasers can be integrated into a navy ships radar and navigation system to target and incinerate enemy vessels at sea. Development teams from the Office of Naval Research have successfully test-fired both weap on systems at targets in a maritime environment, Greenert told the audience. The prototype laser system will be deployed in 2014 for additional tests aboard the afloat forward staging base USS Ponce (AFSB(I)15). By the way, the cost of one blast of directed energy from a laser is estimated at just 85 cents a real budget helper. As of today, the railgun and the laser will augment, but not replace, traditional shipboard weapon sys tems, said Greenert. He added that another technological advance ment is countering the wake-homing torpedo used against high-value ships, such as aircraft carriers, to detect torpedoes well before impact. He explained that wake-homing torpedoes detect the turbulence of a ships wake and follow it to the ships stern before detonation. Many navies, including those of China, North Korea and Iran, arm their submarines with wakehoming torpedoes, Greenert said. We now have a prototype system to defeat the wake-homing torpedo that will deploy later this year with the aircraft carrier USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). After the luncheon, Crenshaw and Greenert attended a media-availability with reporters. Greenert was asked about President Barack Obamas 2014 defense budget that includes a proposed round of additional base closures and realignments by 2015. While I support the BRAC concept of operating most efficiently, as chief of the Navy, I look around and dont see any dramatic need or area that requires closure at this time, said Greenert. The congressman also responded to the question, saying that he did not believe there was much of an appetite in Congress to close military bases or facili ties. Crenshaw, a member of the House Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, concluded, Its been a pleasure for me to welcome the CNO to our region. He made it clear today that installations in northeast Florida and southeast Georgia are very much a part of the Navys future. From the new littoral combat ships that will call Mayport home, to the new P-8 Poseidon aircraft that are already flying from NAS Jacksonville, our region provides unparalleled support of Americas military. Adm. Greenert is a great friend and partner as we work together to meet our national security requirements. CNO VISIT Nearly 2,500 Sailors from NAS Jacksonville and ten ant commands attended an all-hands call with Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON)(AW/NAC) Mike Stevens May 3. Before addressing numerous questions from local Sailors and from around the world via live streaming, Greenert proudly gave the oath to 16 petty officers who chose to be reenlisted by the CNO during the event. After swearing them in, the CNO and MCPON greeted each of the Sailors and pre sented them with coins. First, I want to thank all the family members here today and want to reassure that we will continue to support the Navys family programs, said Greenert. Many of you have concerns about the budget so I want to clarify a few things. We now have a budget for this year which means we are paying our previous debts and are reengaging ship deployments. Training and maintenance for next years deployments is also set. Greenert continued, We are also currently looking at the 2014 budget which could mean more reductions, but we have time to work on reshaping our military and have a much bet ter understanding on how to prioritize to get the job done. As the floor opened up for questions and answers, Sailors discussed such topics as bud get cuts due to sequestration, Navy entitlements, Individual Augmentee (IA) deployments, ship deployment rotations, promotion opportunities, tuition assistance, retirement reform and changes to uniform regulations. IAs will continue to draw down in the future and be filled by Reservists. There are certain skill sets that will still be deployed like those in the medical, logistics, intel ligence and Seabee fields but we are filling more of these billets with volunteers from the Reserves, stated Greenert. Stevens took on several questions such as, Is the Navy happy with the number of enlisted members, specifically in the different ranks and how is retention going to be affected in the future. We are working very hard to get the right people in the right jobs, said Stevens. We are finding that about 20 percent of the enlisted rates are more challenging to fill right now. As for managing enlisted careers, we are creating a single source a new program that should roll-out in June that should help all of us to better manage our careers. Ensign Winston Massey of VP-30 told the CNO that his dream was to become an astronaut and wondered about the future of the Navys space program. We have a need for payloads in space and have a program developing to replace the con stellation (payloads/satellites) currently up there. Its cur rently under discussion what branch should operate the program. But good luck with your dream, Greenert told the young ensign. To close out the all-hands call, Stevens reminded the Sailors to treat one another with decency and respect. I am confident that we will see ourselves through these chal lenging times and continue to CNO, MCPON hold all-hands call at NAS Jax 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 9, 2013

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be the greatest Navy in the world. Greenert added, Thank you for your time. You are all doing a great job. Keep up the good work. After the all-hands call, Greenert gathered with the Sailors he reenlisted and their families for a group photo and thanked them for their dedicated ser vice. ALL HANDS DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Deweys Free Spring Concert Series 7 p.m. on the outdoor stage May 10 7th Street Band May 17 Zero-NFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Thursday Color Pin Bowling 510 p.m. $2 games shoes not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 12 6 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor Pool Hours Open Monday Friday (lap swim only) During lap swim only the waterslide, water park and concessions will not be open. 6 a.m. 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 7 p.m. Saturday & Sunday (recreation swimming) 11 a.m. 6 p.m. 2013 Learn to Swim Program Sign-up at the Gym (the Zone) May 11, 8 a.m. 3 p.m. Session 1: June 1020 Session 2 July 8-18 Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Disney Cruise Lines will be at ITT June 11, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Learn more about exciting 2013/14 trips sailing from Port Canaveral, Miami, Galveston, Barcelona, San Juan and Vancouver. Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Daytona International Speedway Subway Firecracker July 5 and Coke 400 July 6 Tickets on sale now! Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Funkfest Metropolitan Park May 10-11 Two-day ticket $52 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3, 2013 Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7, 2013 Blockout Dates: March 23 April 5, 2013 Call for pricing Jacksonville Symphony $27.50Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT$19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline 2013 Live Broadway Series American Idiot May 14 & 15 $25 $62 Dream Girls May 21 Cesar Millan June 1 $42 $52 MOSH $7 $12 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through May 15 and must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about our special discounted tickets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park One day pass $30, Gold pass $71 Book Shade of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Barracks Bash May 9, 4 8 p.m. Free food, entertainment and prizes! The Players Championship May 11 at 11 a.m. Paintball Trip May 18 at 9 a.m. Universal Studios Weekend Trip May 25-26NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees May 21 for active duty May 9 & 23 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Loudmouth Thursday Any golfer wearing a pair of loudmouth shorts or pants plays 18 holes with cart for $20 Open to military, DoD and guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina May 18, 19, 25 & 26 June 15, 16, 22 & 23 July 20, 21, 27 & 28 Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Movie Under the Stars Featuring The Croods May 24 at 8:30 p.m. Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School June 3 July 10 $500 per person For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy. mil. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 9, 2013 13

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All 40 Navy Lodges worldwide now offer free Wi-Fi to its guests. Guests can now access the free Wi-Fi in their rooms as well as the common areas within the Navy Lodge. We want our guests to have all the amenities they come to expect when theyre away from home, said Michael Bockelman, vice president, Navy Exchange Service Commands (NEXCOM) Navy Lodge Program. By offering free Wi-Fi, guests will be able to keep in touch with loved ones back home or do work on the road much easier. This is anoth er great value Navy Lodge guests receive when they stay with us. Navy Lodges offer family suites and oversized guest rooms that fea ture a kitchenette complete with microwave and utensils, cable TV with premium channels and DVD player. Navy Lodges offer guests house keeping service, vending machines, DVD rental service and laundry facilities as well as handicapped accessible rooms. Guests also have in-room coffee, breakfast in the lobby and newspa per as well as convenient on-base parking while staying at a Navy Lodge. Most Navy Lodges also accept cats and dogs up to 50 pounds. Having access to the Navy Lodge is so important for our military members on permanent change of station orders, said Robert Bianchi, chief executive officer, NEXCOM. Navy Lodges are an important quality of life benefit for our men and women in uniform. We are always looking for ways we can enhance our guests stay at one of our Navy Lodges. Offering free Wi-Fi to our guests makes staying at a Navy Lodge an even greater value for our guests. To make a reservation at a Navy Lodge, call 800-628-9466 (800-NAVY-INN), 24 hours a day, seven days a week or go online at www.navy-lodge.com For other military lodging options go to www.dodlodging.com Pentagon officials yesterday approved the security technical implementation guides for BlackBerry 10 smartphones and BlackBerry PlayBook tablets with BlackBerry Enterprise Service 10, as well as Samsungs Android Knox, to be used on Defense Department networks. This is a significant step towards establishing a multivendor environ ment that supports a variety of stateof-the-art devices and operating systems, Air Force Lt. Col. Damien Pickart, a Pentagon spokesman, said in a statement announcing the approval. Several mobile devices and oper ating systems are going through the Defense Information Systems Agencys review and approval pro cess. A security technical implemen tation guide approval establishes a configuration that allows a secure connection to DOD networks, which facilitates the process by eliminating the need for security reviews at the individual organization level, Pickart explained. However, he added, yesterdays decision does not result in product orders. The level of security necessary throughout the department does not rest solely on any one mobile device, Pickart said, adding that the network and software also must be secured and managed appropriately. An integral part of the secure mobility framework will be the Mobility Device Management and Mobile Application Store, which is in source selection now and anticipated for award in early summer, he said. We are pleased to add Blackberry 10 and the Samsung Knox version of Android to our family of mobile devices supporting the Department of Defense, the spokesman said. We look forward to additional vendors also participating in this process, further enabling a diversity of mobile devices for use within the depart ment. Navy Lodges now offer free Wi-Fi to guestsOfficials approve implementation guides for mobile devices 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 9, 2013

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 9, 2013 Navy accepting STA-21 applications The Seaman-to-Admiral (STA-21) commissioning program, which provides an opportunity for qualified Sailors to receive college educations and Navy com missions, is soliciting applications for fiscal year 2014, as announced in NAVADMIN 102/13 April 23. The deadline for submitting application packages is July 1. We are proud of the STA-21 program and the amazing Sailors who receive their commissions through it, said Rear Adm. Dee Mewbourne, commander, Naval Service Training Command (NSTC). STA-21 officer candidates and their families ben efit from the educational opportunity afforded them at our nations premier universities. Completing their degree in 36 months, they remain on active duty with full pay and allowances and the Navy pays up to $10,000 per year in support of their tuition, fees and books. STA-21 is truly an investment in Sailors as it shapes our future officer corps. Application packages must be postmarked on or before the July 1 deadline date. Early submission is preferred, as this will allow feedback to the Sailor for submission of missing or illegible documents. The deadline for submission of additional documentation to an applicants package is August 1. Before earning their degrees, STA-21 applicants must attend the Naval Science Institute (NSI) course at Officer Training Command (OTC), Naval Station Newport, R.I., prior to beginning college studies at an NROTC-affiliated college or university. STA-21/NSI is an eight-week course of intense offi cer preparation and indoctrination. Course enroll ment is timed to allow college entrance during sum mer or fall semesters/quarters after selection. I assessed what I could do in my rate as a Machinists Mate compared to what I could do as an officer and I felt I could contribute the most to the Navy by joining the officer ranks, said officer can didate and former Machinists Mate 3rd Class Joseph Page, 21, from Indianapolis. I thought becoming an officer would maximize my qualities and my potential and thats how I could give the most to the Navy. Page, who came from Nuclear Prototype School in Charleston, S. C., plans on attending the Citadel Military College in Charleston and then join the Navys submarine community. This has been a great learning experience for me, said Page. I havent been out in the fleet yet but STA21 and NSI has been a great place to gather informa tion from those in my class that came from the fleet. I received a lot of valuable input from my classmates and got a feel for what Ill need to do once I get to the fleet as an officer. Both Page and ET3 and Officer Candidate Brianna Smith, 22, from Erie, Pa., were put in charge of their class of 50 officer candidates. It was an amazing opportunity and has been a great experience and will help prepare us for whats to come, said Smith. You get your college education while learning about leadership roles. Smith plans on attending North Carolina State University in Raleigh, N.C., and then looks to be a Nuclear Warfare Officer on a ship or submarine out of Naval Station Norfolk, Va. Smith also attended Nuclear Prototype School but in Ballston Spa, N. Y., before attending STA-21/NSI in Newport. The STA-21 program benefits Sailors as well as the Navy. The average candidate has at least two years and in most cases more than four years of observed performance which assists in the process of selecting the most qualified Sailors to receive a commission. Additionally, STA-21 candidates are on average older than most midshipmen, bringing a maturity directly reflected in the more than 90 percent completion rate STA-21 program candidates boast. Many Sailors involved in the STA-21 program already have some college credit, and some candidates finish ahead of the three years allotted to earn a degree. Students reporting for NSI should expect an intense academic program, said Lt. Jason Gilmore, assistant operations officer and head of this years STA-21/NSI class. In eight short weeks they will complete six cur riculum modules. It would be real easy for a student to fall behind if they dont arrive ready to hit the books. Our intent at NSI is not only to provide these students with a solid basis in Naval Science, but to also establish a foundation of good study habits in an intense academic environment as these students adjust from life in the fleet to life at a University. In the STA-21 program, as it is in many competitive selection processes, it is often a candidates extra efforts which can result in selection. Lt. Justin Neff, a division officer and NSI instruc tor at OTC, called the STA-21 program an awesome opportunity for motivated Sailors that are looking to get an education, and advance their career. Neff, who was in one of the first STA-21 class at OTC Newport in March 2003 and commissioned after graduating from Old Dominion University in May 2006 also said, One of the best things about STA-21 is that it is your job to go to school. You dont have to worry about pay or housing or standing watches on a ship or sub. You go to school and in three years (or less) you can earn your degree and a commission. Neff was a Gas Turbine Systems Technician (Electrical) 1st Class when he applied for STA-21. I wanted to get the most out of my Navy career and for me, Seaman-to-Admiral was the best way to go, said Neff. STA-21 has opened the door for a wealth of opportunities for me. Selectees will be announced by a NAVADMIN in October. Questions concerning this program should be directed to command career counselors or to the NSTC Officer Development directorate at (850) 4529563. Three U.S. Navy Seabee Mobile Utilities Support Equipment (MUSE) technicians arrived in Virginia April 29 to assist the final dry-docking for USS Enterprise (CVN 65). The technicians will utilize three recently com pleted 2500kVA substations to aid the shipyard in this process for the Navys oldest and largest nuclear powered aircraft carrier. After more than 50 years of service, the Enterprise will undergo her final de-fueling availability in June at Newport News Shipbuilding (NNS), Newport News, Va. We are humbled to support the Enterprise final dry-docking, said Naval Facilities Engineering Command EXWC Commanding Officer Capt. Brant Pickrell. EXWC MUSE transformers will provide the ship with 450 VAC (volts, alternating current) shore power as the shipyard is wired to use only 4160 VAC supply. These substations will support pier-side berth ing of Enterprises supporting fleet operations and provide cold iron support. The technicians began substation installation on April 29, with an expected completion date of May 3. EXWCs MUSE is a specialized unit based at Port Hueneme, Calif. All MUSE technicians are selected from Seabee rates to attend the Army Prime Power School located at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. The yearlong school is dedicated to teaching power pro duction and transformation. The Mobile Utilities Support Equipment serves a number of supported commanders throughout the Navy and Department of Defense. The equipment specializes in filling short term utility shortfalls, whether they are production (Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, Guantanamo Bay, etc.) or transformation. MUSE deploys in support of USS Enterprises final dry-docking Leveraging credit cards to strengthen your credit score A strong credit score can be an integral part of staying financially secure, whatever the economic climate. But for many U.S. service members, deter mining exactly what has an impact on their score can be a daunting task. One thing is for sure: credit cards can and do impact your credit score positively or negatively depending upon how you use them. In fact, credit cards can be one of your best friends or your worst enemies when it comes to your score. So, how can you make your plastic work for you in the quest for strong credit? Below are some tips on how to use your cards to strengthen or maintain your credit and avoid some pitfalls that may lower your score in a hurry. Manage your debt to credit ratio: Closely watch your credit card balance relative to your credit limit, called your debt to credit ratio. Experts differ about the ideal ratio, but all agree that keeping your debt below 30 percent of your available credit line is key to ensuring your credit score isnt negatively impacted. Check your statement regularly to make sure that your credit line hasnt been reduced by your card company, thus raising your debt to credit ratio. Consider a balance transfer: If youre trying to pay down your balance, explore the option of a balance transfer. A balance transfer at a low rate makes it easier to pay down your balance, improving your debt to credit ratio as your balance decreases. Keep an eye out for balance transfers with no fees, zero percent interest during the introductory period and a low rate after the intro period expires. Know that the APR on these offers can jump to above 20 percent after the introductory window though all credit union interest rates are capped at 18 percent. Make all your payments on time: Timely payments establish a track record of reliability and boost credit. If possible, set up automatic monthly payments along with text and email alerts to remind you of your due date. For controlled spending and easy qualification, go with a secured card: If youre wary that a new credit card may make it more difficult to control spend ing, secured cards may be a great solution for you. Theyre also a good option if you have little to no credit or your credit standing is below average. Secured cards require that you provide an up-front deposit, which then equals your credit line. Because secured card limits cannot exceed what you have deposited and tend to be lower than other cards, they help you control your spending. Secured cards also aid you in establishing a track record of on-time payments. Be smart about opening and closing accounts: As a general rule, avoid closing any card accounts. Having a higher average age on your credit accounts posi tively impacts your credit score. Beware not to open a large number of credit cards in a short span of time doing so can indicate to lenders that you are overly eager for credit. Pay down your balance as much as possible each month: Fully paying your balance helps you main tain a healthy debt to credit ratio. If its not possible to pay down your entire balance, try to at least pay down some portion to manage your debt and mini mize interest payments. Maintain some level of activity: Make regular purchases with each of your cards, even if minimal. Complete inactivity can lead to the account being closed. Your credit can even be adversely impacted by inactive cards before the account is shut down. Dont rely on debit or prepaid cards to build credit: Debit and prepaid cards are great additions to your wallet for convenience. However, these cards draw on available funds from an account instead of a line of credit. So using them will not boost your credit. Keeping these tips in mind, you can move forward with a sense of confidence about how to put your cards to work for you. Just remember that credit cards are one of several tools in your toolbelt when it comes to building that solid credit score.Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal government officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 9, 2013 17 HSM-35 became the first composite expeditionary heli copter squadron to include both the worlds most techno logically advanced helicop ter; the MH-60R Seahawk and the MQ-8B Fire Scout Vertical Take-off and Landing Tactical Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (VTUAV); during an establish ment ceremony today on Naval Air Station North Island. As the Navys first operational squadron with both manned and unmanned aircraft, HSM35 heralds a new era for Naval Aviation. The squadron, designated the Magicians, adopted the call sign of HSL-35, which was decommissioned at NAS North Island in 1992, after 19 years of service. The reestablishment of this squadron is exceptional as it points toward the future for our Naval Aviation forces, said Commander, Naval Air Forces, Vice Adm. David Buss. The actions today represent a clear line dividing what Naval Aviation once was and what it will be. As the next generation sub marine hunter and anti-sur face warfare helicopter, the MH-60R is the cornerstone of the Navys Helicopter Concept of Operations. The Fire Scout (VTUAV) system provides unique situation awareness and precision target support for the Navy, said Buss. Both new aircraft will embark with the Navys new high speed, agile, shallow-draft Littoral Combat Ship (LCS), which was also recently intro duced to the fleet. The establishment cere mony included the reading of orders by the squadrons first commanding officer, Cmdr. Christopher Hewlett. More than 100 Sailors stood in formation as their unit became an official part of the Navys Pacific Fleet Air Forces. Today we give birth to our new squadron while celebrat ing the legacy of our past, said Hewlett. We honor all the former Magicians of HSL-35, and will continue in the same spirit of war-fighting excellence to provide extraordinary support to the fleet. Sixty former HSL-35 mem bers were in attendance, including one command ing officer, retired Capt. George Powell and an original Magicians pilot, retired Capt. Rob Moore. Both shared their enthusi asm about the rebirth of their old squadron. I think the reestablishment is awesome, because almost every single unit I was a part of during my time in the Navy has been decommissioned, said Powell. But now this squadron is coming back, and I think its really neat. The Magicians first mission, beginning this summer, will be to undergo training and develop guidelines for what will be the Navys standards of operation for the expeditionary Fire Scout. According to Buss, the pro cedures set by the Magicians will chart the course for Naval Aviations operating future. The Center for Personal and Professional Development (CPPD) announced April 30 that the American Council on Education (ACE) now recommends college credits for four CPPD courses. A team of academic experts evaluated the following CPPD activities and granted ACE recommended credits for: Task-Based Curriculum Development Course; and the Personal Development Instructor Skills Training, which grants Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) 9518. Both Navy Instructor Training Course, which grants NEC 9502 for Navy Instructor; and Master Training Specialist, were reac credited. According to the ACE website, the purpose of an installation site visit is to review and evaluate military training (courses) and experiences (occupations). The evaluation team analyzes materials, identifies learning outcomes, and recommends postsecondary credit based on its findings. CPPD Evaluations Manager Swanson Brown hosted and coordinated the teams visit to CPPD in February. An ACE credit review is a thorough process, said Brown. Courses and examina tions are reviewed by carefully selected teams of faculty evaluators from relevant academic disciplines. If the content, scope and rigor of the course or examination are equivalent to a college-level course, the teams recommend appropriate college credit. According to the ACE website, ACE military reviews bridge the gap between professional military education and post secondary curricula and pro vide parallels for the transfer of the service members acquired learning to current college curricula. This facilitates access to academic degrees. Students can use these credit recommendations to satisfy general education or degree requirements or to demonstrate knowledge and proficiency in a particular subject, said Brown. ACE credit recommenda tions are used as guidelines by colleges and universities, which make their own decisions about awarding credit. The minimum requirement is that the course we want evaluated must be at least 45 hours in length. The benefits of ACE academic reviews for military train ing organizations are that they validate the quality of training, create an alignment and consistency in documenting training across the services and reduce Department of Defense tuition assistance funds. Having ACE recommend college credits for CPPD courses and curriculum develop ment is a direct reflection of the hard work and dedication of the CPPD active duty and civilian team, said CPPD CMDCM Kenneth Schmidt. Our team spends long hours refining each module of each course to ensure the informa tion is provided to the fleet is accurate and up to date. Sailors who pass these courses are not only receiving college cred its, they take with them solid foundational teaching skills to implement at their command. To take advantage of ACE recommended credits for a specific rating, Sailors should visit the nearest Navy College Office or Educational Service Officer to review their Joint Services Transcript (JST). CPPD is responsible for pro viding a wide range of personal and professional development courses and materials, includ ing General Military Training, Navy instructor training, alco hol and drug awareness pro gram training, suicide and sex ual assault prevention, bystander intervention, and personal responsibility classes. CPPDs required leadership training is delivered multiple times throughout a Sailors career via command-delivered enlisted leadership training material and officer leadership courses in a schoolhouse set ting. CPPD also administers the Navys voluntary educa tion program, which pro vides Sailors with the oppor tunity to earn college degrees. CPPD additionally manages the United Services Military Apprenticeship Program (USMAP), which offers Sailors the opportunity to earn civilian apprenticeship certifications. Magicians reborn as Navys first squadron to operate manned and unmanned aircraft CPPD courses recommended for ACE accreditation The American Red Cross Northeast Florida Chapter at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville is recruiting for this summers Junior Red Cross volunteers. This offers an opportunity for students interested in health careers to train with highly skilled Navy Medicine professionalsphy sicians, nurses, pharmacists, therapists and techniciansas well as contribute to a positive experience for patients. The program is open to high school students age 16-18 who have base access. Volunteers work four to 20 hours per week in the hospital and receive CPR training. Apply online by May 31 at www.neflori daredcross.org Click on volunteer, join us, youth volunteer application (or adult volunteer application for 18 year-old students). Fill out the application, select Northeast Florida Chapter, and create a Volunteer Connection account. After submitting the application, complete the online orientation. All applicants are required to attend a kickoff event (which includes an interview) June 8 at 10 a.m. in the hospitals 2nd deck conference room. For more information, call 542-7525.Junior Red Cross volunteers for summer program

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