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Jax air news ( May 2, 2013 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA SLAF
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012

Material Information

Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 2, 2013
Publication Date: 05-02-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02040

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012

Material Information

Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: May 2, 2013
Publication Date: 05-02-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02040


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THURSDAY, MAY 2, 2013 MPRF NEWS BASE BUILDERS GOOD HEALTH Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The Maritime Patrol Association (MPA) celebrated international partnerships at the annual Heritage Dinner April 18 at NAS Jacksonville by welcoming United States Navy service members and foreign allies in the maritime patrol and reconnaissance commu nity to commend each oth ers historic pasts and ongoing cooperative relationships. The United States and allied maritime aviation partner ship spans the better part of the 20th century, said Guest Speaker Rear Adm. Sean Buck, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group. Beginning with the U.S. and allied efforts to defeat the German Navy during both World Wars, aviators proved the capability and future shape of the maritime patrol avia tion. International keynote speaker, Air Commodore Ken McCann, the United Kingdom Air Attache in Washington D.C., spoke of the close ties between the U.S. and the U.K. military forces from before Construction continues on the facil ity that will house operator training for the MQ-4C Triton unmanned air craft system and the P-8A Maintenance Training Facility. The two projects share a common site west of the P-8A Integrated Training Center on Yorktown Avenue. They also share a common entrance canopy on Child Street, where students will go to either the 8,938-sq.-ft., sin gle-story MQ-4C Triton schoolhouse or the 58,262-sq.-ft., two-story P-8A Poseidon schoolhouse for maintainers. Elkins Constructors Quality Control Manager Adam Harris said, With the exterior walls up and the roof almost complete, much of our work has moved inside. You can see various tradesmen fabricating and installing things such as air conditioning ducts, plumbing, con duits for electrical wires and computer cables, chilled water and fire suppres sion systems. After block masons com plete the walls of various rooms, inte rior metal wall framing will be installed MPA Heritage Dinner honors partners, heroes New Triton and Poseidon training facilities taking shape Keeping birds away from airfieldAt Naval Air Station Jacksonville, an average of 200 aircraft helicopters, planes and jets take off and land each day. Those million-dollar-plus fly ing machines inevitably share the air with laughing gulls, ospreys and falcons. Great egrets and great blue herons. Mourning doves and crows. And lots and lots of least terns. If one of them meets an air craft in the worst way, flying into an engine or slamming through a windshield, a disas ter could happen. As Winston Rogers, airfield facilities deputy manager at the base, said, After human and mechanical error, the biggest threat to aviation in the terminal area is wildlife, pri marily birds. The first time a bird vs. air craft collision claimed a Navy life was 1917, the first year the Navy took to the air, said Cmdr. Mark McManus, operations offi cer at NAS Jacksonville. Its always been a threat, he said. Less than six months ago a P-3 Orion at the base struck a bird, and that resulted in rough ly $300,000 worth of damage, Rogers said. But the most well-known recent incident was in 2009, when a U.S. Airways jet struck a flock of Canadian geese and crashed into the Hudson River. The Bird Aircraft Strike Hazard, or BASH, program at the air station tries to save Navy aircraft, money and lives by reducing strikes. It is a joint effort between airfield manage ment, air operations, squadron safety officers and environmen tal employees. Its a team sport, Rogers said. Distracting birds For years the Navy relied mainly on active measures to disperse birds from airfield areas. It used to be, OK, were going to go out with pyrotechnics, were going to scare the birds off, Rogers said. While they still take that approach when the sun rises every day, Rogers gets in a pick up with a scare gun and drives the airfield looking for birds the BASH program also incor porates science. Since 2011, Kevin McGrath, a

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 2, 2013 May 2 1975 U.S. Navy departs Vietnamese waters at end of evacuation. May 3 1861 USS Surprise cap tures Confederate privateer Savannah. 1898 Marines land at Cavite, Philippines and raise U.S. flag. 1949 First Navy firing of a high altitude Viking rocket at White Sands, N.M. May 4 1917 First Navy ships (Destroyer Division 8) arrive at Queenstown, Ireland, to pro vide convoy escorts against German U-boats. 1942 Battle of Coral Sea, the first carrier vs. carrier battle, begins. 1945 Japanese attempt to land on Okinawa is repulsed; kamikaze attacks damage six U.S. Navy ships. 1961 Pilot Cmdr. Malcolm Ross, USNR, and medi cal observer Lt. Cmdr. Victor Prather Jr., ascended in two hours to more than 110,00 feet in Strato-Lab 5, a 411foot hydrogen filled balloon launched from from the deck of USS Antietam. This was the highest altitude attained by man in an open gondola. Tragically, Prather drowned during the recovery. May 5 1944 USS Comfort is com missioned in San Pedro, Calif., the first ship to be manned jointly by Army and Navy per sonnel. 1948 VF-17A becomes first carrier qualified jet squadron (on board USS Saipan). 1961 Cmdr. Alan Shepard Jr. makes first U.S. manned space flight. Freedom 7 (Mercury 3) traveled 15 minutes and 28 sec onds to reach the altitude of 116.5 statute miles with a veloc ity of 5,134 mph. Recovery was by HUS1 helicopter of HMR(L)262 from USS Lake Champlain (CVS-39). 1980 USS Robert E. Peary rescues 440 Vietnamese refu gees from disabled craft south of Thailand. May 6 1909 Great White Fleet anchors in San Francisco. 1916 First ship-to-shore radio telephone voice con versation from USS New Hampshire off Virginia Capes to SECNAV Josephus Daniels in Washington, D.C. 1942 Capt. Milton Miles arrives in Chungking, China, to begin building an intelligence and guerilla training organiza tion, Naval Group China. 1945 Naval landing force evacuates 500 Marshallese from Jaluit Atoll, Marshall Islands May 7 1779 Continental Navy sloop Providence captures British brig Diligent off Cape Charles. 1934 USS Constitution com pletes tour of principal U.S. ports. 1940 FDR orders Pacific Fleet to remain in Hawaiian waters indefinitely. 1942 Carrier aircraft sink Japanese carrier Shoho during Battle of Coral Sea. May 8 1911 Navy ordered its first airplane, Curtiss A-1, Birthday of Naval Aviation 1942 Battle of the Coral Sea ends with Japanese retiring from area. 1945 VE Day, Germanys unconditional surrender to the Allies. 1963 Navy ships evacuate 2,279 civilians from Haiti dur ing crisis. 1972 U.S. Navy and Marine Corps aircraft mine Haiphong Harbor in North Vietnam. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Every April, my older boys eagerly await the first phone call from their Little League coach. Im probably biased, but hes the best one out there. For years he has continued to coach, even after his own son grew out of the league, and he has seen ballplayers go from too-young-to-play siblings on the bleachers to captains of the team. This year, the call from coach came while we were on our way back from a weeklong vacation in Washington, D.C. I put him on speakerphone so that the boys could hear. Their smiles were impossible to hide. The first practice would be in a few days, and the first game in a couple of weeks. Ford and Owen wanted to know which new kids had been recruited for the team. They recognized some names, but not others. And then the coach said, Two teams had to be cut this year. We just didnt have enough kids trying out. So the players from those teams went back into the draft, and some of them will join our team. The boys looked confused: Two teams got cut? What? For as long as Ford has been playing Little League, there have been six teams. Players stay with their team through out the three to four years of Little League, and the team names have become a legacy. Older teenagers say, Oh, I was on that team when I was a kid. Parents say, I always wanted to be on that team. Younger sib lings say, I hope I get to be on that team, too. The league lost two teams? Ford asked. Why? Not enough numbers trying out, Coach said again. Ford and Owen were stunned. It was impossible for them to understand why boys all over the city arent counting down the weeks until Opening Day. How could the league not have enough people trying out? My boys are biased. They love baseball more than any other sport. But in the front seat, I was worrying about something else: Where have all the kids gone? Its not just Little League; on any given day, only a handful of kids are playing in the park down the street. Most of them have mothers hovering nearby. The sidewalks arent filled with kids walking back and forth looking for a game or a neigh bor to play. And now our Little League cant fill up six teams? This isnt a new concern. The term helicopter parents didnt come from nowhere. For quite some time, academics and sociologists have lament ed the loss a childhood that includes a mother hanging out the door and screaming, Come back when the street lights turn on! The handhelddevice generation has been absent from the outdoors for several decades now. But Little League? I thought helicopter parents wanted to involve their chil dren in as many organized, after-school activities as possi ble. I thought the sidewalks and parks were empty because all the kids were at soccer, base ball and dreaded play dates. This troubled me for sev eral days, until it occurred to me that of course Little League would take a hit in this new generation. Baseball is one of the most hands-off (as far as parents are concerned) sports a child can go into. Everything about baseball breeds autonomy: the dug outs that separate parents and children, the fence around the field, the space between the outfield and the bleachers. (Go ahead and try to coach your child from the sidelines; they probably wont hear you.) One mother told me that baseball is too much of a time commitment, for her son. Its true; the teams practice for about two hours several times a week. And the weekend games, this mother said, go on for hours! Well, that depends on per spective. If you stay with your kids, practice probably seems long. If you drop them off, as I do, it doesnt seem long enough. I can hardly get through the grocery store and its time to go get them again. But thats only if I drive them. Most days, they walk to and from the field, and then I get a few extra minutes. A whole gang of boys travels down the sidewalk with baseball bags slung over their shoulders. Who knows what they talk about. Probably a continua tion of the same no-parentsallowed talk that goes on in the dugout. You see, besides the sport, all of this the walks, the dugout, the team is why my boys look forward to baseball. Each spring, they get a little independence from me. They bond with a team. They go into the dugout as little boys, and they come out just a wee bit older. And, well, I guess Im sur prised more boys and moms arent signing up for this.Hey, MoneyChic! A few friends have been talking about the easy money they are being loaned from online payday lenders. It seems way too easy, is there a catch? MoneyChic sez: You may be inter ested in the fast cash those lenders are offering, but are you willing to risk your identity for that money? Not only are payday lenders a horrible decision because of their astronomical interest rates, but they put your identity at risk. According to Jean Ann Fox, direc tor of Consumer Protection for the Consumer Federation of America, Internet payday loans are dangerous for cash-strapped consumers. They combine the high costs and collection risks of check-based payday loans with security risks of sending bank account numbers and Social Security numbers over web links to unknown lenders. Payday loans over the Internet are pretty simple to apply for. Military members are asked to verify employ ment and income which can be done by faxing a copy of your military ID card and your most recent LES. Both of the required items still con tain part or all of your social security number! To further make matter worse, bank account information and pass word must be provided once approved for a loan so payments may be made to the account and taken from the account. This leaves your account vul nerable to predators! Would you want your social security number, picture, pay information, and bank account numbers to be floating through space on a more than likely unsecured website or network? Another potential problem is that a few of these companies are not even legitimate. They are scams that are try ing to steal identities and may even be located outside the United States where our laws do not matter. If a company is not able to be easily located by the consumer, it is more than likely a scam! Making informed financial decisions will help protect your money and your identity. Check your credit report for errors and suspicious activity. Establish an emergency fund so you dont have to rely on these easy to get online pay day loans. Seek assistance from NavyMarine Corps Relief Society as your first resort! To find out exactly how Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society can help you, stop by our office at the Yorktown Gate or call 542-2832. Have questions for Hey, Money Chic? Drop me an e-mail at megan.stolle@ nmcrs.org Where have all the baseball kids gone?

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Lt. Jared Wilhelm, a U.S. Naval War College (NWC) Fleet Seminar Program stu dent assigned to VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville, has been select ed to participate in the 2014 Olmsted Scholar Program. The Olmsted Scholar Program, a three-year pro gram which serves as a key to prepare young officers for future leadership roles in an ever-increasing international operating environment, offers a unique opportunity to pur sue two years of graduate study using a foreign language while providing oversees cultural and travel opportunities. I believe that the Olmsted Scholar Program will better prepare me to be a leader in the maritime patrol and recon naissance community, where an in-depth understanding of foreign cultures impacts Sailors on a daily basis, said Wilhelm. Wilhelm currently serves as the maintenance quality assurance officer for VP-30 and noted how his experience dur ing previous deployments and assignments reinforced the importance of cultural diver sity required of todays Navy leaders. Wilhelm will complete the NWC Fleet Seminar Program in May and begin language training in the summer or fall of 2013. Following one year of inten sive foreign language study stateside, Wilhelm will attend the National University of Cuyo in Mendoza, Argentina to pur sue his political science gradu ate program studies. The Olmsted program will be an extension of the Fleet Seminar Programs ability to expand views beyond our daily work environment, he said. During his tenure in Argentina, Wilhelm will study and interact with the popula tion using Spanish fluency and emphasize development of lan guage skills and regional cul tural. The opportunity to learn a foreign language in an aca demic setting during immer sion in a foreign culture while pursuing graduate work cant be achieved from a ship or a base, added Wilhelm. For more information on the FY-15 Olmsted Scholar Program view NAVADMIN 101/13 or visit www.olmsted foundation.org/olmsted/ web/index.cfm?view=scholars Program/vwMain On April 12, Capt. Mark Turner, direc tor, Navy Staff College at the Naval War College, and VP-30 Commanding Officer Cap. Mark Stevens awarded naval flight officer (NFO) wings to the following 11 officers: Ensign Kristoffe Bostic, Ensign Taylor Brauns, Ensign Samuel Hall, Ensign Clifton Johnson, Lt. j.g. Owen Keller, Lt .j.g. Douglas Kettler, Ensign Steven Miller, Ensign Andrew Nesburg, CWO3 Marcos Plata, Ensign Brian Ruane, and Ensign Eugene Soto. The recipients completed the Undergraduate Maritime Flight Officer syllabus at VP-30, earning their coveted wings of gold. These newly winged aviators will now enroll in the CAT I Fleet Replacement Squadron syllabus at VP-30. Upon completion of the CAT I sylla bus, they will report to operational mar itime patrol and reconnaissance squad rons to begin their initial sea tours in either Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii; Whidbey Island, Wash.; or Jacksonville. The NFO training pipeline begins with Aviation Preflight Introduction (API) instruction in Pensacola, where all aviation officers undergo a class room syllabus and are taught the basics of naval aviation which includes aero dynamics, meteorology and principles of navigation. After completing API, all student NFOs report for primary training at VT-10, co-located at NAS Pensacola. While assigned to VT-10 they transi tion from a classroom learning environ ment to initial airborne flight training in the T-6A Texan II. Upon completion of primary flight training at NAS Pensacola, officers who are selected for the P-3, EP-3 or P-8 training pipeline report to VP-30 for specific aircraft training. As part of their volunteer month cel ebration, HandsOn Jacksonville pre sented the VP-8 Fighting Tigers the Service in Uniform Award. VP-8 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Michael Marston accepted the award at the CelebrateGOOD! event at the Times Union Center for the Performing Arts in downtown Jacksonville, April 18. Exemplifying the Service in Uniform Award, given annually to an excep tional volunteer that wears or has worn a uniform, the Fighting Tigers have helped others across three continents. While deployed from June to November of last year, VP-8 members supported the Exodo Orphanage, the Todo Corazon Homeless Shelter in El Salvador. Across the globe, they helped strengthen international ties with Japan as they helped on the clean up following a devastating 2011 tsunami. Upon returning home, VP-8 kept giving to the Jacksonville community continuing their partnership with the Sulzbacher Center, HabiJax, The Catty Shack Ranch and several schools. The maintenance department of VP-8 continues to support P3-C squadrons at home and abroad. While working through repairs on their own aging aircraft, assist ing with hosting transient squadrons, and supporting Aviation Intermediate Maintenance Department as mod line squadron, the Fighting Tigers team completed two and a half weeks of fuel cell maintenance and an Integrated Maintenance Concept (IMC) inspec tion required to return a critical Task Group 47.1 (VP-10) asset to the forward deployed fight, April, 24. Understanding the VP-10 Red Lancers limited resources to complete major maintenance while deployed, six VP-8 aviation structural mechan ics or airframers as they are commonly known worked a total of 400 man hours to patch leaks in four fuel cells, while others expedited an IMC inspection. This maintenance team truly under stands the meaning of one team, one fight. We were able to get a critical AIP asset back into the counter-drug fight with minimum down time, said AMC James Agner, VP-8 airframes leading chief petty officer. The aircraft was returned to VP-10 following a successful functional check flight. After a short respite, the team is hard at work once again in support of VP-10 with two more aircraft.VP-8 awarded for community service by HandsOn JacksonvilleFighting Tigers help return valuable assets to U.S. Fourth Fleet VP-30 officer selected for 2014 Olmsted Scholar Program VP-30 wings Navys newest naval flight officers JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 2, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 2, 2013 Seabees always improving, building at NAS JacksonvilleIn these times of budget uncertainty, the 52 men and women of Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 202, Detail Jacksonville, are always ready to help with high quality, eco nomical station-improvement projects. At the details Birmingham Avenue headquarters, Officer-in-Charge BUCS(SCW/SW) Mark Boice said, Our highly quali fied Seabees can build projects from the ground up, by providing most of the skilled labor required for the subgrade utilities, foun dations, concrete block walls, steel erection and electri cal systems. Operations Chief UTC(SCW) Duane Jerry explained that Seabees projects at NAS Jacksonville are planned and execut ed in conjunction with Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast and the base public works officer. Jerry keeps track of projects on his computer, from which he generates weekly reports for CBMU-202 head quarters in Little Creek, Va., as well as Naval Construction Group Two in Gulfport, Miss., that provide details on project materials, cost, crew size, days worked, safety and quality assurance. I also include a photo sitrep that graphically shows the completion of every key phase for a particular project from day one. For those in the chain of command who cant be boot-on-theground with our projects, the photo sitrep keeps them up to date, said Jerry. Our detail is for tunate to have a lot of new and efficient equipment. From graders, dozers, dump trucks and forklifts, to gen erators, pumps and other machinery, our equipment enables us to reach the high est project stan dards, said Jerry. CBMU-202 stood up in February 2005 at Little Creek, Va. It has active detach ments in Naval District Washington, NSB Kings Bay, Ga., NAS Jacksonville and NAS Key West in Florida, plus, two reserve detachments at USMC Camp Lejeune, N.C. Boice explained, Our mission is to provide public works support at naval support activities, forward operating bases and fleet hospital/expeditionary medical facilities during wartime or contingency operations. We also pro vide disaster recovery support to naval regional commanders in CONUS. The Seabees were founded on March 5, 1942 and are known throughout the military for their capability to pro vide expeditionary construction and engineering (combat service support) to Navy, Marine Corps, joint and other operational forces.

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for classrooms and administrative spaces. Chris Sears, a retired AMC, is the site safety and health officer for Elkins Constructors. Its nice to come back and serve the navy here at NAS Jax as a civilian. Both Elkins and the navy have strong safety cultures. He noted that the project includes environmen tal enhancements such as the recently installed 20,000-gallon underground cistern that collects and filters rainwater that will be used to flush toilets in the new facilities. Harris added, Like the P-8A Integrated Training Center next door, this design features raised flooring so technicians can easily access electrical wiring and computer cables for future modifications or repairs. These are dynamic structures so as training mod ules change in the future, the building can economi cally adapt. When construction is complete, Boeing will install mock P-8A Poseidon components to provide hands-on training for maintainers that may include an opera tional load trainer, integrated avionics trainer, flight control hydraulics, landing gear, engine and environ mental control systems, said Harris. TRAINING 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 2, 2013

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World War II to present day Afghanistan. Throughout this time, both our great coun tries have been stead fast in the face of adver sity, standing shoulder to shoulder and working seamlessly together to defeat our common foes, said McCann. In recognition of this international brother hood, Flight Lt. John Cruickshank, VC of the Royal Air Force (RAF), was inducted into the MPA Hall of Honor dur ing the dinner along with two U.S. counterparts, Cmdr. Paul Lloyd Milius and Rear Adm. Thomas Davies. These three men and their accomplishments are without a doubt and by anyones standard, legendary, said Buck. Flight Lt. John Cruickshank earned the Victoria Cross, the U.K. equivalent to the U.S. Medal of Honor, for his successful action against a German U-boat while on anti-submarine war fare (ASW) patrol July 17, 1944. As the pilot of a Catalina aircraft, Cruickshank led his crew in the sinking of the submarine while under hostile fire. During the multiple attacks, the navigator/bomb aimer was killed, the second pilot and two other mem bers of the crew were injured, and Cruickshank was struck in 72 places, receiving two serious wounds in the lungs and 10 penetrating wounds in the lower limbs. Refusing medical aid, Cruickshank insisted on taking control of his badly damaged air craft and in spite of his injuries he gave orders as necessary until the air craft was safely landed on the water. He was so criti cally injured that he had to be given a blood trans fusion before he could be removed from the plane to hospital. Accepting the Hall of Honor award on behalf of Cruickshank, Flight Lt. Mark Faulds, a visit ing RAF member train ing at VP-30, extended Cruickshanks sincere thanks for the honor. Cruickshank, who trained at NAS Pensacola in the 1940s is now near ing the age of 93 and is the sole surviving recipi ent of the Victoria Cross from World War II. I spoke with John yes terday, said Faulds. He is 93 and living inde pendently in sheltered housing in Aberdeen, Scotland. He is still as sharp as a tack. According to Faulds, Cruickshank speaks fondly of the U.S. Navy, and says of his training in Pensacola, Fla., It was one of the highlights of my career, and although it was the first stage of my training, I felt it tremen dous value. It made me a good aviator. On Feb. 27, 1968, Cmdr. Paul Milius departed his base at Nakhon Phanom, Thailand piloting an OP-2E Neptune on an armed reconnaissance mission over Laos for Observation Squadron (VO) 67. Milius was over his assigned target and delivering ordnance on the target when the air craft was struck by sus pected anti-aircraft artil lery. A projectile struck the underside of the air craft and exploded in the radar well. The avionics technician was struck by fragments of the projec tile and began bleeding profusely. The radar well burst into flames and Milius ordered the crew to bail out and remained in the cockpit as they departed. Seven crew members safely exited the aircraft and were subsequently rescued by search and rescue forces. Milius was not rescued nor were his remains ever recovered. In 1978, Milius was awarded the Navy Cross and in 1996 the U.S. Navy commissioned the Arleigh Burke classs destroyer, Milius (DDG69), in his honor. The ships motto is Alii Prae Me which translates to others before me. Capt. Barney Walsh, USN (Ret.) accepted the award on behalf of the Milius family and held the dinner guests cap tive recounting the last few moments of the 1968 encounter from his own point of view as the Milius co-pilot aboard the Neptune. I looked up after my chute opened and knew Capt. Milius was at the controls keeping the bird straight and level, allow ing the crew to bail out, said Walsh. Walsh was joined on stage by AXC Roger Arntzen, USN (Ret.), also a former member of VO-67 and Milius crew that day. Walsh indicated that some 25 years after the 1968 incident, We started reassembling our VO-67 personnel and started our squad ron reunions which were enabled due to the Internet. Now we have about 180 of the origi nal squadron mem bers brought together in reunions every two years with the next one sched uled for July 2013 in San Diego, said Walsh. Rear Adm. Thomas Davies, USN (Ret.) was a maritime Navy pilot who received the Distinguished Flying Cross during World War II for the sinking of a German U-boat in the South Atlantic. After the war, as a developmen tal pioneer of the P-2 Neptune, he set several aviation records includ ing the longest unrefu eled flight, flying a P-2 from Perth, Australia to Columbus, Ohio more than 11,000 miles. For this flight he was given a second Distinguished Flying Cross, this time directly from President Harry Truman. In addi tion, he was a command ing officer, a diplomat, and an expert and inno MPA 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 2, 2013

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U.S. Department of Agriculture employ ee, has studied patterns of birds at the base. Working with the information gathered, he tries to identify passive measures that could steer birds away from the airfield, an area of 11 million square yards surrounded by the St. Johns and Ortega rivers and two golf courses, all of which are popular bird destinations. Some of McGraths efforts are plainly visible. Two weeks ago, for example, he put two orange tube men that lean and stand up with the wind atop a han gar that has a white, gravel roof. The roof resembles the preferred nesting area of least terns and the tube men act as scarecrows. Other ways arent as easy to discern. Like this: The base keeps the grass around the airfield eight to 14 inches high. That keeps it high enough so rap tors have trouble seeing prey they might want to swoop in for, but low enough so that Canadian geese arent attracted to areas of tall seedheads. Its nothing to see a Canadian goose land and then they can just put their beak at the bottom of the grass and zip right up and take every seed off and have a mouth full of seed, McGrath said. This week, Seabees at the base began constructing an alternative nesting site for least terns around the base. If the least terns are going to nest at the base, the Navy would prefer they choose this spot. The area will eventually be four acres fenced in to keep predators away and topped with river rocks to attract the birds, said Christine Bauer, natural resources manager at Jacksonville NAS. While the Navy estimates that only 25 percent of bird strikes are reported, the BASH program encourages pilots to collect any remains, known as snarge, to submit for identification. The idea is that better records lead to a better understanding of migratory patterns. Firing blanks While vegetation management and alternative nesting sites are long-term goals, the most immediate and best way to cut down on strikes is dispersing birds when they show up. On Tuesday morning, before the rest of the days responsibilities began, Rogers got in his pickup and drove the airfield. Sometimes birds leave before anyone gets close. There were three juve nile bald eagles stand ing around the airfield and they flew off about the same time they were spotted. Other times birds dont scare as easily and a boom is needed. This also happened Tuesday, when Rogers drove by an approach lighting system for helicopters stretching about 50 yards into the St. Johns River. There were a few dozen least terns walking along the lighting system and they didnt mind Rogers presence. With his scare gun that essentially shoots blanks, he fired a few bangers that sound like a firecracker and a few screamers that act like bottle rockets. At that, the least terns flew into the sky, regrouped and appeared to con sider coming back until Rogers fired another screamer. Satisfied they were gone for a while, Rogers, dressed in jeans, a col lared shirt and cowboy boots, hopped into his pickup and headed out for the rest of the airfield. The job of keeping birds out of the way of flying machines is never ending. Its an all-day process, Rogers said. Its an all-year process in Jacksonville because of our location and climate and proximity to water. Some months are obviously a lot heavier than others. Seagulls are just now starting to come in. BASH JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 2, 2013 11

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Despite the impact of sequester, classes at the NAS Jacksonville Fitness Source continue on thanks to a dedi cated group of volunteers who strive to keep military members and other patrons physically fit. With all the ongoing budget chal lenges weve been facing lately, all Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Departments were mandated to cut fit ness classes down to 12 per week. But thanks to the innovated mindset of NAS Jax MWR Director John Bushick, we have been able to use volunteers on our group exercise classes to keep the morale of our patrons high without affecting budget issues, said NAS Jax Athletic Director Tanya Henigman. With our wonderful group of volun teer instructors, weve been able to keep 29 classes going each week. These are highly trained, nationally certified fit ness instructors who volunteer their time to help our patrons accomplish their fitness goals, she added. Terry Crawford, a civilian employee at the NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center, has volunteered as a group fit ness instructor for the past 10 years. He currently teaches step aerobics, cardio kickboxing and Zumba. I volunteer because I appreciate each and every person who sacrifices time to be in my class. There was a time when I was paid for doing this but when the budget was cut and my pay went away, I was asked to volunteer, said Crawford. I immediately said yes because some of my class members have been with me since my first day and I didnt think it would be fair to leave them after they have shown me such great dedication and devotion. Crawford continued, Some of my students have shared their weight loss success stories with me and the struggles theyve endured. To quit volunteering would be like leaving a great friend or family member. And as a group fitness instructor, I can reach a greater mass of people and become an inspiration to someone afraid to sign up for a personal trainer. For David Santillo, who volunteers his time to instruct the Max Core and spin classes, teaching helps keep him moti vated and challenged. Its important to keep the classes challenging for all levels and to make them fun by showing different routines and training programs. I train to stay in shape for the sports I do, which include racquetball, tennis, cycling and moto cross, he stated. Its real easy for most people to skip the gym. It takes dedication to make working out part of your daily sched ule. The benefits though are reward ing for your health, said Santillo. Its awesome when students who have been attending my class for a month or lon ger, thank me for helping them achieve their goal in fitness and they see a dif ference in performance and the way they look and feel. Anytime I get feed back knowing I made a difference in someones life, is the best encourage ment I can get to continue volunteer ing. Ebony Solomon, an accounting tech nician for Fleet Family and Readiness Programs at Commander, Navy Region Southeast began teaching high-ener gy spin and spin/flex classes in August 2011. I started volunteering because I love spinning and it was a good way to spend my lunch break instead of eating at my desk, said Solomon. Now its more than that. I use music to inspire and push people to do their best. Its not about killing yourself. Its about getting a good workout and enjoying it. I try to make my class different every time so people dont get bored with it and quit. Charles Kerekes, department head at Naval Hospital Jacksonville Substance Volunteers keep fitness classes spinning 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 2, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Deweys free Spring Concert Series 7 p.m. on the outdoor stage May 3 Boogie Freaks May 10 7th Street Band May 17 Zero-NFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per per son Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 126 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included Friday special $1 games per person 25 p.m. Shoe rental not includedFitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 The outdoor pool hours April 1 May 5 Open Monday Friday (lap swim only) 6 a.m. 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 7 p.m. Saturday & Sunday (lap swim only) 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. During lap swim only the waterslide, water park and con cessions will not be open. Outdoor Pool opens for recre ational swimming on May 11Pool will be open weekends, Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. 2013 Learn to Swim Program Sign-up at the Gym (the Zone) May 11, 8 a.m. 3 p.m. Session 1: June 10 20 Session 2 July 8 18 Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Disney Cruise Lines will be at ITT on June 11, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Learn more about excit ing 2013/2014 trips sailing from Port Canaveral, Miami, Galveston, Barcelona, San Juan and Vancouver. Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Daytona International Speedway Subway Firecracker July 5 and Coke 400 July 6 Tickets on sale now! Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Funkfest Metropolitan Park May 10-11 2-day ticket $52 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3, 2013 Tickets are valid for redemp tion through June 7, 2013 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline 2013 Live Broadway Series Celtic Woman May 2 $44 $134 American Idiot May 14 & 15 $25 $62 Dream Girls May 21Cesar Millan June 1 $42 $52Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through May 15and must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about our special discount ed tickets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park One day pass $30, Gold pass $71The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. World of Nations Celebration May 4 at 12 p.m. Barracks Bash May 9, 4 8 p.m. Free food, entertainment and prizes! The Players Championship May 11 at 11 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees May 7 & 21 for active duty May 9 & 23 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holi days. Loudmouth Thursday Any golfer wearing a pair of loudmouth shorts or pants plays 18 holes with cart for $20 Open to military, DoD and guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina May 18, 19, 25 & 26 June 15, 16, 22 & 23 July 20, 21, 27 & 28 Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recre ation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more infor mation. Movie Under the Stars Featuring The Croods May 24 at 8:30 p.m. Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School June 3 July 10 $500 per person For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil. VOLUNTEERSAbuse Rehabilitation Program agrees. Ive been teaching spinning since the late 1990s because it motivates me to stay fit and I enjoy the interaction with the regulars and teaching new students, he said. It also helps me decompress and lowers stress levels. BM1 Chris Hill of Coastal Riverine Squadron 10 is also a certified fitness instructor who volunteers to teach the Extreme Boot Camp Class. I teach group fitness so I can better myself as a coach and as a better person down the road, said Hill, who is certified as a level one Crossfit coach and a Level USAW Sport Performance Olympic weightlifting coach. New volunteer Deonne Noelani Nabalta-Freeman came on board in January to instruct Zumba classes. With years of experience doing Polynesian dancing, Zumba was second nature to her. I have been taking Zumba classes here since 2010 so when the opportu nity came open to teach, I volunteered. I enjoy watching people who are normal ly shy come out and see the transforma tion that they make. The NAS Jax Fitness Source offers a wide variety of fitness classes for begin ners and those who continue to chal lenge their endurance. For more infor mation, call 542-3518 or stop by to pick up a schedule of classes. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 2, 2013 13

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Sailors from NAS Jacksonville joined with Royal Australian Navy (RAN) 725 Squadron on April 25 to commemorate ANZAC Day, the anniversary of the first major military action fought by Australian and New Zealand forces during the First World War. In 1915, the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) formed part of the allied expedition that set out to capture the Gallipoli pen insula in Turkey, explained Cmdr. David Frost, com manding officer of RAN 725 Squadron. The ANZAC force landed on Gallipoli on April 25 and met fierce resistance from the Ottoman Turkish defend ers. What had been planned as a bold stroke to knock Turkey out of the war became a stale mate and dragged on for eight months. At the end of 1915, after both sides had suffered heavy casualties, allied forces were evacuated. More than 8,000 Australian soldiers were killed. April 25 soon became the day on which Australians and New Zealanders remembered the sacrifice of those who died in the war. At the end of the Second World War, ANZAC Day also served to commemorate the lives of Australians who died in that war. In subsequent years, ANZAC Day has been further broadened to include Australians killed in all the military operations in which Australia has been involved. The commemoration at NAS Jacksonville began at 8 a.m. with a gunfire break fast (including black coffee laced with rum) at Mulligans Restaurant. The official cere mony took place at 10 a.m. in the VP-30 Auditorium begin ning with a short video filled with interviews from survivors of Gallipoli. Speaking on behalf of his squadron in remembrance of those who bravely served, Frost said, We dont remem ber ANZAC day as a victory or for some glorification of the horrors of war. We remember ANZAC day as a testament to the human spirit possessed in those who have fought and died. Capt. Mark Stevens, com manding officer of VP-30, closed with warm statements emphasizing the friendship that Americans have enjoyed with Australia and New Zealand. I have been extremely proud to have had the honor to serve with service members from Australia and New Zealand. We have been close allies and friends for many years, and I hope we will continue that close relationship for many more years to come, said Stevens. IA luncheon set for May 16NAS Jacksonville and the Northeast Florida Navy League Councils will host the Individual Augmentee (IA) Recognition Luncheon May 16 at 11 a.m. at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center. During this luncheon, all NAS Jax and tenant com mand Sailors who have returned from an IA assign ment (within the last six months) will be recognized. There is no cost for IAs and their spouses. The cost for other military and civilian guests is $10. Tickets may be purchased at the Fleet and Family Support Center, Monday-Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. The deadline to purchase tickets is May 8. Childcare will be provided at the Child Development Center (CDC) for children of all IAs and spouses in attendance. Please call the CDC at 5428667 to reserve childcare. Pre-registration is required. To RSVP, contact your command CIAC or Bobby Johns, Individual Deployment Support, NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center at bobby.johns.ctr@navy.mil or for additional informa tion, call 542-5745. ANZAC Day commemorated at NAS Jacksonville Navy representatives are needed to help welcome the Traveling Vietnam Memorial Wall to the Green Cove Springs Junior High May 9 from 9:3010:15 a.m. Sailors are asked to line the path (in uniform when able) along with the students and community members as the wall makes its way to the schools football field. The wall will be on display from May 9-12 with a special ceremony May 11 at 10:30 a.m. The Traveling Vietnam Memorial Wall is a scaled version of the Vietnam Memorial in Washington DC, stand ing six feet tall at the center and cov ers almost 300 feet from end to end. It is a traveling memorial serving as a reminder of the great sacrifices made during the Vietnam War. For more information, call 773-3693.Navy volunteers needed for Traveling Vietnam Memorial Wall exhibit 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 2, 2013

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 2, 2013 vator in several scientific fields, includ ing navigation and optics and was the founder and first president of The Foundation for the Promotion of the Art of Navigation. An amazing side note was that as a midshipman in Annapolis, he recog nized the problem the Navy was hav ing with long range gun accuracy and developed an optical site that was uti lized by all large caliber U.S. and even tually U.K. naval guns until their retire ment from service. His optical site can still be seen on retired battleships. Rear Adm. Michael Holmes, USN (Ret.) accepted Davies award on behalf of his family. More than 200 guests turned out for the Heritage Dinner which includ ed several international contingents, including personnel from the United Kingdom, Australia and Taiwan. In addition to the guest speakers and MPA Hall of Honor inductions, sever al U.S. Maritime and Reconnaissance Force personnel were recognized for outstanding achievement in their avia tion designations. MPA awards were given to: MPA Pilots of the Year, Lt. Jacob Lasota of VP-16 and Lt. Lawrence Herman of VP-9; MPA Naval Flight Officers of the Year, Lt. Michael Steffens of VP-30 and Lt. Sarah Allen of VQ-1; MPA Enlisted Aircrewmen of the Year, AWV1(NAC/ AW) Corey Stevenson of VP-30 and AWV1(NAC/AW) Alfred Lombardo of VPU-2. In conjunction with the Heritage Dinner, MPA coordinated several additional events during the 2013 Symposium April 18-19, including the MPA general members meeting, the MPA Scholarship Golf Tournament, the MPA Scholarship 5K, and flight suit social. Incorporated less than two years ago, MPA has grown from wishful thinking to a thriving Florida non-profit corpora tion. In its first 20 months, MPA attract ed just under 1,000 active members, received over $65,000 from corporate sponsors, raised over $9,000 for the MPA Scholarship Fund, entertained hundreds of guests during the annual symposium week, and released sev eral issues of the quarterly newsletter, Planeside. For more information, visit: www. maritimepatrolassociation.org. MPA Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Deputy for Small Business, Nelson Smith, spoke to nearly 100 members of the local Society of American Military Engineers organization at a luncheon in Jacksonville, April 24. He shared a general overview of current challeng es and fiscal 2013 outlook for NAVFAC Southeast. Smiths comments followed those of Beth Myers, U.S. Army Corp of Engineers Jacksonville District Deputy for Small Business, who briefed on upcoming District activity and oppor tunities for small business contracts. The command is still experiencing curtailed activities in sustainment, res toration and modernization projects due to continuing budget uncertain ties, stated Smith. Energy projects are reduced from former levels, but MILCON projects continue. Smith focused his remarks on small business contracting technical issues keying in on proposals, stressing to the audience the importance of read ing, understanding and fully answering all of the questions in a solicitation to ensure consideration. Potential vendors need to pay par ticular attention to the schedule, speci fications, evaluation factors and other contractural provisions set forth in the request for proposal, said Smith. Success is in the details. Read, understand and answer each question fully. Smith, and his team in the NAVFAC Southeast Office of Small Business Programs, know their business. They were recently recognized by NAVFAC Headquarters for exceeding all targets in all small business categories includ ing Small Business, Focus Area Small Business, and Best in Class Small Disadvantaged Business, for fiscal year 2012, a fourth year in a row unprece dented achievement in NAVFAC. For NAVFAC small business informa tion go to: https://smallbusiness.navfac. navy.mil NAVFAC Southeast small business deputy speaks to local contractors A U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Office of Air and Marine crew based at NAS Jacksonville, patrolling the open waters near Panama City, Panama spotted a speedboat carrying four suspects, fuel barrels and more than 3,300 pounds of pure cocaine April 20, which has an estimated value of more than $242 million. The CBP crew was aboard a P-3 air craft flying over the Gulf of Uraba as part of the Joint Interagency Task ForceSouth (JIATFS) Operation Martillo, when they detected a speedboat with a small radar signature traveling at a high rate of speed. The crew was able to see the four suspects, fuel barrels and mul tiple packages aboard the vessel. The crew notified Panama law enforcement and vectored three Panamanian interceptors to the vessels location. After Panamanian law enforcement fired warning shots, the vessel stopped and the crew, all claiming Colombian citizenship, was arrested and their boat seized. Our air crew agents are protecting our nations borders by actively patrol ling the open waters of the Western Caribbean and Eastern Pacific as part of Operation Martillo, said Douglas Garner, director of National Air Security Operations Center in Florida. This year, P-3 operations in Corpus Christi, Texas and Jacksonville assisted in either the seizure or disruption of more than 54,000 pounds of cocaine, which is more than $4 billion denied to transnational criminal organizations. CBP P-3s have been an integral part of the successful counter-narcotic mis sions operating in coordination with JIATFS. The P-3s fly a 42 million square mile area known as the Source and Transit Zone which is twice the size of the con tinental U.S. The P-3s distinctive detection capabilities allow highly-trained crews to identify emerging threats well beyond the land borders of the U.S. in support of a Defense in Depth key CBP strategic goal. The Joint Interagency Task Force South is a national drug task force under U.S. Southern Command that facilitates U.S. and partner nation law enforcement interdiction efforts against illicit trafficking in support of national and regional security. Operation Martillo is designed to stop the flow of illicit trafficking through Central America and its Pacific and Caribbean coasts by disrupting trans national criminal organizations use of coastlines to ferry narcotics. Since its inception on Jan. 15, 2012, Operation Martillo has resulted in the apprehension of more than 400 indi viduals, the seizure of nearly 200 met ric tons of cocaine and the seizure or destruction of more than 100 vessels and aircraft.CBP spots speedboat carrying $242 million in cocaine Volunteers needed for Never Quit event Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville needs 30 volunteers to assist with the Warrior Challenge and an additional 75 officers and chief petty officers to facilitate the red carpet awards during the 2013 Never Quit Beach event May 19 from 5:45 a.m. to 3 p.m. All volunteers will receive a free Never Quit running shirt. For more information, call or email MC1 Brianna Dandridge at 396-5909, Ext 1150. Never Quit 2013 is a series of physical fitness events challenging athletes to maximize their strength and endurance performance including a 5K and a Spec Ops Warrior Challenge. The annual event takes place at Jacksonville Beach. For more information, go to: http:// neverquitnever.com.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 2, 2013 17 VR-62 Nomads awarded Golden Anchor Commander, Naval Reserve Forces announced April 13 that Fleet Logistics Squadron VR-62 won the Reserve Component Program Excellence Award for exceeding retention goals in fiscal year 2012. More commonly referred to as the Golden Anchor award, this honor is earned by commands that meet or exceed pre-determined Navy wide retention crite ria. VR-62 metrics include the following: rate was 100 percent percent percent As a result, the Nomads will fly the Golden Anchor pennant. Im extremely proud of the time and effort that our career counselors NCC Kanisha Armintia and CS1 Ruth Nash as well as other members of the squadron put forth on this, said VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Tony Scarpino. Our challenge now is to keep up the great momen tum weve established here at VR-62, he added. VR-62 is a Navy Reserve squadron based at NAS Jacksonville that operates four of the Navys 19 C-130T Hercules logistics aircraft. Air logistics missions may include high-priority pas sengers, special parts and supplies as well as mail, ammunition, ordnance, and aircraft engines. VP-5 transition spotlightAs VP-5 transitions to the P-8A Poseidon the squad ron is highlighting a transitioning Mad Fox each week. This weeks spotlight shines on AME2(AW) Jesse Espinosa. Espinosa is from Houston, and is one of four broth ers. He previously served in VPU-2 Special Projects out of Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii before joining the Mad Foxes. As an aviation structural mechanic, he is respon sible for numerous systems aboard the P-8A. They include, but are not limited to, survival oxy gen, air conditioning, anti-ice, fire bottles, crew seats, dry bay fire extinguishing, and the onboard inert gas generating system. The AME transition has been unique. They were one of the last groups to receive formalized ground train ing. Therefore, Espinosa spent the beginning of his tran sition receiving hands-on training at VP-30 before solidifying what he had learned with a three-week course at the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training (CNATTU). Espinosa will also soon be qualified as a collateral duty inspector for the P-8A. This will allow him to sign off work completed by other Mad Fox maintainers. This extensive qualification requires him to be qualified in tow tractor, wing walking, brake riding, auxiliary power unit operation, and ordnance. VP-5 has been transitioning to the P-8A Poseidon since Jan. 4. Approximately 65 per cent of all Department of Defense (DoD) house hold goods moves are performed during the summer peak season period (May through August). The mov ing industry continues to advise DoD they do not have the capac ity (equipment and per sonnel) to handle such surges over a short peri od of time. Meaning, every cus tomer may not get their requested moving date. Proper planning, flex ibility in move dates and communication with the household goods transportation service providers can reduce the potential for ship ment difficulties. Personnel preparing to execute a PCS move are encouraged to take the following actions: Register to access the Defense Personal Property System (DPS) at www.move.mil. Orders are not needed to register but will be required along with a signed copy of the appli cation (DD form 1299) when you complete and submit the request for shipment. Once registered (and before you move), go to the www.move.mil main page and click on the link under DOD service members and civilians and review all the information via the links on the left side of the screen. Instructional vid eos are available via YOUTUBE check it out (www.youtube.com/ user/navyhhg). If you have difficulty accessing the system, or problems filling out the informa tion, there are computer kiosks available in the Personal Property Front Office in Building 100 at NAS Jacksonville. To schedule your move: Submit your application early. Three weeks advance notice of the requested move date is required to give you the best chance of getting your requested dates during summer peak season. Once you have your orders, review the Its your move pamphlet at http://www.transcom. mil/dtr/part-iv/dtr_ part_iv_app_k_1.pdf. Complete the self-coun seling at www.move. mil and immediately provide a copy of offi cial orders and a signed copy of the application DD form 1299 to your local personal property office. Applications for household goods moves will not be processed and moves cannot be scheduled without a valid copy of official orders and a signed application. You can drop of your documents at our NAS Jacksonville office locat ed in Bldg 110, 1st floor, Yorktown Ave. We can also accept documents via fax (904-542-1206) or email hhg_jacksonvile@ navy.mil. Be flexible when arranging dates for packing, pick-up and delivery. Moving dur ing the summer sea son (May 15 Aug. 30) presents unique chal lenges, especially moves made during the peak of the peak (June 15 June through July 4). Often during this period mov ing companies are oper ating at capacity and sometimes a first choice of moving dates cannot be accommodated. You should schedule your move before or after the peak of the peak whenever possible. Differences between the requested and actu al pick-up dates can impact plans to vacate housing, commence travel and execute other PCS-related events. Final pack and pickup dates are not con firmed until the con clusion of the pre-move survey, so make sure you obtain confirma tion of pack and pickup dates before making final travel arrange ments. If circumstances require a change to the agreed upon pack and pickup dates, there is a substantial risk that the new requested dates may not be available and this may cause a delay in rescheduling your move. Stay in contact with the household goods moving company/trans portation service pro vider. DPS provides point of contact tele phone numbers for each transportation service provider supporting the move. Immediately notify the local personal prop erty office should any unforeseen issues arise. Consider performing a personally procured move, formerly known as a DITY move. Eligible service members may be paid up to 95 percent of the governments cost for performing a similar move. If you are going to move yourself or direct hire a moving company you must have orders in hand and complete a DD form 2278 in DPS and have it signed by your personal property office prior to taking any actions. Planning, prepara tion, flexibility and communication are keys to executing a successful household goods move. Service members may submit questions about their household goods moves via email to householdgoods@navy. mil or call (904) 5421000, Ext 6120, 6130 or 6107.Make your household move the smoothest ever Apply by May 31The American Red CrossNortheast Florida Chapter at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville is cur rently recruiting for this summers Junior Red Cross volunteers. This offers an excellent opportunity for students interested in health careers to train with highly skilled Navy Medicine professionalsphysi cians, nurses, pharmacists, therapists and techni ciansas well as contribute to a positive experience for patients. The program is open to a limited number of high school students age 16 to 18 who have base access. Volunteers work four to 20 hours per week in locations throughout the hospital, and receive CPR training. Apply onlineby May 31at www.nefloridaredcross. org At the website, click on volunteer, join us, youth volunteer application (or adult volunteer applica tion for 18 year-old students). Fill out the applica tion, select Northeast Florida Chapter, and create a Volunteer Connection account. After submitting the application, complete the online orientation. All applicants are required to attend a kick-off event (which includes an interview) June 8 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the hospitals 2nd deck conference room in the central tower (next to the chapel). For more about this opportunity, contact Junior Red Cross volunteer coordinators Terry Miles or Mary Miciano at 542-7525 or jaxredcrossoffice@med.navy. mil.Experience Navy Medicine as a Junior Red Cross volunteer

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18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 2, 2013 Outdoor cooking is taking off as spring weather takes hold, and commissaries worldwide have special promotions and products ideally suited for what shop pers look for during May. This is a great time of year to clean off the grill and take advantage of the commissaries great savings on fresh Choice Grade-A beef, pork and chicken, said Joyce Chandler, DeCA acting sales director. We havent forgotten that Mothers Day and Memorial Day weekend are special meal occasions during May, and the product selection in our stores worldwide has those covered, too. DeCAs industry partners vendors, suppliers and brokers are collaborating with commissaries in May to offer discounts beyond everyday savings. Overseas stores may have substitute events for cer tain promotional programs. Customers should check with their store manager to verify when they will be offering these sales events. The following promotions run May 9-29: Salute Memorial Day Sale hosted by ConAgra Foods offers shoppers recipe books with coupons and a mail-in opportunity to win outdoor cooking prizes. Select stores will also have product demonstrations. The ConAgra Foods website, www.conagracommis sarydeals.com features a list of all May sale items to help shoppers build their shopping list before heading to the commissary. Coupons will also be available on the website. This event seeks to raise public aware ness for the Fisher House Scholarships for Military Children. ConAgra Foods will donate a portion of their sales to the program. Krafts Salad Days encourages fresh salad sales and rewards shoppers. Commissaries will feature high-value coupon flyers with cross merchandis ing offers on Kraft and commissary produce items. Dr Pepper Snapple Group offers a chance to win 12 gas grills. Customers should look for the mass display of Dr Pepper and Snapple products; win ners will be announced by the end of July. Gatorade has a Memorial Day Sale honoring military members with its fourth annual military in uniform 32-ounce, custom bottle label. Unique in-store displays and online promotional events will drive awareness of this 32-ounce tribute pack. Gatorades Honoring Our Heroes essay con test gives commissary shoppers the opportunity to honor their military heroes and military spouses with prizes and free groceries. Commissary shop pers will be encouraged to visit www.gatorade military.com and in 200 words or less, explain who they feel deserves to win this contest. Those honored can include active duty and veterans, spouses, their families, friends, neighbors or orga nizations that benefit the military community. Each participant who submits an essay online will be provided a commissary-only coupon as a spe cial thank-you. With Memorial Day and Mothers Day, our pro motions this time of year go far to express the grati tude we in DeCA and our industry partners have for our military customers, Chandler said. Its our privi lege to provide a commissary benefit thats worth the trip. Your commissary is blooming with May specials CLIENT: ATF PRODUCT: Car Seat JOB#: P76569_E SPACE: Full Page B/W BLEED: None TRIM: 5.75 in x 10.5 in SAFETY: None GUTTER: None PUBS: n/a ISSUE: n/a TRAFFIC: Donna McDonald ART BUYER: n/a ACCOUNT: Flavia Carvalho RETOUCH: n/a PRODUCTION: Rick Jones ART DIRECTOR: Jacob Maraya COPYWRITER: n/aThis advertisement was prepared by BBDO New York Fonts Helvetica Neue (45 Light, 93 Black Extended), TheSansSemiBold (Plain), Arial Rounded MT (Bold, Regular), TheSansLight (Plain), Univers (93 Extra Black Extended Oblique) Graphic Name Color Space Eff. Res. driver_BW_NYT_3.tif (Gray; 472 ppi), Autism Speaks Logo_ BW.eps (Gray; 1689 ppi), Autism Speaks Logo_4CV9.eps, AdCouncil Logo_4CV9.epsFilename: P76569_E_ATF_GEN_V6.inddProof #: 6 Path: Studio:Volumes:Studio:Mechanic... chanicals:P76569_E_ATF_GEN_V6.indd Operators: Hasani / Blane Robison Ink Names Magenta Yellow BlackCreated: 7/5/07 3:28 PM Saved: 7/20/07 10:40 AM Printed: 7/20/07 10:40 AM Print Scale: 100% Odds of a child being in a fatal automobile accident: 1 in 23,000 Odds of a child being diagnosed with autism: 1 in 150HI-RES ARTPRINTED ON LASER To learn more of the signs of autism, visit autismspeaks.org No words by 16 months. No babbling by 12 months.Some signs to look for:No big smiles or other joyful expressions by 6 months. X1AT: 5.75 inT: 10.5 in

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THURSDAY, MAY 2, 2013 MPRF NEWS BASE BUILDERS GOOD HEALTH Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The Maritime Patrol Association (MPA) celebrated international partnerships at the annual Heritage Dinner April 18 at NAS Jacksonville by welcoming United States Navy service members and foreign allies in the maritime patrol and reconnaissance commu nity to commend each oth ers historic pasts and ongoing cooperative relationships. The United States and allied maritime aviation partner ship spans the better part of the 20th century, said Guest Speaker Rear Adm. Sean Buck, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group. Beginning with the U.S. and allied efforts to defeat the German Navy during both World Wars, aviators proved the capability and future shape of the maritime patrol avia tion. International keynote speaker, Air Commodore Ken McCann, the United Kingdom Air Attache in Washington D.C., spoke of the close ties between the U.S. and the U.K. military forces from before Construction continues on the facil ity that will house operator training for the MQ-4C Triton unmanned air craft system and the P-8A Maintenance Training Facility. The two projects share a common site west of the P-8A Integrated Training Center on Yorktown Avenue. They also share a common entrance canopy on Child Street, where students will go to either the 8,938-sq.-ft., sin gle-story MQ-4C Triton schoolhouse or the 58,262-sq.-ft., two-story P-8A Poseidon schoolhouse for maintainers. Elkins Constructors Quality Control Manager Adam Harris said, With the exterior walls up and the roof almost complete, much of our work has moved inside. You can see various tradesmen fabricating and installing things such as air conditioning ducts, plumbing, conduits for electrical wires and computer cables, chilled water and fire suppres sion systems. After block masons complete the walls of various rooms, inte rior metal wall framing will be installed MPA Heritage Dinner honors partners, heroes New Triton and Poseidon training facilities taking shape Keeping birds away from airfieldAt Naval Air Station Jacksonville, an average of 200 aircraft helicopters, planes and jets take off and land each day. Those million-dollar-plus flying machines inevitably share the air with laughing gulls, ospreys and falcons. Great egrets and great blue herons. Mourning doves and crows. And lots and lots of least terns. If one of them meets an air craft in the worst way, flying into an engine or slamming through a windshield, a disas ter could happen. As Winston Rogers, airfield facilities deputy manager at the base, said, After human and mechanical error, the biggest threat to aviation in the terminal area is wildlife, primarily birds. The first time a bird vs. air craft collision claimed a Navy life was 1917, the first year the Navy took to the air, said Cmdr. Mark McManus, operations officer at NAS Jacksonville. Its always been a threat, he said. Less than six months ago a P-3 Orion at the base struck a bird, and that resulted in roughly $300,000 worth of damage, Rogers said. But the most well-known recent incident was in 2009, when a U.S. Airways jet struck a flock of Canadian geese and crashed into the Hudson River. The Bird Aircraft Strike Hazard, or BASH, program at the air station tries to save Navy aircraft, money and lives by reducing strikes. It is a joint effort between airfield manage ment, air operations, squadron safety officers and environmental employees. Its a team sport, Rogers said. Distracting birds For years the Navy relied mainly on active measures to disperse birds from airfield areas. It used to be, OK, were going to go out with pyrotechnics, were going to scare the birds off, Rogers said. While they still take that approach when the sun rises every day, Rogers gets in a pickup with a scare gun and drives the airfield looking for birds the BASH program also incor porates science. Since 2011, Kevin McGrath, a

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 2, 2013 May 2 1975 U.S. Navy departs Vietnamese waters at end of evacuation. May 3 1861 USS Surprise cap tures Confederate privateer Savannah. 1898 Marines land at Cavite, Philippines and raise U.S. flag. 1949 First Navy firing of a high altitude Viking rocket at White Sands, N.M. May 4 1917 First Navy ships (Destroyer Division 8) arrive at Queenstown, Ireland, to pro vide convoy escorts against German U-boats. 1942 Battle of Coral Sea, the first carrier vs. carrier battle, begins. 1945 Japanese attempt to land on Okinawa is repulsed; kamikaze attacks damage six U.S. Navy ships. 1961 Pilot Cmdr. Malcolm Ross, USNR, and medi cal observer Lt. Cmdr. Victor Prather Jr., ascended in two hours to more than 110,00 feet in Strato-Lab 5, a 411foot hydrogen filled balloon launched from from the deck of USS Antietam. This was the highest altitude attained by man in an open gondola. Tragically, Prather drowned during the recovery. May 5 1944 USS Comfort is com missioned in San Pedro, Calif., the first ship to be manned jointly by Army and Navy per sonnel. 1948 VF-17A becomes first carrier qualified jet squadron (on board USS Saipan). 1961 Cmdr. Alan Shepard Jr. makes first U.S. manned space flight. Freedom 7 (Mercury 3) traveled 15 minutes and 28 seconds to reach the altitude of 116.5 statute miles with a velocity of 5,134 mph. Recovery was by HUS1 helicopter of HMR(L)262 from USS Lake Champlain (CVS-39). 1980 USS Robert E. Peary rescues 440 Vietnamese refu gees from disabled craft south of Thailand. May 6 1909 Great White Fleet anchors in San Francisco. 1916 First ship-to-shore radio telephone voice con versation from USS New Hampshire off Virginia Capes to SECNAV Josephus Daniels in Washington, D.C. 1942 Capt. Milton Miles arrives in Chungking, China, to begin building an intelligence and guerilla training organiza tion, Naval Group China. 1945 Naval landing force evacuates 500 Marshallese from Jaluit Atoll, Marshall Islands May 7 1779 Continental Navy sloop Providence captures British brig Diligent off Cape Charles. 1934 USS Constitution completes tour of principal U.S. ports. 1940 FDR orders Pacific Fleet to remain in Hawaiian waters indefinitely. 1942 Carrier aircraft sink Japanese carrier Shoho during Battle of Coral Sea. May 8 1911 Navy ordered its first airplane, Curtiss A-1, Birthday of Naval Aviation 1942 Battle of the Coral Sea ends with Japanese retiring from area. 1945 VE Day, Germanys unconditional surrender to the Allies. 1963 Navy ships evacuate 2,279 civilians from Haiti dur ing crisis. 1972 U.S. Navy and Marine Corps aircraft mine Haiphong Harbor in North Vietnam. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Every April, my older boys eagerly await the first phone call from their Little League coach. Im probably biased, but hes the best one out there. For years he has continued to coach, even after his own son grew out of the league, and he has seen ballplayers go from too-young-to-play siblings on the bleachers to captains of the team. This year, the call from coach came while we were on our way back from a weeklong vacation in Washington, D.C. I put him on speakerphone so that the boys could hear. Their smiles were impossible to hide. The first practice would be in a few days, and the first game in a couple of weeks. Ford and Owen wanted to know which new kids had been recruited for the team. They recognized some names, but not others. And then the coach said, Two teams had to be cut this year. We just didnt have enough kids trying out. So the players from those teams went back into the draft, and some of them will join our team. The boys looked confused: Two teams got cut? What? For as long as Ford has been playing Little League, there have been six teams. Players stay with their team through out the three to four years of Little League, and the team names have become a legacy. Older teenagers say, Oh, I was on that team when I was a kid. Parents say, I always wanted to be on that team. Younger sib lings say, I hope I get to be on that team, too. The league lost two teams? Ford asked. Why? Not enough numbers trying out, Coach said again. Ford and Owen were stunned. It was impossible for them to understand why boys all over the city arent counting down the weeks until Opening Day. How could the league not have enough people trying out? My boys are biased. They love baseball more than any other sport. But in the front seat, I was worrying about something else: Where have all the kids gone? Its not just Little League; on any given day, only a handful of kids are playing in the park down the street. Most of them have mothers hovering nearby. The sidewalks arent filled with kids walking back and forth looking for a game or a neigh bor to play. And now our Little League cant fill up six teams? This isnt a new concern. The term helicopter parents didnt come from nowhere. For quite some time, academics and sociologists have lament ed the loss a childhood that includes a mother hanging out the door and screaming, Come back when the street lights turn on! The handhelddevice generation has been absent from the outdoors for several decades now. But Little League? I thought helicopter parents wanted to involve their chil dren in as many organized, after-school activities as possi ble. I thought the sidewalks and parks were empty because all the kids were at soccer, base ball and dreaded play dates. This troubled me for sev eral days, until it occurred to me that of course Little League would take a hit in this new generation. Baseball is one of the most hands-off (as far as parents are concerned) sports a child can go into. Everything about baseball breeds autonomy: the dug outs that separate parents and children, the fence around the field, the space between the outfield and the bleachers. (Go ahead and try to coach your child from the sidelines; they probably wont hear you.) One mother told me that baseball is too much of a time commitment, for her son. Its true; the teams practice for about two hours several times a week. And the weekend games, this mother said, go on for hours! Well, that depends on per spective. If you stay with your kids, practice probably seems long. If you drop them off, as I do, it doesnt seem long enough. I can hardly get through the grocery store and its time to go get them again. But thats only if I drive them. Most days, they walk to and from the field, and then I get a few extra minutes. A whole gang of boys travels down the sidewalk with baseball bags slung over their shoulders. Who knows what they talk about. Probably a continua tion of the same no-parentsallowed talk that goes on in the dugout. You see, besides the sport, all of this the walks, the dugout, the team is why my boys look forward to baseball. Each spring, they get a little independence from me. They bond with a team. They go into the dugout as little boys, and they come out just a wee bit older. And, well, I guess Im sur prised more boys and moms arent signing up for this.Hey, MoneyChic! A few friends have been talking about the easy money they are being loaned from online payday lenders. It seems way too easy, is there a catch? MoneyChic sez: You may be inter ested in the fast cash those lenders are offering, but are you willing to risk your identity for that money? Not only are payday lenders a horrible decision because of their astronomical interest rates, but they put your identity at risk. According to Jean Ann Fox, direc tor of Consumer Protection for the Consumer Federation of America, Internet payday loans are dangerous for cash-strapped consumers. They combine the high costs and collection risks of check-based payday loans with security risks of sending bank account numbers and Social Security numbers over web links to unknown lenders. Payday loans over the Internet are pretty simple to apply for. Military members are asked to verify employ ment and income which can be done by faxing a copy of your military ID card and your most recent LES. Both of the required items still con tain part or all of your social security number! To further make matter worse, bank account information and pass word must be provided once approved for a loan so payments may be made to the account and taken from the account. This leaves your account vul nerable to predators! Would you want your social security number, picture, pay information, and bank account numbers to be floating through space on a more than likely unsecured website or network? Another potential problem is that a few of these companies are not even legitimate. They are scams that are trying to steal identities and may even be located outside the United States where our laws do not matter. If a company is not able to be easily located by the consumer, it is more than likely a scam! Making informed financial decisions will help protect your money and your identity. Check your credit report for errors and suspicious activity. Establish an emergency fund so you dont have to rely on these easy to get online pay day loans. Seek assistance from NavyMarine Corps Relief Society as your first resort! To find out exactly how Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society can help you, stop by our office at the Yorktown Gate or call 542-2832. Have questions for Hey, Money Chic? Drop me an e-mail at megan.stolle@ nmcrs.org Where have all the baseball kids gone?

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Lt. Jared Wilhelm, a U.S. Naval War College (NWC) Fleet Seminar Program stu dent assigned to VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville, has been select ed to participate in the 2014 Olmsted Scholar Program. The Olmsted Scholar Program, a three-year pro gram which serves as a key to prepare young officers for future leadership roles in an ever-increasing international operating environment, offers a unique opportunity to pur sue two years of graduate study using a foreign language while providing oversees cultural and travel opportunities. I believe that the Olmsted Scholar Program will better prepare me to be a leader in the maritime patrol and reconnaissance community, where an in-depth understanding of foreign cultures impacts Sailors on a daily basis, said Wilhelm. Wilhelm currently serves as the maintenance quality assurance officer for VP-30 and noted how his experience during previous deployments and assignments reinforced the importance of cultural diver sity required of todays Navy leaders. Wilhelm will complete the NWC Fleet Seminar Program in May and begin language training in the summer or fall of 2013. Following one year of inten sive foreign language study stateside, Wilhelm will attend the National University of Cuyo in Mendoza, Argentina to pur sue his political science graduate program studies. The Olmsted program will be an extension of the Fleet Seminar Programs ability to expand views beyond our daily work environment, he said. During his tenure in Argentina, Wilhelm will study and interact with the popula tion using Spanish fluency and emphasize development of language skills and regional cul tural. The opportunity to learn a foreign language in an aca demic setting during immer sion in a foreign culture while pursuing graduate work cant be achieved from a ship or a base, added Wilhelm. For more information on the FY-15 Olmsted Scholar Program view NAVADMIN 101/13 or visit www.olmsted foundation.org/olmsted/ web/index.cfm?view=scholars Program/vwMain On April 12, Capt. Mark Turner, director, Navy Staff College at the Naval War College, and VP-30 Commanding Officer Cap. Mark Stevens awarded naval flight officer (NFO) wings to the following 11 officers: Ensign Kristoffe Bostic, Ensign Taylor Brauns, Ensign Samuel Hall, Ensign Clifton Johnson, Lt. j.g. Owen Keller, Lt .j.g. Douglas Kettler, Ensign Steven Miller, Ensign Andrew Nesburg, CWO3 Marcos Plata, Ensign Brian Ruane, and Ensign Eugene Soto. The recipients completed the Undergraduate Maritime Flight Officer syllabus at VP-30, earning their coveted wings of gold. These newly winged aviators will now enroll in the CAT I Fleet Replacement Squadron syllabus at VP-30. Upon completion of the CAT I sylla bus, they will report to operational maritime patrol and reconnaissance squadrons to begin their initial sea tours in either Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii; Whidbey Island, Wash.; or Jacksonville. The NFO training pipeline begins with Aviation Preflight Introduction (API) instruction in Pensacola, where all aviation officers undergo a class room syllabus and are taught the basics of naval aviation which includes aero dynamics, meteorology and principles of navigation. After completing API, all student NFOs report for primary training at VT-10, co-located at NAS Pensacola. While assigned to VT-10 they transi tion from a classroom learning environment to initial airborne flight training in the T-6A Texan II. Upon completion of primary flight training at NAS Pensacola, officers who are selected for the P-3, EP-3 or P-8 training pipeline report to VP-30 for specific aircraft training. As part of their volunteer month celebration, HandsOn Jacksonville pre sented the VP-8 Fighting Tigers the Service in Uniform Award. VP-8 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Michael Marston accepted the award at the CelebrateGOOD! event at the Times Union Center for the Performing Arts in downtown Jacksonville, April 18. Exemplifying the Service in Uniform Award, given annually to an excep tional volunteer that wears or has worn a uniform, the Fighting Tigers have helped others across three continents. While deployed from June to November of last year, VP-8 members supported the Exodo Orphanage, the Todo Corazon Homeless Shelter in El Salvador. Across the globe, they helped strengthen international ties with Japan as they helped on the clean up following a devastating 2011 tsunami. Upon returning home, VP-8 kept giving to the Jacksonville community continuing their partnership with the Sulzbacher Center, HabiJax, The Catty Shack Ranch and several schools. The maintenance department of VP-8 continues to support P3-C squadrons at home and abroad. While working through repairs on their own aging aircraft, assist ing with hosting transient squadrons, and supporting Aviation Intermediate Maintenance Department as mod line squadron, the Fighting Tigers team completed two and a half weeks of fuel cell maintenance and an Integrated Maintenance Concept (IMC) inspec tion required to return a critical Task Group 47.1 (VP-10) asset to the forward deployed fight, April, 24. Understanding the VP-10 Red Lancers limited resources to complete major maintenance while deployed, six VP-8 aviation structural mechan ics or airframers as they are commonly known worked a total of 400 man hours to patch leaks in four fuel cells, while others expedited an IMC inspection. This maintenance team truly understands the meaning of one team, one fight. We were able to get a critical AIP asset back into the counter-drug fight with minimum down time, said AMC James Agner, VP-8 airframes leading chief petty officer. The aircraft was returned to VP-10 following a successful functional check flight. After a short respite, the team is hard at work once again in support of VP-10 with two more aircraft.VP-8 awarded for community service by HandsOn JacksonvilleFighting Tigers help return valuable assets to U.S. Fourth Fleet VP-30 officer selected for 2014 Olmsted Scholar Program VP-30 wings Navys newest naval flight officers JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 2, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 2, 2013 Seabees always improving, building at NAS JacksonvilleIn these times of budget uncertainty, the 52 men and women of Construction Battalion Maintenance Unit (CBMU) 202, Detail Jacksonville, are always ready to help with high quality, eco nomical station-improvement projects. At the details Birmingham Avenue headquarters, Officer-in-Charge BUCS(SCW/SW) Mark Boice said, Our highly quali fied Seabees can build projects from the ground up, by providing most of the skilled labor required for the subgrade utilities, foun dations, concrete block walls, steel erection and electri cal systems. Operations Chief UTC(SCW) Duane Jerry explained that Seabees projects at NAS Jacksonville are planned and execut ed in conjunction with Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast and the base public works officer. Jerry keeps track of projects on his computer, from which he generates weekly reports for CBMU-202 head quarters in Little Creek, Va., as well as Naval Construction Group Two in Gulfport, Miss., that provide details on project materials, cost, crew size, days worked, safety and quality assurance. I also include a photo sitrep that graphically shows the completion of every key phase for a particular project from day one. For those in the chain of command who cant be boot-on-theground with our projects, the photo sitrep keeps them up to date, said Jerry. Our detail is for tunate to have a lot of new and efficient equipment. From graders, dozers, dump trucks and forklifts, to gen erators, pumps and other machinery, our equipment enables us to reach the high est project stan dards, said Jerry. CBMU-202 stood up in February 2005 at Little Creek, Va. It has active detach ments in Naval District Washington, NSB Kings Bay, Ga., NAS Jacksonville and NAS Key West in Florida, plus, two reserve detachments at USMC Camp Lejeune, N.C. Boice explained, Our mission is to provide public works support at naval support activities, forward operating bases and fleet hospital/expeditionary medical facilities during wartime or contingency operations. We also pro vide disaster recovery support to naval regional commanders in CONUS. The Seabees were founded on March 5, 1942 and are known throughout the military for their capability to pro vide expeditionary construction and engineering (combat service support) to Navy, Marine Corps, joint and other operational forces.

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for classrooms and administrative spaces. Chris Sears, a retired AMC, is the site safety and health officer for Elkins Constructors. Its nice to come back and serve the navy here at NAS Jax as a civilian. Both Elkins and the navy have strong safety cultures. He noted that the project includes environmen tal enhancements such as the recently installed 20,000-gallon underground cistern that collects and filters rainwater that will be used to flush toilets in the new facilities. Harris added, Like the P-8A Integrated Training Center next door, this design features raised flooring so technicians can easily access electrical wiring and computer cables for future modifications or repairs. These are dynamic structures so as training mod ules change in the future, the building can economically adapt. When construction is complete, Boeing will install mock P-8A Poseidon components to provide hands-on training for maintainers that may include an opera tional load trainer, integrated avionics trainer, flight control hydraulics, landing gear, engine and environmental control systems, said Harris. TRAINING 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 2, 2013

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World War II to present day Afghanistan. Throughout this time, both our great coun tries have been stead fast in the face of adver sity, standing shoulder to shoulder and working seamlessly together to defeat our common foes, said McCann. In recognition of this international brother hood, Flight Lt. John Cruickshank, VC of the Royal Air Force (RAF), was inducted into the MPA Hall of Honor dur ing the dinner along with two U.S. counterparts, Cmdr. Paul Lloyd Milius and Rear Adm. Thomas Davies. These three men and their accomplishments are without a doubt and by anyones standard, legendary, said Buck. Flight Lt. John Cruickshank earned the Victoria Cross, the U.K. equivalent to the U.S. Medal of Honor, for his successful action against a German U-boat while on anti-submarine war fare (ASW) patrol July 17, 1944. As the pilot of a Catalina aircraft, Cruickshank led his crew in the sinking of the submarine while under hostile fire. During the multiple attacks, the navigator/bomb aimer was killed, the second pilot and two other members of the crew were injured, and Cruickshank was struck in 72 places, receiving two serious wounds in the lungs and 10 penetrating wounds in the lower limbs. Refusing medical aid, Cruickshank insisted on taking control of his badly damaged aircraft and in spite of his injuries he gave orders as necessary until the air craft was safely landed on the water. He was so critically injured that he had to be given a blood transfusion before he could be removed from the plane to hospital. Accepting the Hall of Honor award on behalf of Cruickshank, Flight Lt. Mark Faulds, a visit ing RAF member train ing at VP-30, extended Cruickshanks sincere thanks for the honor. Cruickshank, who trained at NAS Pensacola in the 1940s is now near ing the age of 93 and is the sole surviving recipi ent of the Victoria Cross from World War II. I spoke with John yesterday, said Faulds. He is 93 and living inde pendently in sheltered housing in Aberdeen, Scotland. He is still as sharp as a tack. According to Faulds, Cruickshank speaks fondly of the U.S. Navy, and says of his training in Pensacola, Fla., It was one of the highlights of my career, and although it was the first stage of my training, I felt it tremen dous value. It made me a good aviator. On Feb. 27, 1968, Cmdr. Paul Milius departed his base at Nakhon Phanom, Thailand piloting an OP-2E Neptune on an armed reconnaissance mission over Laos for Observation Squadron (VO) 67. Milius was over his assigned target and delivering ordnance on the target when the air craft was struck by sus pected anti-aircraft artillery. A projectile struck the underside of the air craft and exploded in the radar well. The avionics technician was struck by fragments of the projec tile and began bleeding profusely. The radar well burst into flames and Milius ordered the crew to bail out and remained in the cockpit as they departed. Seven crew members safely exited the aircraft and were subsequently rescued by search and rescue forces. Milius was not rescued nor were his remains ever recovered. In 1978, Milius was awarded the Navy Cross and in 1996 the U.S. Navy commissioned the Arleigh Burke classs destroyer, Milius (DDG69), in his honor. The ships motto is Alii Prae Me which translates to others before me. Capt. Barney Walsh, USN (Ret.) accepted the award on behalf of the Milius family and held the dinner guests cap tive recounting the last few moments of the 1968 encounter from his own point of view as the Milius co-pilot aboard the Neptune. I looked up after my chute opened and knew Capt. Milius was at the controls keeping the bird straight and level, allow ing the crew to bail out, said Walsh. Walsh was joined on stage by AXC Roger Arntzen, USN (Ret.), also a former member of VO-67 and Milius crew that day. Walsh indicated that some 25 years after the 1968 incident, We started reassembling our VO-67 personnel and started our squad ron reunions which were enabled due to the Internet. Now we have about 180 of the origi nal squadron mem bers brought together in reunions every two years with the next one sched uled for July 2013 in San Diego, said Walsh. Rear Adm. Thomas Davies, USN (Ret.) was a maritime Navy pilot who received the Distinguished Flying Cross during World War II for the sinking of a German U-boat in the South Atlantic. After the war, as a developmen tal pioneer of the P-2 Neptune, he set several aviation records includ ing the longest unrefu eled flight, flying a P-2 from Perth, Australia to Columbus, Ohio more than 11,000 miles. For this flight he was given a second Distinguished Flying Cross, this time directly from President Harry Truman. In addi tion, he was a commanding officer, a diplomat, and an expert and inno MPA 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 2, 2013

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U.S. Department of Agriculture employee, has studied patterns of birds at the base. Working with the information gathered, he tries to identify passive measures that could steer birds away from the airfield, an area of 11 million square yards surrounded by the St. Johns and Ortega rivers and two golf courses, all of which are popular bird destinations. Some of McGraths efforts are plainly visible. Two weeks ago, for example, he put two orange tube men that lean and stand up with the wind atop a hangar that has a white, gravel roof. The roof resembles the preferred nesting area of least terns and the tube men act as scarecrows. Other ways arent as easy to discern. Like this: The base keeps the grass around the airfield eight to 14 inches high. That keeps it high enough so raptors have trouble seeing prey they might want to swoop in for, but low enough so that Canadian geese arent attracted to areas of tall seedheads. Its nothing to see a Canadian goose land and then they can just put their beak at the bottom of the grass and zip right up and take every seed off and have a mouth full of seed, McGrath said. This week, Seabees at the base began constructing an alternative nesting site for least terns around the base. If the least terns are going to nest at the base, the Navy would prefer they choose this spot. The area will eventually be four acres fenced in to keep predators away and topped with river rocks to attract the birds, said Christine Bauer, natural resources manager at Jacksonville NAS. While the Navy estimates that only 25 percent of bird strikes are reported, the BASH program encourages pilots to collect any remains, known as snarge, to submit for identification. The idea is that better records lead to a better understanding of migratory patterns. Firing blanks While vegetation management and alternative nesting sites are long-term goals, the most immediate and best way to cut down on strikes is dispersing birds when they show up. On Tuesday morning, before the rest of the days responsibilities began, Rogers got in his pickup and drove the airfield. Sometimes birds leave before anyone gets close. There were three juve nile bald eagles stand ing around the airfield and they flew off about the same time they were spotted. Other times birds dont scare as easily and a boom is needed. This also happened Tuesday, when Rogers drove by an approach lighting system for helicopters stretching about 50 yards into the St. Johns River. There were a few dozen least terns walking along the lighting system and they didnt mind Rogers presence. With his scare gun that essentially shoots blanks, he fired a few bangers that sound like a firecracker and a few screamers that act like bottle rockets. At that, the least terns flew into the sky, regrouped and appeared to con sider coming back until Rogers fired another screamer. Satisfied they were gone for a while, Rogers, dressed in jeans, a col lared shirt and cowboy boots, hopped into his pickup and headed out for the rest of the airfield. The job of keeping birds out of the way of flying machines is never ending. Its an all-day process, Rogers said. Its an all-year process in Jacksonville because of our location and climate and proximity to water. Some months are obviously a lot heavier than others. Seagulls are just now starting to come in. BASH JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 2, 2013 11

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Despite the impact of sequester, classes at the NAS Jacksonville Fitness Source continue on thanks to a dedi cated group of volunteers who strive to keep military members and other patrons physically fit. With all the ongoing budget chal lenges weve been facing lately, all Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Departments were mandated to cut fit ness classes down to 12 per week. But thanks to the innovated mindset of NAS Jax MWR Director John Bushick, we have been able to use volunteers on our group exercise classes to keep the morale of our patrons high without affecting budget issues, said NAS Jax Athletic Director Tanya Henigman. With our wonderful group of volunteer instructors, weve been able to keep 29 classes going each week. These are highly trained, nationally certified fit ness instructors who volunteer their time to help our patrons accomplish their fitness goals, she added. Terry Crawford, a civilian employee at the NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center, has volunteered as a group fit ness instructor for the past 10 years. He currently teaches step aerobics, cardio kickboxing and Zumba. I volunteer because I appreciate each and every person who sacrifices time to be in my class. There was a time when I was paid for doing this but when the budget was cut and my pay went away, I was asked to volunteer, said Crawford. I immediately said yes because some of my class members have been with me since my first day and I didnt think it would be fair to leave them after they have shown me such great dedication and devotion. Crawford continued, Some of my students have shared their weight loss success stories with me and the struggles theyve endured. To quit volunteering would be like leaving a great friend or family member. And as a group fitness instructor, I can reach a greater mass of people and become an inspiration to someone afraid to sign up for a personal trainer. For David Santillo, who volunteers his time to instruct the Max Core and spin classes, teaching helps keep him motivated and challenged. Its important to keep the classes challenging for all levels and to make them fun by showing different routines and training programs. I train to stay in shape for the sports I do, which include racquetball, tennis, cycling and moto cross, he stated. Its real easy for most people to skip the gym. It takes dedication to make working out part of your daily sched ule. The benefits though are reward ing for your health, said Santillo. Its awesome when students who have been attending my class for a month or lon ger, thank me for helping them achieve their goal in fitness and they see a dif ference in performance and the way they look and feel. Anytime I get feed back knowing I made a difference in someones life, is the best encourage ment I can get to continue volunteer ing. Ebony Solomon, an accounting technician for Fleet Family and Readiness Programs at Commander, Navy Region Southeast began teaching high-ener gy spin and spin/flex classes in August 2011. I started volunteering because I love spinning and it was a good way to spend my lunch break instead of eating at my desk, said Solomon. Now its more than that. I use music to inspire and push people to do their best. Its not about killing yourself. Its about getting a good workout and enjoying it. I try to make my class different every time so people dont get bored with it and quit. Charles Kerekes, department head at Naval Hospital Jacksonville Substance Volunteers keep fitness classes spinning 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 2, 2013

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Deweys free Spring Concert Series 7 p.m. on the outdoor stage May 3 Boogie Freaks May 10 7th Street Band May 17 Zero-NFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 126 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included Friday special $1 games per person 25 p.m. Shoe rental not includedFitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 The outdoor pool hours April 1 May 5 Open Monday Friday (lap swim only) 6 a.m. 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 7 p.m. Saturday & Sunday (lap swim only) 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. During lap swim only the waterslide, water park and concessions will not be open. Outdoor Pool opens for recreational swimming on May 11Pool will be open weekends, Saturday & Sunday 11 a.m. 6 p.m. 2013 Learn to Swim Program Sign-up at the Gym (the Zone) May 11, 8 a.m. 3 p.m. Session 1: June 10 20 Session 2 July 8 18 Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Disney Cruise Lines will be at ITT on June 11, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Learn more about exciting 2013/2014 trips sailing from Port Canaveral, Miami, Galveston, Barcelona, San Juan and Vancouver. Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Daytona International Speedway Subway Firecracker July 5 and Coke 400 July 6 Tickets on sale now! Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Funkfest Metropolitan Park May 10-11 2-day ticket $52 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3, 2013 Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7, 2013 Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline 2013 Live Broadway Series Celtic Woman May 2 $44 $134 American Idiot May 14 & 15 $25 $62 Dream Girls May 21Cesar Millan June 1 $42 $52Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through May 15and must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about our special discounted tickets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park One day pass $30, Gold pass $71The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. World of Nations Celebration May 4 at 12 p.m. Barracks Bash May 9, 4 8 p.m. Free food, entertainment and prizes! The Players Championship May 11 at 11 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees May 7 & 21 for active duty May 9 & 23 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Loudmouth Thursday Any golfer wearing a pair of loudmouth shorts or pants plays 18 holes with cart for $20 Open to military, DoD and guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Free Stand-up Paddle Board Lessons Every Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina May 18, 19, 25 & 26 June 15, 16, 22 & 23 July 20, 21, 27 & 28 Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Movie Under the Stars Featuring The Croods May 24 at 8:30 p.m. Patriots GroveFlying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School June 3 July 10 $500 per person For more information, call Bill Bonser at 5422930 or e-mail bill.bonser@ navy.mil. VOLUNTEERSAbuse Rehabilitation Program agrees. Ive been teaching spinning since the late 1990s because it motivates me to stay fit and I enjoy the interaction with the regulars and teaching new students, he said. It also helps me decompress and lowers stress levels. BM1 Chris Hill of Coastal Riverine Squadron 10 is also a certified fitness instructor who volunteers to teach the Extreme Boot Camp Class. I teach group fitness so I can better myself as a coach and as a better person down the road, said Hill, who is certified as a level one Crossfit coach and a Level USAW Sport Performance Olympic weightlifting coach. New volunteer Deonne Noelani Nabalta-Freeman came on board in January to instruct Zumba classes. With years of experience doing Polynesian dancing, Zumba was second nature to her. I have been taking Zumba classes here since 2010 so when the opportu nity came open to teach, I volunteered. I enjoy watching people who are normally shy come out and see the transformation that they make. The NAS Jax Fitness Source offers a wide variety of fitness classes for beginners and those who continue to chal lenge their endurance. For more infor mation, call 542-3518 or stop by to pick up a schedule of classes. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 2, 2013 13

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Sailors from NAS Jacksonville joined with Royal Australian Navy (RAN) 725 Squadron on April 25 to commemorate ANZAC Day, the anniversary of the first major military action fought by Australian and New Zealand forces during the First World War. In 1915, the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) formed part of the allied expedition that set out to capture the Gallipoli pen insula in Turkey, explained Cmdr. David Frost, com manding officer of RAN 725 Squadron. The ANZAC force landed on Gallipoli on April 25 and met fierce resistance from the Ottoman Turkish defend ers. What had been planned as a bold stroke to knock Turkey out of the war became a stale mate and dragged on for eight months. At the end of 1915, after both sides had suffered heavy casualties, allied forces were evacuated. More than 8,000 Australian soldiers were killed. April 25 soon became the day on which Australians and New Zealanders remembered the sacrifice of those who died in the war. At the end of the Second World War, ANZAC Day also served to commemorate the lives of Australians who died in that war. In subsequent years, ANZAC Day has been further broadened to include Australians killed in all the military operations in which Australia has been involved. The commemoration at NAS Jacksonville began at 8 a.m. with a gunfire break fast (including black coffee laced with rum) at Mulligans Restaurant. The official cere mony took place at 10 a.m. in the VP-30 Auditorium begin ning with a short video filled with interviews from survivors of Gallipoli. Speaking on behalf of his squadron in remembrance of those who bravely served, Frost said, We dont remem ber ANZAC day as a victory or for some glorification of the horrors of war. We remember ANZAC day as a testament to the human spirit possessed in those who have fought and died. Capt. Mark Stevens, com manding officer of VP-30, closed with warm statements emphasizing the friendship that Americans have enjoyed with Australia and New Zealand. I have been extremely proud to have had the honor to serve with service members from Australia and New Zealand. We have been close allies and friends for many years, and I hope we will continue that close relationship for many more years to come, said Stevens. IA luncheon set for May 16NAS Jacksonville and the Northeast Florida Navy League Councils will host the Individual Augmentee (IA) Recognition Luncheon May 16 at 11 a.m. at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center. During this luncheon, all NAS Jax and tenant command Sailors who have returned from an IA assign ment (within the last six months) will be recognized. There is no cost for IAs and their spouses. The cost for other military and civilian guests is $10. Tickets may be purchased at the Fleet and Family Support Center, Monday-Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. The deadline to purchase tickets is May 8. Childcare will be provided at the Child Development Center (CDC) for children of all IAs and spouses in attendance. Please call the CDC at 5428667 to reserve childcare. Pre-registration is required. To RSVP, contact your command CIAC or Bobby Johns, Individual Deployment Support, NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center at bobby.johns.ctr@navy.mil or for additional information, call 542-5745. ANZAC Day commemorated at NAS Jacksonville Navy representatives are needed to help welcome the Traveling Vietnam Memorial Wall to the Green Cove Springs Junior High May 9 from 9:3010:15 a.m. Sailors are asked to line the path (in uniform when able) along with the students and community members as the wall makes its way to the schools football field. The wall will be on display from May 9-12 with a special ceremony May 11 at 10:30 a.m. The Traveling Vietnam Memorial Wall is a scaled version of the Vietnam Memorial in Washington DC, stand ing six feet tall at the center and cov ers almost 300 feet from end to end. It is a traveling memorial serving as a reminder of the great sacrifices made during the Vietnam War. For more information, call 773-3693.Navy volunteers needed for Traveling Vietnam Memorial Wall exhibit 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 2, 2013

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 2, 2013 vator in several scientific fields, including navigation and optics and was the founder and first president of The Foundation for the Promotion of the Art of Navigation. An amazing side note was that as a midshipman in Annapolis, he recog nized the problem the Navy was hav ing with long range gun accuracy and developed an optical site that was uti lized by all large caliber U.S. and eventually U.K. naval guns until their retirement from service. His optical site can still be seen on retired battleships. Rear Adm. Michael Holmes, USN (Ret.) accepted Davies award on behalf of his family. More than 200 guests turned out for the Heritage Dinner which includ ed several international contingents, including personnel from the United Kingdom, Australia and Taiwan. In addition to the guest speakers and MPA Hall of Honor inductions, sever al U.S. Maritime and Reconnaissance Force personnel were recognized for outstanding achievement in their aviation designations. MPA awards were given to: MPA Pilots of the Year, Lt. Jacob Lasota of VP-16 and Lt. Lawrence Herman of VP-9; MPA Naval Flight Officers of the Year, Lt. Michael Steffens of VP-30 and Lt. Sarah Allen of VQ-1; MPA Enlisted Aircrewmen of the Year, AWV1(NAC/ AW) Corey Stevenson of VP-30 and AWV1(NAC/AW) Alfred Lombardo of VPU-2. In conjunction with the Heritage Dinner, MPA coordinated several additional events during the 2013 Symposium April 18-19, including the MPA general members meeting, the MPA Scholarship Golf Tournament, the MPA Scholarship 5K, and flight suit social. Incorporated less than two years ago, MPA has grown from wishful thinking to a thriving Florida non-profit corporation. In its first 20 months, MPA attract ed just under 1,000 active members, received over $65,000 from corporate sponsors, raised over $9,000 for the MPA Scholarship Fund, entertained hundreds of guests during the annual symposium week, and released sev eral issues of the quarterly newsletter, Planeside. For more information, visit: www. maritimepatrolassociation.org. MPA Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Deputy for Small Business, Nelson Smith, spoke to nearly 100 members of the local Society of American Military Engineers organization at a luncheon in Jacksonville, April 24. He shared a general overview of current challeng es and fiscal 2013 outlook for NAVFAC Southeast. Smiths comments followed those of Beth Myers, U.S. Army Corp of Engineers Jacksonville District Deputy for Small Business, who briefed on upcoming District activity and oppor tunities for small business contracts. The command is still experiencing curtailed activities in sustainment, restoration and modernization projects due to continuing budget uncertain ties, stated Smith. Energy projects are reduced from former levels, but MILCON projects continue. Smith focused his remarks on small business contracting technical issues keying in on proposals, stressing to the audience the importance of read ing, understanding and fully answering all of the questions in a solicitation to ensure consideration. Potential vendors need to pay par ticular attention to the schedule, specifications, evaluation factors and other contractural provisions set forth in the request for proposal, said Smith. Success is in the details. Read, understand and answer each question fully. Smith, and his team in the NAVFAC Southeast Office of Small Business Programs, know their business. They were recently recognized by NAVFAC Headquarters for exceeding all targets in all small business categories including Small Business, Focus Area Small Business, and Best in Class Small Disadvantaged Business, for fiscal year 2012, a fourth year in a row unprece dented achievement in NAVFAC. For NAVFAC small business information go to: https://smallbusiness.navfac. navy.mil NAVFAC Southeast small business deputy speaks to local contractors A U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Office of Air and Marine crew based at NAS Jacksonville, patrolling the open waters near Panama City, Panama spotted a speedboat carrying four suspects, fuel barrels and more than 3,300 pounds of pure cocaine April 20, which has an estimated value of more than $242 million. The CBP crew was aboard a P-3 air craft flying over the Gulf of Uraba as part of the Joint Interagency Task ForceSouth (JIATFS) Operation Martillo, when they detected a speedboat with a small radar signature traveling at a high rate of speed. The crew was able to see the four suspects, fuel barrels and multiple packages aboard the vessel. The crew notified Panama law enforcement and vectored three Panamanian interceptors to the vessels location. After Panamanian law enforcement fired warning shots, the vessel stopped and the crew, all claiming Colombian citizenship, was arrested and their boat seized. Our air crew agents are protecting our nations borders by actively patrolling the open waters of the Western Caribbean and Eastern Pacific as part of Operation Martillo, said Douglas Garner, director of National Air Security Operations Center in Florida. This year, P-3 operations in Corpus Christi, Texas and Jacksonville assisted in either the seizure or disruption of more than 54,000 pounds of cocaine, which is more than $4 billion denied to transnational criminal organizations. CBP P-3s have been an integral part of the successful counter-narcotic missions operating in coordination with JIATFS. The P-3s fly a 42 million square mile area known as the Source and Transit Zone which is twice the size of the continental U.S. The P-3s distinctive detection capabilities allow highly-trained crews to identify emerging threats well beyond the land borders of the U.S. in support of a Defense in Depth key CBP strategic goal. The Joint Interagency Task Force South is a national drug task force under U.S. Southern Command that facilitates U.S. and partner nation law enforcement interdiction efforts against illicit trafficking in support of national and regional security. Operation Martillo is designed to stop the flow of illicit trafficking through Central America and its Pacific and Caribbean coasts by disrupting trans national criminal organizations use of coastlines to ferry narcotics. Since its inception on Jan. 15, 2012, Operation Martillo has resulted in the apprehension of more than 400 indi viduals, the seizure of nearly 200 met ric tons of cocaine and the seizure or destruction of more than 100 vessels and aircraft.CBP spots speedboat carrying $242 million in cocaine Volunteers needed for Never Quit event Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville needs 30 volunteers to assist with the Warrior Challenge and an additional 75 officers and chief petty officers to facilitate the red carpet awards during the 2013 Never Quit Beach event May 19 from 5:45 a.m. to 3 p.m. All volunteers will receive a free Never Quit running shirt. For more information, call or email MC1 Brianna Dandridge at 396-5909, Ext 1150. Never Quit 2013 is a series of physical fitness events challenging athletes to maximize their strength and endurance performance including a 5K and a Spec Ops Warrior Challenge. The annual event takes place at Jacksonville Beach. For more information, go to: http:// neverquitnever.com.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 2, 2013 17 VR-62 Nomads awarded Golden Anchor Commander, Naval Reserve Forces announced April 13 that Fleet Logistics Squadron VR-62 won the Reserve Component Program Excellence Award for exceeding retention goals in fiscal year 2012. More commonly referred to as the Golden Anchor award, this honor is earned by commands that meet or exceed pre-determined Navy wide retention criteria. VR-62 metrics include the following: rate was 100 percent percent percent As a result, the Nomads will fly the Golden Anchor pennant. Im extremely proud of the time and effort that our career counselors NCC Kanisha Armintia and CS1 Ruth Nash as well as other members of the squadron put forth on this, said VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Tony Scarpino. Our challenge now is to keep up the great momentum weve established here at VR-62, he added. VR-62 is a Navy Reserve squadron based at NAS Jacksonville that operates four of the Navys 19 C-130T Hercules logistics aircraft. Air logistics missions may include high-priority passengers, special parts and supplies as well as mail, ammunition, ordnance, and aircraft engines. VP-5 transition spotlightAs VP-5 transitions to the P-8A Poseidon the squadron is highlighting a transitioning Mad Fox each week. This weeks spotlight shines on AME2(AW) Jesse Espinosa. Espinosa is from Houston, and is one of four brothers. He previously served in VPU-2 Special Projects out of Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii before joining the Mad Foxes. As an aviation structural mechanic, he is respon sible for numerous systems aboard the P-8A. They include, but are not limited to, survival oxy gen, air conditioning, anti-ice, fire bottles, crew seats, dry bay fire extinguishing, and the onboard inert gas generating system. The AME transition has been unique. They were one of the last groups to receive formalized ground training. Therefore, Espinosa spent the beginning of his transition receiving hands-on training at VP-30 before solidifying what he had learned with a three-week course at the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training (CNATTU). Espinosa will also soon be qualified as a collateral duty inspector for the P-8A. This will allow him to sign off work completed by other Mad Fox maintainers. This extensive qualification requires him to be qualified in tow tractor, wing walking, brake riding, auxiliary power unit operation, and ordnance. VP-5 has been transitioning to the P-8A Poseidon since Jan. 4. Approximately 65 percent of all Department of Defense (DoD) household goods moves are performed during the summer peak season period (May through August). The mov ing industry continues to advise DoD they do not have the capac ity (equipment and per sonnel) to handle such surges over a short period of time. Meaning, every cus tomer may not get their requested moving date. Proper planning, flex ibility in move dates and communication with the household goods transportation service providers can reduce the potential for ship ment difficulties. Personnel preparing to execute a PCS move are encouraged to take the following actions: Register to access the Defense Personal Property System (DPS) at www.move.mil. Orders are not needed to register but will be required along with a signed copy of the application (DD form 1299) when you complete and submit the request for shipment. Once registered (and before you move), go to the www.move.mil main page and click on the link under DOD service members and civilians and review all the information via the links on the left side of the screen. Instructional vid eos are available via YOUTUBE check it out (www.youtube.com/ user/navyhhg). If you have difficulty accessing the system, or problems filling out the informa tion, there are computer kiosks available in the Personal Property Front Office in Building 100 at NAS Jacksonville. To schedule your move: Submit your application early. Three weeks advance notice of the requested move date is required to give you the best chance of getting your requested dates during summer peak season. Once you have your orders, review the Its your move pamphlet at http://www.transcom. mil/dtr/part-iv/dtr_ part_iv_app_k_1.pdf. Complete the self-coun seling at www.move. mil and immediately provide a copy of offi cial orders and a signed copy of the application DD form 1299 to your local personal property office. Applications for household goods moves will not be processed and moves cannot be scheduled without a valid copy of official orders and a signed application. You can drop of your documents at our NAS Jacksonville office locat ed in Bldg 110, 1st floor, Yorktown Ave. We can also accept documents via fax (904-542-1206) or email hhg_jacksonvile@ navy.mil. Be flexible when arranging dates for packing, pick-up and delivery. Moving dur ing the summer sea son (May 15 Aug. 30) presents unique chal lenges, especially moves made during the peak of the peak (June 15 June through July 4). Often during this period mov ing companies are operating at capacity and sometimes a first choice of moving dates cannot be accommodated. You should schedule your move before or after the peak of the peak whenever possible. Differences between the requested and actual pick-up dates can impact plans to vacate housing, commence travel and execute other PCS-related events. Final pack and pickup dates are not con firmed until the con clusion of the pre-move survey, so make sure you obtain confirma tion of pack and pickup dates before making final travel arrange ments. If circumstances require a change to the agreed upon pack and pickup dates, there is a substantial risk that the new requested dates may not be available and this may cause a delay in rescheduling your move. Stay in contact with the household goods moving company/trans portation service pro vider. DPS provides point of contact tele phone numbers for each transportation service provider supporting the move. Immediately notify the local personal prop erty office should any unforeseen issues arise. Consider performing a personally procured move, formerly known as a DITY move. Eligible service members may be paid up to 95 percent of the governments cost for performing a similar move. If you are going to move yourself or direct hire a moving company you must have orders in hand and complete a DD form 2278 in DPS and have it signed by your personal property office prior to taking any actions. Planning, prepara tion, flexibility and communication are keys to executing a successful household goods move. Service members may submit questions about their household goods moves via email to householdgoods@navy. mil or call (904) 5421000, Ext 6120, 6130 or 6107.Make your household move the smoothest ever Apply by May 31The American Red CrossNortheast Florida Chapter at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville is cur rently recruiting for this summers Junior Red Cross volunteers. This offers an excellent opportunity for students interested in health careers to train with highly skilled Navy Medicine professionalsphysi cians, nurses, pharmacists, therapists and techni ciansas well as contribute to a positive experience for patients. The program is open to a limited number of high school students age 16 to 18 who have base access. Volunteers work four to 20 hours per week in locations throughout the hospital, and receive CPR training. Apply onlineby May 31at www.nefloridaredcross. org At the website, click on volunteer, join us, youth volunteer application (or adult volunteer applica tion for 18 year-old students). Fill out the applica tion, select Northeast Florida Chapter, and create a Volunteer Connection account. After submitting the application, complete the online orientation. All applicants are required to attend a kick-off event (which includes an interview) June 8 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the hospitals 2nd deck conference room in the central tower (next to the chapel). For more about this opportunity, contact Junior Red Cross volunteer coordinators Terry Miles or Mary Miciano at 542-7525 or jaxredcrossoffice@med.navy. mil.Experience Navy Medicine as a Junior Red Cross volunteer

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18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 2, 2013 Outdoor cooking is taking off as spring weather takes hold, and commissaries worldwide have special promotions and products ideally suited for what shoppers look for during May. This is a great time of year to clean off the grill and take advantage of the commissaries great savings on fresh Choice Grade-A beef, pork and chicken, said Joyce Chandler, DeCA acting sales director. We havent forgotten that Mothers Day and Memorial Day weekend are special meal occasions during May, and the product selection in our stores worldwide has those covered, too. DeCAs industry partners vendors, suppliers and brokers are collaborating with commissaries in May to offer discounts beyond everyday savings. Overseas stores may have substitute events for certain promotional programs. Customers should check with their store manager to verify when they will be offering these sales events. The following promotions run May 9-29: Salute Memorial Day Sale hosted by ConAgra Foods offers shoppers recipe books with coupons and a mail-in opportunity to win outdoor cooking prizes. Select stores will also have product demonstrations. The ConAgra Foods website, www.conagracommis sarydeals.com features a list of all May sale items to help shoppers build their shopping list before heading to the commissary. Coupons will also be available on the website. This event seeks to raise public aware ness for the Fisher House Scholarships for Military Children. ConAgra Foods will donate a portion of their sales to the program. Krafts Salad Days encourages fresh salad sales and rewards shoppers. Commissaries will feature high-value coupon flyers with cross merchandising offers on Kraft and commissary produce items. Dr Pepper Snapple Group offers a chance to win 12 gas grills. Customers should look for the mass display of Dr Pepper and Snapple products; win ners will be announced by the end of July. Gatorade has a Memorial Day Sale honoring military members with its fourth annual military in uniform 32-ounce, custom bottle label. Unique in-store displays and online promotional events will drive awareness of this 32-ounce tribute pack. Gatorades Honoring Our Heroes essay con test gives commissary shoppers the opportunity to honor their military heroes and military spouses with prizes and free groceries. Commissary shoppers will be encouraged to visit www.gatorade military.com and in 200 words or less, explain who they feel deserves to win this contest. Those honored can include active duty and veterans, spouses, their families, friends, neighbors or organizations that benefit the military community. Each participant who submits an essay online will be provided a commissary-only coupon as a special thank-you. With Memorial Day and Mothers Day, our promotions this time of year go far to express the grati tude we in DeCA and our industry partners have for our military customers, Chandler said. Its our privilege to provide a commissary benefit thats worth the trip. Your commissary is blooming with May specials CLIENT: ATF PRODUCT: Car Seat JOB#: P76569_E SPACE: Full Page B/W BLEED: None TRIM: 5.75 in x 10.5 in SAFETY: None GUTTER: None PUBS: n/a ISSUE: n/a TRAFFIC: Donna McDonald ART BUYER: n/a ACCOUNT: Flavia Carvalho RETOUCH: n/a PRODUCTION: Rick Jones ART DIRECTOR: Jacob Maraya COPYWRITER: n/aThis advertisement was prepared by BBDO New York Fonts Helvetica Neue (45 Light, 93 Black Extended), TheSansSemiBold (Plain), Arial Rounded MT (Bold, Regular), TheSansLight (Plain), Univers (93 Extra Black Extended Oblique) Graphic Name Color Space Eff. Res. driver_BW_NYT_3.tif (Gray; 472 ppi), Autism Speaks Logo_ BW.eps (Gray; 1689 ppi), Autism Speaks Logo_4CV9.eps, AdCouncil Logo_4CV9.epsFilename: P76569_E_ATF_GEN_V6.inddProof #: 6 Path: Studio:Volumes:Studio:Mechanic... chanicals:P76569_E_ATF_GEN_V6.indd Operators: Hasani / Blane Robison Ink Names Magenta Yellow BlackCreated: 7/5/07 3:28 PM Saved: 7/20/07 10:40 AM Printed: 7/20/07 10:40 AM Print Scale: 100% Odds of a child being in a fatal automobile accident: 1 in 23,000 Odds of a child being diagnosed with autism: 1 in 150HI-RES ARTPRINTED ON LASER To learn more of the signs of autism, visit autismspeaks.org No words by 16 months. No babbling by 12 months.Some signs to look for:No big smiles or other joyful expressions by 6 months. X1AT: 5.75 inT: 10.5 in

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, May 2, 2013