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Jax air news ( April 25, 2013 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA SLAF
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012

Material Information

Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: April 25, 2013
Publication Date: 04-25-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02039

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012

Material Information

Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: April 25, 2013
Publication Date: 04-25-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02039


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THURSDAY, APRIL 25, 2013 PROMOTING SAFETY PRE SERVATION HEAD HEALTH Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The VP-45 Pelicans recently dis played their Pelican Pride at the Langkawi International Maritime and Aerospace Exposition during a recent detachment to Malaysia. Held on the island of Langkawi, a short distance from Malaysias north western coast, LIMA 2013 offered the opportunity to not only showcase the venerable P-3 Orion in Southeast Asia, but also strengthen the bonds of friend ship and cooperation between the mili taries of Malaysia and the United States. AWO1 Joshua Turnage summarized the event, It was truly an honor for us to come here. An invitation to Malaysia to represent the United States is a once in a lifetime event. The exhibition, which drew more than 160,000 people, displayed aircraft from over 40 countries and allowed the Pelicans to interact with military mem bers and fellow aviators from all over the globe. While everyone involved agreed there were many highlights at the air show, the most special moment for the crew occurred when they showed their air craft to children from a local orphan age. We had children at every station talking over the ICS [aircraft commu nication system] to each other, said AWO2 Emily Simpson, with all the smiles and giggling, you could definite ly tell they were having a blast. VP-45s Combat Aircrew Seven also interacted with multiple delegations from other countries as well as sev eral VIPs including the United States Ambassador to Malaysia, Paul Jones, and Royal Malaysian Air Force Lt. Gen. Ackbal who presented the Pelicans with a certificate of appreciation for partici pation in LIMA 2013. When not hard at work at the air show, the Pelicans were able to explore the island of Langkawi and experience Malaysian culture.Whether riding the skycab, a cable car Pointing Poseidon westThe first operational P-8A squadron gears up for deployment The Navys first operational P-8A Poseidon squadron has completed transition to the new maritime patrol aircraft and is on track to take the P-8A on its first operational deploy ment late this year. Patrol Squadron 16 (VP16), based at Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville, Fla., was certified as safe for flight in the P-8A in January and now is engaged in tactical training of its 12 aircrews as it builds up its inventory to six aircraft for its Dec. 1 deployment to Naval Air Facility Kadena, Okinawa, Japan. The squadron had taken delivery of two P-8As by late February. As the Boeing-built P-8A continues in low-rate initial production and winds down its Initial Operational Test and Evaluation, the Navys focus is shifting to the first deploy ment. VP-16s deployment will begin a continuous presence of the Poseidon in the Western Pacific as the P-8A replaces the FDR Squadron executes swim quals and underwater roboticsTwenty-six U.S. Naval Sea Cadets from the F.D. Roosevelt Squadron based at NAS Jacksonville completed their annual swimming qualification April 20 under supervision of instruc tors at the Surface Rescue Swimmer School. After swim quals, the cadets used the indoor pool to test their SeaPerch remotely operated vehicles. FDR Squadron Executive Officer Lt. j.g. David Welch explained that the SeaPerch program is a nation wide project that incorporates STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) resources to create a hands-on educational tool thats chal lenging and fun. SeaPerch is a collaborative effort between the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers. The SeaPerch Program was origi nally designed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to teach underwater robotics to middle and high school students, said Welch. About 11 months ago, ONR pro vided our squadron with 20 SeaPerch kits, which allowed us to form our cadets into two-or three-person robot teams, said Welch. I attended a train-the-trainer course in Rhode Island, to ensure we had enough adult coaches for all the teams. The best thing about SeaPerch is that our kids have to work together, follow instruc tions and acquire some technical skills. Today is our first time in the water with SeaPerch so our cadets are pretty excited. Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville leaders accepted the prestigious 2012 Excellence in Teaching Award from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU)recognizing NH Jacksonville for its superior clinical training of physicians and nurses on April 16. We are blessed to have talented and dedicated faculty and clinicians who strive every day to provide the highest quality for all who walk through our doors. So we are humbled to have been selected for this honor, said Cmdr. Jim Keck, NH Jacksonvilles family medi cine residency program director. Pelicans strengthen bonds at LIMA 2013 Naval Hospital Jacksonville awarded for teaching excellence

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS April 25 1862 Union naval forces occupy New Orleans, La. 1898 Congress declares war existed with Spain since April 21. 1914 First combat observation mis sion by Navy plane at Veracruz, Mexico. April 26 1869 The Good Conduct Medal was authorized. 1921 U.S. Naval Detachment left Yugoslavia after administering area around Spalato for two years to guaran tee transfer of area from Austria to new country. 1952 USS Hobson sinks after collid ing with USS Wasp; 176 lives lost. April 27 1861 President Lincoln extended blockade of Confederacy to Virginia and North Carolina ports. 1865 Body of John Wilkes Booth brought to Washington Navy Yard. April 28 1962 Naval forces capture Forts Jackson and St. Philip, La. 1965 Dominican Republic interven tion began. 1944 U.S. LSTs attacked during Operation Tiger. 1993 SECDEF memo orders Armed Forces to train and assign women on combat aircraft and most combat ships, but not to ground combat positions. April 29 1814 USS Peacock captures HMS Epervier. 1898 U.S. warships engage Spanish gunboats and shore batteries at Cienfuegos, Cuba. 1944 Fast carrier task force (12 car riers) commence two-day bombing of Truk. 1975 Operation Frequent Wind evac uation from Vietnam begins April 30 1798 Congress establishes Department of the Navy. 1975 Saigon falls to North Vietnamese forces. May 1 1898 Battle of Manila Bay, Adm. Dewey defeats Spanish at Manila, Philippines. 1934 Lt. Akers demonstrates blind landing system at College Park, Md. in OJ-2 aircraft. 1945 Vice Adm. Barbey lands Australian troops on Tarakan Island, Borneo, supported by naval gunfire. 1951 USS Princeton aircraft attack Hwachon Dam using aerial torpedoes, only use of this weapon in Korean War. 1980 Eleven Navy ships begin opera tions assisting Coast Guard in rescuing Cuban refugees fleeing Cuba in over crowded boats. On April 15, while the Boston Marathon was getting underway, the boys and I were in Washington, D.C., embarking on another time-honored American tradi tion visiting our representative in congress. We entered the Longworth congressional building at the corner of C Street SE and New Jersey Avenue SE, with the Capitol building visible just a few blocks away. After we went through security, the first thing we saw was what looked like a wooden desk but which actually houses emergency escape hoods in case of a biological or chemical attack on the Capitol. Whats an escape hood? Lindell, 6, asked as he read a sign affixed to the desk. Its just for safety, I said. In case of an emergency. What kind of emergency? Um, well, one where the air in the building is bad. I took his hand to hurry him along. Will we need a hood? No, I said. We took an elevator to the office of Rep. Michael Michaud, from Maines Second District, and also our 22nd dinner guest at Dinner with the Smileys last May. After walking through halls of marble lined with flags of the fifty states, seeing Maines was like spot ting home. Its ours, Mommy! Its ours! Lindell yelled as he ran up to our congressmans door. I thought about all the people, throughout the gen erations, who also traveled the same halls to see their representative. Inside Rep. Michauds reception area there was a shelf filled with Maine-made goods syrup, potato chips, lobster buoys and this was even more sur prising and exciting for Lindell: Its Maine syrup . in D.C.! Michaud invited us into his office. We talked about the weather in Maine and our plans for our weeklong stay in D.C. The congressman showed the boys the lunchbox he used to carry to his job at a mill in East Millinocket, Maine. Ford, 12, asked about other photographs and memorabilia on the walls. This, I thought, is America. On our way out of the building, Lindell asked about the escape hoods again. Is it like a mask for when you cant breathe the air? Yes, Lindell, but you dont need to worry about it. A few hours later, news broke about the bombings in Boston. I stopped mid-step on the sidewalk as I read from my iPhone. I was afraid and wanted to go home, but the next day we had a tour of the Capitol courtesy of our Senator Susan Collins office. The boys were so excited; I could not let them know anything was amiss. And I succeeded for a while. But then, the news was everywhere: on televisions at the hotels compli mentary breakfast, on newsstands at the Metro sta tion, in conversation in the elevator. The boys knew something was wrong. The next day, security was noticeably tighter at the Capitol, but no one not the tourists, the staff, nor the senators stayed hidden or seemed afraid. They wouldnt be terrorized so I took their lead. Still, I cringed when Lindell asked about the hoods again. Little did any of us know, but around that same time, an off-site mail facility had intercepted a ricinladen letter headed for the Capitol. I read the troubling news on the way back to our hotel, and I became increasingly worried about my familys safety. I couldnt hide the weeks news from the boys any longer. Now, reports of both events, plus the fertilizerplant explosion in Texas, nearly saturated the environ ment as we went about our day. I tried to keep things normal because I didnt want the boys to be afraid. In the days that followed, we went to the monuments and museums. I took pictures and collected maps. The boys bought souvenirs. And I hoped that they werent listening when other tourists asked, Did they catch him yet? and How many have died? All the while, I kept a vigilant eye on our surround ings. One morning, during breakfast at the hotel, Lindell saw a lone suitcase on the floor in the lobby. It was a small bag and seemingly abandoned next to the front desk. I wonder if that suitcase has a bomb in it, Lindell said. Maybe we should tell someone about it, Owen, 10, said. Before I could answer, a man returned for his suit case and left the building with it. Well, I doubt it had a bomb in it anyway, Lindell said between bites of waffle. It was probably too small, and who would want to blow up their suitcase? Or this hotel? I bet we are safe. But Im glad we saw that. Owen continued to eat his bagel. Ford ate a blueberry muffin. Sounds from CNN filled the space. Behind my sons, pictures of the Washington Monument and the Lincoln Memorial graced the wall. I thought, maybe this is the new America. VP-5 transition spotlightAs VP-5 transitions to the P-8A Poseidon, the squadron is highlighting a transitioning Mad Fox each week. This weeks spotlight shines on Lt. Allison Cameron. Cameron is part of a family of five from Middleboro, Mass. She has an older brother and a twin sister, who is an E-2C Hawkeye naval flight officer stationed in Japan. Her great grandfather was in the German Air Force and her grandfather was in the Army. Cameron earned her bachelor degree in biol ogy from Boston University. She commissioned through its Reserve Officer Training Corps program in 2007. She is currently the pilot training officer. Her duties include the train ing of all pilots in the squadron from the most junior pilot to the commanding officer. As the pilot training officer she has been leading the VP-5 pilot cadre through the P-8A transition since February. As a qualified patrol plane instructor and mission commander, she is transitioning at the instructor level. It has been a real challenge to learn this air craft at the instructor level while helping the junior pilots who are still working on their upgrading qualifications and the transition, she commented. My experience in the venerable P-3C has been an invaluable asset in both learning and appreciating the new features of the P-8A. VP-5 pilots are conducting training through lectures, operational flight trainers (OFT), and flights in the P-8A under the guidance of VP-30 instruc tors. The OFTs are state-of-the-art and have been a tremendous help, said Cameron. VP-30 has been so helpful in guiding us through this transition and eventually will help guide us through our safe-forflight inspections later this summer. When she isnt busy studying the P-8A, Cameron enjoys running 5K races for charity, spending time with friends at the beach, volunteering at First Coast No More Homeless Pets, and skiing and snowboarding during the winter. VP-5 has been transitioning to the P-8A Poseidon since Jan. 4. From the mouths of children, a new America

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013 3

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Navy divers recover sunken patrol boat Navy Divers from Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) 2 and contracted salvage personnel successfully raised and returned to shore a sunken patrol boat (PB 502), April 18. Coastal Riverine Squadron (CRS) 10, a Navy Reserve unit headquartered at NAS Jacksonville, was conducting a routine training event sailing from Jacksonville to Charleston when one of their patrol boats transiting into Charleston Harbor ran aground on a jetty on the south side on the channel entrance at 9:41 p.m., April 13. Salvage operations like this are quite common, we train to respond to all types of incidents from planes going down to boats sinking and each one brings up its own unique challenges, said Chief Warrant Officer John Sullivan, MDSU2 operations officer-in-charge of the salvage operation. The 34-foot patrol boat was surfaced Thursday morning by Navy divers from approximately 20 feet of water and was towed to shore by a contract ed salvage company. The eight-person Mobile Diving and Salvage (MDS) Company, MDS Co. 2-4 based in Virginia Beach, Va., arrived in Charleston and worked with local Coast Guard and maritime officials to deter mine how to safely recover the submerged vessel by using another similar patrol boat ashore as a model. MDSU2 Divers then performed a site survey to determine the extent of damage to the vessel.On Wednesday and Thursday, divers installed lift points, placed belly bands on the submerged vessel prior to rigging for lift and recovery, and attached salvage lift bags capable of lifting 22,000 pounds. When secured, the vessel was carefully brought to the surface Thursday morning by the lift bags and checked for stability. This is what we train for, said Sullivan. We developed a plan. We executed it, and I thought my team did outstanding. PB 502 was then towed to the U.S. Coast Guard Station. Coastal Riverine Group (CRG) 2 is conducting a thorough investigation into the cause of the inci dent. MDSU 2 is homeported at Joint Expeditionary Base, Little Creek-Ft. Story in Virginia Beach, Va., and has successfully conducted salvage opera tions to support TWA Flight 800, Swiss Air Flight 111, the space shuttles Challenger and Columbia, the I-35W Mississippi River bridge collapse in Minnesota, the Civil War ironclad USS Monitor, and recovery of a downed F-16 Fighting Falcon off the coast of Italy. 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013

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Safety and small business topics at Jacksonville conferenceThe 2013 Jacksonville Acquisition Conference and Trade Show provided opportunities for Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast to teach and learn. Acquisition and safety special ists attended the April 10 event at the University of North Florida Herbert University Center. Many of the acquisition and small business represen tatives were familiar with NAVFACs subcontractor safety clause that has been added to its contract evalu ation process. Since Oct. 1, 2010, NAVFAC Southeast construc tion and service contracts have included provisions in the specifications that all subcontractors must meet an Experience Modification Rate (EMR) not greater than 1.1 and have a Days Away, Restricted, Transferred (DART) rate not greater than 3.0, said NAVFAC Southeast Safety Director Dale Powell. This new requirement was addressed at a break-out session where Powell spoke to attendees specifically about the new safety provision, the importance of communication, acquisition safety, the use of opera tional risk management (ORM), and near miss report ing. Ninety-five percent of the mishaps were coming from subcontractors, said Powell. We had to come up with a way to fix it and since implementing the new safety clause in the contracts, we have seen a 37 percent decrease in two and a half years. Powell shared that NAVFAC Southeast has received overwhelming approval from contractors regarding the new safety factor. It is important to me that NAVFAC is as concerned about safety as we are, said Bob Tabone, project man ager with A. Harold + Associates, LLC. This event was a great refresher to reassure me that we are on the right track. Powell stressed that when contractors work with NAVFAC Southeast, they are partners and it is impor tant that both the Navy and the contractor are behind their safety programs. Many of the 300 in attendance also visited the NAVFAC Southeast display set up in the atrium where Nelson Smith, NAVFAC Southeast Small Business Director spoke with small business representatives. Smith brought brochures on NAVFACs small business program and talked with attendees about how they can do business with the Navy. Keynote speaker retired Rear Adm. Sean Crean, director of the Navys Office of Small Business Programs was optimistic on the outlook for small business opportunities within the Navy. Crean stated that they will continue to keep small business as the first option in Navy acquisition. Crean shared with the group that in fiscal year 2012, the Navy purchased $13.3 billion of supplies and ser vices from small businesses. NAVFAC Southeast contributed over $580 million to the total in fiscal year 2012, representing over 61per cent of NAVFAC Southeasts prime contracts that were awarded directly to small businesses. Events like this are crucial in stimulating dialogue between government and the small business com munity, said Smith. In addition to helping meet continuing education requirements for our acquisi tion community, our small businesses get the chance to improve their knowledge of the acquisition process and also to meet with government representatives to learn about upcoming requirements. Other small business advocates on hand at the con ference included representatives from the General Services Administration, Fleet Logistics Center Southeast, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, as well as state and local government representatives. The PLAYERS, Veterans Coalition job fairThe PLAYERS are holding their second annual job fair in partnership with the Jacksonville Military Veterans Coalition for active duty, Reservists, retired military, veterans and military spouses May 5 at TPC Sawgrass. The job fair is free and will be held in The Turn hospitality venue near the 18th green. For more information, go to www.PGATour.com/ theplayers. Sunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 11 a.m. Protestant Worship 11:15 a.m. Catholic CCD Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study Wednesdays, 7 p.m. at Chapel Complex Building 749 and Thursdays at 7 p.m. in the barracksNAS Jacksonville Chapel CenterCorner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road542-3051 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013 Status of the Phase I scan ning effort for the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Cadastral Modernization Program (CMP) will be pre sented April 25 when NAVFAC Southeast holds its annual CMP meeting on base. Cadastral documents are public real estate records, sur veys or maps showing owner ship, boundaries or value of a property. The NAVFAC Cadastral staff at each Facilities Engineering Command (FEC) is the offi cial custodian of the Navy and Marine Corps real estate records for its area of responsi bility. The team will review the way ahead, the importance of the new process in preserv ing historical records, and any process improvements at the annual CMP meeting. The CMP project is divided into five phases, with each phase being piloted at NAVFAC Southeast before being used to support other Navy regions. As each phase is suc cessfully completed, a new region will adopt the change. NAVFAC Southeast Real Estate Cartographer and Geographic Information Systems Specialist Jill Rose keeps the project on task by coordinating meetings with other FECs, and engag ing with the Naval Air Station Jacksonville Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) and contrac tor ICM Document Solutions to implement any process improvements. Results of these meetings show just how big the project is and the importance of shar ing information as we push this program out for others to use, said Rose. This project will provide access to their legal docu ments in real time creating a process that allows them to be able to enter the coordinates of a location and learn everything about the transaction. Rose explained that the team used available technology to make the workflow easier and the Phase I pilot served as the research and development phase before it was launched to other regions in the Navy. We had to let go of the way we used to do things and focus on how we could make our pro cess better for everyone who needs the information, said Rose. Bob McDowell, NAVFAC Southeast real estate branch head, stated that the project was implemented because a customer requested time-sen sitive real estate information. As the team researched and was able to provide the docu ments within one and a half days, McDowell thought that it should be done more quickly and began researching new ways to improve the response time. The needs of our internal and external customers were crucial to this project to pro vide information as soon as possible, said McDowell. The team recognized the need for change and came up with innovative ways to be bet ter at what they do. Rose met with the NAVFAC Southeast real estate team and other stakeholders to decide the best plan of attack for the real estate files. With Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) and NAVFAC Headquarters supporting the ideas of the team, they started to focus on bringing their cadastral docu ments into the digital age. In a search for these types of records, the NAVFAC Southeast Real Estate team discovered many historical documents along the way some historical treasures were discovered bur ied in boxes. We have deed transfers with Old meets new: NAVFAC Southeast digitally preserving historical documents

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013 7 wet signatures from Presidents Tyler, Polk, Bush, as well as Robert F. Kennedy and the Spanish Governor of Florida, said Rose. Some of the documents are so old and fragile, they needed to be handled with extra care. The historical discoveries brought immediate attention from the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) who visited NAVFAC Southeast to review some of the documents stored in their file system. Finding out the documents have such a historical importance confirmed the need to duplicate and secure the docu ments. NARA is an independent agency of the U.S. government assigned to pre serve and document government histo ry. Historical data contained in the files at NAVFAC Southeast provide a glimpse into the former way of transferring, dis posing or acquiring land. The fact we have documents signed by a Spanish leader transferring prop erty to us is very cool, said Jake Walls, NAVFAC Southeast land surveyor. History lessons are all around us. This project is going to make retriev ing information easier, said Walls. Although it is a huge undertaking, it will be well worth it for our customers and the preservation of important documents. The project fixes many issues in the old process and now includes electronic conversion, retrieval, output, and distri bution of digital and hardcopy informa tion in the form of original deeds, maps, and real estate working files. Partnering with DLA resulted in a reduction in costs for scanning and file storage, and DLAs global presence has been vital for accomplishing this effort NAVFAC-wide, said Rose. DLA provided secure access to the files, storage and retrieval capabilities which were critical components for the project. NAVFAC has multiple survey ing and CMP contracts in place which provide access to electronic Cadastral files for various contractors at each FEC. DLA provides the scanning and retrieval portion of the project and ICM provides the additional staff required to roll out the new program at each FEC. ICM also developed a customized database program used for tracking the location of the original documents; automated the process for manifesting and bookmarking the pdf documents; and developed a color-coded labeling program for categorizing the different types of interests that are maintained by Cadastral. When I first came to NAVFAC Southeast, I began this effort work ing on a conference room table using a standalone laptop computer on loan by DLA, said Leola Hall, DLA office ser vice assistant. The team thought it was important to test the methodology as the project continually changes. New ideas are dis cussed, implemented and outcomes are documented to provide lessons learned before other FECs are brought in. By creating standard operating pro cedures (SOP), the team ensured each file was handled correctly and followed a process to prepare the documents for scanning and conversion. SOPs were designed to ensure consis tency and uniformity across NAVFAC. The goal is that all cadastral files are scanned and retrieved in the same way for Navy and Marine Corps interests. Discovery of missing documents highlights the need for a better record keeping process going forward, said Shenita Brown, ICM scanning docu ment specialist. Brown has seen firsthand, the num ber of incomplete files entered in the database. The team is working on the next phase (Phase II) of the effort which includes standardizing the contents of all new files stored by Cadastral. The team from DLA and ICM has pro cessed more than 200,000 pieces of doc umentation since September 2010 for the NAVFAC Southeast. NAVFAC

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HOSPITALNH Jacksonville is committed to the professional development of health care providers from across the nation, and hosts multiple clinical training programs. It is home to the Navys largest, accredited, award-winning Family Medicine Residency Program cited as USUs 2011 Family Medicine Clinical Site of the Year, a nurse anes thetist program, a perioperative nurs ing course, a trauma nursing course and an Independent Duty Corpsman Center of Excellence. In addition, NH Jacksonville trains students from local universities enrolled in physical thera py, physician assistant, doctor of phar macy and other programs. Clinicians gain experience in mul tiple settings, including rotations at partner facilities, such as Shands Jacksonville, that specialize in highacuity and trauma patients. NH Jacksonville also reaches out into the community to prepare future heal ers, with its Science, Service, Medicine & Mentoring (S2M2) Program, train ing students from Darnell-Cookman Middle/High School of the Medical Arts. All graduate education programs at NH Jacksonville meet national stan dards. And Navy health care provid ers have the same education and train ing as their private-sector colleagues with the addition of experience on battlefields, at sea and on humanitarian missions. USU a top-tier medical school according to U.S. News & World Reports current rankings grants the Excellence in Teaching Award to only two programs (one large and one small) across the military health system each year. The award also includes a $5,000 grant from the Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, to be used for educa tion and training. The following are phone numbers of contacts who can help with consumer problems: Family Service Center 542-2766 Better Business Bureau 721-2288 State Attorneys Office Consumer Mediation 630-2075 City of Jacksonville/ Consumer Affairs Division 630-3467 Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation 1-850-4871395 Construction Industry investigative services 727-5590Got a consumer problem? Heres who to call 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013

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system constructed over 2,500 feet high, or relaxing on one of the many beautiful beaches, all the Pelicans can agree that Langkawi earned its official title of Jewel of the Kedah. At the end of the five-day expedi tion, the Pelicans left Lankawi with memories and friendships which will last a lifetime.At the conclusion of LIMA, the Pelicans flew south to Subang Air Force Base, located near the Malaysian capital city of Kuala Lumpur, where they had the opportunity to demonstrate the operability of the P-3 to members of the Royal Malaysian Air force and Navy during a subject matter expert exchange. Upon their arrival, members of the crew conducted a symposium with Malaysian military members highlighting such topics as the pilot and naval flight officer train ing pipeline, maritime ship rig ging techniques and basic ocean ography. Over the next two days, the Pelicans flew maritime domain assurance flights with Malaysian military riders. During these flights, the flight crew demonstrated the rigging of several vessels as well as capabili ties of the automatic identification mapping camera system. In executing these flights, we were able to both demonstrate the P-3 capabilities as well as improve interoperability between our militaries, remarked VP-45 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mike Vitali. Before departing Kuala Lumpur, crew members were able to get out and experience the capital which included a visit to the Petronas Towers, the highest twin towers in the world. While sad to leave, the Pelicans departed Malaysia confi dent the friendships they fostered on this detachment. VP-45 SEA CADETSFDR Squadron Commanding Officer Lt. j.g.Robert Long brought his mask, flippers and underwater cam era to the pool. SeaPerch is an outstanding program. As our cadets become more familiar with the crafts buoyancy, pro pulsion and maneuverability they will deploy on mis sions that challenge them to place or retrieve an object in the water, said Long. Since today is our first time in deep water, Im going under to take underwater pictures of each teams submarine. This will allow them to fine-tune their control and propulsion systems. They may not realize it but theyre learning a lot about science and engineering as they build these simple, underwater robots. The U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps (NSCC) is for youths ages 13 to 17, and the Navy League Cadet Corps is for youths ages 10 to 12. They give young peo ple the opportunity to experience military life in a hands-on, real-world environment. Current F.D. Roosevelt Squadron enrollment is 40 male and female cadets who drill twice monthly aboard NAS Jacksonville. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013 9

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10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013 Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a disruption in brain func tion caused by a blow to the head or a penetrating head injury. Over the past decade, TBI has gained attention due to the many service members return ing from the Global War on Terror with this injury. However, TBI is not simply an issue for the active duty population. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, at least 1.7 million TBIs occur each year. Anyone is at risk for devel oping TBI. On the homefront, the leading causes of TBI are falls, motor vehicle crashes and traffic incidents, being struck by (or against) something, and assaults. For military personnel in war zones, blasts are a leading cause of TBI. Those suffering from TBI can display a wide variety of symptoms, based on the sever ity of injury. Penetrating head trauma is the greatest threat. But even a minimal injury cant be overlooked, explained Lt. Kermit Salivia, Naval Hospital Jacksonville family medicine physician. A small concussion can result in chronic headaches, bouts of forgetfulness, chang es in sensation, difficulty with communication, disorientation and changes in emotion that can include depression, anxi ety and personality changes. More severe injuries can result in a brain bleed that can cause coma, paralysis and even death. There are many ways to pre vent TBI, according to Salivia. First, identify risks; then take action. Use personal protective equipment in the workplace and in recreation sportsthis includes wearing a helmet when using a motorcycle, allterrain vehicle, bicycle, skateboard or roller skates. In a vehicle, make sure everyone buckles-up and place young children in an infant seat or booster seat. At home, remove trip or slip haz ards, keep firearms secured, supervise children and place protective gates around stairs for toddlers. For the elderly, ensure proper lighting and install handrails on stairs and inclined paths. To talk to a professional, patients can contact their Medical Home Port team (via Central Appointments at 5424677 at the hospital or 5467094 at Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville) or Mental Health at 542-3473. Apply by May 31 The American Red Cross Northeast Florida Chapter at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville is current ly recruiting for this summers Junior Red Cross volunteers. This offers an excellent opportu nity for students interested in health careers to train with highly skilled Navy Medicine professionals phy sicians, nurses, pharmacists, thera pists and technicians as well as contribute to a positive experience for patients. The program is open to a limited number of high school students age 16 to 18 who have base access. Volunteers work four to 20 hours per week in locations throughout the hospital, and receive CPR training. Apply online by May 31 at www.neflori daredcross.org. At the Web site, click on volunteer, join us, youth volunteer applica tion (or adult volunteer application for 18 year-old students). Fill out the application, select Northeast Florida Chapter, and create a Volunteer Connection account. After submitting the application, complete the online orientation. All applicants are required to attend a kick-off event (which includes an interview) June 8 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the hospitals 2nd deck confer ence room in the central tower (next to the chapel). For more about this opportunity, contact Junior Red Cross volunteer coordinators Terry Miles or Mary Miciano at 542-7525 or jaxredcrossof fice@med.navy.mil. The J. Wayne and Delores Barr Weaver Veterans Emergency and Transition Services Fund provides emergency financial assistance and resources to veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom that will help to support their transition into civilian life and stabilization into the community. This financial assistance is pro vided directly to the veterans of these wars.The geographic service area is: Duval, Clay, Nassau, Baker and St. Johns counties. Types of emergency needs we help with but not strictly limited too: vehicle payment or repair, insurance needing to find work or learn a life skill For more information, contact a Red Cross Military Services caseworker at 246-1395. What is a traumatic brain injury and how can it be prevented? Experience Navy Medicine as a Junior Red Cross volunteer Financial aid available for veterans If you are retiring or separating from active duty and need assistance with submitting your claim for disabil ity and compensation to the Veterans Administration (VA), you can start up with getting our medical information in order. AMVETS is the Veterans Service Organization advocate for separat ing or retiring service members and their families providing assistance with submission of claims to the VA for benefits, disabilities and compensa tion. AMVETS is a national Veterans Service Organization authorized to submit claims to the VA and advocate for veterans and their families with the VA nationwide. All assistance is free of charge and you are not required to become a member of AMVETS to use their ser vices. For more information and to make an appointment, call David Sanders at 542-2834 or email david.d.sanders@ navy.mil VA disability assistance available

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POSEIDONLockheed P-3C Orion in succeeding squadron deployments. According to Rear Adm. Sean S. Buck, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group, headquartered in Norfolk, Va., the transition sched ule is designed to take a P-3C squad ron returning from a Western Pacific deployment, convert it to a P-8A squadron, and then send it back to the Western Pacific for its first deploy ment, as is the case with VP-16, which returned from the region last year to begin its transition. [Weve] got a method to our mad ness behind our transition, Buck said Feb. 22 in a briefing with reporters and static display tour of the P-8A at Joint Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility Washington, Md. The idea is we have set up the tran sition such that a squadron with P-3s goes to a Western Pacific deployment, which is a very rich, anti-submarine warfare type of environment. They get the experience of operating in that area, understanding where they detach to, the missions sets, the environment, the climate, all the hazards. [When] they come home from that deployment, they turn in their P-3s and start that transition of getting [P-8] NATOPS [Naval Aviation Training and Operational Procedures Standards] qualified, learning how to fight it, and we send them right back to the Western Pacific where they were familiar with the environment. They just bring a new weapon system, he said. That probably is the best way to meet the fleet commanders needs and give the fleet commander confidence that everything is going to be OK introduc ing a new weapon system into their AOR [area of responsibility], he said. Under current planning, the Navy plans to base five operational P-8A squadrons in Jacksonville, four at NAS Whidbey Island, Wash., and three at Marine Corps Air Station Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. To achieve that laydown will involve a shift of one of the six VP squadrons from Jacksonville to Whidbey Island. However, Buck said the Navy is reevaluating the basing plan with the possibility of moving squadrons from Kaneohe Bay and basing the 12 VP squadrons at only Jacksonville and Whidbey Island. As President [Barack Obama] has shifted his rebalance to the Pacific, and as we have come under budgetary con straints, the Navy asked to reopen the environmental impact study that talked about and determined that basing plan and we are looking to see if there could be a better footprint, Buck said. That is what we are exploring right now and will report out probably in late spring or early summer from that study to the CNO [chief of naval operations], to the secretary of the Navy, and make a determination of whether our original basing plan in 08 needs to be adjusted or not. As of late February, the Navy had flown more than 6,600 flight hours since April 2009 in the P-8 during the developmental and operational test ing at NAS Patuxent River, Md., and in concurrent fleet introduction at NAS Jacksonville. Out of the gate, the aircraft has prov en to be very reliable and very capable, Buck said. Over the past year, we have had the opportunity to fly the aircraft in a wide variety of operational environ ments and mission scenarios and, by all accounts, the aircraft is performing very well. We have executed detach ments from Australia, Hawaii, Guam, Japan, Alaska and Scotland, and suc cessfully employed the airplane against difficult U.S. and allied submarines, both nuclear and diesel. Buck said the biggest improvement in the P-8A over the P-3C it is replacing is the reliability of the overall aircraft system. Boeing delivered the sixth and last P-8A in Low-Rate Production (LRIP) batch 1 in January and is building the seven P-8As in LRIP-2. The second P-8A squadron, VP-5, now is in transition to the aircraft and will be followed in July by VP-45. At the end of this decade, when we are through with transition, the assigned aircraft complement to each fleet squadron will be seven jets, Buck said. We are able, with the aircraft deliv eries right now, to give each squadron two jets during their home training cycle and they will all deploy with six jets. The service entry of the P-8A comes none too soon. The average P-3C in the fleet today has logged more than 17,000 flight hours. One has flown more than 26,000 hours since 1973. Both of these numbers significantly exceed the original design life of the aircraft and substantial structural repairs to the wings have been required over the years to achieve this longevity, Buck said. Despite the success of these wing repairs, remaining P-3 structural com ponents and mission systems continue to age and we are living on borrowed time with P-3Cs. Five years ago, in the midst of man aging a fatigue life crisis in our P-3 fleet that grounded more than 130 P-3s we developed a plan to transition the fleet to the P-8A Poseidon beginning in the spring of 2012, he said, noting that, before the transition began the 12 active duty VP squadrons had fewer than 85 P-3Cs available, compared with 240 at the height of the Cold War. Even though the size of the MPR [maritime patrol reconnaissance] force is less than half of what it was . it remains as relevant today as at any time in its storied history, with 32 aircraft currently forward-deployed around the world, he said. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013 11

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12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013

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Battle of Midway Commemorative Dinner June 1, 2013 World Golf Village Renaissance Resort Keynote: Adm. William Gortney, commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command Cocktails at 6 p.m. Active Duty E6 and below $25E7 to O3 $35 O4 to O5 $45O6 & above $65For more information, contact Bob Price At (904) 246-9982, e-mail: bpricex4@comcast.net or Bill Dudley at (904) 806-4712, E-mail: anuday00@aol.com. Tickets may also be purchased at www.midwaydinner.orgUniform for O4 and above is dinner dress white jacket. For O3 and below, dinner dress white/dinner dress white jacket optional. Civilian is black tie or business attirewww.midwaydinner.org Sponsored by JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013 13

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The P-8A is expected to fly a 10.5hour profile similar to that of a P-3C. Cmdr. Molly J. Boron, commanding officer of VP-16, said the P-8A is actu ally quite a bit more comfortable [in flight]. With the flexible wings, the crew isnt getting bounced around quite as much as in the P-3, [and] it flies very smoothly down low. She said the P-8As mission sets for its upcoming deployment will include anti-submarine warfare, antisurface warfare, and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, the same as those of its prior P-3C deployment. Boron said her squadron will retain 12 combat air crews for its six aircraft, as compared with 12 crews for nine air craft in a P-3C squadron. The P-8A car ries a crew of nine compared with a crew of 11 for a P-3C. The P-8A does not carry the two flight engineers and inflight technician of a P-3C crew, but adds an extra nonacous tic sensor operator. We finished up our transition at the end of January, and so, everybody that we had onboard had spent some time in VP-16 as a P-3 air crew, so all are very experienced folks that we took through transition, Boron said. Theyve all done exceptionally well and part of that is because of their expe rience factor. Weve had one crew finish the ARP [aircrew readiness program] and two more that are in the process right now. Lt. Frank Thomas, training officer for VP-16, said the squadron is receiving its first nuggets, new flight crew person nel with no prior experience as P-3C crew members. When VP-16 deploys, the P-8A will be certified to use the Mk54 anti-subma rine torpedo and the AGM-84 Harpoon anti-ship cruise missile, Buck said. Certification to lay mines and fire the AGM-84K Standoff Land-Attack Missile-Expanded Response will await future deployments. He stressed that the P-8A is capable of prosecuting sub marines at low altitude in a profile very similar to that of a P-3C, and that its high altitude anti-submarine capa bilities will be improved in later incre ments of development. The future capabilities will include the addition of a torpedo that can be launched from high altitude and at a standoff range. The P-8A has a broader area-search capability than the P-3C and can fly to its search area more quickly because of its dash speed and ability to climb and perform better than a turboprop aircraft. In the P-8As crew compartment, or tube, the five tactical crew stations are arranged in a line facing the port side, which recalls the arrangement in the P-3A and P-3B versions of the Orion. In the P-3C, the stations of the tactical coordinator, navigator and non-acous tic sensor operator were physically located separately from each other and from the two acoustic sensor operators. It is working out very well, Boron said. The five of them communicate very well together, integrating the pilots with the three nets that we have avail able to talk between the crew. When the MQ-4C Triton high-alti tude, high endurance unmanned aer ial vehicle the Broad-Area Maritime Surveillance system becomes oper ational in 2016, there will be imme diate information sharing between unmanned systems and the P-8, she said. Buck said that for the next 10 years there are no plans for P-8 air crews to control unmanned systems. He said the Navy is fixing a set of identified software deficiencies and will have addressed them prior to the December deployment. This transition to fleet employment has benefited from an extensive inte grated test process in which develop mental test, operational test and fleet replacement squadron personnel con ducted side-by-side evaluations and gained hands-on experience with the P-8, beginning with the arrival of the first test aircraft in Patuxent River over three years ago, Buck said. This integrated approach to test and evaluation is now paying signifi cant dividends as it has ensured that an upcoming set of preplanned aircraft software updates are perfectly aligned with the fleets operational priorities. He also said that the P-8A is plumbed for aerial refueling and crews will begin training for that capability in 2015. Sending a new aircraft into an area of operations also involves setting up a logistical supply chain to support it. That is probably one of my biggest focus items, Buck said. Its a new type/model/series, so we need to create the warehouse shelves full of a whole new set of spare parts. We have been working diligently with Boeing and with the program manager to be sure we have sufficient logisti cal support in Jacksonville the home of the transition for about the next three or four years as well as logisti cal support in its first deployment site, Okinawa. The Pacific will now have constant seamless representation by the P-8 weapon system. That is where each new transition squadron will deploy to. The P-8A is larger than the P-3C and will need larger hangar facilities for maintenance. With the partnership of the Japanese government, we are building a brand new hangar for the P-8 in Okinawa, Buck said. The scheduled comple tion date of that right now is 2016, so we had to take the existing P-3 hangar and make adjustments to allow that air craft to tuck in there as we await the construction of [the] new hangar. That infrastructure for P-8 is new through out the world and we have a military construction plan to build that out in each of the primary deployment sites throughout this decade. POSEIDON For more information about sports, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013

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Kadena Air Force Base offers a number of intra mural sports for local military personnel to participate in, including flag football, bowling, volleyball and basketball. For the VP-45 Pelicans, each sporting event is another chance to domi nate. The VP-45 flag foot ball team completed a 15 game season and ulti mately emerged as the 2013 Kadena Intramural Flag Football Champions. Competing in a single elimination playoff tour nament which began March 4, the Pelicans dominated through the week to make it to the championship game. We trusted each other and, with the sup port from the squadron and our fans, we knew it was going to be a good night, said defen sive player AWO2 (NAC) Aaron Bucher. The team was right to be confident, securing a 40-13 win over the Kadena AFB Det 1 Honey Badgers. Only a few hundred yards from the football field, the Pelican bowl ing team made their presence known at the base bowling alley. Each Tuesday night for nine weeks, two teams from VP-45 took to the lanes for three games. We started out pret ty slow, but we kept our heads up and started to improve and ended up in first place, PR3 Micah Littlepage said, whose season high of 246 and career high of two perfect games greatly contribut ed to the teams success. Both VP-45 teams earned a spot in the play offs, and after several weeks of playoff competi tion, the Pelicans again ended up on top, clinch ing the Kadena Bowling Championship title. Adding to the squad rons dominance, the VP-45 volleyball team competed in an eightgame season. Finishing the season 6-2, the Pelican team earned a spot in the playoffs and ultimately clinched the championship. Good team cohe sion led to a solid show ing in the playoffs, bringing the Captains Cup Championship to VP-45, said AWO2 David Thibaut. With three champion ship trophies now on dis play, the only question for the Pelican team is when their next chance to dom inate the sports scene will be. Although deployed to Japan, VP-45 members did not let being half way around the world stop them from partici pating in Jacksonvilles Gate River Run. With the cooperation of Doug Alred, the Gate River Run director, VP-45 Sailors signed up for the race on the official website and ran the 15K (9.3 miles) on March 9 and 10 in Okinawa. VP-45s Lt. j.g. John Leeds then submitted the official times and participants will soon receive their completion medals and T-shirts in the mail. The race pro vided a unique oppor tunity for VP-45 Sailors to enjoy a taste of home while deployed. Theres no Green Monster here, Leeds said, referring to Jacksonvilles Hart Bridge, but there are plenty of hills to make up for it. On March 16, the Pelicans dominate Kadena sports scene JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013 What is Adoption? Adoption is a process that cuts all legal ties between the adopted child and the birth parent and trans fers parental authority (e.g., making medical, educational, and welfare decisions for the child) to the adopting parent. While child adoption is the most common, it is also possi ble to adopt an adult. Common reasons are for inheritance purposes, to formalize an exist ing parent/child relationship, or to provide perpetual care for an adult with a disability. Stepparent scenarios are unique. Unless a stepparent officially adopts a stepchild, both biological parents of that stepchild keep their parental authority. However, the step child is still eligible for DEERS enrollment if the steppar ent is the active duty mem ber. Adoption is different from guardianship or temporary legal custody because those actions are typically only tem porary measures concerning a childs welfare, not permanent. Adoption is permanent when a child is legally adopted, that child is treated like a natural child born to that family who can inherit real and personal property. Whether adopting domesti cally or from a foreign coun try, there are two methods of adoption: 1) agency adoption or 2) direct placement/inde pendent adoption. An agency adoption involves a prospective parent working with a public agency or licensed pri vate agency who is tasked with ensuring that the prospective parents are well-matched to the childs background, capabili ties, and needs. An indepen dent adoption is when the birth parent places the child into an unrelated home by either iden tifying an adoptive parent on their own or by using an attor ney or adoption facilitator. An independent adoption cannot take place without termination of the birth parents parental rights, either through the birth parents voluntary consent or through a courts involuntary termination of the parents rights. Independent adoptions also require full compliance with the law, meaning that it is crucial to seek legal counsel before trying to adopt a child via non-agency adoption. To illustrate how important it is to be aware of a states lawful pro cess for adoption, some state laws prohibit a hospital from releasing an infant to some one other than a natural par ent; and other states make it a crime for the adopting parent to pay for any expenses associ ated with the direct placement of the child, including medi cal expenses and home care arrangements. The Adoption Process: Each state has its own adoption laws and eligibility criteria that will dictate your options. Adoption across state lines means that you must comply with the laws in both states, though neigh boring states often have com pacts with each other regarding adoption. If you choose inter national adoption, each coun try has specific guidelines and requirements for prospective parents. That being said, the basic steps for adoption are: Petition: Adoptive parents sign and file a petition for adoption either in the county where the child lives, where the adoption agency is located, or where the adoptive parents live. Consent : If the adoption is by consent, the birth parents must acknowledge their consent in writing. Some states require children over 12 years of age to consent to their adoption. Under certain circumstances, consenting parents have the ability to withdraw consent. If the adoption is based on aban donment, then a separate peti tion for termination of parental rights must be filed with the court. Order of Reference and Home Study : An order of refer ence is filed and refers the case to a licensed private adoption agency or public agency to con duct a home study. Home stud ies typically include the back ground history of the adoptive parents and home situation, recent medical examinations, and other pertinent informa tion. Interlocutory Decree : After the home study is filed, the court issues an interlocutory decree temporarily giving the adoptive parents legal custo dy of the child. Before a final order is issued, there may be a second home study to assess the placement progress. Final Order : The final order of adoption from the court makes the child legally one of the family. After the final order, the childs birth cer tificate is amended to list the adoptive parents as the birth parents. Reimbursement: Active duty members of the Armed Forces who adopt a child under age 18 (including adoption of a stepchild) are eligible for reim bursement of up to $2,000 per child for qualifying expens es. For multiple adoptions, the maximum reimbursable amount is $5,000 per calendar year. If both adoptive parents are active duty, only one mem ber is eligible for reimburse ment. To qualify, the adoption must be arranged through one of the following: a governmen tal agency with responsibil ity under state or local law for child placement; or a private adoption agency authorized by state or local law to place chil dren for adoption. Qualifying expenses include placement fees, legal fees, and medi cal expenses of the biological mother and child. To make a claim for reimbursement, the adoptive parent must submit DD Form 2675 to DFAS and also be able to show documen tation of agency involvement, substantiation of expenses, and finalization of the adop tion. Claims for reimburse ment must be submitted no later than one year following the date the adoption is final ized. See DODINST 1341.9 and OPNAVINST 1754.4 for further details on reimbursements for adoption expenses. Service members who adopt a child in a qualifying adoption are also eligible to receive up to 21 days of non-chargeable leave of absence to be used in con nection with the adoption. The absence must be taken within 12 months following the adop tion and is granted under a commanding officers discre tion. Where to Go for Help: Adoption is a legal pro cess that potentially involves state and international laws. Additionally, an adopting par ents age, marital status and years of being married, eth nicity and religion, and even income are all factors that may impact whether or not they can adopt. Consult your local legal assistance office for guidance on where to start and what ben efits you can take advantage of when planning to add a mem ber to your family. Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville needs 30 volunteers to assist with the Warrior Challenge and an additional 75 officers and chief petty officers to facili tate the red carpet awards during the 2013 Never Quit Beach event May 19 from 5:45 a.m. to 3 p.m. All volunteers will receive a free Never Quit running shirt.For more information, call or e-mail MC1 Brianna Dandridge at 396-5909, Ext 1150. Never Quit 2013 is a series of physi cal fitness events challenging athletes to maximize their strength and endurance performance including a 5K and a Spec Ops Warrior Challenge. The annual event takes place at Jacksonville Beach. For more information, go to: http://neverqui tnever.com. Adoption: How to navigate the process of adding a member to your family Military family teams are forming for the Relay for Life at Fleming Island High School May 3. The event remembers those who have lost their battle with cancer, sup port and encourage those who are fighting, and celebrate those who have survived their battle with cancer. If you are interested, please call Kari Wiese at (207) 730-3294. For more details, visit the Relay for life Web site at www.relayforlife. org/flemingislandfl. The team is called JAX MILITARY FAMILIES.Relay For Life: Military families wanted for eventPelicans hit the road again, this time to support research for leukemia and thyroid cancer. The squad ron sponsored a 5K Run for the Cure which drew more than 175 participants and raised $1,150 which will be donated to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society and the Light of Life Foundation, which focus es on thyroid cancer research and patient support. These charities were particularly important to the Pelican family since three VP-45 Sailors are currently undergoing treatment for these illnesses. It was a great way to bring the command together to support a good cause, said AWF2(NAC/AW) Greta Hynes, who participated in the run. The Pelicans continue to promote health, fitness and sportsmanship at all levels while currently deployed to Kadena Air Force Base, Japan. PELICANSVolunteers needed for Never Quit event

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Deweys free Spring Concert Series 7 p.m. on the outdoor stage April 26 The Ride May 3 Boogie Freaks May 10 7th Street Band May 17 Zero-NFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday change of hours Open 410 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 126 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included Friday special $1 games per person 25 p.m. Shoe rental not includedFitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 The outdoor pool hours April 1 May 5 Open Monday Friday (lap swim only) 6 a.m. 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday (lap swim only) 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. During lap swim only the waterslide, water park and concessions will not be open. 2013 Learn to Swim Program Sign-up at the Gym (the Zone) on Saturday, May 11, 8 a.m. 3 p.m. Session 1: June 1020 Session 2 July 8-18 Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Daytona International Speedway Subway Firecracker July 5 and Coke 400 July 6 Tickets on sale now! Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts Funkfest Metropolitan Park May 10-11 2-day ticket $52 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3, 2013 Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7, 2013 Blockout Dates: March 23 April 5, 2013 Call for pricing Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline 2013 Live Broadway Series Celtic Woman May 2 $44 $134 American Idiot May 14 & 15 $25 $62 Dream Girls May 21 Cesar Millan June 1 $42 $52 Wild Adventures Theme Park One day pass $30, Gold pass $71 The Vault Liberty Recreation Center Trips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Busch Gardens Trip April 27 leaves at 6 a.m. World of Nations Celebration May 4, noon Barracks Bash May 9, 48 p.m. Free food, entertainment and prizes! The Players Championship May 11, 11 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees May 7 & 21 for active duty April 25, May 9 & 23 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Loudmouth Thursday Any golfer wearing a pair of loudmouth shorts or pants plays 18 holes with cart for $20 Open to military, DoD and guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina May 18, 19, 25 & 26 June 15, 16, 22 & 23 July 20, 21, 27 & 28 Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recre ation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information.Flying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School June 3 July 10 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013 17

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Small Business Program provides great opportunities Rear Adm. Kate Gregory, com mander of Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) recognized the NAVFAC Southeast Office of Small Business Programs with awards in three categories acknowledging fiscal year 2012 performance in a letter pre sented April 15. I am thrilled to acknowledge your leadership, commitment, and demon stration of accountability, said Gregory in the letter. Our teams are performing above and beyond, exceeding DoD and DoN initiatives by providing maximum opportunities for small business par ticipation. NAVFAC Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus pre sented the award to Nelson Smith, NAVFAC Southeast Small Business director. The categories NAVFAC Southeast exceeded at include all Small Business Targets, Focus Area Small Business Targets, and Best in Class Small Disadvantaged Business. These awards represent a total com mand engagement in providing the maximum practicable opportunity for small businesses to compete for our requirements, said Smith. It takes the entire team working together. Smith thanked everyone present for their support in meeting these goals. Fiscal year 2012 was the fourth con secutive year that NAVFAC Southeast has exceeded targets in all small busi ness categories an unprecedented achievement in NAVFAC. Each year target goals are estab lished for Small Business, Small Disadvantaged Business, Historically Underutilized Business Zone Small Business, Service-Disabled VeteranOwned Small Business, and WomenOwned Small Business categories. 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013 A new approach to inter viewing sexual assault victims is gleaning more information about the crimes and leading to greater numbers of offender prosecutions. At the End Violence Against Women international confer ence in Baltimore, Md., Russell Strand, chief of the behavioral sciences education and train ing division for the Armys Military Police School at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., spoke with American Forces Press Service about the new Defense Department-backed procedure to investigate sexual assaults. Calling sexual assault a secret crime, Strand said the experience for a victim is the most embarrassing, intimate, life-changing, traumatic thing that can happen. Aside from a murder, he added, he doesnt know of any thing thats more debilitating and earth-shattering than a sexual assault. In 2011, nearly 3,200 sex ual assaults were reported in the military, but Defense Department officials say the number of sexual assaults each year is closer to 19,000, based on anonymous surveys of active-duty service members. Officials also noted that only 1,500 of those cases came up for disciplinary review. Because law enforcement investigations are designed more for witnesses rather than victims, Strand said, he devel oped the forensic experiential trauma interview as a way to interview victims without making them relive the assault. Through neuroscience research, he found that part of the forefront of the brain shuts down or is slow to recall key parts of a trauma during an attack. But a primitive part of the brain stem almost instantly records the event accurately, he said. With that scientific informa tion, Strand said, he tried the law enforcement debriefing approach on sexual assault victims by gaining their trust and talking about how they felt, rather than asking leading questions, such as What hap pened? We show genuine empathy, and say things such as, Im sorry that happened to you, Strand explained. The sec ond thing we say is, Help me understand, and What are you able to remember about your experience? Strand said Criminal Investigation Division agents and other trained military investigators then stop ques tioning and sit back to listen to the victims recollection. Rather than asking about the attack in a chronological order, Strand said, he lets vic tims go in any direction they want, because that aligns with how theyve memorized it. Investigators then put the assault into a sequence of chronological events, he added. We want to get to their memories, so we ask about the sights, sounds, smells, tastes and their feelings, Strand said. Through this approach, he said, investigators want to look for evidence of trauma and the absence of consent in a sexual assault. Working with the sens es is a powerful technique that triggers memories the vic tims dont realize they could recall, he noted. Once the psychophysi ological evidence is gathered, Strand said, the investigator can then ask traditional ques tions while the victims barri ers are relaxed, such as when, where and how the assault happened. Since 2009, more than 700 special agents and prosecutors from each branch of the mili tary have taken forensic experi ential trauma interview train ing, and 500 more are sched uled to complete the course by the end of September, Strand said. He also said DOD has fund ed more than 400 seats for the FETI special victims unit course through fiscal year 2017. Strand said his goal through FETI is to bring the military prevalence rates down for vic tims both men and women while making sure that cul tural change occurs regarding sexual assault. It might take five to 10 years for the preva lence rates to decrease and he expects reporting rates to increase, he added. What we want victims to know is they can be confident we are working really hard to understand what theyve gone through, to understand their experience and help them remember [it] in the most natu ral, scientific way, Strand said. Strand said he also wants sexual offenders to know that law enforcement investigations of sexual assault have become much more sophisticated in identifying their behaviors, and that the crime is now investigated in a manner in which it never has been before. They are at much greater risk of being caught than they were five or 10 years ago, he added. With DOD backing and col laborating with the civilian sector, Strand said, we want to lead the nation, and I think other countries are looking at us to get this right. And we have the capability to do that, he added. Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., command er, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE), presented five Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Awards and 44 let ters of appreciation to members of the CNRSE Human Resources (HR) Program during a ceremony aboard NAS Jacksonville April 17. The ceremony was held four days prior to the decentralization of the HR Program, which will re-assign the majority of CNRSE HR specialists from region headquarters to major com mands on board installations through out the region. Our CNRSE team is proud of the out standing services the HR Program has provided over many years across the Southeast Region, Scorby said. Meeting our Navy mission would not be possible if it were not for the strong support weve received from each mem ber, especially in the areas of labor employee relations, equal employment opportunity, workers compensation, and staffing and classification for more than 4,000 customers in theater. Prior to decentralization, approxi mately 75 HR specialists throughout the region fell under CNRSE responsibility. As of April 21, 57 of them will be transi tioned to other major Commands, such as Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Fleet Forces Command and Naval Education and Training Command. The new Navy-wide model will posi tion HR specialists at each major com mand, whereas CNRSE had previously been servicing about 75 percent of all civilian employees in the region. The decentralization plan was cre ated last year by the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Manpower and Reserve Affairs with the goal of delivering more streamlined and customer-focused sup port. According to Sarah Overstreet, CNRSE Human Resources director, the transition comes with distinct benefits. One of the major advantages to this change in HR servicing is that HR pro fessionals will be able to focus only on the major command to which they are assigned and will not be required to focus on several different commands at the same time, she said. This focus provides the opportuni ty for better customer service through specific, command-focused HR servic ing and better partnerships with cus tomers. The new model may have advantages over a centralized approach, but the transition itself presented some logis tical challenges. It required extensive planning and preparation to pack and organize hundreds of files and case work, Overstreet said. During the ceremony, Scorby expressed his appreciation for each of the program members efforts through out the process. This was obviously no easy feat, as you completed the transition while still serving customers and providing the services required with your everyday workload, Scorby said. Were it not for your willingness to work long hours and pay attention to a host of details, this decentralization process would not be possible, and for that, our Navy owes each of you a debt of gratitude. While decentralization is a major transition for HR specialists throughout the region, civilian employees should not expect to see many changes in the way they receive services, Overstreet said. HR services will continue regardless of the change in the delivery model. There may be a change in the HR pro fessional who currently provides HR services to them, but the new servicing model will include a primary and a sec ondary HR professional for each func tional area, she said. Most services under the new system will be provided from NAS Jacksonville, but HR professionals will be respon sive to phone calls and e-mails and are available to meet via video teleconfer ence, she added. Additional information regarding the specific processes and procedures of regional delivery of HR services will be published in the near future. FFSC offers workshopsYour NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preven tive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to ser vice members and their families. Preregistra tion is required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon reg istration. The following is the schedule for 2013: To register for any of the above workshops call 542-5745. New approach helps sexual assault victims recall detailsSoutheast Region holds ceremony, decentralizes human resources

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THURSDAY, APRIL 25, 2013 PROMOTING SAFETY PRE SERVATION HEAD HEALTH Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The VP-45 Pelicans recently dis played their Pelican Pride at the Langkawi International Maritime and Aerospace Exposition during a recent detachment to Malaysia. Held on the island of Langkawi, a short distance from Malaysias north western coast, LIMA 2013 offered the opportunity to not only showcase the venerable P-3 Orion in Southeast Asia, but also strengthen the bonds of friendship and cooperation between the militaries of Malaysia and the United States. AWO1 Joshua Turnage summarized the event, It was truly an honor for us to come here. An invitation to Malaysia to represent the United States is a once in a lifetime event. The exhibition, which drew more than 160,000 people, displayed aircraft from over 40 countries and allowed the Pelicans to interact with military members and fellow aviators from all over the globe. While everyone involved agreed there were many highlights at the air show, the most special moment for the crew occurred when they showed their air craft to children from a local orphan age. We had children at every station talking over the ICS [aircraft commu nication system] to each other, said AWO2 Emily Simpson, with all the smiles and giggling, you could definitely tell they were having a blast. VP-45s Combat Aircrew Seven also interacted with multiple delegations from other countries as well as sev eral VIPs including the United States Ambassador to Malaysia, Paul Jones, and Royal Malaysian Air Force Lt. Gen. Ackbal who presented the Pelicans with a certificate of appreciation for partici pation in LIMA 2013. When not hard at work at the air show, the Pelicans were able to explore the island of Langkawi and experience Malaysian culture.Whether riding the skycab, a cable car Pointing Poseidon westThe first operational P-8A squadron gears up for deployment The Navys first operational P-8A Poseidon squadron has completed transition to the new maritime patrol aircraft and is on track to take the P-8A on its first operational deploy ment late this year. Patrol Squadron 16 (VP16), based at Naval Air Station (NAS) Jacksonville, Fla., was certified as safe for flight in the P-8A in January and now is engaged in tactical training of its 12 aircrews as it builds up its inventory to six aircraft for its Dec. 1 deployment to Naval Air Facility Kadena, Okinawa, Japan. The squadron had taken delivery of two P-8As by late February. As the Boeing-built P-8A continues in low-rate initial production and winds down its Initial Operational Test and Evaluation, the Navys focus is shifting to the first deploy ment. VP-16s deployment will begin a continuous presence of the Poseidon in the Western Pacific as the P-8A replaces the FDR Squadron executes swim quals and underwater roboticsTwenty-six U.S. Naval Sea Cadets from the F.D. Roosevelt Squadron based at NAS Jacksonville completed their annual swimming qualification April 20 under supervision of instruc tors at the Surface Rescue Swimmer School. After swim quals, the cadets used the indoor pool to test their SeaPerch remotely operated vehicles. FDR Squadron Executive Officer Lt. j.g. David Welch explained that the SeaPerch program is a nation wide project that incorporates STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) resources to create a hands-on educational tool thats challenging and fun. SeaPerch is a collaborative effort between the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers. The SeaPerch Program was origi nally designed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to teach underwater robotics to middle and high school students, said Welch. About 11 months ago, ONR pro vided our squadron with 20 SeaPerch kits, which allowed us to form our cadets into two-or three-person robot teams, said Welch. I attended a train-the-trainer course in Rhode Island, to ensure we had enough adult coaches for all the teams. The best thing about SeaPerch is that our kids have to work together, follow instruc tions and acquire some technical skills. Today is our first time in the water with SeaPerch so our cadets are pretty excited. Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville leaders accepted the prestigious 2012 Excellence in Teaching Award from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU)recognizing NH Jacksonville for its superior clinical training of physicians and nurses on April 16. We are blessed to have talented and dedicated faculty and clinicians who strive every day to provide the highest quality for all who walk through our doors. So we are humbled to have been selected for this honor, said Cmdr. Jim Keck, NH Jacksonvilles family medi cine residency program director. Pelicans strengthen bonds at LIMA 2013 Naval Hospital Jacksonville awarded for teaching excellence

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS April 25 1862 Union naval forces occupy New Orleans, La. 1898 Congress declares war existed with Spain since April 21. 1914 First combat observation mis sion by Navy plane at Veracruz, Mexico. April 26 1869 The Good Conduct Medal was authorized. 1921 U.S. Naval Detachment left Yugoslavia after administering area around Spalato for two years to guarantee transfer of area from Austria to new country. 1952 USS Hobson sinks after collid ing with USS Wasp; 176 lives lost. April 27 1861 President Lincoln extended blockade of Confederacy to Virginia and North Carolina ports. 1865 Body of John Wilkes Booth brought to Washington Navy Yard. April 28 1962 Naval forces capture Forts Jackson and St. Philip, La. 1965 Dominican Republic interven tion began. 1944 U.S. LSTs attacked during Operation Tiger. 1993 SECDEF memo orders Armed Forces to train and assign women on combat aircraft and most combat ships, but not to ground combat positions. April 29 1814 USS Peacock captures HMS Epervier. 1898 U.S. warships engage Spanish gunboats and shore batteries at Cienfuegos, Cuba. 1944 Fast carrier task force (12 car riers) commence two-day bombing of Truk. 1975 Operation Frequent Wind evacuation from Vietnam begins April 30 1798 Congress establishes Department of the Navy. 1975 Saigon falls to North Vietnamese forces. May 1 1898 Battle of Manila Bay, Adm. Dewey defeats Spanish at Manila, Philippines. 1934 Lt. Akers demonstrates blind landing system at College Park, Md. in OJ-2 aircraft. 1945 Vice Adm. Barbey lands Australian troops on Tarakan Island, Borneo, supported by naval gunfire. 1951 USS Princeton aircraft attack Hwachon Dam using aerial torpedoes, only use of this weapon in Korean War. 1980 Eleven Navy ships begin operations assisting Coast Guard in rescuing Cuban refugees fleeing Cuba in over crowded boats. On April 15, while the Boston Marathon was getting underway, the boys and I were in Washington, D.C., embarking on another time-honored American tradition visiting our representative in congress. We entered the Longworth congressional building at the corner of C Street SE and New Jersey Avenue SE, with the Capitol building visible just a few blocks away. After we went through security, the first thing we saw was what looked like a wooden desk but which actually houses emergency escape hoods in case of a biological or chemical attack on the Capitol. Whats an escape hood? Lindell, 6, asked as he read a sign affixed to the desk. Its just for safety, I said. In case of an emergency. What kind of emergency? Um, well, one where the air in the building is bad. I took his hand to hurry him along. Will we need a hood? No, I said. We took an elevator to the office of Rep. Michael Michaud, from Maines Second District, and also our 22nd dinner guest at Dinner with the Smileys last May. After walking through halls of marble lined with flags of the fifty states, seeing Maines was like spotting home. Its ours, Mommy! Its ours! Lindell yelled as he ran up to our congressmans door. I thought about all the people, throughout the generations, who also traveled the same halls to see their representative. Inside Rep. Michauds reception area there was a shelf filled with Maine-made goods syrup, potato chips, lobster buoys and this was even more sur prising and exciting for Lindell: Its Maine syrup . in D.C.! Michaud invited us into his office. We talked about the weather in Maine and our plans for our weeklong stay in D.C. The congressman showed the boys the lunchbox he used to carry to his job at a mill in East Millinocket, Maine. Ford, 12, asked about other photographs and memorabilia on the walls. This, I thought, is America. On our way out of the building, Lindell asked about the escape hoods again. Is it like a mask for when you cant breathe the air? Yes, Lindell, but you dont need to worry about it. A few hours later, news broke about the bombings in Boston. I stopped mid-step on the sidewalk as I read from my iPhone. I was afraid and wanted to go home, but the next day we had a tour of the Capitol courtesy of our Senator Susan Collins office. The boys were so excited; I could not let them know anything was amiss. And I succeeded for a while. But then, the news was everywhere: on televisions at the hotels complimentary breakfast, on newsstands at the Metro sta tion, in conversation in the elevator. The boys knew something was wrong. The next day, security was noticeably tighter at the Capitol, but no one not the tourists, the staff, nor the senators stayed hidden or seemed afraid. They wouldnt be terrorized so I took their lead. Still, I cringed when Lindell asked about the hoods again. Little did any of us know, but around that same time, an off-site mail facility had intercepted a ricinladen letter headed for the Capitol. I read the troubling news on the way back to our hotel, and I became increasingly worried about my familys safety. I couldnt hide the weeks news from the boys any longer. Now, reports of both events, plus the fertilizerplant explosion in Texas, nearly saturated the environment as we went about our day. I tried to keep things normal because I didnt want the boys to be afraid. In the days that followed, we went to the monuments and museums. I took pictures and collected maps. The boys bought souvenirs. And I hoped that they werent listening when other tourists asked, Did they catch him yet? and How many have died? All the while, I kept a vigilant eye on our surroundings. One morning, during breakfast at the hotel, Lindell saw a lone suitcase on the floor in the lobby. It was a small bag and seemingly abandoned next to the front desk. I wonder if that suitcase has a bomb in it, Lindell said. Maybe we should tell someone about it, Owen, 10, said. Before I could answer, a man returned for his suitcase and left the building with it. Well, I doubt it had a bomb in it anyway, Lindell said between bites of waffle. It was probably too small, and who would want to blow up their suitcase? Or this hotel? I bet we are safe. But Im glad we saw that. Owen continued to eat his bagel. Ford ate a blueberry muffin. Sounds from CNN filled the space. Behind my sons, pictures of the Washington Monument and the Lincoln Memorial graced the wall. I thought, maybe this is the new America. VP-5 transition spotlightAs VP-5 transitions to the P-8A Poseidon, the squadron is highlighting a transitioning Mad Fox each week. This weeks spotlight shines on Lt. Allison Cameron. Cameron is part of a family of five from Middleboro, Mass. She has an older brother and a twin sister, who is an E-2C Hawkeye naval flight officer stationed in Japan. Her great grandfather was in the German Air Force and her grandfather was in the Army. Cameron earned her bachelor degree in biol ogy from Boston University. She commissioned through its Reserve Officer Training Corps program in 2007. She is currently the pilot training officer. Her duties include the training of all pilots in the squadron from the most junior pilot to the commanding officer. As the pilot training officer she has been leading the VP-5 pilot cadre through the P-8A transition since February. As a qualified patrol plane instructor and mission commander, she is transitioning at the instructor level. It has been a real challenge to learn this air craft at the instructor level while helping the junior pilots who are still working on their upgrading qualifications and the transition, she commented. My experience in the venerable P-3C has been an invaluable asset in both learning and appreciating the new features of the P-8A. VP-5 pilots are conducting training through lectures, operational flight trainers (OFT), and flights in the P-8A under the guidance of VP-30 instruc tors. The OFTs are state-of-the-art and have been a tremendous help, said Cameron. VP-30 has been so helpful in guiding us through this transition and eventually will help guide us through our safe-forflight inspections later this summer. When she isnt busy studying the P-8A, Cameron enjoys running 5K races for charity, spending time with friends at the beach, volunteering at First Coast No More Homeless Pets, and skiing and snowboarding during the winter. VP-5 has been transitioning to the P-8A Poseidon since Jan. 4. From the mouths of children, a new America

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Navy divers recover sunken patrol boat Navy Divers from Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit (MDSU) 2 and contracted salvage personnel successfully raised and returned to shore a sunken patrol boat (PB 502), April 18. Coastal Riverine Squadron (CRS) 10, a Navy Reserve unit headquartered at NAS Jacksonville, was conducting a routine training event sailing from Jacksonville to Charleston when one of their patrol boats transiting into Charleston Harbor ran aground on a jetty on the south side on the channel entrance at 9:41 p.m., April 13. Salvage operations like this are quite common, we train to respond to all types of incidents from planes going down to boats sinking and each one brings up its own unique challenges, said Chief Warrant Officer John Sullivan, MDSU2 operations officer-in-charge of the salvage operation. The 34-foot patrol boat was surfaced Thursday morning by Navy divers from approximately 20 feet of water and was towed to shore by a contracted salvage company. The eight-person Mobile Diving and Salvage (MDS) Company, MDS Co. 2-4 based in Virginia Beach, Va., arrived in Charleston and worked with local Coast Guard and maritime officials to deter mine how to safely recover the submerged vessel by using another similar patrol boat ashore as a model. MDSU2 Divers then performed a site survey to determine the extent of damage to the vessel.On Wednesday and Thursday, divers installed lift points, placed belly bands on the submerged vessel prior to rigging for lift and recovery, and attached salvage lift bags capable of lifting 22,000 pounds. When secured, the vessel was carefully brought to the surface Thursday morning by the lift bags and checked for stability. This is what we train for, said Sullivan. We developed a plan. We executed it, and I thought my team did outstanding. PB 502 was then towed to the U.S. Coast Guard Station. Coastal Riverine Group (CRG) 2 is conducting a thorough investigation into the cause of the inci dent. MDSU 2 is homeported at Joint Expeditionary Base, Little Creek-Ft. Story in Virginia Beach, Va., and has successfully conducted salvage opera tions to support TWA Flight 800, Swiss Air Flight 111, the space shuttles Challenger and Columbia, the I-35W Mississippi River bridge collapse in Minnesota, the Civil War ironclad USS Monitor, and recovery of a downed F-16 Fighting Falcon off the coast of Italy. 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013

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Safety and small business topics at Jacksonville conferenceThe 2013 Jacksonville Acquisition Conference and Trade Show provided opportunities for Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast to teach and learn. Acquisition and safety special ists attended the April 10 event at the University of North Florida Herbert University Center. Many of the acquisition and small business representatives were familiar with NAVFACs subcontractor safety clause that has been added to its contract evaluation process. Since Oct. 1, 2010, NAVFAC Southeast construc tion and service contracts have included provisions in the specifications that all subcontractors must meet an Experience Modification Rate (EMR) not greater than 1.1 and have a Days Away, Restricted, Transferred (DART) rate not greater than 3.0, said NAVFAC Southeast Safety Director Dale Powell. This new requirement was addressed at a break-out session where Powell spoke to attendees specifically about the new safety provision, the importance of communication, acquisition safety, the use of operational risk management (ORM), and near miss reporting. Ninety-five percent of the mishaps were coming from subcontractors, said Powell. We had to come up with a way to fix it and since implementing the new safety clause in the contracts, we have seen a 37 percent decrease in two and a half years. Powell shared that NAVFAC Southeast has received overwhelming approval from contractors regarding the new safety factor. It is important to me that NAVFAC is as concerned about safety as we are, said Bob Tabone, project manager with A. Harold + Associates, LLC. This event was a great refresher to reassure me that we are on the right track. Powell stressed that when contractors work with NAVFAC Southeast, they are partners and it is important that both the Navy and the contractor are behind their safety programs. Many of the 300 in attendance also visited the NAVFAC Southeast display set up in the atrium where Nelson Smith, NAVFAC Southeast Small Business Director spoke with small business representatives. Smith brought brochures on NAVFACs small business program and talked with attendees about how they can do business with the Navy. Keynote speaker retired Rear Adm. Sean Crean, director of the Navys Office of Small Business Programs was optimistic on the outlook for small business opportunities within the Navy. Crean stated that they will continue to keep small business as the first option in Navy acquisition. Crean shared with the group that in fiscal year 2012, the Navy purchased $13.3 billion of supplies and ser vices from small businesses. NAVFAC Southeast contributed over $580 million to the total in fiscal year 2012, representing over 61percent of NAVFAC Southeasts prime contracts that were awarded directly to small businesses. Events like this are crucial in stimulating dialogue between government and the small business com munity, said Smith. In addition to helping meet continuing education requirements for our acquisi tion community, our small businesses get the chance to improve their knowledge of the acquisition process and also to meet with government representatives to learn about upcoming requirements. Other small business advocates on hand at the conference included representatives from the General Services Administration, Fleet Logistics Center Southeast, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, as well as state and local government representatives. The PLAYERS, Veterans Coalition job fairThe PLAYERS are holding their second annual job fair in partnership with the Jacksonville Military Veterans Coalition for active duty, Reservists, retired military, veterans and military spouses May 5 at TPC Sawgrass. The job fair is free and will be held in The Turn hospitality venue near the 18th green. For more information, go to www.PGATour.com/ theplayers. Sunday Services 8:15 a.m. Protestant Liturgical Worship 9:15 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:45 a.m. Protestant Sunday School 11 a.m. Protestant Worship 11:15 a.m. Catholic CCD Daily Catholic Mass 11:35 a.m. (except Friday) Weekly Bible Study Wednesdays, 7 p.m. at Chapel Complex Building 749 and Thursdays at 7 p.m. in the barracksNAS Jacksonville Chapel CenterCorner of Birmingham Avenue & Mustin Road542-3051 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013 Status of the Phase I scan ning effort for the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Cadastral Modernization Program (CMP) will be pre sented April 25 when NAVFAC Southeast holds its annual CMP meeting on base. Cadastral documents are public real estate records, sur veys or maps showing owner ship, boundaries or value of a property. The NAVFAC Cadastral staff at each Facilities Engineering Command (FEC) is the offi cial custodian of the Navy and Marine Corps real estate records for its area of responsibility. The team will review the way ahead, the importance of the new process in preserv ing historical records, and any process improvements at the annual CMP meeting. The CMP project is divided into five phases, with each phase being piloted at NAVFAC Southeast before being used to support other Navy regions. As each phase is suc cessfully completed, a new region will adopt the change. NAVFAC Southeast Real Estate Cartographer and Geographic Information Systems Specialist Jill Rose keeps the project on task by coordinating meetings with other FECs, and engag ing with the Naval Air Station Jacksonville Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) and contrac tor ICM Document Solutions to implement any process improvements. Results of these meetings show just how big the project is and the importance of shar ing information as we push this program out for others to use, said Rose. This project will provide access to their legal docu ments in real time creating a process that allows them to be able to enter the coordinates of a location and learn everything about the transaction. Rose explained that the team used available technology to make the workflow easier and the Phase I pilot served as the research and development phase before it was launched to other regions in the Navy. We had to let go of the way we used to do things and focus on how we could make our process better for everyone who needs the information, said Rose. Bob McDowell, NAVFAC Southeast real estate branch head, stated that the project was implemented because a customer requested time-sen sitive real estate information. As the team researched and was able to provide the docu ments within one and a half days, McDowell thought that it should be done more quickly and began researching new ways to improve the response time. The needs of our internal and external customers were crucial to this project to pro vide information as soon as possible, said McDowell. The team recognized the need for change and came up with innovative ways to be better at what they do. Rose met with the NAVFAC Southeast real estate team and other stakeholders to decide the best plan of attack for the real estate files. With Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) and NAVFAC Headquarters supporting the ideas of the team, they started to focus on bringing their cadastral docu ments into the digital age. In a search for these types of records, the NAVFAC Southeast Real Estate team discovered many historical documents along the way some historical treasures were discovered buried in boxes. We have deed transfers with Old meets new: NAVFAC Southeast digitally preserving historical documents

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013 7 wet signatures from Presidents Tyler, Polk, Bush, as well as Robert F. Kennedy and the Spanish Governor of Florida, said Rose. Some of the documents are so old and fragile, they needed to be handled with extra care. The historical discoveries brought immediate attention from the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) who visited NAVFAC Southeast to review some of the documents stored in their file system. Finding out the documents have such a historical importance confirmed the need to duplicate and secure the documents. NARA is an independent agency of the U.S. government assigned to pre serve and document government history. Historical data contained in the files at NAVFAC Southeast provide a glimpse into the former way of transferring, disposing or acquiring land. The fact we have documents signed by a Spanish leader transferring prop erty to us is very cool, said Jake Walls, NAVFAC Southeast land surveyor. History lessons are all around us. This project is going to make retrieving information easier, said Walls. Although it is a huge undertaking, it will be well worth it for our customers and the preservation of important documents. The project fixes many issues in the old process and now includes electronic conversion, retrieval, output, and distribution of digital and hardcopy information in the form of original deeds, maps, and real estate working files. Partnering with DLA resulted in a reduction in costs for scanning and file storage, and DLAs global presence has been vital for accomplishing this effort NAVFAC-wide, said Rose. DLA provided secure access to the files, storage and retrieval capabilities which were critical components for the project. NAVFAC has multiple surveying and CMP contracts in place which provide access to electronic Cadastral files for various contractors at each FEC. DLA provides the scanning and retrieval portion of the project and ICM provides the additional staff required to roll out the new program at each FEC. ICM also developed a customized database program used for tracking the location of the original documents; automated the process for manifesting and bookmarking the pdf documents; and developed a color-coded labeling program for categorizing the different types of interests that are maintained by Cadastral. When I first came to NAVFAC Southeast, I began this effort work ing on a conference room table using a standalone laptop computer on loan by DLA, said Leola Hall, DLA office ser vice assistant. The team thought it was important to test the methodology as the project continually changes. New ideas are discussed, implemented and outcomes are documented to provide lessons learned before other FECs are brought in. By creating standard operating pro cedures (SOP), the team ensured each file was handled correctly and followed a process to prepare the documents for scanning and conversion. SOPs were designed to ensure consistency and uniformity across NAVFAC. The goal is that all cadastral files are scanned and retrieved in the same way for Navy and Marine Corps interests. Discovery of missing documents highlights the need for a better record keeping process going forward, said Shenita Brown, ICM scanning docu ment specialist. Brown has seen firsthand, the num ber of incomplete files entered in the database. The team is working on the next phase (Phase II) of the effort which includes standardizing the contents of all new files stored by Cadastral. The team from DLA and ICM has processed more than 200,000 pieces of documentation since September 2010 for the NAVFAC Southeast. NAVFAC

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HOSPITALNH Jacksonville is committed to the professional development of health care providers from across the nation, and hosts multiple clinical training programs. It is home to the Navys largest, accredited, award-winning Family Medicine Residency Program cited as USUs 2011 Family Medicine Clinical Site of the Year, a nurse anes thetist program, a perioperative nurs ing course, a trauma nursing course and an Independent Duty Corpsman Center of Excellence. In addition, NH Jacksonville trains students from local universities enrolled in physical therapy, physician assistant, doctor of phar macy and other programs. Clinicians gain experience in mul tiple settings, including rotations at partner facilities, such as Shands Jacksonville, that specialize in highacuity and trauma patients. NH Jacksonville also reaches out into the community to prepare future heal ers, with its Science, Service, Medicine & Mentoring (S2M2) Program, train ing students from Darnell-Cookman Middle/High School of the Medical Arts. All graduate education programs at NH Jacksonville meet national stan dards. And Navy health care provid ers have the same education and training as their private-sector colleagues with the addition of experience on battlefields, at sea and on humanitarian missions. USU a top-tier medical school according to U.S. News & World Reports current rankings grants the Excellence in Teaching Award to only two programs (one large and one small) across the military health system each year. The award also includes a $5,000 grant from the Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, to be used for education and training. The following are phone numbers of contacts who can help with consumer problems: Family Service Center 542-2766 Better Business Bureau 721-2288 State Attorneys Office Consumer Mediation 630-2075 City of Jacksonville/ Consumer Affairs Division 630-3467 Florida Department of Business & Professional Regulation 1-850-4871395 Construction Industry investigative services 727-5590Got a consumer problem? Heres who to call 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013

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system constructed over 2,500 feet high, or relaxing on one of the many beautiful beaches, all the Pelicans can agree that Langkawi earned its official title of Jewel of the Kedah. At the end of the five-day expedi tion, the Pelicans left Lankawi with memories and friendships which will last a lifetime.At the conclusion of LIMA, the Pelicans flew south to Subang Air Force Base, located near the Malaysian capital city of Kuala Lumpur, where they had the opportunity to demonstrate the operability of the P-3 to members of the Royal Malaysian Air force and Navy during a subject matter expert exchange. Upon their arrival, members of the crew conducted a symposium with Malaysian military members highlighting such topics as the pilot and naval flight officer train ing pipeline, maritime ship rig ging techniques and basic oceanography. Over the next two days, the Pelicans flew maritime domain assurance flights with Malaysian military riders. During these flights, the flight crew demonstrated the rigging of several vessels as well as capabili ties of the automatic identification mapping camera system. In executing these flights, we were able to both demonstrate the P-3 capabilities as well as improve interoperability between our militaries, remarked VP-45 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mike Vitali. Before departing Kuala Lumpur, crew members were able to get out and experience the capital which included a visit to the Petronas Towers, the highest twin towers in the world. While sad to leave, the Pelicans departed Malaysia confi dent the friendships they fostered on this detachment. VP-45 SEA CADETSFDR Squadron Commanding Officer Lt. j.g.Robert Long brought his mask, flippers and underwater camera to the pool. SeaPerch is an outstanding program. As our cadets become more familiar with the crafts buoyancy, propulsion and maneuverability they will deploy on missions that challenge them to place or retrieve an object in the water, said Long. Since today is our first time in deep water, Im going under to take underwater pictures of each teams submarine. This will allow them to fine-tune their control and propulsion systems. They may not realize it but theyre learning a lot about science and engineering as they build these simple, underwater robots. The U.S. Naval Sea Cadet Corps (NSCC) is for youths ages 13 to 17, and the Navy League Cadet Corps is for youths ages 10 to 12. They give young peo ple the opportunity to experience military life in a hands-on, real-world environment. Current F.D. Roosevelt Squadron enrollment is 40 male and female cadets who drill twice monthly aboard NAS Jacksonville. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013 9

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10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013 Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a disruption in brain func tion caused by a blow to the head or a penetrating head injury. Over the past decade, TBI has gained attention due to the many service members returning from the Global War on Terror with this injury. However, TBI is not simply an issue for the active duty population. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, at least 1.7 million TBIs occur each year. Anyone is at risk for devel oping TBI. On the homefront, the leading causes of TBI are falls, motor vehicle crashes and traffic incidents, being struck by (or against) something, and assaults. For military personnel in war zones, blasts are a leading cause of TBI. Those suffering from TBI can display a wide variety of symptoms, based on the severity of injury. Penetrating head trauma is the greatest threat. But even a minimal injury cant be overlooked, explained Lt. Kermit Salivia, Naval Hospital Jacksonville family medicine physician. A small concussion can result in chronic headaches, bouts of forgetfulness, chang es in sensation, difficulty with communication, disorientation and changes in emotion that can include depression, anxi ety and personality changes. More severe injuries can result in a brain bleed that can cause coma, paralysis and even death. There are many ways to prevent TBI, according to Salivia. First, identify risks; then take action. Use personal protective equipment in the workplace and in recreation sportsthis includes wearing a helmet when using a motorcycle, allterrain vehicle, bicycle, skateboard or roller skates. In a vehicle, make sure everyone buckles-up and place young children in an infant seat or booster seat. At home, remove trip or slip hazards, keep firearms secured, supervise children and place protective gates around stairs for toddlers. For the elderly, ensure proper lighting and install handrails on stairs and inclined paths. To talk to a professional, patients can contact their Medical Home Port team (via Central Appointments at 5424677 at the hospital or 5467094 at Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville) or Mental Health at 542-3473. Apply by May 31 The American Red Cross Northeast Florida Chapter at Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville is current ly recruiting for this summers Junior Red Cross volunteers. This offers an excellent opportu nity for students interested in health careers to train with highly skilled Navy Medicine professionals phy sicians, nurses, pharmacists, thera pists and technicians as well as contribute to a positive experience for patients. The program is open to a limited number of high school students age 16 to 18 who have base access. Volunteers work four to 20 hours per week in locations throughout the hospital, and receive CPR training. Apply online by May 31 at www.nefloridaredcross.org. At the Web site, click on volunteer, join us, youth volunteer applica tion (or adult volunteer application for 18 year-old students). Fill out the application, select Northeast Florida Chapter, and create a Volunteer Connection account. After submitting the application, complete the online orientation. All applicants are required to attend a kick-off event (which includes an interview) June 8 from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the hospitals 2nd deck conference room in the central tower (next to the chapel). For more about this opportunity, contact Junior Red Cross volunteer coordinators Terry Miles or Mary Miciano at 542-7525 or jaxredcrossoffice@med.navy.mil. The J. Wayne and Delores Barr Weaver Veterans Emergency and Transition Services Fund provides emergency financial assistance and resources to veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom that will help to support their transition into civilian life and stabilization into the community. This financial assistance is pro vided directly to the veterans of these wars.The geographic service area is: Duval, Clay, Nassau, Baker and St. Johns counties. Types of emergency needs we help with but not strictly limited too: vehicle payment or repair, insurance needing to find work or learn a life skill For more information, contact a Red Cross Military Services caseworker at 246-1395. What is a traumatic brain injury and how can it be prevented? Experience Navy Medicine as a Junior Red Cross volunteer Financial aid available for veterans If you are retiring or separating from active duty and need assistance with submitting your claim for disabil ity and compensation to the Veterans Administration (VA), you can start up with getting our medical information in order. AMVETS is the Veterans Service Organization advocate for separat ing or retiring service members and their families providing assistance with submission of claims to the VA for benefits, disabilities and compensa tion. AMVETS is a national Veterans Service Organization authorized to submit claims to the VA and advocate for veterans and their families with the VA nationwide. All assistance is free of charge and you are not required to become a member of AMVETS to use their ser vices. For more information and to make an appointment, call David Sanders at 542-2834 or email david.d.sanders@ navy.mil VA disability assistance available

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POSEIDONLockheed P-3C Orion in succeeding squadron deployments. According to Rear Adm. Sean S. Buck, commander, Patrol and Reconnaissance Group, headquartered in Norfolk, Va., the transition sched ule is designed to take a P-3C squad ron returning from a Western Pacific deployment, convert it to a P-8A squadron, and then send it back to the Western Pacific for its first deploy ment, as is the case with VP-16, which returned from the region last year to begin its transition. [Weve] got a method to our mad ness behind our transition, Buck said Feb. 22 in a briefing with reporters and static display tour of the P-8A at Joint Base Andrews-Naval Air Facility Washington, Md. The idea is we have set up the transition such that a squadron with P-3s goes to a Western Pacific deployment, which is a very rich, anti-submarine warfare type of environment. They get the experience of operating in that area, understanding where they detach to, the missions sets, the environment, the climate, all the hazards. [When] they come home from that deployment, they turn in their P-3s and start that transition of getting [P-8] NATOPS [Naval Aviation Training and Operational Procedures Standards] qualified, learning how to fight it, and we send them right back to the Western Pacific where they were familiar with the environment. They just bring a new weapon system, he said. That probably is the best way to meet the fleet commanders needs and give the fleet commander confidence that everything is going to be OK introduc ing a new weapon system into their AOR [area of responsibility], he said. Under current planning, the Navy plans to base five operational P-8A squadrons in Jacksonville, four at NAS Whidbey Island, Wash., and three at Marine Corps Air Station Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. To achieve that laydown will involve a shift of one of the six VP squadrons from Jacksonville to Whidbey Island. However, Buck said the Navy is reevaluating the basing plan with the possibility of moving squadrons from Kaneohe Bay and basing the 12 VP squadrons at only Jacksonville and Whidbey Island. As President [Barack Obama] has shifted his rebalance to the Pacific, and as we have come under budgetary constraints, the Navy asked to reopen the environmental impact study that talked about and determined that basing plan and we are looking to see if there could be a better footprint, Buck said. That is what we are exploring right now and will report out probably in late spring or early summer from that study to the CNO [chief of naval operations], to the secretary of the Navy, and make a determination of whether our original basing plan in 08 needs to be adjusted or not. As of late February, the Navy had flown more than 6,600 flight hours since April 2009 in the P-8 during the developmental and operational test ing at NAS Patuxent River, Md., and in concurrent fleet introduction at NAS Jacksonville. Out of the gate, the aircraft has proven to be very reliable and very capable, Buck said. Over the past year, we have had the opportunity to fly the aircraft in a wide variety of operational environ ments and mission scenarios and, by all accounts, the aircraft is performing very well. We have executed detach ments from Australia, Hawaii, Guam, Japan, Alaska and Scotland, and suc cessfully employed the airplane against difficult U.S. and allied submarines, both nuclear and diesel. Buck said the biggest improvement in the P-8A over the P-3C it is replacing is the reliability of the overall aircraft system. Boeing delivered the sixth and last P-8A in Low-Rate Production (LRIP) batch 1 in January and is building the seven P-8As in LRIP-2. The second P-8A squadron, VP-5, now is in transition to the aircraft and will be followed in July by VP-45. At the end of this decade, when we are through with transition, the assigned aircraft complement to each fleet squadron will be seven jets, Buck said. We are able, with the aircraft deliv eries right now, to give each squadron two jets during their home training cycle and they will all deploy with six jets. The service entry of the P-8A comes none too soon. The average P-3C in the fleet today has logged more than 17,000 flight hours. One has flown more than 26,000 hours since 1973. Both of these numbers significantly exceed the original design life of the aircraft and substantial structural repairs to the wings have been required over the years to achieve this longevity, Buck said. Despite the success of these wing repairs, remaining P-3 structural com ponents and mission systems continue to age and we are living on borrowed time with P-3Cs. Five years ago, in the midst of man aging a fatigue life crisis in our P-3 fleet that grounded more than 130 P-3s we developed a plan to transition the fleet to the P-8A Poseidon beginning in the spring of 2012, he said, noting that, before the transition began the 12 active duty VP squadrons had fewer than 85 P-3Cs available, compared with 240 at the height of the Cold War. Even though the size of the MPR [maritime patrol reconnaissance] force is less than half of what it was . it remains as relevant today as at any time in its storied history, with 32 aircraft currently forward-deployed around the world, he said. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013 11

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12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013

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Battle of Midway Commemorative Dinner June 1, 2013 World Golf Village Renaissance Resort Keynote: Adm. William Gortney, commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command Cocktails at 6 p.m. Active Duty E6 and below $25E7 to O3 $35 O4 to O5 $45O6 & above $65For more information, contact Bob Price At (904) 246-9982, e-mail: bpricex4@comcast.net or Bill Dudley at (904) 806-4712, E-mail: anuday00@aol.com. Tickets may also be purchased at www.midwaydinner.orgUniform for O4 and above is dinner dress white jacket. For O3 and below, dinner dress white/dinner dress white jacket optional. Civilian is black tie or business attirewww.midwaydinner.org Sponsored by JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013 13

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The P-8A is expected to fly a 10.5hour profile similar to that of a P-3C. Cmdr. Molly J. Boron, commanding officer of VP-16, said the P-8A is actually quite a bit more comfortable [in flight]. With the flexible wings, the crew isnt getting bounced around quite as much as in the P-3, [and] it flies very smoothly down low. She said the P-8As mission sets for its upcoming deployment will include anti-submarine warfare, antisurface warfare, and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, the same as those of its prior P-3C deployment. Boron said her squadron will retain 12 combat air crews for its six aircraft, as compared with 12 crews for nine aircraft in a P-3C squadron. The P-8A carries a crew of nine compared with a crew of 11 for a P-3C. The P-8A does not carry the two flight engineers and inflight technician of a P-3C crew, but adds an extra nonacoustic sensor operator. We finished up our transition at the end of January, and so, everybody that we had onboard had spent some time in VP-16 as a P-3 air crew, so all are very experienced folks that we took through transition, Boron said. Theyve all done exceptionally well and part of that is because of their experience factor. Weve had one crew finish the ARP [aircrew readiness program] and two more that are in the process right now. Lt. Frank Thomas, training officer for VP-16, said the squadron is receiving its first nuggets, new flight crew person nel with no prior experience as P-3C crew members. When VP-16 deploys, the P-8A will be certified to use the Mk54 anti-subma rine torpedo and the AGM-84 Harpoon anti-ship cruise missile, Buck said. Certification to lay mines and fire the AGM-84K Standoff Land-Attack Missile-Expanded Response will await future deployments. He stressed that the P-8A is capable of prosecuting submarines at low altitude in a profile very similar to that of a P-3C, and that its high altitude anti-submarine capa bilities will be improved in later increments of development. The future capabilities will include the addition of a torpedo that can be launched from high altitude and at a standoff range. The P-8A has a broader area-search capability than the P-3C and can fly to its search area more quickly because of its dash speed and ability to climb and perform better than a turboprop aircraft. In the P-8As crew compartment, or tube, the five tactical crew stations are arranged in a line facing the port side, which recalls the arrangement in the P-3A and P-3B versions of the Orion. In the P-3C, the stations of the tactical coordinator, navigator and non-acous tic sensor operator were physically located separately from each other and from the two acoustic sensor operators. It is working out very well, Boron said. The five of them communicate very well together, integrating the pilots with the three nets that we have avail able to talk between the crew. When the MQ-4C Triton high-alti tude, high endurance unmanned aer ial vehicle the Broad-Area Maritime Surveillance system becomes oper ational in 2016, there will be imme diate information sharing between unmanned systems and the P-8, she said. Buck said that for the next 10 years there are no plans for P-8 air crews to control unmanned systems. He said the Navy is fixing a set of identified software deficiencies and will have addressed them prior to the December deployment. This transition to fleet employment has benefited from an extensive inte grated test process in which develop mental test, operational test and fleet replacement squadron personnel con ducted side-by-side evaluations and gained hands-on experience with the P-8, beginning with the arrival of the first test aircraft in Patuxent River over three years ago, Buck said. This integrated approach to test and evaluation is now paying signifi cant dividends as it has ensured that an upcoming set of preplanned aircraft software updates are perfectly aligned with the fleets operational priorities. He also said that the P-8A is plumbed for aerial refueling and crews will begin training for that capability in 2015. Sending a new aircraft into an area of operations also involves setting up a logistical supply chain to support it. That is probably one of my biggest focus items, Buck said. Its a new type/model/series, so we need to create the warehouse shelves full of a whole new set of spare parts. We have been working diligently with Boeing and with the program manager to be sure we have sufficient logisti cal support in Jacksonville the home of the transition for about the next three or four years as well as logistical support in its first deployment site, Okinawa. The Pacific will now have constant seamless representation by the P-8 weapon system. That is where each new transition squadron will deploy to. The P-8A is larger than the P-3C and will need larger hangar facilities for maintenance. With the partnership of the Japanese government, we are building a brand new hangar for the P-8 in Okinawa, Buck said. The scheduled comple tion date of that right now is 2016, so we had to take the existing P-3 hangar and make adjustments to allow that aircraft to tuck in there as we await the construction of [the] new hangar. That infrastructure for P-8 is new through out the world and we have a military construction plan to build that out in each of the primary deployment sites throughout this decade. POSEIDON For more information about sports, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil. 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013

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Kadena Air Force Base offers a number of intra mural sports for local military personnel to participate in, including flag football, bowling, volleyball and basketball. For the VP-45 Pelicans, each sporting event is another chance to domi nate. The VP-45 flag foot ball team completed a 15 game season and ultimately emerged as the 2013 Kadena Intramural Flag Football Champions. Competing in a single elimination playoff tour nament which began March 4, the Pelicans dominated through the week to make it to the championship game. We trusted each other and, with the sup port from the squadron and our fans, we knew it was going to be a good night, said defen sive player AWO2 (NAC) Aaron Bucher. The team was right to be confident, securing a 40-13 win over the Kadena AFB Det 1 Honey Badgers. Only a few hundred yards from the football field, the Pelican bowl ing team made their presence known at the base bowling alley. Each Tuesday night for nine weeks, two teams from VP-45 took to the lanes for three games. We started out pret ty slow, but we kept our heads up and started to improve and ended up in first place, PR3 Micah Littlepage said, whose season high of 246 and career high of two perfect games greatly contribut ed to the teams success. Both VP-45 teams earned a spot in the playoffs, and after several weeks of playoff competition, the Pelicans again ended up on top, clinch ing the Kadena Bowling Championship title. Adding to the squad rons dominance, the VP-45 volleyball team competed in an eightgame season. Finishing the season 6-2, the Pelican team earned a spot in the playoffs and ultimately clinched the championship. Good team cohe sion led to a solid show ing in the playoffs, bringing the Captains Cup Championship to VP-45, said AWO2 David Thibaut. With three champion ship trophies now on display, the only question for the Pelican team is when their next chance to dominate the sports scene will be. Although deployed to Japan, VP-45 members did not let being half way around the world stop them from partici pating in Jacksonvilles Gate River Run. With the cooperation of Doug Alred, the Gate River Run director, VP-45 Sailors signed up for the race on the official website and ran the 15K (9.3 miles) on March 9 and 10 in Okinawa. VP-45s Lt. j.g. John Leeds then submitted the official times and participants will soon receive their completion medals and T-shirts in the mail. The race pro vided a unique oppor tunity for VP-45 Sailors to enjoy a taste of home while deployed. Theres no Green Monster here, Leeds said, referring to Jacksonvilles Hart Bridge, but there are plenty of hills to make up for it. On March 16, the Pelicans dominate Kadena sports scene JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013 What is Adoption? Adoption is a process that cuts all legal ties between the adopted child and the birth parent and transfers parental authority (e.g., making medical, educational, and welfare decisions for the child) to the adopting parent. While child adoption is the most common, it is also possi ble to adopt an adult. Common reasons are for inheritance purposes, to formalize an existing parent/child relationship, or to provide perpetual care for an adult with a disability. Stepparent scenarios are unique. Unless a stepparent officially adopts a stepchild, both biological parents of that stepchild keep their parental authority. However, the step child is still eligible for DEERS enrollment if the steppar ent is the active duty mem ber. Adoption is different from guardianship or temporary legal custody because those actions are typically only tem porary measures concerning a childs welfare, not permanent. Adoption is permanent when a child is legally adopted, that child is treated like a natural child born to that family who can inherit real and personal property. Whether adopting domesti cally or from a foreign coun try, there are two methods of adoption: 1) agency adoption or 2) direct placement/inde pendent adoption. An agency adoption involves a prospective parent working with a public agency or licensed pri vate agency who is tasked with ensuring that the prospective parents are well-matched to the childs background, capabili ties, and needs. An indepen dent adoption is when the birth parent places the child into an unrelated home by either identifying an adoptive parent on their own or by using an attor ney or adoption facilitator. An independent adoption cannot take place without termination of the birth parents parental rights, either through the birth parents voluntary consent or through a courts involuntary termination of the parents rights. Independent adoptions also require full compliance with the law, meaning that it is crucial to seek legal counsel before trying to adopt a child via non-agency adoption. To illustrate how important it is to be aware of a states lawful pro cess for adoption, some state laws prohibit a hospital from releasing an infant to some one other than a natural par ent; and other states make it a crime for the adopting parent to pay for any expenses associated with the direct placement of the child, including medi cal expenses and home care arrangements. The Adoption Process: Each state has its own adoption laws and eligibility criteria that will dictate your options. Adoption across state lines means that you must comply with the laws in both states, though neigh boring states often have com pacts with each other regarding adoption. If you choose inter national adoption, each coun try has specific guidelines and requirements for prospective parents. That being said, the basic steps for adoption are: Petition: Adoptive parents sign and file a petition for adoption either in the county where the child lives, where the adoption agency is located, or where the adoptive parents live. Consent : If the adoption is by consent, the birth parents must acknowledge their consent in writing. Some states require children over 12 years of age to consent to their adoption. Under certain circumstances, consenting parents have the ability to withdraw consent. If the adoption is based on abandonment, then a separate peti tion for termination of parental rights must be filed with the court. Order of Reference and Home Study : An order of reference is filed and refers the case to a licensed private adoption agency or public agency to conduct a home study. Home stud ies typically include the back ground history of the adoptive parents and home situation, recent medical examinations, and other pertinent informa tion. Interlocutory Decree : After the home study is filed, the court issues an interlocutory decree temporarily giving the adoptive parents legal custo dy of the child. Before a final order is issued, there may be a second home study to assess the placement progress. Final Order : The final order of adoption from the court makes the child legally one of the family. After the final order, the childs birth cer tificate is amended to list the adoptive parents as the birth parents. Reimbursement: Active duty members of the Armed Forces who adopt a child under age 18 (including adoption of a stepchild) are eligible for reimbursement of up to $2,000 per child for qualifying expens es. For multiple adoptions, the maximum reimbursable amount is $5,000 per calendar year. If both adoptive parents are active duty, only one member is eligible for reimburse ment. To qualify, the adoption must be arranged through one of the following: a governmen tal agency with responsibil ity under state or local law for child placement; or a private adoption agency authorized by state or local law to place chil dren for adoption. Qualifying expenses include placement fees, legal fees, and medi cal expenses of the biological mother and child. To make a claim for reimbursement, the adoptive parent must submit DD Form 2675 to DFAS and also be able to show documentation of agency involvement, substantiation of expenses, and finalization of the adop tion. Claims for reimburse ment must be submitted no later than one year following the date the adoption is final ized. See DODINST 1341.9 and OPNAVINST 1754.4 for further details on reimbursements for adoption expenses. Service members who adopt a child in a qualifying adoption are also eligible to receive up to 21 days of non-chargeable leave of absence to be used in con nection with the adoption. The absence must be taken within 12 months following the adop tion and is granted under a commanding officers discre tion. Where to Go for Help: Adoption is a legal pro cess that potentially involves state and international laws. Additionally, an adopting par ents age, marital status and years of being married, eth nicity and religion, and even income are all factors that may impact whether or not they can adopt. Consult your local legal assistance office for guidance on where to start and what benefits you can take advantage of when planning to add a mem ber to your family. Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville needs 30 volunteers to assist with the Warrior Challenge and an additional 75 officers and chief petty officers to facili tate the red carpet awards during the 2013 Never Quit Beach event May 19 from 5:45 a.m. to 3 p.m. All volunteers will receive a free Never Quit running shirt.For more information, call or e-mail MC1 Brianna Dandridge at 396-5909, Ext 1150. Never Quit 2013 is a series of physi cal fitness events challenging athletes to maximize their strength and endurance performance including a 5K and a Spec Ops Warrior Challenge. The annual event takes place at Jacksonville Beach. For more information, go to: http://neverqui tnever.com. Adoption: How to navigate the process of adding a member to your family Military family teams are forming for the Relay for Life at Fleming Island High School May 3. The event remembers those who have lost their battle with cancer, sup port and encourage those who are fighting, and celebrate those who have survived their battle with cancer. If you are interested, please call Kari Wiese at (207) 730-3294. For more details, visit the Relay for life Web site at www.relayforlife. org/flemingislandfl. The team is called JAX MILITARY FAMILIES.Relay For Life: Military families wanted for eventPelicans hit the road again, this time to support research for leukemia and thyroid cancer. The squadron sponsored a 5K Run for the Cure which drew more than 175 participants and raised $1,150 which will be donated to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society and the Light of Life Foundation, which focuses on thyroid cancer research and patient support. These charities were particularly important to the Pelican family since three VP-45 Sailors are currently undergoing treatment for these illnesses. It was a great way to bring the command together to support a good cause, said AWF2(NAC/AW) Greta Hynes, who participated in the run. The Pelicans continue to promote health, fitness and sportsmanship at all levels while currently deployed to Kadena Air Force Base, Japan. PELICANSVolunteers needed for Never Quit event

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Deweys free Spring Concert Series 7 p.m. on the outdoor stage April 26 The Ride May 3 Boogie Freaks May 10 7th Street Band May 17 Zero-NFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday change of hours Open 410 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 126 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included Friday special $1 games per person 25 p.m. Shoe rental not includedFitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 The outdoor pool hours April 1 May 5 Open Monday Friday (lap swim only) 6 a.m. 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday (lap swim only) 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. During lap swim only the waterslide, water park and concessions will not be open. 2013 Learn to Swim Program Sign-up at the Gym (the Zone) on Saturday, May 11, 8 a.m. 3 p.m. Session 1: June 1020 Session 2 July 8-18 Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Daytona International Speedway Subway Firecracker July 5 and Coke 400 July 6 Tickets on sale now! Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts Funkfest Metropolitan Park May 10-11 2-day ticket $52 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3, 2013 Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7, 2013 Blockout Dates: March 23 April 5, 2013 Call for pricing Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline 2013 Live Broadway Series Celtic Woman May 2 $44 $134 American Idiot May 14 & 15 $25 $62 Dream Girls May 21 Cesar Millan June 1 $42 $52 Wild Adventures Theme Park One day pass $30, Gold pass $71 The Vault Liberty Recreation Center Trips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Busch Gardens Trip April 27 leaves at 6 a.m. World of Nations Celebration May 4, noon Barracks Bash May 9, 48 p.m. Free food, entertainment and prizes! The Players Championship May 11, 11 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees May 7 & 21 for active duty April 25, May 9 & 23 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Loudmouth Thursday Any golfer wearing a pair of loudmouth shorts or pants plays 18 holes with cart for $20 Open to military, DoD and guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina May 18, 19, 25 & 26 June 15, 16, 22 & 23 July 20, 21, 27 & 28 Aug. 17, 18, 24 & 25 Sept. 21, 22, 28 & 29 Oct. 19, 20, 26 & 27Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information.Flying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School June 3 July 10 $500 per person JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013 17

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Small Business Program provides great opportunities Rear Adm. Kate Gregory, com mander of Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) recognized the NAVFAC Southeast Office of Small Business Programs with awards in three categories acknowledging fiscal year 2012 performance in a letter pre sented April 15. I am thrilled to acknowledge your leadership, commitment, and demon stration of accountability, said Gregory in the letter. Our teams are performing above and beyond, exceeding DoD and DoN initiatives by providing maximum opportunities for small business par ticipation. NAVFAC Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus pre sented the award to Nelson Smith, NAVFAC Southeast Small Business director. The categories NAVFAC Southeast exceeded at include all Small Business Targets, Focus Area Small Business Targets, and Best in Class Small Disadvantaged Business. These awards represent a total command engagement in providing the maximum practicable opportunity for small businesses to compete for our requirements, said Smith. It takes the entire team working together. Smith thanked everyone present for their support in meeting these goals. Fiscal year 2012 was the fourth con secutive year that NAVFAC Southeast has exceeded targets in all small busi ness categories an unprecedented achievement in NAVFAC. Each year target goals are estab lished for Small Business, Small Disadvantaged Business, Historically Underutilized Business Zone Small Business, Service-Disabled VeteranOwned Small Business, and WomenOwned Small Business categories. 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 25, 2013 A new approach to inter viewing sexual assault victims is gleaning more information about the crimes and leading to greater numbers of offender prosecutions. At the End Violence Against Women international confer ence in Baltimore, Md., Russell Strand, chief of the behavioral sciences education and train ing division for the Armys Military Police School at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., spoke with American Forces Press Service about the new Defense Department-backed procedure to investigate sexual assaults. Calling sexual assault a secret crime, Strand said the experience for a victim is the most embarrassing, intimate, life-changing, traumatic thing that can happen. Aside from a murder, he added, he doesnt know of anything thats more debilitating and earth-shattering than a sexual assault. In 2011, nearly 3,200 sex ual assaults were reported in the military, but Defense Department officials say the number of sexual assaults each year is closer to 19,000, based on anonymous surveys of active-duty service members. Officials also noted that only 1,500 of those cases came up for disciplinary review. Because law enforcement investigations are designed more for witnesses rather than victims, Strand said, he devel oped the forensic experiential trauma interview as a way to interview victims without making them relive the assault. Through neuroscience research, he found that part of the forefront of the brain shuts down or is slow to recall key parts of a trauma during an attack. But a primitive part of the brain stem almost instantly records the event accurately, he said. With that scientific informa tion, Strand said, he tried the law enforcement debriefing approach on sexual assault victims by gaining their trust and talking about how they felt, rather than asking leading questions, such as What happened? We show genuine empathy, and say things such as, Im sorry that happened to you, Strand explained. The sec ond thing we say is, Help me understand, and What are you able to remember about your experience? Strand said Criminal Investigation Division agents and other trained military investigators then stop ques tioning and sit back to listen to the victims recollection. Rather than asking about the attack in a chronological order, Strand said, he lets vic tims go in any direction they want, because that aligns with how theyve memorized it. Investigators then put the assault into a sequence of chronological events, he added. We want to get to their memories, so we ask about the sights, sounds, smells, tastes and their feelings, Strand said. Through this approach, he said, investigators want to look for evidence of trauma and the absence of consent in a sexual assault. Working with the senses is a powerful technique that triggers memories the victims dont realize they could recall, he noted. Once the psychophysi ological evidence is gathered, Strand said, the investigator can then ask traditional ques tions while the victims barri ers are relaxed, such as when, where and how the assault happened. Since 2009, more than 700 special agents and prosecutors from each branch of the mili tary have taken forensic experi ential trauma interview train ing, and 500 more are sched uled to complete the course by the end of September, Strand said. He also said DOD has fund ed more than 400 seats for the FETI special victims unit course through fiscal year 2017. Strand said his goal through FETI is to bring the military prevalence rates down for vic tims both men and women while making sure that cul tural change occurs regarding sexual assault. It might take five to 10 years for the preva lence rates to decrease and he expects reporting rates to increase, he added. What we want victims to know is they can be confident we are working really hard to understand what theyve gone through, to understand their experience and help them remember [it] in the most natural, scientific way, Strand said. Strand said he also wants sexual offenders to know that law enforcement investigations of sexual assault have become much more sophisticated in identifying their behaviors, and that the crime is now investigated in a manner in which it never has been before. They are at much greater risk of being caught than they were five or 10 years ago, he added. With DOD backing and col laborating with the civilian sector, Strand said, we want to lead the nation, and I think other countries are looking at us to get this right. And we have the capability to do that, he added. Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE), presented five Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Awards and 44 let ters of appreciation to members of the CNRSE Human Resources (HR) Program during a ceremony aboard NAS Jacksonville April 17. The ceremony was held four days prior to the decentralization of the HR Program, which will re-assign the majority of CNRSE HR specialists from region headquarters to major com mands on board installations throughout the region. Our CNRSE team is proud of the outstanding services the HR Program has provided over many years across the Southeast Region, Scorby said. Meeting our Navy mission would not be possible if it were not for the strong support weve received from each member, especially in the areas of labor employee relations, equal employment opportunity, workers compensation, and staffing and classification for more than 4,000 customers in theater. Prior to decentralization, approxi mately 75 HR specialists throughout the region fell under CNRSE responsibility. As of April 21, 57 of them will be transitioned to other major Commands, such as Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Fleet Forces Command and Naval Education and Training Command. The new Navy-wide model will position HR specialists at each major command, whereas CNRSE had previously been servicing about 75 percent of all civilian employees in the region. The decentralization plan was cre ated last year by the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Manpower and Reserve Affairs with the goal of delivering more streamlined and customer-focused support. According to Sarah Overstreet, CNRSE Human Resources director, the transition comes with distinct benefits. One of the major advantages to this change in HR servicing is that HR pro fessionals will be able to focus only on the major command to which they are assigned and will not be required to focus on several different commands at the same time, she said. This focus provides the opportuni ty for better customer service through specific, command-focused HR servic ing and better partnerships with cus tomers. The new model may have advantages over a centralized approach, but the transition itself presented some logis tical challenges. It required extensive planning and preparation to pack and organize hundreds of files and case work, Overstreet said. During the ceremony, Scorby expressed his appreciation for each of the program members efforts throughout the process. This was obviously no easy feat, as you completed the transition while still serving customers and providing the services required with your everyday workload, Scorby said. Were it not for your willingness to work long hours and pay attention to a host of details, this decentralization process would not be possible, and for that, our Navy owes each of you a debt of gratitude. While decentralization is a major transition for HR specialists throughout the region, civilian employees should not expect to see many changes in the way they receive services, Overstreet said. HR services will continue regardless of the change in the delivery model. There may be a change in the HR pro fessional who currently provides HR services to them, but the new servicing model will include a primary and a secondary HR professional for each func tional area, she said. Most services under the new system will be provided from NAS Jacksonville, but HR professionals will be respon sive to phone calls and e-mails and are available to meet via video teleconfer ence, she added. Additional information regarding the specific processes and procedures of regional delivery of HR services will be published in the near future. FFSC offers workshopsYour NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preven tive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregistra tion is required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2013: To register for any of the above workshops call 542-5745. New approach helps sexual assault victims recall detailsSoutheast Region holds ceremony, decentralizes human resources

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