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Jax air news ( April 11, 2013 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA SLAF
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012

Material Information

Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: April 11, 2013
Publication Date: 04-11-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02038

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012

Material Information

Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: April 11, 2013
Publication Date: 04-11-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02038


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THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2013 YOUTHS MARCH NAV Y RUN TRIM THE FAT Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The Warrior Legacy of HSM-72 Detachment Seven returned home to NAS Jacksonville April 5 after a nine-month deployment. The Warrior Legacy deployed in support of the maiden voy age of USS Jason Dunham (DDG-109) on June 20, 2012, as part of the Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (CSG-8), composed of USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69), guid ed-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG-66), guided-missile destroyers USS Farragut (DDG99), USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG-81), and the seven squadrons of Carrier Air Wing Seven (CVW-7). Flying the venerable SH-60B, the Warrior Legacy participat ed in 10 operations and exer cises spanning from the Black Sea to the Arabian Gulf. Last July, the detachment participated in Exercise Sea Breeze 2012, the largest mul tinational maritime exercise in the Black Sea, hosted by the Logging another Nomads successIn naval aviation, one of the tenets of crew resource management is adaptability and flexibility.Recently, the Nomads exhibited these tenets or what is also referred to as the Nomads Pivot by reacting quickly and effectively to an urgent airlift request. It all began when VR-62 Operations Officer Lt. Cmdr. Todd Nichols recently received an urgent call from NALO (Naval Aviation Logistics Office) asking for assistance on a Sunday at 1600. We need a 14,200pound RHIB (rigid hull inflatable boat) delivered to the Panama Canal Zone by tomorrow, pleaded the voice on the other end of the line. Nichols responded, We can do that, and the Nomads operations team huddled to plan the mission. In less than 24 hours, a Nomads C-130T took off from NAS Jacksonville, headed to Stennis International Airport in Mississippi to pick up the RHIB and three technicians supporting the FST mis sions. The Naval Oceanographic Office Fleet Survey Team (FST) was performing vital navigation surveys to update nautical charts in the Panama Canal Zone and needed two RHIB to complete their mission. The first RHIB was delivered by another Navy logis tics squadrons C-130T that could not continue its mission due to maintenance issues. The second RHIB was urgently needed to complete the surveys meeting USNAVSOUTH/C4F safety of navigation requirements in a timely fashion. In addition to the technicians, VR-62 picked up a maintenance crew for the other squadrons ailing C-130T that was down in the Panama Canal Zone due to maintenance issues. The Nomads NATOPS department did some quick thinking along the lines of What a great training evolution!Augmenting the basic Nomads C-130T crew were two additional instructors and two loadmaster trainees.What better training for new loadmasters than a real-world mis sion moving outsized cargo. The result: The RHIB was delivered, Aids to Navigation checked. Maintainers fixed the down C-130 and sent it home. RHIB loading and unload ing training exercise resulted in two newly qualified C-130T loadmasters. VR-62 is one of five Navy Reserve C-130T squadrons VR-62 helps keep sea lanes open The Navy has established aggressive targets for reducing energy consump tion and increasing renewable energy production. To help achieve the goals laid out in the Navys energy program, the NAS Jacksonville recently installed an innovative (first-of-its kind for the Department of Defense) sludge treat ment solution at its wastewater treat ment plant to reduce energy consump tion, lower costs, and recycle waste. The CleanB sludge treatment system from BCR Environmental relies on sim ple, safe and repeatable chemistry to achieve disinfection of sewage sludge and organic waste. Traditional sludge treatment systems rely on energy intensive and difficult to control biological or thermal systems. The CleanB system uses two separate chemicals to safely generate chlorine dioxide (common disinfectant) onsite for disinfection and odor elimination of the sewage sludge. The process is completely automated and computer controlled to ensure con sistent operation. During the CleanB treatment pro cess, sludge generated at the NAS Jacksonvilles wastewater treatment plant is pumped to the CleanB chemis try injection system where the chlorine dioxide is generated and added to the sludge stream. The sludge flows through the pro cess control system where it is disin fected and odor-causing compounds are destroyed. Sludge treatment that previ ously took four to six weeks now takes 10 minutes with the CleanB system. Following treatment, the disinfected, odor free product is dewatered using the existing belt press and then collected and transported to a permitted land application site where the nutrient con tent is beneficially recycled. The CleanB system consumes sig nificantly less energy than the aerobic digesters previously used for sludge treatment at NAS Jacksonville. Traditional treatment via aerobic digestion required substantial energy to power the motors that were needed to continuously mix and aerate sludge. Converting to the CleanB system has reduced sludge treatment energy con sumption from close to one million kilo watt hours (kWh) per year to an estimat NAS Jacksonville implements sustainable sewage sludge treatment HSM-72 Detachment 7 returns home

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013 April 11 1783 Congress declares end of war with Great Britain. 1900 Navy accepted its first submarine, USS Holland. 1970 Launch of Apollo 13, commanded by Navy Capt. James Lovell Jr. Pilot was John Swigert Jr. and former naval aviator Fred Haise Jr. was the Lunar Module Pilot. While 200,000 miles from Earth there was an explosion on board that forced Apollo 13 to circle the moon without landing. Mission duration was 5 days, 22 hours, and 54 minutes. Recovery was by HS-4 helicopters from USS Iwo Jima (LPH-2). 1991 U.N. ceasefire ends Persian Gulf War. April 12 1861 Civil War begins when Confederates fire on Fort Sumter, S.C. 1911 Lt. Theodore Ellyson qualifies as first naval aviator. 1962 U.S. Navy demon strates new landing craft with retractable hydrofoils, LCVP (H). 1975 Operation Eagle Pull evacuation from Cambodia. 1981 First launch of re-use able Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-1) with all-Navy crew. Retired Capt. John Young commanded, while Lt. Cmdr. Robert Crippen was the pilot. Mission duration was 2 days, 6 hours, and 20 minutes. Sixteen of the shuttles heat-shielding silicon tiles were lost and 148 damaged during reentry. 1993 Aircraft from USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN71) and NATO forces begin enforcing the no-fly zone over the Bosnia in Operation Deny Flight. April 13 1847 Naval Forces begin five-day battle to capture sev eral towns in Mexico. 1861 Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. 1960 Navys navigation sat ellite, Transit, placed into orbit from Cape Canaveral, Fla. and demonstrates ability to launch another satellite April 14 1898 Commissioning of first Post Civil War hospital ship, USS Solace. 1969 North Korean air craft shoots down Navy EC-121 reconnaissance aircraft from VQ-1 over the Sea of Japan. 1988 USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58) strikes Iranian mine off Qatar. 1989 First Navy ship arrives on scene to assist in Exxon Valdez oil spill cleanup. April 15 1885 Naval forces land at Panama to protect American interests during revolution. 1912 USS Chester and USS Salem sailed from Massachusetts to assist RMS Titanic survivors. 1918 First Marine Aviation Force formed at Marine Flying Field, Miami, Fla. 1961 Launching of first nuclear-powered frigate, USS Bainbridge, at Quincy, Mass. 1962 USS Princeton brought first Marine helicopters to Vietnam. This was first Marine advisory unit to arrive in South Vietnam. 1986 Operation Eldorado Canyon, Navy aircraft from USS America (CV-66) and USS Coral Sea (CV-43) attack Libya in conjunction with USAF air craft after Libya linked to ter rorist bombing of West Berlin discotheque that killed one American and injured 78 oth ers. April 16 1863 Union gunboats pass Confederate batteries at Vicksburg. 1924 Navy commences relief operations in Mississippi Valley floods, lasting until 16 June. 1947 Act of Congress gives Navy Nurse Corps members commissioned rank. 1959 Helicopters from USS Edisto begin rescue operations in Montevideo, Uruguay. By 26 April they had carried 277 flood victims to safety. April 17 1778 Sloop-in-war Ranger captures British brig. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS School mornings with my son, Ford, 12, go something like this: at 7:45 a.m., he yells from downstairs that Im going to make him late. But when we get in the car at 8:05, hes often forgot ten his binder or his gym shorts so he has to run back inside. Of course, its still my problem, if not my fault, when we pull into the school parking lot one minute late. Ford prefers that I turn down my Elvis music before he opens the door, because there is always a crowd of middle schoolers standing nearby on the curb. Apparently, nothings worse than start ing your junior-high school morning with friends hearing What Now My Love on your Moms radio. But Ford always no matter how late or annoyed with me pauses before he shuts the car door and says, Have a good day, Mom, or Ill see you this afternoon. I smile as I watch him run into the school building, papers flying out of his binder and half-open backpack. Sometimes, his shoes are still untied. I wonder if hes forgotten his lunch. School mornings with Owen, 10, go like this: by 8:30, he has fed the dog, picked up Fords base ball bat in the backyard, made breakfast for his younger brother, and brushed his own teeth. He waits patiently by the front door until I am ready. When I drop off Owen, he walks calmly and steadily to the front door. I call out the window, I love you, and have a good day, but he just waves over his shoulder. Sometimes, if I feel like making a scene, I call out again, Its okay; I know you love me, too. Then he pretends to not know me. He slips into the school without much fan fare. There is a word for school mornings with Lindell, 6, but it cant be printed here. If theres syrup on his waffles, he wanted no syrup. If theres milk, he only wanted orange juice. He streaks through the living room and then complains about being cold and unable to dress himself. He takes 10 minutes to put on a pair of Velcro shoes. Once were in the car and backing out of the driveway, he needs to use the bath room. But the scene when I leave Lindell at kinder garten is beyond comparison. First, I have to drag him from the car. He flails and complains about everything from feeling sick to his shoes being too tight. Inside the school lobby, I peel him off me. Then I run out the front door before he can follow. Sometimes, I cry when I get back to my car. The boys ask why I dont home school them. Im genuinely surprised the older boys would want to be home with me. Even so, my reply is that I cant do it all. Thats the tough part of motherhood: I am schedule-keeper, nurse, therapist and discipli narian for these little people who, in Owens case, just wave over their shoulder as they walk into school, like I havent cried a million tears over them. Or, in Lindells case, I have to peel them away, and then feel guilty the rest of the day. Could I really be expected to grade and pass or fail them, too? A couple of weeks ago, I had a freak-out moment about this doing it all stuff, particu larly, morning drop-off with Lindell. It wasnt pretty. I was tired and beaten down, and Owen witnessed the whole cry fest. The next morning, on the way to Lindells school, Owen reached over and grabbed his brothers hand. Youre going to have a good day today, he said. Do you want me to walk you into the school? Lindell nodded. I watched as he and Owen walked hand-inhand to the front of Lindells school. Owen patted Lindells shoulder, said goodbye, then waited as Lindell went inside. Then I realized, maybe I dont have to do it all. Sometimes, their brothers will step up, too. When I dropped off Owen at school that morn ing, he paused before he got out of the car. He smiled and looked over his shoulder. Have a good day, Mom, he said. And it was a good day. Hey, MoneyChic! Its tax time again. What can you tell me about having to pay taxes to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS)? MoneyChic Sez: I was watching the Today Show a few days ago and their finance segment focused on paying your tax bill. It had such good information I wanted to share it with you! According to the IRS, one in six people owe money for taxes. We all talk about filing your taxes and getting a return, but rarely does anyone talk about paying their tax bill! The most important point CNBCs Finance Editor Sharon Epperson couldnt stress enough is to file your taxes! Even if you know you will owe money and may not be able to pay, file your taxes. Filing a six-month extension is another option, but it will only last until October. If you do not file your taxes or for an extension by April 15, the penalty is greater than if you filed and cant pay. If you are late, you will owe 5 percent plus interest of your unpaid bill each month. If you cant pay and you do file, you will have to pay 0.5 per cent plus interest each month. I would take the 0.5 percent over 5 percent any day! Keep in mind also that penalty and interest kick in starting April 16. Youve filed your taxes, now what? If you able to pay your bill right away do so. You can pay by credit card (with a fee!), debit card, and through electronic funds transfer. If you cant pay your bill, set up a payment plan. The easiest way to setup a payment plan with the IRS is to go directly to the IRS.gov website and fill out the form for an installment agree ment. The IRS doesnt care why you cant pay your bill or what happened to your family to put you behind. The IRS wants to know what is the highest amount you can pay each month and when can you start paying. There are tax scams to beware of as well. Identity theft is rampant during tax time. Keep your information private and if filing online, make sure your computer is secure. Watch out for fake IRS emails that are phishing for your information. The IRS will never contact you by email if there is an issue with your return. Their first line of contact is sending you a letter in the mail. The last scam of concern is return preparer fraud. Do you know who is preparing your taxes? The last bit of information I want to pass on to you because so many military spouses have an in home business is that a home office deduc tion is not a flag for an automatic audit! If you were on the brink of not filing because you think you will have a tax bill you cant pay, I hope you decide to file those taxes by the April 15. As always, Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society is here to lend a helping hand. For more information, stop by the office outside the Yorktown Gate or call 542-2832. Have questions for Hey, Money Chic? Drop me an e-mail at megan.stolle@nmcrs.org Moms morning school lesson

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Capt. Mark Stevens, commanding officer of VP-30, recognized gradu ates of the P-3C Acoustic, Non-Acoustic, Flight Engineer, and In-flight Technician initial train ing (CAT I) syllabi on March 22 in the VP-30 Auditorium. The graduates of Acoustic Operator Class 1207, Non-Acoustic Operator Class 1207, Flight Engineer Class 1205 and In-flight Technician Class 1205 will now report to their assigned operational squadrons to begin their initial sea tours Class 1207 CAT I Acoustic Operator AWO3 Zachary Brown AWO3 Robert Camacho AWO3 Arthur Dyer AWO3 David Scudder AWO3 Justin Shuart (Honor Graduate) AWO3 James Walker Class 1207 CAT I Nonacoustic Operator AWO2 Gregory Cummings AWO2 Aaron Sartain AWO2 Josue Veliz (Honor Graduate) AWO3 Kenneth Martinez Class 1205 CAT I Flight Engineer AWF3 Corey Barksdale AWF3 Jordan Head AWF3 Christian Rader (Honor Graduate) Class 1205 CAT I In-flight Technician AWV3 Jose Guerrero (Honor Graduate) AWV3 Douglas Morefield AWV3 Devin Reed VP-30 aircrew graduation The Maritime Patrol Association (MPA) web site is now accepting reg istrations for its 2013 MPA Symposium April 18-19 at NAS Jacksonville. The event encom passes two full days of special events that cel ebrate International Partnerships among avi ators, aircrew and main tainers. Symposium attend ees can sign up for a host of events, includ ing the Scholarship Golf Tournament and 5K, Flight Suit Social and Heritage Dinner. The Heritage Dinner, which will high light the internation al partnerships of the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF), will also serve as a ceremony for two new Hall of Honor inductees from the MPRF commu nity. The International Partnerships theme this year has really allowed us to step back and rec ognize the cooperative efforts of all of our mari time patrol and recon naissance colleagues around the world, said VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens, president of MPA. We look forward to celebrating our inter twined heritage and our bright future with all of our symposium attend ees, he added. Interested MPRF per sonnel can find more information about the 2013 MPA Symposium, as well as register online, by going to: www.mari timepatrolassociation. org/symposium.Register now for the 2013 MPA symposium JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013 More than 400 service mem bers, retirees, civilians and family members turned out for the eighth annual Capt. Chuck Cornett 10K Run and 5K Walk April 6 at NAS Jacksonville. Originally called the Navy Run, the event was renamed after the 2004 death of Cornett, a former NAS Jax executive officer and avid runner. Cornetts family members, Mike Cornett, Sandi and Cliff Cherry and Kathy and Mike Ray traveled to take part in this years run. My dad participated in 96 marathons, including the Boston and Marine Corps mar athons and was the co-founder of the Florida Striders Running Club in 1978. He retired from the Navy as a captain in 1980 after 30 years of service, said Sandi Cherry. My mom also ran more than 20 marathons and was my true inspiration in accomplishing a full marathon. If she could do it, then I could, continued Cherry. In addition to the 10-kilo meter competitive run and five-kilometer walk, there was a runners shoe and apparel fair in the Navy Exchange parking lot. Runners also had an opportunity to visit Allied American University, VyStar Credit Union and the University of Phoenix sponsor booths. Once the runners received their packages with their num bers and timing chips, they stretched and mingled with friends and family. After observing morning colors, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders wel comed the runners and then joined them to await the start ing gun. It is a wonderful day for a run and to promote Navy fit ness. I would like to thank all the MWR staff, Navy Exchange and sponsors for putting on this great event. This should be a fun run and I am looking for ward to it, said Sanders. With a shotgun start, the runners headed down Child Street with Cornetts radar blue and yellow Corvette leading the way. This is such a wonderful event and great for our com munity to come together and promote physical fitness, said NAS Jax Athletic Director Tanya Henigman, who coordi nated the run. Of course, we couldnt pull this off without the help of our volunteers and sponsors. Its a team effort to organize this event. We have about 30 vol unteers out here helping out to ensure everything runs smoothly. Im actually going to start working on next years run this week when I do our after action report because that helps us improve the event each year. The first runner to cross the 5K finish line was Ike Sherlock with a time of 24:11, followed by son and father, Oliver Michelsen coming in at 26:57 and Col. Christopher Michelsen of Blount Island Command at 26:58. The overall winner and first male to cross the 10K finish line was Joe Rivera at 37:32, followed by Lt. Cmdr. Jeremy Judernatz of VR-58 with a time of 37:55 and Avery Blue com ing in at 39:18. The first woman Annual Navy Run attracts hundreds of athletes

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013 5 to cross the 10K line was Lorna Bradford with a time of 39:24. Julie Northrup placed second in the womens overall with a time of 39:41 and Lisa Adams came in third with a time of 43:27. Other winners in their age cat egories were: Master Men and Women (Overall) Capt. Joe McQuade, Naval Hospital Jacksonville, 42:06 Kacee Bryner, 48:53 Men and Women under 11 Skylar Gray, 1:05 Avery Patterson, 45:01 Men 11-14 George Frazier, 44:23 Men and Women 15-19 Jacob Schmit, 39:41 Katie Kramps, 51:12 Men and Women 20-24 JJ Porter, 43:40 Jennifer Therrien, 59:56 Men and Women 25-29 Andre Pualsen, 40:53 Sara Geer, 46:39 Men and Women 30-34 Troy King, 39:54 Michelle McCullough, 46:10 Men and Women 35-39 Gabriel Martinez, 40:58 Colleen Bierbach, 46:36 Men and Women 40-44 Andy Patterson, 45:02 Romonia Goldsmith, 50:49 Men and Women 45-49 Lee Grose, 43:50 Christina Kane, 57:12 Men and Women 50-54 Kingsley Nelson, 45:06 Joanne Harris, 53:23 Men and Women 55-59 Douglas Tillet, 47:57 Kimberly Lundy, 54:06 Men and Women 60-64 Paul Geiger, 45:08 Diane Wilkinson, 1:05 Men and Women 65-69 George White, 47:11 Sunny Matthews, 1:14 Men 70-74 Paul Smith, 49:12 Marie Bendy, 1:01 Men 75 & Up Ben Matthews, 53:18 This is a great run the course is well marked and the event is well organized. I really enjoyed participating in todays run, said NAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM)(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd. I hope everyone will come out to participate in this run again next year. It just keeps getting bigger and better every year and we continue to make upgrades to ensure everyone enjoys this event, said Henigman. Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal govern ment officially endorses any com pany, sponsor or its products or ser vices. NAVY RUN

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013 VP-5 transition spotlightAs VP-5 transitions to the P-8A Poseidon the squad ron is highlighting a transitioning Mad Fox each week. This weeks spotlight shines on AWO2(AW) Jacob Petracco. Petracco comes from a military family. His great grandfather, uncle, and brother all served in the mili tary. His brother is currently in the U.S. Air Force and is part of the Tactical Air Control Party. Petracco is one of VP-5s electronic warfare opera tors. His duties on the P-8A include managing the radar, IFF system, electronic support measures, and operation of the external camera. His transition courseware includes a series of lectures, self guided computer based training, and software device ses sions. All training is aimed to make the operator fully proficient with the Poseidons electronic warfare suite in less than six months. The software on this aircraft is much more in depth, but also more functional, commented Petracco. It has been a tremendous help coming from a generation that grew up with computer technology. VP-5 has been transitioning to the P-8A Poseidon since Jan. 4, 2013. Navy announces Navy Working Uniform Type I update NAVADMIN 084/13 released April 1 provides a sum mary on all Navy Working Uniform (NWU) Type I related guidance and announces the authorized wear of the aiguillette and the expanded wear of the 9-inch rough side out and 8-inch flight deck steel-toed safety boots with the NWU Type I. We believe we owed our Sailors the best opportuni ty to be successful with regards to the uniform wear of the NWU and felt like if we captured all the informa tion into a single NAVADMIN, that would be the right thing to do, said Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (AW/NAC) Mike Stevens. Providing this clarity and education is very important to me. Since the roll-out of the NWU Type I in December 2008, Fleet input has resulted in the revised policy and rules of wear. NAVADMIN 084/13 discusses in detail the description, uniform components, standards of appearance, occasions for wear, and proper care instructions. The NAVADMIN, at commanding officers discre tion, expands the authorized footwear to be worn with NWU Type I to include a black 9-inch leather (smooth) steel-toed boot, a black 9-inch rough side out leather steel-toed boot and a black 8-inch aviation flight deck steel-toed boot. Also at the commanding officers dis cretion, aiguillettes can be worn with the NWU Type I shirt and parka by personnel assigned to billets in which aiguillettes are a prescribed uniform item. Personnel should be aware that puncturing the outer shell of the parka will compromise the manu facturers water proof guarantee and void the lifetime warranty. Parkas that are punctured or torn will have to be repaired or replaced at the owners expense. In addition to NAVADMIN 084/13, the Navy released a training video that demonstrates how to properly wear NWU Type I components. The video can be found at http://www.navy.mil/video_player. asp?id=18243. For more information on uniforms and uniform pol icy, visit the Navy Uniform Matters website at http:// www.public.navy.mil/bupers-npc/support/uniforms/ pages/default2.aspx. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus recognized two employees April 1 for gradu ating from the NAVFAC Leadership Development Program (LDP). Diane Shider and Kendra McMahon were selected for the two-year leadership program in 2010 for the 2011 program. Shider completed the Level 2 program for supervisors and McMahon the Level 1 program for non-supervisors. I commend you on your dedication and commit ment to the program, said Kiwus to the graduates. I have spoke with both of you and look forward to seeing you continue to grow as leaders. Participating in the LDP has given me the oppor tunity to gain extensive leadership experience, said Shider, currently the Deputy Human Resources Officer Director for NAVFAC Southeast. I have learned to be adaptable, while being multi tasked with a high degree of self-initiative. Shider said the most memorable aspect of the pro gram was her rotation at the NAVFAC headquarters in Washington, D.C. as it provided her the opportunity to see the bigger picture and gave her the opportunity to understand business at the headquarters level. McMahon is a contract specialist who wanted to specifically focus on her career and learn more about leadership within the command. This was a great opportunity, said McMahon. I was able to meet and shadow senior leaders. NAVFAC created the LDP to provide more robust developmental opportunities for its future civilian senior leaders. The program is designed to provide leadership development through progressive learning opportu nities consisting of formal education and training, rotational assignments, and other developmental activities. Employees selected for the program are challenged to perform outside their sphere of influence and com fort zone. Annually, NAVFAC selects employees from around the corporation to be a part of the LDP program. NH Jax sponsors Alcohol info event April 11 at NEXThe Naval Hospital Jacksonville Substance Abuse Rehabilitation Program (SARP) will hold an alcoholuse screening and information event on National Alcohol Screening Day, April 11, at the NAS Jax Navy Exchange courtyard from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Alcohol disorders are common and highly treatable and screenings are an important first step. Stop by; its free and confidential. For more information, contact SARP Social Counselor Marty Christiansen at 542-3473 ext. 176. With April being National Alcohol Awareness Month, and April 11 National Alcohol Screening Day, the Military Pathways program is encourag ing service members, veterans and their families, to take advantage of the free, anonymous alcohol-use screenings at www.DrinkingIQ. org. Military Pathways, which offers the online screenings, reports that more than 30,000 screenings for alcohol-use disorders have been completed since it started the pro gram in 2006. The screenings ask individuals to answer a simple set of questions about their drinking habits. After completing a screening, service members receive feedback as to whether their symptoms are consistent with alcohol misuse as well as a list of resources on how and where to get further evalua tion and help. All branches of the military have programs where ser vice members can get treatment for substance abuse problems. Visitors to the site can also access a host of articles, videos, and other information that gives them, among other things, tips on how to cut down on alcohol use. Several free, downloadable mobile applications for mental health are also available. Using alcohol to manage a life problem, what professionals call self-medicating, is never a good idea. Not only does a drink ing problem emerge, the original problem goes unfixed. A success ful career in the military means knowing when to draw the line with alcohol, and when to get help when the drinking is out of con Two graduate from Leadership Development ProgramMilitary observes Alcohol Awareness Month

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Chief petty officers hold service dayBy Kaylee LaRocqueNAS Jacksonville and tenant command chief petty officers (CPOs) flanked the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf April 2 for a day of service to show support to junior Sailors. The chiefs manned the service line dishing up the lunchtime meal, washed pots, pans and dishes in the scullery, greeted Sailors in the dining room and cleaned tables. Were here because this is a way for senior leadership (chiefs) to give back to the Sailors and show them how much we care and appreciate what they do every day, said RPC Michael Music of the NAS Jax Chapel, who coordinated the event. So we decided to take over the galley and help with the lunchtime meal. I sent out an email asking for par ticipation and the chiefs showed up in full force, he added. Although the Sailors were a bit surprised to see the chiefs serving their meal, it was much appreciated. It was a bit of a shock to see them working here, but its nice to see them outside the office showing their sup port, added AT3 Daniel Parra of VP-30. In an email to base CPOs, NAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM) (AW/SW) Brad Shepherd praised the CPOs. Thanks to everyone who participated in the CPO Day of Service. I believe everything went really well and we had a great time. I know the Sailors appreci ated seeing us in the galley showing our thanks and support for all that they do! said Shepherd. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013 7

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Ukrainian Navy. In August, Detachment Seven vis ited Souda Bay, Crete, and Haifa, Israel while supporting Operation Active Endeavour in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. Squadron person nel led the NATO fight against piracy utilizing airborne surface search radar, forward looking infrared (FLIR), and electronic support measures to increase the strike groups recognized maritime picture. Following those operations, USS Jason Dunham transited through the Suez Canal and into the Fifth Fleet area of responsibility. October saw the detachment supporting counter piracy operations in the Gulf of Aden. SH-60B crews provided critical sup port to visually identify contacts of interest at night utilizing FLIR and night vision goggles. Detachment Seven sup ported CSG and surface action group operations throughout the winter. The unique capabilities of an embarked helicopter detachment were also put on display in the form of vertical replenish ment, medical evacuations, and visit, board, search, and seizure missions. In total, the Warrior Legacy flew 1,150 flight hours supporting various operations in a very dynamic environ ment. The detachment flew armed escort sorties while transiting the Strait of Hormuz on twelve occasions, pro viding aerial support for USS Jason Dunham and other surface assets in this contested region. February saw the completion of the longest underway period for both the ship and detachment: 61 consecutive days, mostly on-station in the Red Sea. In March, the ship began the long jour ney home. After a well-deserved port visit to Naples, Italy, USS Jason Dunham crossed the Atlantic and returned to Norfolk, Va. Detachment Seven deployed as one of two final SH-60B detachments from HSL-42. When HSL-42 prepared for its official transition to HSM-72 in January, several personnel exchanges at sea were required to support the conversion to the new MH-60R aircraft. The Warrior Legacy began its deployment under the leadership of Lt. Cmdr. Matthew Chester and ADC(AW) Zachory Bennett. At the mid-deployment point these positions were entrusted to Lt. Cmdr. Aaron Bomar and ATC(AW/SW) Jason Kelly. Additionally, the maintenance officer, operations officer and two helicop ter aircraft commanders turned over underway. The maintenance element, under the continuous leadership of AD1(AW) Edison Muiz was the true Brut Force of the detachment and per formed exceptionally well throughout a high operational tempo for more than nine months. Following multiple extensions in the ater, the Warrior Legacy is returning to Jacksonville as the last ever HSL-42 deployed detachment, boasting the fol lowing major accomplishments: 1,150 mishap-free flight hours across 390 sor ties, 10 enlisted aviation warfare spe cialist qualifications, four enlisted sur face warfare specialist qualifications, and an impressive 83 percent advance ment rate. HSM-72trol, said Robert Ciulla, Ph.D., Mobile Health direc tor for the Defense Departments National Center for Telehealth and Technology. The anonymous selfassessment gives individuals the opportunity to check and see if their drinking is a problem and how to get help or cut back. Military Pathways gives service personnel and their families the opportunity to learn more about men tal health and alcohol use through anonymous selfassessments offered online. The program is designed to help individuals identify symptoms and access assistance before a problem becomes serious. The self-assessments address alcohol use, PTSD, depres sion, generalized anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder and adolescent depression. After completing a self-assessment, individuals receive referral information, including TRICARE, Military OneSource, and Veterans Affairs. The pro gram is run by the nonprofit Screening for Mental HealthR and is funded by the Department of Defense with support from the National Center for Telehealth and Technology. ALCOHOL AWARENESS 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013

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VR-62and is based at NAS Jacksonville. The Nomads of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VR) 62 is a Navy Reserve C-130T unit that got its name from its frequent homeport changes VR-62 had four homeports in the past 20 years. That is a lot of moving, but moving is what the Nomads are all about. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined full-spectrum military operations by providing principally sea-based, for ward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain cooperative rela tionships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneu ver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stabil ity, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. VP-5 hosts bowling night for young SailorsVP-5 hosted a bowling night for mem bers of its Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) March 29. Twenty Mad Foxes and their guests gathered for a night of camaraderie and fun at NAS Jacksonville Freedom Lanes. This was a great bonding event for everyone involved, commented IS3 Nicole Souza, a CSADD committee member. I was able to meet many members of the squadron I would not have normally seen on a daily basis. VP-5s CSADD program was started by YN3 Allan Trahan. The program focuses on informing at risk Sailors 25 and younger about the consequences of risky decision-making and provides mentorship through weekly meetings. The bowling night was one of many upcoming events intended to give VP-5 Sailors an alternative to drink ing on weekend nights and provide an increase in morale. Volunteers from the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville, fam ily members, and athletes cheered and enjoyed the competition at Ridgeview High School March 1 and March 8 during the offi cial start of the 2013 Clay County Special Olympics Summer Games. Sailors from CNATTU Jax volun teered their time setting up, coor dinating and presenting awards to young athletes in track and field events such as relays, various distance runs, shot put, and long jump. AE1(AW) Robert ONeill has been assisting the Special Olympics Clay County branch since September 2011. He is currently CNATTUs vol unteer coordinator for the Special Olympics and his love for the orga nization and its athletes shows in his work. From the beginning of the 2012 season, he made it his goal to attend every event in order to assist these special athletes, teachers and fellow volunteers. During the two-day track and field event, he directed more than130 volunteers during the staging, performance and tear down of the entire event. During the opening ceremony of the elementary school level sum mer games, ONeill was presented a gold medal by Rhonna Smith, Clay County Special Olympics coordinator, for not only his out standing work during the summer games, but for accomplishing his goal of volunteering at nearly every event over the past year. Mrs. Smith came up to me just before the opening ceremony and asked me to stick by her because she needed a hand. The next thing I know shes finishing off the cer emony by talking about one of the volunteers and then hanging a gold medal around my neck. I had no idea she was about to do that, and I am completely honored to be rec ognized for spending time with these great kids, said ONeill. Special Olympics operates year round and is always looking for volunteers. Thousands of volun teers have helped at sporting events such as basketball, golf, soc cer, track and field, and bowling. All of these events aid in pre paring athletes for the culmina tion of the Special Olympics at the state games which will be held in Orlando on May 17-18. Both Clay and Duval counties hold Special Olympics events requiring volunteers. For more information, visit www. soflduval.org. CNATTU Jax Sailor recognized at Special Olympics Volunteers needed for Never Quit Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville needs 30 vol unteers to assist during the Never Quit Beach event May 19 from 5:45 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, call or email MC1 Brianna Dandridge at 396-5909, Ext 1150. Each volunteer will receive a free Never Quit run ning shirt. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013 9

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Sequestration will have no effect on the drawdown in Afghanistan, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said April 6 at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan. [Sequestration] is an avalanche, not a light switch, Army Gen. Martin Dempsey said in a round-table discus sion with members of the press travel ing with him on his trip to Afghanistan. The avalanche started March 1, he said, and is building momentum. Were consuming readiness without building it, because we are taking the money that we would normally have used to build readiness of units that might deploy a year from now and weve had to apply it into our wartime operations, Dempsey said. Additionally, the chairman said, the department is supporting commit ments on the Korean Peninsula and the Persian Gulf. When you fence that off and fully fund it and you have to fence it off, weve got young men and women out there in harms way and they will always be fully funded when you do that, though, the risk you take begins to accrue, Dempsey said. By 2014 the department will face medium-term problems in maintaining readiness, he said. The problems weve got are multiplying and will multiply over time, Dempsey added. We will always do what we have to do to protect the nation and its inter ests, the chairman said. For example, he continued, the theater air defense system recently placed in Guam was costly, but it never crossed our mind not to do it because we wanted to save the money. Money is not a factor when our national interests are threatened, he said, but readiness is something that has to be sustained over time. The cost of requalifying certain service mem bers, like pilots, due to interruptions to training can actually cost more than the training itself would have, the chairman noted. The one thing that I would never do and I know [Defense] Secretary [Chuck] Hagel feels the same way is were never going to deploy a service man or woman whos not ready to deploy, he said. Sequestration is not a risk to our national security at present, the chair man said. But the uncertainty does make us less efficient [and] it sends a very negative message to our men and women who serve. The department will get through the readiness challenge, he said, but the next challenge could be retention. Service members wont stay in the mili tary if they cant do their jobs, the chair man said. Land at the corner of Saratoga Avenue and Langley Street that was formerly the site of Fleet Air Photographic Laboratory (Building 921), is being transformed into a new park with ame nities. The park, adjacent to Commander, Navy Region Southeast (Building 919), will consist of paved walkways with seating areas, a pavilion with benches, landscaping, drainage and sidewalks with curbing. The former Building 921 had histori cal eligibility status under its prior use in the rapid processing of reconnais sance film during the Cuban Missile Crisis in October 1962. The State Historical Preservation Office Memorandum of Agreement, as required under NHPA 106 (National Historical Preservation Act), agreed to the park as compliance for demolition of Building 921. According to Project Manager Lt. j.g. Jon Berube of NAS Jax Public Works Department, the park will become a historical representational park with an interpretive panel discussing the history of Building 921, including its support of photographic reconnais sance squadrons VFP-62 and VAP-62. The park will create a gathering place for the occupants of Building 919 and others for activities such as breaks, lunch and bird watching. It will also eliminate issues affect ing the viability of the sites oak trees caused by vehicles parking directly on their root systems. The park construction is a team effort of Sweat Construction Co. and the Seabees of CBMU-202, Detachment Jacksonville. The estimated completion date is May 24.New historic park under constructionDempsey: Sequestration not yet a national security threat 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013

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Navy officials encourage top-per forming Sailors to volunteer for Recruit Division Commander (RDC) duty, in a Naval message released April 2. According to NAVADMIN 085/13, the motivation and professional develop ment of recruits is a vital Navy mission that requires outstanding role models. RDC assignment is challenging, but rewarding. It offers a number of pro fessional development, leadership and career advancement opportunities. The tasks required are mentally, physically and emotionally demanding, and require proven self-discipline and imaginative problem-solving skills. Sailors assigned as RDCs must con tinually demonstrate superior leader ship and motivational skills in demand ing and often unique situations. RDCs are eligible for the following benefits: $450 per month. ance of $220. actively training a recruit division. Training Specialist qualification. ment (upon completion of tour). Ribbon. Meritorious Advancement Program for petty officers second class. Per MILPERSMAN 1306-954, E-5 Sailors must have a minimum of six years active service with two years time-in-rate upon application to serve as an RDC. E-6s must have a minimum of six years active service upon applying. There are no minimum years of service or time in rate requirements for chiefs and above. Applicants must be war fare-qualified, however, waivers may be granted on case-by-case basis. Sailors must have scored good low or high er in each category on the most recent Physical Fitness Assessment. The RDC candidate must be able to perform and pass the run portion of the Physical Readiness Test (PRT) before the screening is submitted to NPC. Waiver of the run portion of the PRT is not allowed. A complete listing of eligibility requirements and application proce dures can be found in MILPERSMAN 1306-954. Sailors who meet the requirements and would like to apply for the RDC pro gram should submit a 1306/7 (enlisted personnel action request) to their rating detailer. According to the message, there are approximately 200 openings for new RDCs each year. Upon accep tance to the RDC program, Sailors will attend three weeks of instructor school to obtain the 9502 Navy Enlisted Classification and a 13-week RDC School. RDC C school is a physically chal lenging, intensive, hands-on training course that provides prospective RDCs with the skills, perspective, and physi cal readiness to succeed as an RDC. Commands must ensure prospec tive candidates are properly screened to help reduce attrition from RDC C school. Tours are a minimum of 36 months after graduation from RDC School. For more information, read NAVADMIN 085/13 and visit http:// www.npc.navy.mil/enlisted/detailing/ shorespecialprograms/pages/rdc.aspx.>Navy seeks recruit division commanders JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013 11

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Friday Free Entertainment at 7 p.m. April 5 Karaoke Deweys Free Spring Concert Series 7 p.m. on the outdoor stage April 12 Big Engine April 19 State of Mind April 26 The Ride May 3 Boogie Freaks May 10 7th Street Band May 17 Zero-NFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday change of hours Open 410 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 126 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included Friday special $1 games per person 25 p.m. Shoe rental not included Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours April 1 May 5 Open Monday Friday (lap swim only) 6 a.m. 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 7 p.m. Saturday & Sunday (lap swim only) 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. During lap swim only the waterslide, water park and concessions will not be open. 2013 Learn to Swim Program Sign up at the Gym (the Zone) May 11, 8 a.m. 3 p.m. Session 1: June 1020 Session 2 July 8-18 Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Daytona International Speedway Subway Firecracker, July 5 and Coke 400, July 6 Tickets on sale now! Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts Dark Side Of The Moon (Pink Floyd) April 13 at 7:30 p.m. Section A $33; Section B $28; Section C $23 A Lamb Chop Celebration April 20 at 7:30 p.m. Section A $18; Section B $14; Section C $11 Funkfest Metropolitan Park May 10-11, 2-day ticket $52 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3 Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7 Call for pricing Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for families at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline 2013 Live Broadway Series Anthony Bourdain April 24 $50 $70 Celtic Woman May 2 $44 $134 American Idiot May 14 & 15 $25 $62 Dream Girls May 21 Cesar Millan June 1 $42 $52 New Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute 4-day hopper $153.25 Wild Adventures Theme Park One day pass $30, Gold pass $71 Book Shade of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Auto Skills Center Class April 11 at 6 p.m. Paintball Trip April 20 at 9 a.m. Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson April 22 at 6 p.m. Busch Gardens Trip April 27 at 6 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees April 23 for active duty April 11 & 25 for retirees, DoD person nel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Loudmouth Thursday Any golfer wearing a pair of loudmouth shorts or pants plays 18 holes with cart for $20 Open to military, DoD and guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina April 20, 21, 27 & 28 May 18, 19, 25 & 26Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Month of the Military Child Carnival April 20, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Allegheny Softball Field Free games and activities! 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013

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For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill. bonser@navy.mil Sailors who have hit a weight loss plateau, or cant drop the weight despite having a physi cally active lifestyle, may ben efit from a talk with their local dietician, officials said March 28. There are three main rea sons why increasing exercise and activity may lead to weight plateau or increased weight gain. Being more aware will help you identify and adjust accordingly, said Lt. Cmdr. Jennifer Wallinger, registered dietitian, Navy Nutrition, Navy Physical Readiness Program. It is important to balance the nutrients that you put in your body with what you burn off in activity, whether that is normal daily activity or exercise. One reason is that adding activity increases hunger. Make sure the food you eat will fill you up by choos ing nutrient dense foods con taining protein, fiber and healthy fats instead of calorie dense foods [including] high fat and high sugar items with few nutrients, continued Wallinger. Another reason is choosing the wrong foods. The body is designed not to starve. If you do not choose lower-calorie, filling food, you will naturally compensate for the extra calories burned from daily activity and exercise, said Wallinger. Try filling up on vegetables before or as part of your meal. Finally, exercising can pro vide a false sense of entitle ment. People may think, I worked out, so I can have or deserve that burger, cheesecake, nachos or whatever, said Wallinger. Activity helps you burn cal ories, but only if you do not eat all of those calories back. Sailors can track their food intake to ensure they are main taining a calorie deficit to pro mote their weight management goals. SuperTracker is available at http://www.choosemyplate. gov/supertracker-tools/super tracker.html. While many may think con suming fewer calories is the key to weight loss, that meth od can backfire. According to Wallinger, a very low-cal orie diet will ultimately slow your metabolism and weight loss and will encourage rapid weight regain when higher cal orie consumption is resumed. The calories individuals need to lose or gain weight var ies based on factors such as weight, age and activity level. There is a lot of information out there, some good and some bad, said Wallinger. Speaking with a dietician on base can help Sailors identify and navi gate the best method for their needs. Sailors may learn more about healthy eating, nutrition and how to locate a dietician at the Navy Nutrition web site at http://www.public.navy. mil/bupersnpc/support/navy nutrition/Pages/default2.aspx. Relay For Life: Military families wantedMilitary family teams are forming for the Relay for Life at Fleming Island High School May 3. The event remembers those who have lost their battle with cancer, support and encour age those who are fighting, and celebrate those who have survived their battle with cancer. If you are interested, please call Kari Wiese at (207) 730-3294. For more details, visit the Relay for life Web site at www.relayforlife.org/flemingislandfl. The team is called JAX MILITARY FAMILIES.Navy resources available for Sailors who must trim fat The PLAYERS, Veterans Coalition job fair May 5The PLAYERS are holding their second annu al job fair in partnership with the Jacksonville Military Veterans Coalition for active duty, Reservists, retired military, veterans and mili tary spouses May 5 at TPC Sawgrass. The job fair is free and will be held in The Turn hospitality venue near the 18th green. For more information, go to www.PGATour.com/ theplayers. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013 13

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ed 500 kWh per year. This substantial energy reduction will result in savings to NAS Jacksonville of around $75,000 in 2013. Based on projected increases in energy costs, the base will save an average of $107,000 per year of ener gy over the next 20 years. One additional ben efit will be the reduction in operation and maintenance costs and recapitalization of aging infrastructure due to the elimination of a primary clarifier, sludge thickener and two aerobic digesters at this facility. These savings, coupled with the energy savings, result in a simple pay back of 6.3 years for the $700K investment in the CleanB system. The Navys shore ener gy policy is more than environmental steward ship and lowering energy bills. Energy is a strategic resource, and developing efficient operations that rely on resilient energy sources is a matter of national security. Naval forces depend on constant support from shore opera tions, and energy security is essential for powering our critical shore instal lations now and in the future. The CleanB sys tem is a novel and note worthy step toward ener gy security. CLEAN WATER Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention MonthTo all Department of Defense (DOD) Personnel: This month, the Department of Defense observes Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month under the theme, We own it . well solve it . togeth er. This is an opportunity for the entire DOD community service members, civilians, members of our families and leaders at every level to underscore our commitment to eliminating the crime of sexual assault, supporting victims, and intervening when appropriate to help stop unsafe behavior. Together, we must work every day to instill a climate that does not tolerate or ignore sexist behavior, sexual harassment or sexual assault. These have no place in the United States military and violate everything we stand for and the values we defend. Creating a culture free of the scourge of sexual assault requires establishing an environment where dignity and respect is afforded to all, and where diversity is celebrated as one of our greatest assets as a force. We are strong because of our values of service, sacrifice and loyalty and doing what is right. We must watch out for each other and respect each other. By drawing on these strengths, we can and we must stop sexual assault within our ranks. Remember, we own it . well solve it . together.Preparing for pre-deployment Are you an active duty member assigned to a deployable unit? Are you a reservist who has been recalled to active duty for a deployment? Are you a Department of Defense (DoD) civilian deploying for 30 days or more? If you fall into any of these categories, as soon as you get your deploy ment orders you need to begin preparing yourself to be legally ready for your deployment. Powers of attor ney. Powers of attor ney (POA) are legal documents that allow you (the principal) to appoint someone else (the agent) to act on your behalf. There are two types of powers of attorney a general POA and a special POA. A general POA is a blan ket grant of authority for your agent to act on your behalf while you are gone. A special POA gives someone the authority to handle only one spe cific issue for example taxes, vehicles, or your children. Draft your POAs closer in time to your deployment as they are good for one year. Estate planning Estate planning includes several documents. First, a will allows you to name the people you wish to receive your money and possessions (your estate), to name the people you wish to take care of your chil dren (your childrens guardian), and appoints the person in charge of carrying your wishes out (your executor). Second, a living will allows you to state your preference for artificial life support. Third, there are two durable POAs a health care POA and a dura ble General POA that allow your family to make your health care decisions or handle your financial affairs if you are so injured or ill you cannot do these things yourself. Finally, it is important to ensure your SGLI (life insurance) and DD93 (naming beneficiaries of the death gratuity and unpaid pay and allow ances) are updated. Family matters. Family issues can create difficult hurdles to your ability to prepare for and focus on the mission. The Wings Over America Scholarship Foundation (WOASF) is hosting a golf tournament at NAS Jax April 26 at 9 a.m. to benefit scholarships for Navy dependents. The event is open to the public. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. All proceeds ben efit the Wings Over America Scholarship Foundation, a 501(c)3 non-profit foundation. The WOASF annually sponsors more than 40 scholarships, ranging from $2,000 to $10,000, to students who have chosen to continue their education. Scholarship recipients are selected on the basis of scholastic merit, community service and extracur ricular activities. The foundations mis sion is to provide col lege scholarships to dependent children and spouses of naval avia tion commands, offi cer and enlisted, active duty, retired, honorably discharged or deceased. The foundation has awarded more than $635,000 to students since 1987. For more information or to register, visit www. wingsoveramerica.us or call 757-671-3200, ext. 2.WOASF golf tourney set for April 26 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013

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NATO officials are closely analyz ing what the future cyber warrior will look like as the war landscape shifts from air, ground and sea to cyberspace, said Allied Command Transformations deputy chief of staff for strategic plans and policy said March 28. In an interview during a Young Professionals Forging the Future event at Johns Hopkins University Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, Army Maj. Gen. Peter Bayer Jr. said its time to lean into the younger generation in preparation for new and more com plex challenges. Enhanced e-training and applica tion of cyber skill sets need to be cus tomized to the millennial generation born into, rather than adapting to, the information age, Bayer said. The folks that are going to solve the problems of 2030 [are] not me; Ill be doing something else, the general said. Its some 25-yearold already in the uniform of their nation. They already have experi ence in Afghanistan or somewhere else. Theyre going to be the twoor three-star generals or admirals solv ing problems. Bayer said his charge is to develop ongoing training and an open prob lem-solving environment to tap into the minds of young leaders who can bring an innovative perspective as NATO and its transformation com mand shift from operational to con tingency-based missions. I want the junior leaders already in uniform [to be immersed] in this future world of complex problemsolving and begin to develop skills they need to work in an ambiguous uncertain, complex, fast-paced [envi ronment], Bayer said. As U.S. forces pivot to the Pacific during the simultaneous drawdown in Afghanistan, Bayer said, NATO pri orities should adjust accordingly. When Afghanistan is over, we go from an operations-centric alliance to a contingency-based alliance, which means being ready for the next thing, but unsure what that thing might be, he explained. And NATO, he added, has played a large role in the United States being able to focus its attention on new challenges. The only reason the U.S. can think about shifting priorities and empha sis to the Pacific is because we have a secure flank, and its called NATO, Bayer said. NATO should see this as an opportunity, not a threat, [as] increasingly, centers of power are going to be in that part of the world -less so on the traditional East-West axis. The general acknowledged the occasional challenges of concen sus. Its frustrating to have 28 [nations] trying to work on some thing, but theres nothing more pow erful than when we get to the point where 28 say, Yep, thats the answer we can live with, because now were speaking as one. After spending most of the last 20 years in operations since the advent of missions in the Balkans, Bayer said, its vital for NATO to update its training concept and revitalize its exercises program, the general said. I could see the day where the secu rity interests of the alliance will be challenged by some adversary who will employ information, influence, cyber and space, he added. The response from the alliance, Bayer said, would not necessarily require the alliance to use air, sea or land forces in the way it traditionally has. Weve already forced [younger people] to operate very decentralized, and theyre ready for it, so weve got to figure out now how to get the institu tions to catch up.General discusses focus on younger force, cyber capabilities Presented by North Florida Sales Big Engine April 12 State of Mind April 19 The Ride April 26Bring your own blanket and chairs. No coolers or outside food/beverages allowed. Every Friday at 7 p.m. outside stage Spring Concert SeriesFor more information call (904) 542-3900 facebook.com/nasjaxmwr Boogie Freaks May 3 7th Street Band May 10 Zero-N May 17 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013 For many, spring brings a resurgence of energy and activ ity with the milder tempera tures. It is a perfect time to practice your family emergency plan and to re-evaluate and restock your emergency supply kit for the changing season. Although winter weather is becoming a fading memory, it is important to remember that weather and other hazards can be unpredictable. So spring into action as a Ready Navy Family and be ready for any hazard. about hazards that are common in spring months and most like ly to happen in your area. The Ready Navy website Be and Stay Informed offer spe cific instructions, information and resources you may need to know regarding floods, torna does, man-made hazards and emergency actions. Learn what you should know if you need to evacuate or take shelter in your home. make and refine your emergen cy plan so that everyone in the family understands what to do, where to go, and what to take in the event of an emergency. Practice your plan by con ducting a drill where all fam ily members must gather at your designated meeting place, exit ing by various doors. Your emer gency plan should also include how your family will commu nicate with each other, particu larly if normal communication methods, such as phone lines or cell towers, are out. Road conditions and other hazards can limit ease of move ment. Have a contact person outside the area that each mem ber of the family can notify that they are safe, if separated. Place a call to your designat ed contact person to be sure he or she is willing to serve in that role. The Ready Navy website provides printable forms and contact cards to guide you in your planning. prepare for the unexpected is to have on hand one or more emergency kits that include enough water and non-perish able supplies for every family member to survive at least three days. Keep a kit prepared at home, and consider having kits in your car, at work, and a portable ver sion in your home ready to take with you. These kits will enable you and your family to respond to any emergency more effective ly. Make a game of kit building with your children. One idea is to have your chil dren go on a scavenger hunt to find and gather necessary sup plies around your house. Make note of items you are missing and shop together at your local installation commissary and NEX to complete your kit. History shows that children who are involved and informed with emergency planning are better able to react safely in an emergency. For more information about Ready Navy Family, along with tips, forms and guidance to be prepared for and stay informed about all hazards, visit www. ready.navy.mil. Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to ser vice members and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2013: To register for any of the above workshops call 5425745.There are ways to spring into action as a Ready Navy FamilyFFSC offers life skills workshops Sexual assault has no place in the Defense Department, a senior Pentagon official said April 2, calling on the workforce to be part of the solution. In a keynote address kicking off Aberdeen Proving Grounds observance of National Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month, acting Undersecretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness Jessica Wright said sexual assault is a national issue that also affects the Defense Departments mili tary and civilian workforce. The theme for this years observance underscored in a message that Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel sent to the depart ments workforce today is, We own it . well solve it . together. Although we address sexual assault in the month of April, this is an issue that needs to be addressed every day of our lives, Wright told an audience of service members and civilian employees. DOD is a microcosm of America, she added, where employees bring their values and how they were raised into the workforce. I often say if were in Afghanistan and we [see] some thing unsafe, [or] not akin to the values we have grown up with, we would tell that person to stop what theyre doing, because theyre going to affect our wellbeing and their well-being, she said. Yet when we are here in the United States, and we do something thats not akin to . values in a social network, sometimes we have a hard time crossing that boundary and saying, This affects the life of a service member or a civilian we work with, and its inappropri ate. The Defense Department doesnt condone sexual assault, Wright said. We dont tell jokes of a sexual nature, we dont con done unwanted sexual behav iors, and we clearly dont con done sexual assault, she added. Just as everyone knows people who drink a lot of cof fee, exercise a great deal or are Facebook junkies, Wright said. Everyone also knows someone who doesnt live by the Defense Departments values and ethos. I ask that if you know that person, tell [him or her] to stop it, and make sure you report bad behavior should you see it, she added. Thats the only way were going to stop it. Wright said she joined the military in 1975 as a member of the Womens Army Corps, at a time when having a drink at the post club was condoned. But in our military now, . we dont condone drinking [or] drinking and driving. We dont have those social things like we used to, because its just not who we are, she said. I ask each and every one of you to take back a message with you today that says, every single day, we dont condone [sexual assault], she said. Sexual assault awareness and prevention must be part of all levels in the organization, she added, whether employees work with a small group in an office or in a field situation. We have a sexual assault problem, Wright said. We need to jump on top of it and stop it. And it is incumbent upon all of you to do it. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is looking for youth leaders who are dedicated to public service, who are making a dif ference in their communities, and who want to expand their impact as national advocates for youth disaster preparedness. Youth between the ages of 12 and 17 interested in strengthen the nations resiliency against disasters may now apply or be nominated to serve on FEMAs Youth Preparedness Council. Participants will represent the youth perspective on emergency prepared ness and share information with their communities. Those interested may apply directly or be nominated by an adult by sub mitting a completed application form, a narrative, and a letter of recommen dation. Visit www.ready.gov/youthpreparedness to access the application materials and instructions. Applications and supporting mate rials must be received by midnight April 19, 2013. Youth Preparedness Council members will attend the 2013 Youth Preparedness Council Summit and meet with emergency management leadership and national organizations dedicated to youth preparedness to discuss individual and community preparedness. Council members will participate in regular conference calls with FEMA and will complete a youth preparedness project of their choos ing. Engaging youth is an integral step in preparing the nation for all hazards, said FEMAs Region IV Administrator Phil May. Youth have a unique ability to influence their peers and families to be more resilient and play an important role in disaster pre paredness, during and after a crisis. Benjamin Cookeof Memphis, Tenn.,represented FEMAs Region IV on the 2012 Youth Preparedness Council. He frequently spoke to diverse groups of youth about the need for emergency preparedness and vol unteered at the Memphis Virginia Hospital. He has participated in com munity initiatives such as Get Ready Shelby and Go Green Memphis. Sexual assault has no place in DOD, official saysFEMA seeks applicants for youth preparedness council Free tax assistanceREAL$ENSE (United Way) is offering free tax prep aration service Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Building 13 (second floor) at the NAS Jax Main Gate. Appointments are recommended for weekdays although walk-ins will be helped. Saturday is walkin availability only. To make an appointment, call 729-2119.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013 17 While budget cuts and travel restrictions continue to challenge missions for military and civilian travel ers alike, there are many benefits to staying at Navy Gateway Inns and Suites (NGIS) for your official lodg ing needs. Value, convenience, great accommodations, service and very affordable rates are the foundation of the NGIS lodging program. NGIS offers affordable lodging rates that support the recent reduction of command travel expenses. Lodging rates range from $25/night $65/night with varying rates depending on location. Supporting NGIS ensures that travel funds provide the opportunity for improvements to NGIS services and facilities for our war fighting community. Generally, NGIS lodging facilities will save guests between 40 to 65 percent off comparable civilian accommodations. In-room amenities include Internet access, air con ditioning, cable TV with a premium channel, a DVD or VCR, telephone service, microwave and refrigerator. Youll also have housekeeping service, vending machines and guest laundry facilities as well as hand icapped accessible and non-smoking rooms. Free in-room coffee and newspapers as well as con venient on-base parking are also available during your stay. Staying at NGIS not only provides great lodging at great prices but it also offers the convenience of other base amenities. You can visit the Navy Exchange, Morale, Welfare and Recreation activities with dis counted tickets for area attractions and swimming pools, golf courses, beaches, and other great MWR activities right outside your door. For reservations, call 1-877-NAVY-BED (1-877-6289233) or online at www.dodlodging.net The Navys MQ-8B Fire Scout Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) surpassed another milestone in March when the autonomous helicopter completed its 600th deployed flight hour while embarked on guided-mis sile frigate USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49). The Fire Scout, part of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 22, logged its 600th deployed flight hour March 31. This record exceeds the previous Fire Scout deploy ment milestone by 100 hours and will likely climb higher with nearly two months remaining on the frig ates 5th and 7th Fleet deployment. This is the fifth sea-based deployment for the MQ-8B. Fire Scout routinely flies 17 hours per day, while providing 12-hour, real-time Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) orbit to com batant commanders. Bradley received communication upgrades allowing the aircrafts Full Motion Video (FMV) camera feed to be distributed to the ships Combat Information Center (CIC) and to commanders at military installa tions throughout the world. The teams of USS Bradley and HSC-22 have taken Fire Scout and maritime ISR to a new level, said Capt. Patrick Smith, Fire Scout program manager at NAS Patuxent River, Md. They tackled multiple sparing, integration and operational issues. Their perseverance demonstrated the significance of maritime-based ISR. Fire Scout continues to be in great demand and is answering the call globally via our shipboard deployments. Smith said the team will continue to take lessons learned and provide improvements to future deploy ments. The U.S Navy brings a unique capability to the ISR customer, said Cmdr. Pete Ehlers, Bradley command ing officer. Fire Scout is a proven technology with greater multi-payload and mission capability than smaller UAVs the Navy operates. We are able to access many areas of interest without adding an undesirable U.S. footprint on land. Since 2006, the Northrop Grumman-built Fire Scout system has flown more than 8,000 flight hours with more than half of the flight hours performing realworld operational tasking during ship-based and land-based deployments within the past 18 months. This deployment also marks the first time that an HSC squadron has deployed with the Fire Scout. Previous deployments were conducted by the Helicopter Maritime Strike community. Im extremely proud of our aircraft maintainers and aircrew, said Lt. Cmdr. Brett Meskimen, HSC-22 officer in charge. Our active and Reserve Sailors took the lessons from the previous deployments and ran with them. They have set the new standard for future detach ments from both communities. We still have a long way to the end of deployment, but it is worth taking a moment to reflect on the hard work and accomplish ments of the whole team as they support the needs of the warfare commanders. As Sailors prepare to partici pate in the semi-annual Physical Fitness Assessment (PFA), Navy Physical Readiness Program offi cials remind Sailors to verify their results in the Physical Readiness Information Management System (PRIMS). After each PFA, Sailors need to log into PRIMS and ensure their data is entered and accurate, said Bill Moore, director, Navy Physical Readiness Program. Moore added that just like an individual would check their bank account after payday, Sailors need to check their PRIMS following a PFA. All commands are required to report their PFA data via PRIMS no later than 30 days after conducting the PFA in accordance with guide lines established in the Navys Physical Readiness Program instruction, OPNAVINST 6110.1J. Each Sailor must have a record for both PFA cycles in the year, even if the record reflects nonparticipation status due to deploy ment, IA, medical waiver, etc. Sailors need to verify their data within 60 days so that any cor rections can be made by the CFL at the command level. After six months of PFA completion, record changes can only be made by PRIMS administrators at Navy Personnel Command, which requires a Letter of Correction from the individuals commanding officer, on letterhead, that grants authorization to make the change. In most cases the data is going to be correct, but since the CFL is entering data by hand for the entire command, it is possible that a number may get transposed or a line of data missed, said Moore. The sooner a discrepancy is iden tified, the faster it can be fixed. PRIMS was introduced in 2002 as the Navys official source for Sailors PFA data. It is used to monitor and track the progress of active-duty and Reserve person nel and identify, screen, educate and monitor members. PRIMS data is also verified against selection board and promotion board results at Navy Personnel Command. Sailors can access their PRIMS account at https://www.bol.navy. mil. Fire Scout sets deployment milestoneNavy reminds Sailors to verify PRIMS dataNavy Gateway Inns and Suites offer affordable value and service If you have a court case pending for divorce, child custody, child support, or spousal support try to resolve the case well before processing if you have time and it will not impact your case nega tively. Otherwise, notify the court and the other par ties involved of your pending deployment. For single parents or dual military parents make sure that your family care plan is up to date and on file with your command. Civil matters. Are you involved in a pending civil case where you are the plaintiff, defendant, or witness? If you are unable to appear or adequately prepare for the case due to your orders you can request a suit stay under the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act. Seek assistance from your command and notify the court you will not be able to attend as soon as possible to avoid a default judgment. Concerning bills, ensure you have made arrange ments to have these paid either by yourself or an appointed agent back home during your deployment. Minor criminal mat ters If you have any pending criminal cases or unresolved traffic vio lations, it is imperative that you either resolve them or notify the court of your deployment as soon as practicable to ensure you do not incur any additional penalties and/or a warrant is not issued for your arrest. Consumer law/iden tity theft. While on deployment you can have an Active Duty Fraud Alert placed on your credit report to prevent becoming the victim of identity theft. A request is only need ed for the alert by one of the three credit bureas TransUnion (1-800-6807289), Equifax (1-800525-6285), or Experian (1-800-397-3742) and all three will place the alert on your credit report. You are also entitled to a free annual credit his tory report through www. annualcreditreport.com Vehicle and property storage. For your vehi cle, ensure it is stored in a legitimate storage facility and the registration and insurance are current and cover your period of deployment in case your vehicle is damaged while in storage. For your property, ensure homeowners and/ or renters insurance cov ers your period of deploy ment, notify your land lord or neighbors of your absence, have someone regularly check on your property for you, and cre ate a written or videotape record of your property and its condition. Servicemembers Civil Relief Act Matters. The Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA) pro vides great benefits and protections before, dur ing, and after deploy ment. First, the SCRA allows you to reduce the inter est rate on any debt you incurred (for example credit cards and mort gages) before your active duty orders began to 6 percent during active duty. Second, if your deploy ment is for more than 90 days the SCRA will allow you to terminate a residential or vehicle lease provided you give the landlord or lessor a written notice of your intent to terminate the lease under the SCRA along with a copy of your orders. You may also termi nate or suspend your cell phone contract if you are being deployed for more than 90 days outside of the service area. Third, the SCRA may also delay an eviction of your family while you are deployed. Finally, the SCRA also prohibits your property from being sold or repossessed without a court order. If you are interested in taking advantage of any of the SCRAs provisions your legal assistance office can offer guidance on application proce dures and letters. Taxes For those deploying to a combat zone, your combat pay is tax free! For those deployed during tax season there are also tax filing exten sion options from the IRS, including an auto matic 180 day extension to file and pay taxes for those deployed to a com bat zone or in support of a contingency operation (plus credit for the actu al time spent there). For additional information, please visit www.irs.gov USERRA. The Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA) prohibits employers from discrimi nating against reservists because of their deploy ment and requires reem ployment upon their return back home. USERRA requires mobilizing reservists to provide oral or written notice to the employer of their upcoming call to active duty. For more informa tion on USERRA, please contact your legal assis tance office, the National Committee for Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve ( www.esgr. org ), or the Department of Labor ( http://www.dol. gov/vets/ ). Eligibility. Per JAGINST 5801.2B, the highest priority is for legal assistance services is for active duty person nel attached to deploy ing units, other deploy ing active-duty person nel, and Reservists and National Guard members deploying under active duty recall. Pre-mobilization legal counseling and assistance may be provided to active duty or inactive reservists consistent with mobilization readiness needs. DoD civilian personnel deploying for at least 30 days to a combat zone, in support of a contingency operation, or aboard a naval vessel may be pro vided pre-deployment legal assistance services within current means and capabilities. Finally, DoD civil ian personnel who are U.S. citizens, other than local hire employees, employed by, serving with, or accompanying U.S. Armed Forces, when assigned to a foreign country or to a vessel or unit of the Armed Forces of the U.S. in excess of 30 days are eligible for notaries, POAs, wills, and general legal assistance services. Please visit http://www. jag.navy.mil/legal_ser vices/rlso/rlso_southeast. htm for more information or to find out the location of the legal assistance office closest to you. LEGAL

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THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2013 YOUTHS MARCH NAV Y RUN TRIM THE FAT Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The Warrior Legacy of HSM-72 Detachment Seven returned home to NAS Jacksonville April 5 after a nine-month deployment. The Warrior Legacy deployed in support of the maiden voy age of USS Jason Dunham (DDG-109) on June 20, 2012, as part of the Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (CSG-8), composed of USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN-69), guid ed-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG-66), guided-missile destroyers USS Farragut (DDG99), USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG-81), and the seven squadrons of Carrier Air Wing Seven (CVW-7). Flying the venerable SH-60B, the Warrior Legacy participat ed in 10 operations and exer cises spanning from the Black Sea to the Arabian Gulf. Last July, the detachment participated in Exercise Sea Breeze 2012, the largest mul tinational maritime exercise in the Black Sea, hosted by the Logging another Nomads successIn naval aviation, one of the tenets of crew resource management is adaptability and flexibility.Recently, the Nomads exhibited these tenets or what is also referred to as the Nomads Pivot by reacting quickly and effectively to an urgent airlift request. It all began when VR-62 Operations Officer Lt. Cmdr. Todd Nichols recently received an urgent call from NALO (Naval Aviation Logistics Office) asking for assistance on a Sunday at 1600. We need a 14,200pound RHIB (rigid hull inflatable boat) delivered to the Panama Canal Zone by tomorrow, pleaded the voice on the other end of the line. Nichols responded, We can do that, and the Nomads operations team huddled to plan the mission. In less than 24 hours, a Nomads C-130T took off from NAS Jacksonville, headed to Stennis International Airport in Mississippi to pick up the RHIB and three technicians supporting the FST mis sions. The Naval Oceanographic Office Fleet Survey Team (FST) was performing vital navigation surveys to update nautical charts in the Panama Canal Zone and needed two RHIB to complete their mission. The first RHIB was delivered by another Navy logistics squadrons C-130T that could not continue its mission due to maintenance issues. The second RHIB was urgently needed to complete the surveys meeting USNAVSOUTH/C4F safety of navigation requirements in a timely fashion. In addition to the technicians, VR-62 picked up a maintenance crew for the other squadrons ailing C-130T that was down in the Panama Canal Zone due to maintenance issues. The Nomads NATOPS department did some quick thinking along the lines of What a great training evolution!Augmenting the basic Nomads C-130T crew were two additional instructors and two loadmaster trainees.What better training for new loadmasters than a real-world mis sion moving outsized cargo. The result: The RHIB was delivered, Aids to Navigation checked. Maintainers fixed the down C-130 and sent it home. RHIB loading and unload ing training exercise resulted in two newly qualified C-130T loadmasters. VR-62 is one of five Navy Reserve C-130T squadrons VR-62 helps keep sea lanes open The Navy has established aggressive targets for reducing energy consump tion and increasing renewable energy production. To help achieve the goals laid out in the Navys energy program, the NAS Jacksonville recently installed an innovative (first-of-its kind for the Department of Defense) sludge treat ment solution at its wastewater treat ment plant to reduce energy consump tion, lower costs, and recycle waste. The CleanB sludge treatment system from BCR Environmental relies on sim ple, safe and repeatable chemistry to achieve disinfection of sewage sludge and organic waste. Traditional sludge treatment systems rely on energy intensive and difficult to control biological or thermal systems. The CleanB system uses two separate chemicals to safely generate chlorine dioxide (common disinfectant) onsite for disinfection and odor elimination of the sewage sludge. The process is completely automated and computer controlled to ensure con sistent operation. During the CleanB treatment pro cess, sludge generated at the NAS Jacksonvilles wastewater treatment plant is pumped to the CleanB chemistry injection system where the chlorine dioxide is generated and added to the sludge stream. The sludge flows through the pro cess control system where it is disin fected and odor-causing compounds are destroyed. Sludge treatment that previ ously took four to six weeks now takes 10 minutes with the CleanB system. Following treatment, the disinfected, odor free product is dewatered using the existing belt press and then collected and transported to a permitted land application site where the nutrient con tent is beneficially recycled. The CleanB system consumes sig nificantly less energy than the aerobic digesters previously used for sludge treatment at NAS Jacksonville. Traditional treatment via aerobic digestion required substantial energy to power the motors that were needed to continuously mix and aerate sludge. Converting to the CleanB system has reduced sludge treatment energy con sumption from close to one million kilowatt hours (kWh) per year to an estimatNAS Jacksonville implements sustainable sewage sludge treatment HSM-72 Detachment 7 returns home

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013 April 11 1783 Congress declares end of war with Great Britain. 1900 Navy accepted its first submarine, USS Holland. 1970 Launch of Apollo 13, commanded by Navy Capt. James Lovell Jr. Pilot was John Swigert Jr. and former naval aviator Fred Haise Jr. was the Lunar Module Pilot. While 200,000 miles from Earth there was an explosion on board that forced Apollo 13 to circle the moon without landing. Mission duration was 5 days, 22 hours, and 54 minutes. Recovery was by HS-4 helicopters from USS Iwo Jima (LPH-2). 1991 U.N. ceasefire ends Persian Gulf War. April 12 1861 Civil War begins when Confederates fire on Fort Sumter, S.C. 1911 Lt. Theodore Ellyson qualifies as first naval aviator. 1962 U.S. Navy demon strates new landing craft with retractable hydrofoils, LCVP (H). 1975 Operation Eagle Pull evacuation from Cambodia. 1981 First launch of re-use able Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-1) with all-Navy crew. Retired Capt. John Young commanded, while Lt. Cmdr. Robert Crippen was the pilot. Mission duration was 2 days, 6 hours, and 20 minutes. Sixteen of the shuttles heat-shielding silicon tiles were lost and 148 damaged during reentry. 1993 Aircraft from USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN71) and NATO forces begin enforcing the no-fly zone over the Bosnia in Operation Deny Flight. April 13 1847 Naval Forces begin five-day battle to capture sev eral towns in Mexico. 1861 Fort Sumter surrenders to Confederate forces. 1960 Navys navigation sat ellite, Transit, placed into orbit from Cape Canaveral, Fla. and demonstrates ability to launch another satellite April 14 1898 Commissioning of first Post Civil War hospital ship, USS Solace. 1969 North Korean air craft shoots down Navy EC-121 reconnaissance aircraft from VQ-1 over the Sea of Japan. 1988 USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58) strikes Iranian mine off Qatar. 1989 First Navy ship arrives on scene to assist in Exxon Valdez oil spill cleanup. April 15 1885 Naval forces land at Panama to protect American interests during revolution. 1912 USS Chester and USS Salem sailed from Massachusetts to assist RMS Titanic survivors. 1918 First Marine Aviation Force formed at Marine Flying Field, Miami, Fla. 1961 Launching of first nuclear-powered frigate, USS Bainbridge, at Quincy, Mass. 1962 USS Princeton brought first Marine helicopters to Vietnam. This was first Marine advisory unit to arrive in South Vietnam. 1986 Operation Eldorado Canyon, Navy aircraft from USS America (CV-66) and USS Coral Sea (CV-43) attack Libya in conjunction with USAF air craft after Libya linked to ter rorist bombing of West Berlin discotheque that killed one American and injured 78 oth ers. April 16 1863 Union gunboats pass Confederate batteries at Vicksburg. 1924 Navy commences relief operations in Mississippi Valley floods, lasting until 16 June. 1947 Act of Congress gives Navy Nurse Corps members commissioned rank. 1959 Helicopters from USS Edisto begin rescue operations in Montevideo, Uruguay. By 26 April they had carried 277 flood victims to safety. April 17 1778 Sloop-in-war Ranger captures British brig. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS School mornings with my son, Ford, 12, go something like this: at 7:45 a.m., he yells from downstairs that Im going to make him late. But when we get in the car at 8:05, hes often forgot ten his binder or his gym shorts so he has to run back inside. Of course, its still my problem, if not my fault, when we pull into the school parking lot one minute late. Ford prefers that I turn down my Elvis music before he opens the door, because there is always a crowd of middle schoolers standing nearby on the curb. Apparently, nothings worse than starting your junior-high school morning with friends hearing What Now My Love on your Moms radio. But Ford always no matter how late or annoyed with me pauses before he shuts the car door and says, Have a good day, Mom, or Ill see you this afternoon. I smile as I watch him run into the school building, papers flying out of his binder and half-open backpack. Sometimes, his shoes are still untied. I wonder if hes forgotten his lunch. School mornings with Owen, 10, go like this: by 8:30, he has fed the dog, picked up Fords base ball bat in the backyard, made breakfast for his younger brother, and brushed his own teeth. He waits patiently by the front door until I am ready. When I drop off Owen, he walks calmly and steadily to the front door. I call out the window, I love you, and have a good day, but he just waves over his shoulder. Sometimes, if I feel like making a scene, I call out again, Its okay; I know you love me, too. Then he pretends to not know me. He slips into the school without much fan fare. There is a word for school mornings with Lindell, 6, but it cant be printed here. If theres syrup on his waffles, he wanted no syrup. If theres milk, he only wanted orange juice. He streaks through the living room and then complains about being cold and unable to dress himself. He takes 10 minutes to put on a pair of Velcro shoes. Once were in the car and backing out of the driveway, he needs to use the bath room. But the scene when I leave Lindell at kinder garten is beyond comparison. First, I have to drag him from the car. He flails and complains about everything from feeling sick to his shoes being too tight. Inside the school lobby, I peel him off me. Then I run out the front door before he can follow. Sometimes, I cry when I get back to my car. The boys ask why I dont home school them. Im genuinely surprised the older boys would want to be home with me. Even so, my reply is that I cant do it all. Thats the tough part of motherhood: I am schedule-keeper, nurse, therapist and discipli narian for these little people who, in Owens case, just wave over their shoulder as they walk into school, like I havent cried a million tears over them. Or, in Lindells case, I have to peel them away, and then feel guilty the rest of the day. Could I really be expected to grade and pass or fail them, too? A couple of weeks ago, I had a freak-out moment about this doing it all stuff, particu larly, morning drop-off with Lindell. It wasnt pretty. I was tired and beaten down, and Owen witnessed the whole cry fest. The next morning, on the way to Lindells school, Owen reached over and grabbed his brothers hand. Youre going to have a good day today, he said. Do you want me to walk you into the school? Lindell nodded. I watched as he and Owen walked hand-inhand to the front of Lindells school. Owen patted Lindells shoulder, said goodbye, then waited as Lindell went inside. Then I realized, maybe I dont have to do it all. Sometimes, their brothers will step up, too. When I dropped off Owen at school that morning, he paused before he got out of the car. He smiled and looked over his shoulder. Have a good day, Mom, he said. And it was a good day. Hey, MoneyChic! Its tax time again. What can you tell me about having to pay taxes to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS)? MoneyChic Sez: I was watching the Today Show a few days ago and their finance segment focused on paying your tax bill. It had such good information I wanted to share it with you! According to the IRS, one in six people owe money for taxes. We all talk about filing your taxes and getting a return, but rarely does anyone talk about paying their tax bill! The most important point CNBCs Finance Editor Sharon Epperson couldnt stress enough is to file your taxes! Even if you know you will owe money and may not be able to pay, file your taxes. Filing a six-month extension is another option, but it will only last until October. If you do not file your taxes or for an extension by April 15, the penalty is greater than if you filed and cant pay. If you are late, you will owe 5 percent plus interest of your unpaid bill each month. If you cant pay and you do file, you will have to pay 0.5 percent plus interest each month. I would take the 0.5 percent over 5 percent any day! Keep in mind also that penalty and interest kick in starting April 16. Youve filed your taxes, now what? If you able to pay your bill right away do so. You can pay by credit card (with a fee!), debit card, and through electronic funds transfer. If you cant pay your bill, set up a payment plan. The easiest way to setup a payment plan with the IRS is to go directly to the IRS.gov website and fill out the form for an installment agreement. The IRS doesnt care why you cant pay your bill or what happened to your family to put you behind. The IRS wants to know what is the highest amount you can pay each month and when can you start paying. There are tax scams to beware of as well. Identity theft is rampant during tax time. Keep your information private and if filing online, make sure your computer is secure. Watch out for fake IRS emails that are phishing for your information. The IRS will never contact you by email if there is an issue with your return. Their first line of contact is sending you a letter in the mail. The last scam of concern is return preparer fraud. Do you know who is preparing your taxes? The last bit of information I want to pass on to you because so many military spouses have an in home business is that a home office deduction is not a flag for an automatic audit! If you were on the brink of not filing because you think you will have a tax bill you cant pay, I hope you decide to file those taxes by the April 15. As always, Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society is here to lend a helping hand. For more information, stop by the office outside the Yorktown Gate or call 542-2832. Have questions for Hey, Money Chic? Drop me an e-mail at megan.stolle@nmcrs.org Moms morning school lesson

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Capt. Mark Stevens, commanding officer of VP-30, recognized graduates of the P-3C Acoustic, Non-Acoustic, Flight Engineer, and In-flight Technician initial train ing (CAT I) syllabi on March 22 in the VP-30 Auditorium. The graduates of Acoustic Operator Class 1207, Non-Acoustic Operator Class 1207, Flight Engineer Class 1205 and In-flight Technician Class 1205 will now report to their assigned operational squadrons to begin their initial sea tours Class 1207 CAT I Acoustic Operator AWO3 Zachary Brown AWO3 Robert Camacho AWO3 Arthur Dyer AWO3 David Scudder AWO3 Justin Shuart (Honor Graduate) AWO3 James Walker Class 1207 CAT I Nonacoustic Operator AWO2 Gregory Cummings AWO2 Aaron Sartain AWO2 Josue Veliz (Honor Graduate) AWO3 Kenneth Martinez Class 1205 CAT I Flight Engineer AWF3 Corey Barksdale AWF3 Jordan Head AWF3 Christian Rader (Honor Graduate) Class 1205 CAT I In-flight Technician AWV3 Jose Guerrero (Honor Graduate) AWV3 Douglas Morefield AWV3 Devin Reed VP-30 aircrew graduation The Maritime Patrol Association (MPA) website is now accepting registrations for its 2013 MPA Symposium April 18-19 at NAS Jacksonville. The event encom passes two full days of special events that cel ebrate International Partnerships among aviators, aircrew and main tainers. Symposium attend ees can sign up for a host of events, includ ing the Scholarship Golf Tournament and 5K, Flight Suit Social and Heritage Dinner. The Heritage Dinner, which will high light the internation al partnerships of the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF), will also serve as a ceremony for two new Hall of Honor inductees from the MPRF commu nity. The International Partnerships theme this year has really allowed us to step back and rec ognize the cooperative efforts of all of our maritime patrol and recon naissance colleagues around the world, said VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens, president of MPA. We look forward to celebrating our inter twined heritage and our bright future with all of our symposium attend ees, he added. Interested MPRF per sonnel can find more information about the 2013 MPA Symposium, as well as register online, by going to: www.mari timepatrolassociation. org/symposium.Register now for the 2013 MPA symposium JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013 More than 400 service members, retirees, civilians and family members turned out for the eighth annual Capt. Chuck Cornett 10K Run and 5K Walk April 6 at NAS Jacksonville. Originally called the Navy Run, the event was renamed after the 2004 death of Cornett, a former NAS Jax executive officer and avid runner. Cornetts family members, Mike Cornett, Sandi and Cliff Cherry and Kathy and Mike Ray traveled to take part in this years run. My dad participated in 96 marathons, including the Boston and Marine Corps marathons and was the co-founder of the Florida Striders Running Club in 1978. He retired from the Navy as a captain in 1980 after 30 years of service, said Sandi Cherry. My mom also ran more than 20 marathons and was my true inspiration in accomplishing a full marathon. If she could do it, then I could, continued Cherry. In addition to the 10-kilo meter competitive run and five-kilometer walk, there was a runners shoe and apparel fair in the Navy Exchange parking lot. Runners also had an opportunity to visit Allied American University, VyStar Credit Union and the University of Phoenix sponsor booths. Once the runners received their packages with their numbers and timing chips, they stretched and mingled with friends and family. After observing morning colors, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders welcomed the runners and then joined them to await the starting gun. It is a wonderful day for a run and to promote Navy fit ness. I would like to thank all the MWR staff, Navy Exchange and sponsors for putting on this great event. This should be a fun run and I am looking forward to it, said Sanders. With a shotgun start, the runners headed down Child Street with Cornetts radar blue and yellow Corvette leading the way. This is such a wonderful event and great for our com munity to come together and promote physical fitness, said NAS Jax Athletic Director Tanya Henigman, who coordi nated the run. Of course, we couldnt pull this off without the help of our volunteers and sponsors. Its a team effort to organize this event. We have about 30 vol unteers out here helping out to ensure everything runs smoothly. Im actually going to start working on next years run this week when I do our after action report because that helps us improve the event each year. The first runner to cross the 5K finish line was Ike Sherlock with a time of 24:11, followed by son and father, Oliver Michelsen coming in at 26:57 and Col. Christopher Michelsen of Blount Island Command at 26:58. The overall winner and first male to cross the 10K finish line was Joe Rivera at 37:32, followed by Lt. Cmdr. Jeremy Judernatz of VR-58 with a time of 37:55 and Avery Blue com ing in at 39:18. The first woman Annual Navy Run attracts hundreds of athletes

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013 5 to cross the 10K line was Lorna Bradford with a time of 39:24. Julie Northrup placed second in the womens overall with a time of 39:41 and Lisa Adams came in third with a time of 43:27. Other winners in their age cat egories were: Master Men and Women (Overall) Capt. Joe McQuade, Naval Hospital Jacksonville, 42:06 Kacee Bryner, 48:53 Men and Women under 11 Skylar Gray, 1:05 Avery Patterson, 45:01 Men 11-14 George Frazier, 44:23 Men and Women 15-19 Jacob Schmit, 39:41 Katie Kramps, 51:12 Men and Women 20-24 JJ Porter, 43:40 Jennifer Therrien, 59:56 Men and Women 25-29 Andre Pualsen, 40:53 Sara Geer, 46:39 Men and Women 30-34 Troy King, 39:54 Michelle McCullough, 46:10 Men and Women 35-39 Gabriel Martinez, 40:58 Colleen Bierbach, 46:36 Men and Women 40-44 Andy Patterson, 45:02 Romonia Goldsmith, 50:49 Men and Women 45-49 Lee Grose, 43:50 Christina Kane, 57:12 Men and Women 50-54 Kingsley Nelson, 45:06 Joanne Harris, 53:23 Men and Women 55-59 Douglas Tillet, 47:57 Kimberly Lundy, 54:06 Men and Women 60-64 Paul Geiger, 45:08 Diane Wilkinson, 1:05 Men and Women 65-69 George White, 47:11 Sunny Matthews, 1:14 Men 70-74 Paul Smith, 49:12 Marie Bendy, 1:01 Men 75 & Up Ben Matthews, 53:18 This is a great run the course is well marked and the event is well organized. I really enjoyed participating in todays run, said NAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM)(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd. I hope everyone will come out to participate in this run again next year. It just keeps getting bigger and better every year and we continue to make upgrades to ensure everyone enjoys this event, said Henigman. Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government officially endorses any com pany, sponsor or its products or ser vices. NAVY RUN

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013 VP-5 transition spotlightAs VP-5 transitions to the P-8A Poseidon the squadron is highlighting a transitioning Mad Fox each week. This weeks spotlight shines on AWO2(AW) Jacob Petracco. Petracco comes from a military family. His great grandfather, uncle, and brother all served in the military. His brother is currently in the U.S. Air Force and is part of the Tactical Air Control Party. Petracco is one of VP-5s electronic warfare operators. His duties on the P-8A include managing the radar, IFF system, electronic support measures, and operation of the external camera. His transition courseware includes a series of lectures, self guided computer based training, and software device ses sions. All training is aimed to make the operator fully proficient with the Poseidons electronic warfare suite in less than six months. The software on this aircraft is much more in depth, but also more functional, commented Petracco. It has been a tremendous help coming from a generation that grew up with computer technology. VP-5 has been transitioning to the P-8A Poseidon since Jan. 4, 2013. Navy announces Navy Working Uniform Type I update NAVADMIN 084/13 released April 1 provides a summary on all Navy Working Uniform (NWU) Type I related guidance and announces the authorized wear of the aiguillette and the expanded wear of the 9-inch rough side out and 8-inch flight deck steel-toed safety boots with the NWU Type I. We believe we owed our Sailors the best opportunity to be successful with regards to the uniform wear of the NWU and felt like if we captured all the information into a single NAVADMIN, that would be the right thing to do, said Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (AW/NAC) Mike Stevens. Providing this clarity and education is very important to me. Since the roll-out of the NWU Type I in December 2008, Fleet input has resulted in the revised policy and rules of wear. NAVADMIN 084/13 discusses in detail the description, uniform components, standards of appearance, occasions for wear, and proper care instructions. The NAVADMIN, at commanding officers discre tion, expands the authorized footwear to be worn with NWU Type I to include a black 9-inch leather (smooth) steel-toed boot, a black 9-inch rough side out leather steel-toed boot and a black 8-inch aviation flight deck steel-toed boot. Also at the commanding officers discretion, aiguillettes can be worn with the NWU Type I shirt and parka by personnel assigned to billets in which aiguillettes are a prescribed uniform item. Personnel should be aware that puncturing the outer shell of the parka will compromise the manu facturers water proof guarantee and void the lifetime warranty. Parkas that are punctured or torn will have to be repaired or replaced at the owners expense. In addition to NAVADMIN 084/13, the Navy released a training video that demonstrates how to properly wear NWU Type I components. The video can be found at http://www.navy.mil/video_player. asp?id=18243. For more information on uniforms and uniform policy, visit the Navy Uniform Matters website at http:// www.public.navy.mil/bupers-npc/support/uniforms/ pages/default2.aspx. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Commanding Officer Capt. Christopher Kiwus recognized two employees April 1 for gradu ating from the NAVFAC Leadership Development Program (LDP). Diane Shider and Kendra McMahon were selected for the two-year leadership program in 2010 for the 2011 program. Shider completed the Level 2 program for supervisors and McMahon the Level 1 program for non-supervisors. I commend you on your dedication and commit ment to the program, said Kiwus to the graduates. I have spoke with both of you and look forward to seeing you continue to grow as leaders. Participating in the LDP has given me the oppor tunity to gain extensive leadership experience, said Shider, currently the Deputy Human Resources Officer Director for NAVFAC Southeast. I have learned to be adaptable, while being multi tasked with a high degree of self-initiative. Shider said the most memorable aspect of the pro gram was her rotation at the NAVFAC headquarters in Washington, D.C. as it provided her the opportunity to see the bigger picture and gave her the opportunity to understand business at the headquarters level. McMahon is a contract specialist who wanted to specifically focus on her career and learn more about leadership within the command. This was a great opportunity, said McMahon. I was able to meet and shadow senior leaders. NAVFAC created the LDP to provide more robust developmental opportunities for its future civilian senior leaders. The program is designed to provide leadership development through progressive learning opportu nities consisting of formal education and training, rotational assignments, and other developmental activities. Employees selected for the program are challenged to perform outside their sphere of influence and comfort zone. Annually, NAVFAC selects employees from around the corporation to be a part of the LDP program. NH Jax sponsors Alcohol info event April 11 at NEXThe Naval Hospital Jacksonville Substance Abuse Rehabilitation Program (SARP) will hold an alcoholuse screening and information event on National Alcohol Screening Day, April 11, at the NAS Jax Navy Exchange courtyard from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Alcohol disorders are common and highly treatable and screenings are an important first step. Stop by; its free and confidential. For more information, contact SARP Social Counselor Marty Christiansen at 542-3473 ext. 176. With April being National Alcohol Awareness Month, and April 11 National Alcohol Screening Day, the Military Pathways program is encourag ing service members, veterans and their families, to take advantage of the free, anonymous alcohol-use screenings at www.DrinkingIQ. org. Military Pathways, which offers the online screenings, reports that more than 30,000 screenings for alcohol-use disorders have been completed since it started the program in 2006. The screenings ask individuals to answer a simple set of questions about their drinking habits. After completing a screening, service members receive feedback as to whether their symptoms are consistent with alcohol misuse as well as a list of resources on how and where to get further evalua tion and help. All branches of the military have programs where service members can get treatment for substance abuse problems. Visitors to the site can also access a host of articles, videos, and other information that gives them, among other things, tips on how to cut down on alcohol use. Several free, downloadable mobile applications for mental health are also available. Using alcohol to manage a life problem, what professionals call self-medicating, is never a good idea. Not only does a drink ing problem emerge, the original problem goes unfixed. A success ful career in the military means knowing when to draw the line with alcohol, and when to get help when the drinking is out of con Two graduate from Leadership Development ProgramMilitary observes Alcohol Awareness Month

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Chief petty officers hold service dayBy Kaylee LaRocqueNAS Jacksonville and tenant command chief petty officers (CPOs) flanked the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf April 2 for a day of service to show support to junior Sailors. The chiefs manned the service line dishing up the lunchtime meal, washed pots, pans and dishes in the scullery, greeted Sailors in the dining room and cleaned tables. Were here because this is a way for senior leadership (chiefs) to give back to the Sailors and show them how much we care and appreciate what they do every day, said RPC Michael Music of the NAS Jax Chapel, who coordinated the event. So we decided to take over the galley and help with the lunchtime meal. I sent out an email asking for participation and the chiefs showed up in full force, he added. Although the Sailors were a bit surprised to see the chiefs serving their meal, it was much appreciated. It was a bit of a shock to see them working here, but its nice to see them outside the office showing their support, added AT3 Daniel Parra of VP-30. In an email to base CPOs, NAS Jax Command Master Chief (CMDCM) (AW/SW) Brad Shepherd praised the CPOs. Thanks to everyone who participated in the CPO Day of Service. I believe everything went really well and we had a great time. I know the Sailors appreciated seeing us in the galley showing our thanks and support for all that they do! said Shepherd. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013 7

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Ukrainian Navy. In August, Detachment Seven vis ited Souda Bay, Crete, and Haifa, Israel while supporting Operation Active Endeavour in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. Squadron person nel led the NATO fight against piracy utilizing airborne surface search radar, forward looking infrared (FLIR), and electronic support measures to increase the strike groups recognized maritime picture. Following those operations, USS Jason Dunham transited through the Suez Canal and into the Fifth Fleet area of responsibility. October saw the detachment supporting counter piracy operations in the Gulf of Aden. SH-60B crews provided critical sup port to visually identify contacts of interest at night utilizing FLIR and night vision goggles. Detachment Seven sup ported CSG and surface action group operations throughout the winter. The unique capabilities of an embarked helicopter detachment were also put on display in the form of vertical replenishment, medical evacuations, and visit, board, search, and seizure missions. In total, the Warrior Legacy flew 1,150 flight hours supporting various operations in a very dynamic environ ment. The detachment flew armed escort sorties while transiting the Strait of Hormuz on twelve occasions, pro viding aerial support for USS Jason Dunham and other surface assets in this contested region. February saw the completion of the longest underway period for both the ship and detachment: 61 consecutive days, mostly on-station in the Red Sea. In March, the ship began the long journey home. After a well-deserved port visit to Naples, Italy, USS Jason Dunham crossed the Atlantic and returned to Norfolk, Va. Detachment Seven deployed as one of two final SH-60B detachments from HSL-42. When HSL-42 prepared for its official transition to HSM-72 in January, several personnel exchanges at sea were required to support the conversion to the new MH-60R aircraft. The Warrior Legacy began its deployment under the leadership of Lt. Cmdr. Matthew Chester and ADC(AW) Zachory Bennett. At the mid-deployment point these positions were entrusted to Lt. Cmdr. Aaron Bomar and ATC(AW/SW) Jason Kelly. Additionally, the maintenance officer, operations officer and two helicop ter aircraft commanders turned over underway. The maintenance element, under the continuous leadership of AD1(AW) Edison Muiz was the true Brut Force of the detachment and per formed exceptionally well throughout a high operational tempo for more than nine months. Following multiple extensions in the ater, the Warrior Legacy is returning to Jacksonville as the last ever HSL-42 deployed detachment, boasting the fol lowing major accomplishments: 1,150 mishap-free flight hours across 390 sorties, 10 enlisted aviation warfare spe cialist qualifications, four enlisted sur face warfare specialist qualifications, and an impressive 83 percent advancement rate. HSM-72trol, said Robert Ciulla, Ph.D., Mobile Health director for the Defense Departments National Center for Telehealth and Technology. The anonymous selfassessment gives individuals the opportunity to check and see if their drinking is a problem and how to get help or cut back. Military Pathways gives service personnel and their families the opportunity to learn more about men tal health and alcohol use through anonymous selfassessments offered online. The program is designed to help individuals identify symptoms and access assistance before a problem becomes serious. The self-assessments address alcohol use, PTSD, depres sion, generalized anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder and adolescent depression. After completing a self-assessment, individuals receive referral information, including TRICARE, Military OneSource, and Veterans Affairs. The pro gram is run by the nonprofit Screening for Mental HealthR and is funded by the Department of Defense with support from the National Center for Telehealth and Technology. ALCOHOL AWARENESS 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013

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VR-62and is based at NAS Jacksonville. The Nomads of Fleet Logistics Support Squadron (VR) 62 is a Navy Reserve C-130T unit that got its name from its frequent homeport changes VR-62 had four homeports in the past 20 years. That is a lot of moving, but moving is what the Nomads are all about. U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (COMUSNAVSO/C4F) supports USSOUTHCOM joint and combined full-spectrum military operations by providing principally sea-based, for ward presence to ensure freedom of maneuver in the maritime domain, to foster and sustain cooperative relationships with international partners and to fully exploit the sea as maneuver space in order to enhance regional security and promote peace, stabil ity, and prosperity in the Caribbean, Central and South American regions. VP-5 hosts bowling night for young SailorsVP-5 hosted a bowling night for members of its Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions (CSADD) March 29. Twenty Mad Foxes and their guests gathered for a night of camaraderie and fun at NAS Jacksonville Freedom Lanes. This was a great bonding event for everyone involved, commented IS3 Nicole Souza, a CSADD committee member. I was able to meet many members of the squadron I would not have normally seen on a daily basis. VP-5s CSADD program was started by YN3 Allan Trahan. The program focuses on informing at risk Sailors 25 and younger about the consequences of risky decision-making and provides mentorship through weekly meetings. The bowling night was one of many upcoming events intended to give VP-5 Sailors an alternative to drink ing on weekend nights and provide an increase in morale. Volunteers from the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville, fam ily members, and athletes cheered and enjoyed the competition at Ridgeview High School March 1 and March 8 during the offi cial start of the 2013 Clay County Special Olympics Summer Games. Sailors from CNATTU Jax volunteered their time setting up, coordinating and presenting awards to young athletes in track and field events such as relays, various distance runs, shot put, and long jump. AE1(AW) Robert ONeill has been assisting the Special Olympics Clay County branch since September 2011. He is currently CNATTUs vol unteer coordinator for the Special Olympics and his love for the organization and its athletes shows in his work. From the beginning of the 2012 season, he made it his goal to attend every event in order to assist these special athletes, teachers and fellow volunteers. During the two-day track and field event, he directed more than130 volunteers during the staging, performance and tear down of the entire event. During the opening ceremony of the elementary school level sum mer games, ONeill was presented a gold medal by Rhonna Smith, Clay County Special Olympics coordinator, for not only his out standing work during the summer games, but for accomplishing his goal of volunteering at nearly every event over the past year. Mrs. Smith came up to me just before the opening ceremony and asked me to stick by her because she needed a hand. The next thing I know shes finishing off the cer emony by talking about one of the volunteers and then hanging a gold medal around my neck. I had no idea she was about to do that, and I am completely honored to be recognized for spending time with these great kids, said ONeill. Special Olympics operates year round and is always looking for volunteers. Thousands of volun teers have helped at sporting events such as basketball, golf, soccer, track and field, and bowling. All of these events aid in pre paring athletes for the culmina tion of the Special Olympics at the state games which will be held in Orlando on May 17-18. Both Clay and Duval counties hold Special Olympics events requiring volunteers. For more information, visit www. soflduval.org. CNATTU Jax Sailor recognized at Special Olympics Volunteers needed for Never Quit Navy Recruiting District Jacksonville needs 30 vol unteers to assist during the Never Quit Beach event May 19 from 5:45 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, call or email MC1 Brianna Dandridge at 396-5909, Ext 1150. Each volunteer will receive a free Never Quit run ning shirt. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013 9

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Sequestration will have no effect on the drawdown in Afghanistan, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff said April 6 at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan. [Sequestration] is an avalanche, not a light switch, Army Gen. Martin Dempsey said in a round-table discus sion with members of the press travel ing with him on his trip to Afghanistan. The avalanche started March 1, he said, and is building momentum. Were consuming readiness without building it, because we are taking the money that we would normally have used to build readiness of units that might deploy a year from now and weve had to apply it into our wartime operations, Dempsey said. Additionally, the chairman said, the department is supporting commit ments on the Korean Peninsula and the Persian Gulf. When you fence that off and fully fund it and you have to fence it off, weve got young men and women out there in harms way and they will always be fully funded when you do that, though, the risk you take begins to accrue, Dempsey said. By 2014 the department will face medium-term problems in maintaining readiness, he said. The problems weve got are multiplying and will multiply over time, Dempsey added. We will always do what we have to do to protect the nation and its inter ests, the chairman said. For example, he continued, the theater air defense system recently placed in Guam was costly, but it never crossed our mind not to do it because we wanted to save the money. Money is not a factor when our national interests are threatened, he said, but readiness is something that has to be sustained over time. The cost of requalifying certain service mem bers, like pilots, due to interruptions to training can actually cost more than the training itself would have, the chairman noted. The one thing that I would never do and I know [Defense] Secretary [Chuck] Hagel feels the same way is were never going to deploy a service man or woman whos not ready to deploy, he said. Sequestration is not a risk to our national security at present, the chairman said. But the uncertainty does make us less efficient [and] it sends a very negative message to our men and women who serve. The department will get through the readiness challenge, he said, but the next challenge could be retention. Service members wont stay in the military if they cant do their jobs, the chairman said. Land at the corner of Saratoga Avenue and Langley Street that was formerly the site of Fleet Air Photographic Laboratory (Building 921), is being transformed into a new park with amenities. The park, adjacent to Commander, Navy Region Southeast (Building 919), will consist of paved walkways with seating areas, a pavilion with benches, landscaping, drainage and sidewalks with curbing. The former Building 921 had historical eligibility status under its prior use in the rapid processing of reconnais sance film during the Cuban Missile Crisis in October 1962. The State Historical Preservation Office Memorandum of Agreement, as required under NHPA 106 (National Historical Preservation Act), agreed to the park as compliance for demolition of Building 921. According to Project Manager Lt. j.g. Jon Berube of NAS Jax Public Works Department, the park will become a historical representational park with an interpretive panel discussing the history of Building 921, including its support of photographic reconnais sance squadrons VFP-62 and VAP-62. The park will create a gathering place for the occupants of Building 919 and others for activities such as breaks, lunch and bird watching. It will also eliminate issues affect ing the viability of the sites oak trees caused by vehicles parking directly on their root systems. The park construction is a team effort of Sweat Construction Co. and the Seabees of CBMU-202, Detachment Jacksonville. The estimated completion date is May 24.New historic park under constructionDempsey: Sequestration not yet a national security threat 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013

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Navy officials encourage top-per forming Sailors to volunteer for Recruit Division Commander (RDC) duty, in a Naval message released April 2. According to NAVADMIN 085/13, the motivation and professional develop ment of recruits is a vital Navy mission that requires outstanding role models. RDC assignment is challenging, but rewarding. It offers a number of pro fessional development, leadership and career advancement opportunities. The tasks required are mentally, physically and emotionally demanding, and require proven self-discipline and imaginative problem-solving skills. Sailors assigned as RDCs must con tinually demonstrate superior leader ship and motivational skills in demanding and often unique situations. RDCs are eligible for the following benefits: $450 per month. ance of $220. actively training a recruit division. Training Specialist qualification. ment (upon completion of tour). Ribbon. Meritorious Advancement Program for petty officers second class. Per MILPERSMAN 1306-954, E-5 Sailors must have a minimum of six years active service with two years time-in-rate upon application to serve as an RDC. E-6s must have a minimum of six years active service upon applying. There are no minimum years of service or time in rate requirements for chiefs and above. Applicants must be war fare-qualified, however, waivers may be granted on case-by-case basis. Sailors must have scored good low or high er in each category on the most recent Physical Fitness Assessment. The RDC candidate must be able to perform and pass the run portion of the Physical Readiness Test (PRT) before the screening is submitted to NPC. Waiver of the run portion of the PRT is not allowed. A complete listing of eligibility requirements and application proce dures can be found in MILPERSMAN 1306-954. Sailors who meet the requirements and would like to apply for the RDC program should submit a 1306/7 (enlisted personnel action request) to their rating detailer. According to the message, there are approximately 200 openings for new RDCs each year. Upon accep tance to the RDC program, Sailors will attend three weeks of instructor school to obtain the 9502 Navy Enlisted Classification and a 13-week RDC School. RDC C school is a physically chal lenging, intensive, hands-on training course that provides prospective RDCs with the skills, perspective, and physi cal readiness to succeed as an RDC. Commands must ensure prospec tive candidates are properly screened to help reduce attrition from RDC C school. Tours are a minimum of 36 months after graduation from RDC School. For more information, read NAVADMIN 085/13 and visit http:// www.npc.navy.mil/enlisted/detailing/ shorespecialprograms/pages/rdc.aspx.>Navy seeks recruit division commanders JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013 11

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Friday Free Entertainment at 7 p.m. April 5 Karaoke Deweys Free Spring Concert Series 7 p.m. on the outdoor stage April 12 Big Engine April 19 State of Mind April 26 The Ride May 3 Boogie Freaks May 10 7th Street Band May 17 Zero-NFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday change of hours Open 410 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 126 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included Friday special $1 games per person 25 p.m. Shoe rental not included Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours April 1 May 5 Open Monday Friday (lap swim only) 6 a.m. 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 7 p.m. Saturday & Sunday (lap swim only) 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. During lap swim only the waterslide, water park and concessions will not be open. 2013 Learn to Swim Program Sign up at the Gym (the Zone) May 11, 8 a.m. 3 p.m. Session 1: June 1020 Session 2 July 8-18 Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Daytona International Speedway Subway Firecracker, July 5 and Coke 400, July 6 Tickets on sale now! Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts Dark Side Of The Moon (Pink Floyd) April 13 at 7:30 p.m. Section A $33; Section B $28; Section C $23 A Lamb Chop Celebration April 20 at 7:30 p.m. Section A $18; Section B $14; Section C $11 Funkfest Metropolitan Park May 10-11, 2-day ticket $52 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3 Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7 Call for pricing Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for families at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline 2013 Live Broadway Series Anthony Bourdain April 24 $50 $70 Celtic Woman May 2 $44 $134 American Idiot May 14 & 15 $25 $62 Dream Girls May 21 Cesar Millan June 1 $42 $52 New Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute 4-day hopper $153.25 Wild Adventures Theme Park One day pass $30, Gold pass $71 Book Shade of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT!The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Auto Skills Center Class April 11 at 6 p.m. Paintball Trip April 20 at 9 a.m. Stand-up Paddle Board Lesson April 22 at 6 p.m. Busch Gardens Trip April 27 at 6 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees April 23 for active duty April 11 & 25 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Loudmouth Thursday Any golfer wearing a pair of loudmouth shorts or pants plays 18 holes with cart for $20 Open to military, DoD and guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty Skipper B Classes $150 at the Mulberry Cove Marina April 20, 21, 27 & 28 May 18, 19, 25 & 26Auto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Month of the Military Child Carnival April 20, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Allegheny Softball Field Free games and activities! 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013

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For more information, call Bill Bonser at 542-2930/3239 or e-mail bill. bonser@navy.mil Sailors who have hit a weight loss plateau, or cant drop the weight despite having a physi cally active lifestyle, may ben efit from a talk with their local dietician, officials said March 28. There are three main rea sons why increasing exercise and activity may lead to weight plateau or increased weight gain. Being more aware will help you identify and adjust accordingly, said Lt. Cmdr. Jennifer Wallinger, registered dietitian, Navy Nutrition, Navy Physical Readiness Program. It is important to balance the nutrients that you put in your body with what you burn off in activity, whether that is normal daily activity or exercise. One reason is that adding activity increases hunger. Make sure the food you eat will fill you up by choos ing nutrient dense foods con taining protein, fiber and healthy fats instead of calorie dense foods [including] high fat and high sugar items with few nutrients, continued Wallinger. Another reason is choosing the wrong foods. The body is designed not to starve. If you do not choose lower-calorie, filling food, you will naturally compensate for the extra calories burned from daily activity and exercise, said Wallinger. Try filling up on vegetables before or as part of your meal. Finally, exercising can pro vide a false sense of entitle ment. People may think, I worked out, so I can have or deserve that burger, cheesecake, nachos or whatever, said Wallinger. Activity helps you burn cal ories, but only if you do not eat all of those calories back. Sailors can track their food intake to ensure they are maintaining a calorie deficit to pro mote their weight management goals. SuperTracker is available at http://www.choosemyplate. gov/supertracker-tools/super tracker.html. While many may think con suming fewer calories is the key to weight loss, that meth od can backfire. According to Wallinger, a very low-cal orie diet will ultimately slow your metabolism and weight loss and will encourage rapid weight regain when higher calorie consumption is resumed. The calories individuals need to lose or gain weight var ies based on factors such as weight, age and activity level. There is a lot of information out there, some good and some bad, said Wallinger. Speaking with a dietician on base can help Sailors identify and navi gate the best method for their needs. Sailors may learn more about healthy eating, nutrition and how to locate a dietician at the Navy Nutrition web site at http://www.public.navy. mil/bupersnpc/support/navy nutrition/Pages/default2.aspx. Relay For Life: Military families wantedMilitary family teams are forming for the Relay for Life at Fleming Island High School May 3. The event remembers those who have lost their battle with cancer, support and encourage those who are fighting, and celebrate those who have survived their battle with cancer. If you are interested, please call Kari Wiese at (207) 730-3294. For more details, visit the Relay for life Web site at www.relayforlife.org/flemingislandfl. The team is called JAX MILITARY FAMILIES.Navy resources available for Sailors who must trim fat The PLAYERS, Veterans Coalition job fair May 5The PLAYERS are holding their second annual job fair in partnership with the Jacksonville Military Veterans Coalition for active duty, Reservists, retired military, veterans and mili tary spouses May 5 at TPC Sawgrass. The job fair is free and will be held in The Turn hospitality venue near the 18th green. For more information, go to www.PGATour.com/ theplayers. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013 13

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ed 500 kWh per year. This substantial energy reduction will result in savings to NAS Jacksonville of around $75,000 in 2013. Based on projected increases in energy costs, the base will save an average of $107,000 per year of ener gy over the next 20 years. One additional ben efit will be the reduction in operation and maintenance costs and recapitalization of aging infrastructure due to the elimination of a primary clarifier, sludge thickener and two aerobic digesters at this facility. These savings, coupled with the energy savings, result in a simple pay back of 6.3 years for the $700K investment in the CleanB system. The Navys shore ener gy policy is more than environmental steward ship and lowering energy bills. Energy is a strategic resource, and developing efficient operations that rely on resilient energy sources is a matter of national security. Naval forces depend on constant support from shore opera tions, and energy security is essential for powering our critical shore instal lations now and in the future. The CleanB sys tem is a novel and note worthy step toward ener gy security. CLEAN WATER Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention MonthTo all Department of Defense (DOD) Personnel: This month, the Department of Defense observes Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month under the theme, We own it . well solve it . together. This is an opportunity for the entire DOD community service members, civilians, members of our families and leaders at every level to underscore our commitment to eliminating the crime of sexual assault, supporting victims, and intervening when appropriate to help stop unsafe behavior. Together, we must work every day to instill a climate that does not tolerate or ignore sexist behavior, sexual harassment or sexual assault. These have no place in the United States military and violate everything we stand for and the values we defend. Creating a culture free of the scourge of sexual assault requires establishing an environment where dignity and respect is afforded to all, and where diversity is celebrated as one of our greatest assets as a force. We are strong because of our values of service, sacrifice and loyalty and doing what is right. We must watch out for each other and respect each other. By drawing on these strengths, we can and we must stop sexual assault within our ranks. Remember, we own it . well solve it . together.Preparing for pre-deployment Are you an active duty member assigned to a deployable unit? Are you a reservist who has been recalled to active duty for a deployment? Are you a Department of Defense (DoD) civilian deploying for 30 days or more? If you fall into any of these categories, as soon as you get your deploy ment orders you need to begin preparing yourself to be legally ready for your deployment. Powers of attor ney. Powers of attor ney (POA) are legal documents that allow you (the principal) to appoint someone else (the agent) to act on your behalf. There are two types of powers of attorney a general POA and a special POA. A general POA is a blan ket grant of authority for your agent to act on your behalf while you are gone. A special POA gives someone the authority to handle only one spe cific issue for example taxes, vehicles, or your children. Draft your POAs closer in time to your deployment as they are good for one year. Estate planning Estate planning includes several documents. First, a will allows you to name the people you wish to receive your money and possessions (your estate), to name the people you wish to take care of your chil dren (your childrens guardian), and appoints the person in charge of carrying your wishes out (your executor). Second, a living will allows you to state your preference for artificial life support. Third, there are two durable POAs a health care POA and a dura ble General POA that allow your family to make your health care decisions or handle your financial affairs if you are so injured or ill you cannot do these things yourself. Finally, it is important to ensure your SGLI (life insurance) and DD93 (naming beneficiaries of the death gratuity and unpaid pay and allow ances) are updated. Family matters. Family issues can create difficult hurdles to your ability to prepare for and focus on the mission. The Wings Over America Scholarship Foundation (WOASF) is hosting a golf tournament at NAS Jax April 26 at 9 a.m. to benefit scholarships for Navy dependents. The event is open to the public. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. All proceeds ben efit the Wings Over America Scholarship Foundation, a 501(c)3 non-profit foundation. The WOASF annually sponsors more than 40 scholarships, ranging from $2,000 to $10,000, to students who have chosen to continue their education. Scholarship recipients are selected on the basis of scholastic merit, community service and extracurricular activities. The foundations mis sion is to provide col lege scholarships to dependent children and spouses of naval avia tion commands, offi cer and enlisted, active duty, retired, honorably discharged or deceased. The foundation has awarded more than $635,000 to students since 1987. For more information or to register, visit www. wingsoveramerica.us or call 757-671-3200, ext. 2.WOASF golf tourney set for April 26 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013

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NATO officials are closely analyzing what the future cyber warrior will look like as the war landscape shifts from air, ground and sea to cyberspace, said Allied Command Transformations deputy chief of staff for strategic plans and policy said March 28. In an interview during a Young Professionals Forging the Future event at Johns Hopkins University Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, Army Maj. Gen. Peter Bayer Jr. said its time to lean into the younger generation in preparation for new and more com plex challenges. Enhanced e-training and applica tion of cyber skill sets need to be customized to the millennial generation born into, rather than adapting to, the information age, Bayer said. The folks that are going to solve the problems of 2030 [are] not me; Ill be doing something else, the general said. Its some 25-yearold already in the uniform of their nation. They already have experi ence in Afghanistan or somewhere else. Theyre going to be the twoor three-star generals or admirals solv ing problems. Bayer said his charge is to develop ongoing training and an open prob lem-solving environment to tap into the minds of young leaders who can bring an innovative perspective as NATO and its transformation com mand shift from operational to con tingency-based missions. I want the junior leaders already in uniform [to be immersed] in this future world of complex problemsolving and begin to develop skills they need to work in an ambiguous uncertain, complex, fast-paced [environment], Bayer said. As U.S. forces pivot to the Pacific during the simultaneous drawdown in Afghanistan, Bayer said, NATO priorities should adjust accordingly. When Afghanistan is over, we go from an operations-centric alliance to a contingency-based alliance, which means being ready for the next thing, but unsure what that thing might be, he explained. And NATO, he added, has played a large role in the United States being able to focus its attention on new challenges. The only reason the U.S. can think about shifting priorities and emphasis to the Pacific is because we have a secure flank, and its called NATO, Bayer said. NATO should see this as an opportunity, not a threat, [as] increasingly, centers of power are going to be in that part of the world -less so on the traditional East-West axis. The general acknowledged the occasional challenges of concen sus. Its frustrating to have 28 [nations] trying to work on some thing, but theres nothing more powerful than when we get to the point where 28 say, Yep, thats the answer we can live with, because now were speaking as one. After spending most of the last 20 years in operations since the advent of missions in the Balkans, Bayer said, its vital for NATO to update its training concept and revitalize its exercises program, the general said. I could see the day where the secu rity interests of the alliance will be challenged by some adversary who will employ information, influence, cyber and space, he added. The response from the alliance, Bayer said, would not necessarily require the alliance to use air, sea or land forces in the way it traditionally has. Weve already forced [younger people] to operate very decentralized, and theyre ready for it, so weve got to figure out now how to get the institutions to catch up.General discusses focus on younger force, cyber capabilities Presented by North Florida Sales Big Engine April 12 State of Mind April 19 The Ride April 26Bring your own blanket and chairs. No coolers or outside food/beverages allowed. Every Friday at 7 p.m. outside stage Spring Concert SeriesFor more information call (904) 542-3900 facebook.com/nasjaxmwr Boogie Freaks May 3 7th Street Band May 10 Zero-N May 17 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013 15

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16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013 For many, spring brings a resurgence of energy and activ ity with the milder tempera tures. It is a perfect time to practice your family emergency plan and to re-evaluate and restock your emergency supply kit for the changing season. Although winter weather is becoming a fading memory, it is important to remember that weather and other hazards can be unpredictable. So spring into action as a Ready Navy Family and be ready for any hazard. about hazards that are common in spring months and most likely to happen in your area. The Ready Navy website Be and Stay Informed offer spe cific instructions, information and resources you may need to know regarding floods, torna does, man-made hazards and emergency actions. Learn what you should know if you need to evacuate or take shelter in your home. make and refine your emergency plan so that everyone in the family understands what to do, where to go, and what to take in the event of an emergency. Practice your plan by con ducting a drill where all fam ily members must gather at your designated meeting place, exit ing by various doors. Your emergency plan should also include how your family will commu nicate with each other, particularly if normal communication methods, such as phone lines or cell towers, are out. Road conditions and other hazards can limit ease of movement. Have a contact person outside the area that each member of the family can notify that they are safe, if separated. Place a call to your designat ed contact person to be sure he or she is willing to serve in that role. The Ready Navy website provides printable forms and contact cards to guide you in your planning. prepare for the unexpected is to have on hand one or more emergency kits that include enough water and non-perish able supplies for every family member to survive at least three days. Keep a kit prepared at home, and consider having kits in your car, at work, and a portable version in your home ready to take with you. These kits will enable you and your family to respond to any emergency more effective ly. Make a game of kit building with your children. One idea is to have your children go on a scavenger hunt to find and gather necessary sup plies around your house. Make note of items you are missing and shop together at your local installation commissary and NEX to complete your kit. History shows that children who are involved and informed with emergency planning are better able to react safely in an emergency. For more information about Ready Navy Family, along with tips, forms and guidance to be prepared for and stay informed about all hazards, visit www. ready.navy.mil. Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to ser vice members and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2013: To register for any of the above workshops call 5425745.There are ways to spring into action as a Ready Navy FamilyFFSC offers life skills workshops Sexual assault has no place in the Defense Department, a senior Pentagon official said April 2, calling on the workforce to be part of the solution. In a keynote address kicking off Aberdeen Proving Grounds observance of National Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month, acting Undersecretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness Jessica Wright said sexual assault is a national issue that also affects the Defense Departments mili tary and civilian workforce. The theme for this years observance underscored in a message that Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel sent to the departments workforce today is, We own it . well solve it . together. Although we address sexual assault in the month of April, this is an issue that needs to be addressed every day of our lives, Wright told an audience of service members and civilian employees. DOD is a microcosm of America, she added, where employees bring their values and how they were raised into the workforce. I often say if were in Afghanistan and we [see] something unsafe, [or] not akin to the values we have grown up with, we would tell that person to stop what theyre doing, because theyre going to affect our wellbeing and their well-being, she said. Yet when we are here in the United States, and we do something thats not akin to . values in a social network, sometimes we have a hard time crossing that boundary and saying, This affects the life of a service member or a civilian we work with, and its inappropri ate. The Defense Department doesnt condone sexual assault, Wright said. We dont tell jokes of a sexual nature, we dont condone unwanted sexual behav iors, and we clearly dont con done sexual assault, she added. Just as everyone knows people who drink a lot of cof fee, exercise a great deal or are Facebook junkies, Wright said. Everyone also knows someone who doesnt live by the Defense Departments values and ethos. I ask that if you know that person, tell [him or her] to stop it, and make sure you report bad behavior should you see it, she added. Thats the only way were going to stop it. Wright said she joined the military in 1975 as a member of the Womens Army Corps, at a time when having a drink at the post club was condoned. But in our military now, . we dont condone drinking [or] drinking and driving. We dont have those social things like we used to, because its just not who we are, she said. I ask each and every one of you to take back a message with you today that says, every single day, we dont condone [sexual assault], she said. Sexual assault awareness and prevention must be part of all levels in the organization, she added, whether employees work with a small group in an office or in a field situation. We have a sexual assault problem, Wright said. We need to jump on top of it and stop it. And it is incumbent upon all of you to do it. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is looking for youth leaders who are dedicated to public service, who are making a dif ference in their communities, and who want to expand their impact as national advocates for youth disaster preparedness. Youth between the ages of 12 and 17 interested in strengthen the nations resiliency against disasters may now apply or be nominated to serve on FEMAs Youth Preparedness Council. Participants will represent the youth perspective on emergency prepared ness and share information with their communities. Those interested may apply directly or be nominated by an adult by sub mitting a completed application form, a narrative, and a letter of recommendation. Visit www.ready.gov/youthpreparedness to access the application materials and instructions. Applications and supporting mate rials must be received by midnight April 19, 2013. Youth Preparedness Council members will attend the 2013 Youth Preparedness Council Summit and meet with emergency management leadership and national organizations dedicated to youth preparedness to discuss individual and community preparedness. Council members will participate in regular conference calls with FEMA and will complete a youth preparedness project of their choos ing. Engaging youth is an integral step in preparing the nation for all hazards, said FEMAs Region IV Administrator Phil May. Youth have a unique ability to influence their peers and families to be more resilient and play an important role in disaster preparedness, during and after a crisis. Benjamin Cookeof Memphis, Tenn.,represented FEMAs Region IV on the 2012 Youth Preparedness Council. He frequently spoke to diverse groups of youth about the need for emergency preparedness and vol unteered at the Memphis Virginia Hospital. He has participated in community initiatives such as Get Ready Shelby and Go Green Memphis. Sexual assault has no place in DOD, official saysFEMA seeks applicants for youth preparedness council Free tax assistanceREAL$ENSE (United Way) is offering free tax preparation service Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Building 13 (second floor) at the NAS Jax Main Gate. Appointments are recommended for weekdays although walk-ins will be helped. Saturday is walkin availability only. To make an appointment, call 729-2119.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 11, 2013 17 While budget cuts and travel restrictions continue to challenge missions for military and civilian travelers alike, there are many benefits to staying at Navy Gateway Inns and Suites (NGIS) for your official lodging needs. Value, convenience, great accommodations, service and very affordable rates are the foundation of the NGIS lodging program. NGIS offers affordable lodging rates that support the recent reduction of command travel expenses. Lodging rates range from $25/night $65/night with varying rates depending on location. Supporting NGIS ensures that travel funds provide the opportunity for improvements to NGIS services and facilities for our war fighting community. Generally, NGIS lodging facilities will save guests between 40 to 65 percent off comparable civilian accommodations. In-room amenities include Internet access, air conditioning, cable TV with a premium channel, a DVD or VCR, telephone service, microwave and refrigerator. Youll also have housekeeping service, vending machines and guest laundry facilities as well as handicapped accessible and non-smoking rooms. Free in-room coffee and newspapers as well as convenient on-base parking are also available during your stay. Staying at NGIS not only provides great lodging at great prices but it also offers the convenience of other base amenities. You can visit the Navy Exchange, Morale, Welfare and Recreation activities with dis counted tickets for area attractions and swimming pools, golf courses, beaches, and other great MWR activities right outside your door. For reservations, call 1-877-NAVY-BED (1-877-6289233) or online at www.dodlodging.net The Navys MQ-8B Fire Scout Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) surpassed another milestone in March when the autonomous helicopter completed its 600th deployed flight hour while embarked on guided-mis sile frigate USS Robert G. Bradley (FFG 49). The Fire Scout, part of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 22, logged its 600th deployed flight hour March 31. This record exceeds the previous Fire Scout deployment milestone by 100 hours and will likely climb higher with nearly two months remaining on the frigates 5th and 7th Fleet deployment. This is the fifth sea-based deployment for the MQ-8B. Fire Scout routinely flies 17 hours per day, while providing 12-hour, real-time Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) orbit to com batant commanders. Bradley received communication upgrades allowing the aircrafts Full Motion Video (FMV) camera feed to be distributed to the ships Combat Information Center (CIC) and to commanders at military installations throughout the world. The teams of USS Bradley and HSC-22 have taken Fire Scout and maritime ISR to a new level, said Capt. Patrick Smith, Fire Scout program manager at NAS Patuxent River, Md. They tackled multiple sparing, integration and operational issues. Their perseverance demonstrated the significance of maritime-based ISR. Fire Scout continues to be in great demand and is answering the call globally via our shipboard deployments. Smith said the team will continue to take lessons learned and provide improvements to future deployments. The U.S Navy brings a unique capability to the ISR customer, said Cmdr. Pete Ehlers, Bradley commanding officer. Fire Scout is a proven technology with greater multi-payload and mission capability than smaller UAVs the Navy operates. We are able to access many areas of interest without adding an undesirable U.S. footprint on land. Since 2006, the Northrop Grumman-built Fire Scout system has flown more than 8,000 flight hours with more than half of the flight hours performing realworld operational tasking during ship-based and land-based deployments within the past 18 months. This deployment also marks the first time that an HSC squadron has deployed with the Fire Scout. Previous deployments were conducted by the Helicopter Maritime Strike community. Im extremely proud of our aircraft maintainers and aircrew, said Lt. Cmdr. Brett Meskimen, HSC-22 officer in charge. Our active and Reserve Sailors took the lessons from the previous deployments and ran with them. They have set the new standard for future detach ments from both communities. We still have a long way to the end of deployment, but it is worth taking a moment to reflect on the hard work and accomplish ments of the whole team as they support the needs of the warfare commanders. As Sailors prepare to partici pate in the semi-annual Physical Fitness Assessment (PFA), Navy Physical Readiness Program offi cials remind Sailors to verify their results in the Physical Readiness Information Management System (PRIMS). After each PFA, Sailors need to log into PRIMS and ensure their data is entered and accurate, said Bill Moore, director, Navy Physical Readiness Program. Moore added that just like an individual would check their bank account after payday, Sailors need to check their PRIMS following a PFA. All commands are required to report their PFA data via PRIMS no later than 30 days after conducting the PFA in accordance with guidelines established in the Navys Physical Readiness Program instruction, OPNAVINST 6110.1J. Each Sailor must have a record for both PFA cycles in the year, even if the record reflects nonparticipation status due to deployment, IA, medical waiver, etc. Sailors need to verify their data within 60 days so that any cor rections can be made by the CFL at the command level. After six months of PFA completion, record changes can only be made by PRIMS administrators at Navy Personnel Command, which requires a Letter of Correction from the individuals commanding officer, on letterhead, that grants authorization to make the change. In most cases the data is going to be correct, but since the CFL is entering data by hand for the entire command, it is possible that a number may get transposed or a line of data missed, said Moore. The sooner a discrepancy is identified, the faster it can be fixed. PRIMS was introduced in 2002 as the Navys official source for Sailors PFA data. It is used to monitor and track the progress of active-duty and Reserve person nel and identify, screen, educate and monitor members. PRIMS data is also verified against selection board and promotion board results at Navy Personnel Command. Sailors can access their PRIMS account at https://www.bol.navy. mil. Fire Scout sets deployment milestoneNavy reminds Sailors to verify PRIMS dataNavy Gateway Inns and Suites offer affordable value and service If you have a court case pending for divorce, child custody, child support, or spousal support try to resolve the case well before processing if you have time and it will not impact your case nega tively. Otherwise, notify the court and the other par ties involved of your pending deployment. For single parents or dual military parents make sure that your family care plan is up to date and on file with your command. Civil matters. Are you involved in a pending civil case where you are the plaintiff, defendant, or witness? If you are unable to appear or adequately prepare for the case due to your orders you can request a suit stay under the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act. Seek assistance from your command and notify the court you will not be able to attend as soon as possible to avoid a default judgment. Concerning bills, ensure you have made arrange ments to have these paid either by yourself or an appointed agent back home during your deployment. Minor criminal mat ters If you have any pending criminal cases or unresolved traffic violations, it is imperative that you either resolve them or notify the court of your deployment as soon as practicable to ensure you do not incur any additional penalties and/or a warrant is not issued for your arrest. Consumer law/iden tity theft. While on deployment you can have an Active Duty Fraud Alert placed on your credit report to prevent becoming the victim of identity theft. A request is only need ed for the alert by one of the three credit bureas TransUnion (1-800-6807289), Equifax (1-800525-6285), or Experian (1-800-397-3742) and all three will place the alert on your credit report. You are also entitled to a free annual credit his tory report through www. annualcreditreport.com Vehicle and property storage. For your vehi cle, ensure it is stored in a legitimate storage facility and the registration and insurance are current and cover your period of deployment in case your vehicle is damaged while in storage. For your property, ensure homeowners and/ or renters insurance cov ers your period of deployment, notify your land lord or neighbors of your absence, have someone regularly check on your property for you, and create a written or videotape record of your property and its condition. Servicemembers Civil Relief Act Matters. The Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA) pro vides great benefits and protections before, dur ing, and after deploy ment. First, the SCRA allows you to reduce the inter est rate on any debt you incurred (for example credit cards and mort gages) before your active duty orders began to 6 percent during active duty. Second, if your deploy ment is for more than 90 days the SCRA will allow you to terminate a residential or vehicle lease provided you give the landlord or lessor a written notice of your intent to terminate the lease under the SCRA along with a copy of your orders. You may also termi nate or suspend your cell phone contract if you are being deployed for more than 90 days outside of the service area. Third, the SCRA may also delay an eviction of your family while you are deployed. Finally, the SCRA also prohibits your property from being sold or repossessed without a court order. If you are interested in taking advantage of any of the SCRAs provisions your legal assistance office can offer guidance on application proce dures and letters. Taxes For those deploying to a combat zone, your combat pay is tax free! For those deployed during tax season there are also tax filing exten sion options from the IRS, including an auto matic 180 day extension to file and pay taxes for those deployed to a combat zone or in support of a contingency operation (plus credit for the actu al time spent there). For additional information, please visit www.irs.gov USERRA. The Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA) prohibits employers from discriminating against reservists because of their deploy ment and requires reem ployment upon their return back home. USERRA requires mobilizing reservists to provide oral or written notice to the employer of their upcoming call to active duty. For more informa tion on USERRA, please contact your legal assis tance office, the National Committee for Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve ( www.esgr. org ), or the Department of Labor ( http://www.dol. gov/vets/ ). Eligibility. Per JAGINST 5801.2B, the highest priority is for legal assistance services is for active duty personnel attached to deploy ing units, other deploy ing active-duty person nel, and Reservists and National Guard members deploying under active duty recall. Pre-mobilization legal counseling and assistance may be provided to active duty or inactive reservists consistent with mobilization readiness needs. DoD civilian personnel deploying for at least 30 days to a combat zone, in support of a contingency operation, or aboard a naval vessel may be pro vided pre-deployment legal assistance services within current means and capabilities. Finally, DoD civil ian personnel who are U.S. citizens, other than local hire employees, employed by, serving with, or accompanying U.S. Armed Forces, when assigned to a foreign country or to a vessel or unit of the Armed Forces of the U.S. in excess of 30 days are eligible for notaries, POAs, wills, and general legal assistance services. Please visit http://www. jag.navy.mil/legal_ser vices/rlso/rlso_southeast. htm for more information or to find out the location of the legal assistance office closest to you. LEGAL

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