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Jax air news ( April 4, 2013 )

UFPKY National Endowment for the Humanities LSTA SLAF
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012

Material Information

Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: April 4, 2013
Publication Date: 04-04-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02037

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012

Material Information

Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Creation Date: April 4, 2013
Publication Date: 04-04-2013

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02037


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THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013 NEY AW ARD V R -62 Z AW ARD Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com More than 30 Royal Australian Navy (RAN) maintenance personnel began their jour ney through MH-60R Seahawk helicopter maintenance train ing units April 1 at the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville. CNATTU Jax Commanding Officer Cmdr. Daryl Pierce greeted RAN 725 Squadron Commanding Officer Cmdr. David Frost and the first group of MH-60R students. Its my pleasure to welcome you to NAS Jacksonville and CNATTU. I envy you because youre the first Australian squad ron to transition from the old S-70B to the new highly capable MH-60R Seahawk, said Pierce. Your resident project team has worked with CNATTU master instructors to create a phenome nal syllabus and career opportu nity. Enjoy both your classroom and hands-on training, in addi tion to our great Navy lifestyle here in northeast Florida. The training is part of a foreign military sales agreement with the U.S. Navy for 24 MH-60R helicopters. It includes a total package of training, techni cal and logistics support from Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing Atlantic (HSMWINGLANT) at NS Mayport. In December, RAN 725 Squadron will take delivery of its first MH-60R Seahawk heli copters known as the Romeo variant. This will be the first Romeo to come off the Sikorsky pro duction line in New York with a kangaroo painted on its tail, said Frost. In August, well be ready to begin operating from our assigned space in NAS Jacksonville Hangar 1122. Were here to learn in the CPOs celebrate 120th birthdayChief petty officers (CPO) from vari ous commands at NAS Jacksonville gathered to celebrate the 120th CPO Birthday on April 1 by participating in a morning colors event at Building 1. Donning their traditional khaki uni form, they recited the Sailors Creed and the Chiefs Pledge. The chiefs also sang Anchors Aweigh as Navy Band Southeast provided the music. NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd deliv ered remarks as the CPOs gathered around the flagpole. First and foremost, I want to wish everyone a Happy Birthday. I am truly thankful for all of our brothers and sis ters who paved the way for us as we con tinue to keep our forward thinking fra ternity alive, said Shepherd. CPOs are tasked with getting the work done through the junior enlisted Sailors. Additionally, CPOs are respon sible to train junior officers about all facets of our Navy and to develop them into great leaders and visionaries, con tinued Shepherd. Many newly commissioned officers are unfamiliar with the workings of a naval ship, submarine or aircraft as well as the tasks of the department or crew theyre assigned to. The chief briefs the chain of command on what needs to happen to support command mission, rectify issues and how to continue to support our Sailors. Think back to our CPO Creed, those words ring true every day. Shepherd continued, We are essen tially the fulcrum of the organization, which by Websters definition the point or support about which a lever pivots, much like a seesaw. For example, if the chief moves the point (fulcrum) too far in either direction one side officers and the other enlisted, then we change the balance of the fulcrum ultimately giving more care to one and less care to the other. Though we have many duties and unspoken responsibilities, we as CPOs are charged with balancing the com mand, enforcing policy and manag ing the workload. Remember, we will always bring the command back to the centerline, added Shepherd. Long before there were CPOs, supe riority among petty officers on a ship would be decided by the commanding officer (CO). These appointed positions were temporary and the CO had the option to recommend a petty officer to a more permanent position. The official paygrade of CPO was not established until April 1, 1893. Many first class petty officers were shifted to the chief paygrade when the rank was created. As a result, there was no first CPO. On June 1, 1858, the paygrades E8 and Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., com mander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE), signed proclamations March 29 in support of child abuse preven tion, sexual assault awareness and the Month of the Military Child. The proclamations coincide with National Child Abuse Prevention Month, National Sexual Assault Prevention Month and the Month of the Militrary Child, which are all rec ognized during the month of April. These proclamations are in sup port of some very important issues that leaders at all levels in the chain of command should be aware of, Scorby said. Sexual assault is something that Australian Navy maintainers begin Romeo training Scorby signs child abuse prevention, sexual assault awareness and military child proclamations

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013 April 4 1776 Continental Navy frigate Columbus captures HM Tender Hawke, first American capture of a British armed vessel. 1854 Sailors and Marines from sailing sloop, Plymouth, protect U.S. citizens at Shanghai. 1898 Appointment of first Civil Engineering Corps officer, Mordecai Endicott, as chief, Bureau of Yards and Docks. 1949 Establishment of NATO. April 5 1946 USS Missouri (BB-63) arrives in Turkey to return the body of Turkish ambassador to the U.S. and to show U.S. support and willingness to defend Turkey. 1949 The last observation squadron, VO-2, is dises tablished, marking the beginning of a plan to use heli copters in place of fixed-wing aircraft aboard battle ships and cruisers. April 6 1776 Sloop-of-war Ranger, frigate Queen of France and frigate Warren capture British Hibernia and seven other vessels. 1909 Cmdr. Robert E. Peary reports reaching the North Pole. 1917 U.S. declares war on Germany. 1945 First heavy kamikaze attack on ships at Okinawa. 1961 USS Lake Champlain (CV-39) brings oxygen to aid stricken passenger of British liner Queen of Bermuda. 1968 USS New Jersey (BB-62) recommissioned for shore bombardment duty in Vietnam. 1993 Branch Navy Hospital Adak responds to crash of civilian Chinese airline providing lifesaving treat ment and medical evacuation of 89 injured passen gers. Only one passenger out of 265 passengers died. April 7 1776 Continental brig Lexington captures British Edward. 1917 Navy takes control of all wireless radio sta tions in the United States. 1942 Navy accepts African-Americans for general service. 1945 First two Navy flight nurses land on an active battlefield (Iwo Jima): Ensign Jane Kendeigh, USNR, and Lt. J.g. Ann Purvis, USN. 1945 Carrier aircraft defeat last Japanese Navy sor tie (Battle of East China Sea); Yamato, the worlds larg est battleship, and five other ships were sunk. 1979 Launching of first Trident submarine, USS Ohio (SSBN-726) at Groton, Conn. April 8 1925 First planned night landings on a carrier, USS Langley (CV-1), by VF-1. 1950 A PB4Y Privateer of VP-26, with 10 men on board, was lost over the Baltic Sea after being attacked by Soviet aircraft. 1951 First of four detonations from Operation Greenhouse nuclear test. April 9 1861 Second relief convoy for Fort Sumter leaves New York Harbor. 1941 Commissioning of USS North Carolina (BB55), that carried nine 16-inch guns. 1943 Re-establishment of Commodore rank. 1959 Four naval aviators, Lt. Col. John Glenn, USMC, Lt. Cmdr. Walter Schirra, Lt. Cmdr. Alan Shepard Jr., and Lt. Malcolm Scott Carpenter, USN, were among the first seven men selected as prospec tive astronauts under Project Mercury a basic pro gram in the development of space exploration and manned orbital flight. April 10 1941 USS Niblack (DD-424), while rescuing survi vors of a torpedoed ship, depth charged the German submarine for the first action between U.S. and German navies of WW II. 1963 During diving tests, USS Thresher (SSN-593) is lost with all hands (112 crew and 12 civilians) east of Cape Cod, Mass. 1966 River patrol boats of River Patrol Force commenced operations on inland waters of South Vietnam. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS It was April Fools Day five years ago. I was in the bath room brushing my hair when Dustin came home from work, dressed in his green flight suit, and told me to sit down. In fact, he brought a kitchen chair into the bathroom for me to use. Trust me, youll need to sit for this one, he said. We were living in Pensacola, Fla. Six weeks earlier, Dustin had called me in the middle of the day and said, The detailer gave me 13 options for my next assignment [spoiler: Bangor, Maine was not one of the options . yet]. He wants us to pick our top six. Detailers are the people responsible for choosing a ser vice members new zip code. Yes, I said choosing. And, yes, even though the detailer gave Dustin options. The word options is smoke and mirrors for what really hap pens: the detailer puts on a blindfold and throws darts at a map. Also, the detailer probably didnt include me in the con versation. As in, he didnt say, Go home and talk about this with your wife and pick your top six. (Remember, if the military wanted them to have wives, theyd issue one.) Us and our were Dustins special touches to soften the blow. In any case, I took the task of choosing our top six seriously. Dustin gave me a folded paper map of the United States, and I promptly marked an enor mous X over three-fourths of the country. I want to go to Virginia, I said. Dustin frowned. Its not one of the options, he said. Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York and Washington statethose were some of the options. For the next several weeks, Dustin and I worked on a rough draft of our top six. This was like choosing a baby name. We each had a finite amount of vetoes as we scratched off and rearranged cities on the list. All the while, of course, I knew the detailers dart and map would ultimately pick our next place to live. In late March I was wash ing our van in the driveway. Youll find this hard to believe, but it was so hot the soap suds sizzled on the concrete. Sweat poured down my cheeks and the back of my neck. Dustin pulled into the drive way and got out of his car like nothing was wrong. When he passed by me, he said casually, Oh, the detailer added Bangor, Maine, as a 14th option. I laughed. Ha! So thats not going in our top six. Dustin stopped mid-step. Actually, I added it as number seven. On a list of six? I turned around and started cleaning the car again. Well, we can remove that before you turn in the final draft. Dustin bit his lip. I kind of turned in the list today. You what? What followed was several hours of me crying and Dustin following me through the house pleading, Theyll never sent me to Bangor, Sarah. I put it seventh on a list of six! He slept on the couch that night. And over and over again, through our closed bedroom door, he said, Think about it; its not even in our top six. Its number seven. Theres no way. Eventually, I started to believe him. Sending us to our excuse me, his seventh option would be ridiculous. Why tell a family to choose their top six and then send them to the surprise seventh? Then, on April Fools Day, Dustin came into the bath room with a kitchen chair and told me to sit down. Were moving to Bangor, Maine, he said. He had no explanation for how it could have happened, except that he was likely the only person who even listed Bangor, Maine, and the detailer had to send some one. So what can we learn from this? Detailers dont care. Husbands cannot be trusted with a rough draft. Detailers dont care. Options means different things to different people. Detailers dont care. The military still hasnt issued wives for a reason. Detailers dont care. April Fools Day is an awful time to tell your wife bad news. Detailers dont care. Never underestimate the militarys ability to surprise and confuse. But, as it turned out, this April Fools joke was on the detailer and military. Maine has been our best duty station yet. We fell in love with the state almost as quickly as the Department of Defense pulled every active-duty sta tion out of the area. And therefore, I consider our move to Maine as one of the greatest gifts Uncle Sam ever gave me. So, put that in your dart and throw it, Detailer!A detailers April Fools Day gift Hey, MoneyChic! Im divorcing my wife of 12 years. We have two children. Besides child support, what financial concerns should I be aware of before I file? MoneyChic Sez: Its in your best interest to hire a lawyer as soon as possible. The Navy Legal Services Office (NLSO) will be able to give you general advice about separation and divorce proceedings -but a JAG officer will not be able to represent you. Divorce is a state matter, not a military or federal matter. Your finances will change after divorce. You may solely assume debts you werent expecting to take over or you may be giving away a larger portion of your check to your wife to help maintain a lifestyle to which she is accustomed. You and your wife may divide property, debts, and other assets as you would like. If there is mutual agreement, a mediator would be a more cost effective resource. It is when you are not able to come to a joint decision when a judge gets involved to divide property. When it comes to child or spousal support, the Naval Personnel Manual (Section 1754-030) provides guidance for determining ade quate support. This is a guide to use for monetary support until your case goes before a judge for final determination. You have been married for 12 years. If you have also been in the service for at least 12 years and the marriage years and service years overlap, your wife would be entitled to a portion of your retirement pay or pension. The Uniformed Services Former Spouse Protection Act (USFSPA) is what entitles your wife to a portion of your retirement; she would be considered a 10/10 spouse. This would be in addition to child support, alimony, or maintenance. There are three methods for pension payment to your wife. You can buy her out upfront, the share amount is calculated at divorce, but the funds are delayed until retirement, or the share the ex-spouse receives is calculated at retire ment. Both spouses are responsible for family necessi ties, such as food, shelter, and care of the children. You and your wife should only be responsible for personal debts incurred during the marriage, unless they were made on a joint account. This would also depend on your state and if your state is a com munity property state. (Both spouses are respon sible for all debt no matter who took out the loan.) There isnt a piece of paper that says exactly what has to happen in a divorce. Negotiate for things you want and discuss what you are willing to give up. It would be in your best interest to schedule an appointment for a budget evaluation. A caseworker with NavyMarine Corps Relief Society can help you see what your financial future may look like. Call 542-2832 for more info. Got questions? Email megan.stolle@nmcrs.org

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013 3

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Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert released a video message to the fleet recently about the passage of yet another continuing resolution (CR) and what that means for the fleet. In the video, the Navys top admiral discussed the CR exten sion that the president signed last week putting legislation into effect that will restore Defense Department funds through September. What was projected to be a $9 billion shortfall in the Navys operations accounts will be halved according to Greenert. He explained that the bill will take care of four and a half billion dollar shortfall in operations and that the Navy will have to adjust. He also stated, that sequestration, the reduction of spending in all accounts, remains in place. Were going to move ahead in a very deliberate fashion and decide whats important and fund those most important things, said Greenert. Money will be distrib uted to the fleet and important operations can get underway. Among those priorities Greenert said that the Navys bills will be paid, deployed operations will remain funded and some restora tion and modernization projects will return. So what does this mean to you? For our Sailors, this means your pay will be stable as it has been, our manpower accounts have been stable throughout this tur moil, said Greenert. Were going to get our family readiness programs and Morale, Welfare and Recreation pro grams back on track where they need to be. PCS will remain sta ble throughout all this, so moves should continue apace, he con tinued. Despite other branches reduc ing access to tuition assistance, Greenert stated that he will fight to keep education benefits for Sailors intact. Tuition assistance is still at 100 percent, and Im working to keep it at that level, said Greenert. Thats where I think we need to be. Greenert thanked the Navy civilian workforce for their patience during the turmoil of the last couple of months. Remember, were a team here and we cant function without your dedication, said Greenert. As you may know our fur loughs are being reduced from 22 to 14 days, said Greenert. The Secretary of the Navy and I are working with the Department of Defense staff to keep that as low as possible. Greenert stressed that with a balanced approach to spending, careful planning and the dedica tion of all hands, the Navy will be able to successfully navigate these tumultuous fiscal times. I want you to remember to focus on Warfighting First, Operate Forward and Be Ready, said Greenert. Thank you for your patience, thank you for your professionalism, thank you for your service. The VP-26 Tridents will take a brief pause in their preparation for deployment on April 5 to transfer command of the squadron from Cmdr. Erik Thors to Cmdr. Mark Sohaney. Sohaney hails from Emmaus, Pa., and currently serves as executive officer of the squad ron. Prior to his assignment at VP-26, he served as execu tive assistant to the Director for Strategic Planning and Policy (J-5) and country director for Australia and New Zealand at U.S. Pacific Command. His previous assignments include VP-9 and VP-47 at MCB Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, Commander, Carrier Strike Group Five aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63), VP-30 in Jacksonville, and as an enlist ed sonar technician on USS Lake Champlain (CG-57) home ported in San Diego. For the coming year, Sohaney will assume the role of Commander, Task Group 72.2 and 72.4, leading 18 P-3C Orion combat aircrews and the Trident maintenance depart ment during the VP-26 deploy ment to U.S. 7th Fleet.Thors, a native of Pacifica, Calif., previously served as VP-26 executive officer and assumed command of the squadron on May19, 2012. He led the Tridents through a U.S. 5th Fleet deployment to Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar and Sheik Isa Air Base, Bahrain as well as a demanding Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle (IDRC). During the IDRC, Thors oversaw the successful com pletion of multiple maritime joint readiness exercises and executed 19 consecutive days of 24-hour flight operations, maintenance and readiness in response to a deployed Russian submarine. Thors next assignment will take him back to Bahrain to assume duties as chief of staff for Commander, Task Force 57. Fair winds and following seas skipper Thors your Trident family will miss you. The Maritime Patrol Association (MPA) web site is now accepting registrations for its 2013 MPA Symposium April 18 -19 at NAS Jacksonville. The event encompasses two full days of special events that celebrate International Partnerships among aviators, aircrew and maintainers. Symposium attendees can sign up for a host of events, including the Scholarship Golf Tournament and 5K, Flight Suit Social and Heritage Dinner. The Heritage Dinner, which will highlight the inter national partnerships of the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF), will also serve as a ceremony for two new Hall of Honor inductees from the MPRF community. The International Partnerships theme this year has really allowed us to step back and recognize the coop erative efforts of all of our maritime patrol and recon naissance colleagues around the world, said VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens, president of MPA. For more information and to register online, go to: www.maritimepatrolassociation.org/symposium. VP-26 to change command this Friday CNO explains what budget changes mean to youRegister now for 2013 MPA Symposium 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013

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The NAS Jacksonville Flight Line Caf has been select ed runner-up in the annual Capt. Edward F. Ney Award, Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) Large General Mess Category accord ing to a message released by the Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) March 22. It is a pleasure to announce the results of the 2013 Capt. Edward F. Ney Memorial Awards Program for food ser vice excellence. My personal congratulations to all the out standing food service teams, said SECNAV Ray Mabus in the message. I commend the Navy under sea enterprise, surface warfare enterprise, naval aviation enter prise, CNIC and individual com mands for their hard work and commitment to excellence, he continued. The Flight Line Caf staff strives for the best quality ser vice and food for its customers during every meal served. This is a great accomplish ment to be selected as runnerup in the competition and to be named second best Navy galley out of 20 in its category. Our culinary specialists are the best of the best, stated NAS Jax Food Service Officer CWO4 Teresa Cullipher. They have won numer ous culinary competitions in the southeast region and have earned chef certifications which enhance their knowledge and culinary skills. They are the pin nacle of morale at NAS Jax and I couldnt be more proud of our entire team. The team was inspected on all aspects of food service including preparation, presentation and food quality, accountability of records and returns, sanitation, customer service and morale of the crew. Our goal is to provide out standing food service every single meal and ensure our cus tomers have the best nutritional meal possible, added Cullipher. The annual award, co-spon sored by the International Food Service Executives Association, encourages Navy Food Service program excel lence with the goal of improv ing the quality of life for Navy personnel. It is named in honor of Capt. Edward Ney, head of the subsistence division of the Bureau of Supplies and Account from 1940-45. NAS Jax Flight Line Caf earns NEY Award recognition JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013 Nomads earn Battle EFleet Logistics Support Squadron (VR) 62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Tony Scarpino was recently at Marine Corps Air Station Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii flying a Pacific Command (PACOM) mission, when he was notified that the VR-62 Nomads had been awarded the Noel Davis Trophy for 2012. The Noel Davis Trophy is an annual award given by Commander, Naval Air Force Reserve, recognizing battle efficiency (Battle E). VR-62 has now won the Noel Davis Trophy five times in 1997, 1999, 2000, 2007 and 2012. Scarpino commented, VR-62is one of 12 Navy fleet-essential airlift commands based around the country. We operate Navy C-130T Hercules lifters worldwide, providing responsive and rapidly deploy able air logistics support to sustain combat operations at sea.During peacetime, we provide air logistics sup port for all Navy commands. We just love this mission. This is great news. During FY12, VR-62 had been at NAS Jacksonville only a little more than two years, since moving from NAS Brunswick, Maine in August 2009. Often, when a reserve squadron chang es homeport, the conti nuity of the organization is affected. The geographic change meant a majority of VR-62s Selected Reserve members had to leave the squadron. VR-62 met the challenge: rebuild its entire organization in the new location, while also meeting the demands of normal tasking. Additionally, in 2012, three of the four Nomad C-130 Hercules had to be upgraded with new avi onics and propeller con trol systems. VR-62 used this unique leadership opportunity to develop new operational procedures for the entire Navy C-130 fleet. VR-62 instructor pilots, using engineering working Photos courtesy of VR-62

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013 7 papers and their own professional expertise, devised systems training and orientation flights for the squad ron. VR-62s systems, process, and training method ologies then helped the NAVAIR Airworthiness Office produce new flight clearances and new publications for the Avionics and Propeller Control Systems. As the first fleet operator of the new systems, the Nomads went on to train other C-130T squadrons for the Navy. In FY12, the Nomads flew 2,448 flight hours, mis hap-free, delivering 2,231 personnel and 3.25 million pounds of cargo to the fleet. In addition to the squadrons Naval Aviation Logistics Office tasking, the Nomads operated in the Central Command and PACOM areas of responsibility (AOR) for 222 days in support of Operations Enduring Freedom, New Dawn, Vigilant Mariner, and others. In those AORs, Nomads flew 875.1 hours and completed 196 missions, delivering 1,410 personnel, and 2.4 mil lion pounds of cargo. The VR-62 Nomads focused on the fundamentals in a time of rapid change. Recognition with the 2012 Noel Davis Battle E Trophy honors all who went the extra mile during a challenging year. The Noel Davis Trophy is named in honor of Lt. Cmdr. Noel Davis, U.S. Naval Reserve. A graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy and Harvard Law School, Noel Davis assumed command of the first station for Naval Reserve Aviation in 1924, and later took com mand of all Naval Reserve flying. In 1927, he prepared a Keystone Pathfinder aircraft, nicknamed American Legion, for the first nonstop flight attempt from New York to Paris. Regrettably, Davis was killed in a plane crash on April 27, while preparing for that flight. Twenty-four days later, Charles Lindbergh and his Spirit of St. Louis landed safely in Paris. The Noel Davis Trophy, donated to the Navy Department by Harry Guggenheim, was first presented in 1927. A plaque will be presented to VR-62, with the per manent trophy on display at Commander, Naval Air Force Reserve headquarters. VR-62

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schoolhouse and on the shop floor, with the added opportunity to work along side USN maintainers in the hangar. Our neighbors will be HSM-72 and HSM-74. We look forward to watching HSM-74 because, like us, theyre also transitioning from the classic Bravo to the new Romeo, said Frost. By the time 725 Squadron returns to Australia in 2015, about 65 maintainers will be qualified to service and repair the MH-60R. The squadron will receive support on every aspect of the Romeo acquisition, including hardware, software, publica tions, spare parts, weapons and logistics support. Cmdr. Pierce and his CNATTU staff were most helpful in adapting the course ware to reflect the two RAN enlisted avia tion rates avionics and airframes ver sus five USN aviation rates (AD, AM, AE, AT and AO), said Frost. RAN aircrew will also be training at NS Mayport with HSM-40, the fleet replace ment squadron for HSMWINGLANT. Our Australian Seahawk aircrew con figuration is different from USN squad rons. We have a pilot in the right seat, a tactical coordinator/mission commander in the left seat, and a sensor operator in the cabin behind them, explained Frost.We are loving the support that our maintainers and aircrew are getting at NAS Jax and NS Mayport. Everybodys excited about learning this new platform and ulti mately returning to Australia with a higher level of interoperability with our allies. Frost went on to say that RAN squad rons designated with a 7 are training squadrons and those with an 8 are oper ational squadrons. Currently, RAN oper ates only one helicopter squadron (816, equipped with the Bravo variant) that is responsible for both training and opera tional units. Under the new construct for Romeo, 725 Squadron will take on training responsi bilities, as 816 Squadron concentrates on supporting the fleet by primarily serving on board RAN frigates and destroyers. Pierce said, Were pleased to host our Australian allies and begin building a new partnership centered on the MH-60R Seahawk. Weve worked on this program with NAVAIR and the Australian advance team for little more than a year. Our weekly teleconferences with all the play ers ensured that every parameter was met and everything was in place for the arrival of RAN maintainers. Most importantly, we met the challenge of adapting and val idating the curriculum and training aids from USN to RAN standards. Frost added, These maintenance train ing units are complete game-changers for how we instruct our people to take care of helicopters. By embedding our men and women with USN Romeo squadrons, we can accelerate our training, safety and quality assurance. Originally commissioned in 1943, the 725 Squadron decommissioned in 1975 with a strong record of success. RAN 725 Squadron is scheduled to re-commission in early 2015 and will operate solely as a helicopter training squadron much like a fleet replacement squadron in the USN. In addition to the MH-60R Seahawk, CNATTU Jax provides career C school training for maintainers of the P-8A Poseidon, P-3C Orion, and aviation sup port equipment. TRAININGE9 were created, giving birth to both senior and master chiefs. In August 1858, service-wide exami nations were held to decide what chiefs would most qualify for these new advancement positions. CPO Fellow Chief Petty Officers, On April 1st, the U.S. Navy Chiefs mess will cel ebrate 120 years of the United States Chief Petty Officer. We are not only cel ebrating another year of chiefs serving the Navy; we are celebrating everything it means to be the Chief. Our anchors are the symbol of a cul ture and a way of life. Since 1893, chiefs have been charged with the responsi bility of leading sailors to be the best in the world, ready to carry out our navys mission when the nation calls. We welcome that responsibility and lead with honor, courage, and com mitment. As chiefs, its important to remember that we must be all in, all the time because being a chief petty officer is not for the weak of heart or lazy of mind and body. Happy birthday shipmates! I truly appreciate your leadership and the hard work you do every day. Very Respectfully, MCPON(AW/NAC) Mike StevensA message from the Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013

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PROCLAMATIONshould never happen and cannot be tolerated in our Navy and child abuse is in the same category, as well. While April is a month that we look to raise awareness of these issues, we need to remain constantly vigilant to ensure the safety of our children and family mem bers. According to Commander, Navy Installations Command, the Navy recorded more than 1,000 sub stantiated reports of child abuse for fiscal year 2011. While this represents a steady decrease over the past decade, many incidents still go unreported, said Jeanette Werby, CNRSE counseling and advocacy coordinator. There are many reasons that abuse goes unreport ed, Werby said. Many people who know about abuse dont report it because they think its none of their business or are concerned about the stigma a report creates and the damage it may cause to ones career. Also, many children do not report abuse because they worry they will not be believed, have been threatened with further physical harm or simply feel responsible themselves for the abuse. According to Werby, the best way to combat child abuse is to raise awareness. Raising awareness about child abuse underscores that the problem is still here and so are the people who care about its resolution. Affirming at the highest levels that child abuse has serious, long-term out comes for children and their families adds a compel ling dimension to the message that child abuse is unacceptable. Those in leadership roles set the tone and course for awareness, response and intervention, she said. To find out more about how you can help prevent child abuse or to report an incident of child abuse, contact your installations Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC). Like the child abuse prevention and military child proclamation, the Sexual Assault Awareness Month proclamation is intended raise awareness about sexu al assault. Leadership input is of the utmost importance with sexual assault awareness and prevention efforts, said Julie Mooney, regional sex ual assault response coordinator. The Secretary of the Navy established the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office (SAPRO) in 2009 and it has significantly raised awareness. In 2011, SAPRO hosted a SAPR summit with the pri mary focus of raising leaderships awareness of sexual assaults that occur within the ranks and the need for increased prevention efforts. I am optimistic that sup port from leadership in regards to those prevention efforts will have a significant impact on the effective ness of the Navys overall efforts, Mooney said. While raising awareness is one of the primary tools in preventing sexual assault, the Navy SAPR program also focuses on supporting victims. The Navy offers a variety of support services, including clinical counsel ing and legal services. Each installation has a 24-hour SAPR victim advo cate line. These numbers are advertised throughout the installations and may be dialed to ask questions, inquire about resources or report a sexual assault. In addition, each installation has a Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) located at the FFSC to ensure victims receive the support services they need, Mooney said. People may also contact the DoD Safe Helpline at 1-877-995-5247 or via http://www.safe helpline.org Navy Gateway Inns & Suites (NGIS) employees were rec ognized for their outstand ing contributions during their annual awards luncheon at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center March 27. Since the conception of the NGIS branding in the mid2000s, we have made many transitions. We work hard every day to improve the qual ity of service for our custom ers. The work is not easy, but in my opinion, it is the most rewarding job there is. We get to serve the greatest military and civilian team in the world, said NGIS Jax General Manager John Houdek. After lunch, employees watched a video of the Adm. Elmo Zumwalt Five-Star Accreditation and Individual Performance Award cer emony at Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC). The video began with a message from CNIC Vice Adm. William French who stated, In addition to great infrastructure and great facilities, we have the best staff available to provide quality service to each one of our guests. In addition, our NGIS and all of our busi ness lodging together save the Navy about $480 million a year. Congratulations on a great day and I wish I could be there with all of you. NGIS individual award cat egories included manager of the year, supervisor of the year, associate of the year and housekeeper of the year. Zabiyah Israel of NGIS Jacksonville was selected as housekeeper of the year run ner-up as a result of her superb professionalism, devotion to duty, and outstanding perfor mance. Israel received a plaque and letter of appreciation signed by French. The Secretary of the Navy established the Zumwalt Award in 1974 to recognize commands that achieve the highest level of service stan dards. NGIS operations can earn a Three-, Fouror FiveStar rating based on the quality of facilities, amenities, service and financial management. Each year, only half of the Navy installations are inspected. Only commands attaining a Five-Star rating are recog nized as Zumwalt Award win ners. NAS Jacksonville met the Zumwalt Award accreditation standards for 2012. Following a celebratory cake cutting, NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Roy Undersander congratulated the NAS Jax NGIS team on a job extremely well done.NGIS recognizes excellence JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013 9

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Military family teams are forming for the Relay for Life at Fleming Island High School May 3. The event remembers those who have lost their battle with cancer, sup port and encourage those who are fighting, and celebrate those who have survived their battle with cancer. If you are interested, please call Kari Wiese at (207) 730-3294. For more details, visit the Relay for life website at www.relayforlife.org/flem ingislandfl. The team is called JAX MILITARY FAMILIES. Relay For Life: Military families wanted Focus on adjustment of status A green card is evidence of an individual or a resident aliens lawful permanent resi dent (LPR) status in the United States (U.S.). Obtaining a green card is not automatic and not everyone is eligible to obtain a green card. The process can be long and expen sive. Certain relatives of LPRs or U.S. Citizens (USC) are eligible to obtain a green card. The following questions will help determine an individuals eligibility: Where is the relative located? If the rela tive is located outside the U.S., they may have to go through Consular Processing, which includes filing an I-130 (Petition for an Alien Relative) and working with the National Visa Center. For relatives that are located in the U.S., they may be eligible to do an Adjustment of Status Application. Has an I-130 application been filed? Petitioners (the LPR or USC) need to file a petition in order to prove their relatives eli gibility to obtain a green card. The petition is treated like a placeholder in line. Only a certain number of immigrants are able to obtain a green card per year. There are dif ferent quotas based on a persons country of origin and their relationship to the peti tioner. The Visa Bulletin lists the current wait times for individuals seeking a green card.1 Spouses and Children of LPRs and brothers and sisters of USCs have to wait in line before they are eligible to apply to adjust status; that is why they have to file the I-130 and wait their turn before they can file addi tional paperwork. Spouses, minor children and Parents of USCs; however, are consid ered Immediate Relatives, meaning they do not need to wait in line. These individuals, provided they are already in the U.S., are eligible to file for a green card right away. If the I-130 has not previously been filed, it can be filed concurrently with the adjustment of status application package. How did the relative enter the U.S.? If the relative entered the U.S. illegally, with out inspection, then unfortunately, they are unable to apply for a green card at this time (stay tuned for new legislation)! They may be eligible to apply for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals giving them work autho rization if certain conditions are met.2 If a relative entered with a visa, but overstayed the visa, then they are eligible to adjust sta tus if they are married to a USC. It is important to remember that indi viduals coming across the border apply for a visa or permission to enter the country. If someone obtains a visitor visa, they are stating that their intent is to make a short visit to the US, not get married. If a LPR or USC is seeking to get married to a foreign national who travels frequently in and out of the country, they should seek immigration advice, and look into applying for a fianc(e) visa. When the fianc(e) is ready to get mar ried, he/she will enter the U.S. using the fianc(e) visa. Using a tourist visa to come into the U.S. with the intent to get married can be considered Immigration fraud and may be grounds for deportation. Has the relative done anything to make them ineligible to apply to the U.S? Has the relative been convicted of/arrested for any crimes? Was the relative ever stopped at the border, deported, or removed? Did the relative after entering the country ille gally ever leave the country? Has the relative ever put him/herself out as being a USC, such as registering to vote? If there are any doubts as to an individuals eligibility, an attorney should be sought before continuing with the application process. Individuals should collect certified court records, arrest records, etc. and bring them to the attorney to review. Individuals who are unsure of what records exist against them should get an FBI background check and/or submit a G-649 Freedom of Information Act/Privacy Act request to USCIS. Assuming everything is good to go, the Petitioner can move forward with the Adjustment of Status Application Process. A concurrent package would include the fol lowing: All forms are available electronically online at USCIS.gov. It is important to check the site regularly to ensure that you have the most current version of the forms and to get up to date fee information and filing addresses. After filing, USCIS will send a receipt notice. The notice has a case number that can be used to check the applications status online. Service members may call 1-888247-4645 for additional information and/or request that their application be expedited (in exigent circumstances such as deploy ment). Should you have any questions regarding any part of the adjustment of status appli cation process, please contact your nearest legal assistance office. Obtaining a green card 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013

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The Navy announced the 2013 Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) theme of Courage March 25 and issued guidance to focus efforts on awareness and prevention of sexual violence. The Navys Courage theme for the month will support the Department of Defenses theme of We own it . well solve it . together. The goal is to empower commands to take ownership of this problem. Navys recognition of SAAM 2013 is a component of our efforts to build a resilient Navy community. We use the theme of Courage to build the tactics for this years cam paign, said Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, chief of naval per sonnel. Weekly themes will underscore the courage it takes to intervene when shipmates see inappropriate behaviors, as well as the courage to step for ward as a victim to seek help. Its also the courage of ship mates to support victims to make them feel safe in their units and the courage neces sary to do the right thing both for yourself and your ship mates. Each week, the Navy will highlight a subtheme courage to learn, courage to prevent, courage to intervene, courage to support and courage to com mit. Navy installations and com mands around the world will be organizing activities to raise awareness of sexual assault throughout the month. All units are encouraged to par ticipate and promote SAAM events, said Van Buskirk. This year, we are also encouraging Sailors to participate in a video contest to give them the chance to provide a fresh look at how to combat this problem. It provides Sailors an opportunity for personal involvement in communicat ing key messages. Sailors can submit individual and team videos by mail or by uploading them to the FTP site through April 19. Criteria for evaluating entries will include storytelling abil ity, originality, creativity and technical quality. The contest is open to active duty, Reserve and full-time-support Sailors. The winning submission will be broadcast on Directto-Sailor Television and pro vided to the American Forces Network and Pentagon chan nel. Contest rules and proce dures are posted at www.sapr. navy.mil. Sexual Assault Prevention and Response is an important element of the readiness area of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative that consol idates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resil iency and hone the most com bat-effective force in the his tory of the Department. The Department of the Navy is working aggressively to prevent sexual assaults, to support sexual assault victims and to hold offenders account able. For more information read NAVADMIN 075/13 at www.npc.navy.mil and go to www.sapr.navy.mil and click on SAAM 2013.Navy announces SAAM 2013 theme With April being National Alcohol Awareness Month, and April 11 National Alcohol Screening Day, the Military Pathways program is encour aging service members, veterans and their families, to take advantage of the free, anonymous alcohol-use screen ings at www.DrinkingIQ.org. Military Pathways, which offers the online screenings, reports that more than 30,000 screenings for alcohol-use disorders have been completed since it started the program in 2006. The screenings ask individuals to answer a simple set of questions about their drinking habits. After completing a screening, service members receive feedback as to whether their symptoms are consistent with alcohol misuse as well as a list of resources on how and where to get further evaluation and help. All branches of the military have pro grams where service members can get treatment for substance abuse prob lems. Visitors to the site can also access a host of articles, videos, and other infor mation that gives them, among other things, tips on how to cut down on alco hol use. Several free, downloadable mobile applications for mental health are also available. Using alcohol to manage a life prob lem, what professionals call self-med icating, is never a good idea. Not only does a drinking problem emerge, the original problem goes unfixed. A suc cessful career in the military means knowing when to draw the line with alcohol, and when to get help when the drinking is out of control, said Robert Ciulla, Ph.D., Mobile Health director for the Defense Departments National Center for Telehealth and Technology. The anonymous self-assessment gives individuals the opportunity to check and see if their drinking is a problem and how to get help or cut back. Military Pathways gives service per sonnel and their families the opportu nity to learn more about mental health and alcohol use through anonymous self-assessments offered online. The program is designed to help indi viduals identify symptoms and access assistance before a problem becomes serious. The self-assessments address alco hol use, PTSD, depression, generalized anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder and adolescent depression. After completing a self-assessment, individuals receive referral informa tion, including TRICARE, Military OneSource, and Veterans Affairs. The program is run by the nonprofit Screening for Mental HealthR and is funded by the Department of Defense with support from the National Center for Telehealth and Technology.Military observes Alcohol Awareness Month in April JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013 11

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Presented by North Florida Sales Big Engine April 12 State of Mind April 19 The Ride April 26Bring your own blanket and chairs. No coolers or outside food/beverages allowed. Every Friday at 7 p.m. outside stage Spring Concert SeriesFor more information call (904) 542-3900 facebook.com/nasjaxmwr Boogie Freaks May 3 7th Street Band May 10 Zero-N May 17 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013 13

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DEWEYSCall 542-3521 Monday Pizza Madness 2 9 p.m., $5 one-topping pizza Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 7 9 p.m., $.50 wings & $7.95 pizza your way Friday Free Entertainment at 7 p.m. April 5 Karaoke Deweys FREE Spring Concert Series 7 p.m. on the outdoor stage April 12 Big Engine April 19 State of Mind April 26 The Ride May 3 Boogie Freaks May 10 7th Street Band May 17 Zero-NFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday change of hours Open 4 10 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m., all-you-can-bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 4 6 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Includes shoe rental & two hours of bowling Sunday Family Day 12 6 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included Friday special $1 games per person 2 5 p.m. Shoe rental not included Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages include bowl ing, shoe rental, kids meals, cake, balloons and more!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 The outdoor pool hours April 1 May 5 Open Monday Friday (lap swim only) 6 a.m. 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 7 p.m. Saturday & Sunday (lap swim only) 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. The water slide, water park and concessions will not be open dur ing lap swim. Learn-to-Swim Program Sign-up at the Gym (the Zone) on May 11, 8 a.m. 3 p.m. Session 1: June 10 20 Session 2 July 8 18 Session 3 July 22 Aug.1 Fitness Center (located above the Youth Activities Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more info, contact Melissa Luehrs at 542-3518/4238 The Gym equipment is temporar ily relocated to The Zone (Bldg. 798) through June 30. Captain Chuck Cornett Navy Run April 6 at 8 a.m., $25 race day entry Zumba Party April 4, 11 a.m. 12 p.m. Humvee Pull April 4 at 2 p.m. Athletic shoe and apparel sale April 4 6, 9 a.m. 6 p.m. Sign-up at www.1stplacesports. com Call 542-2930/3518I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Daytona International Speedway NASCAR Subway Firecracker July 5 & Coke 400 July 6 Jacksonville Sharks $25, section 100 Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts Dark Side Of The Moon (Pink Floyd) April 13 at 7:30 p.m. Section A $33; Section B $28; Section C $23 A Lamb Chop Celebration April 20 at 7:30 p.m. Section A $18; Section B $14; Section C $11 Legoland Kids go FREE with an adult ticket purchase from ITT Funkfest At Metropolitan Park May 10 11 2-day ticket $52 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid through June 3 Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7 Blockout Dates: March 23 April 5 Call for pricing Orlando Magic Tickets, $18 $268 Jacksonville Symphony, $27.50 Entertainment Books, $30 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zip line Live Broadway Series Anthony Bourdain April 24, $50 $70 Celtic Woman May 2, $44 $134 American Idiot May 14 & 15, $25 $62 Dream Girls May 21 Cesar Millan June 1, $42 $52 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation code #62 Now booking all-inclusive Sandals and Super-Clubs Resorts vacations MOSH, $7 $12 Blue Man Group in Orlando $59.50 includes City Walk venue New Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute 4-day hop per, $153.25 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid mil itary ID. Admission valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets available at ITT through March 31, & must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about special discounted tickets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park, One-day pass $30, Gold pass $71 Wet N Wild Orlando, $32 $45 Book Shade of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off-property hotels near attractions at ITT.The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unac companied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Final Four Championship Game April 8 at 8 p.m. Paintball Trip April 20 at 9 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18, includes cart & green fees April 9 & 23 for active duty April 11 & 25 for retirees, DOD personnel and their guests Twilight Special, daily, play 18-holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m. Monday & Tuesday, play 18-holes for $20, cart and green fee includ ed. Open to military, DOD and guests. Not applicable on holi days. Loudmouth Thursday Any golfer wearing Loudmouth shorts or pants plays 18 holes with cart for $20. Open to military, DOD and guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty 31st Annual Bass Tournament April 13 at first light Register at the Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 Auto Skills Center Class April 11 at 6 p.m. 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding. ASE certified mechanic onsite.Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available. Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you. Month of the Military Child Carnival April 20, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Allegheny Softball Field Free games and activities.Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School June 3 July 10 $500 per person 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013

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The legacy of womens con tributions in history came alive for one Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast leader during a ceremony recogniz ing Womens History Month at Fleet Logistics Center Southeast (FLC SE) March 21. Keynote speaker Camille Destafney, NAVFAC Southeast Environmental Business Line Coordinator and Environmental Program Director for Navy Region Southeast, addressed the FLC SE workforce during the event. This years theme is Women Inspiring Innovation through Imagination: Celebrating Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). According to Destafney, given the opportunity to speak about the achievements of women was an honor. I have a love for math and at the time I graduated in the late 1970s, you taught it, said Destafney. I knew my per sonality would not allow me to teach so my counselor suggest ed engineering. Destafney began her envi ronmental engineer career at Naval Construction Battalion Center, Port Hueneme, Calif. where she was the under ground storage tank and instal lation restoration program manager. During her time there, she managed the removal of 65 underground storage tanks and construction of the soil remediation land farm that led to the installation being the first Department of Defense National Environmental Technology Demonstration Site. Being in this job was fun, said Destafney. The actual job site is where the rubber meets the road. Destafney spoke of histori cal women with STEM back grounds and how they paved the way for current and future women of STEM. She described the achieve ments made by Mary G. Ross, who was the first female engi neer at Lockheeds Missiles Systems Division in 1952 and the first known Native American woman to be an engineer; and Flossie WongStaal, one of the worlds fore most authorities in the field of virology who was a pioneering researcher of retroviruses and her team identified the HIV virus as the cause of AIDS. Effective communication and respect of others is essen tial in engineering; without it, Destafney and her teams would not be able to develop solutions that allow U.S. naval forces to train for combat and effectively carry out their mili tary missions while minimiz ing impacts on the environ ment. I am fortunate to have a very interesting job, said Destafney. You never know what the day will bring. She spoke about how the Navy does aerial surveys of the North Atlantic Right Whale during calving season in sup port of this endangered spe cies. The North Atlantic Right Whale travels from New England to the Southeast to have their calves. By knowing where the whales are we can avoid them and prevent ship strikes, explained Destafney. Communication is key, by working with the survey crews and the ships, we can ensure good communications. During the speech, Destafney mentioned there is a saying, We are often afraid of what we do not understand. Ensuring a solid founda tion of STEM subjects can open many opportunities for women in business, said Destafney. One way we can develop and mature our STEM specialty is to mentor young women and children at early ages. According to Destafney, making STEM subjects fun and appealing to children will dis solve the stigma attached and invite new ideas with free flow ing thought processes to cata pult STEM fields into everyday life. As women, we are strong and can achieve greatness in whatever we do, said Destafney. Just dont give up; seek advice from others, learn from our founding leaders and help others to become success ful. NAVFAC Southeast, inspiring others during Womens History Month If you are retiring or separating from active duty and need assistance with submitting claims for disability and compensation to the Veterans Administration (VA), you can start up to one year prior to retiring/separating getting medical information in order. AMVETS is the Veterans Service Organization advocate for separating or retir ing service members and their families pro viding assistance with submission of claims to the VA for benefits, disabilities and com pensation. All assistance is free and you are not required to become a member of AMVETS. For more information, call David Sanders at 542-2834 or email david.d.sanders@navy.mil .VA disability assistance available JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013 15

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Battle of Midway Commemorative Dinner June 1, 2013 World Golf Village Renaissance Resort Keynote: Adm. William Gortney, commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command Dinner at 6 p.m. Active Duty E6 and below $25E7 to O3 $35 O4 to O5 $45O6 & above $65For more information, contact Bob Price At (904) 246-9982, e-mail: bpricex4@comcast.net or Bill Dudley at (904) 806-4712, E-mail: anuday00@aol.com. Tickets may also be purchased at www.midwaydinner.orgUniform for O4 and above is dinner dress white jacket. For O3 and below, dinner dress white/dinner dress white jacket optional. Civilian is black tie or business attirewww.midwaydinner.org Sponsored by Geertsema and Zahner crowned 2013 Captains Cup Singles Tennis Champs Seventeen men and four women participated in the 2013 Captains Cup Mens and Womens Tennis Tournament at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts March 25. Because there were so many men playing in the tournament, they were split up into five pools of three and four players for each pool. The top eight players from the five pools advanced to a single elimination tournament to determine first, second and third place. After eight matches were played, Cameron Geertsema of Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) won the 2013 Captains Cup Mens Singles Tennis Tournament. Brad Youngers of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) finished second and Vien Tran of FRCSE finished third. The women played a double elimination tourna ment with Shea Zahner of NAVFAC winning the 2013 Captains Cup Womens Singles tournament followed by Amanda Foster, also of NAVFAC, in second and Vanessa Givens of Navy Region Southeast in third. 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013 17 Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS) Garnishment Operations in Cleveland processes all court-ordered garnishments for military members, military retirees and Department of Defense (DoD) civilian employees. Types of garnishment include: child support, alimony, commercial debts, Chapter 13 and 7 bankruptcy orders, and division of military retired pay under the Uniformed Services Former Spouses Protection Act. Child support and alimony The Consumer and Credit Protection Act (CCPA) limits the amount that can be garnished for child support or ali mony to a percentage of an individuals disposable pay. Disposable pay (pay) are wages, salary, bonuses and incentive pay less authorized deductions, such as income tax withholding or debts owed to the government. The maximum per centage that can be deducted from pay is as follows: 50 percent when the obligor pro vides more than half the support of dependents, other than those for whom the support is to be deducted, and has not accrued an arrearage (back pay). 55 percent when the obligor pro vides more than half the support of dependents, other than those for whom the support is to be deducted, and has accrued an arrearage. 60 percent when the obligor does not support other dependents and has not accrued an arrearage. 65 percent when the obligor does not support other dependents and has accrued an arrearage. If the ordered amount of child support or alimony is lower than the maximum percentage allowable, then the full amount will be deducted. Commercial debt Active duty members are typically not subject to garnishment for commercial debt; however, they can be forced to set up involuntary allotments. The percent age cap cannot total more than 25 per cent of pay. If there is no pay available to comply with the court order due to gar nishments for child support or alimony, DFAS will return the garnishment order without action, and the creditor will have to re-apply when there is sufficient pay available. Involuntary withholding for the col lection of a commercial debt from civil service employees is limited to a maxi mum of 25 percent of pay. If the governing state caps the per centage at a lower rate, then that rate prevails. Orders for child support, ali mony and related arrearages have priority over any commercial garnish ment. Retired military or civil service mem bers pay is exempt from garnishment for commercial debts; however, pay due pursuant to the Uniformed Services Former Spouses Protection Act, child support, spousal support, or a property division can be garnished. Taxes If DFAS is served with a levy by the Internal Revenue Service, DFAS must honor the tax levy irrespective of wheth er the obligor is active duty or retired. In the case of garnishments, the collection action is mandatory and any rebuttal concerning the levy must be addressed with the IRS. Levies are continuous, and collection will run until the entire amount is either collected or the IRS informs DFAS that they are released from collecting the levy amount. Bankruptcy DFAS can withhold up to 100 percent of the obligors pay. If DFAS withholds 50 percent for child support, DFAS will withhold the remaining 50 percent of pay for the bankruptcy order. The auto matic stay provisions of the bankruptcy law require that all commercial garnish ments, involuntary allotments and debt collections stop once a person files for bankruptcy; however, child support, ali mony, and their arrearages do not ter minate. Garnishments are very complicated. For more information, please visit DFAS website at http://www.dfas.mil/garnish ment or contact your nearest legal assis tance office. Navy Gateway Inns and Suites While budget cuts and travel restrictions con tinue to challenge missions for military and civilian travelers alike, there are many benefits to staying at Navy Gateway Inns and Suites (NGIS) for your official lodging needs. Value, convenience, great accommodations, service and very affordable rates are the foundation of the NGIS lodging program. NGIS offers affordable lodging rates that support the recent reduction of command travel expens es. Lodging rates range from $25/night $65/ night with varying rates depending on location. Supporting NGIS ensures that travel funds provide the opportunity for improvements to NGIS services and facilities for our war fighting community. Generally, NGIS lodging facilities will save guests between 40 to 65 percent off comparable civil ian accommodations. In-room amenities include Internet access, air conditioning, cable TV with a premium channel, a DVD or VCR, telephone ser vice, microwave and refrigerator. Youll also have housekeeping service, vending machines and guest laundry facilities as well as handicapped accessible and non-smoking rooms. Free in-room coffee and newspapers as well as convenient on-base parking are also available during your stay. Staying at NGIS not only provides great lodging at great prices but it also offers the convenience of other base amenities. You can visit the Navy Exchange, Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) activities with discounted tickets for area attrac tions and swimming pools, golf courses, beach es, movie theaters, youth centers, and other great MWR activities right outside your door. If youre looking for catering and conferencing needs, please contact the host region for particulars on reserving a conference center. For reservations, call 1-877-NAVY-BED (1-877628-9233) or online at www.dodlodging.net Defense Finance and Accounting Service garnishments explained

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Free tax assistanceFrom staff REAL$ENSE (United Way) is offering free tax preparation service Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Building 13 (sec ond floor) at the NAS Jax Main Gate. Appointments are rec ommended for weekdays although walk-ins will be helped. Saturday is walkin availability only. To make an appointment, call 729-2119 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013

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Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2013: To register for any of the above workshops please contact 5425745.Fleet and Family Support Center offers life skills workshops JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013 19

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013 The debate over the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) disability claims backlog has been raging the past few weeks in the media, partially sparked by comments made by speakers at The American Legions Washington Conference last month. The American Legion opposes any plan that would give some wartime veterans priority over others in filing claims for VA benefits On March 24, VA Secretary Eric Shinseki gave his first television inter view in four years on CNNs State of the Union program. That same day, the Legion executive director in Washington, Peter Gaytan, weighed in on the same show, which focused on the claims backlog. Gaytan told CNN host Candy Crowley that the Legion is working with VA to fix the claims process, and that the crux of the problem is inconsistent perfor mance of VA regional offices in adjudi cating claims. Once the problems at those region al offices are addressed, the back log should be reduced substantially, Gaytan said. In 2010, the Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) had about 509,000 claims pending with 39 per cent in backlog (pending more than 125 days). Currently, VBAs figures show about 900,000 claims pending with more than 70 percent in backlog. James E. Koutz, the Legions nation al commander, said, We dont need a presidential commission to figure out how to solve the backlog. Adding another layer of bureaucracy wont get benefits to our veterans any faster. Koutz also challenged the idea of prioritizing claims applications on the basis of war era. Not only does prioritization based on war era violate federal law, it imposes value judgments on the wartime service of veterans. Do we really want to make that kind of call? Is this something that would help to simplify the claims pro cess? We need to honor the service of all veterans by giving them all fair and timely access to the benefits they are due under the law. On March 20, The American Legion submitted a statement for the record to Congress that included three spe cific recommendations for reducing the claims backlog: VA employees, which currently gives the same credit for work, whether it is correct or incorrect. mon errors made in claims process ing, and use the information to create a training plan for employees. claims, in order to increase understand ing of the military among those who are interpreting claims files. The American Legion has more than 2,500 accredited claims representatives nationwide who assist veterans in filing their VA disability claims. It also has more than a dozen full-time employees who help veterans appeal claims that have been denied by VA. Veterans with Apple or Android smart phones can download The American Legions Claims Coach app at www. legion.org to find the nearest Legion service officer, who can assist with fil ing a VA claim. Legion: Change VA claims process, not priorities The Defense Commissary Agency has been chosen by the Produce for Better Health Foundation as one of their retail fruits and veggies champions for 2012. Every year, Produce for Better Health names the top retailers that supported their Fruits & Veggies More Matters national campaign. In 2012, DeCA was among 15 retailers chosen as leaders in the produce world. We take our militarys health very seriously, and supporting this campaign to eat more fruits and vegetables is a great way to get our patrons interested, said Joseph Jeu, DeCA director and CEO. It also speaks to the commissarys commitment to provide healthful options for military families. The Produce for Better Health Foundation measured the agency against criteria such as how DeCA pro moted national Fruits & Veggies More Matters Month and supported the cam paign through its website, in print and through online circulars. All retailers were evaluated against the same criteria. We help our customers realize the importance of fruits and vegetables in their daily diet, said Bridget Bennett, DeCAs produce category manager. Our produce teams are always sup porting healthful options for snacks, meal solutions and quick convenience in our ready to eat selections. The commissaries have been honored by the foundation before. In 2010 and 2011, the commissaries were designated as role models. This is the first time that it has been chosen as a champion. All 15 retailers will be recognized at a luncheon held during the general ses sion of PBHs annual conference in San Francisco. In 2012, Produce Retailer magazine also selected DeCA as its Retailer of the Year, another nod to the agencys pro duce excellence. We are proud to receive this recogni tion, said Jeu. We work hard to make sure our cus tomers have great produce to choose from and this award just proves that we are on the right path. Commissaries selected fruits, veggies champions The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is looking for youth leaders who are dedicated to public ser vice, who are making a difference in their communities, and who want to expand their impact as national advo cates for youth disaster preparedness. Youth between the ages of 12 and 17 interested in strengthen the nations resiliency against disasters may now apply or be nominated to serve on FEMAs Youth Preparedness Council. Participants will represent the youth perspective on emergency prepared ness and share information with their communities. Those interested may apply directly or be nominated by an adult by sub mitting a completed application form, a narrative, and a letter of recommen dation. Visit www.ready.gov/youthpreparedness to access the application materials and instructions. Applications and supporting materi als must be received by midnight April 19, 2013. Youth Preparedness Council mem bers will attend the 2013 Youth Preparedness Council Summit and meet with emergency management leadership and national organiza tions dedicated to youth preparedness to discuss individual and community preparedness. Council members will participate in regular conference calls with FEMA and will complete a youth preparedness project of their choosing. Engaging youth is an integral step in preparing the nation for all hazards, said FEMAs Region IV Administrator Phil May. Youth have a unique ability to influ ence their peers and families to be more resilient and play an important role in disaster preparedness, during and after a crisis. Benjamin Cookeof Memphis, Tenn.,represented FEMAs Region IV on the 2012 Youth Preparedness Council. He frequently spoke to diverse groups of youth about the need for emergency preparedness and volunteered at the Memphis Virginia Hospital. He has par ticipated in community initiatives such as Get Ready Shelby and Go Green Memphis. The J. Wayne and Delores Barr Weaver Veterans Emergency and Transition Services Fund provides emergency financial assistance and resources to veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom that will help to support their transition into civilian life and stabili zation into the community. This financial assistance is provided directly to the veterans of these wars. The geographic service area is: Duval, Clay, Nassau, Baker and St. Johns coun ties. Types of emergency needs we help with but not strictly limited to: vehicle payment or repair, insurance ing to find work or learn a life skill For more information, contact a Red Cross Military Services caseworker at 246-1395.Financial aid available for veteransFEMA seeks applicants for Youth Preparedness CouncilVehicle fuel-saving tips Rising fuel costs are on continually on the minds of most Americans these days. Sure, you can simply stop driving, but for most consumers, thats not an option. You can change your driving habits, as well as performing simple and inexpensive vehicle maintenance. Taking these steps will not only save gas money, but will improve a vehicles safety and dependability. The most common ene mies of fuel efficiency are under-inflated tires, dirty air filters, worn-out spark plugs and a damaged gas cap. vehicles have gas caps that are either damaged, loose or are missing alto gether, causing 147 mil lion gallons of gas to vaporize every year. inflated properly, its like driving with the parking brake on, and can cost a mile or two per gallon. either four, six or eight spark plugs, which fire as many as three million times each 1,000 miles. A dirty spark plug causes misfiring, which wastes fuel. clogged with dirt, dust and bugs chokes off the air and creates a rich air-fuel mixture which wastes gas and causes the engine to lose power. Replacing a clogged air filter can improve gas mileage by as much as 10 percent. lowers gas mileage by as much as 22 percent on the highway and five percent on city streets. at idle gets zero miles per gallon. Letting the vehicle warm up for one to two minutes is sufficient. rapidly at speeds above 60 mph. To get the best possible miles-per-gallon on the highway, use your cruise control. Last year, vehicle check-up events con ducted throughout the country revealed that nearly nine out of 10 cars required some type of maintenance. This reinforces the need for the motoring public to become more aware of the maintenance needs of their vehicle to save money, conserve energy, improve highway safety and help protect the envi ronment. Every motorist can receive a free 56-page car care guide that takes the guesswork out of vehicle maintenance by visiting www.carcare.org.

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The Department of Defense yester day released updated policies and pro cedures March 29 aimed at combat ing sexual assaults in the military and improving care for victims. Senior defense officials said the updated policies and procedures pro vide a framework that improves safety for sexual assault victims, standardizes victim-assistance services across the force, enhances prevention efforts and provides victims added confidence to come forward to report assaults and seek treatment. Todays release of an updated pol icy directive underscores the depart ments commitment to combating sexual assault on every level with in the military, said Army Maj. Gen. Gary Patton, director of DODs Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office (SAPRO). SAPRO officials said the policy changes came about through a coor dinated effort among the services, the National Guard Bureau, the DOD inspector general, military healthcare providers, chaplains and the entire DOD community to improve every aspect of the departments response to sexual assault. We have thousands of victims in the armed forces, Air Force Col. Alan R. Metzler, SAPROs deputy director, said in an interview with American Forces Press Service. We need to make sure that we pre vent sexual assault from happening, and when it does, provide a response system that can care for people and hold people accountable so we can get the perpetrators out of the armed forc es. The updated policies incorporate expedited transfers for victims, estab lish a hotline for crisis intervention, and require additional training as well as new, uniform standards for care givers. We have worked with the national certification body and codified into our policy that every victim advocate, every sexual assault response coordinator have a level of training and competence and national certification so that they are providing victims the best quality care, Metzler said. Senior Pentagon officials emphasize that the department has a zero-toler ance policy for sexual assault. In recent weeks, Patton has met with Capitol Hill lawmakers to discuss the departments response to sexual assault, emphasiz ing that the Pentagon needs to do more to combat the crime while welcoming input from outside groups. A goal of the new policies and proce dures is to encourage sexual assault vic tims to have confidence in the system and to come forward and report crimes, which Metzler acknowledged are vast ly under reported. The department takes this seriously, that when a victim tells us that they have been sexually assaulted, we will believe them, he said. We will protect their privacy. They will be able to have help and care because we understand the nature of this crime and we want them to come forward to get help.DOD releases update to SAPR policy V I T A SELF SERVICE 4 Feb 15 Apr 2013 MW F 0830 1600 (Walk ins) TU TH 1100 1600 (Walk ins) TU TH 1600 1900 (by appointments only) LOCATION: NAS JAX RANGER ST BLDG 4, RM#108 (LEGAL BLDG) TAX ASSISTANCE CENTER 904542 8038 Volunteers are still welcomed! Contact center for more information. Active Duty & Dependents Retirees & Dependents, AGI < $57,000 Reservists Activated 30 days+ Pre/de mobilization Entitled Former Spouses JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013 21

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THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013 NEY AWARD VR-62 Z AWARD Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com More than 30 Royal Australian Navy (RAN) maintenance personnel began their jour ney through MH-60R Seahawk helicopter maintenance train ing units April 1 at the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit (CNATTU) Jacksonville. CNATTU Jax Commanding Officer Cmdr. Daryl Pierce greeted RAN 725 Squadron Commanding Officer Cmdr. David Frost and the first group of MH-60R students. Its my pleasure to welcome you to NAS Jacksonville and CNATTU. I envy you because youre the first Australian squadron to transition from the old S-70B to the new highly capable MH-60R Seahawk, said Pierce. Your resident project team has worked with CNATTU master instructors to create a phenomenal syllabus and career opportunity. Enjoy both your classroom and hands-on training, in addi tion to our great Navy lifestyle here in northeast Florida. The training is part of a foreign military sales agreement with the U.S. Navy for 24 MH-60R helicopters. It includes a total package of training, techni cal and logistics support from Helicopter Maritime Strike Wing Atlantic (HSMWINGLANT) at NS Mayport. In December, RAN 725 Squadron will take delivery of its first MH-60R Seahawk heli copters known as the Romeo variant. This will be the first Romeo to come off the Sikorsky pro duction line in New York with a kangaroo painted on its tail, said Frost. In August, well be ready to begin operating from our assigned space in NAS Jacksonville Hangar 1122. Were here to learn in the CPOs celebrate 120th birthdayChief petty officers (CPO) from vari ous commands at NAS Jacksonville gathered to celebrate the 120th CPO Birthday on April 1 by participating in a morning colors event at Building 1. Donning their traditional khaki uni form, they recited the Sailors Creed and the Chiefs Pledge. The chiefs also sang Anchors Aweigh as Navy Band Southeast provided the music. NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd delivered remarks as the CPOs gathered around the flagpole. First and foremost, I want to wish everyone a Happy Birthday. I am truly thankful for all of our brothers and sisters who paved the way for us as we continue to keep our forward thinking fraternity alive, said Shepherd. CPOs are tasked with getting the work done through the junior enlisted Sailors. Additionally, CPOs are responsible to train junior officers about all facets of our Navy and to develop them into great leaders and visionaries, continued Shepherd. Many newly commissioned officers are unfamiliar with the workings of a naval ship, submarine or aircraft as well as the tasks of the department or crew theyre assigned to. The chief briefs the chain of command on what needs to happen to support command mission, rectify issues and how to continue to support our Sailors. Think back to our CPO Creed, those words ring true every day. Shepherd continued, We are essen tially the fulcrum of the organization, which by Websters definition the point or support about which a lever pivots, much like a seesaw. For example, if the chief moves the point (fulcrum) too far in either direction one side officers and the other enlisted, then we change the balance of the fulcrum ultimately giving more care to one and less care to the other. Though we have many duties and unspoken responsibilities, we as CPOs are charged with balancing the com mand, enforcing policy and manag ing the workload. Remember, we will always bring the command back to the centerline, added Shepherd. Long before there were CPOs, supe riority among petty officers on a ship would be decided by the commanding officer (CO). These appointed positions were temporary and the CO had the option to recommend a petty officer to a more permanent position. The official paygrade of CPO was not established until April 1, 1893. Many first class petty officers were shifted to the chief paygrade when the rank was created. As a result, there was no first CPO. On June 1, 1858, the paygrades E8 and Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr., com mander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE), signed proclamations March 29 in support of child abuse preven tion, sexual assault awareness and the Month of the Military Child. The proclamations coincide with National Child Abuse Prevention Month, National Sexual Assault Prevention Month and the Month of the Militrary Child, which are all recognized during the month of April. These proclamations are in sup port of some very important issues that leaders at all levels in the chain of command should be aware of, Scorby said. Sexual assault is something that Australian Navy maintainers begin Romeo training Scorby signs child abuse prevention, sexual assault awareness and military child proclamations

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013 April 4 1776 Continental Navy frigate Columbus captures HM Tender Hawke, first American capture of a British armed vessel. 1854 Sailors and Marines from sailing sloop, Plymouth, protect U.S. citizens at Shanghai. 1898 Appointment of first Civil Engineering Corps officer, Mordecai Endicott, as chief, Bureau of Yards and Docks. 1949 Establishment of NATO. April 5 1946 USS Missouri (BB-63) arrives in Turkey to return the body of Turkish ambassador to the U.S. and to show U.S. support and willingness to defend Turkey. 1949 The last observation squadron, VO-2, is disestablished, marking the beginning of a plan to use helicopters in place of fixed-wing aircraft aboard battle ships and cruisers. April 6 1776 Sloop-of-war Ranger, frigate Queen of France and frigate Warren capture British Hibernia and seven other vessels. 1909 Cmdr. Robert E. Peary reports reaching the North Pole. 1917 U.S. declares war on Germany. 1945 First heavy kamikaze attack on ships at Okinawa. 1961 USS Lake Champlain (CV-39) brings oxygen to aid stricken passenger of British liner Queen of Bermuda. 1968 USS New Jersey (BB-62) recommissioned for shore bombardment duty in Vietnam. 1993 Branch Navy Hospital Adak responds to crash of civilian Chinese airline providing lifesaving treat ment and medical evacuation of 89 injured passen gers. Only one passenger out of 265 passengers died. April 7 1776 Continental brig Lexington captures British Edward. 1917 Navy takes control of all wireless radio stations in the United States. 1942 Navy accepts African-Americans for general service. 1945 First two Navy flight nurses land on an active battlefield (Iwo Jima): Ensign Jane Kendeigh, USNR, and Lt. J.g. Ann Purvis, USN. 1945 Carrier aircraft defeat last Japanese Navy sortie (Battle of East China Sea); Yamato, the worlds largest battleship, and five other ships were sunk. 1979 Launching of first Trident submarine, USS Ohio (SSBN-726) at Groton, Conn. April 8 1925 First planned night landings on a carrier, USS Langley (CV-1), by VF-1. 1950 A PB4Y Privateer of VP-26, with 10 men on board, was lost over the Baltic Sea after being attacked by Soviet aircraft. 1951 First of four detonations from Operation Greenhouse nuclear test. April 9 1861 Second relief convoy for Fort Sumter leaves New York Harbor. 1941 Commissioning of USS North Carolina (BB55), that carried nine 16-inch guns. 1943 Re-establishment of Commodore rank. 1959 Four naval aviators, Lt. Col. John Glenn, USMC, Lt. Cmdr. Walter Schirra, Lt. Cmdr. Alan Shepard Jr., and Lt. Malcolm Scott Carpenter, USN, were among the first seven men selected as prospec tive astronauts under Project Mercury a basic program in the development of space exploration and manned orbital flight. April 10 1941 USS Niblack (DD-424), while rescuing survi vors of a torpedoed ship, depth charged the German submarine for the first action between U.S. and German navies of WW II. 1963 During diving tests, USS Thresher (SSN-593) is lost with all hands (112 crew and 12 civilians) east of Cape Cod, Mass. 1966 River patrol boats of River Patrol Force commenced operations on inland waters of South Vietnam. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS It was April Fools Day five years ago. I was in the bath room brushing my hair when Dustin came home from work, dressed in his green flight suit, and told me to sit down. In fact, he brought a kitchen chair into the bathroom for me to use. Trust me, youll need to sit for this one, he said. We were living in Pensacola, Fla. Six weeks earlier, Dustin had called me in the middle of the day and said, The detailer gave me 13 options for my next assignment [spoiler: Bangor, Maine was not one of the options . yet]. He wants us to pick our top six. Detailers are the people responsible for choosing a service members new zip code. Yes, I said choosing. And, yes, even though the detailer gave Dustin options. The word options is smoke and mirrors for what really hap pens: the detailer puts on a blindfold and throws darts at a map. Also, the detailer probably didnt include me in the con versation. As in, he didnt say, Go home and talk about this with your wife and pick your top six. (Remember, if the military wanted them to have wives, theyd issue one.) Us and our were Dustins special touches to soften the blow. In any case, I took the task of choosing our top six seriously. Dustin gave me a folded paper map of the United States, and I promptly marked an enor mous X over three-fourths of the country. I want to go to Virginia, I said. Dustin frowned. Its not one of the options, he said. Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York and Washington statethose were some of the options. For the next several weeks, Dustin and I worked on a rough draft of our top six. This was like choosing a baby name. We each had a finite amount of vetoes as we scratched off and rearranged cities on the list. All the while, of course, I knew the detailers dart and map would ultimately pick our next place to live. In late March I was wash ing our van in the driveway. Youll find this hard to believe, but it was so hot the soap suds sizzled on the concrete. Sweat poured down my cheeks and the back of my neck. Dustin pulled into the driveway and got out of his car like nothing was wrong. When he passed by me, he said casually, Oh, the detailer added Bangor, Maine, as a 14th option. I laughed. Ha! So thats not going in our top six. Dustin stopped mid-step. Actually, I added it as number seven. On a list of six? I turned around and started cleaning the car again. Well, we can remove that before you turn in the final draft. Dustin bit his lip. I kind of turned in the list today. You what? What followed was several hours of me crying and Dustin following me through the house pleading, Theyll never sent me to Bangor, Sarah. I put it seventh on a list of six! He slept on the couch that night. And over and over again, through our closed bedroom door, he said, Think about it; its not even in our top six. Its number seven. Theres no way. Eventually, I started to believe him. Sending us to our excuse me, his seventh option would be ridiculous. Why tell a family to choose their top six and then send them to the surprise seventh? Then, on April Fools Day, Dustin came into the bath room with a kitchen chair and told me to sit down. Were moving to Bangor, Maine, he said. He had no explanation for how it could have happened, except that he was likely the only person who even listed Bangor, Maine, and the detailer had to send some one. So what can we learn from this? Detailers dont care. Husbands cannot be trusted with a rough draft. Detailers dont care. Options means different things to different people. Detailers dont care. The military still hasnt issued wives for a reason. Detailers dont care. April Fools Day is an awful time to tell your wife bad news. Detailers dont care. Never underestimate the militarys ability to surprise and confuse. But, as it turned out, this April Fools joke was on the detailer and military. Maine has been our best duty station yet. We fell in love with the state almost as quickly as the Department of Defense pulled every active-duty sta tion out of the area. And therefore, I consider our move to Maine as one of the greatest gifts Uncle Sam ever gave me. So, put that in your dart and throw it, Detailer!A detailers April Fools Day gift Hey, MoneyChic! Im divorcing my wife of 12 years. We have two children. Besides child support, what financial concerns should I be aware of before I file? MoneyChic Sez: Its in your best interest to hire a lawyer as soon as possible. The Navy Legal Services Office (NLSO) will be able to give you general advice about separation and divorce proceedings -but a JAG officer will not be able to represent you. Divorce is a state matter, not a military or federal matter. Your finances will change after divorce. You may solely assume debts you werent expecting to take over or you may be giving away a larger portion of your check to your wife to help maintain a lifestyle to which she is accustomed. You and your wife may divide property, debts, and other assets as you would like. If there is mutual agreement, a mediator would be a more cost effective resource. It is when you are not able to come to a joint decision when a judge gets involved to divide property. When it comes to child or spousal support, the Naval Personnel Manual (Section 1754-030) provides guidance for determining ade quate support. This is a guide to use for monetary support until your case goes before a judge for final determination. You have been married for 12 years. If you have also been in the service for at least 12 years and the marriage years and service years overlap, your wife would be entitled to a portion of your retirement pay or pension. The Uniformed Services Former Spouse Protection Act (USFSPA) is what entitles your wife to a portion of your retirement; she would be considered a 10/10 spouse. This would be in addition to child support, alimony, or maintenance. There are three methods for pension payment to your wife. You can buy her out upfront, the share amount is calculated at divorce, but the funds are delayed until retirement, or the share the ex-spouse receives is calculated at retirement. Both spouses are responsible for family necessi ties, such as food, shelter, and care of the children. You and your wife should only be responsible for personal debts incurred during the marriage, unless they were made on a joint account. This would also depend on your state and if your state is a com munity property state. (Both spouses are respon sible for all debt no matter who took out the loan.) There isnt a piece of paper that says exactly what has to happen in a divorce. Negotiate for things you want and discuss what you are willing to give up. It would be in your best interest to schedule an appointment for a budget evaluation. A caseworker with NavyMarine Corps Relief Society can help you see what your financial future may look like. Call 542-2832 for more info. Got questions? Email megan.stolle@nmcrs.org

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Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert released a video message to the fleet recently about the passage of yet another continuing resolution (CR) and what that means for the fleet. In the video, the Navys top admiral discussed the CR exten sion that the president signed last week putting legislation into effect that will restore Defense Department funds through September. What was projected to be a $9 billion shortfall in the Navys operations accounts will be halved according to Greenert. He explained that the bill will take care of four and a half billion dollar shortfall in operations and that the Navy will have to adjust. He also stated, that sequestration, the reduction of spending in all accounts, remains in place. Were going to move ahead in a very deliberate fashion and decide whats important and fund those most important things, said Greenert. Money will be distributed to the fleet and important operations can get underway. Among those priorities Greenert said that the Navys bills will be paid, deployed operations will remain funded and some restoration and modernization projects will return. So what does this mean to you? For our Sailors, this means your pay will be stable as it has been, our manpower accounts have been stable throughout this tur moil, said Greenert. Were going to get our family readiness programs and Morale, Welfare and Recreation pro grams back on track where they need to be. PCS will remain sta ble throughout all this, so moves should continue apace, he con tinued. Despite other branches reduc ing access to tuition assistance, Greenert stated that he will fight to keep education benefits for Sailors intact. Tuition assistance is still at 100 percent, and Im working to keep it at that level, said Greenert. Thats where I think we need to be. Greenert thanked the Navy civilian workforce for their patience during the turmoil of the last couple of months. Remember, were a team here and we cant function without your dedication, said Greenert. As you may know our fur loughs are being reduced from 22 to 14 days, said Greenert. The Secretary of the Navy and I are working with the Department of Defense staff to keep that as low as possible. Greenert stressed that with a balanced approach to spending, careful planning and the dedica tion of all hands, the Navy will be able to successfully navigate these tumultuous fiscal times. I want you to remember to focus on Warfighting First, Operate Forward and Be Ready, said Greenert. Thank you for your patience, thank you for your professionalism, thank you for your service. The VP-26 Tridents will take a brief pause in their preparation for deployment on April 5 to transfer command of the squadron from Cmdr. Erik Thors to Cmdr. Mark Sohaney. Sohaney hails from Emmaus, Pa., and currently serves as executive officer of the squad ron. Prior to his assignment at VP-26, he served as execu tive assistant to the Director for Strategic Planning and Policy (J-5) and country director for Australia and New Zealand at U.S. Pacific Command. His previous assignments include VP-9 and VP-47 at MCB Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii, Commander, Carrier Strike Group Five aboard USS Kitty Hawk (CV-63), VP-30 in Jacksonville, and as an enlist ed sonar technician on USS Lake Champlain (CG-57) home ported in San Diego. For the coming year, Sohaney will assume the role of Commander, Task Group 72.2 and 72.4, leading 18 P-3C Orion combat aircrews and the Trident maintenance depart ment during the VP-26 deployment to U.S. 7th Fleet.Thors, a native of Pacifica, Calif., previously served as VP-26 executive officer and assumed command of the squadron on May19, 2012. He led the Tridents through a U.S. 5th Fleet deployment to Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar and Sheik Isa Air Base, Bahrain as well as a demanding Inter-Deployment Readiness Cycle (IDRC). During the IDRC, Thors oversaw the successful com pletion of multiple maritime joint readiness exercises and executed 19 consecutive days of 24-hour flight operations, maintenance and readiness in response to a deployed Russian submarine. Thors next assignment will take him back to Bahrain to assume duties as chief of staff for Commander, Task Force 57. Fair winds and following seas skipper Thors your Trident family will miss you. The Maritime Patrol Association (MPA) web site is now accepting registrations for its 2013 MPA Symposium April 18 -19 at NAS Jacksonville. The event encompasses two full days of special events that celebrate International Partnerships among aviators, aircrew and maintainers. Symposium attendees can sign up for a host of events, including the Scholarship Golf Tournament and 5K, Flight Suit Social and Heritage Dinner. The Heritage Dinner, which will highlight the international partnerships of the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF), will also serve as a ceremony for two new Hall of Honor inductees from the MPRF community. The International Partnerships theme this year has really allowed us to step back and recognize the cooperative efforts of all of our maritime patrol and reconnaissance colleagues around the world, said VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens, president of MPA. For more information and to register online, go to: www.maritimepatrolassociation.org/symposium. VP-26 to change command this Friday CNO explains what budget changes mean to youRegister now for 2013 MPA Symposium 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013

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The NAS Jacksonville Flight Line Caf has been select ed runner-up in the annual Capt. Edward F. Ney Award, Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) Large General Mess Category accord ing to a message released by the Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) March 22. It is a pleasure to announce the results of the 2013 Capt. Edward F. Ney Memorial Awards Program for food ser vice excellence. My personal congratulations to all the out standing food service teams, said SECNAV Ray Mabus in the message. I commend the Navy under sea enterprise, surface warfare enterprise, naval aviation enter prise, CNIC and individual commands for their hard work and commitment to excellence, he continued. The Flight Line Caf staff strives for the best quality ser vice and food for its customers during every meal served. This is a great accomplish ment to be selected as runnerup in the competition and to be named second best Navy galley out of 20 in its category. Our culinary specialists are the best of the best, stated NAS Jax Food Service Officer CWO4 Teresa Cullipher. They have won numer ous culinary competitions in the southeast region and have earned chef certifications which enhance their knowledge and culinary skills. They are the pinnacle of morale at NAS Jax and I couldnt be more proud of our entire team. The team was inspected on all aspects of food service including preparation, presentation and food quality, accountability of records and returns, sanitation, customer service and morale of the crew. Our goal is to provide out standing food service every single meal and ensure our customers have the best nutritional meal possible, added Cullipher. The annual award, co-spon sored by the International Food Service Executives Association, encourages Navy Food Service program excel lence with the goal of improv ing the quality of life for Navy personnel. It is named in honor of Capt. Edward Ney, head of the subsistence division of the Bureau of Supplies and Account from 1940-45. NAS Jax Flight Line Caf earns NEY Award recognition JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013 Nomads earn Battle EFleet Logistics Support Squadron (VR) 62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Tony Scarpino was recently at Marine Corps Air Station Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii flying a Pacific Command (PACOM) mission, when he was notified that the VR-62 Nomads had been awarded the Noel Davis Trophy for 2012. The Noel Davis Trophy is an annual award given by Commander, Naval Air Force Reserve, recognizing battle efficiency (Battle E). VR-62 has now won the Noel Davis Trophy five times in 1997, 1999, 2000, 2007 and 2012. Scarpino commented, VR-62is one of 12 Navy fleet-essential airlift commands based around the country. We operate Navy C-130T Hercules lifters worldwide, providing responsive and rapidly deployable air logistics support to sustain combat operations at sea.During peacetime, we provide air logistics support for all Navy commands. We just love this mission. This is great news. During FY12, VR-62 had been at NAS Jacksonville only a little more than two years, since moving from NAS Brunswick, Maine in August 2009. Often, when a reserve squadron chang es homeport, the conti nuity of the organization is affected. The geographic change meant a majority of VR-62s Selected Reserve members had to leave the squadron. VR-62 met the challenge: rebuild its entire organization in the new location, while also meeting the demands of normal tasking. Additionally, in 2012, three of the four Nomad C-130 Hercules had to be upgraded with new avi onics and propeller con trol systems. VR-62 used this unique leadership opportunity to develop new operational procedures for the entire Navy C-130 fleet. VR-62 instructor pilots, using engineering working Photos courtesy of VR-62

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013 7 papers and their own professional expertise, devised systems training and orientation flights for the squadron. VR-62s systems, process, and training method ologies then helped the NAVAIR Airworthiness Office produce new flight clearances and new publications for the Avionics and Propeller Control Systems. As the first fleet operator of the new systems, the Nomads went on to train other C-130T squadrons for the Navy. In FY12, the Nomads flew 2,448 flight hours, mis hap-free, delivering 2,231 personnel and 3.25 million pounds of cargo to the fleet. In addition to the squadrons Naval Aviation Logistics Office tasking, the Nomads operated in the Central Command and PACOM areas of responsibility (AOR) for 222 days in support of Operations Enduring Freedom, New Dawn, Vigilant Mariner, and others. In those AORs, Nomads flew 875.1 hours and completed 196 missions, delivering 1,410 personnel, and 2.4 million pounds of cargo. The VR-62 Nomads focused on the fundamentals in a time of rapid change. Recognition with the 2012 Noel Davis Battle E Trophy honors all who went the extra mile during a challenging year. The Noel Davis Trophy is named in honor of Lt. Cmdr. Noel Davis, U.S. Naval Reserve. A graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy and Harvard Law School, Noel Davis assumed command of the first station for Naval Reserve Aviation in 1924, and later took command of all Naval Reserve flying. In 1927, he prepared a Keystone Pathfinder aircraft, nicknamed American Legion, for the first nonstop flight attempt from New York to Paris. Regrettably, Davis was killed in a plane crash on April 27, while preparing for that flight. Twenty-four days later, Charles Lindbergh and his Spirit of St. Louis landed safely in Paris. The Noel Davis Trophy, donated to the Navy Department by Harry Guggenheim, was first presented in 1927. A plaque will be presented to VR-62, with the per manent trophy on display at Commander, Naval Air Force Reserve headquarters. VR-62

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schoolhouse and on the shop floor, with the added opportunity to work along side USN maintainers in the hangar. Our neighbors will be HSM-72 and HSM-74. We look forward to watching HSM-74 because, like us, theyre also transitioning from the classic Bravo to the new Romeo, said Frost. By the time 725 Squadron returns to Australia in 2015, about 65 maintainers will be qualified to service and repair the MH-60R. The squadron will receive support on every aspect of the Romeo acquisition, including hardware, software, publica tions, spare parts, weapons and logistics support. Cmdr. Pierce and his CNATTU staff were most helpful in adapting the courseware to reflect the two RAN enlisted aviation rates avionics and airframes versus five USN aviation rates (AD, AM, AE, AT and AO), said Frost. RAN aircrew will also be training at NS Mayport with HSM-40, the fleet replace ment squadron for HSMWINGLANT. Our Australian Seahawk aircrew con figuration is different from USN squad rons. We have a pilot in the right seat, a tactical coordinator/mission commander in the left seat, and a sensor operator in the cabin behind them, explained Frost.We are loving the support that our maintainers and aircrew are getting at NAS Jax and NS Mayport. Everybodys excited about learning this new platform and ulti mately returning to Australia with a higher level of interoperability with our allies. Frost went on to say that RAN squad rons designated with a 7 are training squadrons and those with an 8 are operational squadrons. Currently, RAN oper ates only one helicopter squadron (816, equipped with the Bravo variant) that is responsible for both training and opera tional units. Under the new construct for Romeo, 725 Squadron will take on training responsi bilities, as 816 Squadron concentrates on supporting the fleet by primarily serving on board RAN frigates and destroyers. Pierce said, Were pleased to host our Australian allies and begin building a new partnership centered on the MH-60R Seahawk. Weve worked on this program with NAVAIR and the Australian advance team for little more than a year. Our weekly teleconferences with all the play ers ensured that every parameter was met and everything was in place for the arrival of RAN maintainers. Most importantly, we met the challenge of adapting and validating the curriculum and training aids from USN to RAN standards. Frost added, These maintenance training units are complete game-changers for how we instruct our people to take care of helicopters. By embedding our men and women with USN Romeo squadrons, we can accelerate our training, safety and quality assurance. Originally commissioned in 1943, the 725 Squadron decommissioned in 1975 with a strong record of success. RAN 725 Squadron is scheduled to re-commission in early 2015 and will operate solely as a helicopter training squadron much like a fleet replacement squadron in the USN. In addition to the MH-60R Seahawk, CNATTU Jax provides career C school training for maintainers of the P-8A Poseidon, P-3C Orion, and aviation sup port equipment. TRAININGE9 were created, giving birth to both senior and master chiefs. In August 1858, service-wide exami nations were held to decide what chiefs would most qualify for these new advancement positions. CPO Fellow Chief Petty Officers, On April 1st, the U.S. Navy Chiefs mess will celebrate 120 years of the United States Chief Petty Officer. We are not only celebrating another year of chiefs serving the Navy; we are celebrating everything it means to be the Chief. Our anchors are the symbol of a cul ture and a way of life. Since 1893, chiefs have been charged with the responsi bility of leading sailors to be the best in the world, ready to carry out our navys mission when the nation calls. We welcome that responsibility and lead with honor, courage, and com mitment. As chiefs, its important to remember that we must be all in, all the time because being a chief petty officer is not for the weak of heart or lazy of mind and body. Happy birthday shipmates! I truly appreciate your leadership and the hard work you do every day. Very Respectfully, MCPON(AW/NAC) Mike StevensA message from the Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013

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PROCLAMATIONshould never happen and cannot be tolerated in our Navy and child abuse is in the same category, as well. While April is a month that we look to raise awareness of these issues, we need to remain constantly vigilant to ensure the safety of our children and family members. According to Commander, Navy Installations Command, the Navy recorded more than 1,000 sub stantiated reports of child abuse for fiscal year 2011. While this represents a steady decrease over the past decade, many incidents still go unreported, said Jeanette Werby, CNRSE counseling and advocacy coordinator. There are many reasons that abuse goes unreported, Werby said. Many people who know about abuse dont report it because they think its none of their business or are concerned about the stigma a report creates and the damage it may cause to ones career. Also, many children do not report abuse because they worry they will not be believed, have been threatened with further physical harm or simply feel responsible themselves for the abuse. According to Werby, the best way to combat child abuse is to raise awareness. Raising awareness about child abuse underscores that the problem is still here and so are the people who care about its resolution. Affirming at the highest levels that child abuse has serious, long-term outcomes for children and their families adds a compelling dimension to the message that child abuse is unacceptable. Those in leadership roles set the tone and course for awareness, response and intervention, she said. To find out more about how you can help prevent child abuse or to report an incident of child abuse, contact your installations Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC). Like the child abuse prevention and military child proclamation, the Sexual Assault Awareness Month proclamation is intended raise awareness about sexual assault. Leadership input is of the utmost importance with sexual assault awareness and prevention efforts, said Julie Mooney, regional sexual assault response coordinator. The Secretary of the Navy established the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office (SAPRO) in 2009 and it has significantly raised awareness. In 2011, SAPRO hosted a SAPR summit with the pri mary focus of raising leaderships awareness of sexual assaults that occur within the ranks and the need for increased prevention efforts. I am optimistic that support from leadership in regards to those prevention efforts will have a significant impact on the effectiveness of the Navys overall efforts, Mooney said. While raising awareness is one of the primary tools in preventing sexual assault, the Navy SAPR program also focuses on supporting victims. The Navy offers a variety of support services, including clinical counseling and legal services. Each installation has a 24-hour SAPR victim advo cate line. These numbers are advertised throughout the installations and may be dialed to ask questions, inquire about resources or report a sexual assault. In addition, each installation has a Sexual Assault Response Coordinator (SARC) located at the FFSC to ensure victims receive the support services they need, Mooney said. People may also contact the DoD Safe Helpline at 1-877-995-5247 or via http://www.safe helpline.org Navy Gateway Inns & Suites (NGIS) employees were recognized for their outstand ing contributions during their annual awards luncheon at the River Cove Catering and Conference Center March 27. Since the conception of the NGIS branding in the mid2000s, we have made many transitions. We work hard every day to improve the quality of service for our custom ers. The work is not easy, but in my opinion, it is the most rewarding job there is. We get to serve the greatest military and civilian team in the world, said NGIS Jax General Manager John Houdek. After lunch, employees watched a video of the Adm. Elmo Zumwalt Five-Star Accreditation and Individual Performance Award cer emony at Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC). The video began with a message from CNIC Vice Adm. William French who stated, In addition to great infrastructure and great facilities, we have the best staff available to provide quality service to each one of our guests. In addition, our NGIS and all of our busi ness lodging together save the Navy about $480 million a year. Congratulations on a great day and I wish I could be there with all of you. NGIS individual award cat egories included manager of the year, supervisor of the year, associate of the year and housekeeper of the year. Zabiyah Israel of NGIS Jacksonville was selected as housekeeper of the year run ner-up as a result of her superb professionalism, devotion to duty, and outstanding perfor mance. Israel received a plaque and letter of appreciation signed by French. The Secretary of the Navy established the Zumwalt Award in 1974 to recognize commands that achieve the highest level of service stan dards. NGIS operations can earn a Three-, Fouror FiveStar rating based on the quality of facilities, amenities, service and financial management. Each year, only half of the Navy installations are inspected. Only commands attaining a Five-Star rating are recog nized as Zumwalt Award win ners. NAS Jacksonville met the Zumwalt Award accreditation standards for 2012. Following a celebratory cake cutting, NAS Jax Executive Officer Capt. Roy Undersander congratulated the NAS Jax NGIS team on a job extremely well done.NGIS recognizes excellence JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013 9

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Military family teams are forming for the Relay for Life at Fleming Island High School May 3. The event remembers those who have lost their battle with cancer, support and encourage those who are fighting, and celebrate those who have survived their battle with cancer. If you are interested, please call Kari Wiese at (207) 730-3294. For more details, visit the Relay for life website at www.relayforlife.org/flemingislandfl. The team is called JAX MILITARY FAMILIES. Relay For Life: Military families wanted Focus on adjustment of status A green card is evidence of an individual or a resident aliens lawful permanent resi dent (LPR) status in the United States (U.S.). Obtaining a green card is not automatic and not everyone is eligible to obtain a green card. The process can be long and expen sive. Certain relatives of LPRs or U.S. Citizens (USC) are eligible to obtain a green card. The following questions will help determine an individuals eligibility: Where is the relative located? If the rela tive is located outside the U.S., they may have to go through Consular Processing, which includes filing an I-130 (Petition for an Alien Relative) and working with the National Visa Center. For relatives that are located in the U.S., they may be eligible to do an Adjustment of Status Application. Has an I-130 application been filed? Petitioners (the LPR or USC) need to file a petition in order to prove their relatives eligibility to obtain a green card. The petition is treated like a placeholder in line. Only a certain number of immigrants are able to obtain a green card per year. There are dif ferent quotas based on a persons country of origin and their relationship to the peti tioner. The Visa Bulletin lists the current wait times for individuals seeking a green card.1 Spouses and Children of LPRs and brothers and sisters of USCs have to wait in line before they are eligible to apply to adjust status; that is why they have to file the I-130 and wait their turn before they can file additional paperwork. Spouses, minor children and Parents of USCs; however, are consid ered Immediate Relatives, meaning they do not need to wait in line. These individuals, provided they are already in the U.S., are eligible to file for a green card right away. If the I-130 has not previously been filed, it can be filed concurrently with the adjustment of status application package. How did the relative enter the U.S.? If the relative entered the U.S. illegally, with out inspection, then unfortunately, they are unable to apply for a green card at this time (stay tuned for new legislation)! They may be eligible to apply for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals giving them work authorization if certain conditions are met.2 If a relative entered with a visa, but overstayed the visa, then they are eligible to adjust status if they are married to a USC. It is important to remember that indi viduals coming across the border apply for a visa or permission to enter the country. If someone obtains a visitor visa, they are stating that their intent is to make a short visit to the US, not get married. If a LPR or USC is seeking to get married to a foreign national who travels frequently in and out of the country, they should seek immigration advice, and look into applying for a fianc(e) visa. When the fianc(e) is ready to get married, he/she will enter the U.S. using the fianc(e) visa. Using a tourist visa to come into the U.S. with the intent to get married can be considered Immigration fraud and may be grounds for deportation. Has the relative done anything to make them ineligible to apply to the U.S? Has the relative been convicted of/arrested for any crimes? Was the relative ever stopped at the border, deported, or removed? Did the relative after entering the country ille gally ever leave the country? Has the relative ever put him/herself out as being a USC, such as registering to vote? If there are any doubts as to an individuals eligibility, an attorney should be sought before continuing with the application process. Individuals should collect certified court records, arrest records, etc. and bring them to the attorney to review. Individuals who are unsure of what records exist against them should get an FBI background check and/or submit a G-649 Freedom of Information Act/Privacy Act request to USCIS. Assuming everything is good to go, the Petitioner can move forward with the Adjustment of Status Application Process. A concurrent package would include the fol lowing: All forms are available electronically online at USCIS.gov. It is important to check the site regularly to ensure that you have the most current version of the forms and to get up to date fee information and filing addresses. After filing, USCIS will send a receipt notice. The notice has a case number that can be used to check the applications status online. Service members may call 1-888247-4645 for additional information and/or request that their application be expedited (in exigent circumstances such as deploy ment). Should you have any questions regarding any part of the adjustment of status appli cation process, please contact your nearest legal assistance office. Obtaining a green card 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013

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The Navy announced the 2013 Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM) theme of Courage March 25 and issued guidance to focus efforts on awareness and prevention of sexual violence. The Navys Courage theme for the month will support the Department of Defenses theme of We own it . well solve it . together. The goal is to empower commands to take ownership of this problem. Navys recognition of SAAM 2013 is a component of our efforts to build a resilient Navy community. We use the theme of Courage to build the tactics for this years cam paign, said Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk, chief of naval personnel. Weekly themes will underscore the courage it takes to intervene when shipmates see inappropriate behaviors, as well as the courage to step for ward as a victim to seek help. Its also the courage of shipmates to support victims to make them feel safe in their units and the courage neces sary to do the right thing both for yourself and your ship mates. Each week, the Navy will highlight a subtheme courage to learn, courage to prevent, courage to intervene, courage to support and courage to commit. Navy installations and commands around the world will be organizing activities to raise awareness of sexual assault throughout the month. All units are encouraged to par ticipate and promote SAAM events, said Van Buskirk. This year, we are also encouraging Sailors to participate in a video contest to give them the chance to provide a fresh look at how to combat this problem. It provides Sailors an opportunity for personal involvement in communicat ing key messages. Sailors can submit individual and team videos by mail or by uploading them to the FTP site through April 19. Criteria for evaluating entries will include storytelling abil ity, originality, creativity and technical quality. The contest is open to active duty, Reserve and full-time-support Sailors. The winning submission will be broadcast on Directto-Sailor Television and pro vided to the American Forces Network and Pentagon chan nel. Contest rules and proce dures are posted at www.sapr. navy.mil. Sexual Assault Prevention and Response is an important element of the readiness area of the 21st Century Sailor and Marine initiative that consol idates a set of objectives and policies, new and existing, to maximize Sailor and Marine personal readiness, build resiliency and hone the most combat-effective force in the his tory of the Department. The Department of the Navy is working aggressively to prevent sexual assaults, to support sexual assault victims and to hold offenders accountable. For more information read NAVADMIN 075/13 at www.npc.navy.mil and go to www.sapr.navy.mil and click on SAAM 2013.Navy announces SAAM 2013 theme With April being National Alcohol Awareness Month, and April 11 National Alcohol Screening Day, the Military Pathways program is encour aging service members, veterans and their families, to take advantage of the free, anonymous alcohol-use screen ings at www.DrinkingIQ.org. Military Pathways, which offers the online screenings, reports that more than 30,000 screenings for alcohol-use disorders have been completed since it started the program in 2006. The screenings ask individuals to answer a simple set of questions about their drinking habits. After completing a screening, service members receive feedback as to whether their symptoms are consistent with alcohol misuse as well as a list of resources on how and where to get further evaluation and help. All branches of the military have programs where service members can get treatment for substance abuse prob lems. Visitors to the site can also access a host of articles, videos, and other information that gives them, among other things, tips on how to cut down on alcohol use. Several free, downloadable mobile applications for mental health are also available. Using alcohol to manage a life problem, what professionals call self-med icating, is never a good idea. Not only does a drinking problem emerge, the original problem goes unfixed. A suc cessful career in the military means knowing when to draw the line with alcohol, and when to get help when the drinking is out of control, said Robert Ciulla, Ph.D., Mobile Health director for the Defense Departments National Center for Telehealth and Technology. The anonymous self-assessment gives individuals the opportunity to check and see if their drinking is a problem and how to get help or cut back. Military Pathways gives service per sonnel and their families the opportu nity to learn more about mental health and alcohol use through anonymous self-assessments offered online. The program is designed to help individuals identify symptoms and access assistance before a problem becomes serious. The self-assessments address alco hol use, PTSD, depression, generalized anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder and adolescent depression. After completing a self-assessment, individuals receive referral informa tion, including TRICARE, Military OneSource, and Veterans Affairs. The program is run by the nonprofit Screening for Mental HealthR and is funded by the Department of Defense with support from the National Center for Telehealth and Technology.Military observes Alcohol Awareness Month in April JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013 11

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Presented by North Florida Sales Big Engine April 12 State of Mind April 19 The Ride April 26Bring your own blanket and chairs. No coolers or outside food/beverages allowed. Every Friday at 7 p.m. outside stage Spring Concert SeriesFor more information call (904) 542-3900 facebook.com/nasjaxmwr Boogie Freaks May 3 7th Street Band May 10 Zero-N May 17 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013 13

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DEWEYSCall 542-3521 Monday Pizza Madness 2 9 p.m., $5 one-topping pizza Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 7 9 p.m., $.50 wings & $7.95 pizza your way Friday Free Entertainment at 7 p.m. April 5 Karaoke Deweys FREE Spring Concert Series 7 p.m. on the outdoor stage April 12 Big Engine April 19 State of Mind April 26 The Ride May 3 Boogie Freaks May 10 7th Street Band May 17 Zero-NFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday, 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday change of hours Open 4 10 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 4 10 p.m., all-you-can-bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 4 6 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Includes shoe rental & two hours of bowling Sunday Family Day 12 6 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included Friday special $1 games per person 2 5 p.m. Shoe rental not included Book your birthday party with us! Complete packages include bowling, shoe rental, kids meals, cake, balloons and more!Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 The outdoor pool hours April 1 May 5 Open Monday Friday (lap swim only) 6 a.m. 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30 p.m. 7 p.m. Saturday & Sunday (lap swim only) 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. The water slide, water park and concessions will not be open during lap swim. Learn-to-Swim Program Sign-up at the Gym (the Zone) on May 11, 8 a.m. 3 p.m. Session 1: June 10 20 Session 2 July 8 18 Session 3 July 22 Aug.1 Fitness Center (located above the Youth Activities Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more info, contact Melissa Luehrs at 542-3518/4238 The Gym equipment is temporarily relocated to The Zone (Bldg. 798) through June 30. Captain Chuck Cornett Navy Run April 6 at 8 a.m., $25 race day entry Zumba Party April 4, 11 a.m. 12 p.m. Humvee Pull April 4 at 2 p.m. Athletic shoe and apparel sale April 4 6, 9 a.m. 6 p.m. Sign-up at www.1stplacesports. com Call 542-2930/3518I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Daytona International Speedway NASCAR Subway Firecracker July 5 & Coke 400 July 6 Jacksonville Sharks $25, section 100 Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts Dark Side Of The Moon (Pink Floyd) April 13 at 7:30 p.m. Section A $33; Section B $28; Section C $23 A Lamb Chop Celebration April 20 at 7:30 p.m. Section A $18; Section B $14; Section C $11 Legoland Kids go FREE with an adult ticket purchase from ITT Funkfest At Metropolitan Park May 10 11 2-day ticket $52 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid through June 3 Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7 Blockout Dates: March 23 April 5 Call for pricing Orlando Magic Tickets, $18 $268 Jacksonville Symphony, $27.50 Entertainment Books, $30 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zip line Live Broadway Series Anthony Bourdain April 24, $50 $70 Celtic Woman May 2, $44 $134 American Idiot May 14 & 15, $25 $62 Dream Girls May 21 Cesar Millan June 1, $42 $52 Armed Forces Vacation Club Resort Condo Rentals www.afvclub.com installation code #62 Now booking all-inclusive Sandals and Super-Clubs Resorts vacations MOSH, $7 $12 Blue Man Group in Orlando $59.50 includes City Walk venue New Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute 4-day hopper, $153.25 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets available at ITT through March 31, & must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about special discounted tickets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park, One-day pass $30, Gold pass $71 Wet N Wild Orlando, $32 $45 Book Shade of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off-property hotels near attractions at ITT.The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Final Four Championship Game April 8 at 8 p.m. Paintball Trip April 20 at 9 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18, includes cart & green fees April 9 & 23 for active duty April 11 & 25 for retirees, DOD personnel and their guests Twilight Special, daily, play 18-holes with cart for $16 after 1:30 p.m. Monday & Tuesday, play 18-holes for $20, cart and green fee included. Open to military, DOD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Loudmouth Thursday Any golfer wearing Loudmouth shorts or pants plays 18 holes with cart for $20. Open to military, DOD and guestsMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty 31st Annual Bass Tournament April 13 at first light Register at the Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 Auto Skills Center Class April 11 at 6 p.m. 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding. ASE certified mechanic onsite.Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available. Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you. Month of the Military Child Carnival April 20, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Allegheny Softball Field Free games and activities.Flying ClubCall 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School June 3 July 10 $500 per person 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013

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The legacy of womens con tributions in history came alive for one Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast leader during a ceremony recogniz ing Womens History Month at Fleet Logistics Center Southeast (FLC SE) March 21. Keynote speaker Camille Destafney, NAVFAC Southeast Environmental Business Line Coordinator and Environmental Program Director for Navy Region Southeast, addressed the FLC SE workforce during the event. This years theme is Women Inspiring Innovation through Imagination: Celebrating Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). According to Destafney, given the opportunity to speak about the achievements of women was an honor. I have a love for math and at the time I graduated in the late 1970s, you taught it, said Destafney. I knew my per sonality would not allow me to teach so my counselor suggested engineering. Destafney began her envi ronmental engineer career at Naval Construction Battalion Center, Port Hueneme, Calif. where she was the under ground storage tank and installation restoration program manager. During her time there, she managed the removal of 65 underground storage tanks and construction of the soil remediation land farm that led to the installation being the first Department of Defense National Environmental Technology Demonstration Site. Being in this job was fun, said Destafney. The actual job site is where the rubber meets the road. Destafney spoke of histori cal women with STEM back grounds and how they paved the way for current and future women of STEM. She described the achieve ments made by Mary G. Ross, who was the first female engi neer at Lockheeds Missiles Systems Division in 1952 and the first known Native American woman to be an engineer; and Flossie WongStaal, one of the worlds fore most authorities in the field of virology who was a pioneering researcher of retroviruses and her team identified the HIV virus as the cause of AIDS. Effective communication and respect of others is essen tial in engineering; without it, Destafney and her teams would not be able to develop solutions that allow U.S. naval forces to train for combat and effectively carry out their military missions while minimiz ing impacts on the environ ment. I am fortunate to have a very interesting job, said Destafney. You never know what the day will bring. She spoke about how the Navy does aerial surveys of the North Atlantic Right Whale during calving season in sup port of this endangered spe cies. The North Atlantic Right Whale travels from New England to the Southeast to have their calves. By knowing where the whales are we can avoid them and prevent ship strikes, explained Destafney. Communication is key, by working with the survey crews and the ships, we can ensure good communications. During the speech, Destafney mentioned there is a saying, We are often afraid of what we do not understand. Ensuring a solid founda tion of STEM subjects can open many opportunities for women in business, said Destafney. One way we can develop and mature our STEM specialty is to mentor young women and children at early ages. According to Destafney, making STEM subjects fun and appealing to children will dis solve the stigma attached and invite new ideas with free flowing thought processes to cata pult STEM fields into everyday life. As women, we are strong and can achieve greatness in whatever we do, said Destafney. Just dont give up; seek advice from others, learn from our founding leaders and help others to become successful. NAVFAC Southeast, inspiring others during Womens History Month If you are retiring or separating from active duty and need assistance with submitting claims for disability and compensation to the Veterans Administration (VA), you can start up to one year prior to retiring/separating getting medical information in order. AMVETS is the Veterans Service Organization advocate for separating or retiring service members and their families pro viding assistance with submission of claims to the VA for benefits, disabilities and com pensation. All assistance is free and you are not required to become a member of AMVETS. For more information, call David Sanders at 542-2834 or email david.d.sanders@navy.mil .VA disability assistance available JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013 15

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Battle of Midway Commemorative Dinner June 1, 2013 World Golf Village Renaissance Resort Keynote: Adm. William Gortney, commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command Dinner at 6 p.m. Active Duty E6 and below $25E7 to O3 $35 O4 to O5 $45O6 & above $65For more information, contact Bob Price At (904) 246-9982, e-mail: bpricex4@comcast.net or Bill Dudley at (904) 806-4712, E-mail: anuday00@aol.com. Tickets may also be purchased at www.midwaydinner.orgUniform for O4 and above is dinner dress white jacket. For O3 and below, dinner dress white/dinner dress white jacket optional. Civilian is black tie or business attirewww.midwaydinner.org Sponsored by Geertsema and Zahner crowned 2013 Captains Cup Singles Tennis Champs Seventeen men and four women participated in the 2013 Captains Cup Mens and Womens Tennis Tournament at the Guy Ballou Tennis Courts March 25. Because there were so many men playing in the tournament, they were split up into five pools of three and four players for each pool. The top eight players from the five pools advanced to a single elimination tournament to determine first, second and third place. After eight matches were played, Cameron Geertsema of Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) won the 2013 Captains Cup Mens Singles Tennis Tournament. Brad Youngers of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) finished second and Vien Tran of FRCSE finished third. The women played a double elimination tourna ment with Shea Zahner of NAVFAC winning the 2013 Captains Cup Womens Singles tournament followed by Amanda Foster, also of NAVFAC, in second and Vanessa Givens of Navy Region Southeast in third. 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013 17 Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS) Garnishment Operations in Cleveland processes all court-ordered garnishments for military members, military retirees and Department of Defense (DoD) civilian employees. Types of garnishment include: child support, alimony, commercial debts, Chapter 13 and 7 bankruptcy orders, and division of military retired pay under the Uniformed Services Former Spouses Protection Act. Child support and alimony The Consumer and Credit Protection Act (CCPA) limits the amount that can be garnished for child support or ali mony to a percentage of an individuals disposable pay. Disposable pay (pay) are wages, salary, bonuses and incentive pay less authorized deductions, such as income tax withholding or debts owed to the government. The maximum per centage that can be deducted from pay is as follows: 50 percent when the obligor pro vides more than half the support of dependents, other than those for whom the support is to be deducted, and has not accrued an arrearage (back pay). 55 percent when the obligor pro vides more than half the support of dependents, other than those for whom the support is to be deducted, and has accrued an arrearage. 60 percent when the obligor does not support other dependents and has not accrued an arrearage. 65 percent when the obligor does not support other dependents and has accrued an arrearage. If the ordered amount of child support or alimony is lower than the maximum percentage allowable, then the full amount will be deducted. Commercial debt Active duty members are typically not subject to garnishment for commercial debt; however, they can be forced to set up involuntary allotments. The percentage cap cannot total more than 25 per cent of pay. If there is no pay available to comply with the court order due to garnishments for child support or alimony, DFAS will return the garnishment order without action, and the creditor will have to re-apply when there is sufficient pay available. Involuntary withholding for the col lection of a commercial debt from civil service employees is limited to a maxi mum of 25 percent of pay. If the governing state caps the per centage at a lower rate, then that rate prevails. Orders for child support, ali mony and related arrearages have priority over any commercial garnish ment. Retired military or civil service members pay is exempt from garnishment for commercial debts; however, pay due pursuant to the Uniformed Services Former Spouses Protection Act, child support, spousal support, or a property division can be garnished. Taxes If DFAS is served with a levy by the Internal Revenue Service, DFAS must honor the tax levy irrespective of wheth er the obligor is active duty or retired. In the case of garnishments, the collection action is mandatory and any rebuttal concerning the levy must be addressed with the IRS. Levies are continuous, and collection will run until the entire amount is either collected or the IRS informs DFAS that they are released from collecting the levy amount. Bankruptcy DFAS can withhold up to 100 percent of the obligors pay. If DFAS withholds 50 percent for child support, DFAS will withhold the remaining 50 percent of pay for the bankruptcy order. The automatic stay provisions of the bankruptcy law require that all commercial garnishments, involuntary allotments and debt collections stop once a person files for bankruptcy; however, child support, alimony, and their arrearages do not ter minate. Garnishments are very complicated. For more information, please visit DFAS website at http://www.dfas.mil/garnish ment or contact your nearest legal assis tance office. Navy Gateway Inns and Suites While budget cuts and travel restrictions con tinue to challenge missions for military and civilian travelers alike, there are many benefits to staying at Navy Gateway Inns and Suites (NGIS) for your official lodging needs. Value, convenience, great accommodations, service and very affordable rates are the foundation of the NGIS lodging program. NGIS offers affordable lodging rates that support the recent reduction of command travel expens es. Lodging rates range from $25/night $65/ night with varying rates depending on location. Supporting NGIS ensures that travel funds provide the opportunity for improvements to NGIS services and facilities for our war fighting community. Generally, NGIS lodging facilities will save guests between 40 to 65 percent off comparable civil ian accommodations. In-room amenities include Internet access, air conditioning, cable TV with a premium channel, a DVD or VCR, telephone ser vice, microwave and refrigerator. Youll also have housekeeping service, vending machines and guest laundry facilities as well as handicapped accessible and non-smoking rooms. Free in-room coffee and newspapers as well as convenient on-base parking are also available during your stay. Staying at NGIS not only provides great lodging at great prices but it also offers the convenience of other base amenities. You can visit the Navy Exchange, Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) activities with discounted tickets for area attrac tions and swimming pools, golf courses, beach es, movie theaters, youth centers, and other great MWR activities right outside your door. If youre looking for catering and conferencing needs, please contact the host region for particulars on reserving a conference center. For reservations, call 1-877-NAVY-BED (1-877628-9233) or online at www.dodlodging.net Defense Finance and Accounting Service garnishments explained

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Free tax assistanceFrom staff REAL$ENSE (United Way) is offering free tax preparation service Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Building 13 (sec ond floor) at the NAS Jax Main Gate. Appointments are rec ommended for weekdays although walk-ins will be helped. Saturday is walkin availability only. To make an appointment, call 729-2119 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013

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Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2013: To register for any of the above workshops please contact 5425745.Fleet and Family Support Center offers life skills workshops JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013 19

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20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013 The debate over the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) disability claims backlog has been raging the past few weeks in the media, partially sparked by comments made by speakers at The American Legions Washington Conference last month. The American Legion opposes any plan that would give some wartime veterans priority over others in filing claims for VA benefits On March 24, VA Secretary Eric Shinseki gave his first television inter view in four years on CNNs State of the Union program. That same day, the Legion executive director in Washington, Peter Gaytan, weighed in on the same show, which focused on the claims backlog. Gaytan told CNN host Candy Crowley that the Legion is working with VA to fix the claims process, and that the crux of the problem is inconsistent perfor mance of VA regional offices in adjudi cating claims. Once the problems at those region al offices are addressed, the back log should be reduced substantially, Gaytan said. In 2010, the Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) had about 509,000 claims pending with 39 per cent in backlog (pending more than 125 days). Currently, VBAs figures show about 900,000 claims pending with more than 70 percent in backlog. James E. Koutz, the Legions nation al commander, said, We dont need a presidential commission to figure out how to solve the backlog. Adding another layer of bureaucracy wont get benefits to our veterans any faster. Koutz also challenged the idea of prioritizing claims applications on the basis of war era. Not only does prioritization based on war era violate federal law, it imposes value judgments on the wartime service of veterans. Do we really want to make that kind of call? Is this something that would help to simplify the claims pro cess? We need to honor the service of all veterans by giving them all fair and timely access to the benefits they are due under the law. On March 20, The American Legion submitted a statement for the record to Congress that included three spe cific recommendations for reducing the claims backlog: VA employees, which currently gives the same credit for work, whether it is correct or incorrect. mon errors made in claims process ing, and use the information to create a training plan for employees. claims, in order to increase understanding of the military among those who are interpreting claims files. The American Legion has more than 2,500 accredited claims representatives nationwide who assist veterans in filing their VA disability claims. It also has more than a dozen full-time employees who help veterans appeal claims that have been denied by VA. Veterans with Apple or Android smart phones can download The American Legions Claims Coach app at www. legion.org to find the nearest Legion service officer, who can assist with fil ing a VA claim. Legion: Change VA claims process, not priorities The Defense Commissary Agency has been chosen by the Produce for Better Health Foundation as one of their retail fruits and veggies champions for 2012. Every year, Produce for Better Health names the top retailers that supported their Fruits & Veggies More Matters national campaign. In 2012, DeCA was among 15 retailers chosen as leaders in the produce world. We take our militarys health very seriously, and supporting this campaign to eat more fruits and vegetables is a great way to get our patrons interested, said Joseph Jeu, DeCA director and CEO. It also speaks to the commissarys commitment to provide healthful options for military families. The Produce for Better Health Foundation measured the agency against criteria such as how DeCA pro moted national Fruits & Veggies More Matters Month and supported the campaign through its website, in print and through online circulars. All retailers were evaluated against the same criteria. We help our customers realize the importance of fruits and vegetables in their daily diet, said Bridget Bennett, DeCAs produce category manager. Our produce teams are always sup porting healthful options for snacks, meal solutions and quick convenience in our ready to eat selections. The commissaries have been honored by the foundation before. In 2010 and 2011, the commissaries were designated as role models. This is the first time that it has been chosen as a champion. All 15 retailers will be recognized at a luncheon held during the general session of PBHs annual conference in San Francisco. In 2012, Produce Retailer magazine also selected DeCA as its Retailer of the Year, another nod to the agencys pro duce excellence. We are proud to receive this recogni tion, said Jeu. We work hard to make sure our customers have great produce to choose from and this award just proves that we are on the right path. Commissaries selected fruits, veggies champions The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is looking for youth leaders who are dedicated to public service, who are making a difference in their communities, and who want to expand their impact as national advo cates for youth disaster preparedness. Youth between the ages of 12 and 17 interested in strengthen the nations resiliency against disasters may now apply or be nominated to serve on FEMAs Youth Preparedness Council. Participants will represent the youth perspective on emergency prepared ness and share information with their communities. Those interested may apply directly or be nominated by an adult by sub mitting a completed application form, a narrative, and a letter of recommen dation. Visit www.ready.gov/youthpreparedness to access the application materials and instructions. Applications and supporting materi als must be received by midnight April 19, 2013. Youth Preparedness Council mem bers will attend the 2013 Youth Preparedness Council Summit and meet with emergency management leadership and national organiza tions dedicated to youth preparedness to discuss individual and community preparedness. Council members will participate in regular conference calls with FEMA and will complete a youth preparedness project of their choosing. Engaging youth is an integral step in preparing the nation for all hazards, said FEMAs Region IV Administrator Phil May. Youth have a unique ability to influence their peers and families to be more resilient and play an important role in disaster preparedness, during and after a crisis. Benjamin Cookeof Memphis, Tenn.,represented FEMAs Region IV on the 2012 Youth Preparedness Council. He frequently spoke to diverse groups of youth about the need for emergency preparedness and volunteered at the Memphis Virginia Hospital. He has participated in community initiatives such as Get Ready Shelby and Go Green Memphis. The J. Wayne and Delores Barr Weaver Veterans Emergency and Transition Services Fund provides emergency financial assistance and resources to veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom that will help to support their transition into civilian life and stabili zation into the community. This financial assistance is provided directly to the veterans of these wars. The geographic service area is: Duval, Clay, Nassau, Baker and St. Johns counties. Types of emergency needs we help with but not strictly limited to: vehicle payment or repair, insurance ing to find work or learn a life skill For more information, contact a Red Cross Military Services caseworker at 246-1395.Financial aid available for veteransFEMA seeks applicants for Youth Preparedness CouncilVehicle fuel-saving tips Rising fuel costs are on continually on the minds of most Americans these days. Sure, you can simply stop driving, but for most consumers, thats not an option. You can change your driving habits, as well as performing simple and inexpensive vehicle maintenance. Taking these steps will not only save gas money, but will improve a vehicles safety and dependability. The most common ene mies of fuel efficiency are under-inflated tires, dirty air filters, worn-out spark plugs and a damaged gas cap. vehicles have gas caps that are either damaged, loose or are missing alto gether, causing 147 mil lion gallons of gas to vaporize every year. inflated properly, its like driving with the parking brake on, and can cost a mile or two per gallon. either four, six or eight spark plugs, which fire as many as three million times each 1,000 miles. A dirty spark plug causes misfiring, which wastes fuel. clogged with dirt, dust and bugs chokes off the air and creates a rich air-fuel mixture which wastes gas and causes the engine to lose power. Replacing a clogged air filter can improve gas mileage by as much as 10 percent. lowers gas mileage by as much as 22 percent on the highway and five percent on city streets. at idle gets zero miles per gallon. Letting the vehicle warm up for one to two minutes is sufficient. rapidly at speeds above 60 mph. To get the best possible miles-per-gallon on the highway, use your cruise control. Last year, vehicle check-up events con ducted throughout the country revealed that nearly nine out of 10 cars required some type of maintenance. This reinforces the need for the motoring public to become more aware of the maintenance needs of their vehicle to save money, conserve energy, improve highway safety and help protect the environment. Every motorist can receive a free 56-page car care guide that takes the guesswork out of vehicle maintenance by visiting www.carcare.org.

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The Department of Defense yester day released updated policies and procedures March 29 aimed at combat ing sexual assaults in the military and improving care for victims. Senior defense officials said the updated policies and procedures pro vide a framework that improves safety for sexual assault victims, standardizes victim-assistance services across the force, enhances prevention efforts and provides victims added confidence to come forward to report assaults and seek treatment. Todays release of an updated pol icy directive underscores the depart ments commitment to combating sexual assault on every level with in the military, said Army Maj. Gen. Gary Patton, director of DODs Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office (SAPRO). SAPRO officials said the policy changes came about through a coor dinated effort among the services, the National Guard Bureau, the DOD inspector general, military healthcare providers, chaplains and the entire DOD community to improve every aspect of the departments response to sexual assault. We have thousands of victims in the armed forces, Air Force Col. Alan R. Metzler, SAPROs deputy director, said in an interview with American Forces Press Service. We need to make sure that we pre vent sexual assault from happening, and when it does, provide a response system that can care for people and hold people accountable so we can get the perpetrators out of the armed forces. The updated policies incorporate expedited transfers for victims, estab lish a hotline for crisis intervention, and require additional training as well as new, uniform standards for care givers. We have worked with the national certification body and codified into our policy that every victim advocate, every sexual assault response coordinator have a level of training and competence and national certification so that they are providing victims the best quality care, Metzler said. Senior Pentagon officials emphasize that the department has a zero-toler ance policy for sexual assault. In recent weeks, Patton has met with Capitol Hill lawmakers to discuss the departments response to sexual assault, emphasiz ing that the Pentagon needs to do more to combat the crime while welcoming input from outside groups. A goal of the new policies and procedures is to encourage sexual assault victims to have confidence in the system and to come forward and report crimes, which Metzler acknowledged are vastly under reported. The department takes this seriously, that when a victim tells us that they have been sexually assaulted, we will believe them, he said. We will protect their privacy. They will be able to have help and care because we understand the nature of this crime and we want them to come forward to get help.DOD releases update to SAPR policy V I T A SELF -SERVICE 4 Feb -15 Apr 2013 M-WF 0830 -1600 (Walk-ins) TU -TH 1100 -1600 (Walk-ins) TU -TH 16001900 (by appointments only) LOCATION: NAS JAX RANGER ST BLDG 4, RM#108 (LEGAL BLDG) TAX ASSISTANCE CENTER 904542 8038 Volunteers are still welcomed! Contact center for more information. Active Duty & Dependents Retirees & Dependents, AGI < $57,000 Reservists -Activated 30 days+ Pre/de -mobilization Entitled Former Spouses JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, April 4, 2013 21

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