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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 03-28-2013
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02035


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THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 2013 FOOD PANTRY HSM-70 HELPING USO Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The HSM-72 Detachment Eight Doomsdayers returned home to NAS Jacksonville from a nine-month deployment to the Fifth Fleet area of respon sibility March 27. Embarked on the Norfolk, Va. based USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG81), the two-plane detachment returned home after a lengthy and demanding cruise. The detachment and crew departed NS Norfolk June 20, 2012 as part of the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (CSG-8) to conduct mar itime security operations, the ater security cooperation, and various support missions with in the U.S. Central Command region. Led by Lt. Cmdr. Jeremiah Binkley and ADC(AW/SW) Rommel Pitts, Detachment Eight is one of the final two leg acy detachments operating the SH-60B airframe for HSM-72. Binkley and Pitts led six pilots, three aircrewmen, and 16 maintenance professionals The VP-62 Broadarrows Medical Department was awarded the 2012 Blue M for medical read iness March 10, for the second consecutive year. The Blue M is only given to those commands that maintain a high level of medical readiness. Recipients of the award must score a 90 percent or better on a medical record audit performed by Naval Air Force Reserve. Acknowledging our corpsmen is the most important thing, said Capt. Michael MacDonald, VP-62 flight surgeon. They are the ones who spend the countless hours keeping our records on track For VP-62, that person is HM1 Russell Bolton. As the only full-time corpsman in a reserve squadron, maintaining medical readiness can often pose a difficult task. Luckily he is not alone in this task. Ive had a lot of help from my Reserve counter part, HM2 Michael Duer, as well as the corpsmen from our neighboring squadrons. And I couldnt have done it without the support of the Navy Operation Support Center Jacksonville medical team. We all work hand in hand, said Bolton. It really doesnt matter who helps you or who gets the credit for it, the only thing that matters is that the customer is taken care of. Southcom chief warns budget issues could affect national securityU.S. Southern Commands top officer told a Senate panel recently that he is gravely concerned about the effects sequestra tion and other budget constraints will have NAS Jax and NS Mayport Sailors Brush with Kindness More than 25 personnel from NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport and their tenant commands volunteered more than 150 hours with Habitat for Humanity Jacksonville March 16. They served in the urban core where 26 per cent of children live below the poverty level. The volunteers added to the hundreds of others who supported Habitats A Brush With Kindness proj ect. The project ran six weeks and helped revitalize 26 homes in the New Town area of Jacksonville. A Brush With Kindness is part of Habitat for Humanitys larger Neighborhood Revitalization Initiative. To compliment the 1,800 homes the organization has built since 1988, this initiative supports existing homeowners with exte rior minor repair, weatherization, and necessary remod eling. The teams, comprised of all different ranks and rates, scraped and painted, sorted garbage from collected piles, repaired wooden framing, landscaped and reclaimed underutilized space. The homeowners could not stop thanking the teams as the effect was incredible. Their homes were radically different from our arrival and Doomsdayers last ride marks end of an era Broadarrows are repeat winners of medical readiness award

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS March 28 1800 Essex becomes first U.S. Navy vessel to pass Cape of Good Hope. 1814 HMS Phoebe and Cherub capture USS Essex off Valparaiso, Chile. Before capture, Essex had cap tured 24 British prizes during the War of 1812. 1848 USS Supply reaches the Bay of Acre, anchor ing under Mount Carmel near the village of Haifa, during expedition to explore the Dead Sea and the River Jordan. March 29 1954 Carrier aircraft began reconnaissance near Dien Bien Phu, Indochina. 1960 Launch of first fully integrated Fleet Ballistic Missile from USS Observation Island (T-AGM-23). 1973 Naval Advisory Group and Naval forces, Vietnam disestablished and last U.S. prisoners of war left Vietnam. 1975 Evacuation of DaNang by sea begun. March 30 1944 First use of torpedo squadrons from carriers to drop aerial mines (Palau Harbor). 1972 Easter Offensive begins in Vietnam. March 31 1854 Commodore Matthew Perry negotiates Treaty of Kanagawa to open trade between U.S. and Japan. 1971 Poseidon (C-3) missile becomes operational when USS James Madison began her third patrol car rying 16 tactical Poseidon missiles. 1992 USS Missouri (BB-63), the last active American battleship is decommissioned. April 1 1893 Navy General Order 409 of Feb. 25 1893 estab lishes the rate of Chief Petty Officer. 1917 BM1 John Eopolucci, a Naval Armed Guard on board the steamship Aztec, died when the vessel was sunk by a German U-boat. He was the first U.S. Navy sailor killed in action in World War I. 1942 First Naval Air Transportation Service (NATS) squadron for Pacific operations commissioned. 1945 Over 1,200 Navy ships and Army troops begin invasion of Okinawa. 1966 U.S. Naval Forces Vietnam established. April 2 1781 Frigate Alliance captures two British priva teers, Mars and Minerva. 1827 First Naval Hospital construction begun at Portsmouth, Va. 1947 UN places former Japanese mandated islands under U.S. trusteeship. 1951 First Navy use of jet aircraft as a bomber, launched from a carrier, USS Princeton. 1960 The icebreaker USS Glacier (AGB-4) begins 12 days of relief operations, providing helicopter and boat transportation, plus emergency supplies to resi dents of Paramaribo, Suriname after floods. April 3 1797 Capt. Thomas Truxtun issued first known American signal book using numerary system. 1992 First five coed recruit companies from Orlando, Fla. Naval Training Center graduate. A January article written by David Wood for Huffington Post has risen from the dead and its making many military families mad again. The article, Defense budget faces cuts to personnel after decade of war, has more than 60 pages of comments, half of which were made within days of its release on January 30. On page 31, however, after nearly a month of silence, the comments picked up again on March 11. Soon after, it went viral in the military commu nity. I dont know who dug up this relatively old column, but according to an editors note at the bottom, language has been added [post-publication] to clarify some calculations, making this piece of walkingdead commentary something like Frankenstein. Its been patched up and given new life, and now its terrorizing the military community. Oh, and the monster is still evolving. Under pressure and scru tiny, Wood has revised his text multiple times. His original opening sentence was probably the scariest of all: For more than a decade, Congress and the Pentagon have lavished money on the nations 1.3 mil lion active-duty troops and their families. But the word lavished has since been deleted. Semantics and edit-andrewrite-as-you-go journalism aside, Woods biggest prob lem is his apples-to-apples approach to military versus civilian pay that overlooks the hidden costs of military life. Since 2001, total military compensation, including pay and benefits, grew by 20.5 per cent, while comparable pri vate-sector civilian pay did not increase at all, Wood writes. The cost of military compen sation rose steeply even though the size of the active-duty force grew by only 3 percent during that period. We military families dont understand Woods confusion with this. The pay grew by 20.5 percent because of everything that the slightly increased force has been expected to do since 2001 mainly, more frequent and longer deployments. To make his point about mili tary and civilian pay, Wood states that an Army master ser geant who has been in the ser vice since 9/11 and is stationed at Fort Drum makes about $85,000 a year. This number is deceiving. Also, its highly unlikely that anyone would rise to the rank of master ser geant in 10 years. Even so, the base pay for a master sergeant with 10 years of service is about $50,000/year. Allowances for housing and cost of living would be added to the base pay according to the location of the duty station. But lets go with Woods fig ure anyway. According to the U.S. Department of Labors Web site CareerOneStop, an accountant in 2011 could expect to make about $109,900 in a year. But the accountant is com ing home every night. He doesnt leave his family for a year at a time (which often increases child care expens es). And, in general, he doesnt move every three years (more on this below). His life isnt at the whim of the U.S. govern ment. He can wear what he chooses, take vacation when he prefers, and besides a boss and his customers, he doesnt answer to anyone. Yes, the accountant prob ably has to pay for healthcare, and he doesnt get tax-free groceries, but, well, hes mak ing $20,000 more than the guy whos risking his life overseas. All of the above is why Woods whining about military shoppers 30 percent savings on groceries at the commissary falls on unsympathetic ears. Yes, we have access to tax-free groceries, but my husband is required to buy, out of his own pay, many of his uniforms the same ones the military forces him to wear. We dont get a company car. And our free healthcare equates to being seen at government-run hospi tals that are equivalent in inef ficiency and frustration to the Department of Motor Vehicles. Wood leaves these compari sons out, focusing only on what military families get on paper. But even those facts dont always add up. Wood writes, [T]he Pentagon pays all housing costs for families who live off base. This is absolutely false. The military gives us a housing allowance based on local civil ian housing markets. And its not the lavish market, either. That same hypotheti cal master sergeant making $50,000 in base pay would get an additional $2,300 monthly for housing if he was stationed in Washington, D.C. The aver age rate for a 2-bedroom apart ment near D.C. is $2,341. But these figures say noth ing to the fact that military families can rarely build equity in a home. In 13 years of mar riage, Dustin and I have moved a half-dozen times, and weve lost money in real estate every single time. I agree with Wood that there are many areas of wasted spending in the military. As with any government agency, it is full of redundancies, inef ficiencies and frustrations. The general public will learn more about this when they, too, are in government-run health care. But to say that service members are treated lavishly and with an overabundance of allowances and bonuses is inaccurate and frankly offen sive. Its time for Woods column (http://www.huffingtonpost. com/2013/01/30/defense-bud get-cuts_n_2584099.html) to go back into the dark recesses of the Internet.MoneyChic Sez: Heres a catch up to whats been going on! A Sailor and his wife are having their first baby. They want to know ways to make being a family of three less expen sive. Weve covered fbeing prepared for the fact that babies will continue to cost money! Now lets get down to the dirty busi ness of diapers -that will be your most expensive purchase until your baby is potty trained. If you are going to use dis posable, consider buying in bulk as it always makes the price per diaper lower. Some people swear by store brand, where others will only buy premium. Take advantage of different buyer pro grams diaper companies offer. Some reward you with points (found on each diaper package) that can be redeemed for prizes or gift cards. Dont be afraid to call the manufac turer and ask for coupons. Each company knows their products so maybe they can offer a suggestion you didnt think of. Sign up for manufacturer Welcome to New Baby programs and see what you receive in the mail. There are always coupons and deals to be found on dia pers at the stores. Discuss how your child will be fed. Make sure you are on the same page when it comes to the nutrition of your baby. If mom plans to breastfeed, she is going to need encouragement and sup port. Breastfeeding comes easy to some and others have to work hard at it the entire time. Make sure your wife is eating a balanced diet, drinking plenty of fluids, and is relaxed. Lactation consultants are available at the hospital to assist in mak ing the breastfeeding process a smoother one. If using formula, sign up for the formu la manufacturers new baby programs as well. Most will send you canisters of for mula as a welcome home present along with others items. Look for coupons in the mail or call and request them. The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society offers the Budget for Baby class to help you prepare financially. For coming to the class you will also receive a free layette filled with towels, bibs, sleep n plays, and sheets for your baby. Call 5422832 to sign up. A financial plan can also be put togeth er at NMCRS by one of their caseworkers to help you see what your finances will look like after that baby is here. Have questions for Hey, Money Chic? Drop me an email at megan.stolle@ nmcrs.org .Writer misses hidden cost of military life

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Chief of Naval Personnel (CNP) addressed Sailors during an all-hands call aboard Naval Station Norfolk, March 18. Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk took this opportunity to discuss issues affecting Sailors naval careers, their families and their futures. One of the big-ticket items in the news lately is the Tuition Assistance Program (TAP). Ninety percent of Sailors who use TAP complete the courses they take and Navy leadership is actively working to keep TAP in this tough economy, said Van Buskirk. They are looking at the structure to allow those Sailors who are eligible to continue to use it. He also discussed the continued impact Sailors have throughout the fleet from an operational standpoint. The missions you are accomplishing are making a difference in the world because you are all tremendous ambas sadors, said Van Buskirk. We have supported deployments on the ground and on ships and are fully engaged in supporting critical missions from the Horn of Africa to Afghanistan to the Western Pacific. Van Buskirk said his number one pri ority is to man the fleet by ensuring Sailors are assignable, deployable and distributable. In the last year, we have had 90 per cent Perform to Serve (PTS) approval and greater than 95 percent in the last four months. Van Buskirk said the Navy is con tinuing to make improvements to PTS, which increases Sailors ability to have a say in their career and improve the ability to distribute Sailors where the Navy needs them most. During the question and answer ses sion, Van Buskirk was asked about the Navys current financial state since enacting sequestration and what the future holds. It feels good to know that Navy lead ership hears our concerns and for the CNP to come and let us know that he is on our side and doing everything for Sailors, said BM2(SW/AW) Darius Branch. When asked about retirement pay, Van Buskirk said a commission will be stood up to look at retirement pay, but current active duty will be grandfa thered into the current retirement pay. Much of the question and answer session focused on family related pro grams, and Van Buskirk assured attend ees the Navy is dedicated to helping Sailors and their families. The Our Navy remains committed to maintaining the funding for our Sailors and family readiness programs as much as possible, and our goal is to have no impact on those programs in the future, said Van Buskirk. CNP talks tuition assistance, PTS and more JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013 3

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Due to the editors error on Page 1 in the March 21 edition of Jax Air News VP-5 was incorrectly identified as the Pelicans. VP-5 is correctly called the Mad Foxes. We sincerely regret this error. 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013

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Chapel and NEX promote food driveThe NAS Jax Chapel, in conjunction with the NAS Jax Navy Exchange, has initiated a food drive that will run through May 1 in order to restock the chapels food pan tries for families in need. NEX Customers and employees are encouraged to bring any non-perishable items to one of two donation boxes set up in the exits of the Navy Exchange or bring them directly to the chapel. Donations are primarily used to assist active duty and retired military members who may be struggling with financial hardship, but have also been used to support char itable organizations in the local commu nity. Even though our first goal is to support our Sailors and their families, in the past we have worked with organizations such as Waste not Want not and Second Harvest in distributing food to some of Jacksonvilles charities, com mented RP1 Gregory Haywood with the NAS Jax Chapel. We mainly receive donations from base commands, the commissary, and the Navy Wives Club of America. At the moment we are encouraging this food drive in order to help us restock our food pantries and continue to support our people and community, said Haywood. For more information on donations or supporting the food drive, contact the NAS Jax Chapel at 542-3051. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013 Established in February 2009 at NAS Jacksonville, Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 70 is the first east coast squadron to fly the MH-60R Seahawk com monly known as the Romeo vari ant. Now, theyre celebrating their first Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic Battle Efficiency (Battle E) award for the HSM category. HSM-70 Spartans Commanding Officer Cmdr. Christopher Herr congratulated his squadron. Winning this Battle E is special because in 2011 we just missed it by a hair. For 2012, even though we were deployed for a relatively short time with Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8 and USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) Carrier Strike Group our sub sequent shore-based operations schedule was packed with detach ments, including: for Navy training squadrons. Test and Evaluation Center for anti-submarine training. Americas aboard USS Gettysburg (CG 64). ment to support the Naval Undersea Warfare Centers light weight Mk 54 torpedo testing near Cape Cod, Mass. Herr added, Im particularly proud of our performance after our homecoming from Bush. Typically, you enter the maintenance phase and drop off a lot of aircraft for rework which limits aircraft availability and flight hours. But, our people did a great job with the resources at hand and despite a large turnover of personnel, they supported our schedule of weap ons delivery and tactical training that will help springboard us into our next deployment cycle. Herr said, Basically, our squad ron is in the business of shielding a carrier strike group by dropping torpedoes and shooting missiles. Were not thinking about the Battle E in our everyday work. For pilots and aircrew, its mostly doing your job by the book. It also takes maintainers, ordnancemen and support personnel who work tirelessly to ensure our Romeos are up and available at all times. When we deploy the full squad ron (11 aircraft), well have three Romeos on the carrier and four two-plane detachments on the carrier strike groups supporting ships. Currently, under CR/seques tration, the Spartans upcoming deployment has shifted so theyre planning for their next six-month workup cycle to begin sometime this summer. With this schedule shift, we get some time to catch our breath, reevaluate our training objec tives, and make sure our Romeos are flying with the latest software upgrade. Were fortunate that our air wing (CVW-8) was not one of the four recently grounded by Navy Secretary Ray Mabus. That means weve got the funding, people and parts to complete our missions, concluded Herr.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013 7

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in the execution of nearly 1,100 mishap-free flight hours. The lengthy deployment allowed the detachment to conduct exercises with several allied nations to enhance interoperabil ity in the strategic maritime environment. During Exercise Lucky Mariner 2012, the Doomsdayers led the way in protecting a convoy of merchant shipping against asymmetric threats an exercise not conducted since the 1980s. Operationally, the Doomsdayers executed a wide array of mis sions including 14 armed transits of the Strait of Hormuz, escorting coalition warships and ensuring freedom of navigation for com mercial theater shipping. Additionally, aircrews launched sev eral times on short notice to investigate suspected weapons and narcotics smugglers. The abil ity to answer the call with little notice, around the clock, is a tes tament to the entire detach ments capa bilities and professional ism. Most notably, Detachment Eight rescued a severely injured civil ian mariner off the M/V Belde for immediate medical treatment in Oman. The medical evacuation crew, comprised of Binkley, Lt. Alan Shingler, AWR1 Joshua Wyckoff and AWR2 Kelvi Bonanofeliciano, hoisted the injured crewmember from the ships bridge wing after lowering Bonanofeliciano on board the vessel. For his efforts in securing the injured crewmem ber, Bonanofeliciano was recognized as the Naval Helicopter Association Region Three Rescue Swimmer of the Year. Professionally, several detachment members also advanced in rank and earned qualifications. Throughout the past year, 100 percent of detachment members eligible for advancement made rate, five junior maintenance per sonnel earned their enlisted aviation warfare specialist qualifica tion, and seven members earned enlisted surface warfare specialist qualifications. The return home for the Doomsdayers has been a long time in the making. The conclusion of a successful nine-month deploy ment caps an impressive legacy at HSL-42. Although Detachment Eight is returning home to a squadron with a different designation, operating the new Romeo variant of the Seahawk helicopter, the Doomsdayers are being welcomed home with the same Proud Warrior pride and tradition that has resided in the squadron for 25 years. Detachment Eight has surely added to this pride and rightfully earned a lasting place in the annals of the HSM-72 Proud Warriors storied history. HSM-72 HABITAT SOUTHCOMshone bright in their neighborhoods. With such a tremendous turn-out, the groups have paved the way for a continu ing partnership with Habitat for Humanity. Plans are in the works to have regular opportunities for Team Jax and the tenant commands to continue serving our commu nity in truly life changing ways. on the United States ability to deter and respond to regional security challenges and he warned the cuts will damage U.S. leadership, readiness and national security. In nearly every area of U.S military engagement in the Southcom region, Marine Corps Gen. John Kelly told the Senate Armed Services Committee, sequestration will have a negative impact on U.S opera tions or influence. In particular, the spend ing cuts affect preventing illegal drugs from entering the United States, potentially allowing hundreds of tons of cocaine and other illicit products to flood into our cities, he said in prepared remarks to the commit tee. The day could also soon arrive, Kelly said, when Southcom has no assigned DOD sur face assets to conduct detention and moni toring operations, citing a January memo from the chief of naval operations that warned sequestration will compel the Navy to stop all deployments to the Caribbean and South America. The budget sequester, which took effect March 1, has forced the Defense Department to absorb $46 billion in cuts through the rest of the fiscal year, which ends Sept. 30, while an ongoing continuing resolution (CR) continues to impose finan cial uncertainty on military spending as well in the absence of a fiscal year budget. Kelly emphasized that the budget issues come amid regional security challenges and pose potentially devastating long-term impacts. Significantly, reduced U.S military engagement will make it difficult to counter those who would seek to exploit perceptions that the U.S. is abandoning our long-stand ing commitment to the region, the general said. In particular, he suggested that China which he said is expanding its influence in Latin America appears ready to fill the void, especially in light of the likely seques tration-triggered cancellation of this years deployment to the region of the hospital ship USNS Comfort. With an unprecedented three naval deployments to Latin America since 2008, including a hospital ship visit in 2011, China is attempting to directly compete with U.S. military activities in the region, the Southcom commander said. Kelly said Southcom already is absorbing a cut of 26 percent across a range of pro grams, and that if defense cuts continue in coming years, there will be some missions we will simply no longer be able to conduct. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013

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A Womens History Month Leadership Panel was held March 18 at the NAS Jacksonville Chapel to hear several base leaders discuss their careers, experiences and challenges as women in todays U.S. Navy. The event kicked off as Master of Ceremonies Cmdr. Carol Schrader, Transient Personnel Unit/Pre-Trial Confinement Facility Jacksonville com manding officer welcomed the group and introduced the panel members: Capt. Gayle Shaffer, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville commanding officer; Capt. Christine Sears, NH Jacksonville executive officer; Capt. Ruby Tennyson, NH Jacksonville director for adminis tration; Cmdr. Molly Boron; VP-16 com manding officer and CMDCM(AW/SW) Bennora Simmons, NH Jacksonville command master chief. Shaffer was commissioned in the Navy Dental Corps in 1989 and received her Doctor of Dental Medicine from the University of Alabama in 1991. Her tours include: USS Puget Sound; Naval Dental Center (NDC) Great Lakes; 2nd Dental Battalion, 2nd Force Service Support Group, Camp Lejeune, N.C.; Combined Joint Task Force Horn of Africa and Operation Enduring Freedom; Branch Dental Clinic and Branch Health Clinic (BHC) Atsugi, Japan; National Naval Medical Center (NNMC) Bethesda, Md.; 1st Dental Battalion/NDC Camp Pendleton, Calif. and NH Okinawa. Sears earned her Doctor of Medicine from Northwestern University Medical School. After completing her surgical internship at Naval Medical Center San Diego in 1994, she reported to USS McKee. Her other tours include: NH Bremerton; Fleet Hospital 8, Rota, Spain in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom; NNMC Bethesda, Md. and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Tennyson enlisted in the Navy in 1980 serving as a dental techni cian. Her enlisted tours include: NAS Oceana, Va.; USS Yellowstone; NDC San Diego; Naval Station Roosevelt Roads. In 1990, she was selected for appointment to ensign in the Medical Service Corps. She earned her Master of Science from Naval Postgraduate School. As a medical officer, Tennyson served at the National NDC, Bethesda, Md.; Fleet Surgical Team 3; Amphibious Ready Group, Amphibious Squadron 1 deployed on board USS Peleliu; Navy Personnel Command, Millington, Tenn.; 3rd Dental Battalion at NDC, Okinawa, Japan; Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, Washington, DC and Naval BHC Everett, Wash. She also deployed to Kandahar, Afghanistan with NATO Role 3 Multinational Medical Unit. Boron earned her Bachelors degree from the Naval Academy in 1995. Her tours include: VF-101; VP-45; USS Theodore Roosevelt; VP-40 and Joint Staff (Force Structure, Resources and Assessment Directorate; Washington, D.C.). Simmons enlisted in the Navy in 1985 to become an air traffic control ler. Her tours include: NAS Sigonella, Italy; NAS Chasefield, Texas. After con verting to cryptologic technician in 1992, her tours included: Naval Security Group Activity, Galeta Island, Panama; Naval Security Group Detachment, Augsburg, Germany; NTTC Pensacola, Fla; PCU Roosevelt (DDG 80); USS John F. Kennedy; Center for Naval Leadership Learning Site, NS Mayport; NAS Jax celebrates Womens History Month JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013 9

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WOMENNavy Information Operations Center, Kunia, Hawaii; VF-102 and NAF Atsugi, Japan. She earned two masters degrees from University of Maryland. After each leader provided a brief background of their career paths, the floor was opened up for questions from the audience. Some of the ques tions included: What most influenced you to follow your career path, what has been the biggest challenge in your career, what do advice did they have to offer and how do they balance having a family and career? What influenced me the most to take my career path was the desire to get a higher education. I was the first person in my family to attend college and put myself through school. It was a great accomplishment for me, said Shaffer. I was taught by my mentor many years ago that if you want others to take you seriously, then you need to be better than they are. You need to believe in yourself and when chal lenges come up, dont be afraid to step out of your comfort zone. I never imagined myself as the commanding officer of a hospital, but here I am. Sears stressed her desire to use sci ence and technology as a means to help people in the healthcare indus try. The Navy has given me the oppor tunities to work in a field that I love and Im grateful for all Ive been able to accomplish in this field. I think the most difficult challenge for me is the resiliency of being able to determine what I want to do in my career as well as what the Navy wants. You have to find a way to reconcile the two to be successful, expressed Sears, who also talked about juggling her Navy and family life given her current assignment away from her family who remain in Maryland. When we are together, we spend quality family time together. Technology helps but it is very chal lenging being away from them, she continued. I think you can definitely have it all a career and a family, but you need to define what your all is. When asked about the challenges of executive management, Tennyson, who began her career as an enlisted service member says she never set her sights on becoming a naval officer. My goal was to become a com mand master chief. I never thought I would be in the Navy this long. Challenges based on my race and gender motivated me to learn, and do the best with my abilities, she said. Boron stressed that the key to being successful is performance. You have to be able to perform and make a name for yourself. You need to exude confidence and know your strengths, stated Boron. For me, I think the biggest chal lenges in my career have been tran sitioning from an F-14 pilot to the P-3s and now our squadrons latest transition to the new P-8 aircraft. But the Navy gives you a great toolbox for dealing with challenges. Mentorship was also a topic the panel discussed and according to Simmons, having a mentor definitely benefits junior Sailors. My first mentor was the only khaki female at my first duty station. She taught me to stand up for myself and to not be afraid to separate the friend ship line and leadership line of those you work with. Mentorship is very important to helping others be successful. A mentor should be someone who helps you develop professionally and personally, said Simmons. When asked if there she would take the same career path if she could do it all again, Simmons responded, After serving 28 years in the Navy, I wouldnt change anything.. Its been challenging but worth every minute. The event was hosted by NAS Jax Multicultural Awareness and Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville Diversity committees to mark Womens History Month which is observed in March. This years theme is: Women Inspiring Innovation Though Imagination: Celebrating Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. More than 11,000 officers and 56,000 enlisted women are currently serving in the Navyboth active duty and reservein squadrons, onboard ships and on shore duty. The Maritime Patrol Association (MPA) website is now accepting registra tions for its 2013 MPA Symposium April 18 -19 at NAS Jacksonville. The event encompasses two full days of special events that celebrate International Partnerships among avi ators, aircrew and maintainers. Symposium attendees can sign up for a host of events, including the Scholarship Golf Tournament and 5K, Flight Suit Social and Heritage Dinner. The Heritage Dinner, which will highlight the international partner ships of the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF), will also serve as a ceremony for two new Hall of Honor inductees from the MPRF com munity. The International Partnerships theme this year has really allowed us to step back and recognize the cooperative efforts of all of our maritime patrol and reconnaissance colleagues around the world, said VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens, president of MPA. We look forward to celebrating our intertwined heritage and our bright future with all of our symposium attend ees, he concluded. Interested MPRF personnel can find more information about the 2013 MPA Symposium, as well as register online, by going to: www.maritimepatrolasso ciation.org/symposium. Relay For Life: Military families wantedMilitary family teams are forming for the Relay for Life at Fleming Island High School May 3. The event remembers those who have lost their battle with cancer, support and encourage those who are fighting, and celebrate those who have survived their battle with cancer. If you are interested, please call Kari Wiese at (207) 730-3294. For more details, visit the Relay for life Web site at www.relayforlife.org/flemingislandfl. The team is called JAX MILITARY FAMILIES. Register now for 2013 MPA symposium 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013

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The Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) hosted its ninth annual public health equipment evaluation March 19-21 to test insecticide disper sal equipment to combat dis ease spreading and nuisance insects. The evaluation allows manu facturers to demonstrate new types of equipment that may be used by the Department of Defense to help protect deployed military personnel from insects carrying danger ous diseases. We are the only organiza tion dedicated solely to vector (insect) borne disease control and the only organization that evaluates spray equipment for all of the armed services, explained NECE Assistant Officer in Charge Lt. Cmdr. Carl Doud. We hold these events to see what the industry has to offer to meet the needs of the mili tary. We run the equipment through preliminary testing, conduct further testing as needed, and make recommen dations to the Armed Forces Pest Management Board. The equipment committee decides what is purchased for utiliza tion by preventive medicine teams in the field based on our recom mendations. Nine pieces of pesticide application equipment from six dif ferent com panies were evaluated during over the threeday event. Each piece of new equip ment is tested for charac teristics, reliability and safety issues. Another key criteria is droplet size which is measured using a state-of-the-art laser. During the testing process, the temperature is also care fully monitored because high or low temperatures (below 50 or above 85 degrees) can alter droplet size. We are looking for versatile, easy-touse, rugged pieces of equipment something that is applicable to multi-envi ronments and scenarios. We want to provide the best equip ment possible to our personnel deploying, added Doud. Most vector control equip ment is designed to target fly ing insects.The most effective technologies produce insecti cide droplets that will stay sus pended in the air long enough to contact a flying mosquito or other disease vector. The NECE public health equipment evaluation is international ly recognized and attracts partners from indus try, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, state government, mosquito control districts and foreign universi ties. We are also providing testing for the World Health Organization (WHO) which is a new aspect for us, said Doud. This is the first time weve provided support on an inter national level. We hope to soon be designated as a WHO col laborating center because we are one of the few organiza tions in the world that evalu ates on vector borne disease spray equipment. For more information on NECE, go to www.nmcphc. med.navy.mil/Field_Activities/ nece_overview.aspx New disease vector control equipment tested at NECE JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013 11

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The VP-45 Pelicans Combat Aircrew One demonstrated Pelican Pride while on detachment in the Philippines and working alongside Filipino military personnel. Operating out of historic Clark Air Base in Angeles City, Pelicans had the opportunity to collaborate with Filipino Air Force and Navy while executing multiple Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA) missions. Capt. Floremda, Armed Forces Philippines, recalled the countless hours spent in the classroom learning about MDA with the Royal Australian Air Force, only to have his expectations greatly exceeded while operating along side CAC-1 in the mighty P-3 Orion. As he said of the experience, Theres just no substitute for the real thing. Combat Aircrew One Navigator/ Communicator Lt. j.g. Jeff Clauser said, The whole experience was extremely rewarding. Its not every day that you get to share and receive invaluable mar itime tactical knowledge while fostering lasting friendships with a foreign mili tary. AWO2 Jonathan Goldmark, nonacoustic sensor operator, mentioned his exchange with one of the Filipino mili tary members. I thoroughly enjoyed demonstrating to our friends how we execute an MDA mission with non-acoustic sensors. It was also fun getting him in the seat and having him try his hand at utilizing the AIMS camera. At the end of the day, it was not only the spirit of hard work, pride, and dedi cation displayed by Pelicans that made this detachment a success, but of the support and collaborative efforts of the Filipino military and local community alike. This positive experience has paved the way for U.S. Armed Forces to further their relationship with the Filipino mili tary and display our values abroad. VP-5 transition spotlightAs VP-5 transitions to the P-8A Poseidon, the squadron is highlight ing a transitioning Mad Fox each week. This weeks Spotlight shines on AO3(AW) Rumiel Benson. Benson is a native of Grand Rapids, Mich. He is married with two sons. He has been in the Navy for four years and VP-5 is his very first tour. Benson and his fellow ordnance men began their transition Jan. 4 with an ordnance refresher course and familiarization at the P-8A Integrated Training Center. After that, they focused on ordnance specific sys tems on the aircraft at the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training. Throughout their courses, they have been working on their positional quali fications at VP-30. The VP-30 AO shop has been a tre mendous help, stated Benson. They have made sure to bring us in whenever training opportunities take place and answer all our questions. Benson believes the greatest chal lenge with the P-8A is the lack of a long history. Where the P-3C had a very established past with regard to trouble shooting, issues arising with the P-8A are the first instance ever occurring. It has been absolutely essential for VP-5, VP-30, and Boeing personnel to work together to tackle these issues and learn more about this new aircraft. VP-5 ordnancemen are also working on their plane captain qualifications. The P-3C was launched and recovered by linemen based on availability. The P-8A plane captain will have greater responsibility as each signs for a spe cific Poseidon and launches and recov ers it. Aviation ordnancemen are respon sible for the safe handling and loading of weapon stores and their respective systems aboard naval aircraft. In mari time patrol and reconnaissance they also load sonobuoys used for searching and tracking submarines. VP-45 strengthens mutual cooperation in the Philippines JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013 13

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Entertainment: March 29 Ace Winn April 5 Karaoke Deweys free Spring Concert Series 7 p.m. on the outdoor stage April 12 Big Engine April 19 State of Mind April 26 The Ride May 3 Boogie Freaks May 10 7th Street Band May 17 Zero-NFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday change of hours Open 410 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 126 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included Friday special $1 games per person 2 5 p.m. Shoe rental not included March Bowling Madness Command party give-a-way March 1 31Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours: April 1 May 5 Open Monday Friday (lap swim only) 6 a.m. 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday & Sunday (lap swim only) 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. During lap swim only the waterslide, water park and concessions will not be open. 2013 Learn to Swim Program Sign-up at the Gym (the Zone) May 11, 8 a.m. 3 p.m. Session 1: June 1020 Session 2 July 8-18 Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1 Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information, contact Melissa at 542-3518/4238 Capt. Chuck Cornett Navy Run April 6 at 8 a.m. $25 race day entry Zumba Party April 4, 11 a.m. 12 p.m. Hummvee Pull April 4 at 2 p.m. Athletic shoe and apparel sale April 46, 9 a.m. 6 p.m. Sign-up at www.1stplacesports.com Call 542-2930/3518I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Daytona International Speedway Subway Firecracker July 5 and Coke 400 July 6 Tickets on sale now! Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts Dark Side Of The Moon (Pink Floyd) April 13 at 7:30 p.m. Section A $33; Section B $28; Section C $23 A Lamb Chop Celebration April 20 at 7:30 p.m. Section A $18; Section B $14; Section C $11 Funkfest Metropolitan Park May 10-11 2-day ticket $52 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3 Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7 Blockout Dates: March 28 April 5 Call for pricing Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 2013 Live Broadway Series Anthony Bourdain April 24 $50 $70 Celtic Woman May 2 $44 $134 American Idiot May 14 & 15 $25 $62 Dream Girls May 21 Cesar Millan June 1 $42 $52 Blue Man Group in Orlando $59.50 includes City Walk venue Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31 and must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about our special discounted tick ets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park One day pass $30, Gold pass $71 Wet N Wild Orlando $32 $45The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Downtown Art Walk April 3 at 6 p.m. Final Four Championship Game April 8 at 8 p.m. Auto Skills Center Class April 11 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees April 9 & 23 for active duty April 11 & 25 for retirees, DoD person nel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty 31st Annual Bass Tournament April 13 at first light Register at the Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Month of the Military Child Carnival April 20, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Allegheny Softball Field Free games and activities!Flying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School June 3 July 10 $500 per person 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013

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Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville now has primary care managers (PCMs) available for TRICARE Prime enroll ment to a few groups who live within a 30-minute drive: active duty family members, retirees under age 65, and retiree dependents under age 65. NH Jacksonville uniquely offers its enrolled patients the Medical Home Port approach with PCMs lead ing coordinated care teams to meet patients preventive, routine and urgent care needs. People come from all over the nation to see us. You get the highest qual ity care and best outcomes, right here at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, said Capt. Gayle Shaffer, NH Jacksonville commanding officer. Our team of 2,500 military, civilian and contract staff ded icate themselves to taking care of our nations heroes past, present, future and their families. And we under stand and appreciate your service. Critical to NH Jacksonvilles approach to care, each of the 57,000 patients with a PCM at the hospital or a branch health clinic belongs to a Medical Home Port care team, the Navys approach to the nationwide medical home model of care. Medical Home Port places the patient in the center of a collabora tive team of caregivers from doctors and nurses to case managers led by their PCM. The patient and team work together for a coordinated, whole-per son approach to health. Our PCMsphysicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners not only have the same education and training as their private-sector col leagues, they also have experience on battlefields, at sea and on humanitar ian and disaster-relief missions, said Shaffer. In our hospital, we have PCMs in Family Medicine, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics offering primary care for the entire family, from birth through retirement. Patients enrolled with a PCM at one of NH Jacksonvilles facilities can com municate with their Medical Home Port care team on non-urgent issues using Medical Home Port Online secure email (to request appointments, lab results or medication refills). Register for Medical Home Port Online on the commands website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ navalhospitaljax or at www.relayhealth. com And to make appointments, call 542-4677 or 800-529-4677 (Central Appointments). The hospital and its branch health clinics offer enrolled patients a one stop shop experience with multi ple services on-site, such as pharma cy, laboratory and radiology. And NH Jacksonville uses an electronic health record system that supports safety and communication among providers. Patients also have access to NH Jacksonvilles 30-plus primary and spe cialty clinical areas from allergy to wellness. Patients can see some of the regions finest and most highly-trained surgeons including two of only seven fellowship-trained arthroplasty (joint replacement) surgeons in North Florida. Whats more, NH Jacksonville is the first hospital on Floridas First Coast military or civilian to earn Baby Friendly certification from the World Health Organization and UNICEF. Case managers coordinate care for patients with multiple, complex conditions. Free classes include wellness, pregnancy and parenting, and support for deployers and their family members. Specialty centers include diabetes, nutrition, breast care and deployment health. TRICARE Prime members with a PCM in the network can request a PCM at the hospital by completing a PCM Change Form at the TRICARE Service Center (located off-base at 769 Blanding Blvd. in Orange Park) or at the hospital with the TRICARE Health Benefits Advisors at 542-9164 or 542-9165. For more information, visit www. med.navy.mil/sites/navalhospitaljax www.facebook/navalhospitaljackson ville www.twitter.com/NHJax and www.youtube.com/user/navalhospital jax Sign up for e-mail updates at nhjax connect@med.navy.mil. Primary care managers available at hospital for TRICARE Prime enrollment JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013 15

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The NAS Jacksonville 2013 4-on-4 Flag Football League finished with a bang as nem esis VR-62 and VR-58 battled it out in the playoffs March 19. VR-62 was top seed in the play offs and VR-58 was the fourth seed. In the first meeting of the playoffs between the two teams, VR-58 pulled out a 14-13 nail bitter to send the top seed VR-62 to the losers bracket. VR-58 defeated VP-16, 35-28 to land in the championship awaiting the winner of the los ers bracket. VR-62 fought their way through the losers bracket by defeating Fleet Readiness Center, 28-20; then beating the VP-30 Officers, 14-7; and VP-16 42-19 to get another shot at the base championship. Due to the playoffs being a double elimination format, VR-62 would have to beat the four-time NAS Jacksonville 4-on-4 Flag Football Champions, VR-58, two games in a row to win the champion ship. In the first game of the cham pionship, defense was the story of day as the pass rush lead by VR-62s Mike Thomas sacked VR-58s Mark Mitchum six times and Matt Davis intercept ed two of Mitchums passes. VR-58s Mitchum was harassed and hurried all day and never was able to find time to get the ball down field as they had done for most of the playoffs. On the offensive side of the ball, VR-62s Quarterback Andrew Nightwine hit 25 of 37 passes and two touchdowns one to Sean Trombetta and the other to Jovan Young who had 15 catches for the Nomads. On defense, Young was shad owing VR-58s speedster Mike McCoy. McCoy was covering Young when VR-62 was on offense. Playing pretty much one on one with each other, these two key players did battle all day jumping, div ing and crashing in efforts to get the ball or make a play for their teams. VR-62 pulled out all their guns and went on to defeat VR-58 soundly with a score of 32-14. This forced a second and final game for the base championship. VR-62 appeared to look stronger going into the game, however, VR-58 held their own as both teams battled to a 0-0 draw at halftime. VR-62 came out in the second half with Nightwine hitting four straight passes to score on a 47-yard touchdown pass to Trombetta to go up 7-0. After Davis picked off a VR-58 pass, VR-62s Nightwine hit Young for a 70-yard touch down to make it 14-0. Vr-58s offense was dead in the water as Thomas was biting at the heels of Quarterback Mitchum on every play. Thomas had four sacks in this game. VR-58 finally got on the board on a sack of Nightwine by VR-58s Bennett in the end zone for a safety. Shortly after the safety, VR-58s McCoy picked off a Nightwine pass and then McCoy pulled in a 60-yard touchdown pass from VR-58s Mitchum. Suddenly it was 14-9 and VR-58 looked primed to pull off a last minute comeback as they had done so many times already in the playoffs. With four minutes left to play in the game, VR-58s defense came up clutch and stopped the Nomads to give them one more chance to win the game. VR-58 was unable to get a first down as VR-62s Thomas got another sack and Young knocked a fourth down pass away from a leaping McCoy. VR-62 ran out the clock to win their first NAS Jacksonville 4-on-4 Flag Football Championship with a hard fought 14-9 win. For more info, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil VR-62 captures 4-on-4 Flag Football Championship 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013

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Service members and DoD civilians can save money on official travel (i.e. permanent change of duty sta tion, or work-related) by staying at Navy Gateway Inns & Suites (NGIS). With more than 24,000 guest beds at military installations worldwide, NGIS offers lodging servic es for individual and group temporary duty travel ers, Department of Defense (DoD) civilians, Space Available (leisure) travelers, retirees, reservists and their sponsored guests. NGIS offers affordable lodging rates that support the continuing reductions of command travel expenses. Average lodging rates range from $32-$77, depend ing on location. Booking NGIS ensures that travel funds provide the opportunity for improvements to Department of Defense (DoD) lodging operations. NGIS provides a professionally managed, businessbased lodging program for all military and civilian travelers. Every Navy traveler has a responsibility as a stew ard of taxpayer dollars to ensure that federal funds are used for purposes that are appropriate and cost effective, said Commander, Navy Installations Command, Vice Adm. William French. While budget cuts and travel restrictions continue to be a challenge for everyone, there are many benefits to staying at Navy Gateway Inns and Suites for your official lodging needs. They offer value, convenience, great accommodations, service and affordable rates. Those staying at NGIS can expect a business lodging environment; in-room amenities to include internet access, cable television with premium channels, DVD player, telephone service, microwave and refrigerator; business center, wi-fi, vending machines, guest laun dry facilities, handicapped access and all guest rooms are non-smoking. Free in-room coffee and newspa pers as well as convenient on-base parking are also available. Staying at NGIS not only provides great lodging at great prices, but it also offers the convenience of other base amenities, said Tammy Davis, Navy Lodging program manager. Active duty military, retirees and family members can visit the Navy Exchange. Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) offers discounted tickets to area attractions, swimming pools, golf courses, beaches, movie theaters, youth centers and other great MWR activities taking place on base. For catering and conference needs, contact the host region for particulars on reserving a conference cen ter. Reservations at Navy Gateway Inns and Suites are made on a first-come, first-served basis without regard to rate or rank. Non-duty reservations may be made up to 30 days in advance for up to a seven-night stay by calling 877-NAVY-BED (enter the first three letters of the base) or by making reservations at http:// dodlodging.net. TDY reservations may be made at any time by phone or at the website as well. Group reserva tions are also available. NGIS partners with Navy Lodge to maximize onbase government lodging for TDY travelers and to ensure travelers have every opportunity to stay on base while performing training or meeting mis sion requirements. Reservations can be made at 800-NAVY-INN (800-628-9466). Free tax assistanceREAL$ENSE (United Way) is offer ing free tax preparation service Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Building 13 (second floor) at the NAS Jax Main Gate. Appointments are recommended for weekdays although walk-ins will be helped. Saturday is walk-in availability only. To make an appointment, call 7292119. NGIS save you and the Navy money JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013 17

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With just nine weeks remaining in the school year, fewer for those with seniors, does your child need help get ting over the end-of-the year hump? Tutor.com offers help with homework, studying, and test preparation in more than 16 subjects from elementary math to physics. All military dependent students (of active duty military) worldwide can use the program, regardless of where they attend school. If a student has become bogged down in a particular course and nothing you provide seems to help, try Tutor.com. Navy service members and their fami lies now have free, unlimited access to online tutoring from Tutor.com. Expert tutors help students of all ages from K-12 to college to adult learners one-to-one in math, science, social studies and English, as well as with resume writing, and interview prepara tion. Help is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Whenever a student needs help, they enter the question and will be connected to a tutor in an interactive online classroom and work one-to-one in math, science, social studies, and English until the problem is solved. All tutors are screened, certified and background-checked. All sessions are recorded and reviewed for quality con trol. This program is provided by the Department of Defense. Authorized patrons include U.S. active duty mili tary service members, U.S. military reservists, U.S. National Guard person nel on active duty in a deployed status, and DoD civilians in a deployed status, and their dependents. To access the program, login to Navy Knowledge Online account and click on the REFERENCE tab. Look for the Tutor.com box in the right column, and click on the links Kids and Teens or Adults to get a tutor. Authorized users will then follow instructions on the Web site for pass word and login information. It is also about this time that the pres sure to get high marks on exams kicks in. Students who get nervous before a test should be encouraged to try the following tips and strategies for keep ing anxiety down and energy up for the next big exam. Dont cram: Studying like crazy the night before an exam can leave your child exhausted and more stressed out than before. Studying is more effective if done in small doses over several days. Make up practice questions or take practice tests: Knowing the format and style of a test can reduce anxiety. Encourage students to always ask their teachers about how the test will be formatted. Studying is so much more effective when you know what types of questions youll be answering. Get a good nights sleep: Lack of sleep contributes heavily to anxiety. Be sure your child goes to bed on time the night before an exam. Eat a healthy breakfast: Blood sugar is at its lowest in the morning. In order to think and problem-solve effective ly, students need to refuel. But a good breakfast for one child is not the same for another. Figure out what works best for you child. Read through the exam to budget time: By looking over the test, your child can avoid any unexpected sur prises (and anxiety). Previewing also insures finishing in the allotted time. Read all directions: Some students are so anxious to get the test over with that they fail to read the directions. Jot notes: Jotting down brief notes right away can help your child feel less anxious about forgetting impor tant facts or key information. Some stu dents write important formulas or criti cal dates in the margin as soon as they receive their test papers. Answer easy questions first: Getting the easier questions out of the way builds self-confidence and allows your child the time to focus more clearly on the harder questions. Organize thoughts before writ ing: Students who organize their writ ing responses before they start writing typically score higher. Having a plan or even a short outline insures a wellstructured response which hits all the main points. Think positively: Negative thoughts during a test (e.g., Im going to fail) can not only destroy your childs con fidence, but also take up valuable time which should be used to concentrate on the test! Using these tips wont necessar ily keep anxiety away completely. However, practicing these techniques can give your child the right skills to manage test stress when it does happen. So hopefully a combination of tutoring through Tutor.com and these test tips will help your child achieve success and readily promote to the next grade. For questions or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, contact NAS Jax School Liaison Officer Dawn Mills at 778-2236/4868221 or dawn.m.mills@navy.mil Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office located in the Youth Activity Center. Navy Housing Early Application Tool helps service members make earlier, more informed decisions Navy Housing now offers the Housing Early Application Tool (HEAT), an online tool for service members and their families to get housing informa tion and start the application process. Service members can use HEAT and begin gather ing information with or without orders in-hand. The first of its kind for service members and avail able Navy wide, HEAT connects customers with mul tiple Navy Housing Service Centers (HSCs) so they can review all of their housing options at any potential duty stations before accepting orders. HEAT can also start the housing application process for those interested in military family housing (priva tized, government, and leased). Service members want to make smart decisions when negotiating their orders, and we recognize that housing cost, types and availability are key to that decision-making process, said Michael Bowlin, Navy Housing Services program analyst. HEAT enables them to research their housing options and make the best choices for both their careers and their family. Even family members can use HEAT, as it is acces sible from any computer. Navy Housing released a short, informational video about HEAT that can be found on the Navy Housing HEAT website. Service members and their families can visit the website to begin their housing search online and to contact their next HSC at www.cnic.navy.mil/HEAT. Get free test prep help for your student Dear Kate, My kids leave a lot of lights on. I try to run around and turn them off, but usu ally they go to school with three to four still burning energy. Any ideas? Signed, Tired of nagging about lights Dear Tired, Ive been in your shoes, and it can be tough to get everyone on board with a habit change. A low-tech solution is the simple post-it-note. Post bright-colored notes on the light switch, and reward the family if the monthly electricity bill goes down. Pizza anyone? Another solution is occupancy sen sors. These turn the lights off automati cally when no one is in the room. They are a simple installation so you can do it or hire a handyman. Lights are a big energy user in the home, and staying on top of the situa tion will save you money. Kate Do you have a question for Kate? E-mail her at askkate@watton.com And yes, there is a real Kate. She has helped hundreds of consum ers save energy the easy way through habits and low cost changes. Everyone saves after Kates home visit, even the greenest of homes. Shes that good! 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013

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More than 90 golfers signed up to play at the USO Memorial Charity Golf Tournament March 22 at the NAS Jacksonville Golf Club. With temps in the mid-60s, light clouds and a noticeable cool breeze, conditions were ideal for the shotgun start, step-aside format. This is our second USO Memorial Charity Golf Tournament to fund programs for our service members and families, said Greater Jacksonville Area USO Development Director Bob Ross. Our sponsors have been outstanding, as well as our area golfers, so I wouldnt be surprised if we raise up to $30,000 from this event. And it all goes to help improve military morale and quality of life right here in Northeast Florida. This is a great day for golf and wonderful way to support the programs of our local USO, said NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders. One thing that we always strive for at NAS Jacksonville is our commitment to excellence. And thats why you can always depend on the team of caring people at our Greater Jacksonville Area USO they always put our Sailors and families first. Thank you.Golfers raise funds for USO JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013 19

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After nearly 30 years of naval service, friends, family and service members gathered at Naval Station Mayport to bid farewell to Oliver Perry class frigate USS Klakring (FFG 42) at its March 22 decommissioning ceremony. With the ships company man ning the rails, Capt. Paul Flood, Commander, Destroyer Squadron 14, talked about the long, proud tradition of Klakring. From maritime patrols in the Persian Gulf, anti-piracy operations off the coast of Africa, to counter narcotics patrols in the Caribbean Sea, Klakring has always performed exceptionally, said Flood. He went on to thank Cmdr. Bertram Hodge, commanding officer of Klakring, for his leadership as the ship prepared to decommission. I have been fortunate as a Commodore to be able to rely on Hodge, because he knows that the morale of a ship is in its ability to get underway and successfully complete the mission, said Flood. Hodge then addressed the crowd, and spoke about the hard work of the crew and carrying on the tradition of Klakring to the fleet. I could spend my entire speech praising the efforts of the crew they did an outstanding job. As they depart Klakring, they will go on to their next commands and take the fighting spirit of the Klakring with them, said Hodge. In more than 29 years of service Klakring completed more than 22 deployments from three home ports and traveled more than 3.2 million miles worldwide during its service time. Those deployments included the Middle East, South America, Europe and Africa. Klakring was commissioned Aug. 20, 1983 and is named after Rear Adm. Thomas Klakring (1904-1975), a Navy submarine commander during World War II. Klakrings final deployment was to the U.S. 4th Fleet area of responsibil ity, operating in the Caribbean Sea and off the Coast of South America, in support of Operation Martillo a U.S., European, and Western Hemisphere partner nation effort targeting illic it trafficking routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. The ceremony concluded with the crew of Klakring departing the ship, once the last Sailor crossed the brow, the ship was officially decommissioned. Defense Department officials will do what it takes to end sexual assault in the military, the Pentagons top acting gen eral counsel told Congress recently. Robert Taylor told the Senate Armed Services Committees personnel sub committee that DoD is building a struc ture to address sexual assault in the military, and that changes in the legal arena are in the works. The General Counsel Office is work ing with the service judge advocates general to make our judicial, inves tigative and support structures more efficient, effective and responsive to the rights and needs of victims, while pre serving the rights of the accused, he said. Taylor was part of a full day of testi mony before the committee. Earlier in the day, victims of sexual abuse testi fied about their experiences and spoke of a lack of interest exhibited by com manders and a lack of justice in the sys tem. I watched the hearing this morn ing, and I want to take this opportunity to thank the witnesses for coming for ward, Taylor said. I believe that their testimony will contribute to making our military better. An immediate concern to the sub committee was the 3rd Air Force com mander Lt. Gen. Craig Franklin using his discretion under the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) to dismiss charges against an Air Force lieutenant colonel convicted of sexual abuse. In such an instance, once a commander acts, no one can overturn it. Victims and victims rights advocates are up in arms over the dismissal under Article 60 of the UCMJ. They say it per verts the justice system and undoes any good that changes in policies to combat sexual assault have made. A longstanding issue of concern is the significant role the commanders have in the administration of military justice generally and specifically in cases involving allegations of sexual assault, Taylor said. Over the years, Congress has pre served the central role of commanders in the administration of military jus tice, he said. However, Taylor added, the role of commanders has been narrowed numerous times to provide protections for the accused. So it would be a mis reading of the long legislative history of the UCMJ to put the role of a command er beyond a careful re-examination. And thats exactly what Taylor said his office will do. The department has initiated a num ber of reviews to inform Congress and the secretary of defense regarding the advisability of additional changes to the administration of military justice, he said. Taylor said he will work with an inde pendent panel to examine the systems used to investigate, prosecute and adju dicate sexual assault. The panel also will consider the role of convening authorities in the military justice process, including the authority to set aside a court-martials findings of guilt, he said. Taylor says he enters this with an open mind, but said lawyers must pro ceed carefully to ensure that changes to the administration of military justice are constructive and avoid any unin tended negative repercussions. But proper care and caution can not be an excuse for doing nothing, he added. Our men and women in uniform serve to protect us every day, he said. They put their lives on the line for us, for this great country of ours. We owe them a military in which sexual preda tors have no part and sexual assault has no place. USS Klakring decommissioned at MayportDoD examines UCMJ changes to combat sexual assaults 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013

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THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 2013 FOOD PANTRY HSM-70 HELPING USO Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com The HSM-72 Detachment Eight Doomsdayers returned home to NAS Jacksonville from a nine-month deployment to the Fifth Fleet area of respon sibility March 27. Embarked on the Norfolk, Va. based USS Winston S. Churchill (DDG81), the two-plane detachment returned home after a lengthy and demanding cruise. The detachment and crew departed NS Norfolk June 20, 2012 as part of the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (CSG-8) to conduct maritime security operations, the ater security cooperation, and various support missions with in the U.S. Central Command region. Led by Lt. Cmdr. Jeremiah Binkley and ADC(AW/SW) Rommel Pitts, Detachment Eight is one of the final two legacy detachments operating the SH-60B airframe for HSM-72. Binkley and Pitts led six pilots, three aircrewmen, and 16 maintenance professionals The VP-62 Broadarrows Medical Department was awarded the 2012 Blue M for medical readiness March 10, for the second consecutive year. The Blue M is only given to those commands that maintain a high level of medical readiness. Recipients of the award must score a 90 percent or better on a medical record audit performed by Naval Air Force Reserve. Acknowledging our corpsmen is the most important thing, said Capt. Michael MacDonald, VP-62 flight surgeon. They are the ones who spend the countless hours keeping our records on track For VP-62, that person is HM1 Russell Bolton. As the only full-time corpsman in a reserve squadron, maintaining medical readiness can often pose a difficult task. Luckily he is not alone in this task. Ive had a lot of help from my Reserve counterpart, HM2 Michael Duer, as well as the corpsmen from our neighboring squadrons. And I couldnt have done it without the support of the Navy Operation Support Center Jacksonville medical team. We all work hand in hand, said Bolton. It really doesnt matter who helps you or who gets the credit for it, the only thing that matters is that the customer is taken care of. Southcom chief warns budget issues could affect national securityU.S. Southern Commands top officer told a Senate panel recently that he is gravely concerned about the effects sequestra tion and other budget constraints will have NAS Jax and NS Mayport Sailors Brush with Kindness More than 25 personnel from NAS Jacksonville, NS Mayport and their tenant commands volunteered more than 150 hours with Habitat for Humanity Jacksonville March 16. They served in the urban core where 26 per cent of children live below the poverty level. The volunteers added to the hundreds of others who supported Habitats A Brush With Kindness proj ect. The project ran six weeks and helped revitalize 26 homes in the New Town area of Jacksonville. A Brush With Kindness is part of Habitat for Humanitys larger Neighborhood Revitalization Initiative. To compliment the 1,800 homes the organization has built since 1988, this initiative supports existing homeowners with exte rior minor repair, weatherization, and necessary remodeling. The teams, comprised of all different ranks and rates, scraped and painted, sorted garbage from collected piles, repaired wooden framing, landscaped and reclaimed underutilized space. The homeowners could not stop thanking the teams as the effect was incredible. Their homes were radically different from our arrival and Doomsdayers last ride marks end of an era Broadarrows are repeat winners of medical readiness award

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS March 28 1800 Essex becomes first U.S. Navy vessel to pass Cape of Good Hope. 1814 HMS Phoebe and Cherub capture USS Essex off Valparaiso, Chile. Before capture, Essex had captured 24 British prizes during the War of 1812. 1848 USS Supply reaches the Bay of Acre, anchoring under Mount Carmel near the village of Haifa, during expedition to explore the Dead Sea and the River Jordan. March 29 1954 Carrier aircraft began reconnaissance near Dien Bien Phu, Indochina. 1960 Launch of first fully integrated Fleet Ballistic Missile from USS Observation Island (T-AGM-23). 1973 Naval Advisory Group and Naval forces, Vietnam disestablished and last U.S. prisoners of war left Vietnam. 1975 Evacuation of DaNang by sea begun. March 30 1944 First use of torpedo squadrons from carriers to drop aerial mines (Palau Harbor). 1972 Easter Offensive begins in Vietnam. March 31 1854 Commodore Matthew Perry negotiates Treaty of Kanagawa to open trade between U.S. and Japan. 1971 Poseidon (C-3) missile becomes operational when USS James Madison began her third patrol carrying 16 tactical Poseidon missiles. 1992 USS Missouri (BB-63), the last active American battleship is decommissioned. April 1 1893 Navy General Order 409 of Feb. 25 1893 establishes the rate of Chief Petty Officer. 1917 BM1 John Eopolucci, a Naval Armed Guard on board the steamship Aztec, died when the vessel was sunk by a German U-boat. He was the first U.S. Navy sailor killed in action in World War I. 1942 First Naval Air Transportation Service (NATS) squadron for Pacific operations commissioned. 1945 Over 1,200 Navy ships and Army troops begin invasion of Okinawa. 1966 U.S. Naval Forces Vietnam established. April 2 1781 Frigate Alliance captures two British priva teers, Mars and Minerva. 1827 First Naval Hospital construction begun at Portsmouth, Va. 1947 UN places former Japanese mandated islands under U.S. trusteeship. 1951 First Navy use of jet aircraft as a bomber, launched from a carrier, USS Princeton. 1960 The icebreaker USS Glacier (AGB-4) begins 12 days of relief operations, providing helicopter and boat transportation, plus emergency supplies to resi dents of Paramaribo, Suriname after floods. April 3 1797 Capt. Thomas Truxtun issued first known American signal book using numerary system. 1992 First five coed recruit companies from Orlando, Fla. Naval Training Center graduate. A January article written by David Wood for Huffington Post has risen from the dead and its making many military families mad again. The article, Defense budget faces cuts to personnel after decade of war, has more than 60 pages of comments, half of which were made within days of its release on January 30. On page 31, however, after nearly a month of silence, the comments picked up again on March 11. Soon after, it went viral in the military commu nity. I dont know who dug up this relatively old column, but according to an editors note at the bottom, language has been added [post-publication] to clarify some calculations, making this piece of walkingdead commentary something like Frankenstein. Its been patched up and given new life, and now its terrorizing the military community. Oh, and the monster is still evolving. Under pressure and scru tiny, Wood has revised his text multiple times. His original opening sentence was probably the scariest of all: For more than a decade, Congress and the Pentagon have lavished money on the nations 1.3 million active-duty troops and their families. But the word lavished has since been deleted. Semantics and edit-andrewrite-as-you-go journalism aside, Woods biggest prob lem is his apples-to-apples approach to military versus civilian pay that overlooks the hidden costs of military life. Since 2001, total military compensation, including pay and benefits, grew by 20.5 percent, while comparable pri vate-sector civilian pay did not increase at all, Wood writes. The cost of military compen sation rose steeply even though the size of the active-duty force grew by only 3 percent during that period. We military families dont understand Woods confusion with this. The pay grew by 20.5 percent because of everything that the slightly increased force has been expected to do since 2001 mainly, more frequent and longer deployments. To make his point about military and civilian pay, Wood states that an Army master sergeant who has been in the service since 9/11 and is stationed at Fort Drum makes about $85,000 a year. This number is deceiving. Also, its highly unlikely that anyone would rise to the rank of master ser geant in 10 years. Even so, the base pay for a master sergeant with 10 years of service is about $50,000/year. Allowances for housing and cost of living would be added to the base pay according to the location of the duty station. But lets go with Woods fig ure anyway. According to the U.S. Department of Labors Web site CareerOneStop, an accountant in 2011 could expect to make about $109,900 in a year. But the accountant is com ing home every night. He doesnt leave his family for a year at a time (which often increases child care expens es). And, in general, he doesnt move every three years (more on this below). His life isnt at the whim of the U.S. govern ment. He can wear what he chooses, take vacation when he prefers, and besides a boss and his customers, he doesnt answer to anyone. Yes, the accountant prob ably has to pay for healthcare, and he doesnt get tax-free groceries, but, well, hes mak ing $20,000 more than the guy whos risking his life overseas. All of the above is why Woods whining about military shoppers 30 percent savings on groceries at the commissary falls on unsympathetic ears. Yes, we have access to tax-free groceries, but my husband is required to buy, out of his own pay, many of his uniforms the same ones the military forces him to wear. We dont get a company car. And our free healthcare equates to being seen at government-run hospi tals that are equivalent in inefficiency and frustration to the Department of Motor Vehicles. Wood leaves these comparisons out, focusing only on what military families get on paper. But even those facts dont always add up. Wood writes, [T]he Pentagon pays all housing costs for families who live off base. This is absolutely false. The military gives us a housing allowance based on local civilian housing markets. And its not the lavish market, either. That same hypotheti cal master sergeant making $50,000 in base pay would get an additional $2,300 monthly for housing if he was stationed in Washington, D.C. The aver age rate for a 2-bedroom apartment near D.C. is $2,341. But these figures say noth ing to the fact that military families can rarely build equity in a home. In 13 years of mar riage, Dustin and I have moved a half-dozen times, and weve lost money in real estate every single time. I agree with Wood that there are many areas of wasted spending in the military. As with any government agency, it is full of redundancies, inef ficiencies and frustrations. The general public will learn more about this when they, too, are in government-run health care. But to say that service members are treated lavishly and with an overabundance of allowances and bonuses is inaccurate and frankly offen sive. Its time for Woods column (http://www.huffingtonpost. com/2013/01/30/defense-bud get-cuts_n_2584099.html) to go back into the dark recesses of the Internet.MoneyChic Sez: Heres a catch up to whats been going on! A Sailor and his wife are having their first baby. They want to know ways to make being a family of three less expensive. Weve covered fbeing prepared for the fact that babies will continue to cost money! Now lets get down to the dirty busi ness of diapers -that will be your most expensive purchase until your baby is potty trained. If you are going to use dis posable, consider buying in bulk as it always makes the price per diaper lower. Some people swear by store brand, where others will only buy premium. Take advantage of different buyer programs diaper companies offer. Some reward you with points (found on each diaper package) that can be redeemed for prizes or gift cards. Dont be afraid to call the manufac turer and ask for coupons. Each company knows their products so maybe they can offer a suggestion you didnt think of. Sign up for manufacturer Welcome to New Baby programs and see what you receive in the mail. There are always coupons and deals to be found on dia pers at the stores. Discuss how your child will be fed. Make sure you are on the same page when it comes to the nutrition of your baby. If mom plans to breastfeed, she is going to need encouragement and sup port. Breastfeeding comes easy to some and others have to work hard at it the entire time. Make sure your wife is eating a balanced diet, drinking plenty of fluids, and is relaxed. Lactation consultants are available at the hospital to assist in making the breastfeeding process a smoother one. If using formula, sign up for the formula manufacturers new baby programs as well. Most will send you canisters of formula as a welcome home present along with others items. Look for coupons in the mail or call and request them. The Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society offers the Budget for Baby class to help you prepare financially. For coming to the class you will also receive a free layette filled with towels, bibs, sleep n plays, and sheets for your baby. Call 5422832 to sign up. A financial plan can also be put together at NMCRS by one of their caseworkers to help you see what your finances will look like after that baby is here. Have questions for Hey, Money Chic? Drop me an email at megan.stolle@ nmcrs.org .Writer misses hidden cost of military life

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Chief of Naval Personnel (CNP) addressed Sailors during an all-hands call aboard Naval Station Norfolk, March 18. Vice Adm. Scott Van Buskirk took this opportunity to discuss issues affecting Sailors naval careers, their families and their futures. One of the big-ticket items in the news lately is the Tuition Assistance Program (TAP). Ninety percent of Sailors who use TAP complete the courses they take and Navy leadership is actively working to keep TAP in this tough economy, said Van Buskirk. They are looking at the structure to allow those Sailors who are eligible to continue to use it. He also discussed the continued impact Sailors have throughout the fleet from an operational standpoint. The missions you are accomplishing are making a difference in the world because you are all tremendous ambassadors, said Van Buskirk. We have supported deployments on the ground and on ships and are fully engaged in supporting critical missions from the Horn of Africa to Afghanistan to the Western Pacific. Van Buskirk said his number one priority is to man the fleet by ensuring Sailors are assignable, deployable and distributable. In the last year, we have had 90 percent Perform to Serve (PTS) approval and greater than 95 percent in the last four months. Van Buskirk said the Navy is con tinuing to make improvements to PTS, which increases Sailors ability to have a say in their career and improve the ability to distribute Sailors where the Navy needs them most. During the question and answer session, Van Buskirk was asked about the Navys current financial state since enacting sequestration and what the future holds. It feels good to know that Navy leadership hears our concerns and for the CNP to come and let us know that he is on our side and doing everything for Sailors, said BM2(SW/AW) Darius Branch. When asked about retirement pay, Van Buskirk said a commission will be stood up to look at retirement pay, but current active duty will be grandfa thered into the current retirement pay. Much of the question and answer session focused on family related pro grams, and Van Buskirk assured attendees the Navy is dedicated to helping Sailors and their families. The Our Navy remains committed to maintaining the funding for our Sailors and family readiness programs as much as possible, and our goal is to have no impact on those programs in the future, said Van Buskirk. CNP talks tuition assistance, PTS and more JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013 3

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Due to the editors error on Page 1 in the March 21 edition of Jax Air News VP-5 was incorrectly identified as the Pelicans. VP-5 is correctly called the Mad Foxes. We sincerely regret this error. 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013

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Chapel and NEX promote food driveThe NAS Jax Chapel, in conjunction with the NAS Jax Navy Exchange, has initiated a food drive that will run through May 1 in order to restock the chapels food pan tries for families in need. NEX Customers and employees are encouraged to bring any non-perishable items to one of two donation boxes set up in the exits of the Navy Exchange or bring them directly to the chapel. Donations are primarily used to assist active duty and retired military members who may be struggling with financial hardship, but have also been used to support charitable organizations in the local commu nity. Even though our first goal is to support our Sailors and their families, in the past we have worked with organizations such as Waste not Want not and Second Harvest in distributing food to some of Jacksonvilles charities, commented RP1 Gregory Haywood with the NAS Jax Chapel. We mainly receive donations from base commands, the commissary, and the Navy Wives Club of America. At the moment we are encouraging this food drive in order to help us restock our food pantries and continue to support our people and community, said Haywood. For more information on donations or supporting the food drive, contact the NAS Jax Chapel at 542-3051. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013 Established in February 2009 at NAS Jacksonville, Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 70 is the first east coast squadron to fly the MH-60R Seahawk commonly known as the Romeo variant. Now, theyre celebrating their first Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic Battle Efficiency (Battle E) award for the HSM category. HSM-70 Spartans Commanding Officer Cmdr. Christopher Herr congratulated his squadron. Winning this Battle E is special because in 2011 we just missed it by a hair. For 2012, even though we were deployed for a relatively short time with Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8 and USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) Carrier Strike Group our sub sequent shore-based operations schedule was packed with detachments, including: for Navy training squadrons. Test and Evaluation Center for anti-submarine training. Americas aboard USS Gettysburg (CG 64). ment to support the Naval Undersea Warfare Centers lightweight Mk 54 torpedo testing near Cape Cod, Mass. Herr added, Im particularly proud of our performance after our homecoming from Bush. Typically, you enter the maintenance phase and drop off a lot of aircraft for rework which limits aircraft availability and flight hours. But, our people did a great job with the resources at hand and despite a large turnover of personnel, they supported our schedule of weap ons delivery and tactical training that will help springboard us into our next deployment cycle. Herr said, Basically, our squad ron is in the business of shielding a carrier strike group by dropping torpedoes and shooting missiles. Were not thinking about the Battle E in our everyday work. For pilots and aircrew, its mostly doing your job by the book. It also takes maintainers, ordnancemen and support personnel who work tirelessly to ensure our Romeos are up and available at all times. When we deploy the full squadron (11 aircraft), well have three Romeos on the carrier and four two-plane detachments on the carrier strike groups supporting ships. Currently, under CR/seques tration, the Spartans upcoming deployment has shifted so theyre planning for their next six-month workup cycle to begin sometime this summer. With this schedule shift, we get some time to catch our breath, reevaluate our training objec tives, and make sure our Romeos are flying with the latest software upgrade. Were fortunate that our air wing (CVW-8) was not one of the four recently grounded by Navy Secretary Ray Mabus. That means weve got the funding, people and parts to complete our missions, concluded Herr.

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in the execution of nearly 1,100 mishap-free flight hours. The lengthy deployment allowed the detachment to conduct exercises with several allied nations to enhance interoperabil ity in the strategic maritime environment. During Exercise Lucky Mariner 2012, the Doomsdayers led the way in protecting a convoy of merchant shipping against asymmetric threats an exercise not conducted since the 1980s. Operationally, the Doomsdayers executed a wide array of mis sions including 14 armed transits of the Strait of Hormuz, escorting coalition warships and ensuring freedom of navigation for com mercial theater shipping. Additionally, aircrews launched sev eral times on short notice to investigate suspected weapons and narcotics smugglers. The abil ity to answer the call with little notice, around the clock, is a tes tament to the entire detach ments capa bilities and professional ism. Most notably, Detachment Eight rescued a severely injured civilian mariner off the M/V Belde for immediate medical treatment in Oman. The medical evacuation crew, comprised of Binkley, Lt. Alan Shingler, AWR1 Joshua Wyckoff and AWR2 Kelvi Bonanofeliciano, hoisted the injured crewmember from the ships bridge wing after lowering Bonanofeliciano on board the vessel. For his efforts in securing the injured crewmem ber, Bonanofeliciano was recognized as the Naval Helicopter Association Region Three Rescue Swimmer of the Year. Professionally, several detachment members also advanced in rank and earned qualifications. Throughout the past year, 100 percent of detachment members eligible for advancement made rate, five junior maintenance per sonnel earned their enlisted aviation warfare specialist qualifica tion, and seven members earned enlisted surface warfare specialist qualifications. The return home for the Doomsdayers has been a long time in the making. The conclusion of a successful nine-month deploy ment caps an impressive legacy at HSL-42. Although Detachment Eight is returning home to a squadron with a different designation, operating the new Romeo variant of the Seahawk helicopter, the Doomsdayers are being welcomed home with the same Proud Warrior pride and tradition that has resided in the squadron for 25 years. Detachment Eight has surely added to this pride and rightfully earned a lasting place in the annals of the HSM-72 Proud Warriors storied history. HSM-72 HABITAT SOUTHCOMshone bright in their neighborhoods. With such a tremendous turn-out, the groups have paved the way for a continu ing partnership with Habitat for Humanity. Plans are in the works to have regular opportunities for Team Jax and the tenant commands to continue serving our community in truly life changing ways. on the United States ability to deter and respond to regional security challenges and he warned the cuts will damage U.S. leadership, readiness and national security. In nearly every area of U.S military engagement in the Southcom region, Marine Corps Gen. John Kelly told the Senate Armed Services Committee, sequestration will have a negative impact on U.S opera tions or influence. In particular, the spend ing cuts affect preventing illegal drugs from entering the United States, potentially allowing hundreds of tons of cocaine and other illicit products to flood into our cities, he said in prepared remarks to the committee. The day could also soon arrive, Kelly said, when Southcom has no assigned DOD surface assets to conduct detention and monitoring operations, citing a January memo from the chief of naval operations that warned sequestration will compel the Navy to stop all deployments to the Caribbean and South America. The budget sequester, which took effect March 1, has forced the Defense Department to absorb $46 billion in cuts through the rest of the fiscal year, which ends Sept. 30, while an ongoing continuing resolution (CR) continues to impose finan cial uncertainty on military spending as well in the absence of a fiscal year budget. Kelly emphasized that the budget issues come amid regional security challenges and pose potentially devastating long-term impacts. Significantly, reduced U.S military engagement will make it difficult to counter those who would seek to exploit perceptions that the U.S. is abandoning our long-stand ing commitment to the region, the general said. In particular, he suggested that China which he said is expanding its influence in Latin America appears ready to fill the void, especially in light of the likely sequestration-triggered cancellation of this years deployment to the region of the hospital ship USNS Comfort. With an unprecedented three naval deployments to Latin America since 2008, including a hospital ship visit in 2011, China is attempting to directly compete with U.S. military activities in the region, the Southcom commander said. Kelly said Southcom already is absorbing a cut of 26 percent across a range of pro grams, and that if defense cuts continue in coming years, there will be some missions we will simply no longer be able to conduct. 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013

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A Womens History Month Leadership Panel was held March 18 at the NAS Jacksonville Chapel to hear several base leaders discuss their careers, experiences and challenges as women in todays U.S. Navy. The event kicked off as Master of Ceremonies Cmdr. Carol Schrader, Transient Personnel Unit/Pre-Trial Confinement Facility Jacksonville commanding officer welcomed the group and introduced the panel members: Capt. Gayle Shaffer, Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville commanding officer; Capt. Christine Sears, NH Jacksonville executive officer; Capt. Ruby Tennyson, NH Jacksonville director for adminis tration; Cmdr. Molly Boron; VP-16 commanding officer and CMDCM(AW/SW) Bennora Simmons, NH Jacksonville command master chief. Shaffer was commissioned in the Navy Dental Corps in 1989 and received her Doctor of Dental Medicine from the University of Alabama in 1991. Her tours include: USS Puget Sound; Naval Dental Center (NDC) Great Lakes; 2nd Dental Battalion, 2nd Force Service Support Group, Camp Lejeune, N.C.; Combined Joint Task Force Horn of Africa and Operation Enduring Freedom; Branch Dental Clinic and Branch Health Clinic (BHC) Atsugi, Japan; National Naval Medical Center (NNMC) Bethesda, Md.; 1st Dental Battalion/NDC Camp Pendleton, Calif. and NH Okinawa. Sears earned her Doctor of Medicine from Northwestern University Medical School. After completing her surgical internship at Naval Medical Center San Diego in 1994, she reported to USS McKee. Her other tours include: NH Bremerton; Fleet Hospital 8, Rota, Spain in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom; NNMC Bethesda, Md. and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Tennyson enlisted in the Navy in 1980 serving as a dental techni cian. Her enlisted tours include: NAS Oceana, Va.; USS Yellowstone; NDC San Diego; Naval Station Roosevelt Roads. In 1990, she was selected for appointment to ensign in the Medical Service Corps. She earned her Master of Science from Naval Postgraduate School. As a medical officer, Tennyson served at the National NDC, Bethesda, Md.; Fleet Surgical Team 3; Amphibious Ready Group, Amphibious Squadron 1 deployed on board USS Peleliu; Navy Personnel Command, Millington, Tenn.; 3rd Dental Battalion at NDC, Okinawa, Japan; Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, Washington, DC and Naval BHC Everett, Wash. She also deployed to Kandahar, Afghanistan with NATO Role 3 Multinational Medical Unit. Boron earned her Bachelors degree from the Naval Academy in 1995. Her tours include: VF-101; VP-45; USS Theodore Roosevelt; VP-40 and Joint Staff (Force Structure, Resources and Assessment Directorate; Washington, D.C.). Simmons enlisted in the Navy in 1985 to become an air traffic control ler. Her tours include: NAS Sigonella, Italy; NAS Chasefield, Texas. After converting to cryptologic technician in 1992, her tours included: Naval Security Group Activity, Galeta Island, Panama; Naval Security Group Detachment, Augsburg, Germany; NTTC Pensacola, Fla; PCU Roosevelt (DDG 80); USS John F. Kennedy; Center for Naval Leadership Learning Site, NS Mayport; NAS Jax celebrates Womens History Month JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013 9

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WOMENNavy Information Operations Center, Kunia, Hawaii; VF-102 and NAF Atsugi, Japan. She earned two masters degrees from University of Maryland. After each leader provided a brief background of their career paths, the floor was opened up for questions from the audience. Some of the questions included: What most influenced you to follow your career path, what has been the biggest challenge in your career, what do advice did they have to offer and how do they balance having a family and career? What influenced me the most to take my career path was the desire to get a higher education. I was the first person in my family to attend college and put myself through school. It was a great accomplishment for me, said Shaffer. I was taught by my mentor many years ago that if you want others to take you seriously, then you need to be better than they are. You need to believe in yourself and when chal lenges come up, dont be afraid to step out of your comfort zone. I never imagined myself as the commanding officer of a hospital, but here I am. Sears stressed her desire to use science and technology as a means to help people in the healthcare indus try. The Navy has given me the opportunities to work in a field that I love and Im grateful for all Ive been able to accomplish in this field. I think the most difficult challenge for me is the resiliency of being able to determine what I want to do in my career as well as what the Navy wants. You have to find a way to reconcile the two to be successful, expressed Sears, who also talked about juggling her Navy and family life given her current assignment away from her family who remain in Maryland. When we are together, we spend quality family time together. Technology helps but it is very chal lenging being away from them, she continued. I think you can definitely have it all a career and a family, but you need to define what your all is. When asked about the challenges of executive management, Tennyson, who began her career as an enlisted service member says she never set her sights on becoming a naval officer. My goal was to become a com mand master chief. I never thought I would be in the Navy this long. Challenges based on my race and gender motivated me to learn, and do the best with my abilities, she said. Boron stressed that the key to being successful is performance. You have to be able to perform and make a name for yourself. You need to exude confidence and know your strengths, stated Boron. For me, I think the biggest chal lenges in my career have been tran sitioning from an F-14 pilot to the P-3s and now our squadrons latest transition to the new P-8 aircraft. But the Navy gives you a great toolbox for dealing with challenges. Mentorship was also a topic the panel discussed and according to Simmons, having a mentor definitely benefits junior Sailors. My first mentor was the only khaki female at my first duty station. She taught me to stand up for myself and to not be afraid to separate the friendship line and leadership line of those you work with. Mentorship is very important to helping others be successful. A mentor should be someone who helps you develop professionally and personally, said Simmons. When asked if there she would take the same career path if she could do it all again, Simmons responded, After serving 28 years in the Navy, I wouldnt change anything.. Its been challenging but worth every minute. The event was hosted by NAS Jax Multicultural Awareness and Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville Diversity committees to mark Womens History Month which is observed in March. This years theme is: Women Inspiring Innovation Though Imagination: Celebrating Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. More than 11,000 officers and 56,000 enlisted women are currently serving in the Navyboth active duty and reservein squadrons, onboard ships and on shore duty. The Maritime Patrol Association (MPA) website is now accepting registrations for its 2013 MPA Symposium April 18 -19 at NAS Jacksonville. The event encompasses two full days of special events that celebrate International Partnerships among aviators, aircrew and maintainers. Symposium attendees can sign up for a host of events, including the Scholarship Golf Tournament and 5K, Flight Suit Social and Heritage Dinner. The Heritage Dinner, which will highlight the international partner ships of the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force (MPRF), will also serve as a ceremony for two new Hall of Honor inductees from the MPRF com munity. The International Partnerships theme this year has really allowed us to step back and recognize the cooperative efforts of all of our maritime patrol and reconnaissance colleagues around the world, said VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens, president of MPA. We look forward to celebrating our intertwined heritage and our bright future with all of our symposium attendees, he concluded. Interested MPRF personnel can find more information about the 2013 MPA Symposium, as well as register online, by going to: www.maritimepatrolasso ciation.org/symposium. Relay For Life: Military families wantedMilitary family teams are forming for the Relay for Life at Fleming Island High School May 3. The event remembers those who have lost their battle with cancer, support and encourage those who are fighting, and celebrate those who have survived their battle with cancer. If you are interested, please call Kari Wiese at (207) 730-3294. For more details, visit the Relay for life Web site at www.relayforlife.org/flemingislandfl. The team is called JAX MILITARY FAMILIES. Register now for 2013 MPA symposium 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013

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The Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) hosted its ninth annual public health equipment evaluation March 19-21 to test insecticide dispersal equipment to combat dis ease spreading and nuisance insects. The evaluation allows manufacturers to demonstrate new types of equipment that may be used by the Department of Defense to help protect deployed military personnel from insects carrying danger ous diseases. We are the only organiza tion dedicated solely to vector (insect) borne disease control and the only organization that evaluates spray equipment for all of the armed services, explained NECE Assistant Officer in Charge Lt. Cmdr. Carl Doud. We hold these events to see what the industry has to offer to meet the needs of the mili tary. We run the equipment through preliminary testing, conduct further testing as needed, and make recommendations to the Armed Forces Pest Management Board. The equipment committee decides what is purchased for utiliza tion by preventive medicine teams in the field based on our recom mendations. Nine pieces of pesticide application equipment from six dif ferent com panies were evaluated during over the threeday event. Each piece of new equip ment is tested for charac teristics, reliability and safety issues. Another key criteria is droplet size which is measured using a state-of-the-art laser. During the testing process, the temperature is also care fully monitored because high or low temperatures (below 50 or above 85 degrees) can alter droplet size. We are looking for versatile, easy-touse, rugged pieces of equipment something that is applicable to multi-envi ronments and scenarios. We want to provide the best equipment possible to our personnel deploying, added Doud. Most vector control equip ment is designed to target fly ing insects.The most effective technologies produce insecti cide droplets that will stay suspended in the air long enough to contact a flying mosquito or other disease vector. The NECE public health equipment evaluation is international ly recognized and attracts partners from indus try, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, state government, mosquito control districts and foreign universi ties. We are also providing testing for the World Health Organization (WHO) which is a new aspect for us, said Doud. This is the first time weve provided support on an inter national level. We hope to soon be designated as a WHO col laborating center because we are one of the few organiza tions in the world that evalu ates on vector borne disease spray equipment. For more information on NECE, go to www.nmcphc. med.navy.mil/Field_Activities/ nece_overview.aspx New disease vector control equipment tested at NECE JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013 11

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The VP-45 Pelicans Combat Aircrew One demonstrated Pelican Pride while on detachment in the Philippines and working alongside Filipino military personnel. Operating out of historic Clark Air Base in Angeles City, Pelicans had the opportunity to collaborate with Filipino Air Force and Navy while executing multiple Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA) missions. Capt. Floremda, Armed Forces Philippines, recalled the countless hours spent in the classroom learning about MDA with the Royal Australian Air Force, only to have his expectations greatly exceeded while operating alongside CAC-1 in the mighty P-3 Orion. As he said of the experience, Theres just no substitute for the real thing. Combat Aircrew One Navigator/ Communicator Lt. j.g. Jeff Clauser said, The whole experience was extremely rewarding. Its not every day that you get to share and receive invaluable maritime tactical knowledge while fostering lasting friendships with a foreign mili tary. AWO2 Jonathan Goldmark, nonacoustic sensor operator, mentioned his exchange with one of the Filipino military members. I thoroughly enjoyed demonstrating to our friends how we execute an MDA mission with non-acoustic sensors. It was also fun getting him in the seat and having him try his hand at utilizing the AIMS camera. At the end of the day, it was not only the spirit of hard work, pride, and dedication displayed by Pelicans that made this detachment a success, but of the support and collaborative efforts of the Filipino military and local community alike. This positive experience has paved the way for U.S. Armed Forces to further their relationship with the Filipino military and display our values abroad. VP-5 transition spotlightAs VP-5 transitions to the P-8A Poseidon, the squadron is highlight ing a transitioning Mad Fox each week. This weeks Spotlight shines on AO3(AW) Rumiel Benson. Benson is a native of Grand Rapids, Mich. He is married with two sons. He has been in the Navy for four years and VP-5 is his very first tour. Benson and his fellow ordnance men began their transition Jan. 4 with an ordnance refresher course and familiarization at the P-8A Integrated Training Center. After that, they focused on ordnance specific sys tems on the aircraft at the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training. Throughout their courses, they have been working on their positional qualifications at VP-30. The VP-30 AO shop has been a tre mendous help, stated Benson. They have made sure to bring us in whenever training opportunities take place and answer all our questions. Benson believes the greatest chal lenge with the P-8A is the lack of a long history. Where the P-3C had a very established past with regard to troubleshooting, issues arising with the P-8A are the first instance ever occurring. It has been absolutely essential for VP-5, VP-30, and Boeing personnel to work together to tackle these issues and learn more about this new aircraft. VP-5 ordnancemen are also working on their plane captain qualifications. The P-3C was launched and recovered by linemen based on availability. The P-8A plane captain will have greater responsibility as each signs for a spe cific Poseidon and launches and recovers it. Aviation ordnancemen are respon sible for the safe handling and loading of weapon stores and their respective systems aboard naval aircraft. In maritime patrol and reconnaissance they also load sonobuoys used for searching and tracking submarines. VP-45 strengthens mutual cooperation in the Philippines JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013 13

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Entertainment: March 29 Ace Winn April 5 Karaoke Deweys free Spring Concert Series 7 p.m. on the outdoor stage April 12 Big Engine April 19 State of Mind April 26 The Ride May 3 Boogie Freaks May 10 7th Street Band May 17 Zero-NFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday change of hours Open 410 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 46 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 126 p.m., $1.50 games Shoe rental not included Friday special $1 games per person 2 5 p.m. Shoe rental not included March Bowling Madness Command party give-a-way March 1 31Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Outdoor pool hours: April 1 May 5 Open Monday Friday (lap swim only) 6 a.m. 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday & Sunday (lap swim only) 11 a.m. 2:30 p.m. During lap swim only the waterslide, water park and concessions will not be open. 2013 Learn to Swim Program Sign-up at the Gym (the Zone) May 11, 8 a.m. 3 p.m. Session 1: June 1020 Session 2 July 8-18 Session 3 July 22 Aug. 1 Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information, contact Melissa at 542-3518/4238 Capt. Chuck Cornett Navy Run April 6 at 8 a.m. $25 race day entry Zumba Party April 4, 11 a.m. 12 p.m. Hummvee Pull April 4 at 2 p.m. Athletic shoe and apparel sale April 46, 9 a.m. 6 p.m. Sign-up at www.1stplacesports.com Call 542-2930/3518I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Jacksonville Suns Baseball $5.50 $11.50 Daytona International Speedway Subway Firecracker July 5 and Coke 400 July 6 Tickets on sale now! Jacksonville Sharks $25 per person section 100 Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts Dark Side Of The Moon (Pink Floyd) April 13 at 7:30 p.m. Section A $33; Section B $28; Section C $23 A Lamb Chop Celebration April 20 at 7:30 p.m. Section A $18; Section B $14; Section C $11 Funkfest Metropolitan Park May 10-11 2-day ticket $52 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3 Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7 Blockout Dates: March 28 April 5 Call for pricing Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 2013 Live Broadway Series Anthony Bourdain April 24 $50 $70 Celtic Woman May 2 $44 $134 American Idiot May 14 & 15 $25 $62 Dream Girls May 21 Cesar Millan June 1 $42 $52 Blue Man Group in Orlando $59.50 includes City Walk venue Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31 and must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about our special discounted tickets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park One day pass $30, Gold pass $71 Wet N Wild Orlando $32 $45The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Downtown Art Walk April 3 at 6 p.m. Final Four Championship Game April 8 at 8 p.m. Auto Skills Center Class April 11 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees April 9 & 23 for active duty April 11 & 25 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active duty 31st Annual Bass Tournament April 13 at first light Register at the Mulberry Cove MarinaAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Month of the Military Child Carnival April 20, 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Allegheny Softball Field Free games and activities!Flying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School June 3 July 10 $500 per person 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013

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Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville now has primary care managers (PCMs) available for TRICARE Prime enroll ment to a few groups who live within a 30-minute drive: active duty family members, retirees under age 65, and retiree dependents under age 65. NH Jacksonville uniquely offers its enrolled patients the Medical Home Port approach with PCMs lead ing coordinated care teams to meet patients preventive, routine and urgent care needs. People come from all over the nation to see us. You get the highest qual ity care and best outcomes, right here at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, said Capt. Gayle Shaffer, NH Jacksonville commanding officer. Our team of 2,500 military, civilian and contract staff dedicate themselves to taking care of our nations heroes past, present, future and their families. And we under stand and appreciate your service. Critical to NH Jacksonvilles approach to care, each of the 57,000 patients with a PCM at the hospital or a branch health clinic belongs to a Medical Home Port care team, the Navys approach to the nationwide medical home model of care. Medical Home Port places the patient in the center of a collabora tive team of caregivers from doctors and nurses to case managers led by their PCM. The patient and team work together for a coordinated, whole-per son approach to health. Our PCMsphysicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners not only have the same education and training as their private-sector col leagues, they also have experience on battlefields, at sea and on humanitar ian and disaster-relief missions, said Shaffer. In our hospital, we have PCMs in Family Medicine, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics offering primary care for the entire family, from birth through retirement. Patients enrolled with a PCM at one of NH Jacksonvilles facilities can com municate with their Medical Home Port care team on non-urgent issues using Medical Home Port Online secure email (to request appointments, lab results or medication refills). Register for Medical Home Port Online on the commands website at www.med.navy.mil/sites/ navalhospitaljax or at www.relayhealth. com And to make appointments, call 542-4677 or 800-529-4677 (Central Appointments). The hospital and its branch health clinics offer enrolled patients a one stop shop experience with multi ple services on-site, such as pharma cy, laboratory and radiology. And NH Jacksonville uses an electronic health record system that supports safety and communication among providers. Patients also have access to NH Jacksonvilles 30-plus primary and spe cialty clinical areas from allergy to wellness. Patients can see some of the regions finest and most highly-trained surgeons including two of only seven fellowship-trained arthroplasty (joint replacement) surgeons in North Florida. Whats more, NH Jacksonville is the first hospital on Floridas First Coast military or civilian to earn Baby Friendly certification from the World Health Organization and UNICEF. Case managers coordinate care for patients with multiple, complex conditions. Free classes include wellness, pregnancy and parenting, and support for deployers and their family members. Specialty centers include diabetes, nutrition, breast care and deployment health. TRICARE Prime members with a PCM in the network can request a PCM at the hospital by completing a PCM Change Form at the TRICARE Service Center (located off-base at 769 Blanding Blvd. in Orange Park) or at the hospital with the TRICARE Health Benefits Advisors at 542-9164 or 542-9165. For more information, visit www. med.navy.mil/sites/navalhospitaljax www.facebook/navalhospitaljackson ville www.twitter.com/NHJax and www.youtube.com/user/navalhospital jax Sign up for e-mail updates at nhjaxconnect@med.navy.mil. Primary care managers available at hospital for TRICARE Prime enrollment JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013 15

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The NAS Jacksonville 2013 4-on-4 Flag Football League finished with a bang as nem esis VR-62 and VR-58 battled it out in the playoffs March 19. VR-62 was top seed in the playoffs and VR-58 was the fourth seed. In the first meeting of the playoffs between the two teams, VR-58 pulled out a 14-13 nail bitter to send the top seed VR-62 to the losers bracket. VR-58 defeated VP-16, 35-28 to land in the championship awaiting the winner of the los ers bracket. VR-62 fought their way through the losers bracket by defeating Fleet Readiness Center, 28-20; then beating the VP-30 Officers, 14-7; and VP-16 42-19 to get another shot at the base championship. Due to the playoffs being a double elimination format, VR-62 would have to beat the four-time NAS Jacksonville 4-on-4 Flag Football Champions, VR-58, two games in a row to win the champion ship. In the first game of the championship, defense was the story of day as the pass rush lead by VR-62s Mike Thomas sacked VR-58s Mark Mitchum six times and Matt Davis intercepted two of Mitchums passes. VR-58s Mitchum was harassed and hurried all day and never was able to find time to get the ball down field as they had done for most of the playoffs. On the offensive side of the ball, VR-62s Quarterback Andrew Nightwine hit 25 of 37 passes and two touchdowns one to Sean Trombetta and the other to Jovan Young who had 15 catches for the Nomads. On defense, Young was shadowing VR-58s speedster Mike McCoy. McCoy was covering Young when VR-62 was on offense. Playing pretty much one on one with each other, these two key players did battle all day jumping, div ing and crashing in efforts to get the ball or make a play for their teams. VR-62 pulled out all their guns and went on to defeat VR-58 soundly with a score of 32-14. This forced a second and final game for the base championship. VR-62 appeared to look stronger going into the game, however, VR-58 held their own as both teams battled to a 0-0 draw at halftime. VR-62 came out in the second half with Nightwine hitting four straight passes to score on a 47-yard touchdown pass to Trombetta to go up 7-0. After Davis picked off a VR-58 pass, VR-62s Nightwine hit Young for a 70-yard touch down to make it 14-0. Vr-58s offense was dead in the water as Thomas was biting at the heels of Quarterback Mitchum on every play. Thomas had four sacks in this game. VR-58 finally got on the board on a sack of Nightwine by VR-58s Bennett in the end zone for a safety. Shortly after the safety, VR-58s McCoy picked off a Nightwine pass and then McCoy pulled in a 60-yard touchdown pass from VR-58s Mitchum. Suddenly it was 14-9 and VR-58 looked primed to pull off a last minute comeback as they had done so many times already in the playoffs. With four minutes left to play in the game, VR-58s defense came up clutch and stopped the Nomads to give them one more chance to win the game. VR-58 was unable to get a first down as VR-62s Thomas got another sack and Young knocked a fourth down pass away from a leaping McCoy. VR-62 ran out the clock to win their first NAS Jacksonville 4-on-4 Flag Football Championship with a hard fought 14-9 win. For more info, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil VR-62 captures 4-on-4 Flag Football Championship 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013

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Service members and DoD civilians can save money on official travel (i.e. permanent change of duty station, or work-related) by staying at Navy Gateway Inns & Suites (NGIS). With more than 24,000 guest beds at military installations worldwide, NGIS offers lodging servic es for individual and group temporary duty travel ers, Department of Defense (DoD) civilians, Space Available (leisure) travelers, retirees, reservists and their sponsored guests. NGIS offers affordable lodging rates that support the continuing reductions of command travel expenses. Average lodging rates range from $32-$77, depend ing on location. Booking NGIS ensures that travel funds provide the opportunity for improvements to Department of Defense (DoD) lodging operations. NGIS provides a professionally managed, businessbased lodging program for all military and civilian travelers. Every Navy traveler has a responsibility as a stew ard of taxpayer dollars to ensure that federal funds are used for purposes that are appropriate and cost effective, said Commander, Navy Installations Command, Vice Adm. William French. While budget cuts and travel restrictions continue to be a challenge for everyone, there are many benefits to staying at Navy Gateway Inns and Suites for your official lodging needs. They offer value, convenience, great accommodations, service and affordable rates. Those staying at NGIS can expect a business lodging environment; in-room amenities to include internet access, cable television with premium channels, DVD player, telephone service, microwave and refrigerator; business center, wi-fi, vending machines, guest laun dry facilities, handicapped access and all guest rooms are non-smoking. Free in-room coffee and newspa pers as well as convenient on-base parking are also available. Staying at NGIS not only provides great lodging at great prices, but it also offers the convenience of other base amenities, said Tammy Davis, Navy Lodging program manager. Active duty military, retirees and family members can visit the Navy Exchange. Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) offers discounted tickets to area attractions, swimming pools, golf courses, beaches, movie theaters, youth centers and other great MWR activities taking place on base. For catering and conference needs, contact the host region for particulars on reserving a conference cen ter. Reservations at Navy Gateway Inns and Suites are made on a first-come, first-served basis without regard to rate or rank. Non-duty reservations may be made up to 30 days in advance for up to a seven-night stay by calling 877-NAVY-BED (enter the first three letters of the base) or by making reservations at http:// dodlodging.net. TDY reservations may be made at any time by phone or at the website as well. Group reservations are also available. NGIS partners with Navy Lodge to maximize onbase government lodging for TDY travelers and to ensure travelers have every opportunity to stay on base while performing training or meeting mis sion requirements. Reservations can be made at 800-NAVY-INN (800-628-9466). Free tax assistanceREAL$ENSE (United Way) is offer ing free tax preparation service Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Building 13 (second floor) at the NAS Jax Main Gate. Appointments are recommended for weekdays although walk-ins will be helped. Saturday is walk-in availability only. To make an appointment, call 7292119. NGIS save you and the Navy money JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013 17

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With just nine weeks remaining in the school year, fewer for those with seniors, does your child need help getting over the end-of-the year hump? Tutor.com offers help with homework, studying, and test preparation in more than 16 subjects from elementary math to physics. All military dependent students (of active duty military) worldwide can use the program, regardless of where they attend school. If a student has become bogged down in a particular course and nothing you provide seems to help, try Tutor.com. Navy service members and their fami lies now have free, unlimited access to online tutoring from Tutor.com. Expert tutors help students of all ages from K-12 to college to adult learners one-to-one in math, science, social studies and English, as well as with resume writing, and interview preparation. Help is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Whenever a student needs help, they enter the question and will be connected to a tutor in an interactive online classroom and work one-to-one in math, science, social studies, and English until the problem is solved. All tutors are screened, certified and background-checked. All sessions are recorded and reviewed for quality con trol. This program is provided by the Department of Defense. Authorized patrons include U.S. active duty mili tary service members, U.S. military reservists, U.S. National Guard person nel on active duty in a deployed status, and DoD civilians in a deployed status, and their dependents. To access the program, login to Navy Knowledge Online account and click on the REFERENCE tab. Look for the Tutor.com box in the right column, and click on the links Kids and Teens or Adults to get a tutor. Authorized users will then follow instructions on the Web site for pass word and login information. It is also about this time that the pressure to get high marks on exams kicks in. Students who get nervous before a test should be encouraged to try the following tips and strategies for keep ing anxiety down and energy up for the next big exam. Dont cram: Studying like crazy the night before an exam can leave your child exhausted and more stressed out than before. Studying is more effective if done in small doses over several days. Make up practice questions or take practice tests: Knowing the format and style of a test can reduce anxiety. Encourage students to always ask their teachers about how the test will be formatted. Studying is so much more effective when you know what types of questions youll be answering. Get a good nights sleep: Lack of sleep contributes heavily to anxiety. Be sure your child goes to bed on time the night before an exam. Eat a healthy breakfast: Blood sugar is at its lowest in the morning. In order to think and problem-solve effective ly, students need to refuel. But a good breakfast for one child is not the same for another. Figure out what works best for you child. Read through the exam to budget time: By looking over the test, your child can avoid any unexpected sur prises (and anxiety). Previewing also insures finishing in the allotted time. Read all directions: Some students are so anxious to get the test over with that they fail to read the directions. Jot notes: Jotting down brief notes right away can help your child feel less anxious about forgetting impor tant facts or key information. Some students write important formulas or critical dates in the margin as soon as they receive their test papers. Answer easy questions first: Getting the easier questions out of the way builds self-confidence and allows your child the time to focus more clearly on the harder questions. Organize thoughts before writ ing: Students who organize their writ ing responses before they start writing typically score higher. Having a plan or even a short outline insures a wellstructured response which hits all the main points. Think positively: Negative thoughts during a test (e.g., Im going to fail) can not only destroy your childs con fidence, but also take up valuable time which should be used to concentrate on the test! Using these tips wont necessar ily keep anxiety away completely. However, practicing these techniques can give your child the right skills to manage test stress when it does happen. So hopefully a combination of tutoring through Tutor.com and these test tips will help your child achieve success and readily promote to the next grade. For questions or concerns about an educational issue impacting your child, contact NAS Jax School Liaison Officer Dawn Mills at 778-2236/4868221 or dawn.m.mills@navy.mil Or you can schedule a meeting with her in her office located in the Youth Activity Center. Navy Housing Early Application Tool helps service members make earlier, more informed decisions Navy Housing now offers the Housing Early Application Tool (HEAT), an online tool for service members and their families to get housing informa tion and start the application process. Service members can use HEAT and begin gathering information with or without orders in-hand. The first of its kind for service members and available Navy wide, HEAT connects customers with multiple Navy Housing Service Centers (HSCs) so they can review all of their housing options at any potential duty stations before accepting orders. HEAT can also start the housing application process for those interested in military family housing (privatized, government, and leased). Service members want to make smart decisions when negotiating their orders, and we recognize that housing cost, types and availability are key to that decision-making process, said Michael Bowlin, Navy Housing Services program analyst. HEAT enables them to research their housing options and make the best choices for both their careers and their family. Even family members can use HEAT, as it is acces sible from any computer. Navy Housing released a short, informational video about HEAT that can be found on the Navy Housing HEAT website. Service members and their families can visit the website to begin their housing search online and to contact their next HSC at www.cnic.navy.mil/HEAT. Get free test prep help for your student Dear Kate, My kids leave a lot of lights on. I try to run around and turn them off, but usually they go to school with three to four still burning energy. Any ideas? Signed, Tired of nagging about lights Dear Tired, Ive been in your shoes, and it can be tough to get everyone on board with a habit change. A low-tech solution is the simple post-it-note. Post bright-colored notes on the light switch, and reward the family if the monthly electricity bill goes down. Pizza anyone? Another solution is occupancy sen sors. These turn the lights off automatically when no one is in the room. They are a simple installation so you can do it or hire a handyman. Lights are a big energy user in the home, and staying on top of the situa tion will save you money. Kate Do you have a question for Kate? E-mail her at askkate@watton.com And yes, there is a real Kate. She has helped hundreds of consumers save energy the easy way through habits and low cost changes. Everyone saves after Kates home visit, even the greenest of homes. Shes that good! 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013

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More than 90 golfers signed up to play at the USO Memorial Charity Golf Tournament March 22 at the NAS Jacksonville Golf Club. With temps in the mid-60s, light clouds and a noticeable cool breeze, conditions were ideal for the shotgun start, step-aside format. This is our second USO Memorial Charity Golf Tournament to fund programs for our service members and families, said Greater Jacksonville Area USO Development Director Bob Ross. Our sponsors have been outstanding, as well as our area golfers, so I wouldnt be surprised if we raise up to $30,000 from this event. And it all goes to help improve military morale and quality of life right here in Northeast Florida. This is a great day for golf and wonderful way to support the programs of our local USO, said NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders. One thing that we always strive for at NAS Jacksonville is our commitment to excellence. And thats why you can always depend on the team of caring people at our Greater Jacksonville Area USO they always put our Sailors and families first. Thank you.Golfers raise funds for USO JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013 19

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After nearly 30 years of naval service, friends, family and service members gathered at Naval Station Mayport to bid farewell to Oliver Perry class frigate USS Klakring (FFG 42) at its March 22 decommissioning ceremony. With the ships company man ning the rails, Capt. Paul Flood, Commander, Destroyer Squadron 14, talked about the long, proud tradition of Klakring. From maritime patrols in the Persian Gulf, anti-piracy operations off the coast of Africa, to counter narcotics patrols in the Caribbean Sea, Klakring has always performed exceptionally, said Flood. He went on to thank Cmdr. Bertram Hodge, commanding officer of Klakring, for his leadership as the ship prepared to decommission. I have been fortunate as a Commodore to be able to rely on Hodge, because he knows that the morale of a ship is in its ability to get underway and successfully complete the mission, said Flood. Hodge then addressed the crowd, and spoke about the hard work of the crew and carrying on the tradition of Klakring to the fleet. I could spend my entire speech praising the efforts of the crew they did an outstanding job. As they depart Klakring, they will go on to their next commands and take the fighting spirit of the Klakring with them, said Hodge. In more than 29 years of service Klakring completed more than 22 deployments from three home ports and traveled more than 3.2 million miles worldwide during its service time. Those deployments included the Middle East, South America, Europe and Africa. Klakring was commissioned Aug. 20, 1983 and is named after Rear Adm. Thomas Klakring (1904-1975), a Navy submarine commander during World War II. Klakrings final deployment was to the U.S. 4th Fleet area of responsibil ity, operating in the Caribbean Sea and off the Coast of South America, in support of Operation Martillo a U.S., European, and Western Hemisphere partner nation effort targeting illic it trafficking routes in coastal waters along the Central American isthmus. The ceremony concluded with the crew of Klakring departing the ship, once the last Sailor crossed the brow, the ship was officially decommissioned. Defense Department officials will do what it takes to end sexual assault in the military, the Pentagons top acting general counsel told Congress recently. Robert Taylor told the Senate Armed Services Committees personnel sub committee that DoD is building a structure to address sexual assault in the military, and that changes in the legal arena are in the works. The General Counsel Office is work ing with the service judge advocates general to make our judicial, inves tigative and support structures more efficient, effective and responsive to the rights and needs of victims, while preserving the rights of the accused, he said. Taylor was part of a full day of testi mony before the committee. Earlier in the day, victims of sexual abuse testi fied about their experiences and spoke of a lack of interest exhibited by com manders and a lack of justice in the system. I watched the hearing this morn ing, and I want to take this opportunity to thank the witnesses for coming for ward, Taylor said. I believe that their testimony will contribute to making our military better. An immediate concern to the sub committee was the 3rd Air Force com mander Lt. Gen. Craig Franklin using his discretion under the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) to dismiss charges against an Air Force lieutenant colonel convicted of sexual abuse. In such an instance, once a commander acts, no one can overturn it. Victims and victims rights advocates are up in arms over the dismissal under Article 60 of the UCMJ. They say it perverts the justice system and undoes any good that changes in policies to combat sexual assault have made. A longstanding issue of concern is the significant role the commanders have in the administration of military justice generally and specifically in cases involving allegations of sexual assault, Taylor said. Over the years, Congress has pre served the central role of commanders in the administration of military jus tice, he said. However, Taylor added, the role of commanders has been narrowed numerous times to provide protections for the accused. So it would be a mis reading of the long legislative history of the UCMJ to put the role of a commander beyond a careful re-examination. And thats exactly what Taylor said his office will do. The department has initiated a number of reviews to inform Congress and the secretary of defense regarding the advisability of additional changes to the administration of military justice, he said. Taylor said he will work with an independent panel to examine the systems used to investigate, prosecute and adjudicate sexual assault. The panel also will consider the role of convening authorities in the military justice process, including the authority to set aside a court-martials findings of guilt, he said. Taylor says he enters this with an open mind, but said lawyers must proceed carefully to ensure that changes to the administration of military justice are constructive and avoid any unin tended negative repercussions. But proper care and caution can not be an excuse for doing nothing, he added. Our men and women in uniform serve to protect us every day, he said. They put their lives on the line for us, for this great country of ours. We owe them a military in which sexual predators have no part and sexual assault has no place. USS Klakring decommissioned at MayportDoD examines UCMJ changes to combat sexual assaults 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013

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24 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 28, 2013