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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 03-07-2013
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02032


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THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 2013 CHILEAN BRASS FIRE EXER CISE NEW MARINA Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Naval aviators are evaluating energy saving refueling prac tices as part of a program aimed at standardizing fleet-driven energy best practices that do not adversely impact mission or safety. The Naval Aviation Energy Conservation (Air ENCON) program is driving the fleet wide implementation of these practices across the entire operational spectrum from train ing and ground operations to maintenance and flight opera tions. Our goal is to enable the Navy to fly more efficiently by providing options to fleet commanders who manage flight hours, said Lt. Cmdr. Daniel Quinn, Air ENCON program lead, with Commander, Naval Air Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet Force Readiness. The team also includes Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic and Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR). As part of the beta launch running through December 2013, the program distributes quarterly squadron energy report cards and solicits fleet feedback and additional energy saving ideas, said Michael Olszewski, NAVAIR Propulsion & Power, Air ENCON deputy program lead on Feb. 26. Air ENCON directly supports the chief of naval operations goal to increase efficiency and reduce fuel consumption afloat by 15 percent by 2020. Naval aviation operates more than 3,700 aircraft that con sume more than 600 million gallons of petroleum-based fuels each year. Resource constraints and mission requirements demand increased operational capability be extracted from each gallon of fuel. Air ENCON is focusing first on the largest consumers: F/A-18 Hornets and Super Hornets, said Quinn, an F/A-18F weapons systems officer. HSM-70 meets AUTEC challengeHSM-70 recently conducted train ing at the Atlantic Undersea Testing and Evaluation Center (AUTEC), located on Andros Island, Bahamas. AUTEC provides a training envi ronment to evaluate and assess the MH-60R Seahawk communitys warf ighting abilities. Lt. Phil Krites, HSM-70s training Fighting Tigers help in Habitat for Humanity Project The VP-8 Fighting Tigers partic ipated in a Clay County Habitat for Humanity community relations proj ect (COMREL) Feb. 21. According to their website, Habitat for Humanity International was founded in 1976 by Millard and Linda Fuller. Today, Habitat for Humanity is a true world leader in addressing the issues of poverty housing. Through the work of Habitat, thousands of lowincome families have found new hope in the form of affordable housing. Churches, community groups and others have joined together to suc cessfully tackle a significant social problem decent housing for all. Eleven Sailors volunteered to help the entity build a three-bedroom home, laying down tar paper and roof A message from Secretary of Defense Chuck HagelTo all Department of Defense person nel: On Feb. 27, I was privileged to take the oath of office to become the 24th Secretary of Defense. I am humbled by and grate ful for the opportunity that President Obama and the Congress have given me to once again serve our nation. I am most especially grateful for the opportu nity to work with all of you. Every day you work to defend America. The noble cause of your profes sion, your individual sacrifices, and your service inspire us all. As your leader, I will always do my best for our country and for all of you and your families. As with my friends and pre decessors Leon Panetta and Bob Gates, your safety, success and welfare will always be at the forefront of my decisions.I will build on the strong foundation of teamwork built by secretaries Gates and Panetta, as we work together. Leadership is a team business. I have long believed that America must maintain the strongest military on earth. We must lead the international commu nity, with a steady and sure hand to con front threats and challenges together as we work closely with our allies and part ners to advance our common interests and build a more hopeful world.We must use all tools of American power to protect our citizens and our interests, and America must engage not retreat in the world, but engage wisely. This is a defining time for the United States military and for our nation. We are emerging from more than a decade of war, yet the threats facing us are no less danger ous or complicated. Despite these challenges, I believe an historic opportunity exists to help build a safer, more prosperous, and more secure world. But to achieve this goal we must ensure that we are ready, trained and equipped to fulfill our role of protecting the coun try and standing firm against aggression. To that end, the strength, well-being and readiness of our all-volunteer force will be my top priority. This will require 21st cen tury agility and flexibility. We must take care of our people, and working with the VA and other institutions, I will ensure that you and your families get the health care, job opportunities, benefits, and education you have all earned and deserve. My life and career have been about helping our service members, veterans and their fami lies. One of my proudest accomplishments in the U.S. Senate was coauthoring with my fellow Vietnam veteran and friend, Jim Webb, the Post-9/11 G.I. Bill. As I assume this office, I am mindful of the sacrifices that you and your fami lies have made for more than a decade, and continue to make every day.In Afghanistan, where 66,000 of our troops remain in a tough fight, we have a clear and achievable objective to fully transi tion security responsibility to the Afghan National Security Forces by the end of 2014. As you know, Afghan forces will step into the lead for security operations across the country this spring, and over the next year another 34,000 of our troops will come home. As we turn the page on more than a decade of grinding conflict, we must broaden our attention to future threats and challenges. That means continuing to increase our focus on the Asia-Pacific region, reinvigorating historic Alliances Aircraft energy saving initiatives launched

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013 For several mornings in a row, I woke to the same conver sation coming from the landing outside my bedroom: Owen, get my back. Get my back! Got it. The enemys on my tail. Hard right! Hard right! I see him. Im locking in. Got em. Theres another one. Locking in. Hes on my tail. The boys were playing a Nintendo Wii game called World War II Aces. Using the handheld remote, they led his torical aircraft through maneu vers on famed missions. Even Lindell, 5, was learning pilot-talk. The first time I saw him use his hands to demon strate how a plane banked left, I knew it was time to show them Top Gun (Well, not all of Top Gun ; Id need to fast-for ward through that scene.) I put the DVD in the machine, and when the title screen came on, the first notes of Kenny Loggins iconic Danger Zone playing against the whistle and wind of jet noise, the entire 1980s washed over me. I felt like I might even smell the old perm in my hair. The boys stared at the televi sion, their mouths hung open. This is when I knew they need ed some background informa tion. I paused the DVD. Okay, first, I said, you should know that this is what I grew up with. Pop, your grandfather, was an F-14 pilot. What youre about to see is what he did for work when I was a kid. He even went to the famous Top Gun school. Pop? Owen said, the cor ners of his mouth turning up in a smile. Yes, Pop. My Pop? Lindell asked. Yes. But theres more. I reminded the boys of the air craft carriers I grew-up on and around in Norfolk, Va. They were like Pops office, right? Owen said. Yes, we remember, Ford said, his impatience audible. The smell of jet fuel reminds you of being a kid. What else? Can we watch now? Youre going to see an air craft carrier in this movie. Its the same one your dad was on during his first deployment. He and Pop were actually on it together at one point. The boys minds had just been blown. As I realized that I had even more to tell them, I wondered what took me so long to show them this movie. Can we watch now? Ford asked. I pushed play and said what I thought was an aside, Also, people say the main character, Maverick, looks a lot like your dad. Owen put his hand over his mouth. Does Maverick die? I dont want to watch if Maverick dies. Thats when I remembered that Goose dies. I was having second thoughts. But the other boys were already enthralled with the F-14 catapulting off the flight deck. Owen put his hand down and said, These are real planes? They look so futuristic. Thats probably because weve been staring at WWII planes on the game, Ford said. I debated about whether to tell them that the F-14 is indeed outdated now, too, replaced by the F-18. I cant imagine Pop flying that, Ford said. Yeah, I cant imagine an old man flying that plane, Lindell said. I laughed. Well, he wasnt old back then, I said. After Maverick landed his plane and took off his helmet, the boys gasped. He does look like Dad, Ford said. I cant watch this if he dies, Owen said. The boys stood to get clos er to the screen. His mouth, it looks just like Dad, Lindell said. And that expression, Ford yelled, pointing at the screen. That, right there, looks just like him. It became difficult to follow the storyline because the boys had so many questions: Was I born when Pop went to Top Gun? No. Has Dad (Dustin) ever res cued pilots out of the water in the helicopter? Yes. Did I ever ride in an F-14? No. But I did watch Pop break the sound barrier once. The boys continued to recog nize their Dads expressions in Mavericks face. It was almost as if they wanted to touch the screen to be near him, and that made me unspeakably sad. Then the scene came where Goose dies. The room grew quiet. On the screen, Maverick packed up Gooses belongings and took them to Meg Ryan, who played Gooses wife. I dont think I can watch this, Owen said. Owen, Ford sighed. The one who died doesnt look like dad. Still, Owen said. So many things in the Navy are danger ous. I mean, Goose was just practicing, and he died. I had no good response for this. All I could do was nod and rub the hair away from Owens forehead. Next, there were ewws and fake vomiting when Maverick and Charlie (Kelly McGillis) kissed on screen. This seemed to replace all the heavy thoughts from before. The boys went to bed and said very little more about Top Gun The next day, however, all those stories I had told them, having percolated overnight, grew and become distorted. I overheard Owen tell ing a neighbor, My Pop went to Top Gun and was the best fighter pilot that ever lived. He breaks the sound barrier all the time. He was better than Tom Cruise. Hey, Old Manyoure wel come. March 7 1958 Commissioning of USS Grayback, first submarine built from keel up with guided mis sile capability, to fire Regulus II missile. 1966 Department of Navy reorganized into present struc ture under CNO. 1967 PBRs assists Operation Overload II in Rung Sat Zone, Vietnam. 1968 Operation Coronado XII begins in Mekong Delta, Vietnam. 1994 Navy issues first orders to women assigned aboard a combat ship, the aircraft carrier USS Eisenhower (CVN 69). March 8 1854 Commodore Matthew Perry opens treaty negotiations with Japan. 1862 Ironclad ram CSS Virginia destroys USS Cumberland and Congress at Hampton Roads. 1945 Phyllis Daley becomes first African-American ensign in Navy Nurse Corps. 1958 Battleship USS Wisconsin (BB-64) is decom missioned, leaving the Navy without an active battleship for the first time since 1895. 1965 Seventh Fleet lands first major U.S. Marine Corps units in South Vietnam at Danang. March 9 1798 Appointment of first surgeon of U.S. Navy, George Balfour. 1847 Commodore David Connor leads successful amphibious assault near Vera Cruz, Mexico. 1862 First battle between ironclads, USS Monitor and CSS Virginia. 1914 Test of first wind tunnel at Washington Navy Yard. March 10 1783 USS Alliance, com manded by Capt. John Barry defeats HMS Sybil in final naval action of Revolutionary War in West Indies waters. 1933 Pacific Fleet provides assistance after earthquake at Long Beach, Calif. 1945 Navy and civilian nurses interned at Los Banos, Philippines flown back to United States. Navy nurses awarded Bronze Stars. 1948 First use of jets assigned to an operational squadron (VF-5A) on board air craft carrier USS Boxer (CV-21). March 11 1935 Birth of Naval Security Group when OP-20G became the Communications Security Group. 1941 President Franklin Roosevelt signs Lend-Lease Act. 1942 In a PT boat, Lt. Cmdr. John Bulkeley departs the Philippines to take General Douglas MacArthur to Australia. 1945 Use of first Navy land ing craft to cross Rhine River at Bad Neuenahr. 1965 Market Time patrols begin off South Vietnam coast. March 12 1917 All American merchant ships to be armed in war zones. 1942 President Franklin Roosevelt designates Admiral Ernest King to serve as the Chief of Naval Operations, as well as the Commander-in-Chief, United States Fleet. 1956 -VA-83, on board USS Intrepid (CV-11), is the first overseas deployment of a Navy missile squadron. March 13 1895 Award of first subma rine building contract to John P. Holland Torpedo Boat Co. 1917 Armed merchant ships authorized to take action against U-boats. 1959 Naval Research Laboratory takes first ultravio let pictures of sun. 1963 USS Albany (CG-10) and aircraft of Navy Airborne Early Warning Squadron Four from Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico aid five ill crew mem bers of Norwegian freighter Jotunfjell. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Boys first experience with Top Gun When closing out a service members account after death, the Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS) will follow a stan dard order of precedence if there is no benefi ciary designated on the account. There should be a beneficiary listed on the account in order to preclude any ambiguity of who should receive the final pay benefits. To ensure there is a designated beneficiary listed on the service members account, check the backside of the retiree account statement that has been sent out in paper form in the past (usually at the end of the year past or any time a change has been made to the account, e.g. pay raise, allotment change, etc.). Also, it is available electronically at the DFAS MyPay web site (https://mypay.dfas.mil/ mypay.aspx). The order of precedence that DFAS follows in the case of no designated beneficiary is: sur viving spouse, followed by children and their descendants, father and mother of the deceased Retiree News: DFAS order of precedence

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VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens and the Pros of VP-30 recently opened their doors for a visit by Vice Adm. Jose Miguel Romero Aguirre of the Chilean Navy. VP-30 has maintained a relationship training Chilean patrol pilots since 1997 and currently has a Chilean P-3 pilot, Lt. Jorge Guerra, undergoing a rigorous pilot training syllabus. Romero made the trip to discuss the future of the P-3, the primary patrol and reconnaissance aircraft flown by the Chilean Navy. The day started with the admiral fly ing side-by-side with Guerra in the fullmotion P-3 flight station simulator. An experienced P-3A pilot himself, Romero enjoyed time at the controls demonstrating touch-and-go landings beside Guerra while simultaneously discussing VP-30s pilot training syl labus. The group, led by Stevens and VP-30 Executive Officer Cmdr. David Gardella also toured the P-3 tactical crew simu lator and a static display aircraft on the Pros flight line followed by a sit-down discussion on VP-30s training regimen and outlook on both P-3C maintenance and service life. The Chilean Navy contingent received a tour of the P-8 Poseidon air craft, the future of U.S. Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance. Guerra has completed the FRS CAT 1 and patrol plane pilot training syl labi and will qualify as a patrol plane commander and instructor pilot upon completing training requirements and return to Chile. When asked about his time in Jacksonville, Guerra responded, My time at VP-30 has been great. The train ing has been intense and my knowledge and proficiency has benefited from the experience and professionalism of the instructors. They are eager to help and do a great job of reinforcing the impor tance of safety. Additional Chilean pilots are slat ed to commence training at VP-30 in the coming months and the squadron looks forward to continuing its relation ship with the Chilean Navy for years to come. Cmdr. Maurice Meagher assumed com mand of Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) Aviation Jacksonville from Cmdr. Jason Klingenberg during a change of command ceremony Feb. 22 at NAS Jacksonville. Meagher comes to DLA from the Expeditionary Strike Group Two in Norfolk, Va. where he served as assistant chief of staff for logistics. DLA Aviation Commander Brig. Gen. Scott Jansson officiated at the ceremony. DLA Aviation is the aviation demand and supply manager for DLA based in Richmond, Va., and oversees operations at Jacksonville. DLA Aviation at Jacksonville is one of six aviation industrial support sites directly supporting the warfighter through weapon system material manage ment, industrial retail supply and strategic acquisition for consumable and depot-lev el repairable material. Cmdr. Klingenberg has provided the vision and leadership which have been essential to effectively and efficiently pro viding top-notch supply support to Fleet Readiness Center Southeast and the larg er naval aviation enterprise around the world, said Jansson. Under Jasons leadership, custom er collaborations and partnerships have grown and that growth is reflected in DLA Aviations improved support to our indus trial customers here. During his tenure, he established a back order priority cell which met an aggressive goal of 25 percent unfilled order reduc tions and then exceed it to reducing back orders by more than 40 percent. Through intense personal management and close work with key stakeholders, he lead his team to overcome a mid-year spike of unscheduled inductions, while reducing the overall age of G condition (awaiting parts) material by more than 25 days. In speaking to his team, Klingenberg said, Thank you for keeping our custom er-focus and making my job easy. Moe (Cmdr.Meagher), you are a great friend and Im certain you will receive the same excellent support that I have dur ing my tenure here in Jacksonville, said Klingenberg. Meagher said when he presented the option of returning to Jacksonville to his wife and five daughters, there was no hesi tation as they responded affirmatively. So here I am in somewhat of a dream job, taking command of the finest forward site under the DLA Aviation organization, said Meagher. Not lost upon me is the fact the com mand is not something a lot of Navy Supply Corps officers ever have the opportunity to experience. I am truly honored by this opportunity. Meagher went on to say that he is enthu siastic, excited, and prepared to listen and learn from the expertise already assem bled with the DLA Aviation Jacksonville and FRC Southeast organizations. Jansson told the aviation team they were losing a good leader in Klingenberg; how ever, he said, You are getting a well-quali fied leader in Cmdr. Meagher. I know that under his leadership, you will continue to accomplish great things for our FRC and other customers . delivering and sustaining war-winning capabilities. Chilean admiral visits Pros Nest NAS Jacksonville welcomes new DLA Aviation site CO JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013 3

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Like most Americans, Im watching the ongoing national fiscal debates in Washington with great interest and a good deal of trepidation. Its my job to ensure that we man, train and equip a naval aviation force that is ready to fly, fight and win whenever and where ever our forward military com manders around the world need that capability. Its also my role to put in place the poli cies that will ensure that naval aviation endures as a vital and relevant part of our Navy and the broader national security framework. Working with other leaders in the community, we devel oped a vision for naval avia tion that will help us ensure a whole, capable and affordable force. That vision, though still important, is in jeopardy due to the across-the-board nature of looming cuts resulting from the potential of a full year con tinuing resolution and seques tration. The Chief of Naval Operations has given us direc tions to act now in the face of these pending cuts. As we make choices of where and how to cut in the limited way were able in this circum stance, its important to note that all of our processes are interconnected. Once we begin pulling levers to move the big machine, there will be impacts across the entirety of naval avi ation. Some of these impacts may not be immediately appar ent today, but they will impact our future in the near and far term and may not be easily reversed. I understand that there will be fewer resources available. This reality has informed our vision and is driving how naval aviation must organize, man, train, and equip as a whole to successfully perform its mis sions today and in the future. Achieving combat effective ness requires the judicious management of manpower, supplies and training dollars to safely and effectively operate Navy and Marine Corps. Naval aviation has embraced affordability, which I see as generally driven by two ele ments the acquisition cost of our platforms, and the operat ing and sustainment costs of their entire service life. The Navy is in transition to a new, more capable platform in nearly every aircraft commu nity. We must continue these transitions if we are to meet the evolving security threats of tomorrow. We are complet ing our strike-fighter transi tion into the FA-18E/F Super Hornet. We are well into transi tion with our electronic attack community from the EA-6B Prowler into the highly capable EA-18G Growler. We are also well into our rotary wing transition into the lethal multi-mission MH-60R and MH-60S Seahawks pro grams that saved taxpayers (you and me) billions of dollars through multi-year procure ment strategies. Our legacy P-3C Orion squadrons have begun transi tion into the remarkable P-8A Poseidon, an aircraft based on the concept of leveraging a reli able, proven platform that car ries an array of sensors, net works and weapons designed to operate in an open archi tecture warfighting environ ment. Another way were making our Navys aviation force more affordable is by reducing the number of types, models, and series of aircraft within the carrier strike group. For exam ple, in 2005 a carrier strike group deployed with as many as 10 different models of air craft that required eight dif ferent engine types, each with their own maintenance and supply support requirements. In our new vision, a carrier strike group in 2025 would deploy with as few as five dif ferent models of aircraft with five engine types, significantly reducing our lifecycle costs to own and operate those air craft. Theres more to affordabil ity than simply designing and buying better aircraft. The cost to operate our present and future platforms combined with advanced capabilities that are rapidly exceeding the capa bilities of our current train Our Navys aviation futureA relevant, capable and affordable force 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013

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All active duty officer spouses are invited to join the new NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club, which is focused on building camaraderie, offering sup port and sharing information. There are no membership fees to join. The initial upcoming event is a social at the NAS Jax Officers Club March 19 from 6:30-9 p.m. Please RSVP Pam Undersander at roypam5@gmail.com by March 11. New officers spouses club forming War Eagles reach out to local middle schoolThree VP-16 pilots recently visited students from Mayport Coastal Sciences Middle School as part of the Duval Reads Engaging Americas Military (DREAM) Project. War Eagles Lt. Roderick Smith, Lt. Thomas Kuhrt, and Lt. David Hanson spoke to the students about their personal experiences in the military and the impor tance of education in following their own dreams to become Navy pilots. The DREAM Project, a Duval Reads initiative orga nized by Communities in Schools, focused the visit on the story of the Tuskegee Airmen in honor of African American Heritage Month. The pilots were joined by Tuskegee Airmen Historian Emerson Mungin and the students were treated to a viewing of the movie Red Tails. The project focuses on improving the overall lives of military youth through providing assistance in literacy and mentoring as well as connecting the military community with opportunities to improve the city of Jacksonville and surrounding areas through community service. Smith, ground safety officer for VP-16, said, It was a magical experience being able to interact with the kids and share my story with them. I hope I inspired them to follow their dreams wherever they may lead them. VP-5 transition spotlightAs VP-5 transitions to the P-8A Poseidon, the squadron is highlighting a transitioning Mad Fox each week. This weeks Spotlight shines on AT2(AW) Thomas Moore. A native of Durham, N.C., Moore comes from a large family of eight brothers and sisters. His step father is a retired chief warrant officer and former maintenance officer of multiple squadrons. Moore has been in the Navy for six years. His tours include VP-30 and VP-5. He was also honored to repre sent the Navy for six months with the U.S. Military Baseball All-stars and participated in exhibition matches throughout Central America. His transition to the P-8A began with a fiveweek Navy Enlisted Classification course at NAS Jacksonvilles Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit. This course involved classroom work taught by certified Boeing instructors on the electronic systems of the P-8A. With VP-5s Safe for Flight inspection 120 days away, he and fellow ATs completed on-the-job training before and during class at VP-30. Moore is currently taking specialty courses on fiber optics and lasers between his other duties. The P-8A has a far greater redundancy system, Moore replied when asked to compare the P-8A to the P-3C. This isolates almost all troubleshooting issues to software-related problems. Aviation electronic technicians are responsible for the maintenance and repair of electronics and avionics aboard aircraft including, navigation, radio and radar systems. VP-5 has been transitioning to the P-8A Poseidon since Jan. 4, 2013. The VP-8 Fighting Tigers par ticipated in a joint training exer cise with the Amphibious Assault Ship USS Kearsarge (LHD-5) Amphibious Readiness Group (ARG), Feb. 3-15. During the two-week Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX), the Kearsarge ARG trained to conduct strike, expeditionary, and other naval missions in a joint and coali tion environment while inte grating Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Aviation (MPRA) support. With the Fighting Tigers fly ing the P-3 Orion and the VP-16 War Eagles flying the P-8 Poseidon, MPRA assets from NAS Jacksonville flew a combined 10 missions in support of the exer cise, totaling 69 hours. Lt. Stephanie Sandifer of VP-8 served as a liaison officer on board the Amphibious Transport Dock USS San Antonio (LPD-17) during the exercise, providing much needed MPRA experience. My purpose was to explain the capabilities of the Orion and the Poseidon so that the ARG could task them to the best effect, said Sandifer. I also trained the watch standers to control the MPRA assets over the radio. COMPTUEX was a great opportunity to work in a coordi nated operations environment with surface vessels, said VP-8 Patrol Plane Commander Lt. William Flynn. As the exercise moved forward, it was exciting to see both the P-3 Orion aircrews and the sur face warfare participants learn to more effectively collaborate in a simulated hostile environment. The Jacksonville-based Fighting Tigers are undergoing deploy ment readiness workups in prepa ration for their upcoming deploy ment. VP-8 participates in COMPTUEX with USS Kearsarge JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013 5

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6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013 7 NAS Jacksonville firefighters team with local counties for training First Coast Navy Fire and Emergency Services fire fighters from the NAS Jax Division participated in a unique and exciting training environment with both the Clay County and Orange Park Fire Departments Feb. 21. The former Comfort Inn off of Roosevelt Boulevard (slated for destruction in the near future), served as the perfect area for the three departments to practice their skills of forcible entry, ventilation, and simulated search and rescue. Due to the buildings degraded state, the depart ments were mostly free to destroy as much as they needed to complete their exercises. This is great training for us, commented Battalion Fire Chief Scott Bloomer, of the First Coast Navy Fire and Emergency Services, NAS Jax Division. Since this building is going to be torn down any ways, we have free reign to practice bashing in doors, breaking windows, tearing down ceilings, and getting accustomed to new equipment we have. This is all essential in developing our decision making skills of when to do what with fighting fires. The firefighters proceeded to use multiple tools, including axes, crowbars, and saws, to practice forc ible entry and proper ventilation of rooms in the hotel. Although the training was exciting for many of the firefighters, safety and proper procedures were of the utmost importance, and the afternoon saw the prac tice of a potential real world scenario. By simulating a fire, a smoke filled environment, and rescue victims, the three departments coordi nated their efforts to develop superior cooperative and communication skills, with the mindset of potentially having to support each other in the future. The scenario was executed in a timely and profes sional fashion by all the firefighters participating, but many agreed that communication could always be improved. Normally when we train with other departments, we use the burn house at NAS Jax. The opportunity we have to simulate exercises out in town today pro vide us with a unique training scenario and learning experience. All departments have different techniques when faced with various emergency situations, and we learn a lot from each other by training together, Bloomer remarked. Photos by Lt. j.g. Kevin Wendt

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Other participating aircraft plat forms include: H-60 Seahawk, E-2 Hawkeye, C-2 Greyhound, EA-6B Prowler and P-3C Orion. While several energy conservation practices have been used by carrier air wings and their squadrons, they are not practiced consistently across the fleet, said Quinn. This prompt ed the Navy Task Force Energy, Aviation Working Group to develop the Air ENCON program, Olszewski explained. In 2011, the Naval Aviation Enterprise established the team to identify, validate and insti tutionalize energy conservation best practices across the naval aviation community. To date, Air ENCON has validated several energy conservation prac tices, including Short-cycle Mission and Recovery Tanking (SMART) inflight refueling, and expanded use of mobile refueling trucks in place of hot pit refueling stations. Refueling carrier-based aircraft In 2009, Carrier Air Wing 7 pio neered the SMART practice, sav ing about 1.7 million gallons of fuel during 120 fly days. The tradition al tanking practice began in 2002, when the Super Hornet took over the S-3 Viking role as in-flight refueling tanker with a 5-wet configuration, Quinn said. In a standard tanking configura tion, the Super Hornet carries one centerline refueling tank and four auxiliary tanks, totaling about 28,000 pounds or 4,118 gallons of fuel. Excessive weight and drag cause the tanker to consume more fuel than usual leaving only about 5,000 pounds or 735 gallons of fuel to refuel other aircraft. Once launched, the Hornet tanker remains airborne for the complete mission, or sortie, cycle of about 1.5 hours burning fuel the entire time. In addition, fuel that is not trans ferred in flight must be consumed or jettisoned for the tanker to achieve a safe landing weight. In comparison, a Super Hornet in a SMART configuration carries only the centerline refueling pod and 14,000 pounds or 2,059 gallons of fuel. The tanker launches to refuel the aircraft returning from their mis sion then lands within about 20 min utes. Referred to as Yo-yo Tanking in the fleet, this method can still deliver up to 5,000 pounds of fuel per tanker without incurring undue drag, weight or efficiency penalties, Quinn said. Refueling aircraft ashore The truck refueling process was docu mented at NAS Lemoore, Calif., where 85 percent of mission refueling is delivered by truck, instead of by hot pit refueling. Hot pit refueling occurs when an aircraft lands, taxis to a hot pit refueling area and waits in line to refuel with engines running, Quinn explained. As much as 70 gallons of fuel is consumed or wasted while the air craft waits to take on 2,000 gallons, Quinn said. That adds up to mil lions of gallons a year. With truck refueling, the aircraft shuts down, and a truck brings the fuel to the aircraft. However, once the engine is shut down, a turn around inspection, which may take up to an hour, must be conducted. While timing may be an issue that necessitates hot pit refueling, a flight schedule can be built around truck refueling. Air ENCONs goal is to encourage other naval air stations, such as NAS Oceana, Va., to use truck refueling 85 to 88 percent of the time. Its an easy sell, Quinn said. Without infrastructure, capital or manpower investment, about 240,000 gallons per year can be saved at NAS Oceana alone. Culture change Because of Air ENCON, the word is getting out and the culture is changing. The Fleet Readiness Training Plan now requires one day of SMART training as part of a squadrons pre-deploy ment training. The secretary of the Navy says energy management will be a man datory Commanding Officer Fitness Report and Counseling Record ele ment. Air ENCON emphasizes the stra tegic importance of conserving ener gy. While we have been accustomed to having plenty of fuel available, it may not always be the case, con cluded Quinn. Saving fuel also gives warfighters more tactical options, such as more time loitering, more time to stay on post to support a con voy on the ground, or more time on the training range. Air ENCON plans to implement the program fleet wide by January 2014 for active duty Navy squadrons. The U.S. Marine Corps has also expressed interest in future collaboration.like NATO, and making new investments in critical capabilities like cyber security. In order to accomplish our mission, we also must make wise budget decisions to prioritize our interests and requirements. I am greatly concerned about the impact that the looming round of automatic budget cuts will have on you and your families, and on mili tary readiness. As someone who has run businesses, I know that severe budget uncertainty limits our ability and flexibility to manage and plan and use taxpayer dollars in the most efficient manner pos sible. I will work within the administration and with Congress to help resolve this uncertainty in a way that does not break Americas commitment to you, your families, and our veterans. As I begin my time here at the Department, I recognize the immense responsibility that I have, and will work hard every day to fulfill my duties as Secretary of Defense as honestly and effectively as I know how. You are the greatest force for good in the world. I am proud to be part of your team. Thank you for your commitment and dedication to our country. SECDEF AIR ENCON Aircrews assigned to Commander Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance 7th Fleet from VP-10 will participate in the U.S. Navy and Japan Maritime Self Defense (JMSDF) GUAMEX 2013. This bilateral exercise will take place March 1-10 at Andersen Air Force Base in Guam and focus on improving maritime patrol aircraft interoperabil ity between the two allied nations. Commander, Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Seventh Fleet conducts eight to 10 interoperability exer cises each year with the JMSDF to further U.S.JMSDF operations and relations. Based in Jacksonville, the Red Lancers are currently on a six-month deployment to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibil ity as part of Commander, Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance 7th Fleet. VP-10 to participate In GUAMEX 2013 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013

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officer and a former weapons school instructor, described the training at AUTEC as, an opportunity to deploy ordnance against both subsurface and surface threats, which greatly increase our aircrews readiness for deploy ment. Led by HSM-70 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Chris Herr, the Spartans com pleted 10 days of training under the guidance of instructors from Helicopter Maritime Strike Weapons School Atlantic. They participated in multiple train ing missions to include anti-submarine warfare (ASW), anti-surface warfare, captive air training missile missions, surface-to-air counter-tactics, and other MH-60R tactical events. With access to a secure live deep water weapons range off the coast of Andros Island, squadron personnel completed numerous events that would be otherwise difficult to achieve in Jacksonvilles shallow waters. The Spartans employed exercise tor pedoes, operated designation lasers for Hellfire missiles, fired automatic weap ons, employed surface-to-air counter measures, and utilized active sonar while training at AUTEC. With the assistance of a dedicated staff of both active military and civil ian personnel, the crews participated in valuable scenario-based missions. During his first trip to AUTEC, Lt. j.g. Corky Maschke referred to the expe rience as, a good opportunity to use aircraft equipment and sensors in a live environment. In addition to the training received by the aircrew, AUTEC provided an excellent opportunity for the tal ented men and women of the HSM-70 Maintenance Department to hone their skills and improve operational readi ness. The maintainers were led by HSM70 Maintenance Officer Lt. Cmdr. Shon Brown and Maintenance Master Chief AVCM Gene Pickles. Operating at full speed with full flight schedules and the arduous task of alter ing aircraft configurations and equip ment to meet a variety of missions, the Spartan maintenance team rose to the challenge, successfully completing all training requirements. AUTEC was a busy experience, said AEAN Ryan Rossman, a junior mainte nance technician. He stated the detach ment was rewarding, referencing the 16 successfully launched training tor pedoes dropped during ASW training missions. AOAN Leanna Hildebrand admit ted she was very busy and worked long hours, but remarked, I love the Bahamas and look forward to going back to AUTEC. Since returning to NAS Jacksonville, the Spartans look back to their time on Andros Island as an invaluable experi ence that will build the foundation for advanced training. As they approach the Fleet Readiness Training Plan work-up cycle, the Spartans of HSM-70 look forward to bringing the warfighting skills they developed at AUTEC to the fleet. panels. The volunteers started early in the morning working as a team to get the job done. It feels great and rewarding know ing you are part of a project that is going to benefit and make a difference in a family in need, said LS2 Walter Murillo. It also helps me appreciate and value more the things that I have. According to the Clay County Habitat for Humanity Volunteer Coordinator Pamela Portridge, the military assistance to the organization is essential to their success. Almost 80 percent of their volunteers come from the military. The home will be assigned for sale with no interest rate to make the pay ments affordable for qualifying family. This is the first of several COMREL projects VP-8 plans to participate in since coming back from deployment last December, leading to a series of future events with different non-profit entities. In my opinion, we, in the military are an extremely blessed group of people. Not only is working for others humbling, but also part of our ethos as service members, said AWV2 Mark Willard. Furthermore, we should strive to be an example for those around us, as we are highly esteemed by the public, youth in particular. The Jacksonville-based Fighting Tigers are currently undergo ing deployment readiness workups, in preparation for their upcoming deployment. VP-8ing ranges demands that we become much more innovative in combining live, virtual and constructive training. Flight time in the cockpit or crew sta tion will always matter for our naval aviators, but our potential adversaries capabilities are evolving to the point where much of our most realistic train ing in the future may be done in a highfidelity simulator, linked with an array of other simulators in hi-tech, hi-threat environment that cant be replicated anywhere else. Flight hours are likely to become more scarce under budget cuts. Our live training ranges today may not provide the level of hi-end training we need to fully practice our warfighting skills. We are at the cusp of innovative thought and action in determining the right mix of live, virtual and constructive training for our future and bright young avia tion minds are leading the charge here. Ive provided just a few examples of ways naval aviation is doing all we can to deliver value to the American people, even in these austere times. And although we place affordability at the heart of everything we do, we will never lose sight of our true mission: pro viding combat ready aviation forces for ward where and when they are needed most. That mission may be harder to achieve moving forward but we will do everything we can to achieve it. NAVAL AVIATIONin equal parts, legal representative and finally a person entitled under the law of the deceased retirees domicile. While this order of precedence might be what the service member had in mind, a designated beneficiary would specify who was to receive the final pay benefits. RAO HSM-70 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013 9

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Several VP-5 Mad Foxes donned their flight suits and carried on the squadrons extensive efforts in com munity service with a visit to the Jacksonville Urban League Early Head Start Program Feb. 25. VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Erin Osborne, IT1 Cedrick Green, AZ2 Melvin Lamb and YN3 Allan Trahan volunteered to help children strengthen their reading skills and answered ques tions about the U.S. Navy. The volunteers participated by read ing books to the children, who range from birth to three years old. It felt amazing to know that I helped make a child smile today, said Trahan. Seeing the excitement, energy, and joy on the childrens faces was great. The group also brought along a flyers helmet and survival vest to show to the children in the program. Green helped many of the kids try on the flight gear. Even though some of the kids were scared of the helmet and vest, most of them enjoyed trying it on, said Green. It was fun watching them put on the gear and attempting to walk with the heavy vest on. The Jacksonville Urban Leagues Head Start Program is a federally fund ed early childhood education service that provides support for families with children under the age of 5. Each child within the program receives an indi vidualized plan that focuses on edu cation, early intervention, nutrition, social/emotional well-being, and physi cal health. Head Start works to ensure that each child within its program has the tools known as school readiness to be successful in their educational future and in life. VP-5, home ported at NAS Jacksonville, is currently undergoing transition to the new P-8A Poseidon aircraft. The Wings Over America Scholarship Foundation (WOASF) is hosting a golf tournament at NAS Jax April 26 at 9 a.m. to benefit scholarships for Navy dependents. The event is open to the public. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. All proceeds benefit the Wings Over America Scholarship Foundation, a 501(c)3 non-profit foundation. The WOASF annually sponsors more than 40 scholarships, ranging from $2,000 to $10,000, to students who have chosen to continue their educa tion. Scholarship recipients are select ed on the basis of scholastic merit, community service and extracurricu lar activities. The foundations mission is to pro vide college scholarships to dependent children and spouses of naval avia tion commands, officer and enlisted, active duty, retired, honorably dis charged or deceased. The foundation has awarded more than $635,000 to students since 1987. For more information or to register, visit www.wingsoveramerica.us or call 757-671-3200, ext. 2. VP-5 Mad Foxes help Head Start WOASF golf tournament set for April 26 VP-45s Combat Aircrew (CAC) Five recently returned to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan, marking the end of an 11-day detachment to U-Tapao, Thailand in support of Exercise Cobra Gold, a joint military exercise tai lored to emboldening the relationship between the armed forces of the United States and Thailand. Operationally, CAC-5 was able to pro vide crucial aerial surveillance support ing the U.S. Marine Corps during their joint amphibious operations, to include an amphibious assault alongside Thai Marines. CAC-5 also demonstrated the antisubmarine warfare capabilities of American P-3C aircraft to members of the Royal Thai Navy P-3 squadron who flew as on board observers. In addition to these primary mis sions, Pelican demonstrated how to change a tire in a minimal amount of time to the Thai maintainers and air crew provided valuable assistance to USS Bonhomme Richard in trouble shooting their on board mission sys tems. On a personal level, Lt. j.g. Gregory Stewart said of the experience, We were able to show U.S. personnel and assets to the Thai people and demon strate our commitment to our allies in the region. The Pelicans were actively involved in experiencing the local culture and expanding our understanding of Thai customs by visiting nearby islands, rid ing elephants, and sampling the local cuisine at every opportunity. Squadron personnel accomplished a high visibility detachment that was instrumental in improving U.S. and Thai relations to assist in coordinating future multi-lateral joint operations.Pelicans support Exercise Cobra Gold in Thailand 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013

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Plastics fabricators at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) successfully complet ed the rigorous requirements to make composite patches used to repair military aircraft, earning them advanced repair certificates presented at the facility Feb. 6. Pablo Maurosa, Ted Dinkel and Raymond Bizier earned their Composite Repair Level II Certification after complet ing a three-week course, dur ing which they made a variety of composite patches using car bon graphite cloth impregnat ed with epoxy resin. On a scale of 1 to 10, it was a 9.5, said Maurosa of the courses difficulty. For the repair patch to be perfect, the cloth had to be saturated with out any excess resin. It was very precise, down to the gram. The plastics fabricators must be level 1 certified with a mini mum of one years experience working with composites to qualify for the course. FRCSE Composite Training Specialist Kenny Weaver was first to teach the new course in Jacksonville. He said by establishing training capabil ity locally, FRCSE is realizing tremendous savings. Weaver, who instructs recertification classes for levels I and II com posite repairs, said the timesensitive repairs proved very challenging for the students. All the repairs were chal lenging, especially the intricate sanding they had to do when making the double-stacked, precured patch repair, he said. It has to be tapered back with stringent requirements. It was kind of awkward for me to say, Do it again. They were ready to give up, but I gave them some helpful hints, and they overcame their obstacles. They all did an excellent job. Tim Moore, also a compos ite training specialist, traveled from FRC Southwest in San Diego to serve in a train the trainer capacity and assist Weaver. He brought two dou ble vacuum debulking (DVD) boxes needed for the training. Moore has instructed the level II course for about six years. He said the Navy is moving away from aluminum airframes on its newer plat forms in favor of composites, although composite repairs take longer. He said aluminum is 235 percent heavier than car bon fiber for the same strength ratio. The lighter aircraft can travel longer distances and carry heavier loads. Its economics, he said. The [composite] aircraft are lighter and stronger than alu minum, and they use less fuel. The plastics fabricators will use their new skills to make composite repairs on com ponents of the F/A-18 Super Hornet Strike Fighter aircraft. Level II recertification must be renewed biannually. FRCSE machinists and welders are fabricating DVD boxes using scrap alumi num rough cut on a water jet. Manufacturing the boxes inhouse is estimated to save the command thousands of dol lars. Lorrinda Seiberling, the FRCSE training officer, spear headed efforts to bring the level II training to Jacksonville. Dear Kate, I really hate CFLs. These light bulbs just look ugly and their light is harsh. Yet, everyone says they save energy. Do they really work? What else can I do? Signed, Burnt-Out Kate Sez, You are not the first to complain about CFL light bulbs. But their energy savings make it worth a second look. New CFLs look better and last lon ger. Other ways to save on lighting are to take out extra bulbs (is every sin gle one needed?) and to use dimmer switches. Lighting is a big ener gy user in the home, so these changes are very illuminating. FRCSE plastics fabricators make tricky composite patches, earn certification Save on your energy billIn Memoriam William Calvert, 59, a civil ian employee at Personnel Support Detachment Jax passed away Feb. 21 in Orange Park. Calvert was born Feb. 13, 1954 in Boonville, Mo. He proudly served 20 years in the U.S. Navy and was a vet eran of Operation Desert Storm. He was a member of St. Edwards Chapel at NAS Jacksonville and served as the youth group and young adult minister. He was also an avid golfer and enjoyed mountain biking and being outdoors. Calvert is survived by his wife of 32 years, Rose Calvert, two daughters, Editha Alerre and Rachel Calvert; a son, Christopher Calvert; brother, Robert Calvert (Rosemary); five grand children, one great-grandchild and many other family members and friends. Calvert was buried at Jacksonville National Cemetery Feb. 28 following a celebration of his life at NAS Jax St. Edwards Chapel. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013 11

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Chiefs and first class petty officers assigned to Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) conducted a volun teer project at the Ronald McDonald House in Jacksonville, Feb. 28. During the project, participants raked leaves and helped clean up the court yard playground located at the center of the facility, which provides lodging and support services for critically ill, chroni cally ill and seriously injured children and their families. Volunteer efforts like this are huge for us, said Cat McCarroll, the houses event and marketing manager. Were a 30-bedroom house with a small staff, so we depend almost entirely on the community and volunteer groups that come in and help with meals, main tenance or housekeeping. Theyre what keeps this house running. The house is located about a block away from Nemours Childrens Clinic, where most of the children receive treatment. Its services cut out the cost of long-term hotel lodging, making medical treatment more readily avail able for financially-challenged families, although families and individuals of all financial backgrounds are welcome to stay. While guests are asked to give a $10-per-night donation for the duration of their stay, they are not turned away if they cannot make the payment. Since opening in 1988, the house has provid ed services for an average of more than 1,000 families each year. For us, this is a small contribution, but it means so much to the center and its really the least we can do, said LNC(SW/AW) Lucia Abreu, who volun teered. I see it as part of our duty to our community to give back what we can. According to CS1(SW/AW) Brandon Jiles, who coordinated the effort, the project served a dual pupose as both a community relations project and a team-building opportunity for CNRSE chiefs and first classes. Obviously, a good relationship between the chiefs and the first class mess is very important to a command on a number of different levels, Jiles said. Right now, its being emphasized more than ever with the MCPONs (Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy) guidance with the CPO (chief petty offi cer) 365 program, but always its always been an important dynamic in the over all climate of a command. This project was a good way for us to improve upon this and support a good cause at the same time. The house operates solely on dona tions from the local community and vol unteer projects and has shared a partic ularly special relationship with the local military. The military is great because they obviously have the heart and desire to make a difference, said McCarroll. Logistically, you cant beat it because they come in and get the job done and the results are amazing. According to McCarroll, those efforts are appreciated not only by the houses staff, but by the families who stay there as well. What is extraordinary about military volunteers is their effect on the fami lies. A lot of families realize they are enlisted, and for service members to take the time to do this demonstrates to them that there are armies of people out there who care about what they are going through, she said. Additionally, McCarroll said there are always plenty of opportunities for other commands to participate in volunteer projects at the house. There is no shortage of ways to vol unteer, whether you want to help deco rate for the holidays, do arts and crafts, or get your hands dirty and pull weeds, there is really no limit to the ways you can impact the families and every effort is appreciated. Ronald McDonald House Charities was founded in 1974. The first house opened in Philadelphia and was fund ed by McDonalds restaurant proceeds donated by local owners. Today, there are 309 houses in more than 50 coun tries worldwide. For more information, visit http:// www.rmhc.com. Southeast Region Sailors volunteer at Jacksonville Ronald McDonald House JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013 13

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HSM-70 Det Two returns home HSM-70 Detachment Two returned home from a suc cessful deployment com bating piracy off the Horn of Africa Feb. 9. Serving on USS Halyburton (FFG 40), Det. Two was the first MH-60R detach ment to deploy in an expedi tionary status onboard a Oliver Hazard Perry class frigate. Spending six months at sea, this completed just the second deployment in HSM-70s his tory. After departing Naval Station Mayport in early August 2012, Det. Two made a quick transit through the Mediterranean Sea before stationing themselves off the Horn of Africa. They spent four months patrolling the shorelines of Somalia, deterring piracy and providing support to local fish ermen. Their presence in this region coincided with the larg est decrease in piracy related activity over the previous 10 years. As an added benefit of serv ing in the Indian Ocean, squadron personnel vis ited several exciting ports throughout cruise to include: the Azores, Spain, Greece, Djibouti, Oman, Tanzania, Seychelles, and Portugal. USS Halyburton and Det. Two served under the com mand of Combined Task Force 508 and flagships HNLMS Rotterdam (Dutch) and ITS San Marco (Italian). CTF-508 is a NATO anti-piracy Task Force with the primary mission of deterring piracy and providing maritime security. During the four-month period more than 250 flight hours were flown by the detachment in direct sup port of operations Ocean Shield and Active Endeavour. The operational highlight of the cruise occurred on Jan. 4. Shortly before sunset, the lone Spartan MH-60R helicop ter responded to a distress call from a cargo ship, Motor Vessel Jasmine, who reported being shot at by pirates with assault rifles and rocket-propelled grenades. After assessing the condition of the cargo ship and safety of the ships crew, HSM70 aircrew, Lt. Alex Haupt, Lt. Flannery Woodward and AWR2 Anthony Pedersen con ducted an open ocean search and located the suspected pirates, who were traveling in two small skiffs. The following morning, Lt. Cmdr. Donald Clemons, Lt. j.g. Dane Mutschler and AWR2 Daniel Benson re-located the skiff and provided overhead support and intelligence for the Halyburton visit, board, search and seizure team. The two days of tracking and intelligence gathering ultimately led to the capture and detainment of 12 suspected pirates. The realtime intelligence provided by Det. Two personnel proved to be one of several critical factors enabling NATO to extradite the suspected pirates for trial. In addition to their opera tional success, the Spartans excelled in every mission area in which they were tasked and were an invaluable asset to USS Halyburton. By providing an additional operational capability, they were able to support the task force with three medical evac uations, five personnel trans fers and three vertical replen ishment flights. While at sea, three Spartans were promoted: AM2 Richard Lopez, AZ2 Michael Gepner and AM3 Christopher Lemaster. All of the Sailors committed themselves to improving their career through professional advancement and development. Over the course of the deployment, Det. Two qualified one plane captain, 10 flight deck directors, three RAST traverse operators, three landing safety officers and three enlisted aviation warfare specialists. Lemaster was also named 2012 Blue Jacket of the fourth quarter for HSM-70. With the real-world experi ence gained on this successful deployment Det. Two is poised to lead and train the next group of Spartan Sailors for any task on the high seas. NOL celebrates 54 yearsThe Navy Ortega Lakeshore (NOL) Little League opened its 2013 baseball/softball season March 2 at Blue Angel Field located aboard NAS Jacksonville. Ill always have a special place in my heart for Little League, said NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders, prior to throwing the official first pitch on a sunny, windy and cool morning. I was an assistant coach for my sons team in the Virginia Beach Little League for eight years so I really appreciate everything that vol unteers do to provide this athletic oppor tunity to our kids. Former NOL President David Hawkins pinch hit as master of ceremo nies for current NOL President Tommy Brooks who was out of town. Hawkins said, Were fielding 35 teams for the 2013 season with kids ranging from 4 to 16 years old. Baseball and softball are uniquely American sports that build physical skills and character. They offer the camaraderie of a team sport, in addition to requiring the courage and confidence of an individual sport. Sanders added, I love this game and pledge my sup port to NOL players, coaches and families. Play hard, keep up with your studies and enjoy good luck this sea son. The skipper then took the mound and pitched the sea sons first ball to catcher Gabriel Borders. Little League District 11 Chief Umpire Bob Veleta also tipped his hat to the crowd. Ive been an NOL volunteer for decades here at NAS Jax and Ive never seen a betterrun volunteer organization than NOL. Hawkins urged the crowd to join him in applauding the support of Sanders and MWR Installation Program Director John Bushick. The NAS Jax MWR team pro vides out standing sup port for the maintenance of six ball fields, along with helping NOL with various safety and logistics matters. The best I can sum up about our part nership with the Navy is that we all run a tight ship, said Hawkins. He concluded by expressing appreciation for the leagues irreplaceable volunteers. Our coaches, umpires, dugout moms, concession workers and clean ing crews are all volunteers. Thank you for stepping up to support NOL and thanks again for entrusting your young athletes to us. Little League is big at NAS Jax 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013

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Base officials, contractors and rec reational boaters celebrated the grand reopening of Mulberry Cove Marina on the St. Johns River at NAS Jacksonville Feb. 26. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders told the crowd, This new concrete floating dock system not only offers a number of quality boating amenities it also offers improved protection from wave action spurred by thunderstorms and other adverse weather conditions. Congratulations to all the team mem bers who made this a reality. The nine-month project replaced the original dilapidated 62-slip wooden piers with a 96-slip floating concrete dock system. The new slips vary in length from 30 to 50 feet. The renovation includes a stationary pump-out and fueling station, water service, improved parking, fire protec tion, life-saving equipment, dock boxes, pier lighting and ADA access to the main utility pier. Free WiFi is scheduled for installation by the end of April. Electrical service consists of 50-amp and/or 30-amp shore power 240-volt receptacle with an additional 20-amp 120-volt receptacle. Thanks to the wave attenuator sys tem, the new floating concrete piers are designed to withstand 90 mph winds and a six-foot storm surge. The new slips are available for rent monthly at $7.75 per foot for military and $8.75 per foot for DoD employees. For more information, contact Mulberry Cove Marina at 542-3260. New marina now open JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013 15

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The Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) visited Argyle Elementary School as part of a Friday Fun Day pro gram for students. NECE Entomologists treated students to a live display that included a snake, scorpion, and tarantula along with a host of other invertebrates. Its amazing watching the children smile, laugh and sometimes cringe as they get up close and personal with the displays, said Lt. j.g. Matthew Yans, NECE entomologist. The entomologists taught wildlife safety that included tips to avoid bites from dis ease carrying insects native to Florida. Its important that children get hands on learning with science, said Melissa Cordo, Argyle Elementary teacher. Friday Fun Day allows us to present science in a fun, posi tive way while teaching the stu dents valuable biological les sons. This includes ensuring stu dents learn about ways to pro tect themselves in the rich Florida wilderness. During the outreach students not only learned about animal biology but also career opportunities in the Navy. The visit to Argyle Elementary School was a continuation of a long-standing and vibrant outreach program. Aligning with our philoso phy of volunteerism, NECE enjoys a long history of support ing Jacksonville area schools through mentoring programs, presentations and science fair judging, said Cmdr. Eric Hoffman, NECE officer-incharge. This opportunity to posi tively impact the next genera tion of scientists and leaders is a tremendous privilege and responsibility for our staff. There is nothing more reward ing than to hear about the suc cess of these students knowing you played a small role in their development. The school outreach was coordinated by NAS Jacksonville Liaison Officer Dawn Mills as part of Partners in Education (PIE). The PIE mission is to create a volunteer network of resourc es supporting both installa tion and community members interest in the success of youth. These connections help directly support student devel opment and indirectly ensure the communitys vested interest in NAS Jacksonville, said Mills. Programs such as PIE and other community outreach efforts are essential to devel oping future scientists, citizens and sailors. NECE is actively involved in numerous commu nity outreach programs, and sciences fairs throughout Duval and Clay County. If you are interested in partnering with NECE to request a school out reach event contact Lt. Jennifer Wright at: Jennifer.wright@ med.navy.mil Navy Entomology Center of Excellence reaches out to local Jacksonville area schools 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013

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The Navy joins the nation in celebrat ing Womens History Month during the month of March, as announced in Naval Administrative message 039/13, released Feb. 22. Commands are strongly encouraged to increase their knowledge and aware ness of the contributions of women to our Navy and nation by celebrating the national Womens History Month theme, Women Inspiring Innovation through Imagination: Celebrating Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) through programs, exhibits, publica tions, and participation in military and community events. One Navy STEM pioneer includes Grace Murray Hopper, who wanted to put her Ph.D. in Mathematics to use for her nation in the midst of World War II. In 1943, she joined the Naval Reserves and was commissioned as a lieutenant in 1944. During World War II she worked at the Bureau of Ordnance Computation Project at Harvard University and at the end of the war joined the Harvard fac ulty. Retiring as a rear admiral, Hopper, was recognized as a pioneer com puter programmer, the co-inventor of Common Business Oriented Language (COBOL), and for coining the term bug for computer malfunctions. Hopper was buried at Arlington National Cemetery in 1992. USS Hopper (DDG 70) was commissioned as her namesake in 1997; this was only the second Navy warship to be named after a woman. Also during World War II, the Navy launched the Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service (WAVES) program. Along with Hopper, more than 85,000 WAVES worked in STEM fields as air traffic controllers, cryptolo gists, draftsmen, meteorologists, and translators during World War II. In December 2012, history was made in the Navys nuclear commu nity when Lieutenant Junior Grade Marquette Leveque, assigned to the gold crew of USS Wyoming (SSBN 742), and Lieutenants Junior Grade Amber Cowan and Jennifer Noonan of USS Maine (SSBN 741) blue crew became the first female unrestricted line officers to qualify in submarines and receive their Submarine Warfare Insignia, also known as dolphins. Today in the Navy, female officers fill 10 percent of STEM positions, includ ing engineering duty officers and infor mation warfare professionals. Female enlisted Sailors make up 22 percent of the cryptology and intelligence com munity and 21 percent of operational ratings, including aviation warfare sys tems operators and sonar technicians. Female Sailors continue to excel both ashore and afloat, serving in various STEM related fields. More than 54,000 active duty women and more than 10,000 female Reservists are serving in the Navy. They make up 17.3 percent of the force and make indispensable contributions to our mission and operations. Nearly 59,000 women serve in a wide range of special ties as Navy civilians. The current Navy Total Force includes 33 active and Reserve female flag offi cers, 67 female senior executive service members, 56 female command master chiefs, and 6 female command senior chiefs leading from the front. Currently, the top three highestranking female officers in the Navy are Vice Adm. Carol Pottenger, Vice Adm. Michelle Howard, and Vice Adm. Robin Braun. Pottenger, a surface warfare offi cer, was one of the first women selected for sea duty and went on to become the third commander, Navy Expeditionary Combat Command. Howard also a surface warfare offi cer, was the first African American woman to command a ship in the U.S. Navy when she took command of USS Rushmore (LSD 47), and in 2012 she became the first African-American woman to receive a third star in flag rank within the Department of Defense when she was promoted Aug. 24. Braun, a career naval aviator and for mer commanding officer of VR-48, has more than 5,800 flight hours in Navy aircraft. The top three highest-ranking female enlisted leaders in the Navy are Fleet Master Chief Joann Ortloff, Fleet Master Chief April Beldo, and Force Master Chief Nancy Hollingsworth. Force Master Chief April Beldo, currently the Naval Education and Training Command Force Master Chief, will make history as the Navys first female African American Fleet Master Chief when she assumes her position as the Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education (MPT&E) fleet master chief later this month. The Navys 67-strong Senior Executive Service also has a strong STEM presence amongst its seniormost women. Carla Lucchino, Department of Navy Assistant for Administration is the top female civilian SES. Steffanie Easter, executive director for the F-35 Lightning II Joint Program Office, holds a bachelors degree in chemical engineering and masters degree in engineering management. Easter is currently leading the F-35 Lightning II Joint Program, the Department of Defenses initiative for defining affordable and sustainable fifth-generation strike aircraft. Women at the helm: Celebrating Womens History Month JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013 17

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Friday Free Entertainment at 7 p.m. March 8 Pierce In Harmony March 15 Jason Lamar March 22 All About Me March 29 Ace Winn April 5 KaraokeFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 4-6 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 126 p.m., $1.50 games Friday special $1 games per person 25 p.m. Bowling Tournament March 16 at 12 p.m. March Bowling Madness Command party give-a-way March 1-31Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information,contact Melissa at 542-3518/4238 Leprechaun Dash 5K March 15 at 11:30 a.m. Pre-register by March 8I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. ITT Travel Fair March 16, 9:30 a.m. 1 p.m. NEX Courtyard Win prizes! Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts Dark Side Of The Moon (Pink Floyd) Saturday, April 13 at 7:30 p.m. Section A $33; Section B $28; Section C $23 A Lamb Chop Celebration April 20 at 7:30 p.m. Section A $18; Section B $14; Section C $11 Legoland Kids go free with an adult ticket purchase from ITT Funkfest Metropolitan Park May 10-11 2-day ticket $52 Gatornationals March 15,16,17, 2013 Fri. Reserved from $35 $39 Sat. & Sun. Reserved from $50 $54 Fri. General Seating from $28 $32 Sat. & Sun. General Seating from $38 $42 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3 Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7 Blockout Dates: March 23 April 5, 2013 Call for pricing Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline 2013 Live Broadway Series Rock of Ages April 6 Dream Girls May 21 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31 and must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about our special discounted tick ets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park Gold pass $71The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Kayaking Trip Simpson Creek March 16 at 9 a.m. Liberty Bowling Night NAS Freedom Lanes March 20, $6 per person Cummer Art Museum Trip March 26 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees March 12 & 26 for active duty March 14 & 28 for retirees, DoD person nel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Twilight Golf League Tuesday at 5 p.m. March 26 Aug. 27 $20 per person per weekMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Free Easter Egg Hunt March 27 at 7 p.m. McCaffrey Softball Fields Open to children up to age 12Flying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School March 18 April 24 $500 per person For more info, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil Gym at The Zone has new hoursEffective March 8, The Zone Gym will close at 1 p.m. on Fridays and will be closed Saturdays and Sundays due to low patron usage. New hours of operation are: Monday Thursdays 5 a.m. 8 p.m. and Fridays 5 a.m. 1 p.m. The Fitness Center will continue to operate with the following hours Monday through Friday 5 a.m. 9 p.m. and Saturday-Sunday from 7 a.m. 5 p.m. 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013 19 Hundreds of Sailors and civilians gained financial insight on a wide variety of topics as part of Military Saves Week which was held aboard NAS Jacksonville Feb. 25 through March 1. The week began with a kick-off event at Deweys Feb. 25 by NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders who praised the concept of promot ing financial investing to junior Sailors. I wish we had this resource when I was younger because it wasnt until later in life that I developed a sound financial plan.Life is about choices. You have to make the choice of wants versus needs and stay out of debt, said Sanders. The earlier you start saving the bet ter off you will be. So, I encour age you to ask questions and start planning your financial future. Guest speakers for the Military Saves Week Kickoff included David Williams and Thunder Nkere of the First Command Education Foundation and motivational speaker and retired Navy Capt. Andy Andersen. Williams and Nkere provided invaluable information regard ing taking steps towards finan cial success, establishing goals, managing debt and planning for retirement. Andersen pumped up the audience by giving them dif ferent perspectives on financial management through several scenarios and through person al experiences. Im here to give you per spective on who you are right now. To be successful, you need to live within your means. Real investments are not things youve bought to impress oth ers, they are faith, family and friends, he stated. Self worth does not equal net worth. During the week, numer ous workshops were available to provide information about various financial topics such as budgeting and spending plans, insurance needs, separation/ retirement planning, debt and credit management, home buy ing, college costs and car buy ing/leasing. I think the week has been important for people to come and get some financial knowl edge whether its about home buying, car buying, debt man agement, credit management, increasing your credit score, decreasing debt and increas ing wealth, said NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center Financial Educator Rufus Bundrige who coordinated the week-long events. All these are culminated to help indi viduals be more successful and give them a better quality of life. This includes Navy College providing tips on how they can better themselves to be more competitive in the job market if they separate or retire from the military. Many junior Sailors were thrilled with the knowl edge they were receiving in the financial workshops. I think this is really worth taking the time to come lis ten to these briefings espe cially for us junior Sailors who dont know what to do with our money. Ive learned that I need to start investing now and that the Roth IRA is a good way to do that. Im definitely getting some financial educa tion this week, said AN Taretta Madison of VP-30. These workshops are com ing at a good time with possible budget cuts because its help ing us become more knowl edgeable about what to do with our money. I was especially interested in hearing the briefs on buying a car and learning about college options, added AOAN Aaron Sarbey, also from VP-30. As an added incentive, VyStar Credit Union sponsored Military Saves Week by donat ing $500 worth of half dollars that were given to workshop attendees and a $500 check to the winner of a Military Saves Poker Run. For more information on the Military Saves Program, go to www.militarysaves.org. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal govern ment officially endorses any com pany, sponsor or its products or services. Wealth of information provided during Military Saves Week Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville its hospital and branch health clinics is pleased to announce that the 2013 Patient Guide is now in-stock at all of its facilities and also available online at the command website at www. med.navy.mil/sites/navalhospi taljax The Guide is patients all-access tool, with current contact infor mation for all clinical depart ments at the hospital and branch health clinics. This includes Medical Home Port care teams, urgent and emergency care, pharmacy and pharmacy home delivery, outpa tient clinics, expecting and new parent services, inpatient care and surgery, military medicine, TRICARE, and educational class es. To find out more, visit the com mand website at www.med.navy. mil/sites/NavalHospitalJax like the Facebook page at www.face book/NavalHospitalJacksonville follow on Twitter at www.twit ter.com/NHJax and view the YouTube channel at www.you tube.com/user/NavalHospitalJax Sign up for e-mail updates at nhjaxconnect@med.navy.mil.2013 Patient Guide all-access tool arrives

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Commissary frozen food sections are decorated in March for National Frozen Food Month, just one of many special promotional savings offered throughout the store, according to Joyce Chandler, DeCAs acting sales director. Commissaries all over the world are celebrating Frozen Food Month in March, Chandler said. Shoppers will discover everything from greater savings on frozen foods to product demonstrations and high-value coupons bundled up with participat ing products throughout their store. DeCAs industry partners vendors, suppliers and brokers are collaborat ing with commissaries in March to offer discounts beyond everyday savings. Overseas stores may have substitute events for certain promotional pro grams. Customers are asked to check their local commissary for details on dates and times for the following pro motions: Free Milk. This Kelloggs pro motion is an extended celebration of National Breakfast Week. Shoppers can get a free gallon of milk during March 7-April 10 with the purchase of any four Kelloggs cereals or any four boxes of Keebler cookies. Kelloggs also highlights the impor tance of a healthy breakfast, and they do this by offering $5 worth of cou pons in over 20 million packages of cereal, Pop-Tarts and Nutri-Grain Bars. For every coupon redeemed, a break fast will be donated to a child in need through Action for Healthy Kids as part of an effort to provide one million breakfasts. Quaker & Tropicana celebrate the 40th anniversary of National Nutrition Month, an Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics campaign highlighting the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eat ing and physical activity habits. From March 7 to April 10, commissaries will be provided high-value coupons with instructions about a video contest on www.quakermilitary.com. Videos from the 10 finalists will be showcased on the website, and com missary customers can then vote for their favorite video. Producers of the five videos with the most votes will win commissary gift cards. Total value of all prizes awarded is $900. The month of March is offering our commissary shoppers a lot of savings excitement and giveaways, and present ing the very best in nutritional choices for you and your family, Chandler said. Know that your commissary is always worth the trip! Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregistration is required at 5425745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2013: 13-16 (5:30-10 p.m.), Aug. 19-21 (8 a.m.-4 p.m.), Nov. 12-15 (5:30-10 p.m.) (TAP) Separation Workshop (7:30 a.m.4:15 p.m.) March 11-15, April 1-5, April. 8-12, May 6-10, May 13-17, June 3-7, June 17-21, July 8-12, July 15-19, Aug. 5-9, Aug. 19-23, Sept. 9-13, Sept. 16-20, Oct. 7-11, Oct. 21-25, Nov. 4-8, Dec. 2-6. (TAP) Retirement Workshop (7:30 a.m.4:15 p.m.) March 25-29, April 15-19, May 20-24, June 24-28, July 22-26, Aug. 26-30, Sept. 23-27, Oct. 28-Nov. 1, Nov. 18-22, Dec. 16-20. a.m.-noon) March 20, April 22, May 3, June 12, Aug. 16, Sept. 6, Oct. 17, Nov. 27, Dec. 11. (Noon-3 p.m.) July 2. Workshop (8-9:30 a.m.) April 10, May 30, July 15, Sept. 5, Nov. 25. (9:40 a.m.-noon) April 10, May 30, July 15, Sept. 5, Nov. 25. a.m.-4 p.m.) May 1-2, Aug. 14-15, Nov. 13-14. Training (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) March 18-22, June 10-14, Sept. 30-Oct. 4, Dec. 9-13. Management Workshop (8-11 a.m.) April 30, July 2, Oct. 15. Buyers (1-3:30 p.m.) April 22, May 29, Sept. 4. Buying (9-10:30 a.m.) May 29, Aug. 12, Nov. 26. April 11, June 13, Aug. 8, Oct. 10, Dec. 12. p.m.) March 14, May 9, July 11, Sept. 12, Nov. 14. March 16 (10-11:30 a.m.), May 21 (5-6:30 p.m.), July 18 (1-2:30 p.m.) Sept. 14 (1-2:30 p.m.) Nov. 21 (5-6:30 p.m.) March 11, April 8, May 13, June 10, July 8, Aug. 12, Sept. 9, Oct. 7, Nov. 4, Dec. 9. (9-10:30 a.m.) March 12, April 9, May 14, June 11, July 9, Aug. 13, Sept. 10, Oct. 8, Nov. 5, Dec. 10. Extended Stress Management Workshop (8 a.m.-noon) April 16 & 30, July 16 & 30, Oct. 15 & 29. a.m.-noon) March 26, April 23, May 21, June 25, July 23, Aug. 27, Sept. 24, Oct. 22, Nov. 26, Dec. 17. Personal Anger Control Group March 12 April 16 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.), May 2 June 6 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.), June 25 July 30 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.), Aug. 15 Sept. 19 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.), Oct. 8 Nov. 12 (2-4 p.m.) Individual Communication (11 a.m.-1 p.m.) March 19, May 14, July 9, Sept. 10, Nov. 19. Parenting with Love & Logic (1-3 p.m.) May 7, 14, 21, 28; July 9, 16, 23, 30; Sept. 3, 10, 17, 24; Nov. 5, 12, 19, 26. Active Parenting of Teens (1-4 p.m.) April 3, 10, 17, 24; June 5, 12, 19, 26; Aug. 7, 14, 21, 28; Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23. Power 2 Change Womens Support Group (9:30-11 a.m.) Every Wednesday Expectant Families (9 a.m.-3 p.m.) June 4, Sept. 16, Dec. 3. Tiny Tots Play Group (10 a.m.-noon) March 19; April 2, 16, 30; May 14, 18; June 11, 25; July 9, 23; Aug. 6, 20; Sept. 3, 17; Oct. 1, 15, 29; Nov. 12, 16; Dec. 10, 17. Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) Orientation (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) May. 2, July 3, Sept. 5, Nov. 7. EFMP Command POC Training (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) April 4, June 6, Aug. 1, Oct. 3, Dec. 5. To register for any of the above work shops please contact 542-5745. Penguins abound in your commissary this MarchFFSC offers life skills workshops 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013

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NAS Jacksonville trains new command fitness leadersCommand fitness leaders (CFL) from Navy Region Southeast engaged in a five-day CFL class, Feb. 25 March 1. The class is aimed at certifying the CFLs to be ready to effectively promote their command physi cal readiness programs. This is an intensive course that consists of both class room work and a variety of physical activities, com mented Tanya Henigman, NAS Jax fitness director. The class covers Physical Readiness Program policies, balanced nutrition, exercise physiology, safety, health pro motion, medical waivers, and how to promote a variety of exercises to Sailors besides the normal push-ups, sit-ups, and 1.5 mile run. Henigman explained that every CFL in the course must score at least an excellent on their physical readiness test in addition to having solid knowledge of the administra tive details they are taught in the classroom. Through our guidance and the resources we provide, we hope to turn them into the best CFLs they can be. We strongly promote that good physical fitness determines the strength of our Navy and its ability to be mis sion ready, Henigman continued. By teaching them many different fitness techniques here, we can be assured that they will pass on what they have learned to the Sailors in their respective commands. Sailors who wish to learn more about maintaining a high standard of physical fitness are encouraged to visit the website www.navyfitness.org JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013 21

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22 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013 Sequestration actionsThis message was sent on March 1 to all Navy and Marine Corps units by Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. 1. Because no budget deal had been reached, the budget control act required setting in motion the automatic, government-wide cuts known as sequestration. Given that reality and the associated impact of budgetary uncertainty imposed by an indefinite continuing resolu tion, the Department of the Navy intends to commence reductions immediately. 2. The Navy plans to: A. Shut down Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) in April. This will initi ate the preparations to gradually stand-down flying in at least three additional air wings, with two more air wings being reduced to mini mum safe flying levels by the end of the year; B. Defer USNS Comfort humanitarian deployment to Central and South America, continuing promise 2013, including supporting ships, Seabees, and medical units; C. Cancel or defer the deployments of up to six ships to various AORs throughout the month of April; D. Lay up four combat logistics force (CLF) units in PACOM starting in april; E. Return USS Shoup (DDG 86) to homeport early and not proceed as USS Nimitz (CVN 68) escort to CENTCOM; F. Return USS Thach (FFG 43) to homeport early from deployment to SOUTHCOM. 3. The Navy will also immediately: A. Begin negotiating contract modifications to de-obligate efforts for any investment programs for which the remaining unobligated balance will be insufficient after the sequestration reduction is applied. Major programs affected include Virginia-class SSN advance procurement, reactor power units and joint high speed vessel (JHSV); B. Commence final planning to slow Marine Corps depot mainte nance activities, including reductions in the non-permanent work force; C. Cancel March introductory flight screening for future pilots/ nfos; D. Announce intent to cancel Blue Angels shows scheduled for April at MacDill AFB (Tampa, Fla.); NAS Corpus Christi, Texas; Vidalia Ga.; and MCAS Beaufort S.C.); E. Cease new USMC enrollments in voluntary education tuition assistance; F. Cancel March navy recruiting media support and reduce the majority of advertising contracts as much as possible under contrac tual conditions. 4. These actions are being taken to preserve support for those forces stationed overseas and currently forward-deployed. Reductions in lower-priority forward operations, and significant reductions in all other operations, training, and maintenance are the results of this selection process. 5. Actions taken to date will continue, including those affecting the deferral of maintenance for USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72); the deferral of repair work for USS Miami (SSN 755) and USS Porter (DDG 78); the delayed deployment of USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) and USS Gettysburg (CG 64); the civilian hiring freeze; the planning for civilian furloughs; and the reduction of all training not related to the readiness of deployed or next-to-deploy forces. 6. Navy Department leadership understands the uncertainty that these and other decisions create both amongst our people and in the defense industry upon which we rely. The lack of a legislative solution to avoid sequestration is deeply regrettable. We must endeavor to deal with the situation as we face it, not as we wish it could be otherwise. We will continue to keep the safety and well-being of our people foremost in mind, even as we work to keep whole the force structure which supports them. We will also continue to keep the Fleet and Fleet Marine Force fully informed as follow-on decisions are made. During a media availability Feb. 21, Navy officials announced the littoral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS 1) is on track to begin its first deployment March 1.This milestone was announced by the LCS Council, a group established by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert Aug. 22, to oversee continued fleet testing and the introduction of the LCS. Addressing challenges identified by these studies, on the timeline we require, necessitates the establish ment of an empowered council to drive the action across acquisition, requirements and fleet enterprises of the Navy, said Greenert. The output of the council is intended to assist in maximizing the expansive potential capabilities of LCS and its associated mission packages in global fleet operations for the joint warfighter. I am confident we are on a path of success for LCS, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. This council will continue to unify our efforts to implement operational lessons learned from our research and development ships to further ensure successful fleet integration. LCS ships are designed to employ mission packages that address capability gaps in the areas of surface warfare, mine countermeasures, and anti-submarine warfare. Due to its modular design, each LCS ship can be reconfigured to perform one of those three distinct missions in a short period of time. Freedoms deployment will demonstrate her opera tional capabilities, and allow the LCS Council to eval uate crew rotation and maintenance plans. The ship will operate forward from Singapore and spend eight months in theater conducting maritime security operations, participate in international exhi bitions and exercises to highlight U.S. strategic intent in the region, and reassure U.S. partners through bilateral and multilateral interoperability. First Littoral Combat Ship to deploy in March

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24 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013



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THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 2013 CHILEAN BRASS FIRE EXERCISE NEW MARINA Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Naval aviators are evaluating energy saving refueling practices as part of a program aimed at standardizing fleet-driven energy best practices that do not adversely impact mission or safety. The Naval Aviation Energy Conservation (Air ENCON) program is driving the fleet wide implementation of these practices across the entire operational spectrum from training and ground operations to maintenance and flight opera tions. Our goal is to enable the Navy to fly more efficiently by providing options to fleet commanders who manage flight hours, said Lt. Cmdr. Daniel Quinn, Air ENCON program lead, with Commander, Naval Air Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet Force Readiness. The team also includes Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic and Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR). As part of the beta launch running through December 2013, the program distributes quarterly squadron energy report cards and solicits fleet feedback and additional energy saving ideas, said Michael Olszewski, NAVAIR Propulsion & Power, Air ENCON deputy program lead on Feb. 26. Air ENCON directly supports the chief of naval operations goal to increase efficiency and reduce fuel consumption afloat by 15 percent by 2020. Naval aviation operates more than 3,700 aircraft that con sume more than 600 million gallons of petroleum-based fuels each year. Resource constraints and mission requirements demand increased operational capability be extracted from each gallon of fuel. Air ENCON is focusing first on the largest consumers: F/A-18 Hornets and Super Hornets, said Quinn, an F/A-18F weapons systems officer. HSM-70 meets AUTEC challengeHSM-70 recently conducted train ing at the Atlantic Undersea Testing and Evaluation Center (AUTEC), located on Andros Island, Bahamas. AUTEC provides a training envi ronment to evaluate and assess the MH-60R Seahawk communitys warf ighting abilities. Lt. Phil Krites, HSM-70s training Fighting Tigers help in Habitat for Humanity Project The VP-8 Fighting Tigers partic ipated in a Clay County Habitat for Humanity community relations proj ect (COMREL) Feb. 21. According to their website, Habitat for Humanity International was founded in 1976 by Millard and Linda Fuller. Today, Habitat for Humanity is a true world leader in addressing the issues of poverty housing. Through the work of Habitat, thousands of lowincome families have found new hope in the form of affordable housing. Churches, community groups and others have joined together to suc cessfully tackle a significant social problem decent housing for all. Eleven Sailors volunteered to help the entity build a three-bedroom home, laying down tar paper and roof A message from Secretary of Defense Chuck HagelTo all Department of Defense person nel: On Feb. 27, I was privileged to take the oath of office to become the 24th Secretary of Defense. I am humbled by and grate ful for the opportunity that President Obama and the Congress have given me to once again serve our nation. I am most especially grateful for the opportu nity to work with all of you. Every day you work to defend America. The noble cause of your profes sion, your individual sacrifices, and your service inspire us all. As your leader, I will always do my best for our country and for all of you and your families. As with my friends and predecessors Leon Panetta and Bob Gates, your safety, success and welfare will always be at the forefront of my decisions.I will build on the strong foundation of teamwork built by secretaries Gates and Panetta, as we work together. Leadership is a team business. I have long believed that America must maintain the strongest military on earth. We must lead the international commu nity, with a steady and sure hand to con front threats and challenges together as we work closely with our allies and part ners to advance our common interests and build a more hopeful world.We must use all tools of American power to protect our citizens and our interests, and America must engage not retreat in the world, but engage wisely. This is a defining time for the United States military and for our nation. We are emerging from more than a decade of war, yet the threats facing us are no less dangerous or complicated. Despite these challenges, I believe an historic opportunity exists to help build a safer, more prosperous, and more secure world. But to achieve this goal we must ensure that we are ready, trained and equipped to fulfill our role of protecting the coun try and standing firm against aggression. To that end, the strength, well-being and readiness of our all-volunteer force will be my top priority. This will require 21st century agility and flexibility. We must take care of our people, and working with the VA and other institutions, I will ensure that you and your families get the health care, job opportunities, benefits, and education you have all earned and deserve. My life and career have been about helping our service members, veterans and their families. One of my proudest accomplishments in the U.S. Senate was coauthoring with my fellow Vietnam veteran and friend, Jim Webb, the Post-9/11 G.I. Bill. As I assume this office, I am mindful of the sacrifices that you and your fami lies have made for more than a decade, and continue to make every day.In Afghanistan, where 66,000 of our troops remain in a tough fight, we have a clear and achievable objective to fully transi tion security responsibility to the Afghan National Security Forces by the end of 2014. As you know, Afghan forces will step into the lead for security operations across the country this spring, and over the next year another 34,000 of our troops will come home. As we turn the page on more than a decade of grinding conflict, we must broaden our attention to future threats and challenges. That means continuing to increase our focus on the Asia-Pacific region, reinvigorating historic Alliances Aircraft energy saving initiatives launched

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013 For several mornings in a row, I woke to the same conversation coming from the landing outside my bedroom: Owen, get my back. Get my back! Got it. The enemys on my tail. Hard right! Hard right! I see him. Im locking in. Got em. Theres another one. Locking in. Hes on my tail. The boys were playing a Nintendo Wii game called World War II Aces. Using the handheld remote, they led historical aircraft through maneuvers on famed missions. Even Lindell, 5, was learning pilot-talk. The first time I saw him use his hands to demon strate how a plane banked left, I knew it was time to show them Top Gun (Well, not all of Top Gun ; Id need to fast-for ward through that scene.) I put the DVD in the machine, and when the title screen came on, the first notes of Kenny Loggins iconic Danger Zone playing against the whistle and wind of jet noise, the entire 1980s washed over me. I felt like I might even smell the old perm in my hair. The boys stared at the television, their mouths hung open. This is when I knew they needed some background informa tion. I paused the DVD. Okay, first, I said, you should know that this is what I grew up with. Pop, your grandfather, was an F-14 pilot. What youre about to see is what he did for work when I was a kid. He even went to the famous Top Gun school. Pop? Owen said, the cor ners of his mouth turning up in a smile. Yes, Pop. My Pop? Lindell asked. Yes. But theres more. I reminded the boys of the air craft carriers I grew-up on and around in Norfolk, Va. They were like Pops office, right? Owen said. Yes, we remember, Ford said, his impatience audible. The smell of jet fuel reminds you of being a kid. What else? Can we watch now? Youre going to see an air craft carrier in this movie. Its the same one your dad was on during his first deployment. He and Pop were actually on it together at one point. The boys minds had just been blown. As I realized that I had even more to tell them, I wondered what took me so long to show them this movie. Can we watch now? Ford asked. I pushed play and said what I thought was an aside, Also, people say the main character, Maverick, looks a lot like your dad. Owen put his hand over his mouth. Does Maverick die? I dont want to watch if Maverick dies. Thats when I remembered that Goose dies. I was having second thoughts. But the other boys were already enthralled with the F-14 catapulting off the flight deck. Owen put his hand down and said, These are real planes? They look so futuristic. Thats probably because weve been staring at WWII planes on the game, Ford said. I debated about whether to tell them that the F-14 is indeed outdated now, too, replaced by the F-18. I cant imagine Pop flying that, Ford said. Yeah, I cant imagine an old man flying that plane, Lindell said. I laughed. Well, he wasnt old back then, I said. After Maverick landed his plane and took off his helmet, the boys gasped. He does look like Dad, Ford said. I cant watch this if he dies, Owen said. The boys stood to get clos er to the screen. His mouth, it looks just like Dad, Lindell said. And that expression, Ford yelled, pointing at the screen. That, right there, looks just like him. It became difficult to follow the storyline because the boys had so many questions: Was I born when Pop went to Top Gun? No. Has Dad (Dustin) ever res cued pilots out of the water in the helicopter? Yes. Did I ever ride in an F-14? No. But I did watch Pop break the sound barrier once. The boys continued to recognize their Dads expressions in Mavericks face. It was almost as if they wanted to touch the screen to be near him, and that made me unspeakably sad. Then the scene came where Goose dies. The room grew quiet. On the screen, Maverick packed up Gooses belongings and took them to Meg Ryan, who played Gooses wife. I dont think I can watch this, Owen said. Owen, Ford sighed. The one who died doesnt look like dad. Still, Owen said. So many things in the Navy are danger ous. I mean, Goose was just practicing, and he died. I had no good response for this. All I could do was nod and rub the hair away from Owens forehead. Next, there were ewws and fake vomiting when Maverick and Charlie (Kelly McGillis) kissed on screen. This seemed to replace all the heavy thoughts from before. The boys went to bed and said very little more about Top Gun The next day, however, all those stories I had told them, having percolated overnight, grew and become distorted. I overheard Owen tell ing a neighbor, My Pop went to Top Gun and was the best fighter pilot that ever lived. He breaks the sound barrier all the time. He was better than Tom Cruise. Hey, Old Manyoure wel come. March 7 1958 Commissioning of USS Grayback, first submarine built from keel up with guided mis sile capability, to fire Regulus II missile. 1966 Department of Navy reorganized into present struc ture under CNO. 1967 PBRs assists Operation Overload II in Rung Sat Zone, Vietnam. 1968 Operation Coronado XII begins in Mekong Delta, Vietnam. 1994 Navy issues first orders to women assigned aboard a combat ship, the aircraft carrier USS Eisenhower (CVN 69). March 8 1854 Commodore Matthew Perry opens treaty negotiations with Japan. 1862 Ironclad ram CSS Virginia destroys USS Cumberland and Congress at Hampton Roads. 1945 Phyllis Daley becomes first African-American ensign in Navy Nurse Corps. 1958 Battleship USS Wisconsin (BB-64) is decom missioned, leaving the Navy without an active battleship for the first time since 1895. 1965 Seventh Fleet lands first major U.S. Marine Corps units in South Vietnam at Danang. March 9 1798 Appointment of first surgeon of U.S. Navy, George Balfour. 1847 Commodore David Connor leads successful amphibious assault near Vera Cruz, Mexico. 1862 First battle between ironclads, USS Monitor and CSS Virginia. 1914 Test of first wind tunnel at Washington Navy Yard. March 10 1783 USS Alliance, com manded by Capt. John Barry defeats HMS Sybil in final naval action of Revolutionary War in West Indies waters. 1933 Pacific Fleet provides assistance after earthquake at Long Beach, Calif. 1945 Navy and civilian nurses interned at Los Banos, Philippines flown back to United States. Navy nurses awarded Bronze Stars. 1948 First use of jets assigned to an operational squadron (VF-5A) on board aircraft carrier USS Boxer (CV-21). March 11 1935 Birth of Naval Security Group when OP-20G became the Communications Security Group. 1941 President Franklin Roosevelt signs Lend-Lease Act. 1942 In a PT boat, Lt. Cmdr. John Bulkeley departs the Philippines to take General Douglas MacArthur to Australia. 1945 Use of first Navy land ing craft to cross Rhine River at Bad Neuenahr. 1965 Market Time patrols begin off South Vietnam coast. March 12 1917 All American merchant ships to be armed in war zones. 1942 President Franklin Roosevelt designates Admiral Ernest King to serve as the Chief of Naval Operations, as well as the Commander-in-Chief, United States Fleet. 1956 -VA-83, on board USS Intrepid (CV-11), is the first overseas deployment of a Navy missile squadron. March 13 1895 Award of first subma rine building contract to John P. Holland Torpedo Boat Co. 1917 Armed merchant ships authorized to take action against U-boats. 1959 Naval Research Laboratory takes first ultravio let pictures of sun. 1963 USS Albany (CG-10) and aircraft of Navy Airborne Early Warning Squadron Four from Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico aid five ill crew mem bers of Norwegian freighter Jotunfjell. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Boys first experience with Top Gun When closing out a service members account after death, the Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS) will follow a stan dard order of precedence if there is no beneficiary designated on the account. There should be a beneficiary listed on the account in order to preclude any ambiguity of who should receive the final pay benefits. To ensure there is a designated beneficiary listed on the service members account, check the backside of the retiree account statement that has been sent out in paper form in the past (usually at the end of the year past or any time a change has been made to the account, e.g. pay raise, allotment change, etc.). Also, it is available electronically at the DFAS MyPay web site (https://mypay.dfas.mil/ mypay.aspx). The order of precedence that DFAS follows in the case of no designated beneficiary is: surviving spouse, followed by children and their descendants, father and mother of the deceased Retiree News: DFAS order of precedence

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VP-30 Commanding Officer Capt. Mark Stevens and the Pros of VP-30 recently opened their doors for a visit by Vice Adm. Jose Miguel Romero Aguirre of the Chilean Navy. VP-30 has maintained a relationship training Chilean patrol pilots since 1997 and currently has a Chilean P-3 pilot, Lt. Jorge Guerra, undergoing a rigorous pilot training syllabus. Romero made the trip to discuss the future of the P-3, the primary patrol and reconnaissance aircraft flown by the Chilean Navy. The day started with the admiral flying side-by-side with Guerra in the fullmotion P-3 flight station simulator. An experienced P-3A pilot himself, Romero enjoyed time at the controls demonstrating touch-and-go landings beside Guerra while simultaneously discussing VP-30s pilot training syl labus. The group, led by Stevens and VP-30 Executive Officer Cmdr. David Gardella also toured the P-3 tactical crew simu lator and a static display aircraft on the Pros flight line followed by a sit-down discussion on VP-30s training regimen and outlook on both P-3C maintenance and service life. The Chilean Navy contingent received a tour of the P-8 Poseidon air craft, the future of U.S. Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance. Guerra has completed the FRS CAT 1 and patrol plane pilot training syl labi and will qualify as a patrol plane commander and instructor pilot upon completing training requirements and return to Chile. When asked about his time in Jacksonville, Guerra responded, My time at VP-30 has been great. The training has been intense and my knowledge and proficiency has benefited from the experience and professionalism of the instructors. They are eager to help and do a great job of reinforcing the importance of safety. Additional Chilean pilots are slat ed to commence training at VP-30 in the coming months and the squadron looks forward to continuing its relationship with the Chilean Navy for years to come. Cmdr. Maurice Meagher assumed command of Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) Aviation Jacksonville from Cmdr. Jason Klingenberg during a change of command ceremony Feb. 22 at NAS Jacksonville. Meagher comes to DLA from the Expeditionary Strike Group Two in Norfolk, Va. where he served as assistant chief of staff for logistics. DLA Aviation Commander Brig. Gen. Scott Jansson officiated at the ceremony. DLA Aviation is the aviation demand and supply manager for DLA based in Richmond, Va., and oversees operations at Jacksonville. DLA Aviation at Jacksonville is one of six aviation industrial support sites directly supporting the warfighter through weapon system material management, industrial retail supply and strategic acquisition for consumable and depot-level repairable material. Cmdr. Klingenberg has provided the vision and leadership which have been essential to effectively and efficiently pro viding top-notch supply support to Fleet Readiness Center Southeast and the larg er naval aviation enterprise around the world, said Jansson. Under Jasons leadership, custom er collaborations and partnerships have grown and that growth is reflected in DLA Aviations improved support to our industrial customers here. During his tenure, he established a backorder priority cell which met an aggressive goal of 25 percent unfilled order reduc tions and then exceed it to reducing backorders by more than 40 percent. Through intense personal management and close work with key stakeholders, he lead his team to overcome a mid-year spike of unscheduled inductions, while reducing the overall age of G condition (awaiting parts) material by more than 25 days. In speaking to his team, Klingenberg said, Thank you for keeping our customer-focus and making my job easy. Moe (Cmdr.Meagher), you are a great friend and Im certain you will receive the same excellent support that I have dur ing my tenure here in Jacksonville, said Klingenberg. Meagher said when he presented the option of returning to Jacksonville to his wife and five daughters, there was no hesitation as they responded affirmatively. So here I am in somewhat of a dream job, taking command of the finest forward site under the DLA Aviation organization, said Meagher. Not lost upon me is the fact the com mand is not something a lot of Navy Supply Corps officers ever have the opportunity to experience. I am truly honored by this opportunity. Meagher went on to say that he is enthusiastic, excited, and prepared to listen and learn from the expertise already assem bled with the DLA Aviation Jacksonville and FRC Southeast organizations. Jansson told the aviation team they were losing a good leader in Klingenberg; however, he said, You are getting a well-qualified leader in Cmdr. Meagher. I know that under his leadership, you will continue to accomplish great things for our FRC and other customers . delivering and sustaining war-winning capabilities. Chilean admiral visits Pros Nest NAS Jacksonville welcomes new DLA Aviation site CO JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013 3

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Like most Americans, Im watching the ongoing national fiscal debates in Washington with great interest and a good deal of trepidation. Its my job to ensure that we man, train and equip a naval aviation force that is ready to fly, fight and win whenever and where ever our forward military commanders around the world need that capability. Its also my role to put in place the policies that will ensure that naval aviation endures as a vital and relevant part of our Navy and the broader national security framework. Working with other leaders in the community, we devel oped a vision for naval avia tion that will help us ensure a whole, capable and affordable force. That vision, though still important, is in jeopardy due to the across-the-board nature of looming cuts resulting from the potential of a full year continuing resolution and sequestration. The Chief of Naval Operations has given us direc tions to act now in the face of these pending cuts. As we make choices of where and how to cut in the limited way were able in this circum stance, its important to note that all of our processes are interconnected. Once we begin pulling levers to move the big machine, there will be impacts across the entirety of naval aviation. Some of these impacts may not be immediately apparent today, but they will impact our future in the near and far term and may not be easily reversed. I understand that there will be fewer resources available. This reality has informed our vision and is driving how naval aviation must organize, man, train, and equip as a whole to successfully perform its mis sions today and in the future. Achieving combat effective ness requires the judicious management of manpower, supplies and training dollars to safely and effectively operate Navy and Marine Corps. Naval aviation has embraced affordability, which I see as generally driven by two ele ments the acquisition cost of our platforms, and the operat ing and sustainment costs of their entire service life. The Navy is in transition to a new, more capable platform in nearly every aircraft commu nity. We must continue these transitions if we are to meet the evolving security threats of tomorrow. We are complet ing our strike-fighter transi tion into the FA-18E/F Super Hornet. We are well into transition with our electronic attack community from the EA-6B Prowler into the highly capable EA-18G Growler. We are also well into our rotary wing transition into the lethal multi-mission MH-60R and MH-60S Seahawks pro grams that saved taxpayers (you and me) billions of dollars through multi-year procure ment strategies. Our legacy P-3C Orion squadrons have begun transi tion into the remarkable P-8A Poseidon, an aircraft based on the concept of leveraging a reliable, proven platform that carries an array of sensors, net works and weapons designed to operate in an open archi tecture warfighting environ ment. Another way were making our Navys aviation force more affordable is by reducing the number of types, models, and series of aircraft within the carrier strike group. For example, in 2005 a carrier strike group deployed with as many as 10 different models of air craft that required eight dif ferent engine types, each with their own maintenance and supply support requirements. In our new vision, a carrier strike group in 2025 would deploy with as few as five dif ferent models of aircraft with five engine types, significantly reducing our lifecycle costs to own and operate those air craft. Theres more to affordabil ity than simply designing and buying better aircraft. The cost to operate our present and future platforms combined with advanced capabilities that are rapidly exceeding the capa bilities of our current train Our Navys aviation futureA relevant, capable and affordable force 4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013

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All active duty officer spouses are invited to join the new NAS Jax All Officers Spouses Club, which is focused on building camaraderie, offering support and sharing information. There are no membership fees to join. The initial upcoming event is a social at the NAS Jax Officers Club March 19 from 6:30-9 p.m. Please RSVP Pam Undersander at roypam5@gmail.com by March 11. New officers spouses club forming War Eagles reach out to local middle schoolThree VP-16 pilots recently visited students from Mayport Coastal Sciences Middle School as part of the Duval Reads Engaging Americas Military (DREAM) Project. War Eagles Lt. Roderick Smith, Lt. Thomas Kuhrt, and Lt. David Hanson spoke to the students about their personal experiences in the military and the impor tance of education in following their own dreams to become Navy pilots. The DREAM Project, a Duval Reads initiative organized by Communities in Schools, focused the visit on the story of the Tuskegee Airmen in honor of African American Heritage Month. The pilots were joined by Tuskegee Airmen Historian Emerson Mungin and the students were treated to a viewing of the movie Red Tails. The project focuses on improving the overall lives of military youth through providing assistance in literacy and mentoring as well as connecting the military community with opportunities to improve the city of Jacksonville and surrounding areas through community service. Smith, ground safety officer for VP-16, said, It was a magical experience being able to interact with the kids and share my story with them. I hope I inspired them to follow their dreams wherever they may lead them. VP-5 transition spotlightAs VP-5 transitions to the P-8A Poseidon, the squadron is highlighting a transitioning Mad Fox each week. This weeks Spotlight shines on AT2(AW) Thomas Moore. A native of Durham, N.C., Moore comes from a large family of eight brothers and sisters. His step father is a retired chief warrant officer and former maintenance officer of multiple squadrons. Moore has been in the Navy for six years. His tours include VP-30 and VP-5. He was also honored to repre sent the Navy for six months with the U.S. Military Baseball All-stars and participated in exhibition matches throughout Central America. His transition to the P-8A began with a fiveweek Navy Enlisted Classification course at NAS Jacksonvilles Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit. This course involved classroom work taught by certified Boeing instructors on the electronic systems of the P-8A. With VP-5s Safe for Flight inspection 120 days away, he and fellow ATs completed on-the-job training before and during class at VP-30. Moore is currently taking specialty courses on fiber optics and lasers between his other duties. The P-8A has a far greater redundancy system, Moore replied when asked to compare the P-8A to the P-3C. This isolates almost all troubleshooting issues to software-related problems. Aviation electronic technicians are responsible for the maintenance and repair of electronics and avionics aboard aircraft including, navigation, radio and radar systems. VP-5 has been transitioning to the P-8A Poseidon since Jan. 4, 2013. The VP-8 Fighting Tigers participated in a joint training exer cise with the Amphibious Assault Ship USS Kearsarge (LHD-5) Amphibious Readiness Group (ARG), Feb. 3-15. During the two-week Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX), the Kearsarge ARG trained to conduct strike, expeditionary, and other naval missions in a joint and coali tion environment while inte grating Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Aviation (MPRA) support. With the Fighting Tigers fly ing the P-3 Orion and the VP-16 War Eagles flying the P-8 Poseidon, MPRA assets from NAS Jacksonville flew a combined 10 missions in support of the exer cise, totaling 69 hours. Lt. Stephanie Sandifer of VP-8 served as a liaison officer on board the Amphibious Transport Dock USS San Antonio (LPD-17) during the exercise, providing much needed MPRA experience. My purpose was to explain the capabilities of the Orion and the Poseidon so that the ARG could task them to the best effect, said Sandifer. I also trained the watch standers to control the MPRA assets over the radio. COMPTUEX was a great opportunity to work in a coordi nated operations environment with surface vessels, said VP-8 Patrol Plane Commander Lt. William Flynn. As the exercise moved forward, it was exciting to see both the P-3 Orion aircrews and the sur face warfare participants learn to more effectively collaborate in a simulated hostile environment. The Jacksonville-based Fighting Tigers are undergoing deploy ment readiness workups in preparation for their upcoming deploy ment. VP-8 participates in COMPTUEX with USS Kearsarge JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013 5

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013 7 NAS Jacksonville firefighters team with local counties for training First Coast Navy Fire and Emergency Services fire fighters from the NAS Jax Division participated in a unique and exciting training environment with both the Clay County and Orange Park Fire Departments Feb. 21. The former Comfort Inn off of Roosevelt Boulevard (slated for destruction in the near future), served as the perfect area for the three departments to practice their skills of forcible entry, ventilation, and simulated search and rescue. Due to the buildings degraded state, the depart ments were mostly free to destroy as much as they needed to complete their exercises. This is great training for us, commented Battalion Fire Chief Scott Bloomer, of the First Coast Navy Fire and Emergency Services, NAS Jax Division. Since this building is going to be torn down any ways, we have free reign to practice bashing in doors, breaking windows, tearing down ceilings, and getting accustomed to new equipment we have. This is all essential in developing our decision making skills of when to do what with fighting fires. The firefighters proceeded to use multiple tools, including axes, crowbars, and saws, to practice forcible entry and proper ventilation of rooms in the hotel. Although the training was exciting for many of the firefighters, safety and proper procedures were of the utmost importance, and the afternoon saw the practice of a potential real world scenario. By simulating a fire, a smoke filled environment, and rescue victims, the three departments coordi nated their efforts to develop superior cooperative and communication skills, with the mindset of potentially having to support each other in the future. The scenario was executed in a timely and profes sional fashion by all the firefighters participating, but many agreed that communication could always be improved. Normally when we train with other departments, we use the burn house at NAS Jax. The opportunity we have to simulate exercises out in town today provide us with a unique training scenario and learning experience. All departments have different techniques when faced with various emergency situations, and we learn a lot from each other by training together, Bloomer remarked. Photos by Lt. j.g. Kevin Wendt

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Other participating aircraft plat forms include: H-60 Seahawk, E-2 Hawkeye, C-2 Greyhound, EA-6B Prowler and P-3C Orion. While several energy conservation practices have been used by carrier air wings and their squadrons, they are not practiced consistently across the fleet, said Quinn. This prompt ed the Navy Task Force Energy, Aviation Working Group to develop the Air ENCON program, Olszewski explained. In 2011, the Naval Aviation Enterprise established the team to identify, validate and insti tutionalize energy conservation best practices across the naval aviation community. To date, Air ENCON has validated several energy conservation prac tices, including Short-cycle Mission and Recovery Tanking (SMART) inflight refueling, and expanded use of mobile refueling trucks in place of hot pit refueling stations. Refueling carrier-based aircraft In 2009, Carrier Air Wing 7 pio neered the SMART practice, sav ing about 1.7 million gallons of fuel during 120 fly days. The tradition al tanking practice began in 2002, when the Super Hornet took over the S-3 Viking role as in-flight refueling tanker with a 5-wet configuration, Quinn said. In a standard tanking configura tion, the Super Hornet carries one centerline refueling tank and four auxiliary tanks, totaling about 28,000 pounds or 4,118 gallons of fuel. Excessive weight and drag cause the tanker to consume more fuel than usual leaving only about 5,000 pounds or 735 gallons of fuel to refuel other aircraft. Once launched, the Hornet tanker remains airborne for the complete mission, or sortie, cycle of about 1.5 hours burning fuel the entire time. In addition, fuel that is not trans ferred in flight must be consumed or jettisoned for the tanker to achieve a safe landing weight. In comparison, a Super Hornet in a SMART configuration carries only the centerline refueling pod and 14,000 pounds or 2,059 gallons of fuel. The tanker launches to refuel the aircraft returning from their mis sion then lands within about 20 minutes. Referred to as Yo-yo Tanking in the fleet, this method can still deliver up to 5,000 pounds of fuel per tanker without incurring undue drag, weight or efficiency penalties, Quinn said. Refueling aircraft ashore The truck refueling process was docu mented at NAS Lemoore, Calif., where 85 percent of mission refueling is delivered by truck, instead of by hot pit refueling. Hot pit refueling occurs when an aircraft lands, taxis to a hot pit refueling area and waits in line to refuel with engines running, Quinn explained. As much as 70 gallons of fuel is consumed or wasted while the air craft waits to take on 2,000 gallons, Quinn said. That adds up to mil lions of gallons a year. With truck refueling, the aircraft shuts down, and a truck brings the fuel to the aircraft. However, once the engine is shut down, a turn around inspection, which may take up to an hour, must be conducted. While timing may be an issue that necessitates hot pit refueling, a flight schedule can be built around truck refueling. Air ENCONs goal is to encourage other naval air stations, such as NAS Oceana, Va., to use truck refueling 85 to 88 percent of the time. Its an easy sell, Quinn said. Without infrastructure, capital or manpower investment, about 240,000 gallons per year can be saved at NAS Oceana alone. Culture change Because of Air ENCON, the word is getting out and the culture is changing. The Fleet Readiness Training Plan now requires one day of SMART training as part of a squadrons pre-deploy ment training. The secretary of the Navy says energy management will be a man datory Commanding Officer Fitness Report and Counseling Record ele ment. Air ENCON emphasizes the stra tegic importance of conserving ener gy. While we have been accustomed to having plenty of fuel available, it may not always be the case, con cluded Quinn. Saving fuel also gives warfighters more tactical options, such as more time loitering, more time to stay on post to support a convoy on the ground, or more time on the training range. Air ENCON plans to implement the program fleet wide by January 2014 for active duty Navy squadrons. The U.S. Marine Corps has also expressed interest in future collaboration.like NATO, and making new investments in critical capabilities like cyber security. In order to accomplish our mission, we also must make wise budget decisions to prioritize our interests and requirements. I am greatly concerned about the impact that the looming round of automatic budget cuts will have on you and your families, and on military readiness. As someone who has run businesses, I know that severe budget uncertainty limits our ability and flexibility to manage and plan and use taxpayer dollars in the most efficient manner pos sible. I will work within the administration and with Congress to help resolve this uncertainty in a way that does not break Americas commitment to you, your families, and our veterans. As I begin my time here at the Department, I recognize the immense responsibility that I have, and will work hard every day to fulfill my duties as Secretary of Defense as honestly and effectively as I know how. You are the greatest force for good in the world. I am proud to be part of your team. Thank you for your commitment and dedication to our country. SECDEF AIR ENCON Aircrews assigned to Commander Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance 7th Fleet from VP-10 will participate in the U.S. Navy and Japan Maritime Self Defense (JMSDF) GUAMEX 2013. This bilateral exercise will take place March 1-10 at Andersen Air Force Base in Guam and focus on improving maritime patrol aircraft interoperabil ity between the two allied nations. Commander, Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Seventh Fleet conducts eight to 10 interoperability exer cises each year with the JMSDF to further U.S.JMSDF operations and relations. Based in Jacksonville, the Red Lancers are currently on a six-month deployment to the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibil ity as part of Commander, Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance 7th Fleet. VP-10 to participate In GUAMEX 2013 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013

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officer and a former weapons school instructor, described the training at AUTEC as, an opportunity to deploy ordnance against both subsurface and surface threats, which greatly increase our aircrews readiness for deploy ment. Led by HSM-70 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Chris Herr, the Spartans com pleted 10 days of training under the guidance of instructors from Helicopter Maritime Strike Weapons School Atlantic. They participated in multiple train ing missions to include anti-submarine warfare (ASW), anti-surface warfare, captive air training missile missions, surface-to-air counter-tactics, and other MH-60R tactical events. With access to a secure live deep water weapons range off the coast of Andros Island, squadron personnel completed numerous events that would be otherwise difficult to achieve in Jacksonvilles shallow waters. The Spartans employed exercise tor pedoes, operated designation lasers for Hellfire missiles, fired automatic weapons, employed surface-to-air counter measures, and utilized active sonar while training at AUTEC. With the assistance of a dedicated staff of both active military and civil ian personnel, the crews participated in valuable scenario-based missions. During his first trip to AUTEC, Lt. j.g. Corky Maschke referred to the expe rience as, a good opportunity to use aircraft equipment and sensors in a live environment. In addition to the training received by the aircrew, AUTEC provided an excellent opportunity for the tal ented men and women of the HSM-70 Maintenance Department to hone their skills and improve operational readi ness. The maintainers were led by HSM70 Maintenance Officer Lt. Cmdr. Shon Brown and Maintenance Master Chief AVCM Gene Pickles. Operating at full speed with full flight schedules and the arduous task of altering aircraft configurations and equip ment to meet a variety of missions, the Spartan maintenance team rose to the challenge, successfully completing all training requirements. AUTEC was a busy experience, said AEAN Ryan Rossman, a junior maintenance technician. He stated the detachment was rewarding, referencing the 16 successfully launched training tor pedoes dropped during ASW training missions. AOAN Leanna Hildebrand admit ted she was very busy and worked long hours, but remarked, I love the Bahamas and look forward to going back to AUTEC. Since returning to NAS Jacksonville, the Spartans look back to their time on Andros Island as an invaluable experi ence that will build the foundation for advanced training. As they approach the Fleet Readiness Training Plan work-up cycle, the Spartans of HSM-70 look forward to bringing the warfighting skills they developed at AUTEC to the fleet. panels. The volunteers started early in the morning working as a team to get the job done. It feels great and rewarding know ing you are part of a project that is going to benefit and make a difference in a family in need, said LS2 Walter Murillo. It also helps me appreciate and value more the things that I have. According to the Clay County Habitat for Humanity Volunteer Coordinator Pamela Portridge, the military assistance to the organization is essential to their success. Almost 80 percent of their volunteers come from the military. The home will be assigned for sale with no interest rate to make the payments affordable for qualifying family. This is the first of several COMREL projects VP-8 plans to participate in since coming back from deployment last December, leading to a series of future events with different non-profit entities. In my opinion, we, in the military are an extremely blessed group of people. Not only is working for others humbling, but also part of our ethos as service members, said AWV2 Mark Willard. Furthermore, we should strive to be an example for those around us, as we are highly esteemed by the public, youth in particular. The Jacksonville-based Fighting Tigers are currently undergo ing deployment readiness workups, in preparation for their upcoming deployment. VP-8ing ranges demands that we become much more innovative in combining live, virtual and constructive training. Flight time in the cockpit or crew sta tion will always matter for our naval aviators, but our potential adversaries capabilities are evolving to the point where much of our most realistic training in the future may be done in a highfidelity simulator, linked with an array of other simulators in hi-tech, hi-threat environment that cant be replicated anywhere else. Flight hours are likely to become more scarce under budget cuts. Our live training ranges today may not provide the level of hi-end training we need to fully practice our warfighting skills. We are at the cusp of innovative thought and action in determining the right mix of live, virtual and constructive training for our future and bright young aviation minds are leading the charge here. Ive provided just a few examples of ways naval aviation is doing all we can to deliver value to the American people, even in these austere times. And although we place affordability at the heart of everything we do, we will never lose sight of our true mission: providing combat ready aviation forces forward where and when they are needed most. That mission may be harder to achieve moving forward but we will do everything we can to achieve it. NAVAL AVIATIONin equal parts, legal representative and finally a person entitled under the law of the deceased retirees domicile. While this order of precedence might be what the service member had in mind, a designated beneficiary would specify who was to receive the final pay benefits. RAO HSM-70 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013 9

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Several VP-5 Mad Foxes donned their flight suits and carried on the squadrons extensive efforts in com munity service with a visit to the Jacksonville Urban League Early Head Start Program Feb. 25. VP-5 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Erin Osborne, IT1 Cedrick Green, AZ2 Melvin Lamb and YN3 Allan Trahan volunteered to help children strengthen their reading skills and answered questions about the U.S. Navy. The volunteers participated by read ing books to the children, who range from birth to three years old. It felt amazing to know that I helped make a child smile today, said Trahan. Seeing the excitement, energy, and joy on the childrens faces was great. The group also brought along a flyers helmet and survival vest to show to the children in the program. Green helped many of the kids try on the flight gear. Even though some of the kids were scared of the helmet and vest, most of them enjoyed trying it on, said Green. It was fun watching them put on the gear and attempting to walk with the heavy vest on. The Jacksonville Urban Leagues Head Start Program is a federally funded early childhood education service that provides support for families with children under the age of 5. Each child within the program receives an indi vidualized plan that focuses on edu cation, early intervention, nutrition, social/emotional well-being, and physical health. Head Start works to ensure that each child within its program has the tools known as school readiness to be successful in their educational future and in life. VP-5, home ported at NAS Jacksonville, is currently undergoing transition to the new P-8A Poseidon aircraft. The Wings Over America Scholarship Foundation (WOASF) is hosting a golf tournament at NAS Jax April 26 at 9 a.m. to benefit scholarships for Navy dependents. The event is open to the public. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. All proceeds benefit the Wings Over America Scholarship Foundation, a 501(c)3 non-profit foundation. The WOASF annually sponsors more than 40 scholarships, ranging from $2,000 to $10,000, to students who have chosen to continue their educa tion. Scholarship recipients are selected on the basis of scholastic merit, community service and extracurricular activities. The foundations mission is to pro vide college scholarships to dependent children and spouses of naval avia tion commands, officer and enlisted, active duty, retired, honorably dis charged or deceased. The foundation has awarded more than $635,000 to students since 1987. For more information or to register, visit www.wingsoveramerica.us or call 757-671-3200, ext. 2. VP-5 Mad Foxes help Head Start WOASF golf tournament set for April 26 VP-45s Combat Aircrew (CAC) Five recently returned to Kadena Air Base in Okinawa, Japan, marking the end of an 11-day detachment to U-Tapao, Thailand in support of Exercise Cobra Gold, a joint military exercise tai lored to emboldening the relationship between the armed forces of the United States and Thailand. Operationally, CAC-5 was able to provide crucial aerial surveillance supporting the U.S. Marine Corps during their joint amphibious operations, to include an amphibious assault alongside Thai Marines. CAC-5 also demonstrated the antisubmarine warfare capabilities of American P-3C aircraft to members of the Royal Thai Navy P-3 squadron who flew as on board observers. In addition to these primary mis sions, Pelican demonstrated how to change a tire in a minimal amount of time to the Thai maintainers and air crew provided valuable assistance to USS Bonhomme Richard in trouble shooting their on board mission sys tems. On a personal level, Lt. j.g. Gregory Stewart said of the experience, We were able to show U.S. personnel and assets to the Thai people and demon strate our commitment to our allies in the region. The Pelicans were actively involved in experiencing the local culture and expanding our understanding of Thai customs by visiting nearby islands, riding elephants, and sampling the local cuisine at every opportunity. Squadron personnel accomplished a high visibility detachment that was instrumental in improving U.S. and Thai relations to assist in coordinating future multi-lateral joint operations.Pelicans support Exercise Cobra Gold in Thailand 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013

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Plastics fabricators at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) successfully complet ed the rigorous requirements to make composite patches used to repair military aircraft, earning them advanced repair certificates presented at the facility Feb. 6. Pablo Maurosa, Ted Dinkel and Raymond Bizier earned their Composite Repair Level II Certification after complet ing a three-week course, dur ing which they made a variety of composite patches using carbon graphite cloth impregnat ed with epoxy resin. On a scale of 1 to 10, it was a 9.5, said Maurosa of the courses difficulty. For the repair patch to be perfect, the cloth had to be saturated without any excess resin. It was very precise, down to the gram. The plastics fabricators must be level 1 certified with a minimum of one years experience working with composites to qualify for the course. FRCSE Composite Training Specialist Kenny Weaver was first to teach the new course in Jacksonville. He said by establishing training capabil ity locally, FRCSE is realizing tremendous savings. Weaver, who instructs recertification classes for levels I and II com posite repairs, said the timesensitive repairs proved very challenging for the students. All the repairs were chal lenging, especially the intricate sanding they had to do when making the double-stacked, precured patch repair, he said. It has to be tapered back with stringent requirements. It was kind of awkward for me to say, Do it again. They were ready to give up, but I gave them some helpful hints, and they overcame their obstacles. They all did an excellent job. Tim Moore, also a compos ite training specialist, traveled from FRC Southwest in San Diego to serve in a train the trainer capacity and assist Weaver. He brought two dou ble vacuum debulking (DVD) boxes needed for the training. Moore has instructed the level II course for about six years. He said the Navy is moving away from aluminum airframes on its newer plat forms in favor of composites, although composite repairs take longer. He said aluminum is 235 percent heavier than carbon fiber for the same strength ratio. The lighter aircraft can travel longer distances and carry heavier loads. Its economics, he said. The [composite] aircraft are lighter and stronger than alu minum, and they use less fuel. The plastics fabricators will use their new skills to make composite repairs on com ponents of the F/A-18 Super Hornet Strike Fighter aircraft. Level II recertification must be renewed biannually. FRCSE machinists and welders are fabricating DVD boxes using scrap alumi num rough cut on a water jet. Manufacturing the boxes inhouse is estimated to save the command thousands of dol lars. Lorrinda Seiberling, the FRCSE training officer, spear headed efforts to bring the level II training to Jacksonville. Dear Kate, I really hate CFLs. These light bulbs just look ugly and their light is harsh. Yet, everyone says they save energy. Do they really work? What else can I do? Signed, Burnt-Out Kate Sez, You are not the first to complain about CFL light bulbs. But their energy savings make it worth a second look. New CFLs look better and last lon ger. Other ways to save on lighting are to take out extra bulbs (is every sin gle one needed?) and to use dimmer switches. Lighting is a big ener gy user in the home, so these changes are very illuminating. FRCSE plastics fabricators make tricky composite patches, earn certification Save on your energy billIn Memoriam William Calvert, 59, a civil ian employee at Personnel Support Detachment Jax passed away Feb. 21 in Orange Park. Calvert was born Feb. 13, 1954 in Boonville, Mo. He proudly served 20 years in the U.S. Navy and was a vet eran of Operation Desert Storm. He was a member of St. Edwards Chapel at NAS Jacksonville and served as the youth group and young adult minister. He was also an avid golfer and enjoyed mountain biking and being outdoors. Calvert is survived by his wife of 32 years, Rose Calvert, two daughters, Editha Alerre and Rachel Calvert; a son, Christopher Calvert; brother, Robert Calvert (Rosemary); five grandchildren, one great-grandchild and many other family members and friends. Calvert was buried at Jacksonville National Cemetery Feb. 28 following a celebration of his life at NAS Jax St. Edwards Chapel. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013 11

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Chiefs and first class petty officers assigned to Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE) conducted a volun teer project at the Ronald McDonald House in Jacksonville, Feb. 28. During the project, participants raked leaves and helped clean up the court yard playground located at the center of the facility, which provides lodging and support services for critically ill, chronically ill and seriously injured children and their families. Volunteer efforts like this are huge for us, said Cat McCarroll, the houses event and marketing manager. Were a 30-bedroom house with a small staff, so we depend almost entirely on the community and volunteer groups that come in and help with meals, maintenance or housekeeping. Theyre what keeps this house running. The house is located about a block away from Nemours Childrens Clinic, where most of the children receive treatment. Its services cut out the cost of long-term hotel lodging, making medical treatment more readily avail able for financially-challenged families, although families and individuals of all financial backgrounds are welcome to stay. While guests are asked to give a $10-per-night donation for the duration of their stay, they are not turned away if they cannot make the payment. Since opening in 1988, the house has provid ed services for an average of more than 1,000 families each year. For us, this is a small contribution, but it means so much to the center and its really the least we can do, said LNC(SW/AW) Lucia Abreu, who volun teered. I see it as part of our duty to our community to give back what we can. According to CS1(SW/AW) Brandon Jiles, who coordinated the effort, the project served a dual pupose as both a community relations project and a team-building opportunity for CNRSE chiefs and first classes. Obviously, a good relationship between the chiefs and the first class mess is very important to a command on a number of different levels, Jiles said. Right now, its being emphasized more than ever with the MCPONs (Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy) guidance with the CPO (chief petty officer) 365 program, but always its always been an important dynamic in the overall climate of a command. This project was a good way for us to improve upon this and support a good cause at the same time. The house operates solely on dona tions from the local community and volunteer projects and has shared a particularly special relationship with the local military. The military is great because they obviously have the heart and desire to make a difference, said McCarroll. Logistically, you cant beat it because they come in and get the job done and the results are amazing. According to McCarroll, those efforts are appreciated not only by the houses staff, but by the families who stay there as well. What is extraordinary about military volunteers is their effect on the fami lies. A lot of families realize they are enlisted, and for service members to take the time to do this demonstrates to them that there are armies of people out there who care about what they are going through, she said. Additionally, McCarroll said there are always plenty of opportunities for other commands to participate in volunteer projects at the house. There is no shortage of ways to vol unteer, whether you want to help deco rate for the holidays, do arts and crafts, or get your hands dirty and pull weeds, there is really no limit to the ways you can impact the families and every effort is appreciated. Ronald McDonald House Charities was founded in 1974. The first house opened in Philadelphia and was fund ed by McDonalds restaurant proceeds donated by local owners. Today, there are 309 houses in more than 50 coun tries worldwide. For more information, visit http:// www.rmhc.com. Southeast Region Sailors volunteer at Jacksonville Ronald McDonald House JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013 13

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HSM-70 Det Two returns home HSM-70 Detachment Two returned home from a suc cessful deployment com bating piracy off the Horn of Africa Feb. 9. Serving on USS Halyburton (FFG 40), Det. Two was the first MH-60R detach ment to deploy in an expedi tionary status onboard a Oliver Hazard Perry class frigate. Spending six months at sea, this completed just the second deployment in HSM-70s his tory. After departing Naval Station Mayport in early August 2012, Det. Two made a quick transit through the Mediterranean Sea before stationing themselves off the Horn of Africa. They spent four months patrolling the shorelines of Somalia, deterring piracy and providing support to local fishermen. Their presence in this region coincided with the largest decrease in piracy related activity over the previous 10 years. As an added benefit of serv ing in the Indian Ocean, squadron personnel vis ited several exciting ports throughout cruise to include: the Azores, Spain, Greece, Djibouti, Oman, Tanzania, Seychelles, and Portugal. USS Halyburton and Det. Two served under the com mand of Combined Task Force 508 and flagships HNLMS Rotterdam (Dutch) and ITS San Marco (Italian). CTF-508 is a NATO anti-piracy Task Force with the primary mission of deterring piracy and providing maritime security. During the four-month period more than 250 flight hours were flown by the detachment in direct sup port of operations Ocean Shield and Active Endeavour. The operational highlight of the cruise occurred on Jan. 4. Shortly before sunset, the lone Spartan MH-60R helicopter responded to a distress call from a cargo ship, Motor Vessel Jasmine, who reported being shot at by pirates with assault rifles and rocket-propelled grenades. After assessing the condition of the cargo ship and safety of the ships crew, HSM70 aircrew, Lt. Alex Haupt, Lt. Flannery Woodward and AWR2 Anthony Pedersen con ducted an open ocean search and located the suspected pirates, who were traveling in two small skiffs. The following morning, Lt. Cmdr. Donald Clemons, Lt. j.g. Dane Mutschler and AWR2 Daniel Benson re-located the skiff and provided overhead support and intelligence for the Halyburton visit, board, search and seizure team. The two days of tracking and intelligence gathering ultimately led to the capture and detainment of 12 suspected pirates. The realtime intelligence provided by Det. Two personnel proved to be one of several critical factors enabling NATO to extradite the suspected pirates for trial. In addition to their opera tional success, the Spartans excelled in every mission area in which they were tasked and were an invaluable asset to USS Halyburton. By providing an additional operational capability, they were able to support the task force with three medical evac uations, five personnel trans fers and three vertical replen ishment flights. While at sea, three Spartans were promoted: AM2 Richard Lopez, AZ2 Michael Gepner and AM3 Christopher Lemaster. All of the Sailors committed themselves to improving their career through professional advancement and development. Over the course of the deployment, Det. Two qualified one plane captain, 10 flight deck directors, three RAST traverse operators, three landing safety officers and three enlisted aviation warfare specialists. Lemaster was also named 2012 Blue Jacket of the fourth quarter for HSM-70. With the real-world experience gained on this successful deployment Det. Two is poised to lead and train the next group of Spartan Sailors for any task on the high seas. NOL celebrates 54 yearsThe Navy Ortega Lakeshore (NOL) Little League opened its 2013 baseball/softball season March 2 at Blue Angel Field located aboard NAS Jacksonville. Ill always have a special place in my heart for Little League, said NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders, prior to throwing the official first pitch on a sunny, windy and cool morning. I was an assistant coach for my sons team in the Virginia Beach Little League for eight years so I really appreciate everything that vol unteers do to provide this athletic oppor tunity to our kids. Former NOL President David Hawkins pinch hit as master of ceremonies for current NOL President Tommy Brooks who was out of town. Hawkins said, Were fielding 35 teams for the 2013 season with kids ranging from 4 to 16 years old. Baseball and softball are uniquely American sports that build physical skills and character. They offer the camaraderie of a team sport, in addition to requiring the courage and confidence of an individual sport. Sanders added, I love this game and pledge my support to NOL players, coaches and families. Play hard, keep up with your studies and enjoy good luck this season. The skipper then took the mound and pitched the seasons first ball to catcher Gabriel Borders. Little League District 11 Chief Umpire Bob Veleta also tipped his hat to the crowd. Ive been an NOL volunteer for decades here at NAS Jax and Ive never seen a betterrun volunteer organization than NOL. Hawkins urged the crowd to join him in applauding the support of Sanders and MWR Installation Program Director John Bushick. The NAS Jax MWR team pro vides out standing sup port for the maintenance of six ball fields, along with helping NOL with various safety and logistics matters. The best I can sum up about our partnership with the Navy is that we all run a tight ship, said Hawkins. He concluded by expressing appreciation for the leagues irreplaceable volunteers. Our coaches, umpires, dugout moms, concession workers and clean ing crews are all volunteers. Thank you for stepping up to support NOL and thanks again for entrusting your young athletes to us. Little League is big at NAS Jax 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013

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Base officials, contractors and rec reational boaters celebrated the grand reopening of Mulberry Cove Marina on the St. Johns River at NAS Jacksonville Feb. 26. NAS Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders told the crowd, This new concrete floating dock system not only offers a number of quality boating amenities it also offers improved protection from wave action spurred by thunderstorms and other adverse weather conditions. Congratulations to all the team mem bers who made this a reality. The nine-month project replaced the original dilapidated 62-slip wooden piers with a 96-slip floating concrete dock system. The new slips vary in length from 30 to 50 feet. The renovation includes a stationary pump-out and fueling station, water service, improved parking, fire protec tion, life-saving equipment, dock boxes, pier lighting and ADA access to the main utility pier. Free WiFi is scheduled for installation by the end of April. Electrical service consists of 50-amp and/or 30-amp shore power 240-volt receptacle with an additional 20-amp 120-volt receptacle. Thanks to the wave attenuator sys tem, the new floating concrete piers are designed to withstand 90 mph winds and a six-foot storm surge. The new slips are available for rent monthly at $7.75 per foot for military and $8.75 per foot for DoD employees. For more information, contact Mulberry Cove Marina at 542-3260. New marina now open JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013 15

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The Navy Entomology Center of Excellence (NECE) visited Argyle Elementary School as part of a Friday Fun Day program for students. NECE Entomologists treated students to a live display that included a snake, scorpion, and tarantula along with a host of other invertebrates. Its amazing watching the children smile, laugh and sometimes cringe as they get up close and personal with the displays, said Lt. j.g. Matthew Yans, NECE entomologist. The entomologists taught wildlife safety that included tips to avoid bites from dis ease carrying insects native to Florida. Its important that children get hands on learning with science, said Melissa Cordo, Argyle Elementary teacher. Friday Fun Day allows us to present science in a fun, posi tive way while teaching the students valuable biological les sons. This includes ensuring stu dents learn about ways to pro tect themselves in the rich Florida wilderness. During the outreach students not only learned about animal biology but also career opportunities in the Navy. The visit to Argyle Elementary School was a continuation of a long-standing and vibrant outreach program. Aligning with our philoso phy of volunteerism, NECE enjoys a long history of supporting Jacksonville area schools through mentoring programs, presentations and science fair judging, said Cmdr. Eric Hoffman, NECE officer-incharge. This opportunity to posi tively impact the next genera tion of scientists and leaders is a tremendous privilege and responsibility for our staff. There is nothing more reward ing than to hear about the suc cess of these students knowing you played a small role in their development. The school outreach was coordinated by NAS Jacksonville Liaison Officer Dawn Mills as part of Partners in Education (PIE). The PIE mission is to create a volunteer network of resources supporting both installa tion and community members interest in the success of youth. These connections help directly support student devel opment and indirectly ensure the communitys vested interest in NAS Jacksonville, said Mills. Programs such as PIE and other community outreach efforts are essential to devel oping future scientists, citizens and sailors. NECE is actively involved in numerous commu nity outreach programs, and sciences fairs throughout Duval and Clay County. If you are interested in partnering with NECE to request a school out reach event contact Lt. Jennifer Wright at: Jennifer.wright@ med.navy.mil Navy Entomology Center of Excellence reaches out to local Jacksonville area schools 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013

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The Navy joins the nation in celebrating Womens History Month during the month of March, as announced in Naval Administrative message 039/13, released Feb. 22. Commands are strongly encouraged to increase their knowledge and awareness of the contributions of women to our Navy and nation by celebrating the national Womens History Month theme, Women Inspiring Innovation through Imagination: Celebrating Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) through programs, exhibits, publica tions, and participation in military and community events. One Navy STEM pioneer includes Grace Murray Hopper, who wanted to put her Ph.D. in Mathematics to use for her nation in the midst of World War II. In 1943, she joined the Naval Reserves and was commissioned as a lieutenant in 1944. During World War II she worked at the Bureau of Ordnance Computation Project at Harvard University and at the end of the war joined the Harvard fac ulty. Retiring as a rear admiral, Hopper, was recognized as a pioneer com puter programmer, the co-inventor of Common Business Oriented Language (COBOL), and for coining the term bug for computer malfunctions. Hopper was buried at Arlington National Cemetery in 1992. USS Hopper (DDG 70) was commissioned as her namesake in 1997; this was only the second Navy warship to be named after a woman. Also during World War II, the Navy launched the Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service (WAVES) program. Along with Hopper, more than 85,000 WAVES worked in STEM fields as air traffic controllers, cryptologists, draftsmen, meteorologists, and translators during World War II. In December 2012, history was made in the Navys nuclear commu nity when Lieutenant Junior Grade Marquette Leveque, assigned to the gold crew of USS Wyoming (SSBN 742), and Lieutenants Junior Grade Amber Cowan and Jennifer Noonan of USS Maine (SSBN 741) blue crew became the first female unrestricted line officers to qualify in submarines and receive their Submarine Warfare Insignia, also known as dolphins. Today in the Navy, female officers fill 10 percent of STEM positions, includ ing engineering duty officers and information warfare professionals. Female enlisted Sailors make up 22 percent of the cryptology and intelligence com munity and 21 percent of operational ratings, including aviation warfare sys tems operators and sonar technicians. Female Sailors continue to excel both ashore and afloat, serving in various STEM related fields. More than 54,000 active duty women and more than 10,000 female Reservists are serving in the Navy. They make up 17.3 percent of the force and make indispensable contributions to our mission and operations. Nearly 59,000 women serve in a wide range of specialties as Navy civilians. The current Navy Total Force includes 33 active and Reserve female flag offi cers, 67 female senior executive service members, 56 female command master chiefs, and 6 female command senior chiefs leading from the front. Currently, the top three highestranking female officers in the Navy are Vice Adm. Carol Pottenger, Vice Adm. Michelle Howard, and Vice Adm. Robin Braun. Pottenger, a surface warfare officer, was one of the first women selected for sea duty and went on to become the third commander, Navy Expeditionary Combat Command. Howard also a surface warfare offi cer, was the first African American woman to command a ship in the U.S. Navy when she took command of USS Rushmore (LSD 47), and in 2012 she became the first African-American woman to receive a third star in flag rank within the Department of Defense when she was promoted Aug. 24. Braun, a career naval aviator and former commanding officer of VR-48, has more than 5,800 flight hours in Navy aircraft. The top three highest-ranking female enlisted leaders in the Navy are Fleet Master Chief Joann Ortloff, Fleet Master Chief April Beldo, and Force Master Chief Nancy Hollingsworth. Force Master Chief April Beldo, currently the Naval Education and Training Command Force Master Chief, will make history as the Navys first female African American Fleet Master Chief when she assumes her position as the Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education (MPT&E) fleet master chief later this month. The Navys 67-strong Senior Executive Service also has a strong STEM presence amongst its seniormost women. Carla Lucchino, Department of Navy Assistant for Administration is the top female civilian SES. Steffanie Easter, executive director for the F-35 Lightning II Joint Program Office, holds a bachelors degree in chemical engineering and masters degree in engineering management. Easter is currently leading the F-35 Lightning II Joint Program, the Department of Defenses initiative for defining affordable and sustainable fifth-generation strike aircraft. Women at the helm: Celebrating Womens History Month JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013 17

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour 79 p.m., $.50 wings and $7.95 pizza your way Friday Free Entertainment at 7 p.m. March 8 Pierce In Harmony March 15 Jason Lamar March 22 All About Me March 29 Ace Winn April 5 KaraokeFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 4-6 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 126 p.m., $1.50 games Friday special $1 games per person 25 p.m. Bowling Tournament March 16 at 12 p.m. March Bowling Madness Command party give-a-way March 1-31Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information,contact Melissa at 542-3518/4238 Leprechaun Dash 5K March 15 at 11:30 a.m. Pre-register by March 8I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. ITT Travel Fair March 16, 9:30 a.m. 1 p.m. NEX Courtyard Win prizes! Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts Dark Side Of The Moon (Pink Floyd) Saturday, April 13 at 7:30 p.m. Section A $33; Section B $28; Section C $23 A Lamb Chop Celebration April 20 at 7:30 p.m. Section A $18; Section B $14; Section C $11 Legoland Kids go free with an adult ticket purchase from ITT Funkfest Metropolitan Park May 10-11 2-day ticket $52 Gatornationals March 15,16,17, 2013 Fri. Reserved from $35 $39 Sat. & Sun. Reserved from $50 $54 Fri. General Seating from $28 $32 Sat. & Sun. General Seating from $38 $42 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3 Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7 Blockout Dates: March 23 April 5, 2013 Call for pricing Jacksonville Symphony $27.50 Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline 2013 Live Broadway Series Rock of Ages April 6 Dream Girls May 21 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31 and must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about our special discounted tickets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park Gold pass $71The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. Kayaking Trip Simpson Creek March 16 at 9 a.m. Liberty Bowling Night NAS Freedom Lanes March 20, $6 per person Cummer Art Museum Trip March 26 at 6 p.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees March 12 & 26 for active duty March 14 & 28 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 1:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Twilight Golf League Tuesday at 5 p.m. March 26 Aug. 27 $20 per person per weekMulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Free Easter Egg Hunt March 27 at 7 p.m. McCaffrey Softball Fields Open to children up to age 12Flying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School March 18 April 24 $500 per person For more info, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil Gym at The Zone has new hoursEffective March 8, The Zone Gym will close at 1 p.m. on Fridays and will be closed Saturdays and Sundays due to low patron usage. New hours of operation are: Monday Thursdays 5 a.m. 8 p.m. and Fridays 5 a.m. 1 p.m. The Fitness Center will continue to operate with the following hours Monday through Friday 5 a.m. 9 p.m. and Saturday-Sunday from 7 a.m. 5 p.m. 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013 19 Hundreds of Sailors and civilians gained financial insight on a wide variety of topics as part of Military Saves Week which was held aboard NAS Jacksonville Feb. 25 through March 1. The week began with a kick-off event at Deweys Feb. 25 by NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders who praised the concept of promoting financial investing to junior Sailors. I wish we had this resource when I was younger because it wasnt until later in life that I developed a sound financial plan.Life is about choices. You have to make the choice of wants versus needs and stay out of debt, said Sanders. The earlier you start saving the better off you will be. So, I encourage you to ask questions and start planning your financial future. Guest speakers for the Military Saves Week Kickoff included David Williams and Thunder Nkere of the First Command Education Foundation and motivational speaker and retired Navy Capt. Andy Andersen. Williams and Nkere provided invaluable information regarding taking steps towards financial success, establishing goals, managing debt and planning for retirement. Andersen pumped up the audience by giving them dif ferent perspectives on financial management through several scenarios and through person al experiences. Im here to give you per spective on who you are right now. To be successful, you need to live within your means. Real investments are not things youve bought to impress oth ers, they are faith, family and friends, he stated. Self worth does not equal net worth. During the week, numer ous workshops were available to provide information about various financial topics such as budgeting and spending plans, insurance needs, separation/ retirement planning, debt and credit management, home buying, college costs and car buy ing/leasing. I think the week has been important for people to come and get some financial knowl edge whether its about home buying, car buying, debt man agement, credit management, increasing your credit score, decreasing debt and increas ing wealth, said NAS Jax Fleet and Family Support Center Financial Educator Rufus Bundrige who coordinated the week-long events. All these are culminated to help indi viduals be more successful and give them a better quality of life. This includes Navy College providing tips on how they can better themselves to be more competitive in the job market if they separate or retire from the military. Many junior Sailors were thrilled with the knowl edge they were receiving in the financial workshops. I think this is really worth taking the time to come lis ten to these briefings espe cially for us junior Sailors who dont know what to do with our money. Ive learned that I need to start investing now and that the Roth IRA is a good way to do that. Im definitely getting some financial educa tion this week, said AN Taretta Madison of VP-30. These workshops are com ing at a good time with possible budget cuts because its help ing us become more knowl edgeable about what to do with our money. I was especially interested in hearing the briefs on buying a car and learning about college options, added AOAN Aaron Sarbey, also from VP-30. As an added incentive, VyStar Credit Union sponsored Military Saves Week by donat ing $500 worth of half dollars that were given to workshop attendees and a $500 check to the winner of a Military Saves Poker Run. For more information on the Military Saves Program, go to www.militarysaves.org. Neither the U.S. Navy, nor any other part of the federal govern ment officially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. Wealth of information provided during Military Saves Week Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville its hospital and branch health clinics is pleased to announce that the 2013 Patient Guide is now in-stock at all of its facilities and also available online at the command website at www. med.navy.mil/sites/navalhospi taljax The Guide is patients all-access tool, with current contact infor mation for all clinical depart ments at the hospital and branch health clinics. This includes Medical Home Port care teams, urgent and emergency care, pharmacy and pharmacy home delivery, outpa tient clinics, expecting and new parent services, inpatient care and surgery, military medicine, TRICARE, and educational classes. To find out more, visit the command website at www.med.navy. mil/sites/NavalHospitalJax like the Facebook page at www.face book/NavalHospitalJacksonville follow on Twitter at www.twit ter.com/NHJax and view the YouTube channel at www.you tube.com/user/NavalHospitalJax Sign up for e-mail updates at nhjaxconnect@med.navy.mil.2013 Patient Guide all-access tool arrives

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Commissary frozen food sections are decorated in March for National Frozen Food Month, just one of many special promotional savings offered throughout the store, according to Joyce Chandler, DeCAs acting sales director. Commissaries all over the world are celebrating Frozen Food Month in March, Chandler said. Shoppers will discover everything from greater savings on frozen foods to product demonstrations and high-value coupons bundled up with participat ing products throughout their store. DeCAs industry partners vendors, suppliers and brokers are collaborat ing with commissaries in March to offer discounts beyond everyday savings. Overseas stores may have substitute events for certain promotional pro grams. Customers are asked to check their local commissary for details on dates and times for the following pro motions: Free Milk. This Kelloggs pro motion is an extended celebration of National Breakfast Week. Shoppers can get a free gallon of milk during March 7-April 10 with the purchase of any four Kelloggs cereals or any four boxes of Keebler cookies. Kelloggs also highlights the impor tance of a healthy breakfast, and they do this by offering $5 worth of cou pons in over 20 million packages of cereal, Pop-Tarts and Nutri-Grain Bars. For every coupon redeemed, a break fast will be donated to a child in need through Action for Healthy Kids as part of an effort to provide one million breakfasts. Quaker & Tropicana celebrate the 40th anniversary of National Nutrition Month, an Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics campaign highlighting the importance of making informed food choices and developing sound eat ing and physical activity habits. From March 7 to April 10, commissaries will be provided high-value coupons with instructions about a video contest on www.quakermilitary.com. Videos from the 10 finalists will be showcased on the website, and com missary customers can then vote for their favorite video. Producers of the five videos with the most votes will win commissary gift cards. Total value of all prizes awarded is $900. The month of March is offering our commissary shoppers a lot of savings excitement and giveaways, and presenting the very best in nutritional choices for you and your family, Chandler said. Know that your commissary is always worth the trip! Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to service members and their families. Preregistration is required at 5425745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2013: 13-16 (5:30-10 p.m.), Aug. 19-21 (8 a.m.-4 p.m.), Nov. 12-15 (5:30-10 p.m.) (TAP) Separation Workshop (7:30 a.m.4:15 p.m.) March 11-15, April 1-5, April. 8-12, May 6-10, May 13-17, June 3-7, June 17-21, July 8-12, July 15-19, Aug. 5-9, Aug. 19-23, Sept. 9-13, Sept. 16-20, Oct. 7-11, Oct. 21-25, Nov. 4-8, Dec. 2-6. (TAP) Retirement Workshop (7:30 a.m.4:15 p.m.) March 25-29, April 15-19, May 20-24, June 24-28, July 22-26, Aug. 26-30, Sept. 23-27, Oct. 28-Nov. 1, Nov. 18-22, Dec. 16-20. a.m.-noon) March 20, April 22, May 3, June 12, Aug. 16, Sept. 6, Oct. 17, Nov. 27, Dec. 11. (Noon-3 p.m.) July 2. Workshop (8-9:30 a.m.) April 10, May 30, July 15, Sept. 5, Nov. 25. (9:40 a.m.-noon) April 10, May 30, July 15, Sept. 5, Nov. 25. a.m.-4 p.m.) May 1-2, Aug. 14-15, Nov. 13-14. Training (7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.) March 18-22, June 10-14, Sept. 30-Oct. 4, Dec. 9-13. Management Workshop (8-11 a.m.) April 30, July 2, Oct. 15. Buyers (1-3:30 p.m.) April 22, May 29, Sept. 4. Buying (9-10:30 a.m.) May 29, Aug. 12, Nov. 26. April 11, June 13, Aug. 8, Oct. 10, Dec. 12. p.m.) March 14, May 9, July 11, Sept. 12, Nov. 14. March 16 (10-11:30 a.m.), May 21 (5-6:30 p.m.), July 18 (1-2:30 p.m.) Sept. 14 (1-2:30 p.m.) Nov. 21 (5-6:30 p.m.) March 11, April 8, May 13, June 10, July 8, Aug. 12, Sept. 9, Oct. 7, Nov. 4, Dec. 9. (9-10:30 a.m.) March 12, April 9, May 14, June 11, July 9, Aug. 13, Sept. 10, Oct. 8, Nov. 5, Dec. 10. Extended Stress Management Workshop (8 a.m.-noon) April 16 & 30, July 16 & 30, Oct. 15 & 29. a.m.-noon) March 26, April 23, May 21, June 25, July 23, Aug. 27, Sept. 24, Oct. 22, Nov. 26, Dec. 17. Personal Anger Control Group March 12 April 16 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.), May 2 June 6 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.), June 25 July 30 (Tuesdays 2-4 p.m.), Aug. 15 Sept. 19 (Thursdays 11 a.m.-1 p.m.), Oct. 8 Nov. 12 (2-4 p.m.) Individual Communication (11 a.m.-1 p.m.) March 19, May 14, July 9, Sept. 10, Nov. 19. Parenting with Love & Logic (1-3 p.m.) May 7, 14, 21, 28; July 9, 16, 23, 30; Sept. 3, 10, 17, 24; Nov. 5, 12, 19, 26. Active Parenting of Teens (1-4 p.m.) April 3, 10, 17, 24; June 5, 12, 19, 26; Aug. 7, 14, 21, 28; Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23. Power 2 Change Womens Support Group (9:30-11 a.m.) Every Wednesday Expectant Families (9 a.m.-3 p.m.) June 4, Sept. 16, Dec. 3. Tiny Tots Play Group (10 a.m.-noon) March 19; April 2, 16, 30; May 14, 18; June 11, 25; July 9, 23; Aug. 6, 20; Sept. 3, 17; Oct. 1, 15, 29; Nov. 12, 16; Dec. 10, 17. Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) Orientation (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) May. 2, July 3, Sept. 5, Nov. 7. EFMP Command POC Training (1:30 p.m.-3 p.m.) April 4, June 6, Aug. 1, Oct. 3, Dec. 5. To register for any of the above workshops please contact 542-5745. Penguins abound in your commissary this MarchFFSC offers life skills workshops 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013

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NAS Jacksonville trains new command fitness leadersCommand fitness leaders (CFL) from Navy Region Southeast engaged in a five-day CFL class, Feb. 25 March 1. The class is aimed at certifying the CFLs to be ready to effectively promote their command physical readiness programs. This is an intensive course that consists of both class room work and a variety of physical activities, com mented Tanya Henigman, NAS Jax fitness director. The class covers Physical Readiness Program policies, balanced nutrition, exercise physiology, safety, health promotion, medical waivers, and how to promote a variety of exercises to Sailors besides the normal push-ups, sit-ups, and 1.5 mile run. Henigman explained that every CFL in the course must score at least an excellent on their physical readiness test in addition to having solid knowledge of the administrative details they are taught in the classroom. Through our guidance and the resources we provide, we hope to turn them into the best CFLs they can be. We strongly promote that good physical fitness determines the strength of our Navy and its ability to be mis sion ready, Henigman continued. By teaching them many different fitness techniques here, we can be assured that they will pass on what they have learned to the Sailors in their respective commands. Sailors who wish to learn more about maintaining a high standard of physical fitness are encouraged to visit the website www.navyfitness.org JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013 21

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22 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013 Sequestration actionsThis message was sent on March 1 to all Navy and Marine Corps units by Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. 1. Because no budget deal had been reached, the budget control act required setting in motion the automatic, government-wide cuts known as sequestration. Given that reality and the associated impact of budgetary uncertainty imposed by an indefinite continuing resolution, the Department of the Navy intends to commence reductions immediately. 2. The Navy plans to: A. Shut down Carrier Air Wing Two (CVW-2) in April. This will initi ate the preparations to gradually stand-down flying in at least three additional air wings, with two more air wings being reduced to minimum safe flying levels by the end of the year; B. Defer USNS Comfort humanitarian deployment to Central and South America, continuing promise 2013, including supporting ships, Seabees, and medical units; C. Cancel or defer the deployments of up to six ships to various AORs throughout the month of April; D. Lay up four combat logistics force (CLF) units in PACOM starting in april; E. Return USS Shoup (DDG 86) to homeport early and not proceed as USS Nimitz (CVN 68) escort to CENTCOM; F. Return USS Thach (FFG 43) to homeport early from deployment to SOUTHCOM. 3. The Navy will also immediately: A. Begin negotiating contract modifications to de-obligate efforts for any investment programs for which the remaining unobligated balance will be insufficient after the sequestration reduction is applied. Major programs affected include Virginia-class SSN advance procurement, reactor power units and joint high speed vessel (JHSV); B. Commence final planning to slow Marine Corps depot mainte nance activities, including reductions in the non-permanent work force; C. Cancel March introductory flight screening for future pilots/ nfos; D. Announce intent to cancel Blue Angels shows scheduled for April at MacDill AFB (Tampa, Fla.); NAS Corpus Christi, Texas; Vidalia Ga.; and MCAS Beaufort S.C.); E. Cease new USMC enrollments in voluntary education tuition assistance; F. Cancel March navy recruiting media support and reduce the majority of advertising contracts as much as possible under contractual conditions. 4. These actions are being taken to preserve support for those forces stationed overseas and currently forward-deployed. Reductions in lower-priority forward operations, and significant reductions in all other operations, training, and maintenance are the results of this selection process. 5. Actions taken to date will continue, including those affecting the deferral of maintenance for USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72); the deferral of repair work for USS Miami (SSN 755) and USS Porter (DDG 78); the delayed deployment of USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) and USS Gettysburg (CG 64); the civilian hiring freeze; the planning for civilian furloughs; and the reduction of all training not related to the readiness of deployed or next-to-deploy forces. 6. Navy Department leadership understands the uncertainty that these and other decisions create both amongst our people and in the defense industry upon which we rely. The lack of a legislative solution to avoid sequestration is deeply regrettable. We must endeavor to deal with the situation as we face it, not as we wish it could be otherwise. We will continue to keep the safety and well-being of our people foremost in mind, even as we work to keep whole the force structure which supports them. We will also continue to keep the Fleet and Fleet Marine Force fully informed as follow-on decisions are made. During a media availability Feb. 21, Navy officials announced the littoral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS 1) is on track to begin its first deployment March 1.This milestone was announced by the LCS Council, a group established by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert Aug. 22, to oversee continued fleet testing and the introduction of the LCS. Addressing challenges identified by these studies, on the timeline we require, necessitates the establishment of an empowered council to drive the action across acquisition, requirements and fleet enterprises of the Navy, said Greenert. The output of the council is intended to assist in maximizing the expansive potential capabilities of LCS and its associated mission packages in global fleet operations for the joint warfighter. I am confident we are on a path of success for LCS, said Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus. This council will continue to unify our efforts to implement operational lessons learned from our research and development ships to further ensure successful fleet integration. LCS ships are designed to employ mission packages that address capability gaps in the areas of surface warfare, mine countermeasures, and anti-submarine warfare. Due to its modular design, each LCS ship can be reconfigured to perform one of those three distinct missions in a short period of time. Freedoms deployment will demonstrate her opera tional capabilities, and allow the LCS Council to evaluate crew rotation and maintenance plans. The ship will operate forward from Singapore and spend eight months in theater conducting maritime security operations, participate in international exhibitions and exercises to highlight U.S. strategic intent in the region, and reassure U.S. partners through bilateral and multilateral interoperability. First Littoral Combat Ship to deploy in March

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24 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, March 7, 2013