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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 02-28-2013
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02031

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2013 VP-62 COC BIRDS+ BUILD WEALTH Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com NAS Jacksonville security and fire department per sonnel conducted an anti-terrorism/force protection (AT/FP) evolution March 19-22, as the installation participated in the nationwide Exercise Citadel Shield 2013. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders directed the three-day exercise that involved an abandoned boat on the base shoreline; a suspicious simu lated fire inside a P-8A aircraft; and a simulated shots fired scenario inside a mental health facility near Naval Hospital Jacksonville. Sanders explained, These real-world scenarios are part of the Citadel Shield exercise that annual ly tests our AT/FP response. Its a significant learn ing opportunity because it involves coordination of NAS Jax security and fire departments, along with Naval Hospital Jacksonville, Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11, HS-11, NCIS, the FBI and the NAS Jax Emergency Operations Center. Citadel Shield is an annual exercise conducted at Security personnel welcome home IAMA3 Drew Risley and his Military Working Dog (MWD) Doly received a warm welcome home by base leadership and members of the NAS Security Department from their Individual Augmentee (IA) deployment Feb. 19 at Heritage Park. Risley and MWD Doly spent three weeks in September 2012 attending the Inter-Service Advance Skills K9 training at the Yuma Proving Grounds before being deployed to Afghanistan where they were assigned to the Forward Operating Base Fenty. It was an interesting tour working with the Army. But as the only Navy military work ing dog handler, I was basically on my own. It was nice to have my part ner Doly with me and to know that we would take care of each other, said Risley. I appreciate every one being here to welcome us back and Im very happy to be home. As the team arrived via police escort, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders congratulated them on a job well done. I realize how difficult your tour has been and the enormous sacrifices youve made. Thank you for deploying on your own as an IA to serve your country and Im happy to welcome you and Doly home safe and sound, said Sanders. Risley and MWD Doly plan to resume their duties at NAS Jacksonville. VP-10 fights ice in MisawaWith winter weather beginning to lay siege on northern Japan, the Red Lancers of VP-10 are preparing themselves for the long months of operating in Misawas frigid climate. From the warm weather of their home station in Jacksonville, the Red The new Distinguished Warfare Medal will retain its place in the order of precedence among military decora tions, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said Feb. 19. Much of the public discussion of the new medal has centered on its prece dence. It ranks below the Distinguished Flying Cross and above the Bronze Star. We are not diminishing at all the importance of the Bronze Star that remains an important award for our combat troops and will remain so, Little said in a meeting with reporters. Senior civilian and military lead ers decided on where to place the new medal in the order of precedence, he added. We expect this award to be granted pretty rarely, and that factored in to the decision [on its precedence], he said. Juliet Beyler, the Defense Departments acting director of officer and enlisted personnel management, said in an interview after the announcement of the new medal that technological developments on the battlefield have changed the way service members fight. The services all came forward and said there are people who are doing incredible things, and we wanted the ability to recognize them for those things, she said. Service members do not have to be physically present on the battlefield to contribute to success in combat. Unmanned aerial vehicle pilots and cyber specialists can be thousands of miles away from combat and make contributions to victory. To be eligible to receive the award, a service member has to have direct, hands-on employment, such as an unmanned aerial vehicle operator dropping a bomb or a cyber specialist detecting and fending off a computer network attack. Combatant commanders must cer tify the impacts of the action before the award is forwarded to the service secretary for approval. The secretaries may not delegate that authority. Officials stressed that the medal is meant to recognize actions with direct effects on combat. Other awards are available to rec ognize service over a length of time, officials added, noting that the Distinguished Warfare Medal is not an end-of-tour award. New medal to retain place in order of precedence Exercise Citadel Shield tests AT/FP proficiency

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Feb. 28 1844 Explosion of Peacemaker, an experimental 14-inch gun, on board USS Princeton. 1893 Launching of USS Indiana (BB-1), the Navys first true battleship. 1959 USS Strong rescues 13 Arab fishermen from Bahrain when their fishing boats floundered in a storm. 1971 In Vietnam, two carriers remained on station as strike sorties rose to an average of 122 per day, due to a 40 percent increase in enemy truck movements from the previous month, averaging more than 1,400 sorties a day. 1980 Blue crew of USS Francis Scott Key (SSBN657) launches four Trident I (C-4) missiles in first operational test. March 1 1942 U-656 is the first German submarine of World War II to be sunk by naval air (VP-82). 1954 First of six detonations, Operation Castle nuclear test. 1974 USS John F. Kennedy (CVA-67) commenced a yearlong overhaul at Norfolk Naval Shipyard to be converted to handle the new CV concept (an air wing capable of performing strike and ASW operations) and to operate the new F-14 Tomcat fighter as well as the S-3A Viking. March 2 1859 Launch of Saginaw at Mare Island, first Navy ship built on West Coast of U.S. 1867 Civil Engineer Corps established. 1899 Act of Congress creates the rank Admiral of the Navy for George Dewey. 1973 Women begin pilot training in U.S. Navy. 1976 Two VS-22 Lockheed S-3A Viking aircraft landed aboard USS Saratoga (CV-60) off the coast of Italy, completing the first Atlantic crossing by S-3A Vikings. The aircraft departed NAS Cecil Field, Fla., with stops at NAS Bermuda, NAS Lajes, Azores and NS Rota, Spain, before landing on Saratoga. March 3 1776 First amphibious landing operation. Continental naval squadron under Commodore Esek Hopkins lands Sailors and Marines, commanded by Captain Samuel Nicholas, on New Providence Island in the Bahamas, capturing urgently needed ordnance and gunpowder. 1871 Navy Medical Corps established. 1883 Congress authorizes four modern ships of steel: three cruisers, Atlanta, Boston and Chicago; and dispatch boat Dolphin. 1915 Office of Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) established. 1915 Congress creates Federal Naval Reserve Force. 1960 USS Sargo (SSN-583), the third Skate-class nuclear-powered attack submarine, returns to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from arctic cruise of 11,000 miles (6,003 miles of it beneath the polar ice). March 4 1911 Appropriation of first funds for experiments in naval aviation. 1925 Congress authorizes restoration of USS Constitution. 1947 Operation High Jump, air operations in Antarctica, ends. 1963 Navy Hercules aircraft completes 12-day rescue operation of critically ill Danish seaman from Danish freighter off the coast of Antarctica. 1973 The withdrawal of U.S. troops from Vietnam resumed and the U.S. Navy minesweeping force returned to its position off Haiphong. In addition, USS America was ordered to depart the Far East for the U.S. the initial move in reducing the number of carriers serving in Southeast Asia from six to three by mid-June. March 5 1942 Name Seabees and insignia officially authorized. 1943 USS Bogue (CVE-9) begins first anti-subma rine operations by escort carrier. 1960 USS Newport News (CA-148) and personnel from Port Lyautey complete emergency relief oper ations at Agadir, Morocco after earthquake on 29 February. March 6 1822 USS Enterprise captures four pirate ships in Gulf of Mexico. 1862 USS Monitor departs New York City for Hampton Roads, Va. 1942 U.S. Cruisers and destroyers bombard Vila and Munda in the Solomon Islands, sinking two Japanese destroyers. Im writing this onboard Amtraks Acela express train, as we travel to see Dustin in New York City. Note: If you happened to be anywhere near us during this trip, I apologize. We boarded the train at Bostons South Station, where nobody in their right mind wanted to be seated next to us. It might have been our pile of bags, blankets, toys and Lindell, who was already wearing a monkey shaped neck pillow and carrying his green stuffed duck named Lindiddy. This made grab bing a four-person seating arrangement with a table in the middle (prime real estate in train travel) easier. We were in serious travel mode, with travel versions of every board game known to man, and a big supply of coloring books and crayons. However, it quickly became apparent that we were surround ed by 9-to-5 business profession als traveling the northeast corridor for important meetings or exciting weekend plans. They wore suits and high heels. They carried sleek briefcases and messenger bags. They talked on their smartphones. And few of them made use of the lug gage bins at the front of the car or compartments overhead. They were traveling light. The boys and I were loaded down like pack mules, and we occupied our seats like we were moving in. Coloring books, electronics, board games, snacks and more stuffed animals spilled out of my bag. Lindell curled up with his blanket and monkey neck pillow. Ford and Owen fought over the snacks. Bodily functions were proudly announced and quickly shushed by me. The train hadnt even left the station yet. Passengers who had just settled down beside us quietly moved away. Late boarders thought they had scored a whole car nearly empty and with seats free for the taking! Soon, these travelers smiled sheep ishly and pretended to see someone they knew in an adjacent car before slinking away. The boys and I stretched out in our space, a wide buffer surround ing us that no one in a suit dared to penetrate. We unpacked more goodies and games. Lindell said he felt sick to his stomach. As we traveled south, however, the train grew more crowded and unsuspecting travelers were forced to sit beside us. One young lady and her boyfriend with trendy black shoes slid into the seats across from us. If they didnt already have birth control, they were about to get it. We were like animals in a zoo for them. Im not sure the boyfriend, in particular, had ever seen so many primary colors and plastic toys. When the twinkling New York City skyline came into view outside our window, the kids gasped and pressed their faces against the window. This, of course, only encour aged more parallels with a zoo. The boys have never been to New York City. I think thats the Empire State Building, Owen said. No, it cant be, Ford said. The Empire State Building is bigger. No, thats it. I know it is. Ive seen it in the movie Elf. The man across from us smirked and looked away. I sighed. We had come so close to not mentioning Elf or SpongeBob Squarepants. Now we just looked silly. By 10 p.m., the boys had curled up in their seats as best they could and started to fall asleep. Lindell drooled on his monkey neck pil low, and Fords cheek was pressed against the glass. Games and halfeaten snacks littered the table. I tried to make eye contact with the man across from us. I wanted to smile knowingly, as if to say, Im sorry, and Theyre only kids. Its their first time on a train. Theyre a little excited. The man couldnt get out of his seat quicker when the conductor called his stop. He nearly ditched his girlfriend in order to not miss the chance to leave. I waved good bye to him as Lindell snored softly, mouth open and drooling, on my shoulder. For the rest of the trip, I alternated between feeling depressed about our current state of affairs I was that mom on public transporta tion and responsible for reducing the worlds potential birth rate. Then, at Grand Central Station, as the boys and I came through the gate with all our gear in tow, I spotted Dustin. He was smiling like he hadnt seen us in years. He ran to hug us. He grabbed the droolsoaked neck pillow without flinch ing. He reached out to hold grubby hands. And it was at that precise moment that an old cliche finally made sense to me: My three wide-eyed, sticky-mouthed and tired kids were a vision that perhaps only a mother and father could love. Hey, MoneyChic! I was out of town and got into a bit of a pickle, my car broke down! I wasnt able to come up with the money to repair my car myself so I took out a loan from one of those online places. The situation was a bit rushed and now I am having second thoughts about my actions. Did I do the right thing or was there a better way? MoneyChic Sez: Having something go wrong on a trip is definitely not a great situation to be in. Although secured the money to fix your car through an online lender, there is another way the problem could have been resolved. Even though you were not close to NAS Jacksonville, the nearest Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) office, another military relief society office (Army, Air Force), or the Red Cross could assisted you if you qualified for a loan. Army Emergency Relief, Air Force Aid Society, NMCRS, and the Red Cross all work together when members of different branches are not able to reach their designated base for assistance. NMCRS can assist with many things you may not have thought of and car repair is one of them. Lets get back to online and predatory lending. Predatory lending can be defined as imposing unfair and abusive loan terms on borrowers. Most online lenders are predatory lenders. One of the many forms of predatory lending is a short-term loan with disproportionally high fees, such as payday loans or tax refund anticipation loans, where the fee paid for advancing the money for a short period of time works out to an annual interest rate significantly in excess of the market rate for high-risk loans. Payday loans are illegal to receive by military members in the state of Florida which has led many payday lenders to move online. Service members are targets of these quick and easy loans because of the steady job and consistent paychecks members of the military receive. Have you heard of Omni? Pioneer? Those are online companies. They are counting on the never-ending cycle of borrowing and repaying or just continuously borrowing to make their money. Some of these companies are not just online anymore. Omni is known for setting up offices near military installations. Did you read the fine print on the loan con tract? Do you know what interest rate you are being charged? Fortunately for you, the inter est rate must be capped at 36 percent thanks to legislation a few years ago. But unfortunately, the interest rate is probably 36 percent! If a company is online but has originated from an Indian Me and my boys: People repellant

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013 BASH collision prevention program shows resultsThe Department of Defense (DoD) reports at least 3,000 wildlife-related strikes annually involving mili tary aircraft from the Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps. Throughout the DoD, air operations, aviation safety, and natural resources personnel work together to reduce the risk of bird and wildlife strikes that cause an estimated $75 million in damage each year. Potentially dangerous collisions between birds and military aircraft in Northeast Florida are being reduced thanks to a team approach to wildlife management at Navy airfields that include NAS Jacksonville, Naval Station Mayport and Outlying Landing Field (OLF) Whitehouse. For many years, the DoD has worked to improve aviation safety through a number of initiatives one of the most successful being the Bird Aircraft Strike Hazard (BASH) prevention program, said Winston Rogers, air field facilities deputy manager at NAS Jacksonville. Most recently, Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) entered into a national agreement with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to assist in safeguarding shore-based air operations assets. USDA Wildlife Biologist Kevin McGrath and USDA Wildlife Technician Mike Trowell have been part of the NAS Jax BASH program since ------+early 2011. In the past year, USDA established the Wildlife Hazard Assessment (WHA) survey process. We completed nine surveys both day and night to measure the impact of birds and mammals on operations at naval aviation installations in northeast Florida, explained McGrath. The survey identifies all bird populations in an area especially those most likely to have a negative effect when mixed with aircraft. Common species in the airfields vicinity include the great blue heron, snowy egret, wood duck, killdeer, laugh ing gull, royal tern, least tern, mourning dove, red-bellied woodpecker, blue jay, fish crow, Carolina wren, mocking bird, starling, pine warbler, northern cardinal, eastern meadowlark, common grackle and house sparrow. When the WHA survey is completed for NAS Jax, our BASH working group (Airfield Management, Air Operations, squadron safety officers, and the NAS Jax Public Works Environmental Department) will have data on current wildlife populations, what habitat theyre using, and what recommendations will help safely man age threats to aviators, said McGrath. One such recommendation could be to apply skirting to certain sections of the perimeter fence to decrease the number of mammals (such as foxes, coyotes, raccoons and armadillos) foraging on the airfield. The BASH working group would then prioritize the project, estimate materials and labor, and acquire funding. Birds on the airfield change each quarter according to migration fluctuations. In most cases, bird strikes are best prevented by making the airfield unattractive to the most troublesome species. At NAS Jax, as with many airfields worldwide, gulls are the top BASH threat. When it rains, gulls are attracted to puddles on the runways and taxiways. Rainwater also drives insects up out of the grass which also attracts gulls. McGrath pointed out that each Navy airfield in north east Florida is unique according to its geography and natural resources. Obviously, the ocean and the Mayport jetties attract large marine species such as gulls, terns and pelicans. The NAS Jax shoreline with the St. Johns River attracts more inland species such as osprey, vul tures and blackbirds. And OLF Whitehouse presents a southeastern pinewood habitat that attracts blue jays, woodpeckers, hawks, cranes and turkeys. Rogers added, The Navys long-term goal is to do more than just scare birds away from the airfield by shooting pyrotechnics. Our USDA wildlife experts and natural resources staff understand the habitat and feeding preferences of each species as well as how to reduce environmental factors that attract birds. McGrath said, Developing an integrated BASH pro gram requires cooperation and communication, because permanently eliminating birds from the airfield environ ment is impossible. Active communication between all players involved in daily airfield activities is vital to providing up-to-the-minute safety advisories to pilots.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013 5 BASH Role Players: Teamwork Is CrucialThe Navys driving force behind the program is the Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) BASH Manual. Accountable for BASH program and local instruction. Air Ops executes. Integrates with squadrons and other aviation tenants for training, reporting and collection. Lethal control of hazardous wildlife. Non-lethal dispersal of hazardous wildlife. Capture and relocate wildlife from airport boundaries. Ensure protected species are handled according to federal and state laws. Modification of habitats to discourage wildlife attractants. Update BASH requirements in the integrated Natural Resources Plan. Grass cutting, tree removal and brush control. Land use agreements with surrounding land owners. Provides species identification for installation management. Provides data collection and analysis. Provides program assessment. Integrates with other federal agencies for BASH program. Photos by Clark Pierce and Kevin McGrath

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Patrol Squadron (VP) 62 held a change of command ceremony on board NAS Jacksonville, Feb. 23. Cmdr. Jon Townsend relieved Cmdr. Jerry Dearie as commanding officer. Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 11 Capt. Eric Weise presided at the ceremony. Capt. T.D. Smyers (ret.), a former commanding officer of VP-62, and several other former skippers were in atten dance. Smyers, who commanded the squadron from July 2003 to July 2004, was guest speaker. Some of the best experiences of my life were spent as a Broadarrow, said Smyers. Since serving here, I cant help but be inspired by what the VP-62 citizen Sailors provide to our national defense and our national character. The sac rifice and quality of todays Reservist deserves the understanding and respect of Americans everywhere. Here in Jacksonville, Florida, I know its appre ciated. In his final address as command ing officer, Dearie said, Just a short 14 months ago I was sitting in the chair where the XO currently sits and think ing I had hit the lottery. I was not only getting to do what I love to do fly airplanes, track submarines and shoot missiles but I was going to be the one who got to make all the decisions. Going to sleep that night I felt like a kid who got the keys to his dads Ferrari. Dearie spoke of the changes he had seen during the 11 years since he joined the squadron in 2002. As the Broadarrows prepare for an overseas deployment this summer, he said, My greatest regret is that I will not be there with you. XO you have the car keys now. Enjoy the ride. Its fast, its exciting and you will enjoy every min ute of it. With the words I relieve you, sir, Townsend became the 31st command ing officer of the VP-62 Broadarrows, one of two Reserve maritime patrol squadrons in the Navy. The squadron consists of 115 drilling Reservists and 110 active and full-time support personnel. Broadarrow Reservists travel from nine states to train for operational missions in support of national defense. Its exciting to have the opportunity to lead this squadron at a time when the concept of Active Reserve Integration is alive and well, said Townsend. In fiscally austere times, its critical that the call to duty come the way of the Reserve Component. VP-62 has been called to meet global force require ments during the fleet transition to the new P-8A Poseidon. We are ready for the call, and I am excited to be part of it as Commanding Officer. Under Dearies leadership, the squadron celebrated its 33rd consecutive year of class A mishap-free flight opera tions surpassing 100,000 flight hours. VP-62 received the Chief of Naval Operations Naval Aviation Safety Award, known as the Safety S. Dearie guided the efforts of a rigorous new training plan by the Broadarrow Maintenance Team for 135 personnel, accounting for 14,764 maintenance man-hours and 5,656 maintenance actions. The plan led to full implementation of 41 maintenance programs, the qualification of 13 personnel to certify aircraft Safe-for-Flight, 22 Collateral Duty Inspectors, and 11 Quality Assurance Representatives. Ultimately, the new plan resulted in a superb Commander, Naval Air Forces Aviation Maintenance Inspection (AMI) during which AMI inspectors specifically gave out ten bravo zulus to maintenance personnel for their outstanding performance and VP-62 personnel achieved a spotless safety record. During Dearies tenure, VP-62 com pleted 40 missions and provided 232 hours of operational support for Joint Task Force USS Carl Vinson, Joint Task Force USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, Operations Caribshield, Pomeval and RIMPAC 2012.The Squadron demon strated excellent weapons employment capability, highlighted by the success ful deployment of an AGM-65 Maverick missile on target during RIMPAC 2012 exercises. VP-62 continuously provided 77 current and qualified aircrewmen and a minimum of three Combat Aircrews trained and ready to conduct AntiSubmarine Warfare in support of major combat operations and overseas contingency operations. Additionally, pilot proficiency con tinued to be a strength of the squadron, maintaining a 92 percent monthly pilot proficiency rate throughout the year. Townsend completed primary and intermediate flight training with Training Squadron Twenty-Seven (VT-27) in Corpus Christi, Texas and advanced flight training with Training Squadron Thirty-One (VT-31) at NAS Corpus Christi. He was awarded his pilot wings in October of 1997 and reported to the Fleet Replacement Squadron VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville. Townsend served tours with VP-10, VP-30, VP-62, and U.S. Southern Command prior to reporting back to the Broadarrows as executive officer. Cmdr. Ron Soroka assumed duty as the Broadarrows executive officer. VP-62 Broadarrows welcome new skipper 2013 Patient Guide all-access tool arrives Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville its hospital and branch health clinics is pleased to announce that the 2013 Patient Guide is now in-stock at all of its facilities and also available online at the command website at www.med.navy. mil/sites/navalhospitaljax The Guide is patients all-access tool, with current contact information for all clinical departments at the hospital and 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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reservation and are not governed by the same laws as other lenders. Western Sky is an online lender that does not have to cap the interest charged to borrowers. Now that you have the loan, here are a few things you need to be aware of so you arent being taken advantage of further. Make sure the monthly repay ment you were shown you would be paying is exactly that and be aware of the end date of the loan to make sure the payments end. As always, NMCRS is here to lend a helping hand. If you would like more information on how we can help, stop by the office outside the Yorktown Gate or call 542-2832. Have questions for Hey, Money Chic? Drop me an e-mail at megan.stolle@nmcrs.org MONEYCHIC The Pros Nest of VP-30 recently hosted Adm.William Gortney, com mander U.S. Fleet Forces Command and several members of his staff. During the visit, Gortney toured a P-8A Poseidon aircraft and associated training facilities at VP-30, focusing on daily operations during operational maritime patrol and reconnaissance squadron training of replacement pilots, naval flight officers, and naval aircrew men on the new P-8 Poseidon airframe. VP-30 accepted its first P-8 Poseidon in March 2012 to begin training on the new Boeing aircraft while concurrently maintaining fleet requirements as the P-3 Orion Fleet Replacement Squadron. Gortneys visit included a tour of VP-30s new electronic classroom, which provides a wide array of resources to provide computer-based training for officers and enlisted aircrewmen as well as maintainers. Instructor pilots and naval flight offi cers were also able to give him an interactive tour of the new, state-of-the-art, P-8 pilot and tactical crew trainers. The mission of U.S. Fleet Forces Command is to train, certify, and pro vide combat-ready Navy forces to com batant commanders. These forces must be capable of con ducting prompt, sustained naval, joint, and combined operations in support of U.S. national interests. VP-30s training of patrol plane pilots, flight officers, aircrewmen and main tainers is a key contributor to the effectiveness of the maritime patrol and reconnaissance community as it fits under U.S. Fleet Forces Command in support of national interests and secu rity.VP-30 hosts Commander Fleet Forces Command GUIDE branch health clinics. This includes Medical Home Port care teams, urgent and emergency care, pharmacy and pharmacy home delivery, outpatient clinics, expecting and new parent services, inpatient care and surgery, military medi cine, TRICARE, and educational classes. To find out more, visit the command web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/NavalHospitalJax like the Facebook page at www.facebook/ NavalHospitalJacksonville, follow on Twitter at www. twitter.com/NHJax and view the YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/user/NavalHospitalJax Sign up for email updates at nhjaxconnect@med.navy.mil. Bicycle-pedestrian meetings slatedBicyclists and pedestrians residing in Clay, Duval, Nassau and St. Johns Counties have three oppor tunities to provide input for the North Florida Regional Bicycle Pedestrian Master Plan study con ducted by the North Florida Transportation Planning Organization. The open-house public meetings allow attendees to review and comment on the plans draft elements. The public meetings are from 4-8 p.m. at the following locations: 110, 214 N. Hogan St. 75 King St. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013 7

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Satellite pharmacy closing for improvements March 2 Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles satellite pharmacy, located at the Navy Exchange (building 950), will close its lobby and drive-up early March 1 at 4 p.m. in order to upgrade its informa tion technology. On March 2, the satellite pharmacys lobby will be closed and the drive-up window (medication pick-up only) will be open 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. NH Jacksonvilles main (outpa tient) pharmacy will be open standard Saturday hours, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. To register for home delivery of chronic medications (including generics at no cost), go to www.tricare.mil/ homedelivery, or ask a pharmacy staff member. For more information, call the phar macy at 542-7405. Nomads depart for EUCOM detAfter recently completing detached operations in Pacific Command and Central Command (CENTCOM), The VR-62 Nomads departed last week for a European Command (EUCOM) detach ment at NAS Sigonella, Italy. Consisting of 21 maintainers, aircrew and a C-130T packed with tools and per sonal gear, the detachment headed out for EUCOM. The detachment personnel consist of a mix of Selected Reservists and full-time support Sailors. Lt. Cmdr. Todd Nichols, the Nomad operations officer, said, We expect to be very busy consid ering the recent events taking place in AFRICOM, and we like being busy. The Nomads just returned from CENTCOM Jan. 28. We are truly nomadic this year said AWF1 Gregory Autrand, the squadrons operations LPO. VR-62 is one of five Navy Reserve C-130 squadrons serving the Navys global logistics needs. The squadron is home based at NAS Jacksonville. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013 9

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Lancers had to quickly adapt to the challenges of winter weather flying. Too much snow and ice on an aircrafts wings can render it unflyable. While airborne, special heating systems on the P-3C Orion can melt ice that forms on the flight surfaces and propel lers. However, on the ground a team of qualified maintain ers and aircrew must manually remove the ice and snow, and take preventative steps to slow down further buildup on the aircraft. VP-10s last two deployments were to the desert, so resident expertise on snow-removal and de-icing procedures is scarce. We received a lot of great tips and procedures from VP-1 and VP-8, the two previous squad rons operating out of Misawa, but understanding how to apply those procedures is dif ficult without seeing them first hand, said VP-10 Maintenance OfficerLt. Cmdr. David Neall. The Maintenance Department took the proper steps required to conduct these pro cedures in accordance with the NATOPS program, main tenance instruction manuals and Command Task Force 72 standards. To earn the neces sary de-icing qualifications, the Maintenance Department sent AE2 Jeremy Guthrie and AD2 Tommy Penavaldez to the Misawa Ground Support Equipment office where they learned how to use the de-icing truck and how to train others on the proper procedures. The pair then spent the next three weeks indoctrinating their co-workers on the proper procedures and techniques. At the same time, a team consisting of ADCS James Eggl, AWFC Marc Danchak, and AWF1 Brent Duvall began pre paring a squadron-wide demon stration to show the rest of the command the in-depth process involved in safely preparing the aircraft for freezing conditions. We had to get everyone involved with what it takes to properly de-ice and remove snow from the aircraft. Having them see and do the established procedures, rather than read ing about them better prepared the command for success, explained Eggl. The Red Lancers recent ly gathered in the hangar to observe AWF2 John Joseph Jr. strap into a harness and climb onto the aircraft, with two peo ple supporting him with ropes from below, to demonstrate the correct way to brush snow and ice off the aircraft. Afterwards, everyone headed to the flight line where Penaveldaz demon strated how the de-icing truck worked and how to properly spray the special anti-freeze solution from the truck onto the aircraft. We thought this would be a good way to visualize the pro cedure which will make these evolutions run more smoothly should we have to execute them during this deployment, said Neall. We have seen a lot of snow so far this deployment with more expected in the coming months, we wanted to make sure we are prepared to safely operate in these conditions. VP-10 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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CITADELall continental United States naval installations to enhance the training and readiness of navy secu rity forces and other first responders but was not a response to any specific threat. This exercise creates a learning environment for installation personnel to enhance functional plans and operational capabilities, Sanders added. Its vital that we learn how to adapt to unexpected situations. The more opportunities we have to train, the more proficient well become in dealing with AT/ FP events. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013 11

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Sailors from VQ-1, attached to Commander, Task Force (CTF) 47 and assigned to the U.S. Forward Operating Location (USFOL) Curacao in the Netherlands Antilles took time from their busy schedule recently to participate in a community relations (COMREL) project at the Parke Tropikal Zoo. Upon arrival, zoo employees escorted the group to a limited access behindthe-scenes area. The Sailors, anxious to see what animals they would encoun ter, were instead greeted by a large steel shipping container near a field covered in construction debris, garbage and compost. With a limited collection of hedge clippers, rakes, shovels and an axe at the groups disposal, the Sailors got to work. I like to do volunteer work because it gets me out of the military mindset [and] I feel the locals really appreciate our work, said AM3 Victor Hernandez. Over the course of three hours, the group cleared out all of the garbage and construction material, removed most compost, and chopped down a couple of trees and bushes. The zoos administrators were all smiles as they served water to the parched sailors. Regarding the speed and efficiency put towards the project, CPO Nathan Wells stated that COMRELs are a great team-build ing exercise. The Sailors were proud of the chang es brought to the field that will soon become a picnic area. Its regrettable and unfortunate that the field fell into such deplorable condition, said Lt. Jonathon Montes. But Im happy to participate in a dynamic and engaging sequence of events. Rewarded with the smiles of zoo employees and access to the zoo, the Sailors of CTF-47 got a chance to walk around and enjoy the park. Zoo Director Bert Isenia expressed his gratitude and asked them to come back for other projects. The clean up was also featured in the local newspa per. The Parke Tropikal Zoo, which is free to the public, houses exotic animals and a botanical garden. USFOL Curaao operates 24/7 enabling joint, interagency and multinational aircraft operations that con duct detection, monitoring and track ing missions in support of regional counter-drug efforts. It was established as a result of a multi-lateral agree ment between the Kingdom of the Netherlands and the United States whereby aircraft and crews deploy to the USFOL on a temporary basis to conduct counter-drug operations. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Base Support Vehicles and Equipment (BSVE) Product Line declared success Feb. 5 working with General Services Administration (GSA) in a joint venture to streamline the short-term rental process for Navy heavy equipment in the Southeast. Public Works Departments, along with other government agencies, now has access to various types of heavyduty civil engineering support equip ment (CESE) on a short term basis (up to 365 days) through the GSA Heavy Equipment Short Term Rental (STR) Program. Types of equipment in the program include, but are not limited to bulldozers, back-hoes, generators, load ers, and man-lifts. This new tool will definitely help the Navy and will lead to significant cost reductions in operations by allowing us to reduce our pool of equipment, said Jeff Killian, NAVFAC Southeast Public Works business line coordinator. Emergencies come up in our business and this will provide a means to quickly resolve equipment needs. This acquisition strategy is now available by the implementation of a GSA negotiated, multi-vendor/multi region product delivery contract. Historically we have on occasion rented heavy equipment, but the pro cess and payment was somewhat diffi cult to enable full time usage, said Ryan Costa, NAVFAC Southeast transporta tion specialist. With this program the process is web based and we make payment through our already established GSA billing cycle. In 2010, the BSVE team reached out to GSA to collaborate a new initiative to reduce underutilized equipment. The team was aware of the already resounding success of the GSA STR program for light duty vehicles and wanted to look at what could be done for the CESE program. The new contract provides a means for competitive and low cost equipment rentals from multiple vendors, said Costa. Utilizing this program will pro vide multiple cost saving benefits to the Navy and other agencies throughout the Government. With more equipment available on an interim basis through this program, the Navy can look at reducing the inventory of heavy equipment that it owns. Reductions of agency owned assets will dramatically reduce ownership and operational costs such as maintenance, labor and procurement cost, said Costa. The GSA Heavy Equipment STR program will help us meet our strategic goal of reducing our direct and indirect costs. The savings will be realized through not having to procure equipment and also bear the cost of maintenance. As the various sites throughout the south east start utilizing the new program, they will review existing equipment inventories to determine at what point in time the inventory can be purged based on the new rental data. We need to continue to think outside the box and manufacture business strategies like this to mitigate costs always being mindful of the taxpayers dollars. The new program allows flexibility during contingency events by lessening the need for contingency contracting and enabling access to available equip ment on a National scale. NAVFAC Southeast was the exclusive government agency during the pro grams Pilot inception period during the middle of fiscal year 2012 and had realization of programmatic success shortly after. The accessibility of this program is currently available at all stateside locations within the Navys Southeast region, said Costa. BSVE continues to partner with GSA during this evolution and looks forward to the success of the program as GSA plans to phase the programs availability to all government agencies this year.Navy, GSA streamline heavy equipment rental programCleaning up the Curacao zoo 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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Defense Department officials have designated Feb. 25Mar. 1 as Military Saves Week to highlight the need for military families to reduce debt and save for the future, something Pentagon officials emphasize is key to force readiness. The event is part of the yearlong Military Saves campaign, an opportunity for leaders to stress the importance of good financial habits to all members of the force and their families to encourage saving, reducing debt and building wealth, officials said. Military Saves is an ongoing campaign in partnership with America Saves to really hone in on the habits for good sav ings for our military members, Barbara Thompson, director of the Pentagons office of fam ily policy and children and youth, told American Forces Press Service and the Pentagon Channel. The personal finances of military families are important to the Defense Department, she said, because money problems can affect force readiness. When service members and their families can focus on the mission because theyre not worried about their financial situation, we have a much bet ter prepared force, she added. Financial health also is key to force readiness because accumulating debt can jeopardize a service members secu rity clearance. DOD officials have found that junior enlisted service members and their families are more vulnerable to financial problems than other members of the force. Data obtained through surveys and supplied by Thompsons office suggests an increase last year among those who experienced one or more problems in paying bills, despite an overall drop in those who said they were not com fortable with their financial situation. Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, has encouraged each military branch to sponsor finan cial awareness events, with a particular focus on young people, including children of ser vice members. In a memo to the chiefs of the military services and senior enlisted advisors, Dempsey emphasized that by learning good financial habits early in life, our children will strengthen their financial fitness for the future. Thompson said many services are available to members of the military who seek financial advice. Each of the services has contracted with people who have an expertise in financial readiness, she said. In addition to taking advan tage of counseling available on military bases and taking part in upcoming financial aware ness events, Thompson said, military families have other opportunities to learn more about personal finance. For example, she said, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authoritys Investor Education Foundation has a website http://SaveAndInvest.org that includes a financial man agement readiness program designed for service members. Thompson also recommended visiting http://www.mili tarysaves.org for more infor mation about Military Saves and to read about success sto ries related by people who have used the program to achieve their financial goals. All four active services met or exceeded their target recruiting numbers for the first three months of fiscal 2013, Pentagon officials reported Feb. 15. Here are the specific numbers by service so far for the fiscal year, which began Oct. 1: goal of 12,250; of 7,782; of its goal of 6,058; and goal of 6,516. The Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps exhibited strong retention numbers for the third month of fiscal 2013, officials said. While the Navy exhibited strong retention numbers in the mid-career and career catego ries, the Navys achievement of 86 percent in the initial category is a result of the transition from a downsizing to a stabilizing posture. Meanwhile, five of the six reserve components met or exceeded their fiscal 2013 recruiting goals for the first three months of the fiscal year. The Army Reserve finished December 572 short of its goal. Here are the numbers: percent of its goal of 12,015; of its goal of 7,022; of its goal of 1,281; percent of its goal of 2,163; percent of its goal of 2,170; and cent of its goal of 1,872. All reserve components have met their fiscalyear-to-date attrition goals. Officials said that although they expect this trend will continue, attrition numbers for December are not yet available. Military Saves Week highlights personal finance issues Recruiting continued to be robust through December JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013 13

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NAS Jax marks Black History milestonesDozens of Sailors and DoD personnel celebrated Black History Month with a luncheon Feb. 20 at the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf. This year, we celebrate the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation and the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, explained BMC Maurice Mabry, of the NAS Jax Multi-Cultural Awareness Committee. The Emancipation Proclamation included the acceptance of black men into the Union Army and Navy. By the end of the war, almost 200,000 black Soldiers and Sailors had fought for the Union and freedom. The march marked a key moment in the growing struggle for civil rights in the United States, and culminated with the I Have a Dream speech delivered by Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. to 200,000 Americans gathered along the mall of Washington, D.C., said Mabry. Master of Ceremonies AT1 Dominic Sapien welcomed the attendees and introduced Valoria Volasgis of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), who sang the national anthem a capel la. Chaplain (Lt. j.g.) Paul Rodgers delivered the invocation and benediction. In his opening remarks, NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/ SW) Brad Shepherd told the audience that as a youth in Akron, Ohio, he was raised in a neighborhood where everybody was equal equally poor that is. Going to school, the color of your skin didnt really matter. When youre at the Goodwill store and you find a used pair of Chuck Taylor Converse high tops youre living the dream of all your classmates whether theyre black, brown or white, said Shepherd. Few people in our diverse Navy know that African-Americans have fought in every conflict, beginning with the Revolutionary War. In World War II, the elite Tuskegee Airmen were pioneers in equality and integra tion earning 95 Distinguished Flying Crosses. These are justsome of the people who paved the way for all of us to live better lives, no matter where youre from or what your background is. Guest speaker Lt. Clement Smith of FRCSE Avionics Division, said, Im very honored to speak here today. The Emancipation Proclamation and the March on Washington were iconic events for African-Americans. Today, Americas fight for civil rights has pro duced a military force that is one of the most diverse organizations in the world. When Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, it instilled a sense of pride and belonging in black people along with the belief that they can make a difference for themselves and their descendents, said Smith. Frederick Douglass, a former slave and social reformer, proclaimed that the war against the Union was really the war against slavery. By the end of the Civil War, more than 200,000 black soldiers and sailors had fought for their newfound freedom. In 1963, America once again stood at a crossroad. The U.S. Supreme Court had outlawed racial segregation in public schools. Other forms of discrimina tion had also resulted in second-class citizenship for blacks. My parents were part of that tough struggle for integra tion and I value their contribution because they believed that one day their children and their childrens children would live in a more open and equal social, political and economic environ ment, said Smith. In 1964, the U.S. Congress passed the landmark civil rights act that forbade discrimination on the basis of race, sex or religion in hiring, promoting and firing. The act also created the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to implement the law. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013 15

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The captains cup is awarded annually to the command that has demonstrated the highest level of participation and achievement in the NAS Jacksonville Captains Cup Athletics Program during a calendar year. There are 26 captains cup team and individual sporting events. The pro gram is for active duty; selective reservists; DoD and DoD contractor personnel representing activities attached to NAS Jacksonville. There are two types of events: team and individual sports. Commands may enter as many teams or individuals in the events. For the team sports, com mands receive 30 entry points for each team completing the respective sport season. Additional points for team sports are awarded for: league cham pion 20; league runner-up 10; playoff champion 30; playoff runner-up 20; and playoff third place 10. Commands lose 15 captains cup points for every no show forfeiture. For the individual sports, commands receive five entry points for each com mand participant entered in an individual event up to a maximum of 30 points. Additional points for individual sports are awarded for: first place 20; second place 15; and third place 10. Events run throughout the year and the trophy is awarded to the command with the most points accumulated after all the events have been completed. Congratulations to Naval Hospital Jax for winning the 2012 Captains Cup trophy. For more information on the pro gram, e-mail Bill Bonser at bill.bonser@ navy.mil Naval Hospital Jax wins NAS Jax Captains Cup 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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All F-35 Lightning II aircraft have been grounded as a precaution after a routine engine inspection revealed a crack on an engine blade, Defense Department officials said Feb. 22. Officials call this a cautionary sus pension of flight. The Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps fly F-35s. Inspectors found the crack in an F135 engine installed in an F-35A Lightning II aircraft at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. This is the conventional take-off and landing version of the joint strike fighter. Officials are shipping the engine and its associated hardware to Pratt & Whitneys engine facility in Middletown, Conn., to conduct more thorough evaluation and root cause analysis. Officials said the grounding is precau tionary. All F-35 flight operations have been suspended until the investigation is complete, officials said, and it is too early to know the fleetwide impact. The F-35 Joint Program Office is working closely with Pratt & Whitney and Lockheed Martin at all F-35 loca tions to ensure the integrity of the engine, and to return the fleet safely to flight as soon as possible, a Defense Department news release said. F-35s grounded as precaution after crack found in engine blade JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013 17

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Free Entertainment at 7 p.m. March 1 Sho-Nuff March 8 Pierce In Harmony March 15 Jason Lamar March 22 All About Me March 29 Ace Winn April 5 KaraokeFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 6 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per person Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 126 p.m., $1.50 games Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information, contact Melissa at 542-3518/4238 Check-out our new fitness schedule! New classes include Muscle Max, Extreme Bootcamp and Max Core Pick-up the latest copy at the fitness center Leprechaun Dash 5K March 15 at 11:30 a.m. Pre-register by March 8I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. ITT Travel Fair March 16, 9 :30 a.m. 1 p.m. NEX Courtyard Win prizes! Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts Dark Side Of The Moon (Pink Floyd) April 13 at 7:30 p.m. Section A $33; Section B $28; Section C $23 A Lamb Chop Celebration April 20 at 7:30 p.m. Section A $18; Section B $14; Section C $11 Legoland Kids go free with an adult ticket purchase from ITT Funkfest Metropolitan Park May 10-11 2-day ticket $52 Gatornationals March 15,16,17, 2013 Fri Reserved from $35 $39 Sat & Sun Reserved from $50 $54 Fri General Seating from $28 $32 Sat & Sun General Seating from $38 $42 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3 Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7, 2013 Blockout Dates: March 23 April 5, 2013 Call for pricing Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline 201213 Live Broadway Series Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Dream Girls May 21 New Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute 4 day hopper $153.25 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31 and must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about special discounted tickets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park Gold pass $71The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Paintball Trip GTF in Yulee March 2 at 9 a.m. Downtown Art Walk Trip March 6 at 6 p.m. Kayaking Trip Simpson Creek March 16 at 9 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees March 12 & 26 for active duty March 14 & 28 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 12:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays. Twilight Golf League Tuesday at 5 p.m. March 26 Aug. 27 $20 per person per week Mulberry Cove Marina Call 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available!Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m.Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more information. Free Easter Egg Hunt March 27 at 7 p.m. McCaffrey Softball Fields Open to children up to age 12Flying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School March 18 April 24 $500 per person 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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Hundreds of spouses attended the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Hiring Our Heroes Military Spouse Business Alliance Career Forum Feb. 21 at the NAS Jax Officers Club. On March 28, 2011, the National Chamber Foundation and Capital One announced Hiring 500,000 Heroes, a campaign to secure commitments from businesses throughout America to hire 500,000 veterans and military spouses by the end of 2014. In January 2012, Hiring Our Heroes launched the Military Spouse Business Alliance. The alliance improves the lives of working military spouses through a series of initiatives, including mentor ing, entrepreneurial activities, and 20 hiring fairs specifically geared toward military spouses in 2012. Deputy Director of Hiring Our Heroes Military Spouse Employment Program U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation Noreen ONeil explained, Military spouses have a 26 percent unemploy ment rate. Their challenges are very different from a veteran. They are generally under employed and underpaid mostly because of the gaps in their resumes. They also tend to take jobs beneath their skill level just to keep from hav ing gaps in their resume. Military spouses volunteer at a rate three times the national average generally doing tasks that are translatable to corporate speak, she added. This is important for spouses to include on their resumes. Hiring a military spouse isnt charity its good for business, continued ONeil. The career forum offered a full day of networking and educational sessions for military spouses and veterans. For more info, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil NAS Jax hosts career forum JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013 19

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Oakleaf Club of Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville member Molly Croft has been appointed, by NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer, as command ombudsman. Since being introduced into the Navy in 1970, the Ombudsman Program has ensured that issues and con cerns of Navy families are addressed. It is a command operated program intended to improve communication between the command and a Sailors family members. The position is considered an official Navy volunteer, which means that it must be filled by someone with a desire to serve others. They also need to be very structured as they are required to disseminate information throughout the chain of command. They pro vide important information to help families obtain valuable resources during their loved ones careers. Ombudsmen are considered the go to people for guidance. NH Jacksonvilles commanding officer trusts Croft will do a great job linking together command families and command leadership. The Navy ombudsman plays a critical role supporting our Navy familiessomething especially important for our families with deployed spous es, says Shaffer. I have utter confidence Ms. Croft will do an outstanding job guiding our families in the right direction through various challenges they may face timeto-time, serving as their advo cate and helping them navigate available resources. Oakleaf Club of Naval Hospital Jacksonville President Nichol Lee concurs with Shaffer. Lee says Croft brings to the position a great amount of experience and enthusiasm. We are very excited to have Ms. Croft on board as the command ombudsman, says Lee. We look forward to collaborating with her on future endeav ors to benefit the families of our amazing Naval Hospital Jacksonville heroes. Croft found her calling to serve as an ombudsman while her husband, Lt. Cmdr. Coby Croft, was stationed at Naval Station Rota, Spain. In 2004, her husband was deployed after a tsunami occurred in Indonesia. This left Croft, a mother of three, with many apprehensions and questions about who she could turn to without her spouse being there to help. That feel ing of helplessness and anxi ety inspired her to aid others by becoming the command ombudsman until their reloca tion to NH Jacksonville in 2012. My husband has deployed four times, and my children have been various ages and stages during each deploy ment, recalls Croft. The levels of support that we needed changed from one to another. Croft enjoys helping fami lies on a personal level. And she feels NH Jacksonville is uniquely positioned with its high level of Individual Augmentee (IA) deployments, with up to eight percent of its active duty staff deployed around the globe providing combat, humanitarian and disaster care. It can be very lonely and isolating with individual deploy ments, says Croft. Helping a family find resources and pro viding them with the support they need is very satisfying because Ive been that spouse, and Ive walked in those shoes. Along with empowering family members with resources they need to help themselves, the ombudsman is also avail able to help resolve conflicts that may arise between the command and family members from a confidential, nonbiased viewpoint. The ombudsman helps develop fair solutions to complex and difficult prob lems. When Croft became an ombudsman, she took an oath to uphold strict confidentiality. I take very seriously the confidence given to me by the families who contact me, assures Croft. Ive been trained through the Fleet and Family Support Center and continue monthly trainings, maintaining updat ed resources to best serve the families of the command. Contact the command ombudsman at nhjaxombuds man@gmail.com or call 5087610. Naval Hospital Jacksonville welcomes new ombudsman March 1 is the deadline for members of the service who meet the statutory qualifications to apply for the Deployed Servicemember Property Tax Exemption for the 2013 tax year as well as other exemptions. The Deployed Servicemember Property Tax Exemption is avail able for 2013 to members of the service who receive a homestead exemption and who were deployed outside the continental United States, Alaska or Hawaii during the preceding calendar year (2012) in support of designated operations. Though the operations have not been officially designated for the 2013 exemption, applicants are encouraged to file before the March 1 deadline and they will be notified if they do not qualify. Applications are available in the Duval County Property Appraisers Office at 231 East Forsyth Street, Suite 260 or at www.duvalpa.com. Those applying for the 2013 exemption must also supply deployment orders or other proofs of the qualifying deployment(s) that include dates of the deployment(s) and that clearly identify the supported operation(s) and the days during which the service member was outside the continental United States, Alaska or Hawaii. The amount of the exemption is based on the number of days deployed in the previous calendar year. Applicants who miss the March 1 deadline, may file late up to the 25th day following the mailing of theNotices of Proposed Property Taxes inmid-August.Applications will not be acceptedafter this deadline.Servicemembers whose deployment spansover two or more calendar years must apply each year.This exemption is not automatically renewed, and appli cants must have a homestead exemption on their property to qualify. For forms or more information, visit www.duvalpa.com or call the Customer Service/Exemptions Division at 630-2020. Deadline approaching for 2013 Deployed Military Exemption, other Property Tax Exemptions 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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The Wings Over America Scholarship Foundation (WOASF) is hosting a golf tournament at NAS Jax April 26 at 9 a.m. to benefit scholarships for Navy dependents. The event is open to the public. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. All proceeds benefit the Wings Over America Scholarship Foundation, a 501(c)3 non-profit foundation. The WOASF annually sponsors more than 40 scholarships, ranging from $2,000 to $10,000, to students who have chosen to continue their education. Scholarship recipients are selected on the basis of scholastic merit, community service and extracurricular activities. The foundations mission is to pro vide college scholarships to dependent children and spouses of naval aviation commands, officer and enlisted, active duty, retired, honorably discharged or deceased. The foundation has awarded more than $635,000 to students since 1987. For more information or to register, visit www.wingsoveramerica.us or call 757-671-3200, ext. 2. WOASF golf tourney set for April 26 Easter Egg HuntCall 778-9772 for more informationWednesday, March 27 McCaffrey Softball Complex FREE!Staggered egg hunt Start times: 7:00 pm Ages 0 3 7:10 pm Ages 4 6 7:20 pm Ages 7 9 7:30 pm Ages 10 12 facebook.com/nasjaxmwr JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013 21

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Naval aviation pioneer Lt. John Towers in CubaThese 1913 photos show Navy Curtiss flying boats at Fishermans Point on Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Lt. John Towers, a graduate of the Curtiss Flying School in 1911, arrived Jan. 10, 1913, and took command of the new aviation camp. Four large tents served as hangars for Curtiss A-2 and C-1 flying boats. On March 6, 1913, Towers was ordered to prepare an air search for a hostile fleet approaching the Cuban coast. This flight became the first tactical maneuver involving naval aircraft. Towers spotted approaching destroyers without himself being detected. Because his radio malfunctioned, Towers landed beside the flagship and notified the admiral that a hostile force was approaching. From the aviation camp, Towers and his fellow Navy pilots explored the potential of their planes to serve Navy aerial reconnaissance, bombing, photography and radio communications needs. In the ocean waters off Cuba they were able to spot submarines at depths of up to 40 feet. Towers was officially designated as Naval Aviator No. 3 in 1915. Hes also credited with the development of the naval aviator badge, which was designed in 1917. In 1960, the NAS Jacksonville airfield was named Towers Field in recognition of Towers exemplary service in developing naval aviation through World War I and World War II. The Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (IKECSG), with nearly 4,500 Sailors, deployed from Naval Station Norfolk and Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Feb. 21, to support operations in the U.S. Navys 5th and 6th Fleets. The aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), commanded by Capt. Marcus Hitchcock, along with German Frigate FGS Hamburg (F220), commanded by Commander Ralf Kuchler, departed from Naval Station Norfolk. The guided missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66), commanded by Capt. Dan Uhls, deployed from Naval Station Mayport. Eisenhower returned three months earlier than previously scheduled in order to resurface its flight deck prior to a planned redeployment. The IKECSG is redeploying to support carrier strike group presence require ments in the U.S. Navys 5th and 6th Fleet area of operations. Working with allied and partner maritime forces, the IKECSG Sailors will focus heavily on maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the Navys 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. This strike group is tested and always ready for the next mission, said Rear Adm. Michael Manazir, CSG 8 commander. Im proud of the versa tility and flexibility of every Sailor in this strike group. They have proven that we can meet all tasks set out for us by our fleet commanders. I look forward to once again playing a part in ensuring the security of international waterways and building partnerships around the world. For this deployment, IKECSG is comprised of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 8, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN69), embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7, embarked Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 28, German Frigate FGS Hamburg (F220) and USS Hue City (CG 66). Aircraft squadrons of CVW-7 include strike fighter squadrons VFA-143 Pukin Dogs, VFA-131 Wildcats, VFA83 Rampagers and VFA-103 Jolly Rogers, tactical electronics warfare squadron VAQ-140 Patriots, carrier airborne early warning squadron VAW121 Bluetails, Fleet Logistics Support Squadron VRC-40 Rawhides and helicopter anti-submarine squadron HS-5 Nightdippers. Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group deploys 22 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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Five Navy wives from P-3 squadrons at NAS Jax flew to Los Angeles recently to attend the Oscars, thanks to television personalities Kelly Ripa and Michael Strahan. The women Sarah Kribs, Amy Cook, Denise Steffensen, Allison Lyon and Tracy Vitali were selected as winners of the Girls Night Out: Oscar Edition giveaway on the tele vision morning show, Live with Kelly and Michael. All five are married to naval offi cers stationed here. Kribs, who wrote to the show on behalf of her friends, noted that between them they have 13 kids and have moved with the military 28 times. We are five hearts and 10 hands with one incredibly strong bond friendship, said Kribs. Our trip was an amazing, oncein-a-lifetime experience. The sur prises they had in store for us and the events we were a part of -were priceless. We created memories and strengthened friendships that will last a lifetime, said Vitali. She said, Our night out with Kelly Ripa started with a big surprise to be a part of the Jimmy Kimmel Live show. That was amazing! Then we had a wonderful dinner and great conversations with Kelly. She is very down to earth. She is a mother just like us. We all shared great stories. Vitali concluded, We also spent a relaxing day at the Exhale Spa and had a fabulous day of shop ping on Rodeo Drive. The Oscar Fan Experience was an exciting day by the Red Carpet. We all got some great pictures and saw our favorite stars up close. Navy wives win trip to Academy Awards Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to ser vice members and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2013: FFSC offers life skills workshops V I T A SELF -SERVICE 4 Feb -15 Apr 2013 M-WF 0830 -1600 (Walk-ins) TU -TH 1100 -1600 (Walk-ins) TU -TH 16001900 (by appointments only) LOCATION: NAS JAX RANGER ST BLDG 4, RM#108 (LEGAL BLDG) TAX ASSISTANCE CENTER 904542 8038 Volunteers are still welcomed! Contact center for more information. Active Duty & Dependents Retirees & Dependents, AGI < $57,000 Reservists -Activated 30 days+ Pre/de -mobilization Entitled Former Spouses JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013 23

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Are you thinking about borrowing money to buy a home or car? Do you need a line of credit to make home repairs? Have you applied for a new credit card? If your answer to any of these questions is yes, it is important to make sure information on your credit report is accurate and up to date. Even if you are not planning on borrowing money, your credit report has special importance if you are an active duty military member, DoD civilian employee or contractor who requires any level of security clearance. If you fall into any of these categories you must undergo a security clearance background investigation which is subject to periodic review. The investigation will identify any adverse infor mation contained in your credit report such as judgments; property repossession; or delinquencies on debts (90 days delinquent or more on current debts and/or 180 days delinquent or more on debts in the previous seven years). You should review your credit report before you submit any credit applications and well before your security clearance is up for renewal. Reviewing your credit report in advance will provide an opportunity to correct information. Since September 2012, the federal government, through the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, has been actively monitoring and conducting on-site investigations to assure that the credit reporting agencies are complying with the law. Previously, there was not much federal oversight. Now may be the best time to correct any inaccurate infor mation on your credit report. How do you go about correcting errors on your report? You need not hire a credit repair company! The first step is to obtain a credit report from each of the three major nationwide credit reporting agencies: Equifax, Experian, and Trans Union. Each maintain your personal information and individual credit history. Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), you are entitled to receive a free report from each credit reporting agency once a year. Since creditors are not required to submit information to all three of the agencies, your credit report from one agency will likely contain different information from the others. Initially, you should request a report from all three. Afterwards, you can stagger your request once every four months to take full advantage of the free report allowance (for example, you can request a report from Equifax in January, Experian in May, Trans Union in September and Equifax again the following January and so on). To obtain your free report, request it online through www.annualcreditreport.com ( a central website maintained by the three agencies), call 1-877-322-8228, or request it by mail by filling out the Annual Credit Report Request form and mailing it to Annual Credit Report Request Service, P.O. Box 105281, Atlanta, Ga. 30348-5281. Once you receive your reports, closely inspect your personal information and each entry. Although you can make corrections or submit a dispute online, it is recommended that you submit a dispute in a written letter to the credit reporting agency clearly explaining the dispute and requesting the inaccu rate information be removed, corrected or updated. It is in your best interest to also include supporting documentation. The following are the addresses for the three credit reporting agencies: 1550 Peachtree Street, NW Atlanta, GA 30309-2468 701 Experian Parkway Allen, TX 75013 555 West Adams St Chicago, IL 60661 After receiving your letter, the agency must initiate an investigation and notify the entity that provided them the information of your dispute with a copy of the information you provided. When notified, the entity must conduct its own investigation. Once complete, that enti ty must provide the credit reporting agency with a report of the outcome. If your dispute results in a change, the agency must provide you with the results along with a free copy of your cred it report. If your dispute is not resolved, you can place a statement of the dispute in your credit file. Taking the time to review your credit reports can save you from a headache down the road. If you would like help with this process, you can meet with an attorney at the Region Legal Service Office Southeast. Please visit us at http://www.jag.navy.mil/legal_services/ rlso/rlso_southeast.htm for more information or to find out the location of the legal assistance office closest to you. Customers know they can save money every day by shopping their Navy Exchange (NEX). In addition to the average 21 percent savings and no sales tax, customers can also save money by using manufacturers cents off coupons on their NEX purchases. Redeeming coupons provides our customers another way to save money when shopping at their NEX, said Richard Dow, Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) senior vice president store operations. Coupons are a great way to save even more when shopping for the necessities your family needs. In fiscal year 2012, NEXs accepted nearly 1.6 million manufacturers coupons that generated just over $2 million in additional savings to customers. NEXs accept current valid manufac turers coupons for the item featured on the coupon, subject to its terms and conditions. This includes on-line Internet coupons, except for those coupons offering free products, coupons for Proctor & Gamble (P&G) products or those determined to be fraudulent. The NEX does not double or triple the face value of a manufacturers coupon. The NEX accepts scratch-off, percent and cents-off coupons from the Army Air Force Exchange System (AAFES), the Marine Corps Exchange System (MCX) and the Coast Guard Exchange System (CGX). These can be percent and cents-off in-store coupons, coupons present ed in a coupon book, or printed from Facebook. All coupon terms and con ditions apply. The NEX also accepts a manufacturers coupon and NEX cou pon, or coupon from another Military Exchange Service, on the same item. The combination of the two coupons cannot exceed the price of the product; money is not returned to a customer on the redemption of coupon(s) which exceeds the price of the product. Only overseas NEXs accept expired coupons for up to six months past its expiration date. Correcting credit report errors Manufacturers coupons save NEX customers more 24 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2013 VP-62 COC BIRDS+ BUILD WEALTH Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com NAS Jacksonville security and fire department per sonnel conducted an anti-terrorism/force protection (AT/FP) evolution March 19-22, as the installation participated in the nationwide Exercise Citadel Shield 2013. NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders directed the three-day exercise that involved an aban doned boat on the base shoreline; a suspicious simu lated fire inside a P-8A aircraft; and a simulated shots fired scenario inside a mental health facility near Naval Hospital Jacksonville. Sanders explained, These real-world scenarios are part of the Citadel Shield exercise that annual ly tests our AT/FP response. Its a significant learn ing opportunity because it involves coordination of NAS Jax security and fire departments, along with Naval Hospital Jacksonville, Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 11, HS-11, NCIS, the FBI and the NAS Jax Emergency Operations Center. Citadel Shield is an annual exercise conducted at Security personnel welcome home IAMA3 Drew Risley and his Military Working Dog (MWD) Doly received a warm welcome home by base leadership and members of the NAS Security Department from their Individual Augmentee (IA) deployment Feb. 19 at Heritage Park. Risley and MWD Doly spent three weeks in September 2012 attending the Inter-Service Advance Skills K9 training at the Yuma Proving Grounds before being deployed to Afghanistan where they were assigned to the Forward Operating Base Fenty. It was an interesting tour working with the Army. But as the only Navy military work ing dog handler, I was basically on my own. It was nice to have my part ner Doly with me and to know that we would take care of each other, said Risley. I appreciate every one being here to welcome us back and Im very happy to be home. As the team arrived via police escort, NAS Jax Commanding Officer Capt. Bob Sanders congratu lated them on a job well done. I realize how difficult your tour has been and the enormous sacrifices youve made. Thank you for deploying on your own as an IA to serve your coun try and Im happy to welcome you and Doly home safe and sound, said Sanders. Risley and MWD Doly plan to resume their duties at NAS Jacksonville. VP-10 fights ice in MisawaWith winter weather beginning to lay siege on northern Japan, the Red Lancers of VP-10 are preparing themselves for the long months of operating in Misawas frigid climate. From the warm weather of their home station in Jacksonville, the Red The new Distinguished Warfare Medal will retain its place in the order of precedence among military decora tions, Pentagon Press Secretary George Little said Feb. 19. Much of the public discussion of the new medal has centered on its prece dence. It ranks below the Distinguished Flying Cross and above the Bronze Star. We are not diminishing at all the importance of the Bronze Star that remains an important award for our combat troops and will remain so, Little said in a meeting with reporters. Senior civilian and military lead ers decided on where to place the new medal in the order of precedence, he added. We expect this award to be granted pretty rarely, and that factored in to the decision [on its precedence], he said. Juliet Beyler, the Defense Departments acting director of officer and enlisted personnel management, said in an interview after the announcement of the new medal that technological developments on the battlefield have changed the way service members fight. The services all came forward and said there are people who are doing incredible things, and we wanted the ability to recognize them for those things, she said. Service members do not have to be physically present on the battlefield to contribute to success in combat. Unmanned aerial vehicle pilots and cyber specialists can be thousands of miles away from combat and make con tributions to victory. To be eligible to receive the award, a service member has to have direct, hands-on employment, such as an unmanned aerial vehicle operator dropping a bomb or a cyber specialist detecting and fending off a computer network attack. Combatant commanders must cer tify the impacts of the action before the award is forwarded to the service secre tary for approval. The secretaries may not delegate that authority. Officials stressed that the medal is meant to recognize actions with direct effects on combat. Other awards are available to rec ognize service over a length of time, officials added, noting that the Distinguished Warfare Medal is not an end-of-tour award. New medal to retain place in order of precedence Exercise Citadel Shield tests AT/FP proficiency

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2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Feb. 28 1844 Explosion of Peacemaker, an experimental 14-inch gun, on board USS Princeton. 1893 Launching of USS Indiana (BB-1), the Navys first true battleship. 1959 USS Strong rescues 13 Arab fishermen from Bahrain when their fishing boats floundered in a storm. 1971 In Vietnam, two carriers remained on station as strike sorties rose to an average of 122 per day, due to a 40 percent increase in enemy truck movements from the previous month, averaging more than 1,400 sorties a day. 1980 Blue crew of USS Francis Scott Key (SSBN657) launches four Trident I (C-4) missiles in first operational test. March 1 1942 U-656 is the first German submarine of World War II to be sunk by naval air (VP-82). 1954 First of six detonations, Operation Castle nuclear test. 1974 USS John F. Kennedy (CVA-67) commenced a yearlong overhaul at Norfolk Naval Shipyard to be converted to handle the new CV concept (an air wing capable of performing strike and ASW operations) and to operate the new F-14 Tomcat fighter as well as the S-3A Viking. March 2 1859 Launch of Saginaw at Mare Island, first Navy ship built on West Coast of U.S. 1867 Civil Engineer Corps established. 1899 Act of Congress creates the rank Admiral of the Navy for George Dewey. 1973 Women begin pilot training in U.S. Navy. 1976 Two VS-22 Lockheed S-3A Viking aircraft landed aboard USS Saratoga (CV-60) off the coast of Italy, completing the first Atlantic crossing by S-3A Vikings. The aircraft departed NAS Cecil Field, Fla., with stops at NAS Bermuda, NAS Lajes, Azores and NS Rota, Spain, before landing on Saratoga. March 3 1776 First amphibious landing operation. Continental naval squadron under Commodore Esek Hopkins lands Sailors and Marines, commanded by Captain Samuel Nicholas, on New Providence Island in the Bahamas, capturing urgently needed ordnance and gunpowder. 1871 Navy Medical Corps established. 1883 Congress authorizes four modern ships of steel: three cruisers, Atlanta, Boston and Chicago; and dispatch boat Dolphin. 1915 Office of Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) established. 1915 Congress creates Federal Naval Reserve Force. 1960 USS Sargo (SSN-583), the third Skate-class nuclear-powered attack submarine, returns to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii from arctic cruise of 11,000 miles (6,003 miles of it beneath the polar ice). March 4 1911 Appropriation of first funds for experiments in naval aviation. 1925 Congress authorizes restoration of USS Constitution. 1947 Operation High Jump, air operations in Antarctica, ends. 1963 Navy Hercules aircraft completes 12-day rescue operation of critically ill Danish seaman from Danish freighter off the coast of Antarctica. 1973 The withdrawal of U.S. troops from Vietnam resumed and the U.S. Navy minesweeping force returned to its position off Haiphong. In addition, USS America was ordered to depart the Far East for the U.S. the initial move in reducing the number of carriers serving in Southeast Asia from six to three by mid-June. March 5 1942 Name Seabees and insignia officially authorized. 1943 USS Bogue (CVE-9) begins first anti-subma rine operations by escort carrier. 1960 USS Newport News (CA-148) and personnel from Port Lyautey complete emergency relief oper ations at Agadir, Morocco after earthquake on 29 February. March 6 1822 USS Enterprise captures four pirate ships in Gulf of Mexico. 1862 USS Monitor departs New York City for Hampton Roads, Va. 1942 U.S. Cruisers and destroyers bombard Vila and Munda in the Solomon Islands, sinking two Japanese destroyers. Im writing this onboard Amtraks Acela express train, as we travel to see Dustin in New York City. Note: If you happened to be anywhere near us during this trip, I apologize. We boarded the train at Bostons South Station, where nobody in their right mind wanted to be seat ed next to us. It might have been our pile of bags, blankets, toys and Lindell, who was already wearing a monkey shaped neck pillow and carrying his green stuffed duck named Lindiddy. This made grab bing a four-person seating arrange ment with a table in the middle (prime real estate in train travel) easier. We were in serious travel mode, with travel versions of every board game known to man, and a big sup ply of coloring books and crayons. However, it quickly became apparent that we were surround ed by 9-to-5 business profession als traveling the northeast corridor for important meetings or exciting weekend plans. They wore suits and high heels. They carried sleek brief cases and messenger bags. They talked on their smartphones. And few of them made use of the lug gage bins at the front of the car or compartments overhead. They were traveling light. The boys and I were loaded down like pack mules, and we occupied our seats like we were moving in. Coloring books, electronics, board games, snacks and more stuffed animals spilled out of my bag. Lindell curled up with his blanket and monkey neck pillow. Ford and Owen fought over the snacks. Bodily functions were proudly announced and quickly shushed by me. The train hadnt even left the sta tion yet. Passengers who had just settled down beside us quietly moved away. Late boarders thought they had scored a whole car nearly empty and with seats free for the taking! Soon, these travelers smiled sheep ishly and pretended to see someone they knew in an adjacent car before slinking away. The boys and I stretched out in our space, a wide buffer surround ing us that no one in a suit dared to penetrate. We unpacked more goodies and games. Lindell said he felt sick to his stomach. As we traveled south, however, the train grew more crowded and unsuspecting travelers were forced to sit beside us. One young lady and her boyfriend with trendy black shoes slid into the seats across from us. If they didnt already have birth control, they were about to get it. We were like animals in a zoo for them. Im not sure the boyfriend, in particular, had ever seen so many primary colors and plastic toys. When the twinkling New York City skyline came into view outside our window, the kids gasped and pressed their faces against the win dow. This, of course, only encour aged more parallels with a zoo. The boys have never been to New York City. I think thats the Empire State Building, Owen said. No, it cant be, Ford said. The Empire State Building is bigger. No, thats it. I know it is. Ive seen it in the movie Elf. The man across from us smirked and looked away. I sighed. We had come so close to not mentioning Elf or SpongeBob Squarepants. Now we just looked silly. By 10 p.m., the boys had curled up in their seats as best they could and started to fall asleep. Lindell drooled on his monkey neck pil low, and Fords cheek was pressed against the glass. Games and halfeaten snacks littered the table. I tried to make eye contact with the man across from us. I wanted to smile knowingly, as if to say, Im sorry, and Theyre only kids. Its their first time on a train. Theyre a little excited. The man couldnt get out of his seat quicker when the conductor called his stop. He nearly ditched his girlfriend in order to not miss the chance to leave. I waved good bye to him as Lindell snored softly, mouth open and drooling, on my shoulder. For the rest of the trip, I alternated between feeling depressed about our current state of affairs I was that mom on public transporta tion and responsible for reducing the worlds potential birth rate. Then, at Grand Central Station, as the boys and I came through the gate with all our gear in tow, I spotted Dustin. He was smiling like he hadnt seen us in years. He ran to hug us. He grabbed the droolsoaked neck pillow without flinch ing. He reached out to hold grubby hands. And it was at that precise moment that an old cliche finally made sense to me: My three wide-eyed, sticky-mouthed and tired kids were a vision that perhaps only a mother and father could love. Hey, MoneyChic! I was out of town and got into a bit of a pickle, my car broke down! I wasnt able to come up with the money to repair my car myself so I took out a loan from one of those online places. The situation was a bit rushed and now I am having second thoughts about my actions. Did I do the right thing or was there a better way? MoneyChic Sez: Having something go wrong on a trip is definitely not a great situation to be in. Although secured the money to fix your car through an online lender, there is another way the problem could have been resolved. Even though you were not close to NAS Jacksonville, the nearest Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society (NMCRS) office, another military relief society office (Army, Air Force), or the Red Cross could assisted you if you qualified for a loan. Army Emergency Relief, Air Force Aid Society, NMCRS, and the Red Cross all work together when members of different branches are not able to reach their designated base for assistance. NMCRS can assist with many things you may not have thought of and car repair is one of them. Lets get back to online and predatory lending. Predatory lending can be defined as imposing unfair and abusive loan terms on borrowers. Most online lenders are predatory lenders. One of the many forms of predatory lending is a short-term loan with disproportionally high fees, such as payday loans or tax refund anticipa tion loans, where the fee paid for advancing the money for a short period of time works out to an annual interest rate significantly in excess of the market rate for high-risk loans. Payday loans are illegal to receive by military members in the state of Florida which has led many payday lenders to move online. Service members are targets of these quick and easy loans because of the steady job and consistent paychecks members of the military receive. Have you heard of Omni? Pioneer? Those are online companies. They are counting on the never-ending cycle of borrowing and repaying or just continuously borrowing to make their money. Some of these companies are not just online anymore. Omni is known for setting up offices near military installations. Did you read the fine print on the loan con tract? Do you know what interest rate you are being charged? Fortunately for you, the inter est rate must be capped at 36 percent thanks to legislation a few years ago. But unfortunately, the interest rate is probably 36 percent! If a com pany is online but has originated from an Indian Me and my boys: People repellant

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013 BASH collision prevention program shows resultsThe Department of Defense (DoD) reports at least 3,000 wildlife-related strikes annually involving mili tary aircraft from the Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps. Throughout the DoD, air operations, aviation safety, and natural resources personnel work together to reduce the risk of bird and wildlife strikes that cause an estimated $75 million in damage each year. Potentially dangerous collisions between birds and military aircraft in Northeast Florida are being reduced thanks to a team approach to wildlife management at Navy airfields that include NAS Jacksonville, Naval Station Mayport and Outlying Landing Field (OLF) Whitehouse. For many years, the DoD has worked to improve avia tion safety through a number of initiatives one of the most successful being the Bird Aircraft Strike Hazard (BASH) prevention program, said Winston Rogers, air field facilities deputy manager at NAS Jacksonville. Most recently, Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) entered into a national agreement with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to assist in safeguard ing shore-based air operations assets. USDA Wildlife Biologist Kevin McGrath and USDA Wildlife Technician Mike Trowell have been part of the NAS Jax BASH program since ------+early 2011. In the past year, USDA established the Wildlife Hazard Assessment (WHA) survey process. We completed nine surveys both day and night to measure the impact of birds and mammals on operations at naval aviation installations in northeast Florida, explained McGrath. The survey identifies all bird populations in an area especially those most likely to have a negative effect when mixed with aircraft. Common species in the airfields vicinity include the great blue heron, snowy egret, wood duck, killdeer, laugh ing gull, royal tern, least tern, mourning dove, red-bellied woodpecker, blue jay, fish crow, Carolina wren, mocking bird, starling, pine warbler, northern cardinal, eastern meadowlark, common grackle and house sparrow. When the WHA survey is completed for NAS Jax, our BASH working group (Airfield Management, Air Operations, squadron safety officers, and the NAS Jax Public Works Environmental Department) will have data on current wildlife populations, what habitat theyre using, and what recommendations will help safely man age threats to aviators, said McGrath. One such recommendation could be to apply skirting to certain sections of the perimeter fence to decrease the number of mammals (such as foxes, coyotes, raccoons and armadillos) foraging on the airfield. The BASH work ing group would then prioritize the project, estimate materials and labor, and acquire funding. Birds on the airfield change each quarter according to migration fluctuations. In most cases, bird strikes are best prevented by making the airfield unattractive to the most troublesome species. At NAS Jax, as with many airfields worldwide, gulls are the top BASH threat. When it rains, gulls are attracted to puddles on the runways and taxiways. Rainwater also drives insects up out of the grass which also attracts gulls. McGrath pointed out that each Navy airfield in north east Florida is unique according to its geography and natural resources. Obviously, the ocean and the Mayport jetties attract large marine species such as gulls, terns and pelicans. The NAS Jax shoreline with the St. Johns River attracts more inland species such as osprey, vul tures and blackbirds. And OLF Whitehouse presents a southeastern pinewood habitat that attracts blue jays, woodpeckers, hawks, cranes and turkeys. Rogers added, The Navys long-term goal is to do more than just scare birds away from the airfield by shooting pyrotechnics. Our USDA wildlife experts and natural resources staff understand the habitat and feeding prefer ences of each species as well as how to reduce environ mental factors that attract birds. McGrath said, Developing an integrated BASH pro gram requires cooperation and communication, because permanently eliminating birds from the airfield environ ment is impossible. Active communication between all players involved in daily airfield activities is vital to pro viding up-to-the-minute safety advisories to pilots.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013 5 BASH Role Players: Teamwork Is CrucialThe Navys driving force behind the program is the Commander, Navy Installations Command (CNIC) BASH Manual. Accountable for BASH program and local instruc tion. Air Ops executes. Integrates with squadrons and other aviation ten ants for training, reporting and collection. Lethal control of hazardous wildlife. Non-lethal dispersal of hazardous wildlife. Capture and relocate wildlife from airport bound aries. Ensure protected species are handled according to federal and state laws. Modification of habitats to discourage wildlife attractants. Update BASH requirements in the integrated Natural Resources Plan. Grass cutting, tree removal and brush control. Land use agreements with surrounding land own ers. Provides species identification for installation management. Provides data collection and analysis. Provides program assessment. Integrates with other federal agencies for BASH program. Photos by Clark Pierce and Kevin McGrath

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Patrol Squadron (VP) 62 held a change of command ceremony on board NAS Jacksonville, Feb. 23. Cmdr. Jon Townsend relieved Cmdr. Jerry Dearie as commanding officer. Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing (CPRW) 11 Capt. Eric Weise presided at the ceremony. Capt. T.D. Smyers (ret.), a former com manding officer of VP-62, and several other former skippers were in atten dance. Smyers, who commanded the squadron from July 2003 to July 2004, was guest speaker. Some of the best experiences of my life were spent as a Broadarrow, said Smyers. Since serving here, I cant help but be inspired by what the VP-62 citizen Sailors provide to our national defense and our national character. The sac rifice and quality of todays Reservist deserves the understanding and respect of Americans everywhere. Here in Jacksonville, Florida, I know its appre ciated. In his final address as command ing officer, Dearie said, Just a short 14 months ago I was sitting in the chair where the XO currently sits and think ing I had hit the lottery. I was not only getting to do what I love to do fly air planes, track submarines and shoot missiles but I was going to be the one who got to make all the decisions. Going to sleep that night I felt like a kid who got the keys to his dads Ferrari. Dearie spoke of the changes he had seen during the 11 years since he joined the squadron in 2002. As the Broadarrows prepare for an overseas deployment this summer, he said, My greatest regret is that I will not be there with you. XO you have the car keys now. Enjoy the ride. Its fast, its exciting and you will enjoy every min ute of it. With the words I relieve you, sir, Townsend became the 31st command ing officer of the VP-62 Broadarrows, one of two Reserve maritime patrol squadrons in the Navy. The squadron consists of 115 drilling Reservists and 110 active and full-time support person nel. Broadarrow Reservists travel from nine states to train for operational mis sions in support of national defense. Its exciting to have the opportunity to lead this squadron at a time when the concept of Active Reserve Integration is alive and well, said Townsend. In fiscally austere times, its critical that the call to duty come the way of the Reserve Component. VP-62 has been called to meet global force require ments during the fleet transition to the new P-8A Poseidon. We are ready for the call, and I am excited to be part of it as Commanding Officer. Under Dearies leadership, the squad ron celebrated its 33rd consecutive year of class A mishap-free flight opera tions surpassing 100,000 flight hours. VP-62 received the Chief of Naval Operations Naval Aviation Safety Award, known as the Safety S. Dearie guided the efforts of a rigorous new training plan by the Broadarrow Maintenance Team for 135 personnel, accounting for 14,764 maintenance man-hours and 5,656 maintenance actions. The plan led to full implemen tation of 41 maintenance programs, the qualification of 13 personnel to certify aircraft Safe-for-Flight, 22 Collateral Duty Inspectors, and 11 Quality Assurance Representatives. Ultimately, the new plan resulted in a superb Commander, Naval Air Forces Aviation Maintenance Inspection (AMI) during which AMI inspectors specifically gave out ten bravo zulus to maintenance personnel for their outstanding performance and VP-62 personnel achieved a spotless safety record. During Dearies tenure, VP-62 com pleted 40 missions and provided 232 hours of operational support for Joint Task Force USS Carl Vinson, Joint Task Force USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, Operations Caribshield, Pomeval and RIMPAC 2012.The Squadron demon strated excellent weapons employment capability, highlighted by the success ful deployment of an AGM-65 Maverick missile on target during RIMPAC 2012 exercises. VP-62 continuously provided 77 cur rent and qualified aircrewmen and a minimum of three Combat Aircrews trained and ready to conduct AntiSubmarine Warfare in support of major combat operations and overseas contin gency operations. Additionally, pilot proficiency con tinued to be a strength of the squadron, maintaining a 92 percent monthly pilot proficiency rate throughout the year. Townsend completed primary and intermediate flight training with Training Squadron Twenty-Seven (VT-27) in Corpus Christi, Texas and advanced flight training with Training Squadron Thirty-One (VT-31) at NAS Corpus Christi. He was awarded his pilot wings in October of 1997 and reported to the Fleet Replacement Squadron VP-30 at NAS Jacksonville. Townsend served tours with VP-10, VP-30, VP-62, and U.S. Southern Command prior to reporting back to the Broadarrows as executive officer. Cmdr. Ron Soroka assumed duty as the Broadarrows executive officer. VP-62 Broadarrows welcome new skipper 2013 Patient Guide all-access tool arrives Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville its hospital and branch health clinics is pleased to announce that the 2013 Patient Guide is now in-stock at all of its facilities and also available online at the command website at www.med.navy. mil/sites/navalhospitaljax The Guide is patients all-access tool, with current contact information for all clinical departments at the hospital and 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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reservation and are not governed by the same laws as other lenders. Western Sky is an online lender that does not have to cap the interest charged to borrowers. Now that you have the loan, here are a few things you need to be aware of so you arent being taken advantage of further. Make sure the monthly repay ment you were shown you would be paying is exactly that and be aware of the end date of the loan to make sure the payments end. As always, NMCRS is here to lend a helping hand. If you would like more information on how we can help, stop by the office outside the Yorktown Gate or call 542-2832. Have questions for Hey, Money Chic? Drop me an e-mail at megan.stolle@nmcrs.org MONEYCHIC The Pros Nest of VP-30 recently hosted Adm.William Gortney, com mander U.S. Fleet Forces Command and several members of his staff. During the visit, Gortney toured a P-8A Poseidon aircraft and associated training facilities at VP-30, focusing on daily operations during operational maritime patrol and reconnaissance squadron training of replacement pilots, naval flight officers, and naval aircrew men on the new P-8 Poseidon airframe. VP-30 accepted its first P-8 Poseidon in March 2012 to begin training on the new Boeing aircraft while concurrently maintaining fleet requirements as the P-3 Orion Fleet Replacement Squadron. Gortneys visit included a tour of VP-30s new electronic classroom, which provides a wide array of resourc es to provide computer-based training for officers and enlisted aircrewmen as well as maintainers. Instructor pilots and naval flight offi cers were also able to give him an inter active tour of the new, state-of-the-art, P-8 pilot and tactical crew trainers. The mission of U.S. Fleet Forces Command is to train, certify, and pro vide combat-ready Navy forces to com batant commanders. These forces must be capable of con ducting prompt, sustained naval, joint, and combined operations in support of U.S. national interests. VP-30s training of patrol plane pilots, flight officers, aircrewmen and main tainers is a key contributor to the effec tiveness of the maritime patrol and reconnaissance community as it fits under U.S. Fleet Forces Command in support of national interests and secu rity.VP-30 hosts Commander Fleet Forces Command GUIDE branch health clinics. This includes Medical Home Port care teams, urgent and emergency care, pharmacy and pharmacy home delivery, outpatient clinics, expecting and new parent services, inpatient care and surgery, military medi cine, TRICARE, and educational classes. To find out more, visit the command web site at www.med.navy.mil/sites/NavalHospitalJax like the Facebook page at www.facebook/ NavalHospitalJacksonville follow on Twitter at www. twitter.com/NHJax and view the YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/user/NavalHospitalJax Sign up for email updates at nhjaxconnect@med.navy.mil. Bicycle-pedestrian meetings slatedBicyclists and pedestrians residing in Clay, Duval, Nassau and St. Johns Counties have three oppor tunities to provide input for the North Florida Regional Bicycle Pedestrian Master Plan study con ducted by the North Florida Transportation Planning Organization. The open-house public meetings allow attendees to review and comment on the plans draft elements. The public meetings are from 4-8 p.m. at the follow ing locations: 110, 214 N. Hogan St. 75 King St. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013 7

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Satellite pharmacy closing for improvements March 2 Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles satellite pharmacy, located at the Navy Exchange (building 950), will close its lobby and drive-up early March 1 at 4 p.m. in order to upgrade its informa tion technology. On March 2, the satellite pharmacys lobby will be closed and the drive-up window (medication pick-up only) will be open 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. NH Jacksonvilles main (outpa tient) pharmacy will be open standard Saturday hours, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. To register for home delivery of chronic medications (including gener ics at no cost), go to www.tricare.mil/ homedelivery or ask a pharmacy staff member. For more information, call the phar macy at 542-7405. Nomads depart for EUCOM detAfter recently completing detached operations in Pacific Command and Central Command (CENTCOM), The VR-62 Nomads departed last week for a European Command (EUCOM) detach ment at NAS Sigonella, Italy. Consisting of 21 maintainers, aircrew and a C-130T packed with tools and per sonal gear, the detachment headed out for EUCOM. The detachment personnel consist of a mix of Selected Reservists and full-time support Sailors. Lt. Cmdr. Todd Nichols, the Nomad operations officer, said, We expect to be very busy consid ering the recent events taking place in AFRICOM, and we like being busy. The Nomads just returned from CENTCOM Jan. 28. We are truly nomadic this year said AWF1 Gregory Autrand, the squadrons operations LPO. VR-62 is one of five Navy Reserve C-130 squadrons serving the Navys global logistics needs. The squadron is home based at NAS Jacksonville. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013 9

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Lancers had to quickly adapt to the challenges of winter weather flying. Too much snow and ice on an aircrafts wings can render it unflyable. While airborne, spe cial heating systems on the P-3C Orion can melt ice that forms on the flight surfaces and propel lers. However, on the ground a team of qualified maintain ers and aircrew must manually remove the ice and snow, and take preventative steps to slow down further buildup on the air craft. VP-10s last two deployments were to the desert, so resident expertise on snow-removal and de-icing procedures is scarce. We received a lot of great tips and procedures from VP-1 and VP-8, the two previous squad rons operating out of Misawa, but understanding how to apply those procedures is dif ficult without seeing them first hand, said VP-10 Maintenance OfficerLt. Cmdr. David Neall. The Maintenance Department took the proper steps required to conduct these pro cedures in accordance with the NATOPS program, main tenance instruction manuals and Command Task Force 72 standards. To earn the neces sary de-icing qualifications, the Maintenance Department sent AE2 Jeremy Guthrie and AD2 Tommy Penavaldez to the Misawa Ground Support Equipment office where they learned how to use the de-icing truck and how to train others on the proper procedures. The pair then spent the next three weeks indoctrinating their co-workers on the proper procedures and techniques. At the same time, a team consisting of ADCS James Eggl, AWFC Marc Danchak, and AWF1 Brent Duvall began pre paring a squadron-wide demon stration to show the rest of the command the in-depth process involved in safely preparing the aircraft for freezing conditions. We had to get everyone involved with what it takes to properly de-ice and remove snow from the aircraft. Having them see and do the established procedures, rather than read ing about them better prepared the command for success, explained Eggl. The Red Lancers recent ly gathered in the hangar to observe AWF2 John Joseph Jr. strap into a harness and climb onto the aircraft, with two peo ple supporting him with ropes from below, to demonstrate the correct way to brush snow and ice off the aircraft. Afterwards, everyone headed to the flight line where Penaveldaz demon strated how the de-icing truck worked and how to properly spray the special anti-freeze solution from the truck onto the aircraft. We thought this would be a good way to visualize the pro cedure which will make these evolutions run more smoothly should we have to execute them during this deployment, said Neall. We have seen a lot of snow so far this deployment with more expected in the coming months, we wanted to make sure we are prepared to safely operate in these conditions. VP-10 10 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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CITADELall continental United States naval installations to enhance the training and readiness of navy secu rity forces and other first responders but was not a response to any specific threat. This exercise creates a learning environment for installation personnel to enhance functional plans and operational capabilities, Sanders added. Its vital that we learn how to adapt to unexpected situations. The more opportunities we have to train, the more proficient well become in dealing with AT/ FP events. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013 11

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Sailors from VQ-1, attached to Commander, Task Force (CTF) 47 and assigned to the U.S. Forward Operating Location (USFOL) Curacao in the Netherlands Antilles took time from their busy schedule recently to participate in a community relations (COMREL) project at the Parke Tropikal Zoo. Upon arrival, zoo employees escorted the group to a limited access behindthe-scenes area. The Sailors, anxious to see what animals they would encoun ter, were instead greeted by a large steel shipping container near a field covered in construction debris, garbage and compost. With a limited collection of hedge clippers, rakes, shovels and an axe at the groups disposal, the Sailors got to work. I like to do volunteer work because it gets me out of the military mindset [and] I feel the locals really appreciate our work, said AM3 Victor Hernandez. Over the course of three hours, the group cleared out all of the garbage and construction material, removed most compost, and chopped down a couple of trees and bushes. The zoos admin istrators were all smiles as they served water to the parched sailors. Regarding the speed and efficiency put towards the project, CPO Nathan Wells stated that COMRELs are a great team-build ing exercise. The Sailors were proud of the chang es brought to the field that will soon become a picnic area. Its regrettable and unfortunate that the field fell into such deplorable condi tion, said Lt. Jonathon Montes. But Im happy to participate in a dynamic and engaging sequence of events. Rewarded with the smiles of zoo employees and access to the zoo, the Sailors of CTF-47 got a chance to walk around and enjoy the park. Zoo Director Bert Isenia expressed his gratitude and asked them to come back for other projects. The clean up was also featured in the local newspa per. The Parke Tropikal Zoo, which is free to the public, houses exotic animals and a botanical garden. USFOL Curaao operates 24/7 enabling joint, interagency and multinational aircraft operations that con duct detection, monitoring and track ing missions in support of regional counter-drug efforts. It was established as a result of a multi-lateral agree ment between the Kingdom of the Netherlands and the United States whereby aircraft and crews deploy to the USFOL on a temporary basis to con duct counter-drug operations. Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southeast Base Support Vehicles and Equipment (BSVE) Product Line declared success Feb. 5 working with General Services Administration (GSA) in a joint venture to streamline the short-term rental pro cess for Navy heavy equipment in the Southeast. Public Works Departments, along with other government agencies, now has access to various types of heavyduty civil engineering support equip ment (CESE) on a short term basis (up to 365 days) through the GSA Heavy Equipment Short Term Rental (STR) Program. Types of equipment in the program include, but are not limited to bulldozers, back-hoes, generators, load ers, and man-lifts. This new tool will definitely help the Navy and will lead to significant cost reductions in operations by allowing us to reduce our pool of equipment, said Jeff Killian, NAVFAC Southeast Public Works business line coordinator. Emergencies come up in our business and this will provide a means to quickly resolve equipment needs. This acquisition strategy is now avail able by the implementation of a GSA negotiated, multi-vendor/multi region product delivery contract. Historically we have on occasion rented heavy equipment, but the pro cess and payment was somewhat diffi cult to enable full time usage, said Ryan Costa, NAVFAC Southeast transporta tion specialist. With this program the process is web based and we make pay ment through our already established GSA billing cycle. In 2010, the BSVE team reached out to GSA to collaborate a new initiative to reduce underutilized equipment. The team was aware of the already resound ing success of the GSA STR program for light duty vehicles and wanted to look at what could be done for the CESE pro gram. The new contract provides a means for competitive and low cost equipment rentals from multiple vendors, said Costa. Utilizing this program will pro vide multiple cost saving benefits to the Navy and other agencies throughout the Government. With more equipment available on an interim basis through this program, the Navy can look at reducing the inventory of heavy equipment that it owns. Reductions of agency owned assets will dramatically reduce ownership and operational costs such as maintenance, labor and procurement cost, said Costa. The GSA Heavy Equipment STR program will help us meet our strategic goal of reducing our direct and indirect costs. The savings will be realized through not having to procure equipment and also bear the cost of maintenance. As the various sites throughout the south east start utilizing the new program, they will review existing equipment inventories to determine at what point in time the inventory can be purged based on the new rental data. We need to continue to think outside the box and manufacture business strat egies like this to mitigate costs always being mindful of the taxpayers dollars. The new program allows flexibility during contingency events by lessening the need for contingency contracting and enabling access to available equip ment on a National scale. NAVFAC Southeast was the exclusive government agency during the pro grams Pilot inception period during the middle of fiscal year 2012 and had realization of programmatic success shortly after. The accessibility of this program is currently available at all stateside locations within the Navys Southeast region, said Costa. BSVE continues to partner with GSA during this evolution and looks forward to the success of the program as GSA plans to phase the programs availability to all government agencies this year.Navy, GSA streamline heavy equipment rental programCleaning up the Curacao zoo 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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Defense Department officials have designated Feb. 25Mar. 1 as Military Saves Week to highlight the need for military families to reduce debt and save for the future, something Pentagon officials emphasize is key to force readiness. The event is part of the year long Military Saves campaign, an opportunity for leaders to stress the importance of good financial habits to all members of the force and their families to encourage saving, reducing debt and building wealth, offi cials said. Military Saves is an ongoing campaign in partnership with America Saves to really hone in on the habits for good sav ings for our military members, Barbara Thompson, director of the Pentagons office of fam ily policy and children and youth, told American Forces Press Service and the Pentagon Channel. The personal finances of mil itary families are important to the Defense Department, she said, because money problems can affect force readiness. When service members and their families can focus on the mission because theyre not worried about their financial situation, we have a much bet ter prepared force, she added. Financial health also is key to force readiness because accumulating debt can jeopar dize a service members secu rity clearance. DOD officials have found that junior enlisted service members and their families are more vulnerable to financial problems than other members of the force. Data obtained through surveys and supplied by Thompsons office suggests an increase last year among those who experienced one or more problems in paying bills, despite an overall drop in those who said they were not com fortable with their financial situation. Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, has encouraged each mil itary branch to sponsor finan cial awareness events, with a particular focus on young peo ple, including children of ser vice members. In a memo to the chiefs of the military services and senior enlisted advisors, Dempsey emphasized that by learning good financial habits early in life, our children will strength en their financial fitness for the future. Thompson said many services are available to members of the military who seek financial advice. Each of the services has contracted with people who have an expertise in financial readiness, she said. In addition to taking advan tage of counseling available on military bases and taking part in upcoming financial aware ness events, Thompson said, military families have other opportunities to learn more about personal finance. For example, she said, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authoritys Investor Education Foundation has a website http://SaveAndInvest.org that includes a financial man agement readiness program designed for service members. Thompson also recommend ed visiting http://www.mili tarysaves.org for more infor mation about Military Saves and to read about success sto ries related by people who have used the program to achieve their financial goals. All four active services met or exceeded their target recruiting numbers for the first three months of fiscal 2013, Pentagon officials report ed Feb. 15. Here are the specific numbers by service so far for the fiscal year, which began Oct. 1: goal of 12,250; of 7,782; of its goal of 6,058; and goal of 6,516. The Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps exhib ited strong retention numbers for the third month of fiscal 2013, officials said. While the Navy exhibited strong retention numbers in the mid-career and career catego ries, the Navys achievement of 86 percent in the initial category is a result of the transition from a downsizing to a stabilizing posture. Meanwhile, five of the six reserve components met or exceeded their fiscal 2013 recruiting goals for the first three months of the fiscal year. The Army Reserve finished December 572 short of its goal. Here are the numbers: percent of its goal of 12,015; of its goal of 7,022; of its goal of 1,281; percent of its goal of 2,163; percent of its goal of 2,170; and cent of its goal of 1,872. All reserve components have met their fiscalyear-to-date attrition goals. Officials said that although they expect this trend will continue, attrition numbers for December are not yet available. Military Saves Week highlights personal finance issues Recruiting continued to be robust through December JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013 13

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NAS Jax marks Black History milestonesDozens of Sailors and DoD personnel celebrated Black History Month with a luncheon Feb. 20 at the NAS Jax Flight Line Caf. This year, we celebrate the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation and the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, explained BMC Maurice Mabry, of the NAS Jax Multi-Cultural Awareness Committee. The Emancipation Proclamation included the acceptance of black men into the Union Army and Navy. By the end of the war, almost 200,000 black Soldiers and Sailors had fought for the Union and freedom. The march marked a key moment in the growing struggle for civil rights in the United States, and culminated with the I Have a Dream speech deliv ered by Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. to 200,000 Americans gathered along the mall of Washington, D.C., said Mabry. Master of Ceremonies AT1 Dominic Sapien welcomed the attendees and introduced Valoria Volasgis of Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), who sang the national anthem a capel la. Chaplain (Lt. j.g.) Paul Rodgers deliv ered the invocation and benediction. In his opening remarks, NAS Jax Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/ SW) Brad Shepherd told the audience that as a youth in Akron, Ohio, he was raised in a neighborhood where every body was equal equally poor that is. Going to school, the color of your skin didnt really matter. When youre at the Goodwill store and you find a used pair of Chuck Taylor Converse high tops youre living the dream of all your classmates whether theyre black, brown or white, said Shepherd. Few people in our diverse Navy know that African-Americans have fought in every conflict, beginning with the Revolutionary War. In World War II, the elite Tuskegee Airmen were pioneers in equality and integra tion earning 95 Distinguished Flying Crosses. These are justsome of the peo ple who paved the way for all of us to live better lives, no matter where youre from or what your background is. Guest speaker Lt. Clement Smith of FRCSE Avionics Division, said, Im very honored to speak here today. The Emancipation Proclamation and the March on Washington were iconic events for African-Americans. Today, Americas fight for civil rights has pro duced a military force that is one of the most diverse organizations in the world. When Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, it instilled a sense of pride and belonging in black people along with the belief that they can make a difference for themselves and their descendents, said Smith. Frederick Douglass, a former slave and social reformer, proclaimed that the war against the Union was really the war against slavery. By the end of the Civil War, more than 200,000 black soldiers and sailors had fought for their newfound freedom. In 1963, America once again stood at a crossroad. The U.S. Supreme Court had outlawed racial segregation in pub lic schools. Other forms of discrimina tion had also resulted in second-class citizenship for blacks. My parents were part of that tough struggle for integra tion and I value their contribution because they believed that one day their children and their childrens children would live in a more open and equal social, political and economic environ ment, said Smith. In 1964, the U.S. Congress passed the landmark civil rights act that forbade discrimination on the basis of race, sex or religion in hiring, promoting and fir ing. The act also created the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to implement the law. JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013 15

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The captains cup is awarded annual ly to the command that has demonstrat ed the highest level of participation and achievement in the NAS Jacksonville Captains Cup Athletics Program during a calendar year. There are 26 captains cup team and individual sporting events. The pro gram is for active duty; selective reserv ists; DoD and DoD contractor personnel representing activities attached to NAS Jacksonville. There are two types of events: team and individual sports. Commands may enter as many teams or individuals in the events. For the team sports, com mands receive 30 entry points for each team completing the respective sport season. Additional points for team sports are awarded for: league cham pion 20; league runner-up 10; playoff champion 30; playoff runner-up 20; and playoff third place 10. Commands lose 15 captains cup points for every no show forfeiture. For the individual sports, commands receive five entry points for each com mand participant entered in an individ ual event up to a maximum of 30 points. Additional points for individual sports are awarded for: first place 20; second place 15; and third place 10. Events run throughout the year and the trophy is awarded to the command with the most points accumulated after all the events have been completed. Congratulations to Naval Hospital Jax for winning the 2012 Captains Cup tro phy. For more information on the pro gram, e-mail Bill Bonser at bill.bonser@ navy.mil Naval Hospital Jax wins NAS Jax Captains Cup 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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All F-35 Lightning II aircraft have been grounded as a precaution after a routine engine inspection revealed a crack on an engine blade, Defense Department officials said Feb. 22. Officials call this a cautionary sus pension of flight. The Air Force, Navy and Marine Corps fly F-35s. Inspectors found the crack in an F135 engine installed in an F-35A Lightning II aircraft at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. This is the conventional take-off and landing version of the joint strike fighter. Officials are shipping the engine and its associated hardware to Pratt & Whitneys engine facility in Middletown, Conn., to conduct more thorough evaluation and root cause analysis. Officials said the grounding is precau tionary. All F-35 flight operations have been suspended until the investigation is complete, officials said, and it is too early to know the fleetwide impact. The F-35 Joint Program Office is working closely with Pratt & Whitney and Lockheed Martin at all F-35 loca tions to ensure the integrity of the engine, and to return the fleet safely to flight as soon as possible, a Defense Department news release said. F-35s grounded as precaution after crack found in engine blade JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013 17

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DeweysCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Free Entertainment at 7 p.m. March 1 Sho-Nuff March 8 Pierce In Harmony March 15 Jason Lamar March 22 All About Me March 29 Ace Winn April 5 KaraokeFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special 410 p.m. All you can bowl for $5.95 Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling 6 p.m. (family themed) $8 per person 8 p.m. midnight $10 per per son Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day 126 p.m., $1.50 games Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information, contact Melissa at 542-3518/4238 Check-out our new fitness schedule! New classes include Muscle Max, Extreme Bootcamp and Max Core Pick-up the latest copy at the fitness center Leprechaun Dash 5K March 15 at 11:30 a.m. Pre-register by March 8I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. ITT Travel Fair March 16, 9 :30 a.m. 1 p.m. NEX Courtyard Win prizes! Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts Dark Side Of The Moon (Pink Floyd) April 13 at 7:30 p.m. Section A $33; Section B $28; Section C $23 A Lamb Chop Celebration April 20 at 7:30 p.m. Section A $18; Section B $14; Section C $11 Legoland Kids go free with an adult ticket purchase from ITT Funkfest Metropolitan Park May 10-11 2-day ticket $52 Gatornationals March 15,16,17, 2013 Fri Reserved from $35 $39 Sat & Sun Reserved from $50 $54 Fri General Seating from $28 $32 Sat & Sun General Seating from $38 $42 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3 Tickets are valid for redemp tion through June 7, 2013 Blockout Dates: March 23 April 5, 2013 Call for pricing Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT $19.25 adult, $12.50 child, $54.25 zipline 201213 Live Broadway Series Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Dream Girls May 21 New Disney World Orlando Armed Forces Salute 4 day hop per $153.25 Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31 and must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about special discounted tickets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park Gold pass $71The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 542-1335 for information. Paintball Trip GTF in Yulee March 2 at 9 a.m. Downtown Art Walk Trip March 6 at 6 p.m. Kayaking Trip Simpson Creek March 16 at 9 a.m.NAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 542-2936 Military Appreciation Days $18 per person, includes cart & green fees March 12 & 26 for active duty March 14 & 28 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily! Play 18-holes with cart for only $16 after 12:30 p.m. every day! Monday & Tuesday Play 18-holes for $20 Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holi days. Twilight Golf League Tuesday at 5 p.m. March 26 Aug. 27 $20 per person per week Mulberry Cove Marina Call 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recre ation are available!Family Fitness Center hours are Monday Friday, 9 a.m. 1 p.m.Bring your child to work out with you! Call 778-9772 for more infor mation. Free Easter Egg Hunt March 27 at 7 p.m. McCaffrey Softball Fields Open to children up to age 12Flying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School March 18 April 24 $500 per person 18 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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Hundreds of spouses attended the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Hiring Our Heroes Military Spouse Business Alliance Career Forum Feb. 21 at the NAS Jax Officers Club. On March 28, 2011, the National Chamber Foundation and Capital One announced Hiring 500,000 Heroes, a campaign to secure commitments from businesses throughout America to hire 500,000 veterans and military spouses by the end of 2014. In January 2012, Hiring Our Heroes launched the Military Spouse Business Alliance. The alliance improves the lives of working military spouses through a series of initiatives, including mentor ing, entrepreneurial activities, and 20 hiring fairs specifically geared toward military spouses in 2012. Deputy Director of Hiring Our Heroes Military Spouse Employment Program U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation Noreen ONeil explained, Military spouses have a 26 percent unemploy ment rate. Their challenges are very different from a veteran. They are gen erally under employed and underpaid mostly because of the gaps in their resumes. They also tend to take jobs beneath their skill level just to keep from hav ing gaps in their resume. Military spouses volunteer at a rate three times the national average generally doing tasks that are translatable to corporate speak, she added. This is important for spouses to include on their resumes. Hiring a mili tary spouse isnt charity its good for business, continued ONeil. The career forum offered a full day of networking and educational sessions for military spouses and veterans. For more info, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy.mil NAS Jax hosts career forum JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013 19

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Oakleaf Club of Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville member Molly Croft has been appointed, by NH Jacksonville Commanding Officer Capt. Gayle Shaffer, as command ombudsman. Since being introduced into the Navy in 1970, the Ombudsman Program has ensured that issues and con cerns of Navy families are addressed. It is a command operated program intended to improve communication between the command and a Sailors family members. The position is considered an official Navy volunteer, which means that it must be filled by someone with a desire to serve others. They also need to be very structured as they are required to disseminate information throughout the chain of command. They pro vide important information to help families obtain valuable resources during their loved ones careers. Ombudsmen are considered the go to people for guidance. NH Jacksonvilles command ing officer trusts Croft will do a great job linking together com mand families and command leadership. The Navy ombudsman plays a critical role supporting our Navy familiessomething especially important for our families with deployed spous es, says Shaffer. I have utter confidence Ms. Croft will do an outstanding job guiding our families in the right direction through various challenges they may face timeto-time, serving as their advo cate and helping them navigate available resources. Oakleaf Club of Naval Hospital Jacksonville President Nichol Lee concurs with Shaffer. Lee says Croft brings to the position a great amount of experience and enthusiasm. We are very excited to have Ms. Croft on board as the com mand ombudsman, says Lee. We look forward to collaborat ing with her on future endeav ors to benefit the families of our amazing Naval Hospital Jacksonville heroes. Croft found her calling to serve as an ombudsman while her husband, Lt. Cmdr. Coby Croft, was stationed at Naval Station Rota, Spain. In 2004, her husband was deployed after a tsunami occurred in Indonesia. This left Croft, a mother of three, with many apprehensions and questions about who she could turn to without her spouse being there to help. That feel ing of helplessness and anxi ety inspired her to aid others by becoming the command ombudsman until their reloca tion to NH Jacksonville in 2012. My husband has deployed four times, and my children have been various ages and stages during each deploy ment, recalls Croft. The levels of support that we needed changed from one to another. Croft enjoys helping fami lies on a personal level. And she feels NH Jacksonville is uniquely positioned with its high level of Individual Augmentee (IA) deployments, with up to eight percent of its active duty staff deployed around the globe providing combat, humanitarian and disaster care. It can be very lonely and iso lating with individual deploy ments, says Croft. Helping a family find resources and pro viding them with the support they need is very satisfying because Ive been that spouse, and Ive walked in those shoes. Along with empowering fam ily members with resources they need to help themselves, the ombudsman is also avail able to help resolve conflicts that may arise between the command and family members from a confidential, nonbiased viewpoint. The ombudsman helps develop fair solutions to complex and difficult prob lems. When Croft became an ombudsman, she took an oath to uphold strict confidentiality. I take very seriously the confi dence given to me by the fami lies who contact me, assures Croft. Ive been trained through the Fleet and Family Support Center and continue monthly trainings, maintaining updat ed resources to best serve the families of the command. Contact the command ombudsman at nhjaxombuds man@gmail.com or call 5087610. Naval Hospital Jacksonville welcomes new ombudsman March 1 is the deadline for mem bers of the service who meet the statutory qualifications to apply for the Deployed Servicemember Property Tax Exemption for the 2013 tax year as well as other exemptions. The Deployed Servicemember Property Tax Exemption is avail able for 2013 to members of the service who receive a homestead exemption and who were deployed outside the continental United States, Alaska or Hawaii during the preceding calendar year (2012) in support of designated operations. Though the operations have not been officially designated for the 2013 exemption, applicants are encouraged to file before the March 1 deadline and they will be notified if they do not qualify. Applications are available in the Duval County Property Appraisers Office at 231 East Forsyth Street, Suite 260 or at www.duvalpa.com. Those applying for the 2013 exemp tion must also supply deployment orders or other proofs of the quali fying deployment(s) that include dates of the deployment(s) and that clearly identify the supported operation(s) and the days during which the service member was out side the continental United States, Alaska or Hawaii. The amount of the exemption is based on the number of days deployed in the previous calendar year. Applicants who miss the March 1 deadline, may file late up to the 25th day following the mailing of theNotices of Proposed Property Taxes inmid-August.Applications will not be acceptedafter this deadline.Servicemembers whose deployment spansover two or more calendar years must apply each year.This exemption is not automatically renewed, and appli cants must have a homestead exemption on their property to qualify. For forms or more information, visit www.duvalpa.com or call the Customer Service/Exemptions Division at 630-2020. Deadline approaching for 2013 Deployed Military Exemption, other Property Tax Exemptions 20 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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The Wings Over America Scholarship Foundation (WOASF) is hosting a golf tournament at NAS Jax April 26 at 9 a.m. to benefit scholarships for Navy depen dents. The event is open to the public. Registration begins at 7:30 a.m. All proceeds benefit the Wings Over America Scholarship Foundation, a 501(c)3 non-profit foundation. The WOASF annually sponsors more than 40 scholarships, ranging from $2,000 to $10,000, to students who have chosen to continue their education. Scholarship recipients are selected on the basis of scholastic merit, communi ty service and extracurricular activities. The foundations mission is to pro vide college scholarships to dependent children and spouses of naval aviation commands, officer and enlisted, active duty, retired, honorably discharged or deceased. The foundation has awarded more than $635,000 to students since 1987. For more information or to register, visit www.wingsoveramerica.us or call 757-671-3200, ext. 2. WOASF golf tourney set for April 26 Easter Egg HuntCall 778-9772 for more informationWednesday, March 27 McCaffrey Softball Complex FREE!Staggered egg hunt Start times: 7:00 pm Ages 0 3 7:10 pm Ages 4 6 7:20 pm Ages 7 9 7:30 pm Ages 10 12 facebook.com/nasjaxmwr JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013 21

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Naval aviation pioneer Lt. John Towers in CubaThese 1913 photos show Navy Curtiss flying boats at Fishermans Point on Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Lt. John Towers, a graduate of the Curtiss Flying School in 1911, arrived Jan. 10, 1913, and took command of the new aviation camp. Four large tents served as hangars for Curtiss A-2 and C-1 flying boats. On March 6, 1913, Towers was ordered to prepare an air search for a hostile fleet approaching the Cuban coast. This flight became the first tactical maneuver involving naval aircraft. Towers spotted approaching destroyers without himself being detected. Because his radio malfunctioned, Towers landed beside the flagship and notified the admiral that a hostile force was approaching. From the aviation camp, Towers and his fellow Navy pilots explored the potential of their planes to serve Navy aerial reconnaissance, bombing, photography and radio communications needs. In the ocean waters off Cuba they were able to spot submarines at depths of up to 40 feet. Towers was officially designated as Naval Aviator No. 3 in 1915. Hes also credited with the development of the naval aviator badge, which was designed in 1917. In 1960, the NAS Jacksonville airfield was named Towers Field in recognition of Towers exemplary service in developing naval aviation through World War I and World War II. The Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group (IKECSG), with nearly 4,500 Sailors, deployed from Naval Station Norfolk and Naval Station Mayport, Fla., Feb. 21, to support operations in the U.S. Navys 5th and 6th Fleets. The aircraft carrier USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69), commanded by Capt. Marcus Hitchcock, along with German Frigate FGS Hamburg (F220), commanded by Commander Ralf Kuchler, departed from Naval Station Norfolk. The guided missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66), commanded by Capt. Dan Uhls, deployed from Naval Station Mayport. Eisenhower returned three months earlier than previously scheduled in order to resurface its flight deck prior to a planned redeployment. The IKECSG is redeploying to support carrier strike group presence require ments in the U.S. Navys 5th and 6th Fleet area of operations. Working with allied and partner maritime forces, the IKECSG Sailors will focus heavily on maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the Navys 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. This strike group is tested and always ready for the next mission, said Rear Adm. Michael Manazir, CSG 8 commander. Im proud of the versa tility and flexibility of every Sailor in this strike group. They have proven that we can meet all tasks set out for us by our fleet commanders. I look forward to once again playing a part in ensuring the security of international waterways and building partnerships around the world. For this deployment, IKECSG is com prised of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 8, USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN69), embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 7, embarked Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 28, German Frigate FGS Hamburg (F220) and USS Hue City (CG 66). Aircraft squadrons of CVW-7 include strike fighter squadrons VFA-143 Pukin Dogs, VFA-131 Wildcats, VFA83 Rampagers and VFA-103 Jolly Rogers, tactical electronics warfare squadron VAQ-140 Patriots, carrier airborne early warning squadron VAW121 Bluetails, Fleet Logistics Support Squadron VRC-40 Rawhides and heli copter anti-submarine squadron HS-5 Nightdippers. Eisenhower Carrier Strike Group deploys 22 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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Five Navy wives from P-3 squad rons at NAS Jax flew to Los Angeles recently to attend the Oscars, thanks to television personalities Kelly Ripa and Michael Strahan. The women Sarah Kribs, Amy Cook, Denise Steffensen, Allison Lyon and Tracy Vitali were select ed as winners of the Girls Night Out: Oscar Edition giveaway on the tele vision morning show, Live with Kelly and Michael. All five are married to naval offi cers stationed here. Kribs, who wrote to the show on behalf of her friends, noted that between them they have 13 kids and have moved with the military 28 times. We are five hearts and 10 hands with one incredibly strong bond friendship, said Kribs. Our trip was an amazing, oncein-a-lifetime experience. The sur prises they had in store for us and the events we were a part of -were priceless. We created memories and strengthened friendships that will last a lifetime, said Vitali. She said, Our night out with Kelly Ripa started with a big surprise to be a part of the Jimmy Kimmel Live show. That was amazing! Then we had a wonderful dinner and great conversations with Kelly. She is very down to earth. She is a mother just like us. We all shared great stories. Vitali concluded, We also spent a relaxing day at the Exhale Spa and had a fabulous day of shop ping on Rodeo Drive. The Oscar Fan Experience was an exciting day by the Red Carpet. We all got some great pictures and saw our favorite stars up close. Navy wives win trip to Academy Awards Your NAS Jacksonville Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) Life Skills Education and Support Program is the foremost preventive measure for growth in personal and family issues. All FFSC workshops and classes are free to ser vice members and their families. Preregistration is required at 542-5745. If special accommodations or handicapped access is required, please notify FFSC upon registration. The following is the schedule for 2013: FFSC offers life skills workshops V I T A SELF SERVICE 4 Feb 15 Apr 2013 MW F 0830 1600 (Walk ins) TU TH 1100 1600 (Walk ins) TU TH 1600 1900 (by appointments only) LOCATION: NAS JAX RANGER ST BLDG 4, RM#108 (LEGAL BLDG) TAX ASSISTANCE CENTER 904542 8038 Volunteers are still welcomed! Contact center for more information. Active Duty & Dependents Retirees & Dependents, AGI < $57,000 Reservists Activated 30 days+ Pre/de mobilization Entitled Former Spouses JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013 23

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Are you thinking about borrowing money to buy a home or car? Do you need a line of credit to make home repairs? Have you applied for a new credit card? If your answer to any of these questions is yes, it is important to make sure information on your credit report is accurate and up to date. Even if you are not planning on borrowing money, your credit report has special importance if you are an active duty military member, DoD civilian employee or contractor who requires any level of security clearance. If you fall into any of these categories you must undergo a security clearance background investigation which is subject to periodic review. The investigation will identify any adverse infor mation contained in your credit report such as judg ments; property repossession; or delinquencies on debts (90 days delinquent or more on current debts and/or 180 days delinquent or more on debts in the previous seven years). You should review your credit report before you submit any credit applications and well before your security clearance is up for renewal. Reviewing your credit report in advance will provide an opportunity to correct information. Since September 2012, the fed eral government, through the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, has been actively monitoring and conducting on-site investigations to assure that the credit reporting agencies are complying with the law. Previously, there was not much federal oversight. Now may be the best time to correct any inaccurate infor mation on your credit report. How do you go about correcting errors on your report? You need not hire a credit repair company! The first step is to obtain a credit report from each of the three major nationwide credit reporting agencies: Equifax, Experian, and Trans Union. Each maintain your personal information and individual credit his tory. Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), you are entitled to receive a free report from each credit reporting agency once a year. Since creditors are not required to submit information to all three of the agencies, your credit report from one agency will likely contain different information from the others. Initially, you should request a report from all three. Afterwards, you can stagger your request once every four months to take full advantage of the free report allowance (for example, you can request a report from Equifax in January, Experian in May, Trans Union in September and Equifax again the following January and so on). To obtain your free report, request it online through www.annualcreditreport.com ( a cen tral website maintained by the three agencies), call 1-877-322-8228, or request it by mail by filling out the Annual Credit Report Request form and mailing it to Annual Credit Report Request Service, P.O. Box 105281, Atlanta, Ga. 30348-5281. Once you receive your reports, closely inspect your personal information and each entry. Although you can make corrections or submit a dispute online, it is recommended that you submit a dispute in a written letter to the credit reporting agency clearly explaining the dispute and requesting the inaccu rate information be removed, corrected or updated. It is in your best interest to also include supporting documentation. The following are the addresses for the three credit reporting agencies: 1550 Peachtree Street, NW Atlanta, GA 30309-2468 701 Experian Parkway Allen, TX 75013 555 West Adams St Chicago, IL 60661 After receiving your letter, the agency must initiate an investigation and notify the entity that provided them the information of your dispute with a copy of the information you provided. When notified, the entity must conduct its own investigation. Once complete, that enti ty must provide the credit reporting agency with a report of the outcome. If your dispute results in a change, the agency must provide you with the results along with a free copy of your cred it report. If your dispute is not resolved, you can place a statement of the dispute in your credit file. Taking the time to review your credit reports can save you from a headache down the road. If you would like help with this process, you can meet with an attorney at the Region Legal Service Office Southeast. Please visit us at http://www.jag.navy.mil/legal_services/ rlso/rlso_southeast.htm for more information or to find out the location of the legal assistance office clos est to you. Customers know they can save money every day by shopping their Navy Exchange (NEX). In addition to the average 21 percent savings and no sales tax, customers can also save money by using manufacturers cents off coupons on their NEX purchases. Redeeming coupons provides our customers another way to save money when shopping at their NEX, said Richard Dow, Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM) senior vice presi dent store operations. Coupons are a great way to save even more when shopping for the necessities your family needs. In fiscal year 2012, NEXs accepted nearly 1.6 million manufacturers cou pons that generated just over $2 million in additional savings to customers. NEXs accept current valid manufac turers coupons for the item featured on the coupon, subject to its terms and conditions. This includes on-line Internet coupons, except for those cou pons offering free products, coupons for Proctor & Gamble (P&G) products or those determined to be fraudulent. The NEX does not double or triple the face value of a manufacturers coupon. The NEX accepts scratch-off, percent and cents-off coupons from the Army Air Force Exchange System (AAFES), the Marine Corps Exchange System (MCX) and the Coast Guard Exchange System (CGX). These can be percent and cents-off in-store coupons, coupons present ed in a coupon book, or printed from Facebook. All coupon terms and con ditions apply. The NEX also accepts a manufacturers coupon and NEX cou pon, or coupon from another Military Exchange Service, on the same item. The combination of the two coupons cannot exceed the price of the product; money is not returned to a customer on the redemption of coupon(s) which exceeds the price of the product. Only overseas NEXs accept expired coupons for up to six months past its expiration date. Correcting credit report errors Manufacturers coupons save NEX customers more 24 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 28, 2013

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