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Jax air news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028307/02012
 Material Information
Title: Jax air news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: s.n.
s.n.
Place of Publication: United States Naval Air Station Jacksonville Fla
Publication Date: 02-21-2013
Frequency: weekly
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Air bases -- Newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Jacksonville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Duval County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Duval -- Jacksonville -- Jacksonville Naval Air Station
Coordinates: 30.235833 x -81.680556 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
General Note: Publisher: Holt Pub. Co., <1971-1979>; ADD Inc., <1993>.
General Note: Description based on: Vol. 10, no. 24 (Sept. 18, 1952).
Funding: Funded in part by the University of Florida, the Library Services and Technology Assistance granting program of Florida, the State Library and Archives of Florida, and other institutions and individuals.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000579555
oclc - 33313438
notis - ADA7401
lccn - sn 95047201
System ID: UF00028307:02030

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2013 MILITARY SAVE S BOATHOUSE HIGHEST HONOR Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) (AW/NAC) Mike Stevens completed a three-day trip to NAS Jacksonville and Naval Base Guantanamo Bay Cuba Feb. 15. MCPON participated in CPO 365 events, toured base facilities, took the opportunity to discuss the focus areas of his Zeroing in on Excellence initia tive, and answered questions about new uniforms, budget cuts, family readiness group, the Perform to Serve program, and deployments during base-wide all hands calls. CPO 365, a yearlong development and training for first class petty officers, was first introduced in 2010 under former MCPON Rick West. It includes two phas es, the first of which begins in September each year. Under MCPON Stevens revised program, detailed in his 2012-2013 CPO 365 Guidance, all first class petty officers will participate through the duration of Phase One, whether they are board-eligible or not. CPO 365 is so important for the future develop ment of our first class petty officers. I believe that if youre going to lead the future force of our Navy that you must be armed with the best opportunities to suc ceed, said Stevens. CPO 365 is designed to develop leaders through a combination of mentorship, practical experience and training. Representatives from NAS Jacksonville, Navy Region Southeast, NS Mayport and Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) joined City of Jacksonville and state offi cials in signing the Northeast Florida Environmental Compliance Partnering Team Charter Feb. 12 at Jacksonville City Hall. The Navy is a part of the Jacksonville community and the Northeast Florida Environmental Compliance Partnering Team is a prime example of our ongoing cooperation on items of mutual inter est, said Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. We continue to maintain a proactive partnership with environmental regu latory agencies to identify and imple ment innovative solutions with the goals of enhancing environmental com pliance, promoting natural resources management and protecting public health. The Northeast Florida Environmental Compliance Partnering Team shows that we are stronger when we work together on behalf of our water ways, our land, the air we breathe and the future of our city, added Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown. Im proud to carry on this tradi tion of partnership for our city and I thank the Navy, Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) and all the stakeholders for their continued support. The team was established in 2002 to ensure Navy and regulatory agen cies achieve environmental compli ance by identifying and implementing innovative solutions to promote natu ral resources management and protect public health. According to NAS Jax Environmental Director Kevin Gartland, who briefed the team before the charter signing, the partnership has exceeded all expec tations to provide more efficient and effective protection of Jacksonvilles air and water resources. Gartland shared some of the major accomplishments of the partnership The VR-62 Nomads returned recently from Navy Central Command (NAVCENTCOM) after a very successful 10-week detachment. While in NAVCENT, theNomads flew 39 missions in detached operations with one C-130T Hercules aircraft and a crew of 22 maintainers and aircrew. These personnel are madeup of Selected Reserve and Full Time Support Sailors. The Nomads flew high priority mis sions supporting Combined Task Force 53 (CTF53) by providing fast and flexibletransport inthe shortfused high stress environment of the NAVCENTCOM area of responsibility (AOR). During the detachment, the VR-62 team delivered more than 1.3 million pounds of high priority cargo. VR-62 has two basic missions while in NAVCENTCOM Production mis sions to meet the logistics needs of the battle group and special one off type contingency missions to meet the everchanging needs of the AOR on a go now basis. We love both missions, said AWFCS Mike Wendelin. Production missions are great for training a new cadre of loadmasters and flight engineers, and the go now mis sions are just a great source of satisfac tion that the Nomads can accomplish any request anytime. During this period, VR-62 had the privilege of transporting CTF53 Commanding Officer Capt. Glen Leverette and a group of Seabees to Afghanistan, as well as picking up lastminute logistics requests for operations and exercises. Our purpose is to provide the most flexible, responsive and effective air logistics capability to the worlds most powerful Navy.I am really proud of the work we are doing in NAVCENT and around the world, stated VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Tony Scarpino. VR-62 is one of five Navy Reserve C-130T squadrons serving the Navys global logistics needs. The Nomads are home based at NAS Jacksonville. Command Master Chief welcomes MCPON StevensNAS Jacksonville Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd welcomed Stevens with a full itinerary on Feb. 13. MCPON Stevens played an integral part in developing the CPO 365 roll-out that took place in 2010 under MCPON Rick West. He had heard how well the program was being implemented here at NAS Jax and wanted to visit our base to see for himself so we began before dawn with our 4mile run. Shepherd said that MCPON also discussed mentoring approaches for todays Sailorization process and the importance of developing junior Sailors into well-rounded service members. At various stops on his base tour, junior and senior Sailors alike where concerned about the budgetary effects of sequestration. Stevens deferred budget issues to his boss, CNO Adm. Jonathan Greenert, but said that everyone will likely see changes in operational, training and maintenance budgets. As the Navys third-largest shore installation, Stevens and Shepherd were able to spend time at a number of NAS Jacksonville tenant commands, including VP-16, VP-26, Air Operations, Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jacksonville and the Surface Rescue Swimmers School. During his meetings held at Deweys All Hands Club, Stevens took a variety of questions from concerned officers, senior enlisted leaders, as well as E6 and below. Shepherd said that Stevens also assured Sailors that advancement opportunities would stay the same through Perform to Serve an endstrength, force-management tool that uses perfor mance criteria within individual ratings to ensure long-term sustainment of skills and experience throughout the Navy.MCPON visits NAS Jax Navy renews environmental partnership with state, local agencies VR-62 detachment returns

PAGE 2

JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Feb. 21 1944 Marines with support of naval bombardment and carrier aircraft secure Eniwetok atoll. 1945 USSBismark Sea (CVE-95) is struck by a kamikaze off Iwo Jima and sinks in 90 minutes with loss of 318 men. USSSaratoga (CV-3) struck by five kamikazes, but survives with loss of 123 men. Bismark Sea was the last carrier lost in World War II combat. Feb. 22 1865 Rear Adm. Porters gunboats bombard Wilmington, N.C., forcing its surrender. 1870 After arriving on USS Nipsic, and supported by USS Guard and USS Nyack, the Darien Expedition, com manded by Cmdr. Thomas Selfridge Jr., begins active operations ashore at Caldonia Bay to survey the Isthmus of Darien, Panama, for an inter-ocean ship canal. 1909 Great White Fleet returns to Hampton Roads, Va. from around the world cruise. 1943 USS Iowa (BB-61), the lead ship of the last class of American fast battle ships, is commissioned. 1974 Lt. j.g. Barbara Ann Allen becomes first Navy designated female aviator. Feb. 23 1795 U.S. Navy Office of Purveyor of Supplies is established. This is the Navy Supply Corps birthday. 1919 Launching of Osmond Ingram (DD-255), first Navy ship named for an enlisted man. 1944 Carrier groups under Adm. Raymond Spruance attack Saipan, Tinian and Rota in the Marianas. 1945 Marines and a Navy hospital corpsman raise the American flag on Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima. Feb. 24 1813 USS Hornet, under command of Capt. James Lawrence, captures HMS Peacock. 1968 Task Force Clearwater estab lished in I Corps Feb. 25 1861 Saratoga, member of U.S. African Squadron, captures slaver sloop Express. 1933 Commissioning of USS Ranger (CV-4), the Navys first ship designed and built from the keel up as an air craft carrier. Of the eight pre-war U.S. aircraft carriers (CV-1 through CV-8), Ranger was one of only three to survive World War II. 1959 USS Galveston (CLG-3) fires first Talos surface-to-air missile Feb. 26 1811 Congress authorizes first naval hospital. 1913 Approval of experimental wind tunnel for Navy. 1944 Sue Sophia Dauser, super intendent of the Navy Nurse Corps is first woman in Navy to attain rank of Captain. Feb. 27 1942 Battle of the Java Sea, allied naval force attacks Japanese invasion convoy. 1973 First airborne mine sweep in a live minefield took place in Haiphong Harbor, Vietnam ship channel by heli copters from HM-12 embarked on USS New Orleans (LPH 11). Readers were surprised to learn last week that after Dustins yearlong deployment, the military assigned him else where, and together as a family, we decided that the boys and I will stay behind. We will main tain an apartment in one city, a house in the other, and com mute on weekends. Some readers questioned our decision: Why would anyone with young children voluntarily live apart from them? Thats a great way to end up divorced. Others reported feeling empowered by our choices: Good for you for finding a way to follow both of your dreams. Real love doesnt know time or distance. These conflicting reactions reinforce my original mes sage: my peer group is a transi tional generation, sandwiched between our parents, many of whom wouldnt have consid ered anything except keeping the family together, and a new crop of young adults who think following a husband is horribly outdated. Last week, I made the point that the military, by way of its inability to keep up with cul tural fluctuations, creates situ ations where couples have to compromise and live creatively. But the bottom line is that the compromise my husband and I have made is more a symp tom of changing familial roles than it is a reflection of the mil itarys long history of frequent moves. If whats considered a womans role and whats con sidered a mans role hadnt changed, the militarys moveevery-two-years system would not be a problem. Which means that other, civilian marriages are going through their own evolu tion, too. Who comes home to make dinner? Who takes off work when the kids are sick? Perhaps, even, civilian couples have faced the possibility of liv ing temporarily in separate cit ies for the sake of a career. The idea of couples being separated by distance is noth ing newDustins grandmoth er didnt see her husband for many years during World War IIbut the notion that fathers have to be intimately involved in their childrens day-to-day lives is. Remember the 1950s dad who came home from work, patted his kids on the head and then settled into his chair with the newspaper? In our own situation, Dustin and I have taken all that we know about relationships and distance, changing gender roles and expectations, and weve tried to fashion something new and meaningful for our fam ily until we can all be under the same roof again. Here are some of my favorite findings so far. There are many different ways to be absent. I cant stress this enough. Having a spouse physically present is nice, but having a spouse emotionally present is even better. There are plenty of couples who co-exist. Weve all seen them. Maybe weve even been that couple at times, but we usually dont want to be. Yet, if we place physical together ness as the ultimate goal, coexisting can sometimes be a very real and unfulfilling out come. The same applies to parents. Being physically present does not necessarily guarantee that a father is mentally and emo tionally present as well. Being presenttruly presentwheth er through the miles or not, takes commitment and effort. Quality time is more impor tant than quantity of time. Considering last years deployment, by the time Dustin is done with his current tour of duty, we will have had very little time together. Love does not allow Out of sight, out of mind. When things get tough, Dustin reminds me, if the only thing holding our marriage together is being physically in each others presence, then we have bigger problems. Hes right. Love and commitment doesnt stop when he walks out the door. Absence really does build appreciation. Its easy to put things off. Its even easier to forget what you have. But when you say good bye to your husband every Sunday, you cant help but wake up Monday morning thinking of all the things you miss about him. So you spend long hours on the phone together, just talking. And you realize, if he was on the opposite couch, you proba bly would have watched televi sion together in silence instead. And all of the sudden, you feel like you are falling in love with your husband all over again.Hey, Money Chic! I have been looking for a job for months! Jacksonville seems like the hardest place to find employment. Do you have any tips to help me find a job? Money Chic Sez: Of course I do! In fact, there is a Military Spouse Hiring Fair and Career Forum today from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the NAS Jax Officers Club. According to the flier circu lating our office, the Military Spouse Business Alliance is bringing a one-of-a-kind hir ing fair for spouses of active duty, guard, reserves, and retired veterans. This fair will feature: employers looking for and committed to hiring military spouses, presentations to help spouses plan a career in a highly mobile environment, and resume editing on site. There are also many resources on base that may assist you in your job search. The Morale, Welfare and Recreation office has a list of jobs available in Building 1 and on their NAS Jacksonville MWR Facebook page. For more information, call 5423111. The Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) would also be a great place to go. FFSC is able to help with spic ing up your resume, prepar ing you for job interviews, and may be able to put you in con tact with companies interest ed in hiring military spouses. Call 1-866-293-2776 to sched ule an appointment. If you are looking for a gov ernment job, go to usajobs. gov. This website is updated frequently with new positions on base. WorkSource would also be a great resource. They have an office just outside the main gate in Building 13.Their web site states that WorkSource opens the door for employ ment through education, training, and career services. To contact them, call 356JOBS. Worksourcefl.com is their website. Its a tough job market out there. When you find the per fect new job, let me know. We can sit down and work through a new budget to see how your paychecks will impact your financial future. As always, Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society is here to lend a helping hand. If you would like more information, stop by the office outside the Yorktown Gate or call 5422832. Have questions for Hey, Money Chic? Drop me an e-mail at megan.stolle@ nmcrs.org Things to learn from living apart Hiring our Heroes Military Spouse Job Fair will be held today, Feb. 21 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m at the NAS Jax Officers Club. This hiring fair and career forum is open to spouses of active duty, Guard, Reserves, veterans and retirees. 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 21, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Feb. 21 1944 Marines with support of naval bombardment and carrier aircraft secure Eniwetok atoll. 1945 USSBismark Sea (CVE-95) is struck by a kamikaze off Iwo Jima and sinks in 90 minutes with loss of 318 men. USSSaratoga (CV-3) struck by five kamikazes, but survives with loss of 123 men. Bismark Sea was the last carrier lost in World War II combat. Feb. 22 1865 Rear Adm. Porters gunboats bombard Wilmington, N.C., forcing its surrender. 1870 After arriving on USS Nipsic, and supported by USS Guard and USS Nyack, the Darien Expedition, com manded by Cmdr. Thomas Selfridge Jr., begins active operations ashore at Caldonia Bay to survey the Isthmus of Darien, Panama, for an inter-ocean ship canal. 1909 Great White Fleet returns to Hampton Roads, Va. from around the world cruise. 1943 USS Iowa (BB-61), the lead ship of the last class of American fast battle ships, is commissioned. 1974 Lt. j.g. Barbara Ann Allen becomes first Navy designated female aviator. Feb. 23 1795 U.S. Navy Office of Purveyor of Supplies is established. This is the Navy Supply Corps birthday. 1919 Launching of Osmond Ingram (DD-255), first Navy ship named for an enlisted man. 1944 Carrier groups under Adm. Raymond Spruance attack Saipan, Tinian and Rota in the Marianas. 1945 Marines and a Navy hospital corpsman raise the American flag on Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima. Feb. 24 1813 USS Hornet, under command of Capt. James Lawrence, captures HMS Peacock. 1968 Task Force Clearwater estab lished in I Corps Feb. 25 1861 Saratoga, member of U.S. African Squadron, captures slaver sloop Express. 1933 Commissioning of USS Ranger (CV-4), the Navys first ship designed and built from the keel up as an air craft carrier. Of the eight pre-war U.S. aircraft carriers (CV-1 through CV-8), Ranger was one of only three to survive World War II. 1959 USS Galveston (CLG-3) fires first Talos surface-to-air missile Feb. 26 1811 Congress authorizes first naval hospital. 1913 Approval of experimental wind tunnel for Navy. 1944 Sue Sophia Dauser, super intendent of the Navy Nurse Corps is first woman in Navy to attain rank of Captain. Feb. 27 1942 Battle of the Java Sea, allied naval force attacks Japanese invasion convoy. 1973 First airborne mine sweep in a live minefield took place in Haiphong Harbor, Vietnam ship channel by heli copters from HM-12 embarked on USS New Orleans (LPH 11).Readers were surprised to learn last week that after Dustins yearlong deployment, the military assigned him else where, and together as a family, we decided that the boys and I will stay behind. We will main tain an apartment in one city, a house in the other, and com mute on weekends. Some readers questioned our decision: Why would anyone with young children voluntarily live apart from them? Thats a great way to end up divorced. Others reported feeling empowered by our choices: Good for you for finding a way to follow both of your dreams. Real love doesnt know time or distance. These conflicting reactions reinforce my original mes sage: my peer group is a transi tional generation, sandwiched between our parents, many of whom wouldnt have consid ered anything except keeping the family together, and a new crop of young adults who think following a husband is horribly outdated. Last week, I made the point that the military, by way of its inability to keep up with cul tural fluctuations, creates situ ations where couples have to compromise and live creatively. But the bottom line is that the compromise my husband and I have made is more a symp tom of changing familial roles than it is a reflection of the mil itarys long history of frequent moves. If whats considered a womans role and whats con sidered a mans role hadnt changed, the militarys moveevery-two-years system would not be a problem. Which means that other, civilian marriages are going through their own evolu tion, too. Who comes home to make dinner? Who takes off work when the kids are sick? Perhaps, even, civilian couples have faced the possibility of liv ing temporarily in separate cit ies for the sake of a career. The idea of couples being separated by distance is noth ing newDustins grandmoth er didnt see her husband for many years during World War IIbut the notion that fathers have to be intimately involved in their childrens day-to-day lives is. Remember the 1950s dad who came home from work, patted his kids on the head and then settled into his chair with the newspaper? In our own situation, Dustin and I have taken all that we know about relationships and distance, changing gender roles and expectations, and weve tried to fashion something new and meaningful for our fam ily until we can all be under the same roof again. Here are some of my favorite findings so far. There are many different ways to be absent. I cant stress this enough. Having a spouse physically present is nice, but having a spouse emotionally present is even better. There are plenty of couples who co-exist. Weve all seen them. Maybe weve even been that couple at times, but we usually dont want to be. Yet, if we place physical together ness as the ultimate goal, coexisting can sometimes be a very real and unfulfilling out come. The same applies to parents. Being physically present does not necessarily guarantee that a father is mentally and emo tionally present as well. Being presenttruly presentwheth er through the miles or not, takes commitment and effort. Quality time is more impor tant than quantity of time. Considering last years deployment, by the time Dustin is done with his current tour of duty, we will have had very little time together. Love does not allow Out of sight, out of mind. When things get tough, Dustin reminds me, if the only thing holding our marriage together is being physically in each others presence, then we have bigger problems. Hes right. Love and commitment doesnt stop when he walks out the door. Absence really does build appreciation. Its easy to put things off. Its even easier to forget what you have. But when you say good bye to your husband every Sunday, you cant help but wake up Monday morning thinking of all the things you miss about him. So you spend long hours on the phone together, just talking. And you realize, if he was on the opposite couch, you proba bly would have watched televi sion together in silence instead. And all of the sudden, you feel like you are falling in love with your husband all over again.Hey, Money Chic! I have been looking for a job for months! Jacksonville seems like the hardest place to find employment. Do you have any tips to help me find a job? Money Chic Sez: Of course I do! In fact, there is a Military Spouse Hiring Fair and Career Forum today from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the NAS Jax Officers Club. According to the flier circu lating our office, the Military Spouse Business Alliance is bringing a one-of-a-kind hir ing fair for spouses of active duty, guard, reserves, and retired veterans. This fair will feature: employers looking for and committed to hiring military spouses, presentations to help spouses plan a career in a highly mobile environment, and resume editing on site. There are also many resources on base that may assist you in your job search. The Morale, Welfare and Recreation office has a list of jobs available in Building 1 and on their NAS Jacksonville MWR Facebook page. For more information, call 5423111. The Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) would also be a great place to go. FFSC is able to help with spic ing up your resume, prepar ing you for job interviews, and may be able to put you in con tact with companies interest ed in hiring military spouses. Call 1-866-293-2776 to sched ule an appointment. If you are looking for a gov ernment job, go to usajobs. gov. This website is updated frequently with new positions on base. WorkSource would also be a great resource. They have an office just outside the main gate in Building 13.Their web site states that WorkSource opens the door for employ ment through education, training, and career services. To contact them, call 356JOBS. Worksourcefl.com is their website. Its a tough job market out there. When you find the per fect new job, let me know. We can sit down and work through a new budget to see how your paychecks will impact your financial future. As always, Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society is here to lend a helping hand. If you would like more information, stop by the office outside the Yorktown Gate or call 5422832. Have questions for Hey, Money Chic? Drop me an e-mail at megan.stolle@ nmcrs.org Things to learn from living apart Hiring our Heroes Military Spouse Job Fair will be held today, Feb. 21 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m at the NAS Jax Officers Club. This hiring fair and career forum is open to spouses of active duty, Guard, Reserves, veterans and retirees. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Feb. 21 1944 Marines with support of naval bombardment and carrier aircraft secure Eniwetok atoll. 1945 USSBismark Sea (CVE-95) is struck by a kamikaze off Iwo Jima and sinks in 90 minutes with loss of 318 men. USSSaratoga (CV-3) struck by five kamikazes, but survives with loss of 123 men. Bismark Sea was the last carrier lost in World War II combat. Feb. 22 1865 Rear Adm. Porters gunboats bombard Wilmington, N.C., forcing its surrender. 1870 After arriving on USS Nipsic, and supported by USS Guard and USS Nyack, the Darien Expedition, com manded by Cmdr. Thomas Selfridge Jr., begins active operations ashore at Caldonia Bay to survey the Isthmus of Darien, Panama, for an inter-ocean ship canal. 1909 Great White Fleet returns to Hampton Roads, Va. from around the world cruise. 1943 USS Iowa (BB-61), the lead ship of the last class of American fast battle ships, is commissioned. 1974 Lt. j.g. Barbara Ann Allen becomes first Navy designated female aviator. Feb. 23 1795 U.S. Navy Office of Purveyor of Supplies is established. This is the Navy Supply Corps birthday. 1919 Launching of Osmond Ingram (DD-255), first Navy ship named for an enlisted man. 1944 Carrier groups under Adm. Raymond Spruance attack Saipan, Tinian and Rota in the Marianas. 1945 Marines and a Navy hospital corpsman raise the American flag on Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima. Feb. 24 1813 USS Hornet, under command of Capt. James Lawrence, captures HMS Peacock. 1968 Task Force Clearwater estab lished in I Corps Feb. 25 1861 Saratoga, member of U.S. African Squadron, captures slaver sloop Express. 1933 Commissioning of USS Ranger (CV-4), the Navys first ship designed and built from the keel up as an air craft carrier. Of the eight pre-war U.S. aircraft carriers (CV-1 through CV-8), Ranger was one of only three to survive World War II. 1959 USS Galveston (CLG-3) fires first Talos surface-to-air missile Feb. 26 1811 Congress authorizes first naval hospital. 1913 Approval of experimental wind tunnel for Navy. 1944 Sue Sophia Dauser, super intendent of the Navy Nurse Corps is first woman in Navy to attain rank of Captain. Feb. 27 1942 Battle of the Java Sea, allied naval force attacks Japanese invasion convoy. 1973 First airborne mine sweep in a live minefield took place in Haiphong Harbor, Vietnam ship channel by heli copters from HM-12 embarked on USS New Orleans (LPH 11).Readers were surprised to learn last week that after Dustins yearlong deployment, the military assigned him else where, and together as a family, we decided that the boys and I will stay behind. We will main tain an apartment in one city, a house in the other, and com mute on weekends. Some readers questioned our decision: Why would anyone with young children voluntarily live apart from them? Thats a great way to end up divorced. Others reported feeling empowered by our choices: Good for you for finding a way to follow both of your dreams. Real love doesnt know time or distance. These conflicting reactions reinforce my original mes sage: my peer group is a transi tional generation, sandwiched between our parents, many of whom wouldnt have consid ered anything except keeping the family together, and a new crop of young adults who think following a husband is horribly outdated. Last week, I made the point that the military, by way of its inability to keep up with cul tural fluctuations, creates situ ations where couples have to compromise and live creatively. But the bottom line is that the compromise my husband and I have made is more a symp tom of changing familial roles than it is a reflection of the mil itarys long history of frequent moves. If whats considered a womans role and whats con sidered a mans role hadnt changed, the militarys moveevery-two-years system would not be a problem. Which means that other, civilian marriages are going through their own evolu tion, too. Who comes home to make dinner? Who takes off work when the kids are sick? Perhaps, even, civilian couples have faced the possibility of liv ing temporarily in separate cit ies for the sake of a career. The idea of couples being separated by distance is noth ing newDustins grandmoth er didnt see her husband for many years during World War IIbut the notion that fathers have to be intimately involved in their childrens day-to-day lives is. Remember the 1950s dad who came home from work, patted his kids on the head and then settled into his chair with the newspaper? In our own situation, Dustin and I have taken all that we know about relationships and distance, changing gender roles and expectations, and weve tried to fashion something new and meaningful for our fam ily until we can all be under the same roof again. Here are some of my favorite findings so far. There are many different ways to be absent. I cant stress this enough. Having a spouse physically present is nice, but having a spouse emotionally present is even better. There are plenty of couples who co-exist. Weve all seen them. Maybe weve even been that couple at times, but we usually dont want to be. Yet, if we place physical together ness as the ultimate goal, coexisting can sometimes be a very real and unfulfilling out come. The same applies to parents. Being physically present does not necessarily guarantee that a father is mentally and emo tionally present as well. Being presenttruly presentwheth er through the miles or not, takes commitment and effort. Quality time is more impor tant than quantity of time. Considering last years deployment, by the time Dustin is done with his current tour of duty, we will have had very little time together. Love does not allow Out of sight, out of mind. When things get tough, Dustin reminds me, if the only thing holding our marriage together is being physically in each others presence, then we have bigger problems. Hes right. Love and commitment doesnt stop when he walks out the door. Absence really does build appreciation. Its easy to put things off. Its even easier to forget what you have. But when you say good bye to your husband every Sunday, you cant help but wake up Monday morning thinking of all the things you miss about him. So you spend long hours on the phone together, just talking. And you realize, if he was on the opposite couch, you proba bly would have watched televi sion together in silence instead. And all of the sudden, you feel like you are falling in love with your husband all over again.Hey, Money Chic! I have been looking for a job for months! Jacksonville seems like the hardest place to find employment. Do you have any tips to help me find a job? Money Chic Sez: Of course I do! In fact, there is a Military Spouse Hiring Fair and Career Forum today from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the NAS Jax Officers Club. According to the flier circu lating our office, the Military Spouse Business Alliance is bringing a one-of-a-kind hir ing fair for spouses of active duty, guard, reserves, and retired veterans. This fair will feature: employers looking for and committed to hiring military spouses, presentations to help spouses plan a career in a highly mobile environment, and resume editing on site. There are also many resources on base that may assist you in your job search. The Morale, Welfare and Recreation office has a list of jobs available in Building 1 and on their NAS Jacksonville MWR Facebook page. For more information, call 5423111. The Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) would also be a great place to go. FFSC is able to help with spic ing up your resume, prepar ing you for job interviews, and may be able to put you in con tact with companies interest ed in hiring military spouses. Call 1-866-293-2776 to sched ule an appointment. If you are looking for a gov ernment job, go to usajobs. gov. This website is updated frequently with new positions on base. WorkSource would also be a great resource. They have an office just outside the main gate in Building 13.Their web site states that WorkSource opens the door for employ ment through education, training, and career services. To contact them, call 356JOBS. Worksourcefl.com is their website. Its a tough job market out there. When you find the per fect new job, let me know. We can sit down and work through a new budget to see how your paychecks will impact your financial future. As always, Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society is here to lend a helping hand. If you would like more information, stop by the office outside the Yorktown Gate or call 5422832. Have questions for Hey, Money Chic? Drop me an e-mail at megan.stolle@ nmcrs.org Things to learn from living apart Hiring our Heroes Military Spouse Job Fair will be held today, Feb. 21 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m at the NAS Jax Officers Club. This hiring fair and career forum is open to spouses of active duty, Guard, Reserves, veterans and retirees.

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The NAS Jacksonville Military Saves kickoff is Feb. 25 at 8 a.m. at Deweys All Hands Club. Military Saves is a free program. Organizations participate in Military Saves because they want to help ser vicemembers and their families build wealth not debt. Military Saves is part of the Department of Defenses Financial Readiness Campaign and has been a partner with DoD since 2003. Military Saves is a social marketing campaign to persuade, motivate, and encourage military families to save money every month, and to convince leaders and organizations to be aggres sive in promoting automatic savings. Military Saves is a part of America Saves, the larger nation-wide campaign for all Americans. Savers who take the Military Saves Pledge can opt to receive a monthly e-newsletter from Military Saves, as well as a quarterly e-newsletter from America Saves. Workshops continue Feb. 26 28 at the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jacksonville (Building 858), from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Blue Room. Military Saves is a year-round cam paign and provides savings-themed resource packets available to organiza tions throughout the year. Next week is Military Saves Week Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. signed a proc lamation in support of Military Saves Week at Navy Region Southeast (NRSE) headquarters Feb. 13. Military Saves Week runs from Feb. 25 through March 2 and is intended to encourage service members to make responsible financial decisions to build wealth and reduce debt. The proclamation officially recog nizes the week and calls on all service members throughout the Southeast Region to take action to improve their individual and household financial sit uations. Personal financial stability is vital to our mission readiness, Scorby said. If our war fighters and their families are experiencing financial problems, it makes it very difficult to focus on the mission. These difficulties are largely preventable with the proper planning. Our efforts with Military Saves Week encourages everyone to assess their financial situation and honestly ask themselves if they can be doing more to improve it. Military Saves is a social marketing campaign to persuade, motivate and encourage military families to save money every month and to convince leaders to be aggressive in promoting automatic savings. It is a part of the Department of Defenses (DoD) Financial Readiness Campaign and has been a partner with DoD since 2003. This has been a successful campaign for 10 years, said Carol Lucius, NRSE Family Readiness Program work and family life coordinator. If a sailor can identify a goal, whethIf a sailor can identify a goal, wheth er it is to set up an emergency cash fund, get out of debt, make a down pay ment on a car or home, set up a regular and automatic savings plan or saving for college or retirement, Military Saves can help you develop your goals and take action. The program focuses on helping serv ice members develop financial goals and taking the proper steps to achieve them by providing savings advice, tools, resources and motivation. According to Lucius, the program has a tremendous impact on service members because they routinely face extraordinary circumstances. Deployments and frequent moves can be big financial strains on military households and good financial plan ning for both events is essential for suc cess, she said. Fleet and Family Support Centers (FFSC) personal financial managers (PFM), who are accredited financial counselors, will sit down with a fam ily and help them execute a compre hensive financial planning worksheet to illustrate their current financial sit uation and to help them plan for the future. Whether a family is in good financial shape or not, PFMs will work with them to improve their financial situation. The Military Saves campaign is not only targeted at service members, but at the entire family, because spouses and children also play a huge role in overall financial stability, Lucius said. The personal financial readiness of our service members and their fami lies directly supports mission readiness, and engaging our military spouses is important, as they play a vital role in maintaining financial discipline and stabil ity within a military family, she said. Also, by learning good financial habits early in life, our children will strengthen their financial fitness for the future. The Military Youth Saves pro gram is designed to encourage kids and teens to develop good savings habits at a young age. According to Scorby, raising aware ness about Military Saves and promot ing effective financial planning and decision making is the responsibility of all leaders throughout the region not only during Military Saves Week, but year round. I challenge all of our leaders at every level in the chain of command to make sure their service members are aware of this program and the resources it offers, he said. Military Saves Week is a great opportunity to help raise awareness, but responsible financial planning is a continual effort. We need to ensure our war fighters know there is always some where for them to turn to when it comes to financial matters. Service members or dependents who would like more information about resources and services offered through Military Saves, or organizations who would like to find out how they can sup port the program, should contact their local FFSC. In addition, more information is available at http://www.militarysaves. org/.Scorby signs Military Saves Week Proclamation JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 21, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 21, 2013 Oscar sparks timely, efficient response in man overboard drill When personnel at the NAS Jax Air Operations Boat Division require man overboard (MOB) training, their shipmate Oscar (a dummy or simulated Sailor) always volunteers to jump (actually tossed) into the St. Johns River. The drill took place Jan. 30 near the Buckman Bridge on a clear, windy day. Falling overboard is one of the most dangerous and life-threatening things that can happen at sea or in coastal waters, explained Terry Partin, an N31 port operations instructor with Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE). When Oscar goes into the water, it simulates a real person overboard. The first crew member to spot Oscar should throw a life ring and notify the coxswain by shouting man overboard! The coxswain responds by pushing his console MOB button to mark the loca tion (latitude and longitude) on the radar, and notify ing Jax Air Tower by VHS radio. The spotter should point and keep pointing at the victim. By pointing continuously at the victim, the crew member aids the coxswain in safely turning and approaching the victim for rescue. Richard James, also a port operations instructor with CNRSE, reminded the coxswains that recovering an MOB is a team effort. Whenever the coxswain loses sight of the victim especially when piloting a 40-foot search and rescue (SAR) vessel he must inform his crew, lost sight of victim guide me in! Its the responsibility of the crew to stand, point and count down the distance between the victim and the hull of the SAR vessel. While maneuvering, the cox swain may also have to sound five short horn blasts to warn nearby boat traffic. Partin also reminded the Sailors to never jump into the water to rescue a victim. When your boat is approaching the victim, toss a line attached to a life ring and also have a boat hook available. Upon recovery, the victim must be medi cally assessed and if unconscious administer CPR immediately.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 21, 2013 5 PHOTOS BY CLARK PIER C E

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Calling it a matter of fun damental equity, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta signed a memorandum to the service secretaries and the Pentagons top personnel officially extend ing benefits to same-sex part ners of service members. Here is the secretarys announcement of the policy change. Seventeen months ago, the United States military ended the policy of Dont Ask, Dont Tell. We have implemented the repeal of that policy and made clear that discrimination based on sexual orientation has no place in the Department of Defense. At the time of repeal, I com mitted to reviewing benefits that had not previously been available to same-sex partners based on existing law and poli cy. It is a matter of fundamental equity that we provide similar benefits to all of those men and women in uniform who serve their country. The department already provides a group of benefits that are member-des ignated. Today, I am pleased to announce that after a thor ough and deliberate review, the department will extend additional benefits to same-sex partners of service members. Taking care of our service members and honoring the sacrifices of all military fami lies are two core values of this nation. Extending these ben efits is an appropriate next step under current law to ensure that all service members receive equal support for what they do to protect this nation. One of the legal limitations to providing all benefits at this time is the Defense of Marriage Act, which is still the law of the land. There are certain benefits that can only be provided to spouses as defined by that law, which is now being reviewed by the United States Supreme Court. While it will not change during my tenure as secretary of defense, I foresee a time when the law will allow the department to grant full ben efits to service members and their dependents, irrespective of sexual orientation. Until then, the department will con tinue to comply with current law while doing all we can to take care of all Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and their families. While the implementa tion of additional benefits will require substantial poli cy revisions and training, it is my expectation that these benefits will be made avail able as expeditiously as pos sible. One of the great suc cesses at the Department of Defense has been the imple mentation of DADT repeal. It has been highly professional and has strengthened our mili tary community. I am confi dent in the military services ability to effectively implement these changes over the coming months. As he prepares for retirement, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta addressed the Pentagon workforce, thanking them for their contributions to national defense. Speaking in the Pentagon courtyard Feb. 12, Panetta thanked leaders of the Defense Department, civilian employ ees and the military for their commit ment to accomplishing the depart ments mission since he was sworn in as the 23rd secretary of defense on July 1, 2011. Im a believer that our fundamen tal mission here at the Department of Defense is very simple, he said. It is to protect and defend the United States of America and to keep our country safe. And because of your great work, and because of everything you do, we can say with pride that we have kept our country safe. The defense secretary said knowing everything the Defense Department has done helped to keep the country safe is his biggest source of pride as he heads home to California. Panetta also paid tribute to the love and support of the workforces families as they serve in tough jobs. We face a lot of pressure, and chal lenges that sometimes demand we go long distances away from home, he said. And yet throughout that, know ing that our families are there, knowing that they love and support us, is what gives us the ability to do this job. So my deepest thanks go out, not just to all of you, but to your families, he continued. They are part of our Pentagon family, and I thank them from the bottom of my heart for their sacri fice and their dedication. Panetta said he has come away from his experiences as defense sec retary with a deep respect and admi ration for all the dedication and sacrifices involved in keeping the nation safe. Every day I see the people in this department, working and fighting together as one family, united behind our mission of protecting our country, he said. The secretary also lauded service members for their willingness to fight to keep America safe. [Its] our No. 1 job, and I am so grate ful for those that do that, he said. I think that we are, as a nation, strong because there are men and women that are willing to put their lives on the line to protect our country. Panetta also acknowledged the civil ian workforces contributions to the Defense Departments mission. You do everything you can to sup port our mission, he said. You support our warfighters downrange. You dont get a hell of a lot of public recognition, but the fact is your efforts make a dif ference. We could not do this job without the civilian workforce, Panetta contin ued. Youre the unsung heroes of this nation, [and] are an important part of our success. Panetta said he is grateful and proud as he reflects on what the Pentagon team has been able to accom plish together. Weve developed, and are imple menting, a new defense strategy that will sustain the strongest military power on Earth as we face challenges in defending our country while imple menting fiscal discipline, Panetta said. Panetta signs memo extending benefits to same-sex partners Panetta lauds DOD for commitment to protecting nation 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 21, 2013

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I have never believed that we have to choose between our responsibility to national security and our responsibility to fiscal discipline. We can do both. Panetta said the new defense strat egy implements key capabilities the military will need in the future, such as agility, rapid deployment, force pro tection and projection, and rotational deployments, among others. Putting those elements together was the result of a team effort by both the military and the civilian workforce here, he said. I deeply appreciate their working as a team to put that in place. The secretary thanked the Pentagon workforce for its part in maintaining the leading U.S. role in world affairs. We are the strongest military power in the world, he said. The world needs our leadership. The world needs the United States of America to lead the world towards peace and towards pros perity. Panetta expressed his gratitude for having the honor of leading the Defense Department, and told the workforce they would be in my heart forever. My friends, it has been the honor of my life to have served with you in this position as secretary of defense, he said. Its been the greatest privilege Ive had in my almost 50 years of public ser vice to be able to represent the people of this department to our friends and to our partners around the world. PANETTA Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command sent a per sonal message to commanders and commanding officers Feb. 8 about how he plans to main tain fleet readiness through fis cal uncertainty. Adm. Bill Gortney sent the message to discuss some of the impacts on the fleet follow ing Secretary of Defense Leon Panettas approval to delay the scheduled deployment of the Harry S. Truman Strike Group. Panetta made the decision based on current continu ing resolution funding and the prospect of the across-theboard spending cuts known as sequestration. Even with this change, we continue to maintain a carri er presence in the U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) area of responsibility, as well as a mix of other assets, fulfilling endur ing commitments to our part ners, said Gortney in the message. John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group is currently deployed to the CENTCOM AOR. The new plan calls for Truman and her strike group to remain in a ready status in the event they are needed to respond to national security contingen cies. USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) and USS Hue City (CG 66) will deploy to CENTCOM later this month. The two ships returned early from a previ ously scheduled nine-month deployment as a way to mitigate the aircraft carrier Nimitzs delay because of maintenance. This new lineup helps us to sustain our readiness for as long as possible, and train follow-on carrier strike groups for deployment later this year and next, said Gortney. To do otherwise under these very uncertain budget conditions would mean sending these ships on deployment without reliefs behind them. We will not do that. No one is going on deployment without a projected return date. Gortney said hell look at all Fiscal Year 2013 deployments in light of the current budget uncertainty. While we believe the vast majority of deploy ments will be unaffected, there could be some additional changes, he said. He closed the message with a promise to commanders to provide them updated infor mation as it becomes available. He asked his commanders to maintain a good dialogue with their Sailors, civilians and fam ily members. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta approved a new medal Feb. 13 designed to recognize service members directly affect ing combat operations who may not even be on the same continent as the action. The Distinguished Warfare Medal rec ognizes the changing face of warfare. In the past, few, if any, service members not actually in a combat zone directly affected combat operations. These new capabilities have given American service members the ability to engage the enemy and change the course of battle, even from afar, Panetta said at a Pentagon news conference today. Ive always felt having seen the great work that they do, day in and day out that those who performed in an out standing manner should be recognized. Unfortunately, medals that they otherwise might be eligible for simply did not recog nize that kind of contribution. Now, the Defense Department does. The medal provides distinct, depart ment-wide recognition for the extraordi nary achievements that directly impact on combat operations, but that do not involve acts of valor or physical risk that combat entails, Panetta said. Technological advancements have dra matically changed how the American mili tary conducts and supports warfighters. Unmanned aerial vehicles, unmanned underwater vehicles, missile defense tech nology and cyber capabilities all affect combat operations while the operators may not be anywhere near the combat zone. The new medal recognizes the contribu tions of these service members. It will not be awarded for acts of battle field valor, officials said. It will be awarded in the name of the secretary of defense to members of the military whose extraordi nary achievements directly impacted com bat operations, and cannot be used as an end-of-tour award. This new medal recognizes the chang ing character of warfare and those who make extraordinary contributions to it, said Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The criteria for this award will be highly selective and reflect high standards. The most immediate example is the work of an unmanned aerial vehicle opera tor who could be operating a system over Afghanistan while based at Creech Air Force Base, Nev. The unmanned aerial vehicle would directly affect operations on the ground. Another example is that of a soldier at Fort Meade, Md., who detects and thwarts a cyberattack on a DOD computer system. The medal could be used to recognize both these exceptional acts, officials said. In the order of precedence, the Distinguished Warfare Medal will be below the Distinguished Flying Cross, and will be limited to achievements that are truly extraordinary. The members actions must have result ed in an accomplishment so exceptional and outstanding as to clearly set the indi vidual apart from comrades or from other persons in similar situations, a DOD offi cial said. The military department secretary must approve each award, and it may not be pre sented for valorous actions. This limitation was specifically includ ed to keep the Distinguished Warfare Medal from detracting from existing valor decorations, such as the Medal of Honor, Service Crosses and Silver Star Medal, the official said. Award criteria will be incorporated into the next revision of DOD Manual 1348.33V3, Manual of Military Decorations and Awards, Volume 3. When a retiree dies, his or her retired pay ceases upon notifica tion to DFAS. This can be done with a phone call to DFAS (800321-1080). It should be done as soon as possible in order to prevent any overpayment of retired pay that could cause future monetary problems with DFAS. However, the beneficiary (nor mally the spouse) is entitled to the pro-rated amount of his or her military members final months retired pay. This is called the arrears of pay (AOP). When DFAS is notified of the service members death, they will reclaim the final months retired pay and conduct an audit of his or hers account to compute the amount of the AOP. To receive this final payment, a DD Form-1174, Claim for Unpaid Compensation must be filled out and filed with DFAS with a copy of the long form death certificate. This can be done either by submit ting the form via mail or online at the DFAS web site ( http://www. dfas.mil/retiredmilitary.html ). A blank DD-1174 form is normal ly sent to the beneficiary by the DFAS Retired Pay and Annuity sec tion. It can also be obtained at the NAS Jax Retired Activities Office at the Fleet and Family Support Center. However the form is submitted, a copy of the long form death certifi cate has to accompany the 1174 or faxed separately to DFAS Retired Pay and Annuity Section (800-4696559). If the 1174 and death certificate are faxed to DFAS, ensure there is adequate reference to the ser vice member (full name, address, Social Security Number or service number, phone number and name for point of contact on both pieces of documentation). For planning purposes, it can take upwards of four to eight weeks for processing and payment sent to your financial institution. For more information, call 5425790. Fleet Forces outlines fiscal impact on readiness for commanders New medal recognizes changing face of conflict Retiree News: Explaining arrears of pay 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 21, 2013

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I view this training as our most creative avenue to productively engage Chiefs with petty officers and junior officers, and to form enduring relationships charac terized by mutual respect, said Stevens. MCPON talked about the impor tance of effective leadership dur ing a CPO 365 training session in GTMO. As you go through CPO 365, you will become a more effective lead er. If everything we do starts and stops with leadership, then every Sailor will benefit from a more effective leader. He also discussed the value of the Navys leading petty officers. We must have exceptional lead ing petty officers, because you are one of the critical components to the engine that makes the Navy run, said Stevens. Many Sailors showed concern about the looming fiscal environ ment. MCPON recognized the challenges the Navy is currently facing, but asked that Sailors focus on controlling what we own. It is easy to become distracted by things that are beyond our con trol, said Stevens. He also reminded Sailors of the things they do own and control; such as technical training, admin istrative production, and the exe cution of orders. We also have the ability to control much of our own lives by becoming and remaining physi cally, mentally, morally, and spiri tually sound. Fleet engagements are intended to provide senior leadership with a frontline assessment of Sailors and what they are doing in the Fleet. MCPONincluding: expansion to eliminate all wastewater discharge to the St. Johns River and reduce groundwater with drawal by the Navy, City of Jacksonville, FDEP and SJRWMD by 2014; Authoritys treated wastewater to mitigate low flow conditions at the stations wastewater plant and increase reuse irrigation on the base golf course; storage tanks, or storm water violations at NAS Jacksonville or NS Mayport in past three years; nificantly reduces moorings while improving boat safety; pated in numerous city-wide cleanup events and community improvement initiatives; reissued by FDEP; trainer aircraft to reduce material use and person nel exposure to hexavalent chrome; debris by City of Jacksonville, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, NS Mayport and Army Corps of Engineers at Huguenot Park. It has been an honor to be part of this dedicated team of environmental professionals for the past 11 years. The team remains focused on ways to con tinually improve the environmental quality of life on and off the naval installations in Jacksonville, said Gartland. We will significantly reduce wastewater dis charge from NAS Jacksonville to the St. Johns River this year and totally eliminate discharge to the river next year. We will eliminate groundwater withdrawal to irrigate our golf course this year and continue to identify ways to reduce groundwater withdrawal next year, he added. And, we will continue to reach out to our community with inno vative solutions that protect our environment as an integral part of performing our organizational missions. ENVIRONMENTAL Results from the Fiscal Year 2014 Command Master Chief (CMC) and Command Senior Chief (CSC) Selection Boards were released Feb. 15 More than 140 active duty and Reserve senior enlisted Sailors were selected by the FY-14 selec tion board. The Command Master Chief and Command Senior Chief Programs are intended to ensure Sailors are effectively led and developed. Senior enlisted leaders selected for these programs are responsible for leading the alignment efforts of the chiefs mess with the Navy ethos, Navy core values, and the MCPONs mission, vision, and guiding principles. CMCs and CSCs are also charged with ensuring active communica tion throughout the chain of com mand and report directly to their respective commander or com manding officer. They advise their respective commander or commanding offi cer and provide input in the formu lation, implementation, and execu tion of policies concerning morale, welfare, job satisfaction, disci pline, utilization, family support, and training of enlisted Sailors, as well as providing input and advice in matters affecting mission and operations as required. CMC and CSC selection boards convene annually. The board reviews and selects the best quali fied applicants for assignment into the CMC and CSC program. Upon selection and receipt of orders for assignment as CMC, master chief petty officers ratings will be changed to CMDCM. Senior chief petty officers filling CSC bil lets will retain their source rating. Master chiefs and senior chiefs selected into the CMC/CSC pro gram will be assigned by the CMC detailer based on billet availabil ity, experience, qualifications, and desires. Wings Over America Scholarship Foundation (WOASF) is accepting pre-qualification forms for its scholarships. Pre-qualification deadline is March 1 and full application deadline is April 1. WOASF, a 501(c) 3 nonprofit foundation, annu ally sponsors more than 40 scholarships ranging students who have cho sen to continue their edu cation. Scholarship recip ients are selected on the basis of scholastic merit, community service and extracurricular activities. Our mission is to pro vide college scholar ships to dependent chil dren and spouses of US Navy personnel with service in naval avia tion commands; Officer and Enlisted, active duty, retired, honorably dis charged or deceased. The Foundation has awarded more than ing students since 1987. The foundation is funded solely through the gen erous contributions of private and corporate sources. For more info on eligibility and applica tion process, go to www. wingsoveramerica.us or call 757-671-3200 x 2.WOASF scholarships applications due March 1Navy announces new CMCs and CSCs JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 21, 2013 9

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A former astronaut and retired Naval officer vis ited Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), a prior duty station where he served in the mid-1980s then named Naval Aviation Depot, Jacksonville, to tour the military depot and gather information Jan. 31. Retired Navy Capt. Winston Scott, a former astronaut who served as a mission specialist on two National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) missions, met with a team of technical experts doc umenting and filming repair procedures on an EA-6B Prowler aircraft. The Navy is creating mul timedia training aids to aug ment the technical publica tions Fleet maintainers use when performing maintenance and repairs to military aircraft. The Defense Logistics Agency (Documents Services) located in Jacksonville awarded the contract to develop the train ing aids to Job Performance Associates, a Jacksonvillebased company. Scott serves as the senior vice president for external relations and economic development at Florida Institute of Technology (FIT), a private technological university in Melbourne. FIT is considering using multimedia training aids to enhance its technical curric ulum for undergraduate and graduate students. During his visit, Scott met with Navy and Marine Corps specialists to learn about the technical aspects of the proj ect designed to document dif ficult repair procedures. The resulting multimedia tools will allow Sailors and Marines to read, see, hear and perform complicated maintenance pro cedures, step by step. Scott first reported to FRCSE in 1985 as an aeronau tical engineering duty officer assigned as the F/A-18 Hornet Strike Fighter project officer to stand up the platform. He served as the production test pilot flying F/A-18 Hornet, F-14 Tomcat and A-7 Corsair air craft. I flew my tail off, he said. I limited myself to three test flights per day. Scott logged more than 5,000 flight hours on 20 different mil itary and civilian aircraft dur ing his 27-year career. During his visit, he toured the Hornet production line, which has undergone an exten sive transformation in recent years using a cellular concept where artisans perform spe cific tasks in each cell as an aircraft pulses through the hangar. He also toured the Industrial Manufacturing Division where artisans are fabricating scarce and one-of-a-kind aeronauti cal parts, such as the Hornets Y590 former to ensure these legacy aircraft keep flying. The facility is leveragingnew technology and is utilizing Lean and Six Sigma models to identify wasteful practices, reduce costs, and increase quality to the warfighting cus tomer. Scott was selected for NASAs astronaut program in March 1992 and served on two space missions, logging more than 24 days in space including three spacewalks totaling more than 19 hours. Scott said the experi ence he gained at FRCSE con tributed to his NASA selection. He served as a mission specialist on Space Shuttle Endeavour from Jan. 11-20, 1996, which included two spacewalks to practice tech niques later used to assem ble the International Space Station. His second mission was on the Space Shuttle Columbia from Nov. 19 to Dec. 5, 1997. Its unlike anything you can experience here, and words cant describe it, said Scott about the space shuttle launch. Everything is vibrat ing and shaking. It kicks you in the butt. You pass 100 mph when you hit the tower. Its an incredible ride. The crews performed hun dreds of experiments while in space, such as growing crys tals, testing plant growth, observing the earth and con ducting physiological stud ies. He said one of his greatest thrills was working outside the shuttle. You dont walk, you float, said Scott of his three space walks. The suit weighs 350 pounds. You have to be physically fit to control the hundreds of pounds of mass. It is very dif ficult. The spacesuit is self-reg ulating, but it takes a while to adjust to temperature changes. When you work on the dark side of the moon, it is very cold. When on the sunlit side, it is very hot. Former astronaut visits FRCSE JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 21, 2013 11

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A U.S. Army soldier who was awarded the Medal of Honor for risking his life to save his comrades during an ambush in Afghanistan was inducted into the Pentagons Hall of Heroes on Feb. 12. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta, Army Secretary John McHugh and Army Chief of Staff Gen. Raymond Odierno presented the Medal of Honor flag and Hall of Heroes plaque to Staff Sgt. Clinton Romesha. President Barack Obama awarded the 31 year old the nations highest military honor at a White House ceremony a day earlier. Panetta called the former 4th Brigade Combat Team Infantryman a hero as he described Romeshas selfless, fearless reconnaissance during a surprise enemy attack on Oct. 3, 2009 in which 400 Taliban fighters converged on Combat Outpost Keating, Kamdesh District, Nuristan Province. On that deadly day, the out post at the bottom of a steep valley, manned by only 52 Soldiers, fell under attack through concentrated fire. An injured Romesha sum moned help and fought to pro tect the bodies of fallen sol diers while providing cover to wounded team members. Eight of Romeshas comrades perished in the day-long battle. A new greatest generation of Americans has stepped forward after 9/11, Panetta said. A new generation of patriots that answered the call to serve has endured enormous hard ships and they have done it with unflinching courage. Panetta stressed any genera tion in which people risk their lives for America is the great est generation, including those who have fought and died since 9/11. Theyve dealt with lengthy separations from friends and family, repeated deployments to austere battlefields in dis tant lands, he said. Theyve witnessed the hor rors of modern warfare, see ing their comrades in arms, their closest friends horribly maimed, and yes, killed by the scourge of improvised explo sive devices and the scourge of an enemy whose purpose is to kill Americans. Still, Panetta continued, American troops remain undeterred, in vigilant patrol throughout the streets and alleyways of Iraq and in the mountains and deserts of Afghanistan. For 10 long years they have fought because they believe that America is worth fighting for that Americans still serve as a shining example for that world in which we have the most precious values of all values of freedom, equality, justice and democracy. Those ideals and the United States commitment to go after Al Qaida safe havens, Panetta said, brought Romesha and his comrades to that remote out post, where enemies hid with confidence. That the Taliban failed to overtake Combat Outpost Keating is a testament to the bravery, the heroism, the war rior spirit of the 50 American Soldiers who fought to save it, Panetta said. And Clint later [said] to a reporter, That was our America right there we own that and we werent going to let anybody come and take it. During the ceremony, Romesha said Taliban fighters surrounded a place he and 52 other members of Bravo Troop, 3rd Squadron, 61st Cavalry called home. Four hundred Taliban ver sus 52 American Soldiers. It just doesnt seem fair to the Taliban. Romesha said the Medal of Honor is not often given when things go well on the battle field. Some say Im a hero, but it doesnt make sense, because I got to come home with a few scars, Romesha said. Eight of my friends did not have that fortune. He identified each com rade who perished during the attack that day in Afghanistan: Staff Sgt. Justin Gallegos, Sgt. Christopher Griffin, Sgt. Joshua Hardt, Sgt. Joshua Kirk, Spc. Stephan Mace, Staff Sgt. Vernon Martin, Sgt. Michael Scusa, and Pfc. Kevin Thomson. Whether I wear a uniform or civilian attire, I am and will always be a Soldier for life, Romesha said. Panetta said one of his tough est responsibilities is writing condolence letters to the fami lies of those who have made the ultimate sacrifice. . As tough as it is to lose a loved one, perhaps there is some comfort to know that they gave their lives for this country, and that they are heroes, and that they are patriots, and that they will never, never be forgot ten, he said. Romesha is only the fourth living service member to receive the medal for service in Operation Iraqi Freedom or Operation Enduring Freedom. You fought well, you fought bravely, and your courage is now a part of American histo ry, Panetta said. Medal of Honor recipient earns place in Hall of Heroes Bicycle-pedestrian public meetingsResidents in Clay, Duval, Nassau and St. Johns Counties will have one final opportunity to provide input for the North Florida Regional Bicycle Pedestrian Master Plan Study being conducted by the North Florida Transportation Planning Organization. The open-house walk-through public meetings with multiple stations will allow attendees to review and comment on the plans draft elements. The public meetings are from 4-8 p.m. and scheduled as follows: 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 21, 2013

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The VP-45 Pelicans have returned from a success ful TAMEX 13-1 in Pearce, Australia. Generally a quiet base in a rural area reserved for training Australian Air Force pilots, RAAF Base Pierce hosted one Australian and two VP-45 P-3 aircrews and main tainers for two weeks. VP-45 went down under to exhibit a forward presence, flying four missions on top of Australian submarines over a four-day period. Combat Aircrews 4 and 12 reinforced this important strategic alliance with the Australians by working with and hunting a Collins-class diesel-electric submarine. All four missions had a 100 percent completion rate with a total of eight crew qualifications obtained, locating and track ing the submarine for extended periods of time on each sortie. Not only did the aircrews fly successful missions, but the maintenance branch kept the plane in top form allowing the crews to execute the mis sion one station. The detach ment showcased the U.S. Navys Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft expe ditionary and rapid response capabilities to our allies, as well as working with the Australians for the common goal of interoperability. But it was not all work and no play for the crews in Australia. All personnel involved suc ceeded in experiencing the cul ture and country of Australia. While visiting a koala refuge, VP-45 Sailors were able to pet and feed all sorts of Australian animals. From kangaroos to kookaburras, and dingoes to deer, the animals loved to eat popcorn from hands. On the historic side, many Sailors made the 20-minute drive to Fremantle to visit the museums and monuments, including Fremantle Prison. Initially a convict institution to build the colony of Western Australia, the prison is a valu able part of the culture and the settling of Western Australia. Sporting events were also enjoyed by some of the mem bers, taking in a cricket match at the WACA Grounds. The one-day international event was a match between Australia and the West Indies, with the home team emerging victori ous. Overall, the detachment was a fruitful endeavor, allowing the crews to work with and strengthen ties with the Royal Australian Navy and Air Force. It also afforded the Sailors an opportunity to be unofficial ambassadors to the Australian people by taking in their cul ture and experiencing all that Perth and Australia had to offer. Within a week of deploying to Naval Air Facility Misawa, Japan, the Red Lancers of VP-10 participated in a datalink training exercise with their U.S. Navy sister squadron, the Fighting Tigers of VP-8, in conjunction with Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) squadron VP-2 Odin. In late November, the VP-2 aircrew departed from their home base in Hachinohe en route to Misawa where they were welcomed by VP-10 and VP-8. After briefing the details and parameters of the exercise, the Red Lancers and Fighting Tigers crewed together on a U.S. Navy P-3C Orion and established secure voice and data communications links with the VP-2 Orion. With VP-10 relieving VP-8 as the deployed P-3C squadron at Misawa, this training exercise also served as a turnover event between the U.S. and Japanese squadrons. When the exercise con cluded, the Japanese and U.S. Sailors traveled to VP-2s home base in Hachinohe for a reception in honor of VP-10s arrival and VP-8s farewell. After enjoying a diverse spread of Japanese dishes and con versing with their interna tional counterparts, VP-2 Commanding Officer Capt. Seto and VP-8 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mike Marston exchanged words of gratitude for each others hard work and cooperation over the past six months and presented each other with gifts of appreciation. Seto then turned to the VP-10 Commanding Officer Cmdr. VP-45 Pelicans have big showing down under VP-10, VP-8 conduct data-link training with Japanese counterparts The VP-45 Pelicans have returned from a success ful TAMEX 13-1 in Pearce, Australia. Generally a quiet base in a rural area reserved for training Australian Air Force pilots, RAAF Base Pierce hosted one Australian and two VP-45 P-3 aircrews and main tainers for two weeks. VP-45 went down under to exhibit a forward presence, flying four missions on top of Australian submarines over a four-day period. Combat Aircrews 4 and 12 reinforced this important strategic alliance with the Australians by working with and hunting a Collins-class diesel-electric submarine. All four missions had a 100 percent completion rate with a total of eight crew qualifications obtained, locating and track ing the submarine for extended periods of time on each sortie. Not only did the aircrews fly successful missions, but the maintenance branch kept the plane in top form allowing the crews to execute the mis sion one station. The detach ment showcased the U.S. Navys Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft expe ditionary and rapid response capabilities to our allies, as well as working with the Australians for the common goal of interoperability. But it was not all work and no play for the crews in Australia. All personnel involved suc ceeded in experiencing the cul ture and country of Australia. While visiting a koala refuge, VP-45 Sailors were able to pet and feed all sorts of Australian animals. From kangaroos to kookaburras, and dingoes to deer, the animals loved to eat popcorn from hands. On the historic side, many Sailors made the 20-minute drive to Fremantle to visit the museums and monuments, including Fremantle Prison. Initially a convict institution to build the colony of Western Australia, the prison is a valu able part of the culture and the settling of Western Australia. Sporting events were also enjoyed by some of the mem bers, taking in a cricket match at the WACA Grounds. The one-day international event was a match between Australia and the West Indies, with the home team emerging victori ous. Overall, the detachment was a fruitful endeavor, allowing the crews to work with and strengthen ties with the Royal Australian Navy and Air Force. It also afforded the Sailors an opportunity to be unofficial ambassadors to the Australian people by taking in their cul ture and experiencing all that Perth and Australia had to offer. Within a week of deploying to Naval Air Facility Misawa, Japan, the Red Lancers of VP-10 participated in a datalink training exercise with their U.S. Navy sister squadron, the Fighting Tigers of VP-8, in conjunction with Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) squadron VP-2 Odin. In late November, the VP-2 aircrew departed from their home base in Hachinohe en route to Misawa where they were welcomed by VP-10 and VP-8. After briefing the details and parameters of the exercise, the Red Lancers and Fighting Tigers crewed together on a U.S. Navy P-3C Orion and established secure voice and data communications links with the VP-2 Orion. With VP-10 relieving VP-8 as the deployed P-3C squadron at Misawa, this training exercise also served as a turnover event between the U.S. and Japanese squadrons. When the exercise con cluded, the Japanese and U.S. Sailors traveled to VP-2s home base in Hachinohe for a reception in honor of VP-10s arrival and VP-8s farewell. After enjoying a diverse spread of Japanese dishes and con versing with their interna tional counterparts, VP-2 Commanding Officer Capt. Seto and VP-8 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mike Marston exchanged words of gratitude for each others hard work and cooperation over the past six months and presented each other with gifts of appreciation. Seto then turned to the VP-10 Commanding Officer Cmdr. VP-45 Pelicans have big showing down under VP-10, VP-8 conduct data-link training with Japanese counterparts JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 21, 2013 13 The VP-45 Pelicans have returned from a success ful TAMEX 13-1 in Pearce, Australia. Generally a quiet base in a rural area reserved for training Australian Air Force pilots, RAAF Base Pierce hosted one Australian and two VP-45 P-3 aircrews and main tainers for two weeks. VP-45 went down under to exhibit a forward presence, flying four missions on top of Australian submarines over a four-day period. Combat Aircrews 4 and 12 reinforced this important strategic alliance with the Australians by working with and hunting a Collins-class diesel-electric submarine. All four missions had a 100 percent completion rate with a total of eight crew qualifications obtained, locating and track ing the submarine for extended periods of time on each sortie. Not only did the aircrews fly successful missions, but the maintenance branch kept the plane in top form allowing the crews to execute the mis sion one station. The detach ment showcased the U.S. Navys Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft expe ditionary and rapid response capabilities to our allies, as well as working with the Australians for the common goal of interoperability. But it was not all work and no play for the crews in Australia. All personnel involved suc ceeded in experiencing the cul ture and country of Australia. While visiting a koala refuge, VP-45 Sailors were able to pet and feed all sorts of Australian animals. From kangaroos to kookaburras, and dingoes to deer, the animals loved to eat popcorn from hands. On the historic side, many Sailors made the 20-minute drive to Fremantle to visit the museums and monuments, including Fremantle Prison. Initially a convict institution to build the colony of Western Australia, the prison is a valu able part of the culture and the settling of Western Australia. Sporting events were also enjoyed by some of the mem bers, taking in a cricket match at the WACA Grounds. The one-day international event was a match between Australia and the West Indies, with the home team emerging victori ous. Overall, the detachment was a fruitful endeavor, allowing the crews to work with and strengthen ties with the Royal Australian Navy and Air Force. It also afforded the Sailors an opportunity to be unofficial ambassadors to the Australian people by taking in their cul ture and experiencing all that Perth and Australia had to offer. Within a week of deploying to Naval Air Facility Misawa, Japan, the Red Lancers of VP-10 participated in a datalink training exercise with their U.S. Navy sister squadron, the Fighting Tigers of VP-8, in conjunction with Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) squadron VP-2 Odin. In late November, the VP-2 aircrew departed from their home base in Hachinohe en route to Misawa where they were welcomed by VP-10 and VP-8. After briefing the details and parameters of the exercise, the Red Lancers and Fighting Tigers crewed together on a U.S. Navy P-3C Orion and established secure voice and data communications links with the VP-2 Orion. With VP-10 relieving VP-8 as the deployed P-3C squadron at Misawa, this training exercise also served as a turnover event between the U.S. and Japanese squadrons. When the exercise con cluded, the Japanese and U.S. Sailors traveled to VP-2s home base in Hachinohe for a reception in honor of VP-10s arrival and VP-8s farewell. After enjoying a diverse spread of Japanese dishes and con versing with their interna tional counterparts, VP-2 Commanding Officer Capt. Seto and VP-8 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mike Marston exchanged words of gratitude for each others hard work and cooperation over the past six months and presented each other with gifts of appreciation. Seto then turned to the VP-10 Commanding Officer Cmdr. VP-45 Pelicans have big showing down under VP-10, VP-8 conduct data-link training with Japanese counterparts

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Tim Parker to welcome the Red Lancers to Japan. Parker, in return, expressed how excited the Red Lancers were to work with the men and women of VP-2 and to build upon the successful rela tionship started with VP-8. Ultimately, this training exercise helped to strengthen the operational links between the patrol forces of the JMSDF and U.S. Navy and fostered great camaraderie between both forces Sailors. Already off to a great start, VP-10 looks forward to collaborating with the JMSDF during their deployment in the 7th Fleet area of responsibility. MARITIME Deweys All Hands ClubCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour your way Friday Free Entertainment at 7 p.m. Feb. 22 Ace WinnFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday change of hours Open 410 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238 The Gym equipment is temporarily relocated to The Zone, Bldg. 798 now through June 30, 2013. Check-out our new fitness schedule! New classes include Muscle Max, Extreme Bootcamp and Max Core Pick-up the latest copy at the fitness center Outdoor swimming pool opens April 1I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts Gatornationals March 15 17 Funkfest Metropolitan Park May 10-11 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3. Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7. Blockout Dates: March 23 April 5. Call for pricing Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23 Live Broadway Series Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Dream Girls May 21 Blue Man Group in Orlando Special Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31 and must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about our special discounted tick ets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park Gold Book Shade of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT.The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccom panied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. SNAG Golf Lesson Feb. 21 @ 6 p.m. at NAS Jax Golf Club Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23 Free admissionNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 5422936 Military Appreciation Days includes cart & green fees Feb. 21 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily Play 18-holes with 12:30 p.m. every day Monday & Tuesday Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holi days.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center open Mon.Fri., 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you. Movie Under the Stars featuring WreckIt Ralph Feb. 22, 6 p.m. at Patriots Grove Flying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School March 18 April 24 Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles satellite pharmacy, located at the Navy Exchange (building 950), will close its lobby and drive-up early March 1 at 4 p.m. in order to upgrade its information technology. On March 2, the satellite phar macys lobby will be closed and the drive-up window (medication pick-up only) will be open 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. NH Jacksonvilles main (outpatient) phar macy will be open standard Saturday hours, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. To register for home delivery of chronic medications (including gener ics at no cost), go to www.tricare.mil/ homedelivery or ask a pharmacy staff member.For more information, call the phar macy at 542-7405.Satellite pharmacy closing for improvements March 2 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 21, 2013

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The annual Valentines Day 5K brought out 127 runners Feb. 14. The NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department coordinated the run. Placing first overall and first in the mens 40-44 category was Andy Patterson of VP-30 with a time of 17:41. Sarah Reed of Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast (NAVFAC SE) took first in the womens 35-39 category and was the first female to cross the finish line with a time of 20:43. Other winners were: The event was sponsored by the University of Phoenix and Allied American University. The next upcoming runs are the Leprechaun Dash March 15 at 11:30 a.m. and the Capt. Chuck Cornett Navy Run April 6. Volunteers are needed for the Navy Run. For more information, call 542-3239/3518.Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government offi cially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. Annual Valentines Day 5K held For more info, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy. mil V I T A SELF SERVICE 4 Feb 15 Apr 2013 MW F 0830 1600 (Walk ins) TU TH 1100 1600 (Walk ins) TU TH 1600 1900 (by appointments only) LOCATION: NAS JAX RANGER ST BLDG 4, RM#108 (LEGAL BLDG) TAX ASSISTANCE CENTER 904542 8038 Volunteers are still welcomed! Contact center for more information. Active Duty & Dependents Retirees & Dependents, AGI < $57,000 Reservists Activated 30 days+ Pre/de mobilization Entitled Former Spouses March 9, 2013 Invitation to Location Time Attire Dinner Tickets Guests All others: Hotel Guest Speaker JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 21, 2013 15

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The Nightwolves of Carrier Airborne Warning Squadron (VAW) 77 will be disestablished at a ceremony aboard Naval Air Station/Joint Reserve Base New Orleans, March 9. A reserve E-2 squadron based at NASJRB New Orleans, the Nightwolves have been responsible for various mis sions within the strategic reserve including counternarcotics and human traf ficking interdiction, disaster response and missile exercise support. Due to budgetary con straints, the Navy decided to decommission VAW-77 in fiscal year 13. While this choice was difficult, it was within the lim its of the resources available to the Navy. There will always be the need to balance direct warf ighting capability against mis sions like those assigned to VAW-77. VAW-77 consists of six E-2C Hawkeye aircraft and 112 per sonnel (72 Full Time Support and 40 Selected Reservists). The squadrons history goes back to 1995, when the U.S. Congress created the reserve squadron as a result of the fed eral governments escalating war on illegal drug trafficking. VAW-77 operated four spe cially modified E-2C Hawkeye airborne early warning aircraft optimized for counter-drug missions. As part of the Navys postCold War role, VAW-77 flight crews patrolled the waters of the Caribbean in joint missions with the U.S. Coast Guard and other drug enforcement agen cies in search of illegal aircraft and ships. Their last flight was Jan. 29, said Lt. Cmdr. Erin Wreski, program manager for Commander Naval Air Force Reserves (CNAFR) Tactical Support Wing. Their disestablishment cer emony will be March 9, with the squadron officially closeing its doors March 31. The squadrons six aircraft will be transferred to other car rier airborne warning squad rons, Wreski said. And the squadron members will transfer to various other CNAFR squadrons around the country. The Navy remains commit ted to missions within the stra tegic reserve, including coun ter-narcotics and human traf ficking interdiction. Navy ships and aircraft have unique capabilities to detect and monitor criminal activities in the maritime domain, espe cially tracking the movement, by sea and air, of illicit mate rials intended for the United States. Commissaries support Military Saves WeekSavings generated by commissary shopping is why the Defense Commissary Agency is a partner of the 11th annual Military Saves Week campaign that encourages military families to avoid debt and build savings. The campaign, Set a goal, make a plan, save automati cally, runs Feb. 25-March 2 and reflects DeCAs every day action of delivering savings on groceries. Since we sell at cost in delivering the benefit, shop ping your commissary saves you money automatically, said Joseph Jeu, DeCA director and CEO. Were proud to partner with Military Saves to help our customers save money and, in turn, reduce debt. Not only does consistent commissary shopping score savings of 30 percent or more, Jeu said, but savvy shop pers know that using coupons achieves even higher sav ings. Think of coupons as cash, he said. And now, the commissary offers the Rewards Card to deliver even more savings via coupons for download onto your card. At last count, more than 150 coupons were available; new coupons are posted as soon as they become avail able. Patrons can sign up to receive an email alert when new coupons have been posted to the site. Sign up is available at http://www.commissaries.com/rewards_ subscribe.cfm Since the cards debut in August 2012, more than 2.6 million coupons have been downloaded by commissary shoppers. Military Saves is part of the Department of Defenses Financial Readiness Campaign to persuade, motivate and encourage military families to save money every month. The Military Saves website offers great tips on saving and living well but spending less. Not surprisingly, many of the ideas call for grocery shopping with economy in mind, and the commissary can make that simple. Here are a few tips from the website: Tip 1: No matter what your preferences for lunch, the com missary can help keep the lunch box interesting as well as economical. Maybe you eat light fresh, crisp veg gies for munching; bagged salad; yogurt or energy bars. Or maybe you prefer hot meals in lunchtime portions frozen entrees or heat-and-eat items to store in a desk drawer. The commissary can save you 30 percent or more on your brown-bag grocery shopping. Tip 2: Eat out two fewer times a month (savings esti easy, economical meals at home not only saves you money, but the leftovers compound the value by pro viding future ready-to-heat meals. Whether your menu includes salad and hamburgers, hearty soup or multiTip 3: Shop with a list, and stick to it. The savings could be hundreds of dollars. People who shop with a list and buy little else spend much less money than those who decide what to buy when they get to the store. You can plan your trip, tailored to your specific commissary, with the easy Create a Shopping List tool found on the front page of www.commissaries.com. During Military Saves Week and throughout February, commissaries around the world support the campaign by providing information on personal financial aware ness and preparing nutritious meals for less. Customers can join Military Saves via Facebook, Twitter, Web page and monthly newsletter. Visit http://www.militarysaves.org for more informa tion. For the past 12 years, members of the National Naval Officers Association (NNOA) Jacksonville Chapter has mentored young men at the Duval Juvenile Residential Facility (DJRF). They provide monthly mentoring with structured fun and games. The young men also enjoy an annual trip to EverBank Field to watch the Jacksonville Jaguars play. This past football season, NNOA and DJRF fac ulty members chaperoned the boys to a season match-up between the Jaguars and Chicago Bears. Although the Jaguars loss was disappointing, the young men had a blast. The facility is a structured moderate-risk resi dential treatment program for males ages 14-18 and their average length of stay is six months. During their stay, youths receive group and individual mental health, and substance abuse intervention/ counseling. Educational/vocational services are provided by Duval County Schools. The youths also obtain employment skills and participate in a wide variety of facility and community activities that focus on restorative justice and community services. From October through December 2012, NNOA facilitated a community service outreach with the young men. A variety of non-perishable food items were donated for the event. The young men along with members of NNOAdecorated 35 boxes and filled them with donated holiday meal goodies. The outreach helped 20 families at Thanksgiving and 15 families at Christmas. The outreach proved extremely positive for both the young men of DJRF and local families. Budget constraints force disestablishment of VAW-77 in March NNOA Jax Chapter lends a helping hand 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 21, 2013

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2013 MILITARY SAVE S BOATHOUSE HIGHEST HONOR Check us out Online! jaxairnews.com Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy (MCPON) (AW/NAC) Mike Stevens completed a three-day trip to NAS Jacksonville and Naval Base Guantanamo Bay Cuba Feb. 15. MCPON participated in CPO 365 events, toured base facilities, took the opportunity to discuss the focus areas of his Zeroing in on Excellence initia tive, and answered questions about new uniforms, budget cuts, family readiness group, the Perform to Serve program, and deployments during base-wide all hands calls. CPO 365, a yearlong development and training for first class petty officers, was first introduced in 2010 under former MCPON Rick West. It includes two phases, the first of which begins in September each year. Under MCPON Stevens revised program, detailed in his 2012-2013 CPO 365 Guidance, all first class petty officers will participate through the duration of Phase One, whether they are board-eligible or not. CPO 365 is so important for the future develop ment of our first class petty officers. I believe that if youre going to lead the future force of our Navy that you must be armed with the best opportunities to succeed, said Stevens. CPO 365 is designed to develop leaders through a combination of mentorship, practical experience and training. Representatives from NAS Jacksonville, Navy Region Southeast, NS Mayport and Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) joined City of Jacksonville and state offi cials in signing the Northeast Florida Environmental Compliance Partnering Team Charter Feb. 12 at Jacksonville City Hall. The Navy is a part of the Jacksonville community and the Northeast Florida Environmental Compliance Partnering Team is a prime example of our ongoing cooperation on items of mutual inter est, said Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. We continue to maintain a proactive partnership with environmental regu latory agencies to identify and imple ment innovative solutions with the goals of enhancing environmental compliance, promoting natural resources management and protecting public health. The Northeast Florida Environmental Compliance Partnering Team shows that we are stronger when we work together on behalf of our water ways, our land, the air we breathe and the future of our city, added Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown. Im proud to carry on this tradi tion of partnership for our city and I thank the Navy, Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) and all the stakeholders for their continued support. The team was established in 2002 to ensure Navy and regulatory agen cies achieve environmental compli ance by identifying and implementing innovative solutions to promote natu ral resources management and protect public health. According to NAS Jax Environmental Director Kevin Gartland, who briefed the team before the charter signing, the partnership has exceeded all expec tations to provide more efficient and effective protection of Jacksonvilles air and water resources. Gartland shared some of the major accomplishments of the partnership The VR-62 Nomads returned recently from Navy Central Command (NAVCENTCOM) after a very successful 10-week detachment. While in NAVCENT, theNomads flew 39 missions in detached operations with one C-130T Hercules aircraft and a crew of 22 maintainers and aircrew. These personnel are madeup of Selected Reserve and Full Time Support Sailors. The Nomads flew high priority mis sions supporting Combined Task Force 53 (CTF53) by providing fast and flexibletransport inthe shortfused high stress environment of the NAVCENTCOM area of responsibility (AOR). During the detachment, the VR-62 team delivered more than 1.3 million pounds of high priority cargo. VR-62 has two basic missions while in NAVCENTCOM Production mis sions to meet the logistics needs of the battle group and special one off type contingency missions to meet the everchanging needs of the AOR on a go now basis. We love both missions, said AWFCS Mike Wendelin. Production missions are great for training a new cadre of loadmasters and flight engineers, and the go now mis sions are just a great source of satisfac tion that the Nomads can accomplish any request anytime. During this period, VR-62 had the privilege of transporting CTF53 Commanding Officer Capt. Glen Leverette and a group of Seabees to Afghanistan, as well as picking up lastminute logistics requests for operations and exercises. Our purpose is to provide the most flexible, responsive and effective air logistics capability to the worlds most powerful Navy.I am really proud of the work we are doing in NAVCENT and around the world, stated VR-62 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Tony Scarpino. VR-62 is one of five Navy Reserve C-130T squadrons serving the Navys global logistics needs. The Nomads are home based at NAS Jacksonville. Command Master Chief welcomes MCPON StevensNAS Jacksonville Command Master Chief CMDCM(AW/SW) Brad Shepherd welcomed Stevens with a full itinerary on Feb. 13. MCPON Stevens played an integral part in developing the CPO 365 roll-out that took place in 2010 under MCPON Rick West. He had heard how well the program was being implemented here at NAS Jax and wanted to visit our base to see for himself so we began before dawn with our 4mile run. Shepherd said that MCPON also discussed mentoring approaches for todays Sailorization process and the importance of developing junior Sailors into well-rounded service members. At various stops on his base tour, junior and senior Sailors alike where concerned about the budgetary effects of sequestration. Stevens deferred budget issues to his boss, CNO Adm. Jonathan Greenert, but said that everyone will likely see changes in operational, training and maintenance budgets. As the Navys third-largest shore installation, Stevens and Shepherd were able to spend time at a number of NAS Jacksonville tenant commands, including VP-16, VP-26, Air Operations, Fleet Area Control and Surveillance Facility Jacksonville and the Surface Rescue Swimmers School. During his meetings held at Deweys All Hands Club, Stevens took a variety of questions from concerned officers, senior enlisted leaders, as well as E6 and below. Shepherd said that Stevens also assured Sailors that advancement opportunities would stay the same through Perform to Serve an endstrength, force-management tool that uses performance criteria within individual ratings to ensure long-term sustainment of skills and experience throughout the Navy.MCPON visits NAS Jax Navy renews environmental partnership with state, local agencies VR-62 detachment returns

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JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Feb. 21 1944 Marines with support of naval bombardment and carrier aircraft secure Eniwetok atoll. 1945 USSBismark Sea (CVE-95) is struck by a kamikaze off Iwo Jima and sinks in 90 minutes with loss of 318 men. USSSaratoga (CV-3) struck by five kamikazes, but survives with loss of 123 men. Bismark Sea was the last carrier lost in World War II combat. Feb. 22 1865 Rear Adm. Porters gunboats bombard Wilmington, N.C., forcing its surrender. 1870 After arriving on USS Nipsic, and supported by USS Guard and USS Nyack, the Darien Expedition, com manded by Cmdr. Thomas Selfridge Jr., begins active operations ashore at Caldonia Bay to survey the Isthmus of Darien, Panama, for an inter-ocean ship canal. 1909 Great White Fleet returns to Hampton Roads, Va. from around the world cruise. 1943 USS Iowa (BB-61), the lead ship of the last class of American fast battleships, is commissioned. 1974 Lt. j.g. Barbara Ann Allen becomes first Navy designated female aviator. Feb. 23 1795 U.S. Navy Office of Purveyor of Supplies is established. This is the Navy Supply Corps birthday. 1919 Launching of Osmond Ingram (DD-255), first Navy ship named for an enlisted man. 1944 Carrier groups under Adm. Raymond Spruance attack Saipan, Tinian and Rota in the Marianas. 1945 Marines and a Navy hospital corpsman raise the American flag on Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima. Feb. 24 1813 USS Hornet, under command of Capt. James Lawrence, captures HMS Peacock. 1968 Task Force Clearwater estab lished in I Corps Feb. 25 1861 Saratoga, member of U.S. African Squadron, captures slaver sloop Express. 1933 Commissioning of USS Ranger (CV-4), the Navys first ship designed and built from the keel up as an air craft carrier. Of the eight pre-war U.S. aircraft carriers (CV-1 through CV-8), Ranger was one of only three to survive World War II. 1959 USS Galveston (CLG-3) fires first Talos surface-to-air missile Feb. 26 1811 Congress authorizes first naval hospital. 1913 Approval of experimental wind tunnel for Navy. 1944 Sue Sophia Dauser, super intendent of the Navy Nurse Corps is first woman in Navy to attain rank of Captain. Feb. 27 1942 Battle of the Java Sea, allied naval force attacks Japanese invasion convoy. 1973 First airborne mine sweep in a live minefield took place in Haiphong Harbor, Vietnam ship channel by heli copters from HM-12 embarked on USS New Orleans (LPH 11). Readers were surprised to learn last week that after Dustins yearlong deployment, the military assigned him elsewhere, and together as a family, we decided that the boys and I will stay behind. We will maintain an apartment in one city, a house in the other, and com mute on weekends. Some readers questioned our decision: Why would anyone with young children voluntarily live apart from them? Thats a great way to end up divorced. Others reported feeling empowered by our choices: Good for you for finding a way to follow both of your dreams. Real love doesnt know time or distance. These conflicting reactions reinforce my original mes sage: my peer group is a transitional generation, sandwiched between our parents, many of whom wouldnt have consid ered anything except keeping the family together, and a new crop of young adults who think following a husband is horribly outdated. Last week, I made the point that the military, by way of its inability to keep up with cul tural fluctuations, creates situ ations where couples have to compromise and live creatively. But the bottom line is that the compromise my husband and I have made is more a symp tom of changing familial roles than it is a reflection of the militarys long history of frequent moves. If whats considered a womans role and whats con sidered a mans role hadnt changed, the militarys moveevery-two-years system would not be a problem. Which means that other, civilian marriages are going through their own evolu tion, too. Who comes home to make dinner? Who takes off work when the kids are sick? Perhaps, even, civilian couples have faced the possibility of living temporarily in separate cit ies for the sake of a career. The idea of couples being separated by distance is noth ing newDustins grandmoth er didnt see her husband for many years during World War IIbut the notion that fathers have to be intimately involved in their childrens day-to-day lives is. Remember the 1950s dad who came home from work, patted his kids on the head and then settled into his chair with the newspaper? In our own situation, Dustin and I have taken all that we know about relationships and distance, changing gender roles and expectations, and weve tried to fashion something new and meaningful for our fam ily until we can all be under the same roof again. Here are some of my favorite findings so far. There are many different ways to be absent. I cant stress this enough. Having a spouse physically present is nice, but having a spouse emotionally present is even better. There are plenty of couples who co-exist. Weve all seen them. Maybe weve even been that couple at times, but we usually dont want to be. Yet, if we place physical together ness as the ultimate goal, coexisting can sometimes be a very real and unfulfilling out come. The same applies to parents. Being physically present does not necessarily guarantee that a father is mentally and emo tionally present as well. Being presenttruly presentwheth er through the miles or not, takes commitment and effort. Quality time is more impor tant than quantity of time. Considering last years deployment, by the time Dustin is done with his current tour of duty, we will have had very little time together. Love does not allow Out of sight, out of mind. When things get tough, Dustin reminds me, if the only thing holding our marriage together is being physically in each others presence, then we have bigger problems. Hes right. Love and commitment doesnt stop when he walks out the door. Absence really does build appreciation. Its easy to put things off. Its even easier to forget what you have. But when you say good bye to your husband every Sunday, you cant help but wake up Monday morning thinking of all the things you miss about him. So you spend long hours on the phone together, just talking. And you realize, if he was on the opposite couch, you proba bly would have watched televi sion together in silence instead. And all of the sudden, you feel like you are falling in love with your husband all over again.Hey, Money Chic! I have been looking for a job for months! Jacksonville seems like the hardest place to find employment. Do you have any tips to help me find a job? Money Chic Sez: Of course I do! In fact, there is a Military Spouse Hiring Fair and Career Forum today from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the NAS Jax Officers Club. According to the flier circulating our office, the Military Spouse Business Alliance is bringing a one-of-a-kind hir ing fair for spouses of active duty, guard, reserves, and retired veterans. This fair will feature: employers looking for and committed to hiring military spouses, presentations to help spouses plan a career in a highly mobile environment, and resume editing on site. There are also many resources on base that may assist you in your job search. The Morale, Welfare and Recreation office has a list of jobs available in Building 1 and on their NAS Jacksonville MWR Facebook page. For more information, call 5423111. The Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) would also be a great place to go. FFSC is able to help with spicing up your resume, prepar ing you for job interviews, and may be able to put you in contact with companies interest ed in hiring military spouses. Call 1-866-293-2776 to sched ule an appointment. If you are looking for a gov ernment job, go to usajobs. gov. This website is updated frequently with new positions on base. WorkSource would also be a great resource. They have an office just outside the main gate in Building 13.Their website states that WorkSource opens the door for employ ment through education, training, and career services. To contact them, call 356JOBS. Worksourcefl.com is their website. Its a tough job market out there. When you find the perfect new job, let me know. We can sit down and work through a new budget to see how your paychecks will impact your financial future. As always, Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society is here to lend a helping hand. If you would like more information, stop by the office outside the Yorktown Gate or call 5422832. Have questions for Hey, Money Chic? Drop me an e-mail at megan.stolle@ nmcrs.org Things to learn from living apart Hiring our Heroes Military Spouse Job Fair will be held today, Feb. 21 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m at the NAS Jax Officers Club. This hiring fair and career forum is open to spouses of active duty, Guard, Reserves, veterans and retirees. 2 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 21, 2013 JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Feb. 21 1944 Marines with support of naval bombardment and carrier aircraft secure Eniwetok atoll. 1945 USSBismark Sea (CVE-95) is struck by a kamikaze off Iwo Jima and sinks in 90 minutes with loss of 318 men. USSSaratoga (CV-3) struck by five kamikazes, but survives with loss of 123 men. Bismark Sea was the last carrier lost in World War II combat. Feb. 22 1865 Rear Adm. Porters gunboats bombard Wilmington, N.C., forcing its surrender. 1870 After arriving on USS Nipsic, and supported by USS Guard and USS Nyack, the Darien Expedition, com manded by Cmdr. Thomas Selfridge Jr., begins active operations ashore at Caldonia Bay to survey the Isthmus of Darien, Panama, for an inter-ocean ship canal. 1909 Great White Fleet returns to Hampton Roads, Va. from around the world cruise. 1943 USS Iowa (BB-61), the lead ship of the last class of American fast battleships, is commissioned. 1974 Lt. j.g. Barbara Ann Allen becomes first Navy designated female aviator. Feb. 23 1795 U.S. Navy Office of Purveyor of Supplies is established. This is the Navy Supply Corps birthday. 1919 Launching of Osmond Ingram (DD-255), first Navy ship named for an enlisted man. 1944 Carrier groups under Adm. Raymond Spruance attack Saipan, Tinian and Rota in the Marianas. 1945 Marines and a Navy hospital corpsman raise the American flag on Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima. Feb. 24 1813 USS Hornet, under command of Capt. James Lawrence, captures HMS Peacock. 1968 Task Force Clearwater estab lished in I Corps Feb. 25 1861 Saratoga, member of U.S. African Squadron, captures slaver sloop Express. 1933 Commissioning of USS Ranger (CV-4), the Navys first ship designed and built from the keel up as an air craft carrier. Of the eight pre-war U.S. aircraft carriers (CV-1 through CV-8), Ranger was one of only three to survive World War II. 1959 USS Galveston (CLG-3) fires first Talos surface-to-air missile Feb. 26 1811 Congress authorizes first naval hospital. 1913 Approval of experimental wind tunnel for Navy. 1944 Sue Sophia Dauser, super intendent of the Navy Nurse Corps is first woman in Navy to attain rank of Captain. Feb. 27 1942 Battle of the Java Sea, allied naval force attacks Japanese invasion convoy. 1973 First airborne mine sweep in a live minefield took place in Haiphong Harbor, Vietnam ship channel by heli copters from HM-12 embarked on USS New Orleans (LPH 11).Readers were surprised to learn last week that after Dustins yearlong deployment, the military assigned him elsewhere, and together as a family, we decided that the boys and I will stay behind. We will maintain an apartment in one city, a house in the other, and com mute on weekends. Some readers questioned our decision: Why would anyone with young children voluntarily live apart from them? Thats a great way to end up divorced. Others reported feeling empowered by our choices: Good for you for finding a way to follow both of your dreams. Real love doesnt know time or distance. These conflicting reactions reinforce my original mes sage: my peer group is a transitional generation, sandwiched between our parents, many of whom wouldnt have consid ered anything except keeping the family together, and a new crop of young adults who think following a husband is horribly outdated. Last week, I made the point that the military, by way of its inability to keep up with cul tural fluctuations, creates situ ations where couples have to compromise and live creatively. But the bottom line is that the compromise my husband and I have made is more a symp tom of changing familial roles than it is a reflection of the militarys long history of frequent moves. If whats considered a womans role and whats con sidered a mans role hadnt changed, the militarys moveevery-two-years system would not be a problem. Which means that other, civilian marriages are going through their own evolu tion, too. Who comes home to make dinner? Who takes off work when the kids are sick? Perhaps, even, civilian couples have faced the possibility of living temporarily in separate cit ies for the sake of a career. The idea of couples being separated by distance is noth ing newDustins grandmoth er didnt see her husband for many years during World War IIbut the notion that fathers have to be intimately involved in their childrens day-to-day lives is. Remember the 1950s dad who came home from work, patted his kids on the head and then settled into his chair with the newspaper? In our own situation, Dustin and I have taken all that we know about relationships and distance, changing gender roles and expectations, and weve tried to fashion something new and meaningful for our fam ily until we can all be under the same roof again. Here are some of my favorite findings so far. There are many different ways to be absent. I cant stress this enough. Having a spouse physically present is nice, but having a spouse emotionally present is even better. There are plenty of couples who co-exist. Weve all seen them. Maybe weve even been that couple at times, but we usually dont want to be. Yet, if we place physical together ness as the ultimate goal, coexisting can sometimes be a very real and unfulfilling out come. The same applies to parents. Being physically present does not necessarily guarantee that a father is mentally and emo tionally present as well. Being presenttruly presentwheth er through the miles or not, takes commitment and effort. Quality time is more impor tant than quantity of time. Considering last years deployment, by the time Dustin is done with his current tour of duty, we will have had very little time together. Love does not allow Out of sight, out of mind. When things get tough, Dustin reminds me, if the only thing holding our marriage together is being physically in each others presence, then we have bigger problems. Hes right. Love and commitment doesnt stop when he walks out the door. Absence really does build appreciation. Its easy to put things off. Its even easier to forget what you have. But when you say good bye to your husband every Sunday, you cant help but wake up Monday morning thinking of all the things you miss about him. So you spend long hours on the phone together, just talking. And you realize, if he was on the opposite couch, you proba bly would have watched televi sion together in silence instead. And all of the sudden, you feel like you are falling in love with your husband all over again.Hey, Money Chic! I have been looking for a job for months! Jacksonville seems like the hardest place to find employment. Do you have any tips to help me find a job? Money Chic Sez: Of course I do! In fact, there is a Military Spouse Hiring Fair and Career Forum today from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the NAS Jax Officers Club. According to the flier circulating our office, the Military Spouse Business Alliance is bringing a one-of-a-kind hir ing fair for spouses of active duty, guard, reserves, and retired veterans. This fair will feature: employers looking for and committed to hiring military spouses, presentations to help spouses plan a career in a highly mobile environment, and resume editing on site. There are also many resources on base that may assist you in your job search. The Morale, Welfare and Recreation office has a list of jobs available in Building 1 and on their NAS Jacksonville MWR Facebook page. For more information, call 5423111. The Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) would also be a great place to go. FFSC is able to help with spicing up your resume, prepar ing you for job interviews, and may be able to put you in contact with companies interest ed in hiring military spouses. Call 1-866-293-2776 to sched ule an appointment. If you are looking for a gov ernment job, go to usajobs. gov. This website is updated frequently with new positions on base. WorkSource would also be a great resource. They have an office just outside the main gate in Building 13.Their website states that WorkSource opens the door for employ ment through education, training, and career services. To contact them, call 356JOBS. Worksourcefl.com is their website. Its a tough job market out there. When you find the perf ect new job, let me know. We can sit down and work through a new budget to see how your paychecks will impact your financial future. As always, Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society is here to lend a helping hand. If you would like more information, stop by the office outside the Yorktown Gate or call 5422832. Have questions for Hey, Money Chic? Drop me an e-mail at megan.stolle@ nmcrs.org Things to learn from living apart Hiring our Heroes Military Spouse Job Fair will be held today, Feb. 21 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m at the NAS Jax Officers Club. This hiring fair and career forum is open to spouses of active duty, Guard, Reserves, veterans and retirees. JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS JAX AIR NEWS, JAX AIR NEWS Feb. 21 1944 Marines with support of naval bombardment and carrier aircraft secure Eniwetok atoll. 1945 USSBismark Sea (CVE-95) is struck by a kamikaze off Iwo Jima and sinks in 90 minutes with loss of 318 men. USSSaratoga (CV-3) struck by five kamikazes, but survives with loss of 123 men. Bismark Sea was the last carrier lost in World War II combat. Feb. 22 1865 Rear Adm. Porters gunboats bombard Wilmington, N.C., forcing its surrender. 1870 After arriving on USS Nipsic, and supported by USS Guard and USS Nyack, the Darien Expedition, com manded by Cmdr. Thomas Selfridge Jr., begins active operations ashore at Caldonia Bay to survey the Isthmus of Darien, Panama, for an inter-ocean ship canal. 1909 Great White Fleet returns to Hampton Roads, Va. from around the world cruise. 1943 USS Iowa (BB-61), the lead ship of the last class of American fast battleships, is commissioned. 1974 Lt. j.g. Barbara Ann Allen becomes first Navy designated female aviator. Feb. 23 1795 U.S. Navy Office of Purveyor of Supplies is established. This is the Navy Supply Corps birthday. 1919 Launching of Osmond Ingram (DD-255), first Navy ship named for an enlisted man. 1944 Carrier groups under Adm. Raymond Spruance attack Saipan, Tinian and Rota in the Marianas. 1945 Marines and a Navy hospital corpsman raise the American flag on Mt. Suribachi, Iwo Jima. Feb. 24 1813 USS Hornet, under command of Capt. James Lawrence, captures HMS Peacock. 1968 Task Force Clearwater estab lished in I Corps Feb. 25 1861 Saratoga, member of U.S. African Squadron, captures slaver sloop Express. 1933 Commissioning of USS Ranger (CV-4), the Navys first ship designed and built from the keel up as an air craft carrier. Of the eight pre-war U.S. aircraft carriers (CV-1 through CV-8), Ranger was one of only three to survive World War II. 1959 USS Galveston (CLG-3) fires first Talos surface-to-air missile Feb. 26 1811 Congress authorizes first naval hospital. 1913 Approval of experimental wind tunnel for Navy. 1944 Sue Sophia Dauser, super intendent of the Navy Nurse Corps is first woman in Navy to attain rank of Captain. Feb. 27 1942 Battle of the Java Sea, allied naval force attacks Japanese invasion convoy. 1973 First airborne mine sweep in a live minefield took place in Haiphong Harbor, Vietnam ship channel by heli copters from HM-12 embarked on USS New Orleans (LPH 11).Readers were surprised to learn last week that after Dustins yearlong deployment, the military assigned him elsewhere, and together as a family, we decided that the boys and I will stay behind. We will maintain an apartment in one city, a house in the other, and com mute on weekends. Some readers questioned our decision: Why would anyone with young children voluntarily live apart from them? Thats a great way to end up divorced. Others reported feeling empowered by our choices: Good for you for finding a way to follow both of your dreams. Real love doesnt know time or distance. These conflicting reactions reinforce my original mes sage: my peer group is a transitional generation, sandwiched between our parents, many of whom wouldnt have consid ered anything except keeping the family together, and a new crop of young adults who think following a husband is horribly outdated. Last week, I made the point that the military, by way of its inability to keep up with cul tural fluctuations, creates situ ations where couples have to compromise and live creatively. But the bottom line is that the compromise my husband and I have made is more a symp tom of changing familial roles than it is a reflection of the militarys long history of frequent moves. If whats considered a womans role and whats con sidered a mans role hadnt changed, the militarys moveevery-two-years system would not be a problem. Which means that other, civilian marriages are going through their own evolu tion, too. Who comes home to make dinner? Who takes off work when the kids are sick? Perhaps, even, civilian couples have faced the possibility of living temporarily in separate cit ies for the sake of a career. The idea of couples being separated by distance is noth ing newDustins grandmoth er didnt see her husband for many years during World War IIbut the notion that fathers have to be intimately involved in their childrens day-to-day lives is. Remember the 1950s dad who came home from work, patted his kids on the head and then settled into his chair with the newspaper? In our own situation, Dustin and I have taken all that we know about relationships and distance, changing gender roles and expectations, and weve tried to fashion something new and meaningful for our fam ily until we can all be under the same roof again. Here are some of my favorite findings so far. There are many different ways to be absent. I cant stress this enough. Having a spouse physically present is nice, but having a spouse emotionally present is even better. There are plenty of couples who co-exist. Weve all seen them. Maybe weve even been that couple at times, but we usually dont want to be. Yet, if we place physical together ness as the ultimate goal, coexisting can sometimes be a very real and unfulfilling out come. The same applies to parents. Being physically present does not necessarily guarantee that a father is mentally and emo tionally present as well. Being presenttruly presentwheth er through the miles or not, takes commitment and effort. Quality time is more impor tant than quantity of time. Considering last years deployment, by the time Dustin is done with his current tour of duty, we will have had very little time together. Love does not allow Out of sight, out of mind. When things get tough, Dustin reminds me, if the only thing holding our marriage together is being physically in each others presence, then we have bigger problems. Hes right. Love and commitment doesnt stop when he walks out the door. Absence really does build appreciation. Its easy to put things off. Its even easier to forget what you have. But when you say good bye to your husband every Sunday, you cant help but wake up Monday morning thinking of all the things you miss about him. So you spend long hours on the phone together, just talking. And you realize, if he was on the opposite couch, you proba bly would have watched televi sion together in silence instead. And all of the sudden, you feel like you are falling in love with your husband all over again.Hey, Money Chic! I have been looking for a job for months! Jacksonville seems like the hardest place to find employment. Do you have any tips to help me find a job? Money Chic Sez: Of course I do! In fact, there is a Military Spouse Hiring Fair and Career Forum today from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the NAS Jax Officers Club. According to the flier circulating our office, the Military Spouse Business Alliance is bringing a one-of-a-kind hir ing fair for spouses of active duty, guard, reserves, and retired veterans. This fair will feature: employers looking for and committed to hiring military spouses, presentations to help spouses plan a career in a highly mobile environment, and resume editing on site. There are also many resources on base that may assist you in your job search. The Morale, Welfare and Recreation office has a list of jobs available in Building 1 and on their NAS Jacksonville MWR Facebook page. For more information, call 5423111. The Fleet and Family Support Center (FFSC) would also be a great place to go. FFSC is able to help with spicing up your resume, prepar ing you for job interviews, and may be able to put you in contact with companies interest ed in hiring military spouses. Call 1-866-293-2776 to sched ule an appointment. If you are looking for a gov ernment job, go to usajobs. gov. This website is updated frequently with new positions on base. WorkSource would also be a great resource. They have an office just outside the main gate in Building 13.Their website states that WorkSource opens the door for employ ment through education, training, and career services. To contact them, call 356JOBS. Worksourcefl.com is their website. Its a tough job market out there. When you find the perf ect new job, let me know. We can sit down and work through a new budget to see how your paychecks will impact your financial future. As always, Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society is here to lend a helping hand. If you would like more information, stop by the office outside the Yorktown Gate or call 5422832. Have questions for Hey, Money Chic? Drop me an e-mail at megan.stolle@ nmcrs.org Things to learn from living apart Hiring our Heroes Military Spouse Job Fair will be held today, Feb. 21 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m at the NAS Jax Officers Club. This hiring fair and career forum is open to spouses of active duty, Guard, Reserves, veterans and retirees.

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The NAS Jacksonville Military Saves kickoff is Feb. 25 at 8 a.m. at Deweys All Hands Club. Military Saves is a free program. Organizations participate in Military Saves because they want to help ser vicemembers and their families build wealth not debt. Military Saves is part of the Department of Defenses Financial Readiness Campaign and has been a partner with DoD since 2003. Military Saves is a social marketing campaign to persuade, motivate, and encourage military families to save money every month, and to convince leaders and organizations to be aggressive in promoting automatic savings. Military Saves is a part of America Saves, the larger nation-wide campaign for all Americans. Savers who take the Military Saves Pledge can opt to receive a monthly e-newsletter from Military Saves, as well as a quarterly e-newsletter from America Saves. Workshops continue Feb. 26 28 at the Center for Naval Aviation Technical Training Unit Jacksonville (Building 858), from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Blue Room. Military Saves is a year-round cam paign and provides savings-themed resource packets available to organiza tions throughout the year. Next week is Military Saves Week Commander, Navy Region Southeast Rear Adm. Jack Scorby Jr. signed a proclamation in support of Military Saves Week at Navy Region Southeast (NRSE) headquarters Feb. 13. Military Saves Week runs from Feb. 25 through March 2 and is intended to encourage service members to make responsible financial decisions to build wealth and reduce debt. The proclamation officially recog nizes the week and calls on all service members throughout the Southeast Region to take action to improve their individual and household financial situations. Personal financial stability is vital to our mission readiness, Scorby said. If our war fighters and their families are experiencing financial problems, it makes it very difficult to focus on the mission. These difficulties are largely preventable with the proper planning. Our efforts with Military Saves Week encourages everyone to assess their financial situation and honestly ask themselves if they can be doing more to improve it. Military Saves is a social marketing campaign to persuade, motivate and encourage military families to save money every month and to convince leaders to be aggressive in promoting automatic savings. It is a part of the Department of Defenses (DoD) Financial Readiness Campaign and has been a partner with DoD since 2003. This has been a successful campaign for 10 years, said Carol Lucius, NRSE Family Readiness Program work and family life coordinator. If a sailor can identify a goal, whethIf a sailor can identify a goal, whether it is to set up an emergency cash fund, get out of debt, make a down payment on a car or home, set up a regular and automatic savings plan or saving for college or retirement, Military Saves can help you develop your goals and take action. The program focuses on helping service members develop financial goals and taking the proper steps to achieve them by providing savings advice, tools, resources and motivation. According to Lucius, the program has a tremendous impact on service members because they routinely face extraordinary circumstances. Deployments and frequent moves can be big financial strains on military households and good financial plan ning for both events is essential for success, she said. Fleet and Family Support Centers (FFSC) personal financial managers (PFM), who are accredited financial counselors, will sit down with a fam ily and help them execute a compre hensive financial planning worksheet to illustrate their current financial sit uation and to help them plan for the future. Whether a family is in good financial shape or not, PFMs will work with them to improve their financial situation. The Military Saves campaign is not only targeted at service members, but at the entire family, because spouses and children also play a huge role in overall financial stability, Lucius said. The personal financial readiness of our service members and their fami lies directly supports mission readiness, and engaging our military spouses is important, as they play a vital role in maintaining financial discipline and stabil ity within a military family, she said. Also, by learning good financial habits early in life, our children will strengthen their financial fitness for the future. The Military Youth Saves pro gram is designed to encourage kids and teens to develop good savings habits at a young age. According to Scorby, raising aware ness about Military Saves and promot ing effective financial planning and decision making is the responsibility of all leaders throughout the region not only during Military Saves Week, but year round. I challenge all of our leaders at every level in the chain of command to make sure their service members are aware of this program and the resources it offers, he said. Military Saves Week is a great opportunity to help raise awareness, but responsible financial planning is a continual effort. We need to ensure our war fighters know there is always somewhere for them to turn to when it comes to financial matters. Service members or dependents who would like more information about resources and services offered through Military Saves, or organizations who would like to find out how they can support the program, should contact their local FFSC. In addition, more information is available at http://www.militarysaves. org/.Scorby signs Military Saves Week Proclamation JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 21, 2013 3

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4 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 21, 2013 Oscar sparks timely, efficient response in man overboard drill When personnel at the NAS Jax Air Operations Boat Division require man overboard (MOB) training, their shipmate Oscar (a dummy or simulated Sailor) always volunteers to jump (actually tossed) into the St. Johns River. The drill took place Jan. 30 near the Buckman Bridge on a clear, windy day. Falling overboard is one of the most dangerous and life-threatening things that can happen at sea or in coastal waters, explained Terry Partin, an N31 port operations instructor with Commander, Navy Region Southeast (CNRSE). When Oscar goes into the water, it simulates a real person overboard. The first crew member to spot Oscar should throw a life ring and notify the coxswain by shouting man overboard! The coxswain responds by pushing his console MOB button to mark the location (latitude and longitude) on the radar, and notifying Jax Air Tower by VHS radio. The spotter should point and keep pointing at the victim. By pointing continuously at the victim, the crew member aids the coxswain in safely turning and approaching the victim for rescue. Richard James, also a port operations instructor with CNRSE, reminded the coxswains that recovering an MOB is a team effort. Whenever the coxswain loses sight of the victim especially when piloting a 40-foot search and rescue (SAR) vessel he must inform his crew, lost sight of victim guide me in! Its the responsibility of the crew to stand, point and count down the distance between the victim and the hull of the SAR vessel. While maneuvering, the cox swain may also have to sound five short horn blasts to warn nearby boat traffic. Partin also reminded the Sailors to never jump into the water to rescue a victim. When your boat is approaching the victim, toss a line attached to a life ring and also have a boat hook available. Upon recovery, the victim must be medi cally assessed and if unconscious administer CPR immediately.

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JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 21, 2013 5 PHOTOS BY CLARK PIER CE

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Calling it a matter of fun damental equity, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta signed a memorandum to the service secretaries and the Pentagons top personnel officially extending benefits to same-sex part ners of service members. Here is the secretarys announcement of the policy change. Seventeen months ago, the United States military ended the policy of Dont Ask, Dont Tell. We have implemented the repeal of that policy and made clear that discrimination based on sexual orientation has no place in the Department of Defense. At the time of repeal, I committed to reviewing benefits that had not previously been available to same-sex partners based on existing law and policy. It is a matter of fundamental equity that we provide similar benefits to all of those men and women in uniform who serve their country. The department already provides a group of benefits that are member-des ignated. Today, I am pleased to announce that after a thor ough and deliberate review, the department will extend additional benefits to same-sex partners of service members. Taking care of our service members and honoring the sacrifices of all military fami lies are two core values of this nation. Extending these ben efits is an appropriate next step under current law to ensure that all service members receive equal support for what they do to protect this nation. One of the legal limitations to providing all benefits at this time is the Defense of Marriage Act, which is still the law of the land. There are certain benefits that can only be provided to spouses as defined by that law, which is now being reviewed by the United States Supreme Court. While it will not change during my tenure as secretary of defense, I foresee a time when the law will allow the department to grant full ben efits to service members and their dependents, irrespective of sexual orientation. Until then, the department will continue to comply with current law while doing all we can to take care of all Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and their families. While the implementa tion of additional benefits will require substantial poli cy revisions and training, it is my expectation that these benefits will be made avail able as expeditiously as pos sible. One of the great suc cesses at the Department of Defense has been the imple mentation of DADT repeal. It has been highly professional and has strengthened our military community. I am confi dent in the military services ability to effectively implement these changes over the coming months. As he prepares for retirement, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta addressed the Pentagon workforce, thanking them for their contributions to national defense. Speaking in the Pentagon courtyard Feb. 12, Panetta thanked leaders of the Defense Department, civilian employ ees and the military for their commit ment to accomplishing the depart ments mission since he was sworn in as the 23rd secretary of defense on July 1, 2011. Im a believer that our fundamen tal mission here at the Department of Defense is very simple, he said. It is to protect and defend the United States of America and to keep our country safe. And because of your great work, and because of everything you do, we can say with pride that we have kept our country safe. The defense secretary said knowing everything the Defense Department has done helped to keep the country safe is his biggest source of pride as he heads home to California. Panetta also paid tribute to the love and support of the workforces families as they serve in tough jobs. We face a lot of pressure, and chal lenges that sometimes demand we go long distances away from home, he said. And yet throughout that, know ing that our families are there, knowing that they love and support us, is what gives us the ability to do this job. So my deepest thanks go out, not just to all of you, but to your families, he continued. They are part of our Pentagon family, and I thank them from the bottom of my heart for their sacri fice and their dedication. Panetta said he has come away from his experiences as defense sec retary with a deep respect and admi ration for all the dedication and sacrifices involved in keeping the nation safe. Every day I see the people in this department, working and fighting together as one family, united behind our mission of protecting our country, he said. The secretary also lauded service members for their willingness to fight to keep America safe. [Its] our No. 1 job, and I am so grateful for those that do that, he said. I think that we are, as a nation, strong because there are men and women that are willing to put their lives on the line to protect our country. Panetta also acknowledged the civil ian workforces contributions to the Defense Departments mission. You do everything you can to sup port our mission, he said. You support our warfighters downrange. You dont get a hell of a lot of public recognition, but the fact is your efforts make a dif ference. We could not do this job without the civilian workforce, Panetta contin ued. Youre the unsung heroes of this nation, [and] are an important part of our success. Panetta said he is grateful and proud as he reflects on what the Pentagon team has been able to accomplish together. Weve developed, and are imple menting, a new defense strategy that will sustain the strongest military power on Earth as we face challenges in defending our country while imple menting fiscal discipline, Panetta said. Panetta signs memo extending benefits to same-sex partners Panetta lauds DOD for commitment to protecting nation 6 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 21, 2013

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I have never believed that we have to choose between our responsibility to national security and our responsibility to fiscal discipline. We can do both. Panetta said the new defense strat egy implements key capabilities the military will need in the future, such as agility, rapid deployment, force protection and projection, and rotational deployments, among others. Putting those elements together was the result of a team effort by both the military and the civilian workforce here, he said. I deeply appreciate their working as a team to put that in place. The secretary thanked the Pentagon workforce for its part in maintaining the leading U.S. role in world affairs. We are the strongest military power in the world, he said. The world needs our leadership. The world needs the United States of America to lead the world towards peace and towards prosperity. Panetta expressed his gratitude for having the honor of leading the Defense Department, and told the workforce they would be in my heart forever. My friends, it has been the honor of my life to have served with you in this position as secretary of defense, he said. Its been the greatest privilege Ive had in my almost 50 years of public service to be able to represent the people of this department to our friends and to our partners around the world. PANETTA Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command sent a per sonal message to commanders and commanding officers Feb. 8 about how he plans to main tain fleet readiness through fiscal uncertainty. Adm. Bill Gortney sent the message to discuss some of the impacts on the fleet follow ing Secretary of Defense Leon Panettas approval to delay the scheduled deployment of the Harry S. Truman Strike Group. Panetta made the decision based on current continu ing resolution funding and the prospect of the across-theboard spending cuts known as sequestration. Even with this change, we continue to maintain a carri er presence in the U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) area of responsibility, as well as a mix of other assets, fulfilling enduring commitments to our part ners, said Gortney in the message. John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group is currently deployed to the CENTCOM AOR. The new plan calls for Truman and her strike group to remain in a ready status in the event they are needed to respond to national security contingen cies. USS Dwight D. Eisenhower (CVN 69) and USS Hue City (CG 66) will deploy to CENTCOM later this month. The two ships returned early from a previ ously scheduled nine-month deployment as a way to mitigate the aircraft carrier Nimitzs delay because of maintenance. This new lineup helps us to sustain our readiness for as long as possible, and train follow-on carrier strike groups for deployment later this year and next, said Gortney. To do otherwise under these very uncertain budget conditions would mean sending these ships on deployment without reliefs behind them. We will not do that. No one is going on deployment without a projected return date. Gortney said hell look at all Fiscal Year 2013 deployments in light of the current budget uncertainty. While we believe the vast majority of deploy ments will be unaffected, there could be some additional changes, he said. He closed the message with a promise to commanders to provide them updated infor mation as it becomes available. He asked his commanders to maintain a good dialogue with their Sailors, civilians and family members. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta approved a new medal Feb. 13 designed to recognize service members directly affecting combat operations who may not even be on the same continent as the action. The Distinguished Warfare Medal rec ognizes the changing face of warfare. In the past, few, if any, service members not actually in a combat zone directly affected combat operations. These new capabilities have given American service members the ability to engage the enemy and change the course of battle, even from afar, Panetta said at a Pentagon news conference today. Ive always felt having seen the great work that they do, day in and day out that those who performed in an out standing manner should be recognized. Unfortunately, medals that they otherwise might be eligible for simply did not recognize that kind of contribution. Now, the Defense Department does. The medal provides distinct, depart ment-wide recognition for the extraordi nary achievements that directly impact on combat operations, but that do not involve acts of valor or physical risk that combat entails, Panetta said. Technological advancements have dra matically changed how the American military conducts and supports warfighters. Unmanned aerial vehicles, unmanned underwater vehicles, missile defense tech nology and cyber capabilities all affect combat operations while the operators may not be anywhere near the combat zone. The new medal recognizes the contribu tions of these service members. It will not be awarded for acts of battlefield valor, officials said. It will be awarded in the name of the secretary of defense to members of the military whose extraordi nary achievements directly impacted combat operations, and cannot be used as an end-of-tour award. This new medal recognizes the chang ing character of warfare and those who make extraordinary contributions to it, said Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The criteria for this award will be highly selective and reflect high standards. The most immediate example is the work of an unmanned aerial vehicle operator who could be operating a system over Afghanistan while based at Creech Air Force Base, Nev. The unmanned aerial vehicle would directly affect operations on the ground. Another example is that of a soldier at Fort Meade, Md., who detects and thwarts a cyberattack on a DOD computer system. The medal could be used to recognize both these exceptional acts, officials said. In the order of precedence, the Distinguished Warfare Medal will be below the Distinguished Flying Cross, and will be limited to achievements that are truly extraordinary. The members actions must have resulted in an accomplishment so exceptional and outstanding as to clearly set the indi vidual apart from comrades or from other persons in similar situations, a DOD official said. The military department secretary must approve each award, and it may not be presented for valorous actions. This limitation was specifically included to keep the Distinguished Warfare Medal from detracting from existing valor decorations, such as the Medal of Honor, Service Crosses and Silver Star Medal, the official said. Award criteria will be incorporated into the next revision of DOD Manual 1348.33V3, Manual of Military Decorations and Awards, Volume 3. When a retiree dies, his or her retired pay ceases upon notifica tion to DFAS. This can be done with a phone call to DFAS (800321-1080). It should be done as soon as possible in order to prevent any overpayment of retired pay that could cause future monetary problems with DFAS. However, the beneficiary (nor mally the spouse) is entitled to the pro-rated amount of his or her military members final months retired pay. This is called the arrears of pay (AOP). When DFAS is notified of the service members death, they will reclaim the final months retired pay and conduct an audit of his or hers account to compute the amount of the AOP. To receive this final payment, a DD Form-1174, Claim for Unpaid Compensation must be filled out and filed with DFAS with a copy of the long form death certificate. This can be done either by submitting the form via mail or online at the DFAS web site ( http://www. dfas.mil/retiredmilitary.html ). A blank DD-1174 form is normally sent to the beneficiary by the DFAS Retired Pay and Annuity section. It can also be obtained at the NAS Jax Retired Activities Office at the Fleet and Family Support Center. However the form is submitted, a copy of the long form death certificate has to accompany the 1174 or faxed separately to DFAS Retired Pay and Annuity Section (800-4696559). If the 1174 and death certificate are faxed to DFAS, ensure there is adequate reference to the ser vice member (full name, address, Social Security Number or service number, phone number and name for point of contact on both pieces of documentation). For planning purposes, it can take upwards of four to eight weeks for processing and payment sent to your financial institution. For more information, call 5425790. Fleet Forces outlines fiscal impact on readiness for commanders New medal recognizes changing face of conflict Retiree News: Explaining arrears of pay 8 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 21, 2013

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I view this training as our most creative avenue to productively engage Chiefs with petty officers and junior officers, and to form enduring relationships charac terized by mutual respect, said Stevens. MCPON talked about the importance of effective leadership dur ing a CPO 365 training session in GTMO. As you go through CPO 365, you will become a more effective lead er. If everything we do starts and stops with leadership, then every Sailor will benefit from a more effective leader. He also discussed the value of the Navys leading petty officers. We must have exceptional leading petty officers, because you are one of the critical components to the engine that makes the Navy run, said Stevens. Many Sailors showed concern about the looming fiscal environ ment. MCPON recognized the challenges the Navy is currently facing, but asked that Sailors focus on controlling what we own. It is easy to become distracted by things that are beyond our control, said Stevens. He also reminded Sailors of the things they do own and control; such as technical training, administrative production, and the exe cution of orders. We also have the ability to control much of our own lives by becoming and remaining physi cally, mentally, morally, and spiri tually sound. Fleet engagements are intended to provide senior leadership with a frontline assessment of Sailors and what they are doing in the Fleet. MCPONincluding: expansion to eliminate all wastewater discharge to the St. Johns River and reduce groundwater with drawal by the Navy, City of Jacksonville, FDEP and SJRWMD by 2014; Authoritys treated wastewater to mitigate low flow conditions at the stations wastewater plant and increase reuse irrigation on the base golf course; storage tanks, or storm water violations at NAS Jacksonville or NS Mayport in past three years; nificantly reduces moorings while improving boat safety; pated in numerous city-wide cleanup events and community improvement initiatives; reissued by FDEP; trainer aircraft to reduce material use and personnel exposure to hexavalent chrome; debris by City of Jacksonville, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, NS Mayport and Army Corps of Engineers at Huguenot Park. It has been an honor to be part of this dedicated team of environmental professionals for the past 11 years. The team remains focused on ways to con tinually improve the environmental quality of life on and off the naval installations in Jacksonville, said Gartland. We will significantly reduce wastewater dis charge from NAS Jacksonville to the St. Johns River this year and totally eliminate discharge to the river next year. We will eliminate groundwater withdrawal to irrigate our golf course this year and continue to identify ways to reduce groundwater withdrawal next year, he added. And, we will continue to reach out to our community with innovative solutions that protect our environment as an integral part of performing our organizational missions. ENVIRONMENTAL Results from the Fiscal Year 2014 Command Master Chief (CMC) and Command Senior Chief (CSC) Selection Boards were released Feb. 15 More than 140 active duty and Reserve senior enlisted Sailors were selected by the FY-14 selec tion board. The Command Master Chief and Command Senior Chief Programs are intended to ensure Sailors are effectively led and developed. Senior enlisted leaders selected for these programs are responsible for leading the alignment efforts of the chiefs mess with the Navy ethos, Navy core values, and the MCPONs mission, vision, and guiding principles. CMCs and CSCs are also charged with ensuring active communica tion throughout the chain of com mand and report directly to their respective commander or com manding officer. They advise their respective commander or commanding offi cer and provide input in the formulation, implementation, and execution of policies concerning morale, welfare, job satisfaction, disci pline, utilization, family support, and training of enlisted Sailors, as well as providing input and advice in matters affecting mission and operations as required. CMC and CSC selection boards convene annually. The board reviews and selects the best quali fied applicants for assignment into the CMC and CSC program. Upon selection and receipt of orders for assignment as CMC, master chief petty officers ratings will be changed to CMDCM. Senior chief petty officers filling CSC billets will retain their source rating. Master chiefs and senior chiefs selected into the CMC/CSC pro gram will be assigned by the CMC detailer based on billet availabil ity, experience, qualifications, and desires. Wings Over America Scholarship Foundation (WOASF) is accepting pre-qualification forms for its scholarships. Pre-qualification deadline is March 1 and full application deadline is April 1. WOASF, a 501(c) 3 nonprofit foundation, annu ally sponsors more than 40 scholarships ranging students who have cho sen to continue their education. Scholarship recipients are selected on the basis of scholastic merit, community service and extracurricular activities. Our mission is to pro vide college scholar ships to dependent chil dren and spouses of US Navy personnel with service in naval avia tion commands; Officer and Enlisted, active duty, retired, honorably dis charged or deceased. The Foundation has awarded more than ing students since 1987. The foundation is funded solely through the gen erous contributions of private and corporate sources. For more info on eligibility and application process, go to www. wingsoveramerica.us or call 757-671-3200 x 2.WOASF scholarships applications due March 1Navy announces new CMCs and CSCs JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 21, 2013 9

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A former astronaut and retired Naval officer vis ited Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE), a prior duty station where he served in the mid-1980s then named Naval Aviation Depot, Jacksonville, to tour the military depot and gather information Jan. 31. Retired Navy Capt. Winston Scott, a former astronaut who served as a mission specialist on two National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) missions, met with a team of technical experts documenting and filming repair procedures on an EA-6B Prowler aircraft. The Navy is creating mul timedia training aids to aug ment the technical publica tions Fleet maintainers use when performing maintenance and repairs to military aircraft. The Defense Logistics Agency (Documents Services) located in Jacksonville awarded the contract to develop the train ing aids to Job Performance Associates, a Jacksonvillebased company. Scott serves as the senior vice president for external relations and economic development at Florida Institute of Technology (FIT), a private technological university in Melbourne. FIT is considering using multimedia training aids to enhance its technical curric ulum for undergraduate and graduate students. During his visit, Scott met with Navy and Marine Corps specialists to learn about the technical aspects of the proj ect designed to document dif ficult repair procedures. The resulting multimedia tools will allow Sailors and Marines to read, see, hear and perform complicated maintenance pro cedures, step by step. Scott first reported to FRCSE in 1985 as an aeronau tical engineering duty officer assigned as the F/A-18 Hornet Strike Fighter project officer to stand up the platform. He served as the production test pilot flying F/A-18 Hornet, F-14 Tomcat and A-7 Corsair air craft. I flew my tail off, he said. I limited myself to three test flights per day. Scott logged more than 5,000 flight hours on 20 different military and civilian aircraft dur ing his 27-year career. During his visit, he toured the Hornet production line, which has undergone an extensive transformation in recent years using a cellular concept where artisans perform spe cific tasks in each cell as an aircraft pulses through the hangar. He also toured the Industrial Manufacturing Division where artisans are fabricating scarce and one-of-a-kind aeronauti cal parts, such as the Hornets Y590 former to ensure these legacy aircraft keep flying. The facility is leveragingnew technology and is utilizing Lean and Six Sigma models to identify wasteful practices, reduce costs, and increase quality to the warfighting customer. Scott was selected for NASAs astronaut program in March 1992 and served on two space missions, logging more than 24 days in space including three spacewalks totaling more than 19 hours. Scott said the experience he gained at FRCSE con tributed to his NASA selection. He served as a mission specialist on Space Shuttle Endeavour from Jan. 11-20, 1996, which included two spacewalks to practice tech niques later used to assem ble the International Space Station. His second mission was on the Space Shuttle Columbia from Nov. 19 to Dec. 5, 1997. Its unlike anything you can experience here, and words cant describe it, said Scott about the space shuttle launch. Everything is vibrat ing and shaking. It kicks you in the butt. You pass 100 mph when you hit the tower. Its an incredible ride. The crews performed hun dreds of experiments while in space, such as growing crys tals, testing plant growth, observing the earth and con ducting physiological stud ies. He said one of his greatest thrills was working outside the shuttle. You dont walk, you float, said Scott of his three space walks. The suit weighs 350 pounds. You have to be physically fit to control the hundreds of pounds of mass. It is very dif ficult. The spacesuit is self-regulating, but it takes a while to adjust to temperature changes. When you work on the dark side of the moon, it is very cold. When on the sunlit side, it is very hot. Former astronaut visits FRCSE JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 21, 2013 11

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A U.S. Army soldier who was awarded the Medal of Honor for risking his life to save his comrades during an ambush in Afghanistan was inducted into the Pentagons Hall of Heroes on Feb. 12. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta, Army Secretary John McHugh and Army Chief of Staff Gen. Raymond Odierno presented the Medal of Honor flag and Hall of Heroes plaque to Staff Sgt. Clinton Romesha. President Barack Obama awarded the 31 year old the nations highest military honor at a White House ceremony a day earlier. Panetta called the former 4th Brigade Combat Team Infantryman a hero as he described Romeshas selfless, fearless reconnaissance during a surprise enemy attack on Oct. 3, 2009 in which 400 Taliban fighters converged on Combat Outpost Keating, Kamdesh District, Nuristan Province. On that deadly day, the out post at the bottom of a steep valley, manned by only 52 Soldiers, fell under attack through concentrated fire. An injured Romesha sum moned help and fought to protect the bodies of fallen sol diers while providing cover to wounded team members. Eight of Romeshas comrades perished in the day-long battle. A new greatest generation of Americans has stepped forward after 9/11, Panetta said. A new generation of patriots that answered the call to serve has endured enormous hardships and they have done it with unflinching courage. Panetta stressed any genera tion in which people risk their lives for America is the great est generation, including those who have fought and died since 9/11. Theyve dealt with lengthy separations from friends and family, repeated deployments to austere battlefields in distant lands, he said. Theyve witnessed the hor rors of modern warfare, see ing their comrades in arms, their closest friends horribly maimed, and yes, killed by the scourge of improvised explo sive devices and the scourge of an enemy whose purpose is to kill Americans. Still, Panetta continued, American troops remain undeterred, in vigilant patrol throughout the streets and alleyways of Iraq and in the mountains and deserts of Afghanistan. For 10 long years they have fought because they believe that America is worth fighting for that Americans still serve as a shining example for that world in which we have the most precious values of all values of freedom, equality, justice and democracy. Those ideals and the United States commitment to go after Al Qaida safe havens, Panetta said, brought Romesha and his comrades to that remote out post, where enemies hid with confidence. That the Taliban failed to overtake Combat Outpost Keating is a testament to the bravery, the heroism, the war rior spirit of the 50 American Soldiers who fought to save it, Panetta said. And Clint later [said] to a reporter, That was our America right there we own that and we werent going to let anybody come and take it. During the ceremony, Romesha said Taliban fighters surrounded a place he and 52 other members of Bravo Troop, 3rd Squadron, 61st Cavalry called home. Four hundred Taliban ver sus 52 American Soldiers. It just doesnt seem fair to the Taliban. Romesha said the Medal of Honor is not often given when things go well on the battle field. Some say Im a hero, but it doesnt make sense, because I got to come home with a few scars, Romesha said. Eight of my friends did not have that fortune. He identified each com rade who perished during the attack that day in Afghanistan: Staff Sgt. Justin Gallegos, Sgt. Christopher Griffin, Sgt. Joshua Hardt, Sgt. Joshua Kirk, Spc. Stephan Mace, Staff Sgt. Vernon Martin, Sgt. Michael Scusa, and Pfc. Kevin Thomson. Whether I wear a uniform or civilian attire, I am and will always be a Soldier for life, Romesha said. Panetta said one of his tough est responsibilities is writing condolence letters to the fami lies of those who have made the ultimate sacrifice. . As tough as it is to lose a loved one, perhaps there is some comfort to know that they gave their lives for this country, and that they are heroes, and that they are patriots, and that they will never, never be forgotten, he said. Romesha is only the fourth living service member to receive the medal for service in Operation Iraqi Freedom or Operation Enduring Freedom. You fought well, you fought bravely, and your courage is now a part of American histo ry, Panetta said. Medal of Honor recipient earns place in Hall of Heroes Bicycle-pedestrian public meetingsResidents in Clay, Duval, Nassau and St. Johns Counties will have one final opportunity to provide input for the North Florida Regional Bicycle Pedestrian Master Plan Study being conducted by the North Florida Transportation Planning Organization. The open-house walk-through public meetings with multiple stations will allow attendees to review and comment on the plans draft elements. The public meetings are from 4-8 p.m. and scheduled as follows: 12 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 21, 2013

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The VP-45 Pelicans have returned from a success ful TAMEX 13-1 in Pearce, Australia. Generally a quiet base in a rural area reserved for training Australian Air Force pilots, RAAF Base Pierce hosted one Australian and two VP-45 P-3 aircrews and main tainers for two weeks. VP-45 went down under to exhibit a forward presence, flying four missions on top of Australian submarines over a four-day period. Combat Aircrews 4 and 12 reinforced this important strategic alliance with the Australians by working with and hunting a Collins-class diesel-electric submarine. All four missions had a 100 percent completion rate with a total of eight crew qualifications obtained, locating and track ing the submarine for extended periods of time on each sortie. Not only did the aircrews fly successful missions, but the maintenance branch kept the plane in top form allowing the crews to execute the mis sion one station. The detach ment showcased the U.S. Navys Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft expe ditionary and rapid response capabilities to our allies, as well as working with the Australians for the common goal of interoperability. But it was not all work and no play for the crews in Australia. All personnel involved suc ceeded in experiencing the culture and country of Australia. While visiting a koala refuge, VP-45 Sailors were able to pet and feed all sorts of Australian animals. From kangaroos to kookaburras, and dingoes to deer, the animals loved to eat popcorn from hands. On the historic side, many Sailors made the 20-minute drive to Fremantle to visit the museums and monuments, including Fremantle Prison. Initially a convict institution to build the colony of Western Australia, the prison is a valu able part of the culture and the settling of Western Australia. Sporting events were also enjoyed by some of the mem bers, taking in a cricket match at the WACA Grounds. The one-day international event was a match between Australia and the West Indies, with the home team emerging victori ous. Overall, the detachment was a fruitful endeavor, allowing the crews to work with and strengthen ties with the Royal Australian Navy and Air Force. It also afforded the Sailors an opportunity to be unofficial ambassadors to the Australian people by taking in their cul ture and experiencing all that Perth and Australia had to offer. Within a week of deploying to Naval Air Facility Misawa, Japan, the Red Lancers of VP-10 participated in a datalink training exercise with their U.S. Navy sister squadron, the Fighting Tigers of VP-8, in conjunction with Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) squadron VP-2 Odin. In late November, the VP-2 aircrew departed from their home base in Hachinohe en route to Misawa where they were welcomed by VP-10 and VP-8. After briefing the details and parameters of the exercise, the Red Lancers and Fighting Tigers crewed together on a U.S. Navy P-3C Orion and established secure voice and data communications links with the VP-2 Orion. With VP-10 relieving VP-8 as the deployed P-3C squadron at Misawa, this training exercise also served as a turnover event between the U.S. and Japanese squadrons. When the exercise con cluded, the Japanese and U.S. Sailors traveled to VP-2s home base in Hachinohe for a reception in honor of VP-10s arrival and VP-8s farewell. After enjoying a diverse spread of Japanese dishes and con versing with their interna tional counterparts, VP-2 Commanding Officer Capt. Seto and VP-8 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mike Marston exchanged words of gratitude for each others hard work and cooperation over the past six months and presented each other with gifts of appreciation. Seto then turned to the VP-10 Commanding Officer Cmdr. VP-45 Pelicans have big showing down under VP-10, VP-8 conduct data-link training with Japanese counterparts The VP-45 Pelicans have returned from a success ful TAMEX 13-1 in Pearce, Australia. Generally a quiet base in a rural area reserved for training Australian Air Force pilots, RAAF Base Pierce hosted one Australian and two VP-45 P-3 aircrews and main tainers for two weeks. VP-45 went down under to exhibit a forward presence, flying four missions on top of Australian submarines over a four-day period. Combat Aircrews 4 and 12 reinforced this important strategic alliance with the Australians by working with and hunting a Collins-class diesel-electric submarine. All four missions had a 100 percent completion rate with a total of eight crew qualifications obtained, locating and track ing the submarine for extended periods of time on each sortie. Not only did the aircrews fly successful missions, but the maintenance branch kept the plane in top form allowing the crews to execute the mis sion one station. The detach ment showcased the U.S. Navys Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft expe ditionary and rapid response capabilities to our allies, as well as working with the Australians for the common goal of interoperability. But it was not all work and no play for the crews in Australia. All personnel involved suc ceeded in experiencing the culture and country of Australia. While visiting a koala refuge, VP-45 Sailors were able to pet and feed all sorts of Australian animals. From kangaroos to kookaburras, and dingoes to deer, the animals loved to eat popcorn from hands. On the historic side, many Sailors made the 20-minute drive to Fremantle to visit the museums and monuments, including Fremantle Prison. Initially a convict institution to build the colony of Western Australia, the prison is a valu able part of the culture and the settling of Western Australia. Sporting events were also enjoyed by some of the mem bers, taking in a cricket match at the WACA Grounds. The one-day international event was a match between Australia and the West Indies, with the home team emerging victori ous. Overall, the detachment was a fruitful endeavor, allowing the crews to work with and strengthen ties with the Royal Australian Navy and Air Force. It also afforded the Sailors an opportunity to be unofficial ambassadors to the Australian people by taking in their cul ture and experiencing all that Perth and Australia had to offer. Within a week of deploying to Naval Air Facility Misawa, Japan, the Red Lancers of VP-10 participated in a datalink training exercise with their U.S. Navy sister squadron, the Fighting Tigers of VP-8, in conjunction with Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) squadron VP-2 Odin. In late November, the VP-2 aircrew departed from their home base in Hachinohe en route to Misawa where they were welcomed by VP-10 and VP-8. After briefing the details and parameters of the exercise, the Red Lancers and Fighting Tigers crewed together on a U.S. Navy P-3C Orion and established secure voice and data communications links with the VP-2 Orion. With VP-10 relieving VP-8 as the deployed P-3C squadron at Misawa, this training exercise also served as a turnover event between the U.S. and Japanese squadrons. When the exercise con cluded, the Japanese and U.S. Sailors traveled to VP-2s home base in Hachinohe for a reception in honor of VP-10s arrival and VP-8s farewell. After enjoying a diverse spread of Japanese dishes and con versing with their interna tional counterparts, VP-2 Commanding Officer Capt. Seto and VP-8 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mike Marston exchanged words of gratitude for each others hard work and cooperation over the past six months and presented each other with gifts of appreciation. Seto then turned to the VP-10 Commanding Officer Cmdr. VP-45 Pelicans have big showing down under VP-10, VP-8 conduct data-link training with Japanese counterparts JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 21, 2013 13 The VP-45 Pelicans have returned from a success ful TAMEX 13-1 in Pearce, Australia. Generally a quiet base in a rural area reserved for training Australian Air Force pilots, RAAF Base Pierce hosted one Australian and two VP-45 P-3 aircrews and main tainers for two weeks. VP-45 went down under to exhibit a forward presence, flying four missions on top of Australian submarines over a four-day period. Combat Aircrews 4 and 12 reinforced this important strategic alliance with the Australians by working with and hunting a Collins-class diesel-electric submarine. All four missions had a 100 percent completion rate with a total of eight crew qualifications obtained, locating and track ing the submarine for extended periods of time on each sortie. Not only did the aircrews fly successful missions, but the maintenance branch kept the plane in top form allowing the crews to execute the mis sion one station. The detach ment showcased the U.S. Navys Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft expe ditionary and rapid response capabilities to our allies, as well as working with the Australians for the common goal of interoperability. But it was not all work and no play for the crews in Australia. All personnel involved suc ceeded in experiencing the culture and country of Australia. While visiting a koala refuge, VP-45 Sailors were able to pet and feed all sorts of Australian animals. From kangaroos to kookaburras, and dingoes to deer, the animals loved to eat popcorn from hands. On the historic side, many Sailors made the 20-minute drive to Fremantle to visit the museums and monuments, including Fremantle Prison. Initially a convict institution to build the colony of Western Australia, the prison is a valu able part of the culture and the settling of Western Australia. Sporting events were also enjoyed by some of the mem bers, taking in a cricket match at the WACA Grounds. The one-day international event was a match between Australia and the West Indies, with the home team emerging victori ous. Overall, the detachment was a fruitful endeavor, allowing the crews to work with and strengthen ties with the Royal Australian Navy and Air Force. It also afforded the Sailors an opportunity to be unofficial ambassadors to the Australian people by taking in their cul ture and experiencing all that Perth and Australia had to offer. Within a week of deploying to Naval Air Facility Misawa, Japan, the Red Lancers of VP-10 participated in a datalink training exercise with their U.S. Navy sister squadron, the Fighting Tigers of VP-8, in conjunction with Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) squadron VP-2 Odin. In late November, the VP-2 aircrew departed from their home base in Hachinohe en route to Misawa where they were welcomed by VP-10 and VP-8. After briefing the details and parameters of the exercise, the Red Lancers and Fighting Tigers crewed together on a U.S. Navy P-3C Orion and established secure voice and data communications links with the VP-2 Orion. With VP-10 relieving VP-8 as the deployed P-3C squadron at Misawa, this training exercise also served as a turnover event between the U.S. and Japanese squadrons. When the exercise con cluded, the Japanese and U.S. Sailors traveled to VP-2s home base in Hachinohe for a reception in honor of VP-10s arrival and VP-8s farewell. After enjoying a diverse spread of Japanese dishes and con versing with their interna tional counterparts, VP-2 Commanding Officer Capt. Seto and VP-8 Commanding Officer Cmdr. Mike Marston exchanged words of gratitude for each others hard work and cooperation over the past six months and presented each other with gifts of appreciation. Seto then turned to the VP-10 Commanding Officer Cmdr. VP-45 Pelicans have big showing down under VP-10, VP-8 conduct data-link training with Japanese counterparts

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Tim Parker to welcome the Red Lancers to Japan. Parker, in return, expressed how excited the Red Lancers were to work with the men and women of VP-2 and to build upon the successful rela tionship started with VP-8. Ultimately, this training exercise helped to strengthen the operational links between the patrol forces of the JMSDF and U.S. Navy and fostered great camaraderie between both forces Sailors. Already off to a great start, VP-10 looks forward to collaborating with the JMSDF during their deployment in the 7th Fleet area of responsibility. MARITIME Deweys All Hands ClubCall 542-3521 Free Texas Holdem Tournaments Monday & Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday Social Hour your way Friday Free Entertainment at 7 p.m. Feb. 22 Ace WinnFreedom Lanes Bowling CenterCall 542-3493. New day for free bowling for active duty Thursday 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Wednesday change of hours Open 410 p.m. Wednesday Evening Bowling Special Shoe rental not included Saturday Night Extreme Bowling Price includes two hours of bowling Shoe rental included Sunday Family Day Fitness & AquaticsCall 542-2930 Family Fitness Center (located above the Youth Center Gym) Open Monday Friday 9 a.m. 1 p.m. For more information please contact Melissa Luehrs at (904) 542-3518/4238 The Gym equipment is temporarily relocated to The Zone, Bldg. 798 now through June 30, 2013. Check-out our new fitness schedule! New classes include Muscle Max, Extreme Bootcamp and Max Core Pick-up the latest copy at the fitness center Outdoor swimming pool opens April 1I.T.T. EventsCall 542-3318. Thrasher Horne Center for the Arts Gatornationals March 15 17 Funkfest Metropolitan Park May 10-11 Discover Disney Florida resident ticket valid for sale through June 3. Tickets are valid for redemption through June 7. Blockout Dates: March 23 April 5. Call for pricing Gatorland military member is free, tickets available for family members at ITT Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23 Live Broadway Series Billy Elliot March 2 Rock of Ages April 6 Dream Girls May 21 Blue Man Group in Orlando Special Universal Studios Special Complimentary tickets for active duty and retirees, free 3-day, park-to-park ticket with valid military ID. Admission is valid for up to 14 days from first use. Tickets are available at ITT through March 31 and must be redeemed by June 30. Ask about our special discounted tickets for family members. Wild Adventures Theme Park Gold Book Shade of Green, Disneyworld hotel properties, Universal hotels and off property hotels near attractions at ITT.The Vault Liberty Recreation CenterTrips, activities and costs may be restricted to E1-E6 single or unaccompanied active duty members. Call 5421335 for information. SNAG Golf Lesson Feb. 21 @ 6 p.m. at NAS Jax Golf Club Monster Truck Jam Feb. 23 Free admissionNAS Jax Golf ClubGolf course info: 542-3249 Mulligans info: 5422936 Military Appreciation Days includes cart & green fees Feb. 21 for retirees, DoD personnel and their guests Twilight Special Daily Play 18-holes with 12:30 p.m. every day Monday & Tuesday Cart and green fee included. Open to military, DoD and guests. Not applicable on holidays.Mulberry Cove MarinaCall 542-3260. Free Kayak & Canoe Rental Every Thursday for active dutyAuto Skills CenterCall 542-3227 22 work bays, wheel balancing, tool checkout, paint booth and welding! ASE certified mechanic onsite!Youth Activities CenterCall 778-9772 Drop-in care and open recreation are available! Family Fitness Center open Mon.Fri., 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Bring your child to work out with you. Movie Under the Stars featuring WreckIt Ralph Feb. 22, 6 p.m. at Patriots Grove Flying Club Call 777-8549 Private Pilot Ground School March 18 April 24 Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonvilles satellite pharmacy, located at the Navy Exchange (building 950), will close its lobby and drive-up early March 1 at 4 p.m. in order to upgrade its information technology. On March 2, the satellite phar macys lobby will be closed and the drive-up window (medication pick-up only) will be open 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. NH Jacksonvilles main (outpatient) phar macy will be open standard Saturday hours, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. To register for home delivery of chronic medications (including gener ics at no cost), go to www.tricare.mil/ homedelivery or ask a pharmacy staff member.For more information, call the phar macy at 542-7405.Satellite pharmacy closing for improvements March 2 14 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 21, 2013

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The annual Valentines Day 5K brought out 127 runners Feb. 14. The NAS Jax Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Department coordinated the run. Placing first overall and first in the mens 40-44 category was Andy Patterson of VP-30 with a time of 17:41. Sarah Reed of Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast (NAVFAC SE) took first in the womens 35-39 category and was the first female to cross the finish line with a time of 20:43. Other winners were: The event was sponsored by the University of Phoenix and Allied American University. The next upcoming runs are the Leprechaun Dash March 15 at 11:30 a.m. and the Capt. Chuck Cornett Navy Run April 6. Volunteers are needed for the Navy Run. For more information, call 542-3239/3518.Neither MWR, nor the U.S. Navy or any other part of the federal government offi cially endorses any company, sponsor or its products or services. Annual Valentines Day 5K held For more info, call Bill Bonser at 5422930/3239 or e-mail bill.bonser@navy. mil V I T A SELF -SERVICE 4 Feb -15 Apr 2013 M-WF 0830 -1600 (Walk-ins) TU -TH 1100 -1600 (Walk-ins) TU -TH 16001900 (by appointments only) LOCATION: NAS JAX RANGER ST BLDG 4, RM#108 (LEGAL BLDG) TAX ASSISTANCE CENTER 904542 8038 Volunteers are still welcomed! Contact center for more information. Active Duty & Dependents Retirees & Dependents, AGI < $57,000 Reservists -Activated 30 days+ Pre/de -mobilization Entitled Former Spouses March 9, 2013 Invitation to Location Time Attire Dinner Tickets Guests All others: Hotel Guest Speaker JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 21, 2013 15

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The Nightwolves of Carrier Airborne Warning Squadron (VAW) 77 will be disestablished at a ceremony aboard Naval Air Station/Joint Reserve Base New Orleans, March 9. A reserve E-2 squadron based at NASJRB New Orleans, the Nightwolves have been responsible for various mis sions within the strategic reserve including counternarcotics and human traf ficking interdiction, disaster response and missile exercise support. Due to budgetary con straints, the Navy decided to decommission VAW-77 in fiscal year 13. While this choice was difficult, it was within the limits of the resources available to the Navy. There will always be the need to balance direct warf ighting capability against mis sions like those assigned to VAW-77. VAW-77 consists of six E-2C Hawkeye aircraft and 112 per sonnel (72 Full Time Support and 40 Selected Reservists). The squadrons history goes back to 1995, when the U.S. Congress created the reserve squadron as a result of the federal governments escalating war on illegal drug trafficking. VAW-77 operated four spe cially modified E-2C Hawkeye airborne early warning aircraft optimized for counter-drug missions. As part of the Navys postCold War role, VAW-77 flight crews patrolled the waters of the Caribbean in joint missions with the U.S. Coast Guard and other drug enforcement agen cies in search of illegal aircraft and ships. Their last flight was Jan. 29, said Lt. Cmdr. Erin Wreski, program manager for Commander Naval Air Force Reserves (CNAFR) Tactical Support Wing. Their disestablishment cer emony will be March 9, with the squadron officially closeing its doors March 31. The squadrons six aircraft will be transferred to other carrier airborne warning squad rons, Wreski said. And the squadron members will transfer to various other CNAFR squadrons around the country. The Navy remains commit ted to missions within the strategic reserve, including coun ter-narcotics and human traf ficking interdiction. Navy ships and aircraft have unique capabilities to detect and monitor criminal activities in the maritime domain, espe cially tracking the movement, by sea and air, of illicit mate rials intended for the United States. Commissaries support Military Saves WeekSavings generated by commissary shopping is why the Defense Commissary Agency is a partner of the 11th annual Military Saves Week campaign that encourages military families to avoid debt and build savings. The campaign, Set a goal, make a plan, save automatically, runs Feb. 25-March 2 and reflects DeCAs every day action of delivering savings on groceries. Since we sell at cost in delivering the benefit, shop ping your commissary saves you money automatically, said Joseph Jeu, DeCA director and CEO. Were proud to partner with Military Saves to help our customers save money and, in turn, reduce debt. Not only does consistent commissary shopping score savings of 30 percent or more, Jeu said, but savvy shoppers know that using coupons achieves even higher savings. Think of coupons as cash, he said. And now, the commissary offers the Rewards Card to deliver even more savings via coupons for download onto your card. At last count, more than 150 coupons were available; new coupons are posted as soon as they become avail able. Patrons can sign up to receive an email alert when new coupons have been posted to the site. Sign up is available at http://www.commissaries.com/rewards_ subscribe.cfm Since the cards debut in August 2012, more than 2.6 million coupons have been downloaded by commissary shoppers. Military Saves is part of the Department of Defenses Financial Readiness Campaign to persuade, motivate and encourage military families to save money every month. The Military Saves website offers great tips on saving and living well but spending less. Not surprisingly, many of the ideas call for grocery shopping with economy in mind, and the commissary can make that simple. Here are a few tips from the website: Tip 1: No matter what your preferences for lunch, the com missary can help keep the lunch box interesting as well as economical. Maybe you eat light fresh, crisp veg gies for munching; bagged salad; yogurt or energy bars. Or maybe you prefer hot meals in lunchtime portions frozen entrees or heat-and-eat items to store in a desk drawer. The commissary can save you 30 percent or more on your brown-bag grocery shopping. Tip 2: Eat out two fewer times a month (savings estieasy, economical meals at home not only saves you money, but the leftovers compound the value by pro viding future ready-to-heat meals. Whether your menu includes salad and hamburgers, hearty soup or multiTip 3: Shop with a list, and stick to it. The savings could be hundreds of dollars. People who shop with a list and buy little else spend much less money than those who decide what to buy when they get to the store. You can plan your trip, tailored to your specific commissary, with the easy Create a Shopping List tool found on the front page of www.commissaries.com. During Military Saves Week and throughout February, commissaries around the world support the campaign by providing information on personal financial aware ness and preparing nutritious meals for less. Customers can join Military Saves via Facebook, Twitter, Web page and monthly newsletter. Visit http://www.militarysaves.org for more informa tion. For the past 12 years, members of the National Naval Officers Association (NNOA) Jacksonville Chapter has mentored young men at the Duval Juvenile Residential Facility (DJRF). They provide monthly mentoring with structured fun and games. The young men also enjoy an annual trip to EverBank Field to watch the Jacksonville Jaguars play. This past football season, NNOA and DJRF fac ulty members chaperoned the boys to a season match-up between the Jaguars and Chicago Bears. Although the Jaguars loss was disappointing, the young men had a blast. The facility is a structured moderate-risk resi dential treatment program for males ages 14-18 and their average length of stay is six months. During their stay, youths receive group and individual mental health, and substance abuse intervention/ counseling. Educational/vocational services are provided by Duval County Schools. The youths also obtain employment skills and participate in a wide variety of facility and community activities that focus on restorative justice and community services. From October through December 2012, NNOA facilitated a community service outreach with the young men. A variety of non-perishable food items were donated for the event. The young men along with members of NNOAdecorated 35 boxes and filled them with donated holiday meal goodies. The outreach helped 20 families at Thanksgiving and 15 families at Christmas. The outreach proved extremely positive for both the young men of DJRF and local families. Budget constraints force disestablishment of VAW-77 in March NNOA Jax Chapter lends a helping hand 16 JAX AIR NEWS, NAS JACKSONVILLE, Thursday, February 21, 2013

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